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Sample records for cerevisiae strain kf-7

  1. Ethanol production from kitchen waste using the flocculating yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain KF-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yue-Qin; Liu, Kai; An, Ming-Zhe; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Koike, Yoji [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd., 1-7-7 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama City, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan); Wu, Xiao-Lei [Department of Energy and Resources Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2008-11-15

    A process for producing ethanol from kitchen waste was developed in this study. The process consists of freshness preservation of the waste, saccharification of the sugars in the waste, continuous ethanol fermentation of the saccharified liquid, and anaerobic treatment of the saccharification residue and the stillage. Spraying lactic acid bacteria (LCB) on the kitchen waste kept the waste fresh for over 1 week. High glucose recovery (85.5%) from LCB-sprayed waste was achieved after saccharification using Nagase N-40 glucoamylase. The resulting saccharified liquid was used directly for ethanol fermentation, without the addition of any nutrients. High ethanol productivity (24.0 g l{sup -1} h{sup -1}) was obtained when the flocculating yeast strain KF-7 was used in a continuous ethanol fermentation process at a dilution rate of 0.8 h{sup -1}. The saccharification residue was mixed with stillage and treated in a thermophilic anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR); a VTS loading rate of 6 g l{sup -1} d{sup -1} with 72% VTS digestion efficiency was achieved. Using this process, 30.9 g ethanol, and 65.2 l biogas with 50% methane, was produced from 1 kg of kitchen waste containing 118.0 g total sugar. Thus, energy in kitchen waste can be converted to ethanol and methane, which can then be used as fuels, while simultaneously treating kitchen waste. (author)

  2. Ethanol production from kitchen waste using the flocculating yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain KF-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.-Q.; Koike, Yoji; Liu Kai; An, M.-Z.; Morimura, Shigeru; Wu Xiaolei; Kida, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    A process for producing ethanol from kitchen waste was developed in this study. The process consists of freshness preservation of the waste, saccharification of the sugars in the waste, continuous ethanol fermentation of the saccharified liquid, and anaerobic treatment of the saccharification residue and the stillage. Spraying lactic acid bacteria (LCB) on the kitchen waste kept the waste fresh for over 1 week. High glucose recovery (85.5%) from LCB-sprayed waste was achieved after saccharification using Nagase N-40 glucoamylase. The resulting saccharified liquid was used directly for ethanol fermentation, without the addition of any nutrients. High ethanol productivity (24.0 g l -1 h -1 ) was obtained when the flocculating yeast strain KF-7 was used in a continuous ethanol fermentation process at a dilution rate of 0.8 h -1 . The saccharification residue was mixed with stillage and treated in a thermophilic anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR); a VTS loading rate of 6 g l -1 d -1 with 72% VTS digestion efficiency was achieved. Using this process, 30.9 g ethanol, and 65.2 l biogas with 50% methane, was produced from 1 kg of kitchen waste containing 118.0 g total sugar. Thus, energy in kitchen waste can be converted to ethanol and methane, which can then be used as fuels, while simultaneously treating kitchen waste

  3. Mobilomics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menconi, Giulia; Battaglia, Giovanni; Grossi, Roberto; Pisanti, Nadia; Marangoni, Roberto

    2013-03-20

    Mobile Genetic Elements (MGEs) are selfish DNA integrated in the genomes. Their detection is mainly based on consensus-like searches by scanning the investigated genome against the sequence of an already identified MGE. Mobilomics aims at discovering all the MGEs in a genome and understanding their dynamic behavior: The data for this kind of investigation can be provided by comparative genomics of closely related organisms. The amount of data thus involved requires a strong computational effort, which should be alleviated. Our approach proposes to exploit the high similarity among homologous chromosomes of different strains of the same species, following a progressive comparative genomics philosophy. We introduce a software tool based on our new fast algorithm, called regender, which is able to identify the conserved regions between chromosomes. Our case study is represented by a unique recently available dataset of 39 different strains of S.cerevisiae, which regender is able to compare in few minutes. By exploring the non-conserved regions, where MGEs are mainly retrotransposons called Tys, and marking the candidate Tys based on their length, we are able to locate a priori and automatically all the already known Tys and map all the putative Tys in all the strains. The remaining putative mobile elements (PMEs) emerging from this intra-specific comparison are sharp markers of inter-specific evolution: indeed, many events of non-conservation among different yeast strains correspond to PMEs. A clustering based on the presence/absence of the candidate Tys in the strains suggests an evolutionary interconnection that is very similar to classic phylogenetic trees based on SNPs analysis, even though it is computed without using phylogenetic information. The case study indicates that the proposed methodology brings two major advantages: (a) it does not require any template sequence for the wanted MGEs and (b) it can be applied to infer MGEs also for low coverage genomes

  4. Mobilomics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile Genetic Elements (MGEs) are selfish DNA integrated in the genomes. Their detection is mainly based on consensus–like searches by scanning the investigated genome against the sequence of an already identified MGE. Mobilomics aims at discovering all the MGEs in a genome and understanding their dynamic behavior: The data for this kind of investigation can be provided by comparative genomics of closely related organisms. The amount of data thus involved requires a strong computational effort, which should be alleviated. Results Our approach proposes to exploit the high similarity among homologous chromosomes of different strains of the same species, following a progressive comparative genomics philosophy. We introduce a software tool based on our new fast algorithm, called regender, which is able to identify the conserved regions between chromosomes. Our case study is represented by a unique recently available dataset of 39 different strains of S.cerevisiae, which regender is able to compare in few minutes. By exploring the non–conserved regions, where MGEs are mainly retrotransposons called Tys, and marking the candidate Tys based on their length, we are able to locate a priori and automatically all the already known Tys and map all the putative Tys in all the strains. The remaining putative mobile elements (PMEs) emerging from this intra–specific comparison are sharp markers of inter–specific evolution: indeed, many events of non–conservation among different yeast strains correspond to PMEs. A clustering based on the presence/absence of the candidate Tys in the strains suggests an evolutionary interconnection that is very similar to classic phylogenetic trees based on SNPs analysis, even though it is computed without using phylogenetic information. Conclusions The case study indicates that the proposed methodology brings two major advantages: (a) it does not require any template sequence for the wanted MGEs and (b) it can be applied to

  5. Isolation, identification and characterization of regional indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Šuranská

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present work we isolated and identified various indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and screened them for the selected oenological properties. These S. cerevisiae strains were isolated from berries and spontaneously fermented musts. The grape berries (Sauvignon blanc and Pinot noir were grown under the integrated and organic mode of farming in the South Moravia (Czech Republic wine region. Modern genotyping techniques such as PCR-fingerprinting and interdelta PCR typing were employed to differentiate among indigenous S. cerevisiae strains. This combination of the methods provides a rapid and relatively simple approach for identification of yeast of S. cerevisiae at strain level. In total, 120 isolates were identified and grouped by molecular approaches and 45 of the representative strains were tested for selected important oenological properties including ethanol, sulfur dioxide and osmotic stress tolerance, intensity of flocculation and desirable enzymatic activities. Their ability to produce and utilize acetic/malic acid was examined as well; in addition, H2S production as an undesirable property was screened. The oenological characteristics of indigenous isolates were compared to a commercially available S. cerevisiae BS6 strain, which is commonly used as the starter culture. Finally, some indigenous strains coming from organically treated grape berries were chosen for their promising oenological properties and these strains will be used as the starter culture, because application of a selected indigenous S. cerevisiae strain can enhance the regional character of the wines.

  6. Efficient screening of environmental isolates for Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that are suitable for brewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Hidehiko; Hino, Mika; Takashita, Hideharu; Kajiwara, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Keiko; Furukawa, Kensuke

    2014-01-01

    We developed an efficient screening method for Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from environmental isolates. MultiPlex PCR was performed targeting four brewing S. cerevisiae genes (SSU1, AWA1, BIO6, and FLO1). At least three genes among the four were amplified from all S. cerevisiae strains. The use of this method allowed us to successfully obtain S. cerevisiae strains.

  7. Potential application of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper aimed at evaluating the fermentation behavior of selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in banana pulp and they were compared with commercial yeast (baker's yeast) for subsequent production of distilled spirits. Five types of microorganisms were used: Four yeast strains obtained from accredited ...

  8. In vitro screening of probiotic properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii and food-borne Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Aa Kuhle, Alis; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Jespersen, Lene

    2005-01-01

    .6-16.8%) recorded for two isolates from blue veined cheeses. Merely 25% of the S. cerevisiae var. boulardii strains displayed good adhesive properties (16.2-28.0%). The expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1α decreased strikingly in IPEC-J2 cells exposed to a Shiga-like toxin 2e producing Escherichia coli...... strain when the cells were pre- and coincubated with S. cerevisiae var. boulardii even though this yeast strain was low adhesive (5.4%), suggesting that adhesion is not a mandatory prerequisite for such a probiotic effect. A strain of S. cerevisiae isolated from West African sorghum beer exerted similar......The probiotic potential of IS Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used for production of foods or bevel-ages or isolated from such, and eight strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii, was investigated. All strains included were able to withstand pH 2.5 and 0.3% Ox-all. Adhesion...

  9. Mead production: selection and characterization assays of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana Paula; Dias, Teresa; Andrade, João; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Estevinho, Letícia M

    2009-08-01

    Mead is a traditional drink, which results from the alcoholic fermentation of diluted honey carried out by yeasts. However, when it is produced in a homemade way, mead producers find several problems, namely, the lack of uniformity in the final product, delayed and arrested fermentations, and the production of "off-flavours" by the yeasts. These problems are usually associated with the inability of yeast strains to respond and adapt to unfavourable and stressful growth conditions. The main objectives of this work were to evaluate the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from honey of the Trás-os-Montes (Northeast Portugal), to produce mead. Five strains from honey, as well as one laboratory strain and one commercial wine strain, were evaluated in terms of their fermentation performance under ethanol, sulphur dioxide and osmotic stress. All the strains showed similar behaviour in these conditions. Two yeasts strains isolated from honey and the commercial wine strain were further tested for mead production, using two different honey (a dark and a light honey), enriched with two supplements (one commercial and one developed by the research team), as fermentation media. The results obtained in this work show that S. cerevisiae strains isolated from honey, are appropriate for mead production. However it is of extreme importance to take into account the characteristics of the honey, and supplements used in the fermentation medium formulation, in order to achieve the best results in mead production.

  10. In vitro screening of probiotic properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii and food-borne Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Aa Kühle, Alis; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Jespersen, Lene

    2005-05-01

    The probiotic potential of 18 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used for production of foods or beverages or isolated from such, and eight strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii, was investigated. All strains included were able to withstand pH 2.5 and 0.3% Oxgall. Adhesion to the nontumorigenic porcine jejunal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2) was investigated by incorporation of 3H-methionine into the yeast cells and use of liquid scintillation counting. Only few of the food-borne S. cerevisiae strains exhibited noteworthy adhesiveness with the strongest levels of adhesion (13.6-16.8%) recorded for two isolates from blue veined cheeses. Merely 25% of the S. cerevisiae var. boulardii strains displayed good adhesive properties (16.2-28.0%). The expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1alpha decreased strikingly in IPEC-J2 cells exposed to a Shiga-like toxin 2e producing Escherichia coli strain when the cells were pre- and coincubated with S. cerevisiae var. boulardii even though this yeast strain was low adhesive (5.4%), suggesting that adhesion is not a mandatory prerequisite for such a probiotic effect. A strain of S. cerevisiae isolated from West African sorghum beer exerted similar effects hence indicating that food-borne strains of S. cerevisiae may possess probiotic properties in spite of low adhesiveness.

  11. Evaluation of cytochrome P-450 concentration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Míriam Cristina Sakuragui Matuo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been widely used in mutagenicity tests due to the presence of a cytochrome P-450 system, capable of metabolizing promutagens to active mutagens. There are a large number of S. cerevisiae strains with varying abilities to produce cytochrome P-450. However, strain selection and ideal cultivation conditions are not well defined. We compared cytochrome P-450 levels in four different S. cerevisiae strains and evaluated the cultivation conditions necessary to obtain the highest levels. The amount of cytochrome P-450 produced by each strain varied, as did the incubation time needed to reach the maximum level. The highest cytochrome P-450 concentrations were found in media containing fermentable sugars. The NCYC 240 strain produced the highest level of cytochrome P-450 when grown in the presence of 20 % (w/v glucose. The addition of ethanol to the media also increased cytochrome P-450 synthesis in this strain. These results indicate cultivation conditions must be specific and well-established for the strain selected in order to assure high cytochrome P-450 levels and reliable mutagenicity results.Linhagens de Saccharomyces cerevisiae tem sido amplamente empregadas em testes de mutagenicidade devido à presença de um sistema citocromo P-450 capaz de metabolizar substâncias pró-mutagênicas à sua forma ativa. Devido à grande variedade de linhagens de S. cerevisiae com diferentes capacidades de produção de citocromo P-450, torna-se necessária a seleção de cepas, bem como a definição das condições ideais de cultivo. Neste trabalho, foram comparados os níveis de citocromo P-450 em quatro diferentes linhagens de S. cerevisiae e avaliadas as condições de cultivo necessárias para obtenção de altas concentrações deste sistema enzimático. O maior nível enzimático foi encontrado na linhagem NCYC 240 em presença de 20 % de glicose (p/v. A adição de etanol ao meio de cultura também produziu um aumento na s

  12. Exploring the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Volatile Metabolome: Indigenous versus Commercial Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Zélia; Melo, André; Figueiredo, Ana Raquel; Coimbra, Manuel A.; Gomes, Ana C.; Rocha, Sílvia M.

    2015-01-01

    Winemaking is a highly industrialized process and a number of commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are used around the world, neglecting the diversity of native yeast strains that are responsible for the production of wines peculiar flavours. The aim of this study was to in-depth establish the S. cerevisiae volatile metabolome and to assess inter-strains variability. To fulfill this objective, two indigenous strains (BT2652 and BT2453 isolated from spontaneous fermentation of grapes collected in Bairrada Appellation, Portugal) and two commercial strains (CSc1 and CSc2) S. cerevisiae were analysed using a methodology based on advanced multidimensional gas chromatography (HS-SPME/GC×GC-ToFMS) tandem with multivariate analysis. A total of 257 volatile metabolites were identified, distributed over the chemical families of acetals, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, terpenic compounds, esters, ethers, furan-type compounds, hydrocarbons, pyrans, pyrazines and S-compounds. Some of these families are related with metabolic pathways of amino acid, carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism as well as mono and sesquiterpenic biosynthesis. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used with a dataset comprising all variables (257 volatile components), and a distinction was observed between commercial and indigenous strains, which suggests inter-strains variability. In a second step, a subset containing esters and terpenic compounds (C10 and C15), metabolites of particular relevance to wine aroma, was also analysed using PCA. The terpenic and ester profiles express the strains variability and their potential contribution to the wine aromas, specially the BT2453, which produced the higher terpenic content. This research contributes to understand the metabolic diversity of indigenous wine microflora versus commercial strains and achieved knowledge that may be further exploited to produce wines with peculiar aroma properties. PMID:26600152

  13. Redox balancing in recombinant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderlund, M

    1998-09-01

    In metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing Pichia stipitis XYL1 and XYL2 genes, encoding xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), respectively, xylitol is excreted as the major product during anaerobic xylose fermentation and only low yields of ethanol are produced. This has been interpreted as a result of the dual cofactor dependence of XR and the exclusive use of NAD{sup +} by XDH. The excretion of xylitol was completely stopped and the formation of glycerol and acetic acid were reduced in xylose utilising S. cerevisiae strains cultivated in oxygen-limited conditions by expressing lower levels of XR than of XDH. The expression level of XYL1 and XYL2 were controlled by changing the promoters and transcription directions of the genes. A new functional metabolic pathway was established when Thermus thermophilus xylA gene was expressed in S. cerevisiae. The recombinant strain was able to ferment xylose to ethanol when cultivated on a minimal medium containing xylose as only carbon source. In order to create a channeled metabolic transfer in the two first steps of the xylose metabolism, XYL1 and XYL2 were fused in-frame and expressed in S. cerevisiae. When the fusion protein, containing a linker of three amino acids, was co expressed together with native XR and XDH monomers, enzyme complexes consisting of chimeric and native subunits were formed. The total activity of these complexes exhibited 10 and 9 times higher XR and XDH activity, respectively, than the original conjugates, consisting of only chimeric subunits. This strain produced less xylitol and the xylitol yield was lower than with strains only expressing native XR and XDH monomers. In addition, more ethanol and less acetic acid were formed. A new gene encoding the cytoplasmic transhydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii was cloned. The enzyme showed high similarity to the family of pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductase. To analyse the physiological effect of

  14. Evaluation of molecular typing techniques to assign genetic diversity among Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baleiras Couto, M.M.; Eijsma, B.; Hofstra, H.; Huis in 't Veld, J.H.J.; Vossen, J.M.B.M. van der

    1996-01-01

    Discrimination of strains within the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae was demonstrated by the use of four different techniques to type 15 strains isolated from spoiled wine and beer. Random amplified polymorphic DNA with specific oligonucleotides and PCR fingerprinting with the microsatellite

  15. The Transcriptional Response of Diverse Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains to Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Lily S.; Fleury, Samantha T.; Galazka, Jonathan M.

    2018-01-01

    Spaceflight imposes multiple stresses on biological systems resulting in genome-scale adaptations. Understanding these adaptations and their underlying molecular mechanisms is important to clarifying and reducing the risks associated with spaceflight. One such risk is infection by microbes present in spacecraft and their associated systems and inhabitants. This risk is compounded by results suggesting that some microbes may exhibit increased virulence after exposure to spaceflight conditions. The yeast, S. cerevisiae, is a powerful microbial model system, and its response to spaceflight has been studied for decades. However, to date, these studies have utilized common lab strains. Yet studies on trait variation in S. cerevisiae demonstrate that these lab strains are not representative of wild yeast and instead respond to environmental stimuli in an atypical manner. Thus, it is not clear how transferable these results are to the wild S. cerevisiae strains likely to be encountered during spaceflight. To determine if diverse S. cerevisiae strains exhibit a conserved response to simulated microgravity, we will utilize a collection of 100 S. cerevisiae strains isolated from clinical, environmental and industrial settings. We will place selected S. cerevisiae strains in simulated microgravity using a high-aspect rotating vessel (HARV) and document their transcriptional response by RNA-sequencing and quantify similarities and differences between strains. Our research will have a strong impact on the understanding of how genetic diversity of microorganisms effects their response to spaceflight, and will serve as a platform for further studies.

  16. Stress Tolerance Variations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Diverse Ecological Sources and Geographical Locations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Lin Zheng

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a platform organism for bioethanol production from various feedstocks and robust strains are desirable for efficient fermentation because yeast cells inevitably encounter stressors during the process. Recently, diverse S. cerevisiae lineages were identified, which provided novel resources for understanding stress tolerance variations and related shaping factors in the yeast. This study characterized the tolerance of diverse S. cerevisiae strains to the stressors of high ethanol concentrations, temperature shocks, and osmotic stress. The results showed that the isolates from human-associated environments overall presented a higher level of stress tolerance compared with those from forests spared anthropogenic influences. Statistical analyses indicated that the variations of stress tolerance were significantly correlated with both ecological sources and geographical locations of the strains. This study provides guidelines for selection of robust S. cerevisiae strains for bioethanol production from nature.

  17. Divergence in wine characteristics produced by wild and domesticated strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyma, Katie E; Saerens, Sofie M; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Fay, Justin C

    2011-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the primary species used by wine makers to convert sugar into alcohol during wine fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is found in vineyards, but is also found in association with oak trees and other natural sources. Although wild strains of S. cerevisiae as well as other Saccharomyces species are also capable of wine fermentation, a genetically distinct group of S. cerevisiae strains is primarily used to produce wine, consistent with the idea that wine making strains have been domesticated for wine production. In this study, we demonstrate that humans can distinguish between wines produced using wine strains and wild strains of S. cerevisiae as well as its sibling species, Saccharomyces paradoxus. Wine strains produced wine with fruity and floral characteristics, whereas wild strains produced wine with earthy and sulfurous characteristics. The differences that we observe between wine and wild strains provides further evidence that wine strains have evolved phenotypes that are distinct from their wild ancestors and relevant to their use in wine production. PMID:22093681

  18. Novel strategy to improve vanillin tolerance and ethanol fermentation performances of Saccharomycere cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dao-Qiong; Jin, Xin-Na; Zhang, Ke; Fang, Ya-Hong; Wu, Xue-Chang

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a novel strategy for improving the vanillin tolerance and ethanol fermentation performances of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. Isogeneic diploid, triploid, and tetraploid S. cerevisiae strains were generated by genome duplication of haploid strain CEN.PK2-1C. Ploidy increments improved vanillin tolerance and diminished proliferation capability. Antimitotic drug methyl benzimidazol-2-ylcarbamate (MBC) was used to introduce chromosomal aberrations into the tetraploid S. cerevisiae strain. Interestingly, aneuploid mutants with DNA contents between triploid and tetraploid were more resistant to vanillin and showed faster ethanol fermentation rates than all euploid strains. The physiological characteristics of these mutants suggest that higher bioconversion capacities of vanillin and ergosterol contents might contribute to improved vanillin tolerance. This study demonstrates that genome duplication and MBC treatment is a powerful strategy to improve the vanillin tolerance of yeast strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Excessive by-product formation : A key contributor to low isobutanol yields of engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milne, N.S.W.; Wahl, S.A.; Van Maris, A.J.A.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    It is theoretically possible to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in which isobutanol is the predominant catabolic product and high-yielding isobutanol-producing strains are already reported by industry. Conversely, isobutanol yields of engineered S. cerevisiae strains reported in the

  20. Screening of Non- Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains for Tolerance to Formic Acid in Bioethanol Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshoma, Cyprian E; Greetham, Darren; Louis, Edward J; Smart, Katherine A; Phister, Trevor G; Powell, Chris; Du, Chenyu

    2015-01-01

    Formic acid is one of the major inhibitory compounds present in hydrolysates derived from lignocellulosic materials, the presence of which can significantly hamper the efficiency of converting available sugars into bioethanol. This study investigated the potential for screening formic acid tolerance in non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains, which could be used for the development of advanced generation bioethanol processes. Spot plate and phenotypic microarray methods were used to screen the formic acid tolerance of 7 non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. S. kudriavzeii IFO1802 and S. arboricolus 2.3319 displayed a higher formic acid tolerance when compared to other strains in the study. Strain S. arboricolus 2.3319 was selected for further investigation due to its genetic variability among the Saccharomyces species as related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and availability of two sibling strains: S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 in the lab. The tolerance of S. arboricolus strains (2.3317, 2.3318 and 2.3319) to formic acid was further investigated by lab-scale fermentation analysis, and compared with S. cerevisiae NCYC2592. S. arboricolus 2.3319 demonstrated improved formic acid tolerance and a similar bioethanol synthesis capacity to S. cerevisiae NCYC2592, while S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 exhibited an overall inferior performance. Metabolite analysis indicated that S. arboricolus strain 2.3319 accumulated comparatively high concentrations of glycerol and glycogen, which may have contributed to its ability to tolerate high levels of formic acid.

  1. Improved xylose and arabinose utilization by an industrial recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain using evolutionary engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, R.G.; Karhumaa, Kaisa; Fonseca, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cost-effective fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysate to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires efficient mixed sugar utilization. Notably, the rate and yield of xylose and arabinose co-fermentation to ethanol must be enhanced. Results: Evolutionary engineering was used...... to improve the simultaneous conversion of xylose and arabinose to ethanol in a recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain carrying the heterologous genes for xylose and arabinose utilization pathways integrated in the genome. The evolved strain TMB3130 displayed an increased consumption rate...... of our knowledge, this is the first report that characterizes the molecular mechanisms for improved mixed-pentose utilization obtained by evolutionary engineering of a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain. Increased transport of pentoses and increased activities of xylose converting enzymes contributed...

  2. Genetic diversity and molecular characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from winemaking environments

    OpenAIRE

    Schuller, Dorit Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Ciências The principal aim of the present work is to assess the genetic diversity of fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains found in vineyards belonging to the Vinho Verde Region in order to create a strain collection representing the region’s biodiversity wealth as a basis for future strain selection and improvement programs. Validation of molecular techniques for accurate genotyping is an indispensable prerequisite for biogeographical surveys. Molecular ty...

  3. Sensitivity to Lovastatin of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Deleted for Pleiotropic Drug Resistance (PDR) Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Formenti, Luca Riccardo; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The use of statins is well established in human therapy, and model organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae are commonly used in studies of drug action at molecular and cellular levels. The investigation of the resistance mechanisms towards statins may suggest new approaches to improve therapy...... based on the use of statins. We investigated the susceptibility to lovastatin of S. cerevisiae strains deleted for PDR genes, responsible for exporting hydrophobic and amphi-philic drugs, such as lovastatin. Strains deleted for the genes tested, PDR1, PDR3, PDR5 and SNQ2, exhibited remarkably different...

  4. Phenotypic evaluation and characterization of 21 industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, In Iok; Turner, Timothy Lee; Kim, Heejin; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su

    2018-02-01

    Microorganisms have been studied and used extensively to produce value-added fuels and chemicals. Yeasts, specifically Saccharomyces cerevisiae, receive industrial attention because of their well-known ability to ferment glucose and produce ethanol. Thousands of natural or genetically modified S. cerevisiae have been found in industrial environments for various purposes. These industrial strains are isolated from industrial fermentation sites, and they are considered as potential host strains for superior fermentation processes. In many cases, industrial yeast strains have higher thermotolerance, increased resistances towards fermentation inhibitors and increased glucose fermentation rates under anaerobic conditions when compared with laboratory yeast strains. Despite the advantages of industrial strains, they are often not well characterized. Through screening and phenotypic characterization of commercially available industrial yeast strains, industrial fermentation processes requiring specific environmental conditions may be able to select an ideal starting yeast strain to be further engineered. Here, we have characterized and compared 21 industrial S. cerevisiae strains under multiple conditions, including their tolerance to varying pH conditions, resistance to fermentation inhibitors, sporulation efficiency and ability to ferment lignocellulosic sugars. These data may be useful for the selection of a parental strain for specific biotechnological applications of engineered yeast. © FEMS 2018. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. A Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae Killer Strain Secreting the X Factor Related to Killer Activity and Inhibition of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 Killer Toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvydas, Vytautas; Bružauskaitė, Ieva; Gedminienė, Genovaitė; Šiekštelė, Rimantas

    2016-09-01

    It was determined that Kx strains secrete an X factor which can inhibit all known Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer toxins (K1, K2, K28) and some toxins of other yeast species-the phenomenon not yet described in the scientific literature. It was shown that Kx type yeast strains posess a killer phenotype producing small but clear lysis zones not only on the sensitive strain α'1 but also on the lawn of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 type killer strains at temperatures between 20 and 30 °C. The pH at which killer/antikiller effect of Kx strain reaches its maximum is about 5.0-5.2. The Kx yeast were identified as to belong to S. cerevisiae species. Another newly identified S. cerevisiae killer strain N1 has killer activity but shows no antikilller properties against standard K1, K2 and K28 killer toxins. The genetic basis for Kx killer/antikiller phenotype was associated with the presence of M-dsRNA which is bigger than M-dsRNA of standard S. cerevisiae K1, K2, K28 type killer strains. Killer and antikiller features should be encoded by dsRNA. The phenomenon of antikiller (inhibition) properties was observed against some killer toxins of other yeast species. The molecular weight of newly identified killer toxins which produces Kx type strains might be about 45 kDa.

  6. Bioethanol strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae characterised by microsatellite and stress resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Vanda Renata; Antonangelo, Ana Teresa Burlamaqui Faraco; Bassi, Ana Paula Guarnieri; Colombi, Débora; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae may display characteristics that are typical of rough-type colonies, made up of cells clustered in pseudohyphal structures and comprised of daughter buds that do not separate from the mother cell post-mitosis. These strains are known to occur frequently in fermentation tanks with significant lower ethanol yield when compared to fermentations carried out by smooth strains of S. cerevisiae that are composed of dispersed cells. In an attempt to delineate genetic and phenotypic differences underlying the two phenotypes, this study analysed 10 microsatellite loci of 22 S. cerevisiae strains as well as stress resistance towards high concentrations of ethanol and glucose, low pH and cell sedimentation rates. The results obtained from the phenotypic tests by Principal-Component Analysis revealed that unlike the smooth colonies, the rough colonies of S. cerevisiae exhibit an enhanced resistance to stressful conditions resulting from the presence of excessive glucose and ethanol and high sedimentation rate. The microsatellite analysis was not successful to distinguish between the colony phenotypes as phenotypic assays. The relevant industrial strain PE-2 was observed in close genetic proximity to rough-colony although it does not display this colony morphology. A unique genetic pattern specific to a particular phenotype remains elusive. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Bioethanol strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae characterised by microsatellite and stress resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanda Renata Reis

    Full Text Available Abstract Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae may display characteristics that are typical of rough-type colonies, made up of cells clustered in pseudohyphal structures and comprised of daughter buds that do not separate from the mother cell post-mitosis. These strains are known to occur frequently in fermentation tanks with significant lower ethanol yield when compared to fermentations carried out by smooth strains of S. cerevisiae that are composed of dispersed cells. In an attempt to delineate genetic and phenotypic differences underlying the two phenotypes, this study analysed 10 microsatellite loci of 22 S. cerevisiae strains as well as stress resistance towards high concentrations of ethanol and glucose, low pH and cell sedimentation rates. The results obtained from the phenotypic tests by Principal-Component Analysis revealed that unlike the smooth colonies, the rough colonies of S. cerevisiae exhibit an enhanced resistance to stressful conditions resulting from the presence of excessive glucose and ethanol and high sedimentation rate. The microsatellite analysis was not successful to distinguish between the colony phenotypes as phenotypic assays. The relevant industrial strain PE-2 was observed in close genetic proximity to rough-colony although it does not display this colony morphology. A unique genetic pattern specific to a particular phenotype remains elusive.

  8. The use of genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in the wine industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Dorit; Casal, Margarida

    2005-08-01

    In recent decades, science and food technology have contributed at an accelerated rate to the introduction of new products to satisfy nutritional, socio-economic and quality requirements. With the emergence of modern molecular genetics, the industrial importance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is continuously extended. The demand for suitable genetically modified (GM) S. cerevisiae strains for the biofuel, bakery and beverage industries or for the production of biotechnological products (e.g. enzymes, pharmaceutical products) will continuously grow in the future. Numerous specialised S. cerevisiae wine strains were obtained in recent years, possessing a wide range of optimised or novel oenological properties, capable of satisfying the demanding nature of modern winemaking practise. The unlocking of transcriptome, proteome and metabolome complexities will contribute decisively to the knowledge about the genetic make-up of commercial yeast strains and will influence wine strain improvement via genetic engineering. The most relevant advances regarding the importance and implications of the use of GM yeast strains in the wine industry are discussed in this mini-review. In this work, various aspects are considered including the strategies used for the construction of strains with respect to current legislation requirements, the environmental risk evaluations concerning the deliberate release of genetically modified yeast strains, the methods for detection of recombinant DNA and protein that are currently under evaluation, and the reasons behind the critical public perception towards the application of such strains.

  9. Ecological interactions among Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: insight into the dominance phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Perrone, Benedeta; Navarro-Tapia, Elisabeth; Querol, Amparo; Cocolin, Luca

    2017-03-07

    This study investigates the behaviour of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, in order to obtain insight into the intraspecies competition taking place in mixed populations of this species. Two strains of S. cerevisiae, one dominant and one non-dominant, were labelled and mixed, and individual fermentations were set up to study the transcriptomes of the strains by means of RNA-seq. The results obtained suggest that cell-to-cell contact and aggregation, which are driven by the expression of genes that are associated with the cell surface, are indispensable conditions for the achievement of dominance. Observations on mixed aggregates, made up of cells of both strains, which were detected by means of flow cytometry, have confirmed the transcriptomic data. Furthermore, overexpression of the SSU1 gene, which encodes for a transporter that confers resistance to sulphites, provides an ecological advantage to the dominant strain. A mechanistic model is proposed that sheds light on the dominance phenomenon between different strains of the S. cerevisiae species. The collected data suggest that cell-to-cell contact, together with differential sulphite production and resistance is important in determining the dominance of one strain over another.

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains tor second-generation ethanol production : from academie exploration to industrial implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Mickel L.A.; Bracher, J.M.; Papapetridis, I.; Verhoeven, M.D.; de Bruijn, J.A.; de Waal, P.; van Maris, A.J.A.; Klaassen, P; Pronk, J.T.

    2017-01-01

    The recent start-up of several full-scale ‘second generation’ ethanol plants marks a major milestone in the development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates of agricultural residues and energy crops. After a discussion of the challenges that these

  11. Torulaspora delbrueckii contribution in mixed brewing fermentations with different Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonico, Laura; Comitini, Francesca; Ciani, Maurizio

    2017-10-16

    In recent years, there has been growing demand for distinctive high quality beer. Fermentation management has a fundamental role in beer quality and the levels of aroma compounds. Use of non-conventional yeast has been proposed to enhance beer bioflavor. In the present work we investigated mixed fermentations using three commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, without and with addition of a selected Torulaspora delbrueckii strain evaluating their interactions, as well as the aroma profiles. At the S. cerevisiae/T. delbrueckii co-inoculation ratio of 1:20, viable cell counts indicated that T. delbrueckii dominated all of the three combinations. In the mixed fermentations, T. delbrueckii provided higher levels of higher alcohols (excepting of β-phenyl ethanol), in contrast to data obtained in winemaking, where higher alcohols had lower levels. Moreover, mixed fermentations showed significantly higher ethyl acetate (from 5 to 16mg/L) and isoamyl acetate (from 0.019 to 0.128mg/L), and were generally lower in ethyl hexanoate and ethyl octanoate. Therefore, irrespective of S. cerevisiae strain, T. delbrueckii influenced on all mixed fermentations. On the other hand, the mixed fermentations were also affected by each of the three S. cerevisiae strains, which resulted in beers with distinctive flavors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Genomic Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BAW-6, a Yeast Strain Optimal for Brewing Barley Shochu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Yasuhiro; Mori, Kazuki; Tashiro, Kosuke; Higuchi, Yujiro; Takegawa, Kaoru; Takashita, Hideharu

    2018-04-05

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BAW-6, which is used for the production of barley shochu, a traditional Japanese spirit. This genomic information can be used to elucidate the genetic basis underlying the high alcohol production capacity and citric acid tolerance of shochu yeast. Copyright © 2018 Kajiwara et al.

  13. Ethanol-independent biofilm formation by a flor wine yeast strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Severino; Gross, Michael K; Zara, Giacomo; Budroni, Marilena; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2010-06-01

    Flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae form a biofilm on the surface of wine at the end of fermentation, when sugar is depleted and growth on ethanol becomes dependent on oxygen. Here, we report greater biofilm formation on glycerol and ethyl acetate and inconsistent formation on succinic, lactic, and acetic acids.

  14. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ethanol strains PE-2 and CAT-1 for efficient lignocellulosic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaní, Aloia; Pereira, Filipa; Johansson, Björn; Domingues, Lucília

    2015-03-01

    In this work, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains PE-2 and CAT-1, commonly used in the Brazilian fuel ethanol industry, were engineered for xylose fermentation, where the first fermented xylose faster than the latter, but also produced considerable amounts of xylitol. An engineered PE-2 strain (MEC1121) efficiently consumed xylose in presence of inhibitors both in synthetic and corn-cob hydrolysates. Interestingly, the S. cerevisiae MEC1121 consumed xylose and glucose simultaneously, while a CEN.PK based strain consumed glucose and xylose sequentially. Deletion of the aldose reductase GRE3 lowered xylitol production to undetectable levels and increased xylose consumption rate which led to higher final ethanol concentrations. Fermentation of corn-cob hydrolysate using this strain, MEC1133, resulted in an ethanol yield of 0.47 g/g of total sugars which is 92% of the theoretical yield. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A set of haploid strains available for genetic studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coi, Anna Lisa; Legras, Jean-Luc; Zara, Giacomo; Dequin, Sylvie; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-09-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been extensively studied for biofilm formation, however the lack of specific haploid model strains has limited the application of genetic approaches such as gene knockout, allelic replacement and Quantitative Trait Locus mapping for the deciphering of the molecular basis of velum formation under biological ageing. The aim of this work was to construct a set of flor isogenic haploid strains easy to manipulate genetically. The analysis of the allelic variations at 12 minisatellite loci of 174 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains allowed identifying three flor parental strains with different phylogenic positions. These strains were characterized for sporulation efficiency, growth on galactose, adherence to polystyrene, agar invasion, growth on wine and ability to develop a biofilm. Interestingly, the inability to grow on galactose was found associated with a frameshift in GAL4 gene that seems peculiar of flor strains. From these wild flor strains, isogenic haploid strains were constructed by deleting HO gene with a loxP-KanMX-loxP cassette followed by the removal of the kanamycin cassette. Haploid strains obtained were characterized for their phenotypic and genetic properties and compared with the parental strains. Preliminary results showed that the haploid strains represent new tools for genetic studies and breeding programs on biofilm formation. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Physiological studies in aerobic batch cultivations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains harboring the MEL1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Simon; Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Ronnow, B.

    2000-01-01

    Physiological studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains harboring the MEL1 gene were carried out in aerobic batch cultivations on glucose-galactose mixtures and on the disaccharide melibiose, which is hydrolyzed by the enzyme melibiase (Mel1, EC 3.2.1.22) into a glucose and a galactose moiety...... rates were 2.5-3.3-fold higher on glucose than on galactose for all the strains examined, and hence, ethanol production was pronounced on glucose due to respiro-fermentative metabolism. The T256 strain and the T200 strain having the MEL1 gene inserted in the HXK2 locus and the LEU2 locus, respectively...

  17. Bioaccumulation of uranium from waste water using different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tykva, R.; Novak, J.; Podracka, E.; Popa, K.

    2009-01-01

    Five different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were tested for their abilities to accumulate uranium from waste water containing competitive ions. Samples of water passing out from a previous uranium mill were used. The strains tested possess different abilities to accumulate uranium. The kinetics of bioaccumulation, the leaching degree, the influence of cell density and their origin were investigated. Under the applied experimental conditions, more than a half of the total activity (uranium and the decay products) could be accumulated after 60 min contact time of 1 mL (S. cerevisiae) suspension and 5 mL of water. The other cations present in solution effectively competed for the uranium accumulation. 226 Ra and its decay products were completely retained using all tested strains. (authors)

  18. Influence of genetic background of engineered xylose-fermenting industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for ethanol production from lignocellulosic hydrolysates

    Science.gov (United States)

    An industrial ethanol-producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with genes needed for xylose-fermentation integrated into its genome was used to obtain haploids and diploid isogenic strains. The isogenic strains were more effective in metabolizing xylose than their parental strain (p < 0.05) and abl...

  19. Relationship of trehalose accumulation with ethanol fermentation in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pin-Mei; Zheng, Dao-Qiong; Chi, Xiao-Qin; Li, Ou; Qian, Chao-Dong; Liu, Tian-Zhe; Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Du, Feng-Guang; Sun, Pei-Yong; Qu, Ai-Min; Wu, Xue-Chang

    2014-01-01

    The protective effect and the mechanisms of trehalose accumulation in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were investigated during ethanol fermentation. The engineered strains with more intercellular trehalose achieved significantly higher fermentation rates and ethanol yields than their wild strain ZS during very high gravity (VHG) fermentation, while their performances were not different during regular fermentation. The VHG fermentation performances of these strains were consistent with their growth capacity under osmotic stress and ethanol stress, the key stress factors during VHG fermentation. These results suggest that trehalose accumulation is more important for VHG fermentation of industrial yeast strains than regular one. The differences in membrane integrity and antioxidative capacity of these strains indicated the possible mechanisms of trehalose as a protectant under VHG condition. Therefore, trehalose metabolic engineering may be a useful strategy for improving the VHG fermentation performance of industrial yeast strains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ethanol production from xylose in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. Current state and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Sawayama, Shigeki [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Hiroshima (JP). Biomass Technology Research Center (BTRC); Kodaki, Tsutomu [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Advanced Energy

    2009-08-15

    Bioethanol production from xylose is important for utilization of lignocellulosic biomass as raw materials. The research on yeast conversion of xylose to ethanol has been intensively studied especially for genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the last 20 years. S. cerevisiae, which is a very safe microorganism that plays a traditional and major role in industrial bioethanol production, has several advantages due to its high ethanol productivity, as well as its high ethanol and inhibitor tolerance. However, this yeast cannot ferment xylose, which is the dominant pentose sugar in hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass. A number of different strategies have been applied to engineer yeasts capable of efficiently producing ethanol from xylose, including the introduction of initial xylose metabolism and xylose transport, changing the intracellular redox balance, and overexpression of xylulokinase and pentose phosphate pathways. In this review, recent progress with regard to these studies is discussed, focusing particularly on xylose-fermenting strains of S. cerevisiae. Recent studies using several promising approaches such as host strain selection and adaptation to obtain further improved xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae are also addressed. (orig.)

  1. Production of volatile and sulfur compounds by ten Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains inoculated in Trebbiano must

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca ePatrignani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In wines, the presence of sulphur compounds is the resulting of several contributions among which yeast metabolism. The characterization of the starter Saccharomyces cerevisiae needs to be performed also taking into account this ability even if evaluated together with the overall metabolic profile. In this perspective, principal aim of this experimental research was the evaluation of the volatile profiles, throughout GC/MS technique coupled with solid phase micro extraction, of wines obtained throughout the fermentation of 10 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, the production of sulphur compounds was further evaluated by using a gas-chromatograph coupled with a Flame Photometric Detector. Specifically, the ten strains were inoculated in Trebbiano musts and the fermentations were monitored for 19 days. In the produced wines, volatile and sulphur compounds as well as amino acid concentrations were investigated. Also the physico-chemical characteristics of the wines and their electronic nose profiles were evaluated.

  2. Genomics and Biochemistry of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldarov, M A; Kishkovskaia, S A; Tanaschuk, T N; Mardanov, A V

    2016-12-01

    Saccharomyces yeasts have been used for millennia for the production of beer, wine, bread, and other fermented products. Long-term "unconscious" selection and domestication led to the selection of hundreds of strains with desired production traits having significant phenotypic and genetic differences from their wild ancestors. This review summarizes the results of recent research in deciphering the genomes of wine Saccharomyces strains, the use of comparative genomics methods to study the mechanisms of yeast genome evolution under conditions of artificial selection, and the use of genomic and postgenomic approaches to identify the molecular nature of the important characteristics of commercial wine strains of Saccharomyces. Succinctly, data concerning metagenomics of microbial communities of grapes and wine and the dynamics of yeast and bacterial flora in the course of winemaking is provided. A separate section is devoted to an overview of the physiological, genetic, and biochemical features of sherry yeast strains used to produce biologically aged wines. The goal of the review is to convince the reader of the efficacy of new genomic and postgenomic technologies as tools for developing strategies for targeted selection and creation of new strains using "classical" and modern techniques for improving winemaking technology.

  3. The Impact of Single Amino Acids on Growth and Volatile Aroma Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Samantha Fairbairn; Alexander McKinnon; Hannibal T. Musarurwa; António C. Ferreira; António C. Ferreira; Florian F. Bauer

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae significantly influence fermentation kinetics and the production of volatile compounds important for wine aroma. Amino acids are the most important nitrogen source and have been classified based on how well they support growth. This study evaluated the effect of single amino acids on growth kinetics and major volatile production of two phenotypically different commercial wine yeast strains in synthetic grape must. Four growth p...

  4. Air-liquid biofilm formation is dependent on ammonium depletion in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Giacomo; Budroni, Marilena; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Zara, Severino

    2011-12-01

    Air-liquid biofilm formation appears to be an adaptive mechanism that promotes foraging of Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor strains in response to nutrient starvation. The FLO11 gene plays a central role in this phenotype as its expression allows yeast cells to rise to the liquid surface. Here, we investigated the role of ammonium depletion in air-liquid biofilm formation and FLO11 expression in a S. cerevisiae flor strain. The data obtained show that increasing ammonium concentrations from 0 to 450 m m reduce air-liquid biofilm in terms of biomass and velum formation and correlate with a reduction of FLO11 expression. Rapamycin inhibition of the TOR pathway and deletion of RAS2 gene significantly reduced biofilm formation and FLO11 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that ammonium depletion is a key factor in the induction of air-liquid biofilm formation and FLO11 expression in S. cerevisiae flor strains. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Screening Saccharomyces cerevisiae Distillery Strains in Industrial Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty-four distillery yeast strains were obtained from the ARS Culture Collection (NRRL) in Peoria, IL, and screened for ethanol production at 30 and 35°C using industrial media. The medium used in the tests consisted of corn mash prepared by combining coarse ground corn, water, and stillage from a...

  6. Physiology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from Brazilian biomes: new insights into biodiversity and industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beato, Felipe B.; Bergdahl, Basti; Rosa, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Fourteen indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from the barks of three tree species located in the Atlantic Rain Forest and Cerrado biomes in Brazil were genetically and physiologically compared to laboratory strains and to strains from the Brazilian fuel ethanol industry. Although...

  7. The Influence of Some Commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains on the Quality of Chardonnay Wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Podgorski

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in some aroma compounds and sensory properties caused by different commercial S. cerevisiae strains and by epiphyte microorganisms in Chardonnay wines were investigated. Wines fermented with the Lalvin-71 B strain contained significantly lower concentrations of alcohol, isoamyl alcohol, isobutanol and total acidity than the wines obtained from spontaneous and other inoculated fermentations. The highest concentrations of 2-phenyl ethanol and 2-phenyl ethyl acetate were found in the spontaneously fermented wines, whereas no essential changes in these compounds were found among the wines of other treatments. Compared to the spontaneous fermentation, Lalvin-71 B strain fermented wines had somewhat higher concentrations of butyric and caproic acid and ethyl butyrate. Lalvin-71 B strain fermented wines were assessed as the best whereas the quality of the wines produced with Lalvin aromatic-2056 strain was the most inferior in quality.

  8. Xylitol production by genetically modified industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using glycerol as co-substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogje, Anushree B; Ghosalkar, Anand

    2017-06-01

    Xylitol is commercially used in chewing gum and dental care products as a low calorie sweetener having medicinal properties. Industrial yeast strain of S. cerevisiae was genetically modified to overexpress an endogenous aldose reductase gene GRE3 and a xylose transporter gene SUT1 for the production of xylitol. The recombinant strain (XP-RTK) carried the expression cassettes of both the genes and the G418 resistance marker cassette KanMX integrated into the genome of S. cerevisiae. Short segments from the 5' and 3' delta regions of the Ty1 retrotransposons were used as homology regions for integration of the cassettes. Xylitol production by the industrial recombinant strain was evaluated using hemicellulosic hydrolysate of the corn cob with glucose as the cosubstrate. The recombinant strain XP-RTK showed significantly higher xylitol productivity (212 mg L -1  h -1 ) over the control strain XP (81 mg L -1  h -1 ). Glucose was successfully replaced by glycerol as a co-substrate for xylitol production by S. cerevisiae. Strain XP-RTK showed the highest xylitol productivity of 318.6 mg L -1  h -1 and titre of 47 g L -1 of xylitol at 12 g L -1 initial DCW using glycerol as cosubstrate. The amount of glycerol consumed per amount of xylitol produced (0.47 mol mol -1 ) was significantly lower than glucose (23.7 mol mol -1 ). Fermentation strategies such as cell recycle and use of the industrial nitrogen sources were demonstrated using hemicellulosic hydrolysate for xylitol production.

  9. Feasibility of protein turnover studies in prototroph Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Perez, Miguel; Villén, Judit

    2015-04-07

    Quantitative proteomics studies of yeast that use metabolic labeling with amino acids rely on auxotrophic mutations of one or more genes on the amino acid biosynthesis pathways. These mutations affect yeast metabolism and preclude the study of some biological processes. Overcoming this limitation, it has recently been described that proteins in a yeast prototrophic strain can also be metabolically labeled with heavy amino acids. However, the temporal profiles of label incorporation under the different phases of the prototroph's growth have not been examined. Labeling trajectories are important in the study of protein turnover and dynamics, in which label incorporation into proteins is monitored across many time points. Here we monitored protein labeling trajectories for 48 h after a pulse with heavy lysine in a yeast prototrophic strain and compared them with those of a lysine auxotrophic yeast. Labeling was successful in prototroph yeast during exponential growth phase but not in stationary phase. Furthermore, we were able to determine the half-lives of more than 1700 proteins during exponential phase of growth with high accuracy and reproducibility. We found a median half-life of 2 h in both strains, which corresponds with the cellular doubling time. Nucleolar and ribosomal proteins showed short half-lives, whereas mitochondrial proteins and other energy production enzymes presented longer half-lives. Except for some proteins involved in lysine biosynthesis, we observed a high correlation in protein half-lives between prototroph and auxotroph strains. Overall, our results demonstrate the feasibility of using prototrophs for proteomic turnover studies and provide a reliable data set of protein half-lives in exponentially growing yeast.

  10. Glucose-free fructose production from Jerusalem artichoke using a recombinant inulinase-secreting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Jiang, Jiaxi; Ji, Wangming; Li, Yuyang; Liu, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Using inulin (polyfructose) obtained from Jerusalen artichokes, we have produced fructose free of residual glucose using a recombinant inulinase-secreting strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a one-step fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke tubers. For producing fructose from inulin, a recombinant inulinase-producing Saccharomyce cerevisiae strain was constructed with a deficiency in fructose uptake by disruption of two hexokinase genes hxk1 and hxk2. The inulinase gene introduced into S. cerevisiae was cloned from Kluyveromyces cicerisporus. Extracellular inulinase activity of the recombinant hxk-mutated S. cerevisiae strain reached 31 U ml(-1) after 96 h growth. When grown in a medium containing Jerusalem artichoke tubers as the sole component without any additives, the recombinant yeast accumulated fructose up to 9.2% (w/v) in the fermentation broth with only 0.1% (w/v) glucose left after 24 h.

  11. Genetic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from palm wine in eastern Nigeria. Comparison with other African strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeronye, O U; Legras, J-L

    2009-05-01

    To study the yeast diversity of Nigerian palm wines by comparison with other African strains. Twenty-three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were obtained from palm wine samples collected at four locations in eastern Nigeria, and characterized using different molecular techniques: internal transcribed spacer restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis, pulsed field gel electrophoresis, inter delta typing and microsatellite multilocus analysis. These techniques revealed that palm wine yeasts represent a group of closely related strains that includes other West African isolates (CBS400, NCYC110, DVPG6044). Population analysis revealed an excess of homozygote strains and an allelic richness similar to wine suggestive of local domestication. Several other African yeast strains were not connected to this group. Ghana sorghum beer strains and other African strains (DBVPG1853 and MUCL28071) displayed strikingly high relatedness with European bread, beer or wine strains, and the genome of strain MUCL30909 contained African and wine-type alleles, indicating its hybrid origin. Nigerian palm wine yeast represents a local specific yeast flora, whereas a European origin or hybrid was suspected for several other Africa isolates. This study presents the first genetic characterization of an autochthonous African palm wine yeast population and confirms the idea that human intervention has favoured yeast migration.

  12. RNAseq-based transcriptome comparison of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from diverse fermentative environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Clara; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Morard, Miguel; Toft, Christina; Barrio, Eladio; Querol, Amparo

    2017-09-18

    Transcriptome analyses play a central role in unraveling the complexity of gene expression regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This species, one of the most important microorganisms for humans given its industrial applications, shows an astonishing degree of genetic and phenotypic variability among different strains adapted to specific environments. In order to gain novel insights into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae biology of strains adapted to different fermentative environments, we analyzed the whole transcriptome of three strains isolated from wine, flor wine or mezcal fermentations. An RNA-seq transcriptome comparison of the different yeasts in the samples obtained during synthetic must fermentation highlighted the differences observed in the genes that encode mannoproteins, and in those involved in aroma, sugar transport, glycerol and alcohol metabolism, which are important under alcoholic fermentation conditions. These differences were also observed in the physiology of the strains after mannoprotein and aroma determinations. This study offers an essential foundation for understanding how gene expression variations contribute to the fermentation differences of the strains adapted to unequal fermentative environments. Such knowledge is crucial to make improvements in fermentation processes and to define targets for the genetic improvement or selection of wine yeasts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Growth temperature exerts differential physiological and transcriptional responses in laboratory and wine strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizarra, Francisco J.; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been widely used as a model for studying eukaryotic cells and mapping the molecular mechanisms of many different human diseases. Industrial wine yeasts, on the other hand, have been selected on the basis of their adaptation to stringent environm......Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been widely used as a model for studying eukaryotic cells and mapping the molecular mechanisms of many different human diseases. Industrial wine yeasts, on the other hand, have been selected on the basis of their adaptation to stringent...... environmental conditions and the organoleptic properties that they confer to wine. Here, we used a two-factor design to study the responses of a standard laboratory strain, CEN.PK113-7D, and an industrial wine yeast strain, EC1118, to growth temperatures of 15 degrees C and 30 degrees C in nitrogen......-limited, anaerobic, steady-state chemostat cultures. Physiological characterization revealed that the growth temperature strongly impacted the biomass yield of both strains. Moreover, we found that the wine yeast was better adapted to mobilizing resources for biomass production and that the laboratory yeast...

  14. Benchmarking two commonly used Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for heterologous vanillin-β-glucoside production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Strucko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used eukaryotic model organism and a key cell factory for production of biofuels and wide range of chemicals. From the broad palette of available yeast strains, the most popular are those derived from laboratory strain S288c and the industrially relevant CEN.PK strain series. Importantly, in recent years these two strains have been subjected to comparative “-omics” analyzes pointing out significant genotypic and phenotypic differences. It is therefore possible that the two strains differ significantly with respect to their potential as cell factories for production of specific compounds. To examine this possibility, we have reconstructed a de novo vanillin-β-glucoside pathway in an identical manner in S288c and CEN.PK strains. Characterization of the two resulting strains in two standard conditions revealed that the S288c background strain produced up to 10-fold higher amounts of vanillin-β-glucoside compared to CEN.PK. This study demonstrates that yeast strain background may play a major role in the outcome of newly developed cell factories for production of a given product. Keywords: Yeast, Cell factory, Strain choice, Heterologous production, Vanillin-glucoside, Shikimate pathway

  15. Fermentation performance of engineered and evolved xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonderegger, M.; Jeppsson, M.; Larsson, C.

    2004-01-01

    Lignocellulose hydrolysate is an abundant substrate for bioethanol production. The ideal microorganism for such a fermentation process should combine rapid and efficient conversion of the available carbon sources to ethanol with high tolerance to ethanol and to inhibitory components in the hydrol......Lignocellulose hydrolysate is an abundant substrate for bioethanol production. The ideal microorganism for such a fermentation process should combine rapid and efficient conversion of the available carbon sources to ethanol with high tolerance to ethanol and to inhibitory components...... in the hydrolysate. A particular biological problem are the pentoses, which are not naturally metabolized by the main industrial ethanol producer Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several recombinant, mutated, and evolved xylose fermenting S. cerevisiae strains have been developed recently. We compare here the fermentation...

  16. Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Different Origins to Elevated Iron Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Garay, Carlos Andrés; de Llanos, Rosa; Romero, Antonia María; Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotic organisms. However, the low solubility of ferric iron has tremendously increased the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia, especially in women and children, with dramatic consequences. Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a model eukaryotic organism, a fermentative microorganism, and a feed supplement. In this report, we explore the genetic diversity of 123 wild and domestic strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from different geographical origins and sources to characterize how yeast cells respond to elevated iron concentrations in the environment. By using two different forms of iron, we selected and characterized both iron-sensitive and iron-resistant yeast strains. We observed that when the iron concentration in the medium increases, iron-sensitive strains accumulate iron more rapidly than iron-resistant isolates. We observed that, consistent with excess iron leading to oxidative stress, the redox state of iron-sensitive strains was more oxidized than that of iron-resistant strains. Growth assays in the presence of different oxidative reagents ruled out that this phenotype was due to alterations in the general oxidative stress protection machinery. It was noteworthy that iron-resistant strains were more sensitive to iron deficiency conditions than iron-sensitive strains, which suggests that adaptation to either high or low iron is detrimental for the opposite condition. An initial gene expression analysis suggested that alterations in iron homeostasis genes could contribute to the different responses of distant iron-sensitive and iron-resistant yeast strains to elevated environmental iron levels. PMID:26773083

  17. Extracellular Phytase Production by the Wine Yeast S. cerevisiae (Finarome Strain) during Submerged Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłosowski, Grzegorz; Mikulski, Dawid; Jankowiak, Oliwia

    2018-04-08

    One of the key steps in the production of phytases of microbial origin is selection of culture parameters, followed by isolation of the enzyme and evaluation of its catalytic activity. It was found that conditions for S. cerevisiae yeast culture, strain Finarome, giving the reduction in phytic acid concentration of more than 98% within 24 h of incubation were as follows: pH 5.5, 32 °C, continuous stirring at 80 rpm, the use of mannose as a carbon source and aspartic acid as a source of nitrogen. The highest catalytic activity of the isolated phytase was observed at 37 °C, pH 4.0 and using phytate as substrate at concentration of 5.0 mM. The presence of ethanol in the medium at a concentration of 12% v / v reduces the catalytic activity to above 60%. Properties of phytase derived from S. cerevisiae yeast culture, strain Finarome, indicate the possibility of its application in the form of a cell's free crude protein isolate for the hydrolysis of phytic acid to improve the efficiency of alcoholic fermentation processes. Our results also suggest a possibility to use the strain under study to obtain a fusant derived with specialized distillery strains, capable of carrying out a highly efficient fermentation process combined with the utilization of phytates.

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for second-generation ethanol production: from academic exploration to industrial implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Mickel L. A.; Bracher, Jasmine M.; Papapetridis, Ioannis; Verhoeven, Maarten D.; de Bruijn, Hans; de Waal, Paul P.; van Maris, Antonius J. A.; Klaassen, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The recent start-up of several full-scale ‘second generation’ ethanol plants marks a major milestone in the development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates of agricultural residues and energy crops. After a discussion of the challenges that these novel industrial contexts impose on yeast strains, this minireview describes key metabolic engineering strategies that have been developed to address these challenges. Additionally, it outlines how proof-of-concept studies, often developed in academic settings, can be used for the development of robust strain platforms that meet the requirements for industrial application. Fermentation performance of current engineered industrial S. cerevisiae strains is no longer a bottleneck in efforts to achieve the projected outputs of the first large-scale second-generation ethanol plants. Academic and industrial yeast research will continue to strengthen the economic value position of second-generation ethanol production by further improving fermentation kinetics, product yield and cellular robustness under process conditions. PMID:28899031

  19. Thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains representing potentials for bioethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke by consolidated bioprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Nan; Yuan, Bo; Sun, Juan; Wang, Shi-An; Li, Fu-Li

    2012-09-01

    Thermotolerant inulin-utilizing yeast strains are desirable for ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). To obtain such strains, 21 naturally occurring yeast strains isolated by using an enrichment method and 65 previously isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were investigated in inulin utilization, extracellular inulinase activity, and ethanol fermentation from inulin and Jerusalem artichoke tuber flour at 40 °C. The strains Kluyveromyces marxianus PT-1 (CGMCC AS2.4515) and S. cerevisiae JZ1C (CGMCC AS2.3878) presented the highest extracellular inulinase activity and ethanol yield in this study. The highest ethanol concentration in Jerusalem artichoke tuber flour fermentation (200 g L(-1)) at 40 °C achieved by K. marxianus PT-1 and S. cerevisiae JZ1C was 73.6 and 65.2 g L(-1), which corresponded to the theoretical ethanol yield of 90.0 and 79.7 %, respectively. In the range of 30 to 40 °C, temperature did not have a significant effect on ethanol production for both strains. This study displayed the distinctive superiority of K. marxianus PT-1 and S. cerevisiae JZ1C in the thermotolerance and utilization of inulin-type oligosaccharides reserved in Jerusalem artichoke tubers. It is proposed that both K. marxianus and S. cerevisiae have considerable potential in ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by a high temperature CBP.

  20. Thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains representing potentials for bioethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke by consolidated bioprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Nan [Agricultural Univ., Qingdao, SD (China). College of Animal Science and Technology; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, SD (China). Key Lab. of Biofuels; Yuan, Bo; Wang, Shi-An; Li, Fu-Li [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, SD (China). Key Lab. of Biofuels; Sun, Juan [Agricultural Univ., Qingdao, SD (China). College of Animal Science and Technology

    2012-09-15

    Thermotolerant inulin-utilizing yeast strains are desirable for ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). To obtain such strains, 21 naturally occurring yeast strains isolated by using an enrichment method and 65 previously isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were investigated in inulin utilization, extracellular inulinase activity, and ethanol fermentation from inulin and Jerusalem artichoke tuber flour at 40 C. The strains Kluyveromyces marxianus PT-1 (CGMCC AS2.4515) and S. cerevisiae JZ1C (CGMCC AS2.3878) presented the highest extracellular inulinase activity and ethanol yield in this study. The highest ethanol concentration in Jerusalem artichoke tuber flour fermentation (200 g L{sup -1}) at 40 C achieved by K. marxianus PT-1 and S. cerevisiae JZ1C was 73.6 and 65.2 g L{sup -1}, which corresponded to the theoretical ethanol yield of 90.0 and 79.7 %, respectively. In the range of 30 to 40 C, temperature did not have a significant effect on ethanol production for both strains. This study displayed the distinctive superiority of K. marxianus PT-1 and S. cerevisiae JZ1C in the thermotolerance and utilization of inulin-type oligosaccharides reserved in Jerusalem artichoke tubers. It is proposed that both K. marxianus and S. cerevisiae have considerable potential in ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by a high temperature CBP. (orig.)

  1. The role of nitrogen uptake on the competition ability of three vineyard Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendramini, Chiara; Beltran, Gemma; Nadai, Chiara; Giacomini, Alessio; Mas, Albert; Corich, Viviana

    2017-10-03

    Three vineyard strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, P301.4, P304.4 and P254.12, were assayed in comparison with a commercial industrial strain, QA23. The aim was to understand if nitrogen availability could influence strain competition ability during must fermentation. Pairwise-strain fermentations and co-fermentations with the simultaneous presence of the four strains were performed in synthetic musts at two nitrogen levels: control nitrogen condition (CNC) that assured the suitable assimilable nitrogen amount required by the yeast strains to complete the fermentation and low nitrogen condition (LNC) where nitrogen is present at very low level. Results suggested a strong involvement of nitrogen availability, as the frequency in must of the vineyard strains, respect to QA23, in LNC was always higher than that found in CNC. Moreover, in CNC only strain P304.4 reached the same strain frequency as QA23. P304.4 competition ability increased during the fermentation, indicating better performance when nitrogen availability was dropping down. P301.4 was the only strain sensitive to QA23 killer toxin. In CNC, when it was co-inoculated with the industrial strain QA23, P301.4 was never detected. In LNC, P301.4 after 12h accounted for 10% of the total population. This percentage increased after 48h (20%). Single-strain fermentations were also run in both conditions and the nitrogen metabolism further analyzed. Fermentation kinetics, ammonium and amino-acid consumptions and the expression of genes under nitrogen catabolite repression evidenced that vineyard yeasts, and particularly strain P304.4, had higher nitrogen assimilation rate than the commercial control. In conclusion, the high nitrogen assimilation rate seems to be an additional strategy that allowed vineyard yeasts successful competition during the growth in grape musts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Raspberry wine fermentation with suspended and immobilized yeast cells of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjević, Radovan; Gibson, Brian; Sandell, Mari; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Bugarski, Branko; Leskošek-Čukalović, Ida; Vunduk, Jovana; Nikićević, Ninoslav; Nedović, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the differences in fermentative behaviour of two different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (EC1118 and RC212) and to determine the differences in composition and sensory properties of raspberry wines fermented with immobilized and suspended yeast cells of both strains at 15 °C. Analyses of aroma compounds, glycerol, acetic acid and ethanol, as well as the kinetics of fermentation and a sensory evaluation of the wines, were performed. All fermentations with immobilized yeast cells had a shorter lag phase and faster utilization of sugars and ethanol production than those fermented with suspended cells. Slower fermentation kinetics were observed in all the samples that were fermented with strain RC212 (suspended and immobilized) than in samples fermented with strain EC1118. Significantly higher amounts of acetic acid were detected in all samples fermented with strain RC212 than in those fermented with strain EC1118 (0.282 and 0.602 g/l, respectively). Slightly higher amounts of glycerol were observed in samples fermented with strain EC1118 than in those fermented with strain RC212. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Laboratory evolution of a biotin-requiring Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for full biotin prototrophy and identification of causal mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bracher, J.M.; de Hulster, A.F.; van den Broek, M.A.; Daran, J.G.; van Maris, A.J.A.; Pronk, J.T.

    2017-01-01

    Biotin prototrophy is a rare, incompletely understood, and industrially relevant characteristic of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The genome of the haploid laboratory strain CEN.PK113-7D contains a full complement of biotin biosynthesis genes, but its growth in biotin-free synthetic medium is

  4. Substrate-Limited Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Strains Allow Control of Fermentation during Bread Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, Nore; Laurent, Jitka; Verspreet, Joran; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Courtin, Christophe M

    2017-04-26

    Identification and use of yeast strains that are unable to consume one or more otherwise fermentable substrate types could allow a more controlled fermentation process with more flexibility regarding fermentation times. In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different capacities to consume substrates present in wheat were selected to investigate the impact of substrate limitation on dough fermentation and final bread volume. Results show that fermentation of dough with maltose-negative strains relies on the presence of fructan and sucrose as fermentable substrates and can be used for regular bread making. Levels of fructan and sucrose, endogenously present or added, hence determine the extent of fermentation and timing at the proofing stage. Whole meal is inherently more suitable for substrate-limited fermentation than white flour due to the presence of higher native levels of these substrates. Bread making protocols with long fermentation times are accommodated by addition of substrates such as sucrose.

  5. A novel strategy to construct yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for very high gravity fermentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglin Tao

    Full Text Available Very high gravity (VHG fermentation is aimed to considerably increase both the fermentation rate and the ethanol concentration, thereby reducing capital costs and the risk of bacterial contamination. This process results in critical issues, such as adverse stress factors (ie., osmotic pressure and ethanol inhibition and high concentrations of metabolic byproducts which are difficult to overcome by a single breeding method. In the present paper, a novel strategy that combines metabolic engineering and genome shuffling to circumvent these limitations and improve the bioethanol production performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains under VHG conditions was developed. First, in strain Z5, which performed better than other widely used industrial strains, the gene GPD2 encoding glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase was deleted, resulting in a mutant (Z5ΔGPD2 with a lower glycerol yield and poor ethanol productivity. Second, strain Z5ΔGPD2 was subjected to three rounds of genome shuffling to improve its VHG fermentation performance, and the best performing strain SZ3-1 was obtained. Results showed that strain SZ3-1 not only produced less glycerol, but also increased the ethanol yield by up to 8% compared with the parent strain Z5. Further analysis suggested that the improved ethanol yield in strain SZ3-1 was mainly contributed by the enhanced ethanol tolerance of the strain. The differences in ethanol tolerance between strains Z5 and SZ3-1 were closely associated with the cell membrane fatty acid compositions and intracellular trehalose concentrations. Finally, genome rearrangements in the optimized strain were confirmed by karyotype analysis. Hence, a combination of genome shuffling and metabolic engineering is an efficient approach for the rapid improvement of yeast strains for desirable industrial phenotypes.

  6. Breeding of a xylose-fermenting hybrid strain by mating genetically engineered haploid strains derived from industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Seitaro; Matsushika, Akinori; Watanabe, Seiya; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2014-12-01

    The industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae IR-2 is a promising host strain to genetically engineer xylose-utilizing yeasts for ethanol fermentation from lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Two IR-2-based haploid strains were selected based upon the rate of xylulose fermentation, and hybrids were obtained by mating recombinant haploid strains harboring heterogeneous xylose dehydrogenase (XDH) (wild-type NAD(+)-dependent XDH or engineered NADP(+)-dependent XDH, ARSdR), xylose reductase (XR) and xylulose kinase (XK) genes. ARSdR in the hybrids selected for growth rates on yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) agar and YP-xylose agar plates typically had a higher activity than NAD(+)-dependent XDH. Furthermore, the xylose-fermenting performance of the hybrid strain SE12 with the same level of heterogeneous XDH activity was similar to that of a recombinant strain of IR-2 harboring a single set of genes, XR/ARSdR/XK. These results suggest not only that the recombinant haploid strains retain the appropriate genetic background of IR-2 for ethanol production from xylose but also that ARSdR is preferable for xylose fermentation.

  7. Robust metabolic responses to varied carbon sources in natural and laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne A Van Voorhies

    Full Text Available Understanding factors that regulate the metabolism and growth of an organism is of fundamental biologic interest. This study compared the influence of two different carbon substrates, dextrose and galactose, on the metabolic and growth rates of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast metabolic and growth rates varied widely depending on the metabolic substrate supplied. The metabolic and growth rates of a yeast strain maintained under long-term laboratory conditions was compared to strain isolated from natural condition when grown on different substrates. Previous studies had determined that there are numerous genetic differences between these two strains. However, the overall metabolic and growth rates of a wild isolate of yeast was very similar to that of a strain that had been maintained under laboratory conditions for many decades. This indicates that, at in least this case, metabolism and growth appear to be well buffered against genetic differences. Metabolic rate and cell number did not co-vary in a simple linear manner. When grown in either dextrose or galactose, both strains showed a growth pattern in which the number of cells continued to increase well after the metabolic rate began a sharp decline. Previous studied have reported that O₂ consumption in S. cerevisiae grown in reduced dextrose levels were elevated compared to higher levels. Low dextrose levels have been proposed to induce caloric restriction and increase life span in yeast. However, there was no evidence that reduced levels of dextrose increased metabolic rates, measured by either O₂ consumption or CO₂ production, in the strains used in this study.

  8. Impact of Commercial Strain Use on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Population Structure and Dynamics in Pinot Noir Vineyards and Spontaneous Fermentations of a Canadian Winery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T Martiniuk

    Full Text Available Wine is produced by one of two methods: inoculated fermentation, where a commercially-produced, single Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae yeast strain is used; or the traditional spontaneous fermentation, where yeast present on grape and winery surfaces carry out the fermentative process. Spontaneous fermentations are characterized by a diverse succession of yeast, ending with one or multiple strains of S. cerevisiae dominating the fermentation. In wineries using both fermentation methods, commercial strains may dominate spontaneous fermentations. We elucidate the impact of the winery environment and commercial strain use on S. cerevisiae population structure in spontaneous fermentations over two vintages by comparing S. cerevisiae populations in aseptically fermented grapes from a Canadian Pinot Noir vineyard to S. cerevisiae populations in winery-conducted fermentations of grapes from the same vineyard. We also characterize the vineyard-associated S. cerevisiae populations in two other geographically separate Pinot Noir vineyards farmed by the same winery. Winery fermentations were not dominated by commercial strains, but by a diverse number of strains with genotypes similar to commercial strains, suggesting that a population of S. cerevisiae derived from commercial strains is resident in the winery. Commercial and commercial-related yeast were also identified in the three vineyards examined, although at a lower frequency. There is low genetic differentiation and S. cerevisiae population structure between vineyards and between the vineyard and winery that persisted over both vintages, indicating commercial yeast are a driver of S. cerevisiae population structure. We also have evidence of distinct and persistent populations of winery and vineyard-associated S. cerevisiae populations unrelated to commercial strains. This study is the first to characterize S. cerevisiae populations in Canadian vineyards.

  9. Impact of Commercial Strain Use on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Population Structure and Dynamics in Pinot Noir Vineyards and Spontaneous Fermentations of a Canadian Winery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiniuk, Jonathan T; Pacheco, Braydon; Russell, Gordon; Tong, Stephanie; Backstrom, Ian; Measday, Vivien

    2016-01-01

    Wine is produced by one of two methods: inoculated fermentation, where a commercially-produced, single Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) yeast strain is used; or the traditional spontaneous fermentation, where yeast present on grape and winery surfaces carry out the fermentative process. Spontaneous fermentations are characterized by a diverse succession of yeast, ending with one or multiple strains of S. cerevisiae dominating the fermentation. In wineries using both fermentation methods, commercial strains may dominate spontaneous fermentations. We elucidate the impact of the winery environment and commercial strain use on S. cerevisiae population structure in spontaneous fermentations over two vintages by comparing S. cerevisiae populations in aseptically fermented grapes from a Canadian Pinot Noir vineyard to S. cerevisiae populations in winery-conducted fermentations of grapes from the same vineyard. We also characterize the vineyard-associated S. cerevisiae populations in two other geographically separate Pinot Noir vineyards farmed by the same winery. Winery fermentations were not dominated by commercial strains, but by a diverse number of strains with genotypes similar to commercial strains, suggesting that a population of S. cerevisiae derived from commercial strains is resident in the winery. Commercial and commercial-related yeast were also identified in the three vineyards examined, although at a lower frequency. There is low genetic differentiation and S. cerevisiae population structure between vineyards and between the vineyard and winery that persisted over both vintages, indicating commercial yeast are a driver of S. cerevisiae population structure. We also have evidence of distinct and persistent populations of winery and vineyard-associated S. cerevisiae populations unrelated to commercial strains. This study is the first to characterize S. cerevisiae populations in Canadian vineyards.

  10. Impact of different spray-drying conditions on the viability of wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte, Maria; Troianiello, Gabriele Danilo; Di Capua, Marika; Romano, Raffaele; Blaiotta, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Spray-drying (SD) is widely considered a suitable method to preserve microorganisms, but data regarding yeasts are still scanty. In this study, the effect of growing media, process variables and carriers over viability of a wild wine Saccharomyces (S.) cerevisiae LM52 was evaluated. For biomass production, the strain was grown (batch and fed-batch fermentation) in a synthetic, as well as in a beet sugar molasses based-medium. Drying of cells resuspended in several combinations of soluble starch and maltose was performed at different inlet and outlet temperatures. Under the best conditions-suspension in soluble starch plus maltose couplet to inlet and outlet temperatures of 110 and 55 °C, respectively-the loss of viability of S. cerevisiae LM52 was 0.8 ± 0.1 and 0.5 ± 0.2 Log c.f.u. g(-1) for synthetic and molasses-based medium, respectively. Similar results were obtained when S. cerevisiae strains Zymoflore F15 and EC1118, isolated from commercial active dry yeast (ADY), were tested. Moreover, powders retained a high vitality and showed good fermentation performances up to 6 month of storage, at both 4 and -20 °C. Finally, fermentation performances of different kinds of dried formulates (SD and ADY) compared with fresh cultures did not show significant differences. The procedure proposed allowed a small-scale production of yeast in continuous operation with relatively simple equipment, and may thus represent a rapid response-on-demand for the production of autochthonous yeasts for local wine-making.

  11. Effects of Six Commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains on Phenolic Attributes, Antioxidant Activity, and Aroma of Kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa cv.) Wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingchen; Cao, Lin; Li, Shaohua; Wang, Ranran; Jiang, Zijing; Che, Zhenming; Lin, Hongbin

    2017-01-01

    “Hayward” kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa cv.), widely planted all around the world, were fermented with six different commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (BM4×4, RA17, RC212, WLP77, JH-2, and CR476) to reveal their influence on the phenolic profiles, antioxidant activity, and aromatic components. Significant differences in the levels of caffeic acid, protocatechuate, and soluble solid content were found among wines with the six fermented strains. Wines fermented with RC212 strain exhibited the highest total phenolic acids as well as DPPH radical scavenging ability and also had the strongest ability to produce volatile esters. Wines made with S. cerevisiae BM 4×4 had the highest content of volatile acids, while the highest alcohol content was presented in CR476 wines. Scoring spots of wines with these strains were separated in different quadrants on the components of phenolics and aromas by principal component analyses. Kiwifruit wines made with S. cerevisiae RC212 were characterized by a rich fruity flavor, while CR476 strain and WLP77 strain produced floral flavors and green aromas, respectively. Altogether, the results indicated that the use of S. cerevisiae RC212 was the most suitable for the fermentation of kiwifruit wine with desirable characteristics. PMID:28251154

  12. Construction of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for bioethanol active dry yeast (ADY) production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Daoqiong; Zhang, Ke; Gao, Kehui; Liu, Zewei; Zhang, Xing; Li, Ou; Sun, Jianguo; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Du, Fengguang; Sun, Peiyong; Qu, Aimin; Wu, Xuechang

    2013-01-01

    The application of active dry yeast (ADY) in bioethanol production simplifies operation processes and reduces the risk of bacterial contamination. In the present study, we constructed a novel ADY strain with improved stress tolerance and ethanol fermentation performances under stressful conditions. The industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain ZTW1 showed excellent properties and thus subjected to a modified whole-genome shuffling (WGS) process to improve its ethanol titer, proliferation capability, and multiple stress tolerance for ADY production. The best-performing mutant, Z3-86, was obtained after three rounds of WGS, producing 4.4% more ethanol and retaining 2.15-fold higher viability than ZTW1 after drying. Proteomics and physiological analyses indicated that the altered expression patterns of genes involved in protein metabolism, plasma membrane composition, trehalose metabolism, and oxidative responses contribute to the trait improvement of Z3-86. This work not only successfully developed a novel S. cerevisiae mutant for application in commercial bioethanol production, but also enriched the current understanding of how WGS improves the complex traits of microbes.

  13. Construction of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for bioethanol active dry yeast (ADY production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoqiong Zheng

    Full Text Available The application of active dry yeast (ADY in bioethanol production simplifies operation processes and reduces the risk of bacterial contamination. In the present study, we constructed a novel ADY strain with improved stress tolerance and ethanol fermentation performances under stressful conditions. The industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain ZTW1 showed excellent properties and thus subjected to a modified whole-genome shuffling (WGS process to improve its ethanol titer, proliferation capability, and multiple stress tolerance for ADY production. The best-performing mutant, Z3-86, was obtained after three rounds of WGS, producing 4.4% more ethanol and retaining 2.15-fold higher viability than ZTW1 after drying. Proteomics and physiological analyses indicated that the altered expression patterns of genes involved in protein metabolism, plasma membrane composition, trehalose metabolism, and oxidative responses contribute to the trait improvement of Z3-86. This work not only successfully developed a novel S. cerevisiae mutant for application in commercial bioethanol production, but also enriched the current understanding of how WGS improves the complex traits of microbes.

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae vineyard strains have different nitrogen requirements that affect their fermentation performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos Junior, W J F; Viel, A; Bovo, B; Carlot, M; Giacomini, A; Corich, V

    2017-11-01

    In this work the fermentation performances of seven vineyard strains, together with the industrial strain EC1118, have been investigated at three differing yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) concentrations (300 mg N l -1 , 150 mg N l -1 and 70 mg N l -1 ) in synthetic musts. The results indicated that the response to different nitrogen levels is strain dependent. Most of the strains showed a dramatic decrease of the fermentation at 70 mg N l -1 but no significant differences in CO 2 production were found when fermentations at 300 mg N l -1 and 150 mg N l -1 were compared. Only one among the vineyard strains showed a decrease of the fermentation when 150 mg N l -1 were present in the must. These results contribute to shed light on strain nitrogen requirements and offer new perspectives to manage the fermentation process during winemaking. Selected vineyard Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains can improve the quality and the complexity of local wines. Wine quality is also influenced by nitrogen availability that modulates yeast fermentation activity. In this work, yeast nitrogen assimilation was evaluated to clarify the nitrogen requirements of vineyard strains. Most of the strains needed high nitrogen levels to express the best fermentation performances. The results obtained indicate the critical nitrogen levels. When the nitrogen concentration was above the critical level, the fermentation process increased, but if the level of nitrogen was further increased no effect on the fermentation was found. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Radiosensitivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303-1A and BY4741 Strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Young; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nili, Mohammad [Dawnesh Radiation Research Institute, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-05-15

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a simple eukaryotic cell, has been widely used as a model for all eukaryotes including humans for the study of fundamental cellular processes such as DNA replication, DNA recombination, cell cycle, cell division and metabolism. Numerous laboratory strains are used in yeast research. Most of the mutants have been derived from the two widely used laboratory strains W303-1A and BY4741. While BY4741 is a derivative of S288C, used in the systematic sequencing of the S. cerevisiae genome, strains with a W303 background serve in many physiological and biochemical studies. It was found in a recent study that W303-1A contains a mutant allele of YBP1, ybp1-1, encoding four amino acid substitutions, that results in increased peroxide sensitivity. Mutation of ybp1-1 is not a complete loss of function allele as it is more resistant to peroxides than the knock-out mutant. Ybp1 is required for oxidation of specific cysteine residues of the transcription factor Yap1p resulting in the nuclear localization of Yap1p in response to stress. Ionizing radiation (IR) can produce highly reactive hydroxyl radicals through the decomposition of cellular water, such as superoxide anion radical, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical. These reactive oxygen species (ROS) can cause wide-ranging cellular damage, including DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), lipid peroxidation, and protein modification. Also, ROS produced by IR cause oxidative stress. Detoxification enzymes are activated for ROS scavenging against oxidative stress. Also, antioxidants are used for detoxification of ROS and reduction of oxidative damage. NAC, one of the antioxidants, is a precursor for glutathione (GSH). The aim of the present study was to compare the differences in radiosensitivity associated cell viability between the two strains. Also, effect of NAC against IR on cell protection was investigated

  16. Increased ethanol accumulation from glucose via reduction of ATP level in a recombinant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae overexpressing alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkiv, Marta V; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Abbas, Charles A; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2014-05-15

    The production of ethyl alcohol by fermentation represents the largest scale application of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in industrial biotechnology. Increased worldwide demand for fuel bioethanol is anticipated over the next decade and will exceed 200 billion liters from further expansions. Our working hypothesis was that the drop in ATP level in S. cerevisiae cells during alcoholic fermentation should lead to an increase in ethanol production (yield and productivity) with a greater amount of the utilized glucose converted to ethanol. Our approach to achieve this goal is to decrease the intracellular ATP level via increasing the unspecific alkaline phosphatase activity. Intact and truncated versions of the S. cerevisiae PHO8 gene coding for vacuolar or cytosolic forms of alkaline phosphatase were fused with the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH1) promoter. The constructed expression cassettes used for transformation vectors also contained the dominant selective marker kanMX4 and S. cerevisiae δ-sequence to facilitate multicopy integration to the genome. Laboratory and industrial ethanol producing strains BY4742 and AS400 overexpressing vacuolar form of alkaline phosphatase were characterized by a slightly lowered intracellular ATP level and biomass accumulation and by an increase in ethanol productivity (13% and 7%) when compared to the parental strains. The strains expressing truncated cytosolic form of alkaline phosphatase showed a prolonged lag-phase, reduced biomass accumulation and a strong defect in ethanol production. Overexpression of vacuolar alkaline phosphatase leads to an increased ethanol yield in S. cerevisiae.

  17. Ecological survey of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from vineyards in the Vinho Verde Region of Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Dorit; Alves, Hugo; Dequin, Sylvie; Casal, Margarida

    2005-01-01

    One thousand six hundred and twenty yeast isolates were obtained from 54 spontaneous fermentations performed from grapes collected in 18 sampling sites of three vineyards (Vinho Verde Wine Region in northwest Portugal) during the 2001-2003 harvest seasons. All isolates were analyzed by mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (mtDNA RFLP) and a pattern profile was verified for each isolate, resulting in a total of 297 different profiles, that all belonged to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The strains corresponding to seventeen profiles showed a wider temporal and geographical distribution, being characterized by a generalized pattern of sporadic presence, absence and reappearance. One strain (ACP10) showed a more regional distribution with a perennial behavior. In different fermentations ACP10 was either dominant or not, showing that the final outcome of fermentation was dependent on the specific composition of the yeast community in the must. Few of the grape samples collected before harvest initiated a spontaneous fermentation, compared to the samples collected after harvest, in a time frame of about 2 weeks. The associated strains were also much more diversified: 267 patterns among 1260 isolates compared to 30 patterns among 360 isolates in the post- and pre-harvest samples, respectively. Fermenting yeast populations have never been characterized before in this region and the present work reports the presence of commercial yeast strains used by the wineries. The present study aims at the development of strategies for the preservation of biodiversity and genetic resources as a basis for further strain development.

  18. Haploid deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that determine survival during space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Kelly; Allen, Patricia L.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Nesbit, Jacqueline; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Wilson, James W.; Ramamurthy, Rajee; D'Elia, Riccardo; Muse, Kenneth E.; Hammond, Jeffrey; Freeman, Jake; Stodieck, Louis S.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2007-02-01

    This study identifies genes that determine survival during a space flight, using the model eukaryotic organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Select strains of a haploid yeast deletion series grew during storage in distilled water in space, but not in ground based static or clinorotation controls. The survival advantages in space in distilled water include a 133-fold advantage for the deletion of PEX19, a chaperone and import receptor for newly- synthesized class I peroxisomal membrane proteins, to 77-40 fold for deletion strains lacking elements of aerobic respiration, isocitrate metabolism, and mitochondrial electron transport. Following automated addition of rich growth media, the space flight was associated with a marked survival advantage of strains with deletions in catalytically active genes including hydrolases, oxidoreductases and transferases. When compared to static controls, space flight was associated with a marked survival disadvantage of deletion strains lacking transporter, antioxidant and catalytic activity. This study identifies yeast deletion strains with a survival advantage during storage in distilled water and space flight, and amplifies our understanding of the genes critical for survival in space.

  19. Molecular and Technological Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Isolated from Natural Fermentation of Susumaniello Grape Must in Apulia, Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Tristezza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of autochthonous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains is an important step towards the conservation and employment of microbial biodiversity. The utilization of selected autochthonous yeast strains would be a powerful tool to enhance the organoleptic and sensory properties of typical regional wines. In fact, indigenous yeasts are better tailored to a particular must and because of this they are able to praise the peculiarities of the derived wine. The present study described the biodiversity of indigenous S. cerevisiae strains isolated from natural must fermentations of an ancient and recently rediscovered Apulian grape cultivar, denoted as “Susumaniello.” The yeast strains denoted by the best oenological and technological features were identified and their fermentative performances were tested by either laboratory assay. Five yeast strains showed that they could be excellent candidates for the production of industrial starter cultures, since they dominated the fermentation process and produced wines characterized by peculiar oenological and organoleptic features.

  20. Co-utilization of L-arabinose and D-xylose by laboratory and industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

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    Boles Eckhard

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive alternative for the production of bioethanol. Traditionally, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used in industrial ethanol fermentations. However, S. cerevisiae is naturally not able to ferment the pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose, which are present in high amounts in lignocellulosic raw materials. Results We describe the engineering of laboratory and industrial S. cerevisiae strains to co-ferment the pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose. Introduction of a fungal xylose and a bacterial arabinose pathway resulted in strains able to grow on both pentose sugars. Introduction of a xylose pathway into an arabinose-fermenting laboratory strain resulted in nearly complete conversion of arabinose into arabitol due to the L-arabinose reductase activity of the xylose reductase. The industrial strain displayed lower arabitol yield and increased ethanol yield from xylose and arabinose. Conclusion Our work demonstrates simultaneous co-utilization of xylose and arabinose in recombinant strains of S. cerevisiae. In addition, the co-utilization of arabinose together with xylose significantly reduced formation of the by-product xylitol, which contributed to improved ethanol production.

  1. Loss of lager specific genes and subtelomeric regions define two different Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineages for Saccharomyces pastorianus Group I and II strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monerawela, Chandre; James, Tharappel C; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Bond, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Lager yeasts, Saccharomyces pastorianus, are interspecies hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus and are classified into Group I and Group II clades. The genome of the Group II strain, Weihenstephan 34/70, contains eight so-called 'lager-specific' genes that are located in subtelomeric regions. We evaluated the origins of these genes through bioinformatic and PCR analyses of Saccharomyces genomes. We determined that four are of cerevisiae origin while four originate from S. eubayanus. The Group I yeasts contain all four S. eubayanus genes but individual strains contain only a subset of the cerevisiae genes. We identified S. cerevisiae strains that contain all four cerevisiae 'lager-specific' genes, and distinct patterns of loss of these genes in other strains. Analysis of the subtelomeric regions uncovered patterns of loss in different S. cerevisiae strains. We identify two classes of S. cerevisiae strains: ale yeasts (Foster O) and stout yeasts with patterns of 'lager-specific' genes and subtelomeric regions identical to Group I and II S. pastorianus yeasts, respectively. These findings lead us to propose that Group I and II S. pastorianus strains originate from separate hybridization events involving different S. cerevisiae lineages. Using the combined bioinformatic and PCR data, we describe a potential classification map for industrial yeasts. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  2. CRISPR–Cas system enables fast and simple genome editing of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

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    Vratislav Stovicek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a demand to develop 3rd generation biorefineries that integrate energy production with the production of higher value chemicals from renewable feedstocks. Here, robust and stress-tolerant industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae will be suitable production organisms. However, their genetic manipulation is challenging, as they are usually diploid or polyploid. Therefore, there is a need to develop more efficient genetic engineering tools. We applied a CRISPR–Cas9 system for genome editing of different industrial strains, and show simultaneous disruption of two alleles of a gene in several unrelated strains with the efficiency ranging between 65% and 78%. We also achieved simultaneous disruption and knock-in of a reporter gene, and demonstrate the applicability of the method by designing lactic acid-producing strains in a single transformation event, where insertion of a heterologous gene and disruption of two endogenous genes occurred simultaneously. Our study provides a foundation for efficient engineering of industrial yeast cell factories. Keywords: CRISPR–Cas9, Genome editing, Industrial yeast, Biorefineries, Chemical production

  3. Impact of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains on Health-Promoting Compounds in Wine

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    Simona Guerrini

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Moderate wine consumption is associated with human health benefits (reduction of cardiovascular risk and neurodegenerative diseases, decrease of onset of certain cancers attributed to a series of bioactive compounds, mainly polyphenols, with antioxidant power capable of counteracting the negative action of free radicals. Polyphenols are naturally present in the grapes, but an additional amount originates during winemaking. The aim of this work was to assess the ability of four commercial and two indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains to produce bioactive compounds (tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, tryptophol, melatonin and glutathione during alcoholic fermentation. In order to exclude the fraction of antioxidant compounds naturally occurring in grapes, the strains were inoculated in a synthetic must. At the end of fermentation the bioactive compounds were analysed by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography, while antioxidant activity was measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay. Moreover, freeze-dried samples, originating from the experimental wines, were used to perform ex-vivo assays on cultured cells (RAW 264.7 murine macrophages with the aim to evaluate their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The results indicated that the production of the considered bioactive compounds is a strain-specific property; therefore, the different yeast strains utilized during fermentation have different capabilities to modify the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of the wine.

  4. Production of fructanase by a wild strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on tequila agave fructan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-González, R I; Pelayo-Ortiz, C; Jacques, G; Guatemala, G; Arriola, E; Arias, J A; Toriz, G

    2015-01-01

    A new wild strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CF3) isolated from tequila must was evaluated for production of fructanase on Agave tequilana Weber fructan (FT). Fructanase activity (F) was assessed by a 3(3) factorial design (substrate, temperature and pH). High enzymatic activity (31.1 U/ml) was found at 30 °C, pH 5, using FT (10 g/l) as substrate. The effect of initial substrate concentration on F (FT0, 5.7-66 g/l) was studied and it was found that F was highest (44.8 U/ml) at FT0 25 g/l. A 2(2) factorial experimental design with five central points was utilized to study the effect of stirring and aeration on fructanase activity; stirring exhibited a stronger effect on F. The ratio fructanase to invertase (F/S) was 0.57, which confirms that the enzymes are fructanase. Crude fructanase reached high substrate hydrolysis (48 wt%) in 10 h. It is shown that S. cerevisiae CF3 was able to produce large amounts of fructanase by growing it on fructan from A. tequilana.

  5. Key Process Conditions for Production of C4 Dicarboxylic Acids in Bioreactor Batch Cultures of an Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, R.M.; De Hulster, E.; Kloezen, W.; Pronk, J.T.; Van Maris, A.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    A recent effort to improve malic acid production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae by means of metabolic engineering resulted in a strain that produced up to 59 g liter(-1) of malate at a yield of 0.42 mol (mol glucose)(-1) in calcium carbonate-buffered shake flask cultures. With shake flasks, process

  6. IMPROVEMENT OF BORASSUS AKEASSII WINES QUALITY BY CONTROLLED FERMENTATION USING SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAPSOBA François

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Palm wine produced traditionally and consumed by many people around the world and specifically in Burkina Faso posed health risks because of questionable quality of wine produced by mix culture fermentation and the use of antiseptics for the stabilization. In order to improve its quality, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from Borassus akeassii wines and identified by amplification and RFLP analysis of the 5-8S-ITS region were used for in vitro fermentation of unfermented palm sap. The physicochemical characteristics of the sap were measured before and after fermentation process by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC and the microbiological quality were also performed. HPLC analysis showed that glucose and fructose concentration in palm sap were 37.0 and 27.6 g/L respectively, ethanol content was ranged between 2.76 and 5.31 % (g/mL for controlled fermentation and 2.20 % (g/mL for spontaneous fermentation. Lactic and acetic acids were ranged between 0.1 and 0.3 g/L and 1.5 and 1.6 g/L for controlled fermentation versus 2.5 and 3.1 g/L and the spontaneous fermentation respectively. Coliforms and Staphylococcus aureus were detected only in the unfermented palm sap and the wine fermented spontaneously. Principal component analysis showed a good separation between spontaneous and controlled fermentation. Sterilization and controlled fermentation of the unfermented sap with palm wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains led to the improvement of palm wine quality.

  7. Development Of An Efficient Glycerol Utilizing Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Strain Via Adaptive Laboratory Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strucko, Tomas; Zirngibl, Katharina; Tharwat Tolba Mohamed, Elsayed

    2015-01-01

    that popular wild-type laboratory yeast strains, commonly applied in metabolic engineering studies, did not grow or grew very slowly in glycerol medium.In this work, an adaptive laboratory evolution approach to obtain S. cerevisiae strains with an improved ability to grow on glycerol was applied. A broad array...... of evolved strains, which exhibited a significant increase in the specific growth rate and a higher glycerol consumption rate, were isolated. The best performing strains were further analyzed by classical genetics and whole genome re-sequencing in order to understand the molecular basis of glycerol...

  8. Biodiversity of autolytic ability in flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains suitable for traditional sparkling wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perpetuini, Giorgia; Di Gianvito, Paola; Arfelli, Giuseppe; Schirone, Maria; Corsetti, Aldo; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2016-07-01

    Yeasts involved in secondary fermentation of traditional sparkling wines should show specific characteristics, such as flocculation capacity and autolysis. Recently it has been postulated that autophagy may contribute to the outcome of autolysis. In this study, 28 flocculent wine Saccahromyces cerevisiae strains characterized by different flocculation degrees were studied for their autolytic and autophagic activities. Autolysis was monitored in synthetic medium through the determination of amino acid nitrogen and total proteins released. At the same time, novel primer sets were developed to determine the expression of the genes ATG1, ATG17 and ATG29. Twelve strains were selected on the basis of their autolytic rate and ATG gene expressions in synthetic medium and were inoculated in a base wine. After 30, 60 and 180 days the autolytic process and ATG gene expressions were evaluated. The obtained data showed that autolysis and ATG gene expressions differed among strains and were independent of the degree of flocculation. This biodiversity could be exploited to select new starter stains to improve sparkling wine production. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Xylose fermentation efficiency and inhibitor tolerance of the recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain NAPX37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Cheng; Mitsumasu, Kanako; Gou, Zi-Xi; Gou, Min; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Guo-Ying; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Akamatsu, Takashi; Taguchi, Hisataka; Kida, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    Industrial yeast strains with good xylose fermentation ability and inhibitor tolerance are important for economical lignocellulosic bioethanol production. The flocculating industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain NAPX37, harboring the xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase (XR-XDH)-based xylose metabolic pathway, displayed efficient xylose fermentation during batch and continuous fermentation. During batch fermentation, the xylose consumption rates at the first 36 h were similar (1.37 g/L/h) when the initial xylose concentrations were 50 and 75 g/L, indicating that xylose fermentation was not inhibited even when the xylose concentration was as high as 75 g/L. The presence of glucose, at concentrations of up to 25 g/L, did not affect xylose consumption rate at the first 36 h. Strain NAPX37 showed stable xylose fermentation capacity during continuous ethanol fermentation using xylose as the sole sugar, for almost 1 year. Fermentation remained stable at a dilution rate of 0.05/h, even though the xylose concentration in the feed was as high as 100 g/L. Aeration rate, xylose concentration, and MgSO4 concentration were found to affect xylose consumption and ethanol yield. When the xylose concentration in the feed was 75 g/L, a high xylose consumption rate of 6.62 g/L/h and an ethanol yield of 0.394 were achieved under an aeration rate of 0.1 vvm, dilution rate of 0.1/h, and 5 mM MgSO4. In addition, strain NAPX37 exhibited good tolerance to inhibitors such as weak acids, furans, and phenolics during xylose fermentation. These findings indicate that strain NAPX37 is a promising candidate for application in the industrial production of lignocellulosic bioethanol.

  10. Modern technology homogenizes enological traits of indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains associated with Msalais, a traditional wine in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lixia; Xue, Julan

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we performed a pilot-scale evaluation of the enological characteristics of indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains associated with Msalais, a traditional Chinese wine produced by a unique technology of boiling grape juice prior to spontaneous fermentation. Technical and sensory characteristics of top ten indigenous strains previously identified by us by screening a collection of 436 indigenous S. cerevisiae strains (Zhu et al. 2016) were assayed in a traditional craft workshop (TCW) and a modern plant (MP). The use of these strains reduced the spontaneous fermentation (Spo F) period by 6-15 days, and resulted in higher sugar and lower alcohol content in TCW Msalais than in MP Msalais. Sensory scores of Msalais fermented by the ten strains were higher than those of wine produced with a commercial strain cy3079, varying in TCW fermentations and significantly different from Spo F, but homogenous for all MP fermentations. Four strains were extensively screened for use in industrial Msalais production. We conclude that modern technology homogenizes enological traits of indigenous strains while traditional craftsmanship maintains their enological diversity. Some strains domesticated in the course of both processes are suitable for industrial Msalais production.

  11. Engineering of a novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strain with a respiratory phenotype at high external glucose concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricsson, C; de Jesus Ferreira, M C; Hedfalk, K; Elbing, K; Larsson, C; Bill, R M; Norbeck, J; Hohmann, S; Gustafsson, L

    2005-10-01

    The recently described respiratory strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae KOY.TM6*P is, to our knowledge, the only reported strain of S. cerevisiae which completely redirects the flux of glucose from ethanol fermentation to respiration, even at high external glucose concentrations (27). In the KOY.TM6*P strain, portions of the genes encoding the predominant hexose transporter proteins, Hxt1 and Hxt7, were fused within the regions encoding transmembrane (TM) domain 6. The resulting chimeric gene, TM6*, encoded a chimera composed of the amino-terminal half of Hxt1 and the carboxy-terminal half of Hxt7. It was subsequently integrated into the genome of an hxt null strain. In this study, we have demonstrated the transferability of this respiratory phenotype to the V5 hxt1-7Delta strain, a derivative of a strain used in enology. We also show by using this mutant that it is not necessary to transform a complete hxt null strain with the TM6* construct to obtain a non-ethanol-producing phenotype. The resulting V5.TM6*P strain, obtained by transformation of the V5 hxt1-7Delta strain with the TM6* chimeric gene, produced only minor amounts of ethanol when cultured on external glucose concentrations as high as 5%. Despite the fact that glucose flux was reduced to 30% in the V5.TM6*P strain compared with that of its parental strain, the V5.TM6*P strain produced biomass at a specific rate as high as 85% that of the V5 wild-type strain. Even more relevant for the potential use of such a strain for the production of heterologous proteins and also of low-alcohol beverages is the observation that the biomass yield increased 50% with the mutant compared to its parental strain.

  12. Flux control-based design of furfural-resistance strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for lignocellulosic biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrean, Pornkamol

    2017-04-01

    We have previously developed a dynamic flux balance analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for elucidation of genome-wide flux response to furfural perturbation (Unrean and Franzen, Biotechnol J 10(8):1248-1258, 2015). Herein, the dynamic flux distributions were analyzed by flux control analysis to identify target overexpressed genes for improved yeast robustness against furfural. The flux control coefficient (FCC) identified overexpressing isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1), a rate-controlling flux for ethanol fermentation, and dicarboxylate carrier (DIC1), a limiting flux for cell growth, as keys of furfural-resistance phenotype. Consistent with the model prediction, strain characterization showed 1.2- and 2.0-fold improvement in ethanol synthesis and furfural detoxification rates, respectively, by IDH1 overexpressed mutant compared to the control. DIC1 overexpressed mutant grew at 1.3-fold faster and reduced furfural at 1.4-fold faster than the control under the furfural challenge. This study hence demonstrated the FCC-based approach as an effective tool for guiding the design of robust yeast strains.

  13. Biotechnological process for obtaining new fermented products from cashew apple fruit by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Suzane Macêdo; Silva, Cristina Ferraz; Moreira, Jane Jesus Silveira; Narain, Narendra; Souza, Roberto Rodrigues

    2011-09-01

    In Brazil, the use of cashew apple (Anacardium occidentale L.) to obtain new products by biotechnological process represents an important alternative to avoid wastage of a large quantity of this fruit, which reaches about 85% of the annual production of 1 million tons. This work focuses on the development of an alcoholic product obtained by the fermentation of cashew apple juice. The inoculation with two different strains of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae viz. SCP and SCT, were standardized to a concentration of 10(7 )cells ml(-1). Each inoculum was added to 1,500 ml of cashew must. Fermentation was performed at 28 ± 3°C and aliquots were withdrawn every 24 h to monitor soluble sugar concentrations, pH, and dry matter contents. The volatile compounds in fermented products were analyzed using the gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system. After 6 days, the fermentation process was completed, cells removed by filtration and centrifugation, and the products were stabilized under refrigeration for a period of 20 days. The stabilized products were stored in glass bottles and pasteurized at 60 ± 5°C/30 min. Both fermented products contained ethanol concentration above 6% (v v(-1)) while methanol was not detected and total acidity was below 90 mEq l(-1), representing a pH of 3.8-3.9. The volatile compounds were characterized by the presence of aldehyde (butyl aldehyde diethyl acetal, 2,4-dimethyl-hepta-2,4-dienal, and 2-methyl-2-pentenal) and ester (ethyl α-methylbutyrate) representing fruity aroma. The strain SCT was found to be better and efficient and this produced 10% more alcohol over that of strain SCP.

  14. Diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from Borassus akeassii palm wines from Burkina Faso in comparison to other African beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapsoba, François; Legras, Jean-Luc; Savadogo, Aly; Dequin, Sylvie; Traore, Alfred Sababenedyo

    2015-10-15

    In South-West of Burkina Faso, palm wine is produced by spontaneous fermentation of the sap from a specific palm tree Borassus akeassii and plays an important role in people's lives. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main agent of this alcoholic fermentation but little is known about the diversity of the isolates from palm. In this work, 39 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were isolated from palm wine samples collected from 14 sites in Burkina Faso, as well as 7 isolates obtained from sorghum beer (Dolo) from 3 distant sites. Their diversity was analyzed at 12 microsatellite loci, and compared to the genotypes obtained for other African yeast populations isolated from Cocoa hulks from Ghana, sorghum beer from Ivory Coast, palm wine from Djibouti Republic, and to our database of strains from miscellaneous origins (bread, beer, wine, sake, oaks…). The ploidy of these strains has been assessed as well by flow cytometry. Our results show that B. akeassii palm wine contains a specific yeast population of diploid strains, different from Dolo produced in the same area and from other palm wine strains from Ivory Coast, Nigeria, or Djibouti Republic. In contrast, Dolo strains appeared as a group of related and mainly tetraploid strains despite being isolated from different countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Temperature on the Prevalence of Saccharomyces Non cerevisiae Species against a S. cerevisiae Wine Strain in Wine Fermentation: Competition, Physiological Fitness, and Influence in Final Wine Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-del-Real, Javier; Lairón-Peris, María; Barrio, Eladio; Querol, Amparo

    2017-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main microorganism responsible for the fermentation of wine. Nevertheless, in the last years wineries are facing new challenges due to current market demands and climate change effects on the wine quality. New yeast starters formed by non-conventional Saccharomyces species (such as S. uvarum or S. kudriavzevii) or their hybrids (S. cerevisiae x S. uvarum and S. cerevisiae x S. kudriavzevii) can contribute to solve some of these challenges. They exhibit good fermentative capabilities at low temperatures, producing wines with lower alcohol and higher glycerol amounts. However, S. cerevisiae can competitively displace other yeast species from wine fermentations, therefore the use of these new starters requires an analysis of their behavior during competition with S. cerevisiae during wine fermentation. In the present study we analyzed the survival capacity of non-cerevisiae strains in competition with S. cerevisiae during fermentation of synthetic wine must at different temperatures. First, we developed a new method, based on QPCR, to quantify the proportion of different Saccharomyces yeasts in mixed cultures. This method was used to assess the effect of competition on the growth fitness. In addition, fermentation kinetics parameters and final wine compositions were also analyzed. We observed that some cryotolerant Saccharomyces yeasts, particularly S. uvarum, seriously compromised S. cerevisiae fitness during competences at lower temperatures, which explains why S. uvarum can replace S. cerevisiae during wine fermentations in European regions with oceanic and continental climates. From an enological point of view, mixed co-cultures between S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus or S. eubayanus, deteriorated fermentation parameters and the final product composition compared to single S. cerevisiae inoculation. However, in co-inoculated synthetic must in which S. kudriavzevii or S. uvarum coexisted with S. cerevisiae, there were fermentation

  16. Excessive by-product formation: A key contributor to low isobutanol yields of engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, N; Wahl, S A; van Maris, A J A; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2016-12-01

    It is theoretically possible to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in which isobutanol is the predominant catabolic product and high-yielding isobutanol-producing strains are already reported by industry. Conversely, isobutanol yields of engineered S. cerevisiae strains reported in the scientific literature typically remain far below 10% of the theoretical maximum. This study explores possible reasons for these suboptimal yields by a mass-balancing approach. A cytosolically located, cofactor-balanced isobutanol pathway, consisting of a mosaic of bacterial enzymes whose in vivo functionality was confirmed by complementation of null mutations in branched-chain amino acid metabolism, was expressed in S. cerevisiae . Product formation by the engineered strain was analysed in shake flasks and bioreactors. In aerobic cultures, the pathway intermediate isobutyraldehyde was oxidized to isobutyrate rather than reduced to isobutanol. Moreover, significant concentrations of the pathway intermediates 2,3-dihydroxyisovalerate and α-ketoisovalerate, as well as diacetyl and acetoin, accumulated extracellularly. While the engineered strain could not grow anaerobically, micro-aerobic cultivation resulted in isobutanol formation at a yield of 0.018±0.003 mol/mol glucose. Simultaneously, 2,3-butanediol was produced at a yield of 0.649±0.067 mol/mol glucose. These results identify massive accumulation of pathway intermediates, as well as overflow metabolites derived from acetolactate, as an important, previously underestimated contributor to the suboptimal yields of 'academic' isobutanol strains. The observed patterns of by-product formation is consistent with the notion that in vivo activity of the iron-sulphur-cluster-requiring enzyme dihydroxyacid dehydratase is a key bottleneck in the present and previously described 'academic' isobutanol-producing yeast strains.

  17. Bakery by-products based feeds borne-Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with probiotic and antimycotoxin effects plus antibiotic resistance properties for use in animal production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poloni, Valeria; Salvato, Lauranne; Pereyra, Carina; Oliveira, Aguida; Rosa, Carlos; Cavaglieri, Lilia; Keller, Kelly Moura

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to select S. cerevisiae strains able to exert probiotic and antimycotoxin effects plus antibiotics resistance properties for use in animal production. S. cerevisiae LL74 and S. cerevisiae LL83 were isolated from bakery by-products intended for use in animal feed and examined for phenotypic characteristics and nutritional profile. Resistance to antibiotic, tolerance to gastrointestinal conditions, autoaggregation and coaggregation assay, antagonism to animal pathogens and aflatoxin B 1 binding were studied. S. cerevisiae LL74 and S. cerevisiae LL83 showed resistance to all the antibiotics assayed (ampicillin, streptomycin, neomycin, norfloxacin, penicillin G, sulfonamide and trimethoprim). The analysis showed that exposure time to acid pH had a significant impact onto the viable cell counts onto both yeast strains. Presence of bile 0.5% increased significantly the growth of the both yeast strains. Moreover, they were able to tolerate the simulated gastrointestinal conditions assayed. In general, the coaggregation was positive whereas the autoaggregation capacity was not observed. Both strains were able to adsorb AFB 1 . In conclusion, selected S. cerevisiae LL74 and S. cerevisiae LL83 have potential application to be used as a biological method in animal feed as antibiotic therapy replacement in, reducing the adverse effects of AFB 1 and giving probiotic properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Co-consumption of sugars or ethanol and glucose in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain deleted in the HXK2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raamsdonk, L M; Diderich, J A; Kuiper, A; van Gaalen, M; Kruckeberg, A L; Berden, J A; Van Dam, K; Kruckberg, A L

    2001-08-01

    In previous studies it was shown that deletion of the HXK2 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yields a strain that hardly produces ethanol and grows almost exclusively oxidatively in the presence of abundant glucose. This paper reports on physiological studies on the hxk2 deletion strain on mixtures of glucose/sucrose, glucose/galactose, glucose/maltose and glucose/ethanol in aerobic batch cultures. The hxk2 deletion strain co-consumed galactose and sucrose, together with glucose. In addition, co-consumption of glucose and ethanol was observed during the early exponential growth phase. In S.cerevisiae, co-consumption of ethanol and glucose (in the presence of abundant glucose) has never been reported before. The specific respiration rate of the hxk2 deletion strain growing on the glucose/ethanol mixture was 900 micromol.min(-1).(g protein)(-1), which is four to five times higher than that of the hxk2 deletion strain growing oxidatively on glucose, three times higher than its parent growing on ethanol (when respiration is fully derepressed) and is almost 10 times higher than its parent growing on glucose (when respiration is repressed). This indicates that the hxk2 deletion strain has a strongly enhanced oxidative capacity when grown on a mixture of glucose and ethanol. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The Impact of Single Amino Acids on Growth and Volatile Aroma Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Fairbairn

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen availability and utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae significantly influence fermentation kinetics and the production of volatile compounds important for wine aroma. Amino acids are the most important nitrogen source and have been classified based on how well they support growth. This study evaluated the effect of single amino acids on growth kinetics and major volatile production of two phenotypically different commercial wine yeast strains in synthetic grape must. Four growth parameters, lag phase, maximum growth rate, total biomass formation and time to complete fermentation were evaluated. In contrast with previous findings, in fermentative conditions, phenylalanine and valine supported growth well and asparagine supported it poorly. The four parameters showed good correlations for most amino acid treatments, with some notable exceptions. Single amino acid treatments resulted in the predictable production of aromatic compounds, with a linear correlation between amino acid concentration and the concentration of aromatic compounds that are directly derived from these amino acids. With the increased complexity of nitrogen sources, linear correlations were lost and aroma production became unpredictable. However, even in complex medium minor changes in amino acid concentration continued to directly impact the formation of aromatic compounds, suggesting that the relative concentration of individual amino acids remains a predictor of aromatic outputs, independently of the complexity of metabolic interactions between carbon and nitrogen metabolism and between amino acid degradation and utilization pathways.

  20. Biotransformation of soy whey into soy alcoholic beverage by four commercial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Jian-Yong; Lu, Yuyun; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2017-12-04

    Soy whey is a liquid waste stream generated from tofu and soy protein manufacturing, and is commonly disposed of into the drainage system in food industry. Instead of disposing of soy whey as a waste, it could be used to produce alcoholic beverages. This study investigated the feasibility of converting soy whey into soy alcoholic beverage using four commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains as a zero-waste approach to tackle the soy whey disposal issue. The four Saccharomyces yeasts grew by approximately 2logCFU/mL and produced approximately 7-8% (v/v) of ethanol. Isoflavone glucosides were hydrolyzed and transformed into isoflavone aglycones, increasing the antioxidant capacity. New aroma-active volatiles, especially esters and higher alcohols, were produced and imparted fruity and floral notes to the soy alcoholic beverage. Therefore, alcoholic fermentation would serve as a solution toward zero-waste manufacturing by biotransforming soy whey into a world's first novel functional alcoholic beverage naturally enriched with free isoflavones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of Novel Desiccation-Tolerant S. cerevisiae Strains for Deep Space Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieze, Sofia Massaro; Santa Maria, Sergio R.; Liddell, Lauren; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2017-01-01

    NASA's BioSentinel mission, a secondary payload that will fly on the Space Launch Systems first Exploration Mission (EM-1), utilizes the budding yeast S. cerevisiae to study the biological response to the deep space radiation environment. Yeast samples are desiccated prior to launch to suspend growth and metabolism while the spacecraft travels to its target heliocentric orbit beyond Low Earth Orbit. Each sample is then rehydrated at the desired time points to reactivate the cells. A major risk in this mission is the loss of cell viability that occurs in the recovery period following the desiccation and rehydration process. Cell survival is essential for the detection of the biological response to features in the deep space environment, including ionizing radiation.The aim of this study is to mitigate viable cell loss in future biosensors by identifying mutations and genes that confer tolerance to desiccation stress in rad51, a radiation-sensitive yeast strain. We initiated a screen for desiccation-tolerance after rehydrating cells that were desiccated for three years, and selected various clones exhibiting robust growth. To verify retention of radiation sensitivity in the isolated clonesa crucial feature for a successful biosensorwe exposed them to ionizing radiation. Finally, to elucidate the genetic and molecular bases for observed desiccation-tolerance, we will perform whole-genome sequencing of those rad51 clones that exhibit both robust growth and radiation sensitivity following desiccation. The identification and characterization of desiccation-tolerant strains will allow us to engineer a biological model that will be resilient in face of the challenges of the deep space environment, and will thus ensure the experimental success of future biosensor missions.

  2. Comparative studies on the fermentation performance of autochthonous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in Chinese light-fragrant liquor during solid-state or submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Y; Wu, Q; Xu, Y

    2017-04-01

    To explore the metabolic characteristic of autochthonous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in Chinese light-fragrant liquor fermentation. Inter-delta amplification analysis was used to differentiate the S. cerevisiae strains at strain level. Twelve biotypes (I-XII) were identified among the 72 S. cerevisiae strains preselected. A comparison was conducted between solid-state fermentation (SSF) and submerged fermentation (SmF) with S. cerevisiae strains had different genotype, with a focus on the production of ethanol and the volatile compounds. The degree of ethanol ranged from 28·0 to 45·2 g l -1 in SmF and from 14·8 to 25·6 g kg -1 in SSF, and SSF was found to be more suitable for the production of ethanol with higher yield coefficient of all the S. cerevisiae strains. The metabolite profiles of each yeast strain showed obvious distinction in the two fermentations. The highest amounts of ethyl acetate in SmF and SSF were found in genotype VII (328·2 μg l -1 ) and genotype V (672 μg kg -1 ), respectively. In addition, the generation of some volatile compounds could be strictly related to the strain used. Compound β-damascenone was only detected in genotypes I, II, X and XII in the two fermentation processes. Furthermore, laboratory scale fermentations were clearly divided into SSF and SmF in hierarchical cluster analysis regardless of the inoculated yeast strains, indicating that the mode of fermentation was more important than the yeast strains inoculated. The autochthonous S. cerevisiae strains in Chinese light-fragrant liquor vary considerably in terms of their volatiles profiles during SSF and SmF. This work facilitates a better understanding of the fermentative mechanism in the SSF process for light-fragrant liquor production. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Inhibitor tolerance of a recombinant flocculating industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain during glucose and xylose co-fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Cheng Li

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have negative effects on the ethanol fermentation capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, the effects of eight typical inhibitors, including weak acids, furans, and phenols, on glucose and xylose co-fermentation of the recombinant xylose-fermenting flocculating industrial S. cerevisiae strain NAPX37 were evaluated by batch fermentation. Inhibition on glucose fermentation, not that on xylose fermentation, correlated with delayed cell growth. The weak acids and the phenols showed additive effects. The effect of inhibitors on glucose fermentation was as follows (from strongest to weakest: vanillin > phenol > syringaldehyde > 5-HMF > furfural > levulinic acid > acetic acid > formic acid. The effect of inhibitors on xylose fermentation was as follows (from strongest to weakest: phenol > vanillin > syringaldehyde > furfural > 5-HMF > formic acid > levulinic acid > acetic acid. The NAPX37 strain showed substantial tolerance to typical inhibitors and showed good fermentation characteristics, when a medium with inhibitor cocktail or rape straw hydrolysate was used. This research provides important clues for inhibitors tolerance of recombinant industrial xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae.

  4. Menadione stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains deficient in the glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, F A V; Herdeiro, R S; Panek, A D; Eleutherio, E C A; Pereira, M D

    2007-02-01

    Using S. cerevisiae as a eukaryotic cell model we have analyzed the involvement of both glutathione transferase isoforms, Gtt1 and Gtt2, in constitutive resistance and adaptive response to menadione, a quinone which can exert its toxicity as redox cycling and/or electrophiles. The detoxification properties, of these enzymes, have also been analyzed by the appearance of S-conjugates in the media. Direct exposure to menadione (20 mM/60 min) showed to be lethal for cells deficient on both Gtt1 and Gtt2 isoforms. However, after pre-treatment with a low menadione concentration, cells deficient in Gtt2 displayed reduced ability to acquire tolerance when compared with the control and the Gtt1 deficient strains. Analyzing the toxic effects of menadione we observed that the gtt2 mutant showed no reduction in lipid peroxidation levels. Moreover, measuring the levels of intracellular oxidation during menadione stress we have shown that the increase of this oxidative stress parameter was due to the capacity menadione possesses in generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and that both GSH and Gtt2 isoform were required to enhance ROS production. Furthermore, the efflux of the menadione-GSH conjugate, which is related with detoxification of xenobiotic pathways, was not detected in the gtt2 mutant. Taken together, these results suggest that acquisition of tolerance against stress generated by menadione and the process of detoxification through S-conjugates are dependent upon Gtt2 activity. This assessment was corroborated by the increase of GTT2 expression, and not of GTT1, after menadione treatment.

  5. Engineering and two-stage evolution of a lignocellulosic hydrolysate-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for anaerobic fermentation of xylose from AFEX pretreated corn stover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas S Parreiras

    Full Text Available The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH. We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH.

  6. Laboratory Evolution of a Biotin-Requiring Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain for Full Biotin Prototrophy and Identification of Causal Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracher, Jasmine M; de Hulster, Erik; Koster, Charlotte C; van den Broek, Marcel; Daran, Jean-Marc G; van Maris, Antonius J A; Pronk, Jack T

    2017-08-15

    Biotin prototrophy is a rare, incompletely understood, and industrially relevant characteristic of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The genome of the haploid laboratory strain CEN.PK113-7D contains a full complement of biotin biosynthesis genes, but its growth in biotin-free synthetic medium is extremely slow (specific growth rate [μ] ≈ 0.01 h -1 ). Four independent evolution experiments in repeated batch cultures and accelerostats yielded strains whose growth rates (μ ≤ 0.36 h -1 ) in biotin-free and biotin-supplemented media were similar. Whole-genome resequencing of these evolved strains revealed up to 40-fold amplification of BIO1 , which encodes pimeloyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase. The additional copies of BIO1 were found on different chromosomes, and its amplification coincided with substantial chromosomal rearrangements. A key role of this gene amplification was confirmed by overexpression of BIO1 in strain CEN.PK113-7D, which enabled growth in biotin-free medium (μ = 0.15 h -1 ). Mutations in the membrane transporter genes TPO1 and/or PDR12 were found in several of the evolved strains. Deletion of TPO1 and PDR12 in a BIO1 -overexpressing strain increased its specific growth rate to 0.25 h -1 The effects of null mutations in these genes, which have not been previously associated with biotin metabolism, were nonadditive. This study demonstrates that S. cerevisiae strains that carry the basic genetic information for biotin synthesis can be evolved for full biotin prototrophy and identifies new targets for engineering biotin prototrophy into laboratory and industrial strains of this yeast. IMPORTANCE Although biotin (vitamin H) plays essential roles in all organisms, not all organisms can synthesize this vitamin. Many strains of baker's yeast, an important microorganism in industrial biotechnology, contain at least some of the genes required for biotin synthesis. However, most of these strains cannot synthesize biotin at all or do so at rates that are

  7. Comparing the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways in arabinose and xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethanolic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable option for the production of bioethanol. This process would greatly benefit from recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains also able to ferment, besides the hexose sugar fraction, the pentose sugars, arabinose and xylose. Different pathways can be introduced in S. cerevisiae to provide arabinose and xylose utilisation. In this study, the bacterial arabinose isomerase pathway was combined with two different xylose utilisation pathways: the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways, respectively, in genetically identical strains. The strains were compared with respect to aerobic growth in arabinose and xylose batch culture and in anaerobic batch fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose. Results The specific aerobic arabinose growth rate was identical, 0.03 h-1, for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase strain. The xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain displayed higher aerobic growth rate on xylose, 0.14 h-1, and higher specific xylose consumption rate in anaerobic batch fermentation, 0.09 g (g cells-1 h-1 than the xylose isomerase strain, which only reached 0.03 h-1 and 0.02 g (g cells-1h-1, respectively. Whereas the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain produced higher ethanol yield on total sugars, 0.23 g g-1 compared with 0.18 g g-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, the xylose isomerase strain achieved higher ethanol yield on consumed sugars, 0.41 g g-1 compared with 0.32 g g-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain. Anaerobic fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose resulted in higher final ethanol concentration, 14.7 g l-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain compared with 11.8 g l-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, and in higher specific ethanol productivity, 0.024 g (g cells-1 h-1 compared with 0.01 g (g cells-1 h-1

  8. Laboratory Evolution of a Biotin-Requiring Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain for Full Biotin Prototrophy and Identification of Causal Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hulster, Erik; Koster, Charlotte C.; van den Broek, Marcel; van Maris, Antonius J. A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biotin prototrophy is a rare, incompletely understood, and industrially relevant characteristic of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The genome of the haploid laboratory strain CEN.PK113-7D contains a full complement of biotin biosynthesis genes, but its growth in biotin-free synthetic medium is extremely slow (specific growth rate [μ] ≈ 0.01 h−1). Four independent evolution experiments in repeated batch cultures and accelerostats yielded strains whose growth rates (μ ≤ 0.36 h−1) in biotin-free and biotin-supplemented media were similar. Whole-genome resequencing of these evolved strains revealed up to 40-fold amplification of BIO1, which encodes pimeloyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase. The additional copies of BIO1 were found on different chromosomes, and its amplification coincided with substantial chromosomal rearrangements. A key role of this gene amplification was confirmed by overexpression of BIO1 in strain CEN.PK113-7D, which enabled growth in biotin-free medium (μ = 0.15 h−1). Mutations in the membrane transporter genes TPO1 and/or PDR12 were found in several of the evolved strains. Deletion of TPO1 and PDR12 in a BIO1-overexpressing strain increased its specific growth rate to 0.25 h−1. The effects of null mutations in these genes, which have not been previously associated with biotin metabolism, were nonadditive. This study demonstrates that S. cerevisiae strains that carry the basic genetic information for biotin synthesis can be evolved for full biotin prototrophy and identifies new targets for engineering biotin prototrophy into laboratory and industrial strains of this yeast. IMPORTANCE Although biotin (vitamin H) plays essential roles in all organisms, not all organisms can synthesize this vitamin. Many strains of baker's yeast, an important microorganism in industrial biotechnology, contain at least some of the genes required for biotin synthesis. However, most of these strains cannot synthesize biotin at all or do so at rates

  9. Fermentation of oat and soybean hull hydrolysates into ethanol and xylitol by recombinant industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under diverse oxygen environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we evaluated the capacity of recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae YRH 396 and YRH 400 strains to ferment sugars from oat hull and soybean hull hydrolysates into ethanol and xylitol. The strains were genetically modified by chromosomal integration of Pichia stipitis XYLI/XYL...

  10. Comparison of SHF and SSF processes from steam-exploded wheat straw for ethanol production by xylose-fermenting and robust glucose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas Pejo, Elia; Oliva, Jose M.; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2008-01-01

    In this study, bioethanol production from steam-exploded wheat straw using different process configurations was evaluated using two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, F12 and Red Star. The strain F12 has been engineerically modified to allow xylose consumption as cereal straw contain considerable ...

  11. Genome Sequences of Industrially Relevant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain M3707, Isolated from a Sample of Distillers Yeast and Four Haploid Derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Courtney M.; Clum, Alicia; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Sharma, Aditi; Zane, Matthew; Barry, Kerrie; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Davison, Brian H.; Lynd, Lee R.; Gilna, Paul; Hau, Heidi; Hogsett, David A.; Froehlich, Allan C.

    2013-04-19

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain M3707 was isolated from a sample of commercial distillers yeast, and its genome sequence together with the genome sequences for the four derived haploid strains M3836, M3837, M3838, and M3839 has been determined. Yeasts have potential for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) for biofuel production, and access to these genome sequences will facilitate their development.

  12. Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain Kagoshima No. 2, Used for Brewing the Japanese Distilled Spirit Shōchū.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kazuki; Kadooka, Chihiro; Masuda, Chika; Muto, Ai; Okutsu, Kayu; Yoshizaki, Yumiko; Takamine, Kazunori; Futagami, Taiki; Tamaki, Hisanori

    2017-10-12

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain Kagoshima no. 2, which is used for brewing shōchū, a traditional distilled spirit in Japan. The genome data will facilitate an understanding of the evolutional traits and genetic background related to the characteristic features of strain Kagoshima no. 2. Copyright © 2017 Mori et al.

  13. Evaluating the probiotic and therapeutic potentials of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain (OBS2) isolated from fermented nectar of toddy palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Banoth; Rani, Ganapathiwar Swarupa; Kumar, Bhukya Kiran; Chandrasekhar, Banoth; Krishna, Kommalapati Vamsi; Devi, Tangutur Anjana; Bhima, Bhukya

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the probiotic characteristics of 15 yeast strains isolated from nectar of toddy palm. Initially, the collected samples were inoculated on yeast extract peptone dextrose agar plates and the colonies so obtained were culturally and morphologically characterized. Commercial probiotic yeast, Saccharomyces boulardii served as the control in these experiments. Of the 15 yeast strains, the isolates that were resistant to antibiotics and worked synergistically with other cultures were considered for further evaluation. Selected isolates were evaluated in vitro for tolerance to simulated gastrointestinal conditions such as temperature, pH, bile and gastric juice. Further the yeast isolates were evaluated for their pathogenicity and adherence to intestinal epithelial cells. The 2 yeast isolates with efficient probiotic properties were finally characterized by sequencing their 5.8 S rRNA and partial sequences of internal transcribed spacer 1 and 2. The sequences were BLAST searched in the National Center for Biotechnology Information, nucleic acid database for sequence similarity of organisms and phylogenetic evolutionary analysis was carried out. Based on maximum similarity of basic local alignment search tool results, organisms were characterized as Pichia kudriavzevii OBS1 (100%) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae OBS2 (96%) and sequences were finally deposited in the GenBank data library. Among these two isolates, S. cerevisiae OBS2 displayed slight/moderate antioxidant and anticancer property. Hence, strain OBS2 can be utilized and explored as a potential probiotic for therapeutic applications.

  14. FLO11 gene length and transcriptional level affect biofilm-forming ability of wild flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Giacomo; Zara, Severino; Pinna, Claudia; Marceddu, Salvatore; Budroni, Marilena

    2009-12-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, FLO11 encodes an adhesin that is associated with different phenotypes, such as adherence to solid surfaces, hydrophobicity, mat and air-liquid biofilm formation. In the present study, we analysed FLO11 allelic polymorphisms and FLO11-associated phenotypes of 20 flor strains. We identified 13 alleles of different lengths, varying from 3.0 to 6.1 kb, thus demonstrating that FLO11 is highly polymorphic. Two alleles of 3.1 and 5.0 kb were cloned into strain BY4742 to compare the FLO11-associated phenotypes in the same genetic background. We show that there is a significant correlation between biofilm-forming ability and FLO11 length both in different and in the same genetic backgrounds. Moreover, we propose a multiple regression model that allows prediction of air-liquid biofilm-forming ability on the basis of transcription levels and lengths of FLO11 alleles in a population of S. cerevisiae flor strains. Considering that transcriptional differences are only partially explained by the differences in the promoter sequences, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that FLO11 transcription levels are strongly influenced by genetic background and affect biofilm-forming ability.

  15. An efficient xylose-fermenting recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain obtained through adaptive evolution and its global transcription profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yu; Chen, Xiao; Peng, Bingyin; Chen, Liyuan; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China). State Key Lab. of Microbial Technology

    2012-11-15

    Factors related to ethanol production from xylose in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae that contain an exogenous initial metabolic pathway are still to be elucidated. In the present study, a strain that expresses the xylose isomerase gene of Piromyces sp. Pi-xylA and overexpresses XKS1, RPE1, RKI1, TAL1, and TKL1, with deleted GRE3 and COX4 genes was constructed. The xylose utilization capacity of the respiratory deficiency strain was poor but improved via adaptive evolution in xylose. The {mu}{sub max} of the evolved strain in 20 gl{sup -1} xylose is 0.11 {+-} 0.00 h{sup -1}, and the evolved strain consumed 17.83 gl{sup -1} xylose within 72 h, with an ethanol yield of 0.43 gg{sup -1} total consumed sugars during glucose-xylose cofermentation. Global transcriptional changes and effect of several specific genes were studied. The result revealed that the increased xylose isomerase activity, the upregulation of enzymes involved in glycolysis and glutamate synthesis, and the downregulation of trehalose and glycogen synthesis, may have contributed to the improved xylose utilization of the strain. Furthermore, the deletion of PHO13 decreased the xylose growth in the respiration deficiency strain although deleting PHO13 can improve the xylose metabolism in other strains. (orig.)

  16. The effect of hexose ratios on metabolite production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains obtained from the spontaneous fermentation of mezcal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva Hernández, Amanda A; Taillandier, Patricia; Reséndez Pérez, Diana; Narváez Zapata, José A; Larralde Corona, Claudia Patricia

    2013-04-01

    Mezcal from Tamaulipas (México) is produced by spontaneous alcoholic fermentation using Agave spp. musts, which are rich in fructose. In this study eight Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates obtained at the final stage of fermentation from a traditional mezcal winery were analysed in three semi-synthetic media. Medium M1 had a sugar content of 100 g l(-1) and a glucose/fructose (G/F) of 9:1. Medium M2 had a sugar content of 100 g l(-1) and a G/F of 1:9. Medium M3 had a sugar content of 200 g l(-1) and a G/F of 1:1. In the three types of media tested, the highest ethanol yield was obtained from the glucophilic strain LCBG-3Y5, while strain LCBG-3Y8 was highly resistant to ethanol and the most fructophilic of the mezcal strains. Strain LCBG-3Y5 produced more glycerol (4.4 g l(-1)) and acetic acid (1 g l(-1)) in M2 than in M1 (1.7 and 0.5 g l(-1), respectively), and the ethanol yields were higher for all strains in M1 except for LCBG-3Y5, -3Y8 and the Fermichamp strain. In medium M3, only the Fermichamp strain was able to fully consume the 100 g of fructose l(-1) but left a residual 32 g of glucose l(-1). Regarding the hexose transporters, a high number of amino acid polymorphisms were found in the Hxt1p sequences. Strain LCBG-3Y8 exhibited eight unique amino acid changes, followed by the Fermichamp strain with three changes. In Hxt3p, we observed nine amino acid polymorphisms unique for the Fermichamp strain and five unique changes for the mezcal strains.

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae UE-ME3 is a good strain for isoproturon biorremediation?

    OpenAIRE

    Candeias, M; Alves-Pereira, I; Ferreira, R

    2010-01-01

    Isoproturon, an herbicide of pre- and pos-emergence of Autumn-Winter crops, persists occasionally in soil, groundwater and biological systems at levels above those established by European Directives. Saccharomyces cerevisiae UE-ME3 exposed in stationary phase to 50 and 100 mM isoproturon exhibit growth rates higher than control or exposed cells to 5 and 25 mM of this phenylurea. However, in S.cerevisiae UE-ME3 grown in the presence of 5 mM isoproturon, were observed a decrease of ...

  18. Induction of ploidy level increments in an asporogenous industrial strain of the yeast Saccaromyces cerevisiae by UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    Cells of an asporogenous industrial strain of the yeast Saccaromyces cerevisiae were irradiated with UV light by using a method that was developed previously. This treatment gave rise to large-cell clones among the surviving cells, from which colonies consisting of cells with a normal morphology and a prototropic property were obtained. The large-cell trait of these was stably inheritable, with the cell volumes being about twice that of the parent for 7 years on a slant agar medium at 4C with repeated transfers. The cellular DNA content of these clones, in comparison to those of two authentic haploid strains, was determined by chemical analysis. The ratio of the DNA contents showed that the parent and its large-cell derivatives were a diploid and tetraploids, respectively. No abnormality was found in the chromosomal DNA patterns of the large-cell clones, at least as determined by agarose gel electrophoresis with a CHEF-DR II pulsed-field electrophoresis system. These findings led to the conclusion that the UV light method is applicable for inducing ploidy level increments in the widely used yeast species S. cerevisiae

  19. High hydrostatic pressure activates gene expression that leads to ethanol production enhancement in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae distillery strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravim, Fernanda; Lippman, Soyeon I.; da Silva, Lucas F.; Souza, Diego T.; Fernandes, A. Alberto R.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Broach, James R.

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) is a stress that exerts broad effects on microorganisms with characteristics similar to those of common environmental stresses. In this study, we aimed to identify genetic mechanisms that can enhance alcoholic fermentation of wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from Brazilian spirit fermentation vats. Accordingly, we performed a time course microarray analysis on a S. cerevisiae strain submitted to mild sublethal pressure treatment of 50 MPa for 30 min at room temperature, followed by incubation for 5, 10 and 15 min without pressure treatment. The obtained transcriptional profiles demonstrate the importance of post-pressurisation period on the activation of several genes related to cell recovery and stress tolerance. Based on these results, we over-expressed genes strongly induced by HHP in the same wild yeast strain and identified genes, particularly SYM1, whose over-expression results in enhanced ethanol production and stress tolerance upon fermentation. The present study validates the use of HHP as a biotechnological tool for the fermentative industries. PMID:22915193

  20. Improved ethanol production at high temperature by consolidated bioprocessing using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain engineered with artificial zinc finger protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, M Mahfuza; Yu, Xinshui; Kondo, Akihiko; Bai, Fengwu; Zhao, Xinqing

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae MNII/cocδBEC3 was transformed by an artificial zinc finger protein (AZFP) library to improve its thermal tolerance, and the strain MNII-AZFP with superior growth at 42°C was selected. Improved degradation of acid swollen cellulose by 45.9% led to an increase in ethanol production, when compared to the control strain. Moreover, the fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke stalk (JAS) by MNII-AZFP was shortened by 12h at 42°C with a concomitant improvement in ethanol production. Comparative transcriptomics analysis suggested that the AZFP in the mutant exerted beneficial effect by modulating the expression of multiple functional genes. These results provide a feasible strategy for efficient ethanol production from JAS and other cellulosic biomass through CBP based-fermentation at elevated temperatures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Differing effects of 2 active dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strains on ruminal acidosis and methane production in nonlactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Y-H; Walker, N D; McGinn, S M; Beauchemin, K A

    2011-05-01

    Fifteen ruminally cannulated, nonlactating Holstein cows were used to measure the effects of 2 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fed as active dried yeasts, on ruminal pH and fermentation and enteric methane (CH(4)) emissions. Nonlactating cows were blocked by total duration (h) that their ruminal pH was below 5.8 during a 6-d pre-experimental period. Within each block, cows were randomly assigned to control (no yeast), yeast strain 1 (Levucell SC), or yeast strain 2 (a novel strain selected for enhanced in vitro fiber degradation), with both strains (Lallemand Animal Nutrition, Montréal, QC, Canada) providing 1 × 10(10) cfu/head per day. Cows were fed once daily a total mixed ration consisting of a 50:50 forage to concentrate ratio (dry matter basis). The yeast strains were dosed via the rumen cannula daily at the time of feeding. During the 35-d experiment, ruminal pH was measured continuously for 7 d (d 22 to 28) by using an indwelling system, and CH(4) gas was measured for 4 d (d 32 to 35) using the sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas technique (with halters and yokes). Rumen contents were sampled on 2 d (d 22 and 26) at 0, 3, and 6h after feeding. Dry matter intake, body weight, and apparent total-tract digestibility of nutrients were not affected by yeast feeding. Strain 2 decreased the average daily minimum (5.35 vs. 5.65 or 5.66), mean (5.98 vs. 6.24 or 6.34), and maximum ruminal pH (6.71 vs. 6.86 or 6.86), and prolonged the time that ruminal pH was below 5.8 (7.5 vs. 3.3 or 1.0 h/d) compared with the control or strain 1, respectively. The molar percentage of acetate was lower and that of propionate was greater in the ruminal fluid of cows receiving strain 2 compared with cows receiving no yeast or strain 1. Enteric CH(4) production adjusted for intake of dry matter or gross energy, however, did not differ between either yeast strain compared with the control but it tended to be reduced by 10% when strain 2 was compared with strain 1. The study shows that

  2. Gene expression cross-profiling in genetically modified industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during high-temperature ethanol production from xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ku Syahidah Ku; Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Hatanaka, Haruyo; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2013-01-10

    Production of ethanol from xylose at high temperature would be an economical approach since it reduces risk of contamination and allows both the saccharification and fermentation steps in SSF to be running at elevated temperature. Eight recombinant xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains developed from industrial strains were constructed and subjected to high-temperature fermentation at 38 °C. The best performing strain was sun049T, which produced up to 15.2 g/L ethanol (63% of the theoretical production), followed by sun048T and sun588T, both with 14.1 g/L ethanol produced. Via transcriptomic analysis, expression profiling of the top three best ethanol producing strains compared to a negative control strain, sun473T, led to the discovery of genes in common that were regulated in the same direction. Identification of the 20 most highly up-regulated and the 20 most highly down-regulated genes indicated that the cells regulate their central metabolism and maintain the integrity of the cell walls in response to high temperature. We also speculate that cross-protection in the cells occurs, allowing them to maintain ethanol production at higher concentration under heat stress than the negative controls. This report provides further transcriptomics information in the interest of producing a robust microorganism for high-temperature ethanol production utilizing xylose. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Truncation of Gal4p explains the inactivation of the GAL/MEL regulon in both Saccharomyces bayanus and some Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulermo, Rémi; Legras, Jean-Luc; Brunel, François; Devillers, Hugo; Sarilar, Véronique; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Nguyen, Huu-Vang

    2016-09-01

    In the past, the galactose-negative (Gal(-)) phenotype was a key physiological character used to distinguish Saccharomyces bayanus from S. cerevisiae In this work, we investigated the inactivation of GAL gene networks in S. bayanus, which is an S. uvarum/S. eubayanus hybrid, and in S. cerevisiae wine strains erroneously labelled 'S. bayanus'. We made an inventory of their GAL genes using genomes that were either available publicly, re-sequenced by us, or assembled from public data and completed with targeted sequencing. In the S. eubayanus/S. uvarum CBS 380(T) hybrid, the GAL/MEL network is composed of genes from both parents: from S. uvarum, an otherwise complete set that lacks GAL4, and from S. eubayanus, a truncated version of GAL4 and an additional copy of GAL3 and GAL80 Similarly, two different truncated GAL4 alleles were found in S. cerevisiae wine strains EC1118 and LalvinQA23. The lack of GAL4 activity in these strains was corrected by introducing a full-length copy of S. cerevisiae GAL4 on a CEN4/ARS plasmid. Transformation with this plasmid restored galactose utilisation in Gal(-) strains, and melibiose fermentation in strain CBS 380(T) The melibiose fermentation phenotype, formerly regarded as characteristic of S. uvarum, turned out to be widespread among Saccharomyces species. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Yield improvement of heterologous peptides expressed in yps1-disrupted Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egel-Mitani; Andersen; Diers; Hach; Thim; Hastrup; Vad

    2000-06-01

    Heterologous protein expression levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentations are highly dependent on the susceptibility to endogenous yeast proteases. Small peptides, such as glucagon and glucagon-like-peptides (GLP-1 and GLP-2), featuring an open structure are particularly accessible for proteolytic degradation during fermentation. Therefore, homogeneous products cannot be obtained. The most sensitive residues are found at basic amino acid residues in the peptide sequence. These heterologous peptides are degraded mainly by the YPS1-encoded aspartic protease, yapsin1, when produced in the yeast. In this article, distinct degradation products were analyzed by HPLC and mass spectrometry, and high yield of the heterologous peptide production has been achieved by the disruption of the YPS1 gene (previously called YAP3). By this technique, high yield continuous fermentation of glucagon in S. cerevisiae is now possible.

  5. Relationship between solute permeability and osmotic remediability in a galactose-negative strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassel, J; Douglas, H C

    1970-11-01

    An osmotic remedial allele, gal 7-1, in the galactose pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to either penetrating (ethylene glycol and diethylene glycol) or nonpenetrating (KCl, NaCl, and sorbitol) solutes in the growth medium. Extracts from cells grown under restrictive conditions gave no increase in enzyme activity (gal-1-phosphate, uridylyl transferase) when exposed to the penetrating solutes; thus protein synthesis or possibly polymer assembly is proposed as the critical step remedied by the addition of the solutes.

  6. Improving the productivity of S-adenosyl-l-methionine by metabolic engineering in an industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weijun; Hang, Baojian; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Wang, Ri; Shen, Minjie; Huang, Lei; Xu, Zhinan

    2016-10-20

    S-Adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) is an important metabolite having prominent roles in treating various diseases. In order to improve the production of SAM, the regulation of three metabolic pathways involved in SAM biosynthesis were investigated in an industrial yeast strain ZJU001. GLC3 encoded glycogen-branching enzyme (GBE), SPE2 encoded SAM decarboxylase, as well as ERG4 and ERG6 encoded key enzymes in ergosterol biosynthesis, were knocked out in ZJU001 accordingly. The results indicated that blocking of either glycogen pathway or SAM decarboxylation pathway could improve the SAM accumulation significantly in ZJU001, while single disruption of either ERG4 or ERG6 gene had no obvious effect on SAM production. Moreover, the double mutant ZJU001-GS with deletion of both GLC3 and SPE2 genes was also constructed, which showed further improvement of SAM accumulation. Finally, SAM2 was overexpressed in ZJU001-GS to give the best SAM-producing recombinant strain ZJU001-GS-SAM2, in which 12.47g/L SAM was produced by following our developed pseudo-exponential fed-batch cultivation strategy, about 81.0% increase comparing to its parent strain ZJU001. The present work laid a solid base for large-scale SAM production with the industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification by phenotypic and genetic approaches of an indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strain with high desiccation tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambuto, Marianna; Romaniello, Rossana; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Romano, Patrizia; Votta, Sonia; Capece, Angela

    2017-10-01

    During active dry yeast (ADY) production process, cells are exposed to multiple stresses, such as thermal, oxidative and hyperosmotic shock. Previously, by analysing cells in exponential growth phase, we selected an indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strain, namely CD-6Sc, for its higher tolerance to desiccation and higher expression of specific desiccation stress-related genes in comparison to other yeast strains. In this study, we performed a desiccation treatment on stationary phase cells by comparing the efficacy of two different methods: a 'laboratory dry test' on a small scale (mild stress) and a treatment by spray-drying (severe stress), one of the most appropriate preservation method for yeasts and other micro-organisms. The expression of selected desiccation-related genes has been also assessed in order to validate predictive markers for desiccation tolerance. Our data demonstrate that the 'mild' and the 'severe' desiccation treatments give similar results in terms of cell recovery, but the choice of marker genes strictly depends on the growth phase in which cells undergo desiccation. The indigenous CD-6Sc was ultimately identified as a high dehydration stress-tolerant indigenous strain suitable for ADY production. This study highlights the exploitation of natural yeast biodiversity as a source of hidden technological features and as an alternative approach to strain improvement by genetic modifications. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Genetic engineering of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains using a selection/counter-selection approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyna, Dariusz R; Cordente, Antonio G; Varela, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Gene modification of laboratory yeast strains is currently a very straightforward task thanks to the availability of the entire yeast genome sequence and the high frequency with which yeast can incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome. Unfortunately, laboratory strains do not perform well in industrial settings, indicating the need for strategies to modify industrial strains to enable strain development for industrial applications. Here we describe approaches we have used to genetically modify industrial strains used in winemaking.

  9. Evolutionary engineering of a glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-negative, acetate-reducing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain enables anaerobic growth at high glucose concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadalupe-Medina, Víctor; Metz, Benjamin; Oud, Bart; van Der Graaf, Charlotte M; Mans, Robert; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2014-01-01

    Glycerol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is required for redox-cofactor balancing in anaerobic cultures, causes yield reduction in industrial bioethanol production. Recently, glycerol formation in anaerobic S. cerevisiae cultures was eliminated by expressing Escherichia coli (acetylating) acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (encoded by mhpF) and simultaneously deleting the GPD1 and GPD2 genes encoding glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, thus coupling NADH reoxidation to reduction of acetate to ethanol. Gpd– strains are, however, sensitive to high sugar concentrations, which complicates industrial implementation of this metabolic engineering concept. In this study, laboratory evolution was used to improve osmotolerance of a Gpd– mhpF-expressing S. cerevisiae strain. Serial batch cultivation at increasing osmotic pressure enabled isolation of an evolved strain that grew anaerobically at 1 M glucose, at a specific growth rate of 0.12 h−1. The evolved strain produced glycerol at low concentrations (0.64 ± 0.33 g l−1). However, these glycerol concentrations were below 10% of those observed with a Gpd+ reference strain. Consequently, the ethanol yield on sugar increased from 79% of the theoretical maximum in the reference strain to 92% for the evolved strains. Genetic analysis indicated that osmotolerance under aerobic conditions required a single dominant chromosomal mutation, and one further mutation in the plasmid-borne mhpF gene for anaerobic growth. PMID:24004455

  10. Effect of 905 MHz microwave radiation on colony growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains FF18733, FF1481 and D7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrhovac, Ivana; Hrascan, Reno; Franekic, Jasna

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of weak radiofrequency microwave (RF/MW) radiation emitted by mobile phones on colony growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae strains FF18733 (wild-type), FF1481 (rad1 mutant) and D7 (commonly used to detect reciprocal and nonreciprocal mitotic recombinations) were exposed to a 905 MHz electromagnetic field that closely matched the Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) pulse modulation signals for mobile phones at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.12 W/kg. Following 15-, 30- and 60-minutes exposure to RF/MW radiation, strain FF18733 did not show statistically significant changes in colony growth compared to the control sample. The irradiated strains FF1481 and D7 demonstrated statistically significant reduction of colony growth compared to non-irradiated strains after all exposure times. Furthermore, strain FF1481 was more sensitive to RF/MW radiation than strain D7. The findings indicate that pulsed RF/MW radiation at a low SAR level can affect the rate of colony growth of different S. cerevisiae strains

  11. Effects of feedstock and co-culture of Lactobacillus fermentum and wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain during fuel ethanol fermentation by the industrial yeast strain PE-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Vanda R; Bassi, Ana Paula G; Cerri, Bianca C; Almeida, Amanda R; Carvalho, Isis G B; Bastos, Reinaldo G; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra R

    2018-02-16

    Even though contamination by bacteria and wild yeasts are frequently observed during fuel ethanol fermentation, our knowledge regarding the effects of both contaminants together is very limited, especially considering that the must composition can vary from exclusively sugarcane juice to a mixture of molasses and juice, affecting the microbial development. Here we studied the effects of the feedstock (sugarcane juice and molasses) and the co-culture of Lactobacillus fermentum and a wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain (rough colony and pseudohyphae) in single and multiple-batch fermentation trials with an industrial strain of S. cerevisiae (PE-2) as starter yeast. The results indicate that in multiple-cycle batch system, the feedstock had a minor impact on the fermentation than in single-cycle batch system, however the rough yeast contamination was more harmful than the bacterial contamination in multiple-cycle batch fermentation. The inoculation of both contaminants did not potentiate the detrimental effect in any substrate. The residual sugar concentration in the fermented broth had a higher concentration of fructose than glucose for all fermentations, but in the presence of the rough yeast, the discrepancy between fructose and glucose concentrations were markedly higher, especially in molasses. The biggest problem associated with incomplete fermentation seemed to be the lower consumption rate of sugar and the reduced fructose preference of the rough yeast rather than the lower invertase activity. Lower ethanol production, acetate production and higher residual sugar concentration are characteristics strongly associated with the rough yeast strain and they were not potentiated with the inoculation of L. fermentum.

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCMI 885 secretes peptides that inhibit the growth of some non-Saccharomyces wine-related strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albergaria, Helena; Francisco, Diana; Gori, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    of mixed supernatants towards H. guilliermondii was inactivated by protease treatments, thus revealing the proteinaceous nature of the toxic compounds. Analysis of the protein pattern of mixed supernatants on Tricine SDS-PAGE showed that this S. cerevisiae strain secretes peptides (

  13. Growth of catalase A and catalase T deficient mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ethanol and oleic acid : Growth profiles and catalase activities in relation to microbody proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, Ida J. van der; Rytka, Joanna; Kunau, Wolf H.; Veenhuis, Marten

    The parental strain (A+T+) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mutants, deficient in catalase T (A+T-), catalase A (A-T+) or both catalases (A-T-), grew on ethanol and oleic acid with comparable doubling times. Specific activities of catalase were low in glucose- and ethanol-grown cells. In the two

  14. FLO11 expression and lipid biosynthesis are required for air-liquid biofilm formation in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Giacomo; Goffrini, Paola; Lodi, Tiziana; Zara, Severino; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Budroni, Marilena

    2012-11-01

    Air-liquid biofilm formation is largely dependent on Flo11p and seems related to cell lipid content and composition. Here, it is shown that in the presence of cerulenin, a known inhibitor of the fatty acid synthase complex, biofilm formation is inhibited together with FLO11 transcription in a flor strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while the administration of saturated fatty acids to cerulenin-containing medium restores biofilm formation and FLO11 transcription. It is also shown that, in biofilm cells, the FLO11 transcription is accompanied by the transcription of ACC1, ACS1 and INO1 key genes in lipid biosynthesis and that biofilm formation is affected by the lack of inositol in flor medium. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that the air-liquid biofilm formation depends on FLO11 transcription levels as well as on fatty acids biosynthesis. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mitotic chromosome loss in a radiation-sensitive strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimer, R.K.; Contopoulou, R.; Schild, D.

    1981-01-01

    Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with mutations in the RAD52 gene have previously been shown to be defective in meiotic and mitotic recombination, in sporulation, and in repair of radiation-induced damage to DNA. In this study we show that diploid cells homozygous for rad52 lose chromosomes at high frequencies and that these frequencies of loss can be increased dramatically by exposure of these cells to x-rays. Genetic analyses of survivors of x-ray treatment demonstrate that chromosome loss events result in the conversion of diploid cells to cells with near haploid chromosome numbers

  16. Growth of catalase A and catalase T deficient mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ethanol and oleic acid: Growth profiles and catalase activities in relation to microbody proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Klei, Ida J. van der; Rytka, Joanna; Kunau, Wolf H.; Veenhuis, Marten

    1990-01-01

    The parental strain (A+T+) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mutants, deficient in catalase T (A+T-), catalase A (A-T+) or both catalases (A-T-), grew on ethanol and oleic acid with comparable doubling times. Specific activities of catalase were low in glucose- and ethanol-grown cells. In the two oleic acid-grown A+-strains (A+T+ and A+T-) high catalase activities were found; catalase activity invariably remained low in the A-T+ strain and was never detected in the A-T- strain. The levels of β-...

  17. Influence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains on General Composition and Sensorial Properties of White Wines Made from Vitis vinifera cv. Albariño

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Vilanova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Yeast strains contribute to the oenological and sensorial characteristics of the wines they produce. The present study was performed to determine the influence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains on the composition and sensorial properties of Albariño wine. The must obtained from Albariño grapes was inoculated with 12 different yeast strains isolated from a single winery in Galicia, Spain. Chemical and sensorial analyses were performed on the final wines, which differed depending on the yeast strain used.

  18. Yeast Autolysis in Sparkling Wine Aging: Use of Killer and Sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains in Co-Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Silvia Jane; De Leonardis, Antonella; Lustrato, Giuseppe; Testa, Bruno; Iorizzo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Sparkling wines produced by traditional method owe their characteristics to secondary fermentation and maturation that occur during a slow ageing in bottles. Yeast autolysis plays an important role during the sparkling wine aging. Using a combination of killer and sensitive yeasts is possible to accelerate yeast autolysis and reduce maturing time. killer and sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, separately and in co-cultures, were inoculated in base wine and bottled on pilot-plant scale. Commercial Saccaromyces bayanus strain was also investigated. Protein free amino acid and polysaccharides contents and sensory analysis were determined on the wine samples at 3, 6 and 9 months of aging. Yeast autolysis that occurs during the production of sparkling wines, obtained with co-cultures of killer and sensitive strains, has influenced free amino acids, total protein and polysaccharides content after 3 months aging time: sparkling wines, produced without the use of these yeasts, have reached the same results only after 9 months aging time. These results demonstrate that killer and sensitive yeasts in co-culture can accelerate the onset of autolysis in enological conditions, and has a positive effect on the quality of the aroma and flavor of sparkling wine. This paper offers an interesting biotechnological method to reduce production time of sparkling wine with economical benefits for the producers. We revised all patents relating to sparkling wine considering only those of interest for our study.

  19. Robust cellulosic ethanol production from SPORL-pretreated lodgepole pine using an adapted strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae without detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, S; Luo, X L; Yang, X S; Zhu, J Y

    2010-11-01

    This study reports an ethanol yield of 270L/ton wood from lodgepole pine pretreated with sulfite pretreatment to overcome recalcitrance of lignocellulose (SPORL) using an adapted strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y5, without detoxification. The enzymatic hydrolysate produced from pretreated cellulosic solids substrate was combined with pretreatment hydrolysate before fermentation. Detoxification of the pretreatment hydrolysate using overliming or XAD-4 resin before being combined with enzymatic hydrolysate improved ethanol productivity in the first 4h of fermentation and overall fermentation efficiency. However, detoxification did not improve final ethanol yield because of sugar losses. The Y5 strain showed excellent ethanol productivities of 2.0 and 0.8g/L/h averaged over a period of 4 and 24h, respectively, in the undetoxified run. The furan metabolization rates of the Y5 strain were significantly higher for the undetoxified run than those for the detoxidfied runs, suggesting it can tolerate even higher furan concentrations than those studied. Preliminary mass and energy balances were conducted. SPORL produced an excellent monomeric sugar recovery value of about 85% theoretical and a net energy output of 4.05GJ/ton wood with an ethanol energy production efficiency of 178% before distillation.

  20. Geographical markers for Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with similar technological origins domesticated for rice-based ethnic fermented beverages production in North East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyaram, Kumaraswamy; Tamang, Jyoti Prakash; Capece, Angela; Romano, Patrizia

    2011-11-01

    Autochthonous strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from traditional starters used for the production of rice-based ethnic fermented beverage in North East India were examined for their genetic polymorphism using mitochondrial DNA-RFLP and electrophoretic karyotyping. Mitochondrial DNA-RFLP analysis of S. cerevisiae strains with similar technological origins from hamei starter of Manipur and marcha starter of Sikkim revealed widely separated clusters based on their geographical origin. Electrophoretic karyotyping showed high polymorphism amongst the hamei strains within similar mitochondrial DNA-RFLP cluster and one unique karyotype of marcha strain was widely distributed in the Sikkim-Himalayan region. We conceptualized the possibility of separate domestication events for hamei strains in Manipur (located in the Indo-Burma biodiversity hotspot) and marcha strains in Sikkim (located in Himalayan biodiversity hotspot), as a consequence of less homogeneity in the genomic structure between these two groups, their clear separation being based on geographical origin, but not on technological origin and low strain level diversity within each group. The molecular markers developed based on HinfI-mtDNA-RFLP profile and the chromosomal doublets in chromosome VIII position of Sikkim-Himalayan strains could be effectively used as geographical markers for authenticating the above starter strains and differentiating them from other commercial strains.

  1. Use of Torulaspora delbrueckii Co-fermentation With Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains With Different Aromatic Characteristic to Improve the Diversity of Red Wine Aroma Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo-Qin; Luan, Yu; Duan, Chang-Qing; Yan, Guo-Liang

    2018-01-01

    The use of selected Saccharomyces and non- Saccharomyces strains as mixed starters has advantages over pure fermentation due to achieving wine products with distinctive and diversified aroma expected by consumers. To obtain a way to improve the aroma diversity and increase the differentiation of wine product, in this study, the aromatic effect of multi-culture of indigenous Torulaspora delbrueckii ( TD 12), simultaneous and sequential inoculation with two Saccharomyces strains (indigenous icewine yeast SC 45 and commercial yeast BDX) with different enological characteristics were investigated in laboratory-scale 20 L fermenter, respectively. The results showed that T. delbrueckii co-fermented with different S. cerevisiae strain could generate diversified physicochemical and aromatic quality of wine as evidenced by PCA. Mixed fermentation of SC 45/ TD 12 produced higher contents of higher alcohol (3-methyl-1-pentanol and phenylethyl alcohol), ethyl esters (ethyl decanoate and ethyl butanoate), terpenes and phenylacetaldehyde with less fatty acids (hexanoic acid, octanoic acid) and acetic acid, while BDX/ TD 12 generated more C 6 alcohol (1-hexanol) and acetate esters (ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate). Compared to simultaneous inoculation, sequential inoculation could achieve higher aroma diversity, and generate higher intensity of fruity, flowery and sweet attributes of wine as assessed by calculating the odor activity values. The different S. cerevisiae strain and inoculation method in alcoholic fermentation could further influence the formations of aromatic compounds in malolactic fermentation. Our results highlighted the importance of S. cerevisiae strain in shaping the aromatic quality of wine in mixed fermentation, and also suggested that using different S. cerevisiae strains with distinct aromatic characteristics co-fermentation with specific non- Saccharomyces strain is a potential way to increase the aromatic diversity and quality of wine product, which

  2. Use of Torulaspora delbrueckii Co-fermentation With Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains With Different Aromatic Characteristic to Improve the Diversity of Red Wine Aroma Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Qin Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of selected Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces strains as mixed starters has advantages over pure fermentation due to achieving wine products with distinctive and diversified aroma expected by consumers. To obtain a way to improve the aroma diversity and increase the differentiation of wine product, in this study, the aromatic effect of multi-culture of indigenous Torulaspora delbrueckii (TD12, simultaneous and sequential inoculation with two Saccharomyces strains (indigenous icewine yeast SC45 and commercial yeast BDX with different enological characteristics were investigated in laboratory-scale 20 L fermenter, respectively. The results showed that T. delbrueckii co-fermented with different S. cerevisiae strain could generate diversified physicochemical and aromatic quality of wine as evidenced by PCA. Mixed fermentation of SC45/TD12 produced higher contents of higher alcohol (3-methyl-1-pentanol and phenylethyl alcohol, ethyl esters (ethyl decanoate and ethyl butanoate, terpenes and phenylacetaldehyde with less fatty acids (hexanoic acid, octanoic acid and acetic acid, while BDX/TD12 generated more C6 alcohol (1-hexanol and acetate esters (ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate. Compared to simultaneous inoculation, sequential inoculation could achieve higher aroma diversity, and generate higher intensity of fruity, flowery and sweet attributes of wine as assessed by calculating the odor activity values. The different S. cerevisiae strain and inoculation method in alcoholic fermentation could further influence the formations of aromatic compounds in malolactic fermentation. Our results highlighted the importance of S. cerevisiae strain in shaping the aromatic quality of wine in mixed fermentation, and also suggested that using different S. cerevisiae strains with distinct aromatic characteristics co-fermentation with specific non-Saccharomyces strain is a potential way to increase the aromatic diversity and quality of wine product, which

  3. Use of Torulaspora delbrueckii Co-fermentation With Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains With Different Aromatic Characteristic to Improve the Diversity of Red Wine Aroma Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo-Qin; Luan, Yu; Duan, Chang-Qing; Yan, Guo-Liang

    2018-01-01

    The use of selected Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces strains as mixed starters has advantages over pure fermentation due to achieving wine products with distinctive and diversified aroma expected by consumers. To obtain a way to improve the aroma diversity and increase the differentiation of wine product, in this study, the aromatic effect of multi-culture of indigenous Torulaspora delbrueckii (TD12), simultaneous and sequential inoculation with two Saccharomyces strains (indigenous icewine yeast SC45 and commercial yeast BDX) with different enological characteristics were investigated in laboratory-scale 20 L fermenter, respectively. The results showed that T. delbrueckii co-fermented with different S. cerevisiae strain could generate diversified physicochemical and aromatic quality of wine as evidenced by PCA. Mixed fermentation of SC45/TD12 produced higher contents of higher alcohol (3-methyl-1-pentanol and phenylethyl alcohol), ethyl esters (ethyl decanoate and ethyl butanoate), terpenes and phenylacetaldehyde with less fatty acids (hexanoic acid, octanoic acid) and acetic acid, while BDX/TD12 generated more C6 alcohol (1-hexanol) and acetate esters (ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate). Compared to simultaneous inoculation, sequential inoculation could achieve higher aroma diversity, and generate higher intensity of fruity, flowery and sweet attributes of wine as assessed by calculating the odor activity values. The different S. cerevisiae strain and inoculation method in alcoholic fermentation could further influence the formations of aromatic compounds in malolactic fermentation. Our results highlighted the importance of S. cerevisiae strain in shaping the aromatic quality of wine in mixed fermentation, and also suggested that using different S. cerevisiae strains with distinct aromatic characteristics co-fermentation with specific non-Saccharomyces strain is a potential way to increase the aromatic diversity and quality of wine product, which could provide

  4. INHIBITION OF THE GROWTH OF TOLERANT YEAST Saccharomyces cerevisiae STRAIN I136 BY A MIXTURE OF SYNTHETIC INHIBITORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eny Ida Riyanti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomass from lignocellulosic wastes is a potential source for biobased products.  However, one of the constraints in utilization of biomass hydrolysate is the presence of inhibitors. Therefore, the use of inhibitor-tolerant microorganisms in the fermentation is required. The study aimed to investigate the effect of a mixture of inhibitors on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain I136 grown in medium containing synthetic inhibitors (acetic acid, formic acid, furfural, 5-hydroxymethyl furfural/5-HMF, and levulinic acid in four different concentrations with a mixture of carbon sources, glucose  (50 g.l-1 and xylose (50 g.l-1 at 30oC. The parameters related to growth and fermentation products were observed. Results showed that the strain was able to grow in media containing natural inhibitors (BSL medium with µmax of 0.020/h. Higher level of synthetic inhibitors prolonged the lag phase, decreased the cell biomass and ethanol production, and specific growth rate. The strain could detoxify furfural and 5-HMF and produced the highest ethanol (Y(p/s of 0.32 g.g-1 when grown in BSL. Glucose was utilized as its level decreased in a result of increase in cell biomass, in contrast to xylose which was not consumed. The highest cell biomass was produced in YNB with Y (x/s value of 0.25 g.g-1. The strain produced acetic acid as a dominant side product and could convert furfural into a less toxic compound, hydroxyl furfural. This robust tolerant strain provides basic information on resistance mechanism and would be useful for bio-based cell factory using lignocellulosic materials. 

  5. Novel starters for old processes: use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdough for craft beer production at a brewery scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marongiu, Antonella; Zara, Giacomo; Legras, Jean-Luc; Del Caro, Alessandra; Mascia, Ilaria; Fadda, Costantino; Budroni, Marilena

    2015-01-01

    The deliberate inoculation of yeast strains isolated from food matrices such as wine or bread, could allow the transfer of novel properties to beer. In this work, the feasibility of the use of baker's yeast strains as starters for craft beer production has been evaluated at laboratory and brewery scale. Nine out of 12 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdoughs metabolized 2 % maltose, glucose and trehalose and showed growth rates and cell populations higher than those of the brewer's strain Safbrew-S33. Analysis of allelic variation at 12 microsatellite loci clustered seven baker's strains and Safbrew-S33 in the main group of bread isolates. Chemical analyses of beers produced at a brewery scale showed significant differences among the beers produced with the baker's strain S38 or Safbrew-S33, while no significant differences were observed when S38 or the brewer's strain Safbrew-F2 was used for re-fermentation. The sensory profile of beers obtained with S38 or the brewer's yeasts did not show significant differences, thus suggesting that baker's strains of S. cerevisiae could represent a reservoir of biodiversity for the selection of starter strains for craft beer production.

  6. Benchmarking two commonly used Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for heterologous vanillin-β-glucoside production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strucko, Tomas; Magdenoska, Olivera; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2015-01-01

    factories for production of specific compounds. To examine this possibility, we have reconstructed a de novo vanillin-β-glucoside pathway in an identical manner in S288c and CEN.PK strains. Characterization of the two resulting strains in two standard conditions revealed that the S288c background strain...... produced up to 10-fold higher amounts of vanillin-β-glucoside compared to CEN.PK. This study demonstrates that yeast strain background may play a major role in the outcome of newly developed cell factories for production of a given product....

  7. Glucose and maltose metabolism in MIG1-disrupted and MAL-constitutive strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Christopher; Olsson, Lisbeth; Rønnow, B

    1997-01-01

    in a mixed glucose-maltose medium revealed that the MAL-constitutive strains were more alleviated than the single MIG1-disrupted transformant. While all transformants exhibited higher maximum specific growth rates (0.24-0.25 h(-1)) in glucose-maltose mixtures than the wild type strain (0.20 h(-1)), the MAL-constitutive...

  8. Engineering industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for xylose fermentation and comparison for switchgrass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccharomyces physiology and fermentation related properties vary broadly among industrial strains. In this study, six industrial strains of varied genetic background were engineered to ferment xylose. Aerobic growth rates on xylose were 0.040 h**-1 to 0.167 h**-1. Fermentation of xylose, glucose/xy...

  9. Exploring grape marc as trove for new thermotolerant and inhibitor-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for second-generation bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, Lorenzo; Basaglia, Marina; Trento, Alberto; Van Rensburg, Eugéne; García-Aparicio, Maria; Van Zyl, Willem H; Casella, Sergio

    2013-11-29

    Robust yeasts with high inhibitor, temperature, and osmotic tolerance remain a crucial requirement for the sustainable production of lignocellulosic bioethanol. These stress factors are known to severely hinder culture growth and fermentation performance. Grape marc was selected as an extreme environment to search for innately robust yeasts because of its limited nutrients, exposure to solar radiation, temperature fluctuations, weak acid and ethanol content. Forty newly isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains gave high ethanol yields at 40°C when inoculated in minimal media at high sugar concentrations of up to 200 g/l glucose. In addition, the isolates displayed distinct inhibitor tolerance in defined broth supplemented with increasing levels of single inhibitors or with a cocktail containing several inhibitory compounds. Both the fermentation ability and inhibitor resistance of these strains were greater than those of established industrial and commercial S. cerevisiae yeasts used as control strains in this study. Liquor from steam-pretreated sugarcane bagasse was used as a key selective condition during the isolation of robust yeasts for industrial ethanol production, thus simulating the industrial environment. The isolate Fm17 produced the highest ethanol concentration (43.4 g/l) from the hydrolysate, despite relatively high concentrations of weak acids, furans, and phenolics. This strain also exhibited a significantly greater conversion rate of inhibitory furaldehydes compared with the reference strain S. cerevisiae 27P. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing a strain of S. cerevisiae able to produce an ethanol yield equal to 89% of theoretical maximum yield in the presence of high concentrations of inhibitors from sugarcane bagasse. This study showed that yeasts with high tolerance to multiple stress factors can be obtained from unconventional ecological niches. Grape marc appeared to be an unexplored and promising substrate for the

  10. Caffeine enhancement of radiation killing in different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannan, M.A.; Nasim, A.

    1977-01-01

    Haploid and diploid wild type strains, and three classes of radiation-sensitive mutants of Saccharomyces cerrevisiae were tesed for enhancement of UV-inactivation by caffeine in growth medium. In addition the sensitizing effect of caffeine was studied in a haploid and a diploid wild type strain after gamma-irradiation. The drug sensitized the UV-irradiated cells of all strains except those reported to be only slightly UV-sensitive but highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. After gamma-irradiation, no coffeine-enhancement of killing was observed in stationary phase cells of either the haploid or the diploid strain. However, log-phase cells of both strains were partially sensitized. The results of both sets of experiments suggested that caffeine interferes with a recombinational repair occurring in cells in S or G2 phase. (orig.) [de

  11. Multi-gene phylogenetic analysis reveals that shochu-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains form a distinct sub-clade of the Japanese sake cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futagami, Taiki; Kadooka, Chihiro; Ando, Yoshinori; Okutsu, Kayu; Yoshizaki, Yumiko; Setoguchi, Shinji; Takamine, Kazunori; Kawai, Mikihiko; Tamaki, Hisanori

    2017-10-01

    Shochu is a traditional Japanese distilled spirit. The formation of the distinguishing flavour of shochu produced in individual distilleries is attributed to putative indigenous yeast strains. In this study, we performed the first (to our knowledge) phylogenetic classification of shochu strains based on nucleotide gene sequences. We performed phylogenetic classification of 21 putative indigenous shochu yeast strains isolated from 11 distilleries. All of these strains were shown or confirmed to be Saccharomyces cerevisiae, sharing species identification with 34 known S. cerevisiae strains (including commonly used shochu, sake, ale, whisky, bakery, bioethanol and laboratory yeast strains and clinical isolate) that were tested in parallel. Our analysis used five genes that reflect genome-level phylogeny for the strain-level classification. In a first step, we demonstrated that partial regions of the ZAP1, THI7, PXL1, YRR1 and GLG1 genes were sufficient to reproduce previous sub-species classifications. In a second step, these five analysed regions from each of 25 strains (four commonly used shochu strains and the 21 putative indigenous shochu strains) were concatenated and used to generate a phylogenetic tree. Further analysis revealed that the putative indigenous shochu yeast strains form a monophyletic group that includes both the shochu yeasts and a subset of the sake group strains; this cluster is a sister group to other sake yeast strains, together comprising a sake-shochu group. Differences among shochu strains were small, suggesting that it may be possible to correlate subtle phenotypic differences among shochu flavours with specific differences in genome sequences. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Wine yeast phenomics: A standardized fermentation method for assessing quantitative traits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in enological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Margaux; Trujillo, Marine; Prodhomme, Duyên; Barbe, Jean-Christophe; Gibon, Yves; Marullo, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    This work describes the set up of a small scale fermentation methodology for measuring quantitative traits of hundreds of samples in an enological context. By using standardized screw cap vessels, the alcoholic fermentation kinetics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were measured by following their weight loss over the time. This dispositive was coupled with robotized enzymatic assays for measuring metabolites of enological interest in natural grape juices. Despite the small volume used, kinetic parameters and fermentation end products measured are similar with those observed in larger scale vats. The vessel used also offers the possibility to assay 32 volatiles compounds using a headspace solid-phase micro-extraction coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The vessel shaking applied strongly impacted most of the phenotypes investigated due to oxygen transfer occuring in the first hours of the alcoholic fermentation. The impact of grape must and micro-oxygenation was investigated illustrating some relevant genetic x environmental interactions. By phenotyping a wide panel of commercial wine starters in five grape juices, broad phenotypic correlations between kinetics and metabolic end products were evidentiated. Moreover, a multivariate analysis illustrates that some grape musts are more able than others to discriminate commercial strains since some are less robust to environmental changes. PMID:29351285

  13. High-level ethanol production from starch by a flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain displaying cell-surface glucoamylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, A.; Shigechi, H.; Abe, M.; Uyama, K. [Dept. of Chemical Science and Engineering, Kobe Univ., Nadaku, Kobe (Japan); Matsumoto, T.; Fukuda, H. [Div. of Molecular Science, Kobe Univ., Nadaku, Kobe (Japan); Takahashi, S.; Ueda, M.; Tanaka, A. [Dept. of Synthetic Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, Kyoto Univ., Sakyoku, Kyoto (Japan); Kishimoto, M. [Dept. of Biotechnology, Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    A Strain of host yeast YF207, which is a tryptophan auxotroph and shows strong flocculation ability, was obtained from Saccharomyces diastaticus ATCC60712 and S. cerevisiae W303-1B by tetrad analysis. The plasmid pGA11, which is a multicopy plasmid for cell-surface expression of the Rhyzopus oryzae glucoamylase/{alpha}-agglutinin fusion protein, was then introduced into this flocculent yeast strain (YF207/pGA11). Yeast YF207/pGA11 grew rapidly under aerobic condition (dissolved oxygen 2.0 ppm), using soluble starch. The harvested cells were used for batch fermentation of soluble starch to ethanol under anaerobic condition and showed high ethanol production rates (0.71 g h{sup -1} I{sup -1}) without a time lag, because glucoamylase was immobilized on the yeast cell surface. During repeated utilization of cells for fermentation, YF207/pGA11 maintained high ethanol production rates over 300 h. Moreover, in fed-batch fermentation with YF207/pGA11 for approximately 120 h, the ethanol concentration reached up to 50 g I{sup -1}. In conclusion, flocculent yeast cells displaying cell-surface glucoamylase are considered to be very effective for the direct fermentation of soluble starch to ethanol. (orig.)

  14. Co-fermentation using Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Strains Hyper-secreting Different Cellulases for the Production of Cellulosic Bioethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cho-Ryong; Sung, Bong Hyun; Lim, Kwang-Mook; Kim, Mi-Jin; Sohn, Min Jeong; Bae, Jung-Hoon; Sohn, Jung-Hoon

    2017-06-30

    To realize the economical production of ethanol and other bio-based chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass by consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), various cellulases from different sources were tested to improve the level of cellulase secretion in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by screening an optimal translational fusion partner (TFP) as both a secretion signal and fusion partner. Among them, four indispensable cellulases for cellulose hydrolysis, including Chaetomium thermophilum cellobiohydrolase (CtCBH1), Chrysosporium lucknowense cellobiohydrolase (ClCBH2), Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase (TrEGL2), and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera β-glucosidase (SfBGL1), were identified to be highly secreted in active form in yeast. Despite variability in the enzyme levels produced, each recombinant yeast could secrete approximately 0.6-2.0 g/L of cellulases into the fermentation broth. The synergistic effect of the mixed culture of the four strains expressing the essential cellulases with the insoluble substrate Avicel and several types of cellulosic biomass was demonstrated to be effective. Co-fermentation of these yeast strains produced approximately 14 g/L ethanol from the pre-treated rice straw containing 35 g/L glucan with 3-fold higher productivity than that of wild type yeast using a reduced amount of commercial cellulases. This process will contribute to the cost-effective production of bioenergy such as bioethanol and biochemicals from cellulosic biomass.

  15. Wine yeast phenomics: A standardized fermentation method for assessing quantitative traits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in enological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Emilien; Bernard, Margaux; Trujillo, Marine; Prodhomme, Duyên; Barbe, Jean-Christophe; Gibon, Yves; Marullo, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    This work describes the set up of a small scale fermentation methodology for measuring quantitative traits of hundreds of samples in an enological context. By using standardized screw cap vessels, the alcoholic fermentation kinetics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were measured by following their weight loss over the time. This dispositive was coupled with robotized enzymatic assays for measuring metabolites of enological interest in natural grape juices. Despite the small volume used, kinetic parameters and fermentation end products measured are similar with those observed in larger scale vats. The vessel used also offers the possibility to assay 32 volatiles compounds using a headspace solid-phase micro-extraction coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The vessel shaking applied strongly impacted most of the phenotypes investigated due to oxygen transfer occuring in the first hours of the alcoholic fermentation. The impact of grape must and micro-oxygenation was investigated illustrating some relevant genetic x environmental interactions. By phenotyping a wide panel of commercial wine starters in five grape juices, broad phenotypic correlations between kinetics and metabolic end products were evidentiated. Moreover, a multivariate analysis illustrates that some grape musts are more able than others to discriminate commercial strains since some are less robust to environmental changes.

  16. Comparative analysis on inactivation kinetics of between piezotolerant and piezosensitive mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under combinations of high hydrostatic pressure and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazuki; Kuwabara, Yuki; Kuwabara, Wataru; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Kanako; Hayashi, Mayumi; Iguchi, Akinori; Shigematsu, Toru

    2017-12-01

    We previously obtained a pressure-tolerant (piezotolerant) and a pressure sensitive (piezosensitive) mutant strain, under ambient temperature, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain KA31a. The inactivation kinetics of these mutants were analyzed at 150 to 250MPa with 4 to 40°C. By a multiple regression analysis, the pressure and temperature dependency of the inactivation rate constants k values of both mutants, as well as the parent strain KA31a, were well approximated with high correlation coefficients (0.92 to 0.95). For both mutants, as well as strain KA31a, the lowest k value was shown at a low pressure levels with around ambient temperature. The k value approximately increased with increase in pressure level, and with increase and decrease in temperature. The piezosensitive mutant strain a924E1 showed piezosensitivity at all pressure and temperature levels, compared with the parent strain KA31a. In contrast, the piezotolerant mutant strain a2568D8 showed piezotolerance at 4 to 20°C, but did not show significant piezotolerance at 40°C. These results of the variable influence of temperature on pressure inactivation of these strains would be important for better understanding of piezosensitive and piezotolerant mechanisms, as well as the pressure inactivation mechanism of S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Outlining a future for non-Saccharomyces yeasts: selection of putative spoilage wine strains to be used in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape juice fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domizio, Paola; Romani, Cristina; Lencioni, Livio; Comitini, Francesca; Gobbi, Mirko; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Ciani, Maurizio

    2011-06-30

    The use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts that are generally considered as spoilage yeasts, in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape must fermentation was here evaluated. Analysis of the main oenological characteristics of pure cultures of 55 yeasts belonging to the genera Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Saccharomycodes and Zygosaccharomyces revealed wide biodiversity within each genus. Moreover, many of these non-Saccharomyces strains had interesting oenological properties in terms of fermentation purity, and ethanol and secondary metabolite production. The use of four non-Saccharomyces yeasts (one per genus) in mixed cultures with a commercial S. cerevisiae strain at different S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratios was investigated. This revealed that most of the compounds normally produced at high concentrations by pure cultures of non-Saccharomyces, and which are considered detrimental to wine quality, do not reach threshold taste levels in these mixed fermentations. On the other hand, the analytical profiles of the wines produced by these mixed cultures indicated that depending on the yeast species and the S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio, these non-Saccharomyces yeasts can be used to increase production of polysaccharides and to modulate the final concentrations of acetic acid and volatile compounds, such as ethyl acetate, phenyl-ethyl acetate, 2-phenyl ethanol, and 2-methyl 1-butanol. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals similarities and dissimilarities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains response to nitrogen availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Barbosa

    Full Text Available Nitrogen levels in grape-juices are of major importance in winemaking ensuring adequate yeast growth and fermentation performance. Here we used a comparative transcriptome analysis to uncover wine yeasts responses to nitrogen availability during fermentation. Gene expression was assessed in three genetically and phenotypically divergent commercial wine strains (CEG, VL1 and QA23, under low (67 mg/L and high nitrogen (670 mg/L regimes, at three time points during fermentation (12 h, 24 h and 96 h. Two-way ANOVA analysis of each fermentation condition led to the identification of genes whose expression was dependent on strain, fermentation stage and on the interaction of both factors. The high fermenter yeast strain QA23 was more clearly distinct from the other two strains, by differential expression of genes involved in flocculation, mitochondrial functions, energy generation and protein folding and stabilization. For all strains, higher transcriptional variability due to fermentation stage was seen in the high nitrogen fermentations. A positive correlation between maximum fermentation rate and the expression of genes involved in stress response was observed. The finding of common genes correlated with both fermentation activity and nitrogen up-take underlies the role of nitrogen on yeast fermentative fitness. The comparative analysis of genes differentially expressed between both fermentation conditions at 12 h, where the main difference was the level of nitrogen available, showed the highest variability amongst strains revealing strain-specific responses. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a small set of genes whose expression profiles can quantitatively assess the common response of the yeast strains to varying nitrogen conditions. The use of three contrasting yeast strains in gene expression analysis prompts the identification of more reliable, accurate and reproducible biomarkers that will facilitate the diagnosis of deficiency of this

  19. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Similarities and Dissimilarities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Strains Response to Nitrogen Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Catarina; García-Martínez, José; Pérez-Ortín, José E.; Mendes-Ferreira, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen levels in grape-juices are of major importance in winemaking ensuring adequate yeast growth and fermentation performance. Here we used a comparative transcriptome analysis to uncover wine yeasts responses to nitrogen availability during fermentation. Gene expression was assessed in three genetically and phenotypically divergent commercial wine strains (CEG, VL1 and QA23), under low (67 mg/L) and high nitrogen (670 mg/L) regimes, at three time points during fermentation (12h, 24h and 96h). Two-way ANOVA analysis of each fermentation condition led to the identification of genes whose expression was dependent on strain, fermentation stage and on the interaction of both factors. The high fermenter yeast strain QA23 was more clearly distinct from the other two strains, by differential expression of genes involved in flocculation, mitochondrial functions, energy generation and protein folding and stabilization. For all strains, higher transcriptional variability due to fermentation stage was seen in the high nitrogen fermentations. A positive correlation between maximum fermentation rate and the expression of genes involved in stress response was observed. The finding of common genes correlated with both fermentation activity and nitrogen up-take underlies the role of nitrogen on yeast fermentative fitness. The comparative analysis of genes differentially expressed between both fermentation conditions at 12h, where the main difference was the level of nitrogen available, showed the highest variability amongst strains revealing strain-specific responses. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a small set of genes whose expression profiles can quantitatively assess the common response of the yeast strains to varying nitrogen conditions. The use of three contrasting yeast strains in gene expression analysis prompts the identification of more reliable, accurate and reproducible biomarkers that will facilitate the diagnosis of deficiency of this nutrient in the grape

  20. Oxygen availability and strain combination modulate yeast growth dynamics in mixed culture fermentations of grape must with Starmerella bacillaris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englezos, Vasileios; Cravero, Francesco; Torchio, Fabrizio; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Ortiz-Julien, Anne; Lambri, Milena; Gerbi, Vincenzo; Rolle, Luca; Cocolin, Luca

    2018-02-01

    Starmerella bacillaris (synonym Candida zemplinina) is a non-Saccharomyces yeast that has been proposed as a co-inoculant of selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in mixed culture fermentations to enhance the analytical composition of the wines. In order to acquire further knowledge on the metabolic interactions between these two species, in this study we investigated the impact of oxygen addition and combination of Starm. bacillaris with S. cerevisiae strains on the microbial growth and metabolite production. Fermentations were carried out under two different conditions of oxygen availability. Oxygen availability and strain combination clearly influenced the population dynamics throughout the fermentation. Oxygen concentration increased the survival time of Starm. bacillaris and decreased the growth rate of S. cerevisiae strains in mixed culture fermentations, whereas it did not affect the growth of the latter in pure culture fermentations. This study reveals new knowledge about the influence of oxygen availability on the successional evolution of yeast species during wine fermentation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Enological characterization of Spanish Saccharomyces kudriavzevii strains, one of the closest relatives to parental strains of winemaking and brewing Saccharomyces cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peris, D; Pérez-Través, L; Belloch, C; Querol, A

    2016-02-01

    Wine fermentation and innovation have focused mostly on Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. However, recent studies have shown that other Saccharomyces species can also be involved in wine fermentation or are useful for wine bouquet, such as Saccharomyces uvarum and Saccharomyces paradoxus. Many interspecies hybrids have also been isolated from wine fermentation, such as S. cerevisiae × Saccharomyces kudriavzevii hybrids. In this study, we explored the genetic diversity and fermentation performance of Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains, which we compared to other S. kudriavzevii strains. Fermentations of red and white grape musts were performed, and the phenotypic differences between Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains under different temperature conditions were examined. An ANOVA analysis suggested striking similarity between strains for glycerol and ethanol production, although a high diversity of aromatic profiles among fermentations was found. The sources of these phenotypic differences are not well understood and require further investigation. Although the Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains showed desirable properties, particularly must fermentations, the quality of their wines was no better than those produced with a commercial S. cerevisiae. We suggest hybridization or directed evolution as methods to improve and innovate wine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Physiology of the fuel ethanol strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae PE-2 at low pH indicates a context-dependent performance relevant for industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Bianca, Bianca E; de Hulster, Erik; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A; Gombert, Andreas K

    2014-12-01

    Selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are used in Brazil to produce the hitherto most energetically efficient first-generation fuel ethanol. Although genome and some transcriptome data are available for some of these strains, quantitative physiological data are lacking. This study investigates the physiology of S. cerevisiae strain PE-2, widely used in the Brazilian fuel ethanol industry, in comparison with CEN.PK113-7D, a reference laboratory strain, focusing on tolerance to low pH and acetic acid stress. Both strains were grown in anaerobic bioreactors, operated as batch, chemostat or dynamic continuous cultures. Despite their different backgrounds, biomass and product formation by the two strains were similar under a range of conditions (pH 5 or pH cells, incubated at pH 1.5, indicated a superior survival of glucose-depleted PE-2 cells, when compared with either CEN.PK113-7D or a commercial bakers' strain. These results indicate that the sulfuric acid washing step, used in the fuel ethanol industry to decrease bacterial contamination due to non-aseptic operation, might have exerted an important selective pressure on the microbial populations present in such environments. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. CRISPR–Cas system enables fast and simple genome editing of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovicek, Vratislav; Borodina, Irina; Förster, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    , their genetic manipulation is challenging, as they are usually diploid or polyploid. Therefore, there is a need to develop more efficient genetic engineering tools. We applied a CRISPR–Cas9 system for genome editing of different industrial strains, and show simultaneous disruption of two alleles of a gene...... in several unrelated strains with the efficiency ranging between 65% and 78%. We also achieved simultaneous disruption and knock-in of a reporter gene, and demonstrate the applicability of the method by designing lactic acid-producing strains in a single transformation event, where insertion...... of a heterologous gene and disruption of two endogenous genes occurred simultaneously. Our study provides a foundation for efficient engineering of industrial yeast cell factories....

  4. The Geographic Distribution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Isolates within three Italian Neighboring Winemaking Regions Reveals Strong Differences in Yeast Abundance, Genetic Diversity and Industrial Strain Dissemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Viel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the interest for natural fermentations has been re-evaluated in terms of increasing the wine terroir and managing more sustainable winemaking practices. Therefore, the level of yeast genetic variability and the abundance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae native populations in vineyard are becoming more and more crucial at both ecological and technological level. Among the factors that can influence the strain diversity, the commercial starter release that accidentally occur in the environment around the winery, has to be considered. In this study we led a wide scale investigation of S. cerevisiae genetic diversity and population structure in the vineyards of three neighboring winemaking regions of Protected Appellation of Origin, in North-East of Italy. Combining mtDNA RFLP and microsatellite markers analyses we evaluated 634 grape samples collected over 3 years. We could detect major differences in the presence of S. cerevisiae yeasts, according to the winemaking region. The population structures revealed specificities of yeast microbiota at vineyard scale, with a relative Appellation of Origin area homogeneity, and transition zones suggesting a geographic differentiation. Surprisingly, we found a widespread industrial yeast dissemination that was very high in the areas where the native yeast abundance was low. Although geographical distance is a key element involved in strain distribution, the high presence of industrial strains in vineyard reduced the differences between populations. This finding indicates that industrial yeast diffusion it is a real emergency and their presence strongly interferes with the natural yeast microbiota.

  5. Comparisons of five Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for ethanol production from SPORL pretreated lodgepole pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The performances of 5 yeast strains under three levels of toxicity were evaluated using hydrolysates from lodgepole pine pretreated by Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome the Recalcitrance of Lignocelluloses (SPORL). The highest level of toxicity was represented by the whole pretreated biomass slurry, ...

  6. Comparisons of five Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for ethanol production from SPORL pretreated lodgepole pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haifeng Zhou; Tianqing Lan; Bruce S. Dien; Ronald E. Hector; J.Y. Zhu

    2014-01-01

    The performances of five yeast strains under three levels of toxicity were evaluated using hydrolysates from lodgepole pine pretreated by Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome the Recalcitrance of Lignocelluloses (SPORL). The highest level of toxicity was represented by the whole pretreated biomass slurry, while intermediate toxicity was represented by the...

  7. De novo production of six key grape aroma monoterpenes by a geraniol synthase-engineered S. cerevisiae wine strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Ester; Rico, Juan; Gil, José Vicente; Orejas, Margarita

    2015-09-16

    Monoterpenes are important contributors to grape and wine aroma. Moreover, certain monoterpenes have been shown to display health benefits with antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anticancer or hypotensive properties amongst others. The aim of this study was to construct self-aromatizing wine yeasts to overproduce de novo these plant metabolites in wines. Expression of the Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil) geraniol synthase (GES) gene in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strain substantially changed the terpene profile of wine produced from a non-aromatic grape variety. Under microvinification conditions, and without compromising other fermentative traits, the recombinant yeast excreted geraniol de novo at an amount (~750 μg/L) well exceeding (>10-fold) its threshold for olfactory perception and also exceeding the quantities present in wines obtained from highly aromatic Muscat grapes. Interestingly, geraniol was further metabolized by yeast enzymes to additional monoterpenes and esters: citronellol, linalool, nerol, citronellyl acetate and geranyl acetate, resulting in a total monoterpene concentration (~1,558 μg/L) 230-fold greater than that of the control. We also found that monoterpene profiles of wines derived from mixed fermentations were found to be determined by the composition of the initial yeast inocula suggesting the feasibility of producing 'à la carte' wines having predetermined monoterpene contents. Geraniol synthase-engineered yeasts demonstrate potential in the development of monoterpene enhanced wines.

  8. The yeast culture Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Strain 47 as manipulator of rumen fermentation in postpartal period of dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Doležal

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, examined was the effect of a yeast culture (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Strain 47 on rumen fermentation of cows. Animals received a diet consisting of good maize silage with a higher dry matter content (16  kg, 16  kg of clovergrass haylage, 3  kg of meadow hay and 7.5  kg feed mixture. The yeast culture was added to the mixture in the dose 6  g/day and cow. The supplement of yeast culture showed a positive effect on VFA production in comparison with control (1.16±0.013B vs. 0.84±0.063A  g/ 100 ml, and lower production of lactic acid. The utilisation of ammonia was higher by cows in treated group (8.68±0.084A mmol/L. The difference in number of protozoa of cows in the control and experimental groups was significant (302.0±12.349A vs. 359.2±1.304B ths /1 ml of rumen fluid.

  9. Succinate Dehydrogenase Activity Assay in situ with Blue Tetrazolium Salt in Crabtree-Positive Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Berlowska

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A spectrophotometric method for determining succinate dehydrogenase (SDH activity assay in azide-sensitive yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been developed. The permeabilization of yeast cells by 0.05 % digitonin permitted to study yeast enzymatic activity in situ. The reduction of blue tetrazolium salt (BT to blue tetrazolium formazan (BTf was conducted in the presence of phenazine methosulphate (PMS as an exogenous electron carrier, and sodium azide (SA as an inhibitor of cytochrome oxidase (Cyt pathway. Various factors such as type of substrate, BT concentration, cell number, temperature and time of incubation, and different Cyt pathway blockers were optimized. In earlier studies, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO had been selected as the best solvent for extraction of BTf from yeast cells. The linear correlation between permeabilized yeast cell density and amount of formed formazan was evidenced in the range from 9·10^7 to 5·10^8 cells per sample solution. Below the yeast cell concentration of 10^7 the absorbance values were too low to detect formazans with good precision. This standarized procedure allows the estimation of SDH activity in whole cells, depending on vitality level of yeast populations. Significant increases of succinate dehydrogenase activities were observed in sequential passages as the result of the increase of activity of the strain and adaptation to cultivation conditions.

  10. Growth-rate dependency of de novo resveratrol production in chemostat cultures of an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, T.; De la Torre Cortes, P.; Van Gulik, W.M.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran-Lapujade, P.A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become a popular host for production of non-native compounds. The metabolic pathways involved generally require a net input of energy. To maximize the ATP yield on sugar in S. cerevisiae, industrial cultivation is typically performed in aerobic,

  11. Optimizing anaerobic growth rate and fermentation kinetics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing Calvin-cycle enzymes for improved ethanol yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papapetridis, I.; Goudriaan, M.; De Keijzer, Nikita A.; van den Broek, M.A.; van Maris, A.J.A.; Pronk, J.T.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Reduction or elimination of by-product formation is of immediate economic relevance in fermentation processes for industrial bioethanol production with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Anaerobic cultures of wild-type S. cerevisiae require formation of glycerol to maintain the

  12. Comparisons of five Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for ethanol production from SPORL-pretreated lodgepole pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haifeng; Lan, Tianqing; Dien, Bruce S; Hector, Ronald E; Zhu, J Y

    2014-01-01

    The performances of five yeast strains under three levels of toxicity were evaluated using hydrolysates from lodgepole pine pretreated by Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome the Recalcitrance of Lignocelluloses (SPORL). The highest level of toxicity was represented by the whole pretreated biomass slurry, while intermediate toxicity was represented by the hydrolysate with partial loading of pretreatment spent liquor. The zero toxicity was represented using the enzymatic hydrolysate produced from thoroughly washed SPORL lodgepole pine solids. The results indicate that strains D5A and YRH400 can tolerate the whole pretreated biomass slurry to produce 90.1 and 73.5% theoretical ethanol yield. Strains Y1528, YRH403, and FPL450 did not grow in whole hydrolysate cultures and were observed to have lower ethanol productivities than D5A and YRH400 on the hydrolysate with intermediate toxicity. Both YRH400 and YRH403 were genetically engineered for xylose fermentation but were not able to consume xylose efficiently in hydrolysate. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  13. Enhanced 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol production in sequential mixed fermentation with Torulaspora delbrueckii/Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals a situation of synergistic interaction between two industrial strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eRenault

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the volatile thiol productions of 2 industrial strains of Torulaspora delbrueckii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation (AF of Sauvignon Blanc must. In order to evaluate the influence of the inoculation procedure, sequential and simultaneous mixed cultures were carried out and compared to pure cultures of T. delbrueckii and S. cerevisiae. The results confirmed the inability of T. delbrueckii to release 4-methyl-4-sulfanylpentan-2-one (4MSP and its low capacity to produce 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate (3SHA, as already reported in previous studies. A synergistic interaction was observed between the two species, resulting in higher levels of 3SH (3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol and its acetate when S. cerevisiae was inoculated 24 hours after T. delbrueckii, compared to the pure cultures. To elucidate the nature of the interactions between these 2 species, the yeast population kinetics were examined and monitored, as well as the production of 3SH, its acetate and their related non-odorous precursors: Glut-3SH (glutathionylated conjugate precursor and Cys-3SH (cysteinylated conjugate precursor. For the first time, it was suggested that, unlike, S. cerevisiae, which is able to metabolize the two precursor forms, T. delbrueckii was only able to metabolize the glutathionylated precursor. Consequently, the presence of T. delbrueckii during mixed fermentation led to an increase in Glut-3SH degradation and Cys-3SH production. This overproduction was dependent on the T. delbrueckii biomass. In sequential culture, thus favouring T. delbrueckii development, the higher availability of Cys-3SH throughout AF (alcoholic fermentation resulted in more abundant 3SH and 3SHA production by S. cerevisiae

  14. Enhanced 3-Sulfanylhexan-1-ol Production in Sequential Mixed Fermentation with Torulaspora delbrueckii/Saccharomyces cerevisiae Reveals a Situation of Synergistic Interaction between Two Industrial Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Philippe; Coulon, Joana; Moine, Virginie; Thibon, Cécile; Bely, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the volatile thiol productions of two industrial strains of Torulaspora delbrueckii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation (AF) of Sauvignon Blanc must. In order to evaluate the influence of the inoculation procedure, sequential and simultaneous mixed cultures were carried out and compared to pure cultures of T. delbrueckii and S. cerevisiae. The results confirmed the inability of T. delbrueckii to release 4-methyl-4-sulfanylpentan-2-one (4MSP) and its low capacity to produce 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate (3SHA), as already reported in previous studies. A synergistic interaction was observed between the two species, resulting in higher levels of 3SH (3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol) and its acetate when S. cerevisiae was inoculated 24 h after T. delbrueckii, compared to the pure cultures. To elucidate the nature of the interactions between these two species, the yeast population kinetics were examined and monitored, as well as the production of 3SH, its acetate and their related non-odorous precursors: Glut-3SH (glutathionylated conjugate precursor) and Cys-3SH (cysteinylated conjugate precursor). For the first time, it was suggested that, unlike S. cerevisiae, which is able to metabolize the two precursor forms, T. delbrueckii was only able to metabolize the glutathionylated precursor. Consequently, the presence of T. delbrueckii during mixed fermentation led to an increase in Glut-3SH degradation and Cys-3SH production. This overproduction was dependent on the T. delbrueckii biomass. In sequential culture, thus favoring T. delbrueckii development, the higher availability of Cys-3SH throughout AF resulted in more abundant 3SH and 3SHA production by S. cerevisiae.

  15. Mechanistic Study of Utilization of Water-Insoluble Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glucans by Bifidobacterium breve Strain JCM1192.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keung, Hoi Yee; Li, Tsz Kai; Sham, Lok To; Cheung, Man Kit; Cheung, Peter Chi Keung; Kwan, Hoi Shan

    2017-04-01

    Bifidobacteria exert beneficial effects on hosts and are extensively used as probiotics. However, due to the genetic inaccessibility of these bacteria, little is known about their mechanisms of carbohydrate utilization and regulation. Bifidobacterium breve strain JCM1192 can grow on water-insoluble yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ) cell wall glucans (YCWG), which were recently considered as potential prebiotics. According to the results of 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry, the YCWG were composed of highly branched (1→3,1→6)-β-glucans and (1→4,1→6)-α-glucans. Although the YCWG were composed of 78.3% β-glucans and 21.7% α-glucans, only α-glucans were consumed by the B. breve strain. The ABC transporter ( malEFG1 ) and pullulanase ( aapA ) genes were transcriptionally upregulated in the metabolism of insoluble yeast glucans, suggesting their potential involvement in the process. A nonsense mutation identified in the gene encoding an ABC transporter ATP-binding protein (MalK) led to growth failure of an ethyl methanesulfonate-generated mutant with yeast glucans. Coculture of the wild-type strain and the mutant showed that this protein was responsible for the import of yeast glucans or their breakdown products, rather than the export of α-glucan-catabolizing enzymes. Further characterization of the carbohydrate utilization of the mutant and three of its revertants indicated that this mutation was pleiotropic: the mutant could not grow with maltose, glycogen, dextrin, raffinose, cellobiose, melibiose, or turanose. We propose that insoluble yeast α-glucans are hydrolyzed by extracellular pullulanase into maltose and/or maltooligosaccharides, which are then transported into the cell by the ABC transport system composed of MalEFG1 and MalK. The mechanism elucidated here will facilitate the development of B. breve and water-insoluble yeast glucans as novel synbiotics. IMPORTANCE In general, Bifidobacterium strains are genetically intractable

  16. The effect of temperature on the growth of strains of Kloeckera apiculata and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in apple juice fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao, A; Irastorza, A; Dueñas, M; Fernandez, K

    1997-01-01

    The influence of temperature (10 degrees C and 25 degrees C) on the survival and growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kloeckera apiculata was examined in mixed and pure cultures during fermentation in apple juice. The growth reached by S. cerevisiae did not seem to be affected by temperature and the presence of K. apiculata. However, the growth and survival of K. apiculata, both in single and mixed cultures, were substantially enhanced at 10 degrees C. The highest amount of ethyl acetate was produced by K. apiculata in pure culture at 10 degrees C. Nevertheless, this concentration was lowest when both yeasts were fermented together at 10 degrees C and 25 degrees C.

  17. Biochemical and Molecular Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Obtained from Sugar-Cane Juice Fermentations and Their Impact in Cachaça Production▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Valdinéia Aparecida; Vicente, Maristela Araújo; Fietto, Luciano Gomes; de Miranda Castro, Ieso; Coutrim, Maurício Xavier; Schüller, Dorit; Alves, Henrique; Casal, Margarida; de Oliveira Santos, Juliana; Araújo, Leandro Dias; da Silva, Paulo Henrique Alves; Brandão, Rogelio Lopes

    2008-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from different regions of Minas Gerais, Brazil, were isolated and characterized aiming at the selection of starter yeasts to be used in the production of cachaça, the Brazilian sugar cane spirit. The methodology established took into account the screening for biochemical traits desirable in a yeast cachaça producer, such as no H2S production, high tolerance to ethanol and high temperatures, high fermentative capacity, and the abilities to flocculate and to produce mycocins. Furthermore, the yeasts were exposed to drugs such as 5,5′,5"-trifluor-d,l-leucine and cerulenin to isolate those that potentially overproduce higher alcohols and esters. The utilization of a random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR method with primers based on intron splicing sites flanking regions of the COX1 gene, as well as microsatellite analysis, was not sufficient to achieve good differentiation among selected strains. In contrast, karyotype analysis allowed a clear distinction among all strains. Two selected strains were experimentally evaluated as cachaça producers. The results suggest that the selection of strains as fermentation starters requires the combined use of biochemical and molecular criteria to ensure the isolation and identification of strains with potential characteristics to produce cachaça with a higher quality standard. PMID:18065624

  18. Phenotypic selection of a wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation of AFEX pretreated corn stover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingie Jin; Cory Sarks; Christa Gunawan; Benjamin D. Bice; Shane P. Simonett; Ragothaman Avanasi Narasimhan; Laura B. Willis; Bruce E. Dale; Venkatesh Balan; Trey K. Sato

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) process involves enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass and fermentation of glucose and xylose in one bioreactor. The optimal temperatures for enzymatic hydrolysis are higher than the standard fermentation temperature of ethanologenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover,...

  19. Dynamic study of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during the spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc in Jingyang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunxiao; Liu, Yanlin

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae genotypes during spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc planted in 1957 in Jingyang region of China was followed in this study. Using a combination of colony morphology on Wallerstein Nutrient (WLN) medium, sequence analysis of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain and 5.8S-ITS-RFLP analysis, a total of 686 isolates were identified at the species level. The six species identified were S. cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Issatchenkia terricola, Pichia kudriavzevii (Issatchenkia orientalis) and Trichosporon coremiiforme. This is the first report of T. coremiiforme as an inhabitant of grape must. Three new colony morphologies on WLN medium and one new 5.8S-ITS-RFLP profile are described. Species of non-Saccharomyces, predominantly H. opuntiae, were found in early stages of fermentation. Subsequently, S. cerevisiae prevailed followed by large numbers of P. kudriavzevii that dominated at the end of fermentations. Six native genotypes of S. cerevisiae were determined by interdelta sequence analysis. Genotypes III and IV were predominant. As a first step in exploring untapped yeast resources of the region, this study is important for monitoring the yeast ecology in native fermentations and screening indigenous yeasts that will produce wines with regional characteristics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhancing ethanol yields through d-xylose and l-arabinose co-fermentation after construction of a novel high efficient l-arabinose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Antonio; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2017-04-01

    Lignocellulose contains two pentose sugars, l-arabinose and d-xylose, neither of which is naturally fermented by first generation (1G) ethanol-producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast. Since these sugars are inaccessible to 1G yeast, a significant percentage of the total carbon in bioethanol production from plant residues, which are used in second generation (2G) ethanol production, remains unused. Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting d-xylose are available on the market; however, there are few examples of l-arabinose-fermenting yeasts, and commercially, there are no strains capable of fermenting both d-xylose and l-arabinose because of metabolic incompatibilities when both metabolic pathways are expressed in the same cell. To attempt to solve this problem we have tested d-xylose and l-arabinose co-fermentation. To find efficient alternative l-arabinose utilization pathways to the few existing ones, we have used stringent methodology to screen for new genes (metabolic and transporter functions) to facilitate l-arabinose fermentation in recombinant yeast. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach in a successfully constructed yeast strain capable of using l-arabinose as the sole carbon source and capable of fully transforming it to ethanol, reaching the maximum theoretical fermentation yield (0.43 g g-1). We demonstrate that efficient co-fermentation of d-xylose and l-arabinose is feasible using two different co-cultured strains, and observed no fermentation delays, yield drops or accumulation of undesired byproducts. In this study we have identified a technically efficient strategy to enhance ethanol yields by 10 % in 2G plants in a process based on C5 sugar co-fermentation.

  1. Effects of fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    yassine

    2013-02-13

    Feb 13, 2013 ... Effect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation on the ... beetroot, fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, betalain compounds. ... by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (González et al., .... Both red and yellow pigments were influenced during S. .... in beverages such as white wine, grape fruit, and green.

  2. Elimination of glycerol production in anaerobic cultures of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain engineered to use acetic acid as an electron acceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadalupe Medina, Víctor; Almering, Marinka J H; van Maris, Antonius J A; Pronk, Jack T

    2010-01-01

    In anaerobic cultures of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae, glycerol production is essential to reoxidize NADH produced in biosynthetic processes. Consequently, glycerol is a major by-product during anaerobic production of ethanol by S. cerevisiae, the single largest fermentation process in industrial biotechnology. The present study investigates the possibility of completely eliminating glycerol production by engineering S. cerevisiae such that it can reoxidize NADH by the reduction of acetic acid to ethanol via NADH-dependent reactions. Acetic acid is available at significant amounts in lignocellulosic hydrolysates of agricultural residues. Consistent with earlier studies, deletion of the two genes encoding NAD-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1 and GPD2) led to elimination of glycerol production and an inability to grow anaerobically. However, when the E. coli mhpF gene, encoding the acetylating NAD-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.10; acetaldehyde+NAD++coenzyme Aacetyl coenzyme A+NADH+H+), was expressed in the gpd1Delta gpd2Delta strain, anaerobic growth was restored by supplementation with 2.0 g liter(-1) acetic acid. The stoichiometry of acetate consumption and growth was consistent with the complete replacement of glycerol formation by acetate reduction to ethanol as the mechanism for NADH reoxidation. This study provides a proof of principle for the potential of this metabolic engineering strategy to improve ethanol yields, eliminate glycerol production, and partially convert acetate, which is a well-known inhibitor of yeast performance in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, to ethanol. Further research should address the kinetic aspects of acetate reduction and the effect of the elimination of glycerol production on cellular robustness (e.g., osmotolerance).

  3. Enhancement of ethanol production from green liquor-ethanol-pretreated sugarcane bagasse by glucose-xylose cofermentation at high solid loadings with mixed Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yanzhi; Li, Pengfei; Lei, Fuhou; Xing, Yang; Jiang, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    Efficient cofermentation of glucose and xylose is necessary for economically feasible bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. Here, we demonstrate pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse (SCB) with green liquor (GL) combined with ethanol (GL-Ethanol) by adding different GL amounts. The common Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CSC) and thermophilic S. cerevisiae (TSC) strains were used and different yeast cell mass ratios (CSC to TSC) were compared. The simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSF/SSCF) process was performed by 5-20% (w/v) dry substrate (DS) solid loadings to determine optimal conditions for the co-consumption of glucose and xylose. Compared to previous studies that tested fermentation of glucose using only the CSC, we obtained higher ethanol yield and concentration (92.80% and 23.22 g/L) with 1.5 mL GL/g-DS GL-Ethanol-pretreated SCB at 5% (w/v) solid loading and a CSC-to-TSC yeast cell mass ratio of 1:2 (w/w). Using 10% (w/v) solid loading under the same conditions, the ethanol concentration increased to 42.53 g/L but the ethanol yield decreased to 84.99%. In addition, an increase in the solid loading up to a certain point led to an increase in the ethanol concentration from 1.5 mL GL/g-DS-pretreated SCB. The highest ethanol concentration (68.24 g/L) was obtained with 15% (w/v) solid loading, using a CSC-to-TSC yeast cell mass ratio of 1:3 (w/w). GL-Ethanol pretreatment is a promising pretreatment method for improving both glucan and xylan conversion efficiencies of SCB. There was a competitive relationship between the two yeast strains, and the glucose and xylose utilization ability of the TSC was better than that of the CSC. Ethanol concentration was obviously increased at high solid loading, but the yield decreased as a result of an increase in the viscosity and inhibitor levels in the fermentation system. Finally, the SSCF of GL-Ethanol-pretreated SCB with mixed S. cerevisiae strains increased ethanol concentration and was an

  4. Systematic strain construction and process development: Xylitol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing Candida tenuis xylose reductase in wild-type or mutant form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratter, S M; Eixelsberger, T; Nidetzky, B

    2015-12-01

    A novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae whole-cell biocatalyst for xylitol production based on Candida tenuis xylose reductase (CtXR) is presented. Six recombinant strains expressing wild-type CtXR or an NADH-specific mutant were constructed and evaluated regarding effects of expression mode, promoter strength, biocatalyst concentration and medium composition. Intracellular XR activities ranged from 0.09 U mgProt(-1) to 1.05 U mgProt(-1) but did not correlate with the strains' xylitol productivities, indicating that other factors limited xylose conversion in the high-activity strains. The CtXR mutant decreased the biocatalyst's performance, suggesting use of the NADPH-preferring wild-type enzyme when (semi-)aerobic conditions are applied. In a bioreactor process, the best-performing strain converted 40 g L(-1) xylose with an initial productivity of 1.16 g L(-1)h(-1) and a xylitol yield of 100%. The obtained results underline the potential of CtXR wild-type for xylose reduction and point out parameters to improve "green" xylitol production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Metabolic and transcriptomic response of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain EC1118 after an oxygen impulse under carbon-sufficient, nitrogen-limited fermentative conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Marcelo; Aceituno, Felipe F; Slater, Alex W; Almonacid, Leonardo I; Melo, Francisco; Agosin, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    During alcoholic fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exposed to continuously changing environmental conditions, such as decreasing sugar and increasing ethanol concentrations. Oxygen, a critical nutrient to avoid stuck and sluggish fermentations, is only discretely available throughout the process after pump-over operation. In this work, we studied the physiological response of the wine yeast S. cerevisiae strain EC1118 to a sudden increase in dissolved oxygen, simulating pump-over operation. With this aim, an impulse of dissolved oxygen was added to carbon-sufficient, nitrogen-limited anaerobic continuous cultures. Results showed that genes related to mitochondrial respiration, ergosterol biosynthesis, and oxidative stress, among other metabolic pathways, were induced after the oxygen impulse. On the other hand, mannoprotein coding genes were repressed. The changes in the expression of these genes are coordinated responses that share common elements at the level of transcriptional regulation. Beneficial and detrimental effects of these physiological processes on wine quality highlight the dual role of oxygen in 'making or breaking wines'. These findings will facilitate the development of oxygen addition strategies to optimize yeast performance in industrial fermentations. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence that a recombinationless strain, rad 51, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks the budding cell resistance to γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama-Inaba, Hiroko; Saeki, Tetsuya

    1975-01-01

    The radiosensitivities of a wild-type and x-ray sensitive mutant, rad 51 (defective in genetic recombination) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to γ-rays were compared, using non-synchronized and partially synchronized cultures. The rad 51 cells, either haploid or diploid, showed only very small changes in radiosensitivity during cell growth, whereas the wild-type cells, especially haploid, showed the well-known budding resistance. The heterozygous (wild/rad 51) diploid cells showed in a survival curve a remarkable budding resistance and sigmoidal inactivation kinetics similar to those of wild-type homozygous diploid cells. (author)

  7. Osmotolerance and leavening ability in sweet and frozen sweet dough. Comparative analysis between Torulaspora delbrueckii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Lopez, M J; Prieto, J A; Randez-Gil, F

    2003-01-01

    The response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and freeze-tolerant Torulaspora delbrueckii strains to osmotic stress and their CO2 production capacity in sweet and frozen-sweet dough has been examined. T. delbrueckii strains, IGC5321 and IGC5323 showed higher leavening ability than Saccharomyces, specially after exposure to hyperosmotic stress of bread dough containing 20% sucrose and 2% salt added. In addition, Torulaspora and especially T. delbrueckii IGC5321 exhibited no loss of CO2 production capacity during freeze-thaw stress. Overall, these results appeared to indicate that Torulaspora cells are more tolerant than Saccharomyces to osmotic stress of bread dough. This trait correlated with a low invertase activity, a slow rate of trehalose mobilisation and the ability to respond rapidly to osmotic stress. Growth behaviour on high osmotic synthetic media was also examined. Cells of the IGC5321 strain showed intrinsic osmotolerance and ion toxicity resistance. However, T. delbrueckii IGC5323 exhibited a clear phenotype of osmosensitivity. Hence, this characteristic may not be essential or the only determinant for leavening ability in salted high-sugar dough.

  8. Ethanol production and maximum cell growth are highly correlated with membrane lipid composition during fermentation as determined by lipidomic analysis of 22 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Clark M; Lozada-Contreras, Michelle; Jiranek, Vladimir; Longo, Marjorie L; Block, David E

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing ethanol yield during fermentation is important for efficient production of fuel alcohol, as well as wine and other alcoholic beverages. However, increasing ethanol concentrations during fermentation can create problems that result in arrested or sluggish sugar-to-ethanol conversion. The fundamental cellular basis for these problem fermentations, however, is not well understood. Small-scale fermentations were performed in a synthetic grape must using 22 industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (primarily wine strains) with various degrees of ethanol tolerance to assess the correlation between lipid composition and fermentation kinetic parameters. Lipids were extracted at several fermentation time points representing different growth phases of the yeast to quantitatively analyze phospholipids and ergosterol utilizing atmospheric pressure ionization-mass spectrometry methods. Lipid profiling of individual fermentations indicated that yeast lipid class profiles do not shift dramatically in composition over the course of fermentation. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data was performed using partial least-squares linear regression modeling to correlate lipid composition data with fermentation kinetic data. The results indicate a strong correlation (R(2) = 0.91) between the overall lipid composition and the final ethanol concentration (wt/wt), an indicator of strain ethanol tolerance. One potential component of ethanol tolerance, the maximum yeast cell concentration, was also found to be a strong function of lipid composition (R(2) = 0.97). Specifically, strains unable to complete fermentation were associated with high phosphatidylinositol levels early in fermentation. Yeast strains that achieved the highest cell densities and ethanol concentrations were positively correlated with phosphatidylcholine species similar to those known to decrease the perturbing effects of ethanol in model membrane systems.

  9. Global mRNA expression analysis in myosin II deficient strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals an impairment of cell integrity functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera-Molina Félix E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MYO1 gene encodes the myosin II heavy chain (Myo1p, a protein required for normal cytokinesis in budding yeast. Myo1p deficiency in yeast (myo1Δ causes a cell separation defect characterized by the formation of attached cells, yet it also causes abnormal budding patterns, formation of enlarged and elongated cells, increased osmotic sensitivity, delocalized chitin deposition, increased chitin synthesis, and hypersensitivity to the chitin synthase III inhibitor Nikkomycin Z. To determine how differential expression of genes is related to these diverse cell wall phenotypes, we analyzed the global mRNA expression profile of myo1Δ strains. Results Global mRNA expression profiles of myo1Δ strains and their corresponding wild type controls were obtained by hybridization to yeast oligonucleotide microarrays. Results for selected genes were confirmed by real time RT-PCR. A total of 547 differentially expressed genes (p ≤ 0.01 were identified with 263 up regulated and 284 down regulated genes in the myo1Δ strains. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed the significant over-representation of genes in the protein biosynthesis and stress response categories. The SLT2/MPK1 gene was up regulated in the microarray, and a myo1Δslt2Δ double mutant was non-viable. Overexpression of ribosomal protein genes RPL30 and RPS31 suppressed the hypersensitivity to Nikkomycin Z and increased the levels of phosphorylated Slt2p in myo1Δ strains. Increased levels of phosphorylated Slt2p were also observed in wild type strains under these conditions. Conclusion Following this analysis of global mRNA expression in yeast myo1Δ strains, we conclude that 547 genes were differentially regulated in myo1Δ strains and that the stress response and protein biosynthesis gene categories were coordinately regulated in this mutant. The SLT2/MPK1 gene was confirmed to be essential for myo1Δ strain viability, supporting that the up

  10. A novel wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain TSH1 in scaling-up of solid-state fermentation of ethanol from sweet sorghum stalks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Du

    Full Text Available The rising demand for bioethanol, the most common alternative to petroleum-derived fuel used worldwide, has encouraged a feedstock shift to non-food crops to reduce the competition for resources between food and energy production. Sweet sorghum has become one of the most promising non-food energy crops because of its high output and strong adaptive ability. However, the means by which sweet sorghum stalks can be cost-effectively utilized for ethanol fermentation in large-scale industrial production and commercialization remains unclear. In this study, we identified a novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, TSH1, from the soil in which sweet sorghum stalks were stored. This strain exhibited excellent ethanol fermentative capacity and ability to withstand stressful solid-state fermentation conditions. Furthermore, we gradually scaled up from a 500-mL flask to a 127-m3 rotary-drum fermenter and eventually constructed a 550-m3 rotary-drum fermentation system to establish an efficient industrial fermentation platform based on TSH1. The batch fermentations were completed in less than 20 hours, with up to 96 tons of crushed sweet sorghum stalks in the 550-m3 fermenter reaching 88% of relative theoretical ethanol yield (RTEY. These results collectively demonstrate that ethanol solid-state fermentation technology can be a highly efficient and low-cost solution for utilizing sweet sorghum, providing a feasible and economical means of developing non-food bioethanol.

  11. A novel wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain TSH1 in scaling-up of solid-state fermentation of ethanol from sweet sorghum stalks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ran; Yan, Jianbin; Feng, Quanzhou; Li, Peipei; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Sandra; Li, Shizhong

    2014-01-01

    The rising demand for bioethanol, the most common alternative to petroleum-derived fuel used worldwide, has encouraged a feedstock shift to non-food crops to reduce the competition for resources between food and energy production. Sweet sorghum has become one of the most promising non-food energy crops because of its high output and strong adaptive ability. However, the means by which sweet sorghum stalks can be cost-effectively utilized for ethanol fermentation in large-scale industrial production and commercialization remains unclear. In this study, we identified a novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, TSH1, from the soil in which sweet sorghum stalks were stored. This strain exhibited excellent ethanol fermentative capacity and ability to withstand stressful solid-state fermentation conditions. Furthermore, we gradually scaled up from a 500-mL flask to a 127-m3 rotary-drum fermenter and eventually constructed a 550-m3 rotary-drum fermentation system to establish an efficient industrial fermentation platform based on TSH1. The batch fermentations were completed in less than 20 hours, with up to 96 tons of crushed sweet sorghum stalks in the 550-m3 fermenter reaching 88% of relative theoretical ethanol yield (RTEY). These results collectively demonstrate that ethanol solid-state fermentation technology can be a highly efficient and low-cost solution for utilizing sweet sorghum, providing a feasible and economical means of developing non-food bioethanol.

  12. Effect of selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains and different aging techniques on the polysaccharide and polyphenolic composition and sensorial characteristics of Cabernet Sauvignon red wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Barrio-Galán, Rubén; Cáceres-Mella, Alejandro; Medel-Marabolí, Marcela; Peña-Neira, Álvaro

    2015-08-15

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of two Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains with different capabilities of polysaccharide liberation during alcoholic fermentation in addition to subsequent aging on lees with or without oak wood chips as well as aging with commercial inactive dry yeast on the physical, chemical and sensorial characteristics of Cabernet Sauvignon red wines. The HPS (high levels of polysaccharides) yeast strain released higher amounts of polysaccharides (429 g L(-1)) than EC1118 (390 g L(-1)) during alcoholic fermentation, but the concentration equalized during the aging period (424 and 417 g L(-1) respectively). All aging techniques increased the polysaccharide concentration, but the increase was dependent on the technique applied. A higher liberation of polysaccharides reduced the concentration of most of the phenolic families analyzed. Moreover, no clear effect of the different aging techniques used in this study on color stabilization was found. The HPS wines were better valued than the EC1118 wines by the panel of tasters after alcoholic fermentation. In general, the HPS wines showed better physicochemical and sensorial characteristics than the EC1118 wines. According to the results obtained during the aging period, all aging techniques contributed to improve wine quality, but it was difficult to establish the technique that allowed the best wine to be obtained, because it depended on the aging technique used and the period of aging. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus K; Andersen, Kaj Scherz; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biofilms can be defined as multi-cellular aggregates adhering to a surface and embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM). The nonpathogenic yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, follows the common traits of microbial biofilms with cell-cell and cell-surface adhesion. S. cerevisiae is shown t...

  14. A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae evolved for fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass displays improved growth and fermentative ability in high solids concentrations and in the presence of inhibitory compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkins Gary M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Softwoods are the dominant source of lignocellulosic biomass in the northern hemisphere, and have been investigated worldwide as a renewable substrate for cellulosic ethanol production. One challenge to using softwoods, which is particularly acute with pine, is that the pretreatment process produces inhibitory compounds detrimental to the growth and metabolic activity of fermenting organisms. To overcome the challenge of bioconversion in the presence of inhibitory compounds, especially at high solids loading, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was subjected to evolutionary engineering and adaptation for fermentation of pretreated pine wood (Pinus taeda. Results An industrial strain of Saccharomyces, XR122N, was evolved using pretreated pine; the resulting daughter strain, AJP50, produced ethanol much more rapidly than its parent in fermentations of pretreated pine. Adaptation, by preculturing of the industrial yeast XR122N and the evolved strains in 7% dry weight per volume (w/v pretreated pine solids prior to inoculation into higher solids concentrations, improved fermentation performance of all strains compared with direct inoculation into high solids. Growth comparisons between XR122N and AJP50 in model hydrolysate media containing inhibitory compounds found in pretreated biomass showed that AJP50 exited lag phase faster under all conditions tested. This was due, in part, to the ability of AJP50 to rapidly convert furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural to their less toxic alcohol derivatives, and to recover from reactive oxygen species damage more quickly than XR122N. Under industrially relevant conditions of 17.5% w/v pretreated pine solids loading, additional evolutionary engineering was required to decrease the pronounced lag phase. Using a combination of adaptation by inoculation first into a solids loading of 7% w/v for 24 hours, followed by a 10% v/v inoculum (approximately equivalent to 1 g/L dry cell weight into 17

  15. Production of fermentation aroma compounds by Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts: effects of yeast assimilable nitrogen on two model strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrau, Francisco M; Medina, Karina; Farina, Laura; Boido, Eduardo; Henschke, Paul A; Dellacassa, Eduardo

    2008-11-01

    The contribution of yeast fermentation metabolites to the aromatic profile of wine is well documented; however, the biotechnological application of this knowledge, apart from strain selection, is still rather limited and often contradictory. Understanding and modeling the relationship between nutrient availability and the production of desirable aroma compounds by different strains must be one of the main objectives in the selection of industrial yeasts for the beverage and food industry. In order to overcome the variability in the composition of grape juices, we have used a chemically defined model medium for studying yeast physiological behavior and metabolite production in response to nitrogen supplementation so as to identify an appropriate yeast assimilable nitrogen level for strain differentiation. At low initial nitrogen concentrations, strain KU1 produced higher quantities of esters and fatty acids whereas M522 produced higher concentrations of isoacids, gamma-butyrolactone, higher alcohols and 3-methylthio-1-propanol. We propose that although strains KU1 and M522 have a similar nitrogen consumption profile, they represent useful models for the chemical characterization of wine strains in relation to wine quality. The differential production of aroma compounds by the two strains is discussed in relation to their capacity for nitrogen usage and their impact on winemaking. The results obtained here will help to develop targeted metabolic footprinting methods for the discrimination of industrial yeasts.

  16. Flocculation in ale brewing strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: re-evaluation of the role of cell surface charge and hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holle, Ann Van; Machado, Manuela D; Soares, Eduardo V

    2012-02-01

    Flocculation is an eco-friendly process of cell separation, which has been traditionally exploited by the brewing industry. Cell surface charge (CSC), cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and the presence of active flocculins, during the growth of two (NCYC 1195 and NCYC 1214) ale brewing flocculent strains, belonging to the NewFlo phenotype, were examined. Ale strains, in exponential phase of growth, were not flocculent and did not present active flocculent lectins on the cell surface; in contrast, the same strains, in stationary phase of growth, were highly flocculent (>98%) and presented a hydrophobicity of approximately three to seven times higher than in exponential phase. No relationship between growth phase, flocculation and CSC was observed. For comparative purposes, a constitutively flocculent strain (S646-1B) and its isogenic non-flocculent strain (S646-8D) were also used. The treatment of ale brewing and S646-1B strains with pronase E originated a loss of flocculation and a strong reduction of CSH; S646-1B pronase E-treated cells displayed a similar CSH as the non-treated S646-8D cells. The treatment of the S646-8D strain with protease did not reduce CSH. In conclusion, the increase of CSH observed at the onset of flocculation of ale strains is a consequence of the presence of flocculins on the yeast cell surface and not the cause of yeast flocculation. CSH and CSC play a minor role in the auto-aggregation of the ale strains since the degree of flocculation is defined, primarily, by the presence of active flocculins on the yeast cell wall.

  17. Isolation of a high malic and low acetic acid-producing sake yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain screened from respiratory inhibitor 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP)-resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, Shingo; Kiyoshi, Keiji; Oba, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Kenichi; Kadokura, Toshimori; Nakazato, Atsumi; Nakayama, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    We isolated 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP)-resistant sake yeast strains by UV mutagenesis. Among the DNP-resistant mutants, we focused on strains exhibiting high malic acid and low acetic acid production. The improved organic acid composition is unlikely to be under the control of enzyme activities related to malic and acetic acid synthesis pathways. Instead, low mitochondrial activity was observed in DNP-resistant mutants, indicating that the excess pyruvic acid generated during glycolysis is not metabolized in the mitochondria but converted to malic acid in the cytosol. In addition, the NADH/NAD(+) ratio of the DNP-resistant strains was higher than that of the parental strain K901. These results suggest that the increased NADH/NAD(+) ratio together with the low mitochondrial activity alter the organic acid composition because malic acid synthesis requires NADH, while acetic acid uses NAD(+). Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of the secondary compounds produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and wild yeast strains during the production of "cachaça" Análise dos componentes secundários produzidos por Saccharomyces cerevisiae e leveduras selvagens durante a produção de cachaça

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Fachine Dato

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare the composition of "cachaças" produced in 10 fermentation cycles by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc and wild yeast strains [Pichia silvicola (Ps, Pichia anomala 1 (Pa1, Pichia anomala 2 (Pa2 and Dekkera bruxelensis (Db], isolated from distilleries in Jaboticabal - SP, Brazil. The secondary components of the heart fraction were determined by gas chromatography. The levels of secondary components were influenced by the wine pH, which varied among yeast strains. S. cerevisiae showed slightly more secondary components, whereas wild strains produced more higher alcohols. Wild yeast strains were shown to be adequate for the production of a high quality "cachaça".O presente trabalho visou estabelecer uma comparação entre composição de cachaças produzidas por Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc e estirpes de leveduras selvagens [Pichia silvicola (Ps, Pichia anomala 1 (Pa1, Pichia anomala 2 (Pa2 e Dekkera bruxelensis (Db], isoladas em destilarias da região de Jaboticabal-SP. Os componentes secundários da fração denominada coração foram determinados por cromatografia gasosa. Os níveis dos componentes secundários foram influenciados pelo pH dos respectivos vinhos, os quais dependem da estirpe de levedura empregada no processo fermentativo. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae apresentou valores ligeiramente superiores de componentes secundários, enquanto as estirpes selvagens produziram maiores teores de álcoois superiores. As estirpes selvagens de leveduras mostraram-se adequadas para obtenção de uma cachaça de boa qualidade.

  19. Linking Genotype and Phenotype of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Reveals Metabolic Engineering Targets and Leads to Triterpene Hyper-Producers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karina Marie; Udatha, Gupta D. B. R. K.; Semba, Saori

    2011-01-01

    with the S288C strain, we implemented a strategy for the construction of a beta-amyrin production platform. The genes Erg8, Erg9 and HFA1 contained non-silent SNPs that were computationally analyzed to evaluate the changes that cause in the respective protein structures. Subsequently, Erg8, Erg9 and HFA1...

  20. Different response to acetic acid stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and l-ascorbic acid-producing strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martani, Francesca; Fossati, Tiziana; Posteri, Riccardo; Signori, Lorenzo; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2013-09-01

    Biotechnological processes are of increasing significance for industrial production of fine and bulk chemicals, including biofuels. Unfortunately, under operative conditions microorganisms meet multiple stresses, such as non-optimal pH, temperature, oxygenation and osmotic stress. Moreover, they have to face inhibitory compounds released during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomasses, which constitute the preferential substrate for second-generation processes. Inhibitors include furan derivatives, phenolic compounds and weak organic acids, among which acetic acid is one of the most abundant and detrimental for cells. They impair cellular metabolism and growth, reducing the productivity of the process: therefore, the development of robust cell factories with improved production rates and resistance is of crucial importance. Here we show that a yeast strain engineered to endogenously produce vitamin C exhibits an increased tolerance compared to the parental strain when exposed to acetic acid at moderately toxic concentrations, measured as viability on plates. Starting from this evidence, we investigated more deeply: (a) the nature and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS); (b) the activation of enzymes that act directly as detoxifiers of reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, in parental and engineered strains during acetic acid stress. The data indicate that the engineered strain can better recover from stress by limiting ROS accumulation, independently from SOD activation. The engineered yeast can be proposed as a model for further investigating direct and indirect mechanism(s) by which an antioxidant can rescue cells from organic acid damage; moreover, these studies will possibly provide additional targets for further strain improvements. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Variation in Indole-3-Acetic Acid Production by Wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. paradoxus Strains from Diverse Ecological Sources and Its Effect on Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yen-Yu; Chen, Hung-Wei; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is the most common naturally occurring and most thoroughly studied plant growth regulator. Microbial synthesis of IAA has long been known. Microbial IAA biosynthesis has been proposed as possibly occurring through multiple pathways, as has been proven in plants. However, the biosynthetic pathways of IAA and the ecological roles of IAA in yeast have not been widely studied. In this study, we investigated the variation in IAA production and its effect on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its closest relative Saccharomyces paradoxus yeasts from diverse ecological sources. We found that almost all Saccharomyces yeasts produced IAA when cultured in medium supplemented with the primary precursor of IAA, L-tryptophan (L-Trp). However, when cultured in medium without L-Trp, IAA production was only detected in three strains. Furthermore, exogenous added IAA exerted stimulatory and inhibitory effects on yeast growth. Interestingly, a negative correlation was observed between the amount of IAA production in the yeast cultures and the IAA inhibition ratio of their growth.

  2. Enhanced ethanol production, volatile compound biosynthesis and fungicide removal during growth of a newly isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain on enriched pasteurized grape musts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarris, Dimitris; Kotseridis, Yorgos; Galiotou-Panayotou, Maria; Papanikolaou, Seraphim [Department of Food Science and Technology, Agricultural University of Athens (Greece); Linga, Maria [Oinognosia, Wine analysis and consulting, Kiato (Greece)

    2009-02-15

    The kinetic behavior of a newly isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, grown on pasteurized grape musts enriched with industrial sugars, was studied after the addition of various concentrations [0.0 (reference), 0.4 and 2.4 mg/L] of the fungicide quinoxyfen to the medium. Batch-flask cultures were carried out. Significant quantities of biomass (10.0{+-}0.8 g/L) were produced regardless of quinoxyfen addition to the medium; therefore, the addition of the fungicide did not seriously inhibit biomass production. Ethanol was synthesized in very high quantities in all trials (highest concentrations 106.4-119.2 g/L). A slight decrease of ethanol production in terms of both absolute value and conversion yield of ethanol produced per sugar consumed was, however, observed when the quinoxyfen concentration was increased. The addition of quinoxyfen led to significantly lower ethylic ester levels, which also pertains to the acetates analyzed in this study. Fusel alcohol synthesis seemed to be activated when 0.4 mg/L quinoxyfen was added, but at 2.4 mg/L of added fungicide, no statistically significant differences were observed compared with the control trial. Volatile acid levels did not present a uniform trend in relation with the added fungicide. Finally, the fermentation was accompanied by a significant reduction of the fungicide concentration (79-82 wt% fungicide removal). (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Elimination of Glycerol Production in Anaerobic Cultures of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain Engineered To Use Acetic Acid as an Electron Acceptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medina, V.G.; Almering, M.J.H.; Van Maris, A.J.A.; Pronk, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    In anaerobic cultures of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae, glycerol production is essential to reoxidize NADH produced in biosynthetic processes. Consequently, glycerol is a major by-product during anaerobic production of ethanol by S. cerevisiae, the single largest fermentation process in

  4. L-Lactic acid production from glucose and xylose with engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: aeration and carbon source influence yields and productivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novy, Vera; Brunner, Bernd; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2018-04-11

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, engineered for L-lactic acid production from glucose and xylose, is a promising production host for lignocellulose-to-lactic acid processes. However, the two principal engineering strategies-pyruvate-to-lactic acid conversion with and without disruption of the competing pyruvate-to-ethanol pathway-have not yet resulted in strains that combine high lactic acid yields (Y LA ) and productivities (Q LA ) on both sugar substrates. Limitations seemingly arise from a dependency on the carbon source and the aeration conditions, but the underlying effects are poorly understood. We have recently presented two xylose-to-lactic acid converting strains, IBB14LA1 and IBB14LA1_5, which have the L-lactic acid dehydrogenase from Plasmodium falciparum (pfLDH) integrated at the pdc1 (pyruvate decarboxylase) locus. IBB14LA1_5 additionally has its pdc5 gene knocked out. In this study, the influence of carbon source and oxygen on Y LA and Q LA in IBB14LA1 and IBB14LA1_5 was investigated. In anaerobic fermentation IBB14LA1 showed a higher Y LA on xylose (0.27 g g Xyl -1 ) than on glucose (0.18 g g Glc -1 ). The ethanol yields (Y EtOH , 0.15 g g Xyl -1 and 0.32 g g Glc -1 ) followed an opposite trend. In IBB14LA1_5, the effect of the carbon source on Y LA was less pronounced (~ 0.80 g g Xyl -1 , and 0.67 g g Glc -1 ). Supply of oxygen accelerated glucose conversions significantly in IBB14LA1 (Q LA from 0.38 to 0.81 g L -1  h -1 ) and IBB14LA1_5 (Q LA from 0.05 to 1.77 g L -1  h -1 ) at constant Y LA (IBB14LA1 ~ 0.18 g g Glc -1 ; IBB14LA1_5 ~ 0.68 g g Glc -1 ). In aerobic xylose conversions, however, lactic acid production ceased completely in IBB14LA1 and decreased drastically in IBB14LA1_5 (Y LA aerobic ≤ 0.25 g g Xyl -1 and anaerobic ~ 0.80 g g Xyl -1 ) at similar Q LA (~ 0.04 g L -1  h -1 ). Switching from aerobic to microaerophilic conditions (pO 2  ~ 2%) prevented lactic acid metabolization, observed for

  5. Metabolic pathway engineering based on metabolomics confers acetic and formic acid tolerance to a recombinant xylose-fermenting strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishii Jun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of novel yeast strains with increased tolerance toward inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates is highly desirable for the production of bio-ethanol. Weak organic acids such as acetic and formic acids are necessarily released during the pretreatment (i.e. solubilization and hydrolysis of lignocelluloses, which negatively affect microbial growth and ethanol production. However, since the mode of toxicity is complicated, genetic engineering strategies addressing yeast tolerance to weak organic acids have been rare. Thus, enhanced basic research is expected to identify target genes for improved weak acid tolerance. Results In this study, the effect of acetic acid on xylose fermentation was analyzed by examining metabolite profiles in a recombinant xylose-fermenting strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Metabolome analysis revealed that metabolites involved in the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP [e.g. sedoheptulose-7-phosphate, ribulose-5-phosphate, ribose-5-phosphate and erythrose-4-phosphate] were significantly accumulated by the addition of acetate, indicating the possibility that acetic acid slows down the flux of the pathway. Accordingly, a gene encoding a PPP-related enzyme, transaldolase or transketolase, was overexpressed in the xylose-fermenting yeast, which successfully conferred increased ethanol productivity in the presence of acetic and formic acid. Conclusions Our metabolomic approach revealed one of the molecular events underlying the response to acetic acid and focuses attention on the non-oxidative PPP as a target for metabolic engineering. An important challenge for metabolic engineering is identification of gene targets that have material importance. This study has demonstrated that metabolomics is a powerful tool to develop rational strategies to confer tolerance to stress through genetic engineering.

  6. Effect of Agave tequilana juice on cell wall polysaccharides of three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from different origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Uscanga, Blanca; Arrizon, Javier; Ramirez, Jesús; Solis-Pacheco, Josué

    2007-02-01

    In this study, a characterization of cell wall polysaccharide composition of three yeasts involved in the production of agave distilled beverages was performed. The three yeast strains were isolated from different media (tequila, mezcal and bakery) and were evaluated for the beta(1,3)-glucanase lytic activity and the beta-glucan/ mannan ratio during the fermentation of Agave tequilana juice and in YPD media (control). Fermentations were performed in shake flasks with 30 g l(-1) sugar concentration of A. tequilana juice and with the control YPD using 30 g l(-1) of glucose. The three yeasts strains showed different levels of beta-glucan and mannan when they were grown in A. tequilana juice in comparison to the YPD media. The maximum rate of cell wall lyses was 50% lower in fermentations with A. tequilana juice for yeasts isolated from tequila and mezcal than compared to the bakery yeast.

  7. Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered for xylose metabolism exhibits a respiratory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-Su Jin; Jose M. Laplaza; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2004-01-01

    Native strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae do not assimilate xylose. S. cerevisiae engineered for D-xylose utilization through the heterologous expression of genes for aldose reductase ( XYL1), xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2), and D-xylulokinase ( XYL3 or XKS1) produce only limited amounts of ethanol in xylose medium. In recombinant S. cerevisiae expressing XYL1, XYL2,...

  8. Heterooligomeric phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    2004-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains five phosphoribosyl diphosphate (PRPP) synthase-homologous genes (PRS1-5), which specify PRPP synthase subunits 1-5. Expression of the five S. cerevisiae PRS genes individually in an Escherichia coli PRPP-less strain (Deltaprs) showed that a single PRS...

  9. Efeitos do cádmio sobre o crescimento das leveduras Saccharomyces cerevisiae PE-2 e Saccharomyces cerevisiae IZ-1904, e a capacidade da vinhaça em atenuar a toxicidade Effect of cadmium on the growth of two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, and the vinasse capacity to atenuate the toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Mariano-da-Silva

    2004-03-01

    , minimizando os efeitos deletérios do metal.The present study was carried out in order to evaluate the capability of different cadmium concentration (0; 0,05, 0,10 and 0,50mM to affect the growth of two S. cerevisiae strains (PE-2 and IZ-1904 in YED (yeast extract 1% and dextrose 2% medium, and to evaluate the three vinasse concentration capability (0,15 and 30% to attenuate the two cadmium concentration toxicity (0,1 and 0,5mM, using S. cerevisiae PE-2 strain in YED medium. In the first assay, the medium was inoculated in aseptic conditions with 1mL of 1% yeast suspension (PE-2 or IZ-1904 and incubated at 30ºC, 70 RPM for 18 hours. During anaerobic growth (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 and 18 hours, portions of cell suspension were taken out and biomass concentration was determined. At the end of fermentation, yeast viability, budding rate and bacterial contamination were determined. Both, initial and final trehalose, was measured. In the second assay, the medium was inoculated in aseptic conditions with 2mL of 1% PE-2 suspension and incubated at 30ºC, 120 rpm for 18 hours. During the anaerobic growth (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12,14, 16 and 18 hours portions of cell suspension were taken out and biomass concentration was determined. At the end of fermentation, alcohol production, yeast viability, budding rate and bacterial contamination were determined. Both, initial and final trehalose, was measured. The increase of cadmium levels showed a reduction on yeast growth and cell viability. Vinasse showed low toxicity, but protected yeast cells very effectively against the toxic effects of cadmium.

  10. Fermentation of mixed glucose-xylose substrates by engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: role of the coenzyme specificity of xylose reductase, and effect of glucose on xylose utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimacek Mario

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of the substantial metabolic engineering effort previously devoted to the development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting both the hexose and pentose sugars present in lignocellulose hydrolysates, the productivity of reported strains for conversion of the naturally most abundant pentose, xylose, is still a major issue of process efficiency. Protein engineering for targeted alteration of the nicotinamide cofactor specificity of enzymes catalyzing the first steps in the metabolic pathway for xylose was a successful approach of reducing xylitol by-product formation and improving ethanol yield from xylose. The previously reported yeast strain BP10001, which expresses heterologous xylose reductase from Candida tenuis in mutated (NADH-preferring form, stands for a series of other yeast strains designed with similar rational. Using 20 g/L xylose as sole source of carbon, BP10001 displayed a low specific uptake rate qxylose (g xylose/g dry cell weight/h of 0.08. The study presented herein was performed with the aim of analysing (external factors that limit qxylose of BP10001 under xylose-only and mixed glucose-xylose substrate conditions. We also carried out a comprehensive investigation on the currently unclear role of coenzyme utilization, NADPH compared to NADH, for xylose reduction during co-fermentation of glucose and xylose. Results BP10001 and BP000, expressing C. tenuis xylose reductase in NADPH-preferring wild-type form, were used. Glucose and xylose (each at 10 g/L were converted sequentially, the corresponding qsubstrate values being similar for each strain (glucose: 3.0; xylose: 0.05. The distribution of fermentation products from glucose was identical for both strains whereas when using xylose, BP10001 showed enhanced ethanol yield (BP10001 0.30 g/g; BP000 0.23 g/g and decreased yields of xylitol (BP10001 0.26 g/g; BP000 0.36 g/g and glycerol (BP10001 0.023 g/g; BP000 0.072 g/g as compared

  11. Performance of the auxotrophic Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 as host for the production of IL-1β in aerated fed-batch reactor: role of ACA supplementation, strain viability, and maintenance energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zueco Jesus

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 is an auxotrophic commonly used strain. In this work it has been used as host for the expression and secretion of human interleukin-1β (IL1β, using the cell wall protein Pir4 as fusion partner. To achieve high cell density and, consequently, high product yield, BY4741 [PIR4-IL1β] was cultured in an aerated fed-batch reactor, using a defined mineral medium supplemented with casamino acids as ACA (auxotrophy-complementing amino acid source. Also the S. cerevisiae mutant BY4741 Δyca1 [PIR4-IL1β], carrying the deletion of the YCA1 gene coding for a caspase-like protein involved in the apoptotic response, was cultured in aerated fed-batch reactor and compared to the parental strain, to test the effect of this mutation on strain robustness. Viability of the producer strains was examined during the runs and a mathematical model, which took into consideration the viable biomass present in the reactor and the glucose consumption for both growth and maintenance, was developed to describe and explain the time-course evolution of the process for both, the BY4741 parental and the BY4741 Δyca1 mutant strain. Results Our results show that the concentrations of ACA in the feeding solution, corresponding to those routinely used in the literature, are limiting for the growth of S. cerevisiae BY4741 [PIR4-IL1β] in fed-batch reactor. Even in the presence of a proper ACA supplementation, S. cerevisiae BY4741 [PIR4-IL1β] did not achieve a high cell density. The Δyca1 deletion did not have a beneficial effect on the overall performance of the strain, but it had a clear effect on its viability, which was not impaired during fed-batch operations, as shown by the kd value (0.0045 h-1, negligible if compared to that of the parental strain (0.028 h-1. However, independently of their robustness, both the parental and the Δyca1 mutant ceased to grow early during fed-batch runs, both strains using most of the

  12. Possible roles of vacuolar H+-ATPase and mitochondrial function in tolerance to air-drying stress revealed by genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Jun; Ando, Akira; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    Yeasts used in bread making are exposed to air-drying stress during dried yeast production processes. To clarify the genes required for air-drying tolerance, we performed genome-wide screening using the complete deletion strain collection of diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screening identified 278 gene deletions responsible for air-drying sensitivity. These genes were classified based on their cellular function and on the localization of their gene products. The results showed that the genes required for air-drying tolerance were frequently involved in mitochondrial functions and in connection with vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, which plays a role in vacuolar acidification. To determine the role of vacuolar acidification in air-drying stress tolerance, we monitored intracellular pH. The results showed that intracellular acidification was induced during air-drying and that this acidification was amplified in a deletion mutant of the VMA2 gene encoding a component of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, suggesting that vacuolar H(+)-ATPase helps maintain intracellular pH homeostasis, which is affected by air-drying stress. To determine the effects of air-drying stress on mitochondria, we analysed the mitochondrial membrane potential under air-drying stress conditions using MitoTracker. The results showed that mitochondria were extremely sensitive to air-drying stress, suggesting that a mitochondrial function is required for tolerance to air-drying stress. We also analysed the correlation between oxidative-stress sensitivity and air-drying-stress sensitivity. The results suggested that oxidative stress is a critical determinant of sensitivity to air-drying stress, although ROS-scavenging systems are not necessary for air-drying stress tolerance. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Cell Size Influences the Reproductive Potential and Total Lifespan of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast as Revealed by the Analysis of Polyploid Strains

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    Renata Zadrag-Tecza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The total lifespan of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae may be divided into two phases: the reproductive phase, during which the cell undergoes mitosis cycles to produce successive buds, and the postreproductive phase, which extends from the last division to cell death. These phases may be regulated by a common mechanism or by distinct ones. In this paper, we proposed a more comprehensive approach to reveal the mechanisms that regulate both reproductive potential and total lifespan in cell size context. Our study was based on yeast cells, whose size was determined by increased genome copy number, ranging from haploid to tetraploid. Such experiments enabled us to test the hypertrophy hypothesis, which postulates that excessive size achieved by the cell—the hypertrophy state—is the reason preventing the cell from further proliferation. This hypothesis defines the reproductive potential value as the difference between the maximal size that a cell can reach and the threshold value, which allows a cell to undergo its first cell cycle and the rate of the cell size to increase per generation. Here, we showed that cell size has an important impact on not only the reproductive potential but also the total lifespan of this cell. Moreover, the maximal cell size value, which limits its reproduction capacity, can be regulated by different factors and differs depending on the strain ploidy. The achievement of excessive size by the cell (hypertrophic state may lead to two distinct phenomena: the cessation of reproduction without “mother” cell death and the cessation of reproduction with cell death by bursting, which has not been shown before.

  14. Adaption of Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing a heterologous protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Astrid Mørkeberg; Beck, Vibe; Højlund Christensen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Production of the heterologous protein, bovine aprotinin, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was shown to affect the metabolism of the host cell to various extent depending on the strain genotype. Strains with different genotypes, industrial and laboroatory, respectively, were investigated. The maximal...

  15. Signature pathway expression of xylose utilization in the genetically engineered industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The limited xylose utilizing ability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a major obstacle for efficient cellulosic ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials. Haploid laboratory strains of S. cerevisiae are commonly used for genetic engineering to enable its xylose utiliza...

  16. Comparisons of radiosensitivity and damage repair potential between mutants from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain of yeast and laboratory-bred wild yeasts with particular attention being given to giant cell formation after X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinen, A.

    1988-01-01

    Yeast cells were exposed to X-rays at dose levels up to 10 kGy to induce damage to the DNA and investigate its effects on cellular growth patterns. For this purpose, comparisons were carried out between one diploid strain and six haploid strains of the Saccharomyces uvarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae species, which permitted the individual recovery and damage repair pathways to be described in more detail. The laboratory-bred wild strains ATCC 9080, 211 and 706 were judged to have unimpaired repair mechanisms as compared to the auxotrophs, which fact was evident from the higher radiosensitivity of the latter. A further parameter in this evaluation of growth behaviours was giant cell formation. The results here provided evidence in confirmation of deviations between wild strains and mutants. Even though the ceiling values for the formation of giant cells were similarly high in all strains, impairments of cell division and initial development were observed for the mutants already at considerably lower dose levels. (orig./MG) [de

  17. A loss-of-function mutation in the PAS kinase Rim15p is related to defective quiescence entry and high fermentation rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Araki, Yuya; Zhou, Yan; Maeya, Naoki; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2012-06-01

    Sake yeast cells have defective entry into the quiescent state, allowing them to sustain high fermentation rates. To reveal the underlying mechanism, we investigated the PAS kinase Rim15p, which orchestrates initiation of the quiescence program in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that Rim15p is truncated at the carboxyl terminus in modern sake yeast strains as a result of a frameshift mutation. Introduction of this mutation or deletion of the full-length RIM15 gene in a laboratory strain led to a defective stress response, decreased synthesis of the storage carbohydrates trehalose and glycogen, and impaired G(1) arrest, which together closely resemble the characteristic phenotypes of sake yeast. Notably, expression of a functional RIM15 gene in a modern sake strain suppressed all of these phenotypes, demonstrating that dysfunction of Rim15p prevents sake yeast cells from entering quiescence. Moreover, loss of Rim15p or its downstream targets Igo1p and Igo2p remarkably improved the fermentation rate in a laboratory strain. This finding verified that Rim15p-mediated entry into quiescence plays pivotal roles in the inhibition of ethanol fermentation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss-of-function mutation in the RIM15 gene may be the key genetic determinant of the increased ethanol production rates in modern sake yeast strains.

  18. Directed evolution of pyruvate decarboxylase-negative Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yielding a C2-independent, glucose-tolerant, and pyruvate-hyperproducing yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van Maris; J.M. Geertman; A. Vermeulen; M.K. Groothuizen; A.A. Winkler; M.D. Piper; J.P. van Dijken; J.T. Pronk

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe absence of alcoholic fermentation makes pyruvate decarboxylase-negative (Pdc(-)) strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae an interesting platform for further metabolic engineering of central metabolism. However, Pdc(-) S. cerevisiae strains have two growth defects:

  19. Effect of dilution rate and nutrients addition on the fermentative capability and synthesis of aromatic compounds of two indigenous strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in continuous cultures fed with Agave tequilana juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán-Marroquín, G A; Córdova, J; Valle-Rodríguez, J O; Estarrón-Espinosa, M; Díaz-Montaño, D M

    2011-11-15

    Knowledge of physiological behavior of indigenous tequila yeast used in fermentation process is still limited. Yeasts have significant impact on the productivity fermentation process as well as the sensorial characteristics of the alcoholic beverage. For these reasons a better knowledge of the physiological and metabolic features of these yeasts is required. The effects of dilution rate, nitrogen and phosphorus source addition and micro-aeration on growth, fermentation and synthesis of volatile compounds of two native Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, cultured in continuous fed with Agave tequilana juice were studied. For S1 and S2 strains, maximal concentrations of biomass, ethanol, consumed sugars, alcohols and esters were obtained at 0.04 h⁻¹. Those concentrations quickly decreased as D increased. For S. cerevisiae S1 cultures (at D=0.08 h⁻¹) supplemented with ammonium phosphate (AP) from 1 to 4 g/L, concentrations of residual sugars decreased from 29.42 to 17.60 g/L and ethanol increased from 29.63 to 40.08 g/L, respectively. The S1 culture supplemented with AP was then micro-aerated from 0 to 0.02 vvm, improving all the kinetics parameters: biomass, ethanol and glycerol concentrations increased from 5.66, 40.08 and 3.11 g/L to 8.04, 45.91 and 4.88 g/L; residual sugars decreased from 17.67 g/L to 4.48 g/L; and rates of productions of biomass and ethanol, and consumption of sugars increased from 0.45, 3.21 and 7.33 g/L·h to 0.64, 3.67 and 8.38 g/L·h, respectively. Concentrations of volatile compounds were also influenced by the micro-aeration rate. Ester and alcohol concentrations were higher, in none aerated and in aerated cultures respectively. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Hybridization of Palm Wine Yeasts ( Saccharomyces Cerevisiae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haploid auxotrophic strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were selected from palm wine and propagated by protoplast fusion with Brewers yeast. Fusion resulted in an increase in both ethanol production and tolerance against exogenous ethanol. Mean fusion frequencies obtained for a mating types ranged between 8 x ...

  1. Optimization of ethanol, citric acid, and α-amylase production from date wastes by strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus niger, and Candida guilliermondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acourene, S; Ammouche, A

    2012-05-01

    The present study deals with submerged ethanol, citric acid, and α-amylase fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae SDB, Aspergillus niger ANSS-B5, and Candida guilliermondii CGL-A10, using date wastes as the basal fermentation medium. The physical and chemical parameters influencing the production of these metabolites were optimized. As for the ethanol production, the optimum yield obtained was 136.00 ± 0.66 g/l under optimum conditions of an incubation period of 72 h, inoculum content of 4% (w/v), sugars concentration of 180.0 g/l, and ammonium phosphate concentration of 1.0 g/l. Concerning citric acid production, the cumulative effect of temperature (30°C), sugars concentration of 150.0 g/l, methanol concentration of 3.0%, initial pH of 3.5, ammonium nitrate concentration of 2.5 g/l, and potassium phosphate concentration of 2.5 g/l during the fermentation process of date wastes syrup did increase the citric acid production to 98.42 ± 1.41 g/l. For the production of α-amylase, the obtained result shows that the presence of starch strongly induces the production of α-amylase with a maximum at 5.0 g/l. Among the various nitrogen sources tested, urea at 5.0 g/l gave the maximum biomass and α-amylase estimated at 5.76 ± 0.56 g/l and 2,304.19 ± 31.08 μmol/l/min, respectively after 72 h incubation at 30°C, with an initial pH of 6.0 and potassium phosphate concentration of 6.0 g/l.

  2. Invertase SUC2 Is the Key Hydrolase for Inulin Degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shi-An; Li, Fu-Li

    2013-01-01

    Specific Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were recently found to be capable of efficiently utilizing inulin, but genetic mechanisms of inulin hydrolysis in yeast remain unknown. Here we report functional characteristics of invertase SUC2 from strain JZ1C and demonstrate that SUC2 is the key enzyme responsible for inulin metabolism in S. cerevisiae.

  3. Characterization of global yeast quantitative proteome data generated from the wild-type and glucose repression Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: The comparison of two quantitative methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usaite, Renata; Wohlschlegel, James; Venable, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The quantitative proteomic analysis of complex protein mixtures is emerging as a technically challenging but viable systems-level approach for studying cellular function. This study presents a large-scale comparative analysis of protein abundances from yeast protein lysates derived from both wild......-type yeast and yeast strains lacking key components of the Snf1 kinase complex. Four different strains were grown under well-controlled chemostat conditions. Multidimensional protein identification technology followed by quantitation using either spectral counting or stable isotope labeling approaches...... labeling strategy. The stable isotope labeling based quantitative approach was found to be highly reproducible among biological replicates when complex protein mixtures containing small expression changes were analyzed. Where poor correlation between stable isotope labeling and spectral counting was found...

  4. Effects of post-treatment incubation on recombinogenesis in incision-proficient and incision-deficient strains of saccharomyces cerevisiae, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Tetsuya; Machida, Isamu

    1991-01-01

    After the photoaddition of mono- and bifunctional furocoumarins to G1 phase cells, most gene conversion and crossing-over occurred without post-irradiation incubation of these cells in incision-proficient strains. In contrast, incision-deficient cells showed marked induction of both recombinational events only after treated cells had been incubated for several hours before selection. These results indicate that when furocoumarins are photoadded to G1 cells, initiation of recombinational events occurs during the same G1 phase in the incision-proficient cells; whereas, it occurs only after post-irradiation DNA replication in incision-deficient cells. The action of the PSO2 gene product specific for the repair of DNA crosslinks in recombination induction is discussed and compared to the actions of the excision repair genes RAD1 and RAD2. (author)

  5. Evidence against a photoprotective component of photoreactivation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacQuillan, A.M.; Green, G.; Perry, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    Photoreactivation-deficient (phr - ) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were shown to lack in vitro DNA-photolyase activity. A phr - mutant was then compared with a phr + strain for near-UV induced photoprotection from far-UV irradiation. Neither strain exhibited a photoprotective effect. (author)

  6. Engineering of carbon catabolite repression in recombinant xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Haack, Martin Brian; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2004-01-01

    analysed for changes in xylose consumption rate and ethanol production rate during anaerobic batch and chemostat cultivations on a mixture of 20 g l(-1) glucose and 50 g l(-1) xylose, and their characteristics were compared to the parental strain S. cerevisiae TMB3001 (XYL1, XYL2, XKS1). Improvement...... that xylose is a repressive sugar for S. cerevisiae....

  7. Creation of a synthetic xylose-inducible promoter for Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is currently used to produce ethanol from glucose, but it cannot utilize five-carbon sugars contained in the hemicellulose component of biomass feedstocks. S. cerevisiae strains engineered for xylose fermentation have been made using constitutive promoters to express the req...

  8. 2μ plasmid in Saccharomyces species and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strope, Pooja K; Kozmin, Stanislav G; Skelly, Daniel A; Magwene, Paul M; Dietrich, Fred S; McCusker, John H

    2015-12-01

    We determined that extrachromosomal 2μ plasmid was present in 67 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 100-genome strains; in addition to variation in the size and copy number of 2μ, we identified three distinct classes of 2μ. We identified 2μ presence/absence and class associations with populations, clinical origin and nuclear genotypes. We also screened genome sequences of S. paradoxus, S. kudriavzevii, S. uvarum, S. eubayanus, S. mikatae, S. arboricolus and S. bayanus strains for both integrated and extrachromosomal 2μ. Similar to S. cerevisiae, we found no integrated 2μ sequences in any S. paradoxus strains. However, we identified part of 2μ integrated into the genomes of some S. uvarum, S. kudriavzevii, S. mikatae and S. bayanus strains, which were distinct from each other and from all extrachromosomal 2μ. We identified extrachromosomal 2μ in one S. paradoxus, one S. eubayanus, two S. bayanus and 13 S. uvarum strains. The extrachromosomal 2μ in S. paradoxus, S. eubayanus and S. cerevisiae were distinct from each other. In contrast, the extrachromosomal 2μ in S. bayanus and S. uvarum strains were identical with each other and with one of the three classes of S. cerevisiae 2μ, consistent with interspecific transfer. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Functional co-operation between the nuclei of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mitochondria from other yeast species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spirek, M.; Horvath, A.; Piskur, Jure

    2000-01-01

    We elaborated a simple method that allows the transfer of mitochondria from collection yeasts to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Protoplasts prepared from different yeasts were fused to the protoplasts of the ade2-1, ura3-52, kar1-1, rho (0) strain of S. cerevisiae and were selected for respiring cybrids....... italicus, S, oviformis, S. capensis and S. chevalieri) exhibited complete compatibility with S. cerevisiae nuclei. The closely related S. douglasii mitochondrial genome could also partially restore respiration-deficiency in rho (0) S. cerevisiae, whereas mitochondrial genomes from phylogenetically less...

  10. Natural and modified promoters for tailored metabolic engineering of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubmann, Georg; Thevelein, Johan M; Nevoigt, Elke

    2014-01-01

    The ease of highly sophisticated genetic manipulations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has initiated numerous initiatives towards development of metabolically engineered strains for novel applications beyond its traditional use in brewing, baking, and wine making. In fact, baker's yeast has

  11. Multiplexed CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing and Gene Regulation Using Csy4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Raphael; Skrekas, Christos; Nielsen, Jens

    2018-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) technology has greatly accelerated the field of strain engineering. However, insufficient efforts have been made toward developing robust multiplexing tools in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we exploit the RNA processing capacity...

  12. Construction of killer industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 and its fermentation performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijender K. Bajaj

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1, a time tested industrial yeast possesses most of the desirable fermentation characteristics like fast growth and fermentation rate, osmotolerance, high ethanol tolerance, ability to ferment molasses, and to ferment at elevated temperatures etc. However, this yeast was found to be sensitive against the killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, killer trait was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 by protoplast fusion with Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 475, a killer strain. The resultant fusants were characterized for desirable fermentation characteristics. All the technologically important characteristics of distillery yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 were retained in the fusants, and in addition the killer trait was also introduced into them. Further, the killer activity was found to be stably maintained during hostile conditions of ethanol fermentations in dextrose or molasses, and even during biomass recycling.

  13. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Goebel, Cristine; de Mattos Oliveira, Flávio; Severo, Luiz Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an ubiquitous yeast widely used in industry and it is also a common colonizer of the human mucosae. However, the incidence of invasive infection by these fungi has significantly increased in the last decades. To evaluate the infection by S. cerevisiae in a hospital in southern Brazil during a period of 10 years (2000-2010). Review of medical records of patients infected by this fungus. In this period, 6 patients were found to be infected by S. cerevisiae. The age range of the patients was from 10 years to 84. Urine, blood, ascitic fluid, peritoneal dialysis fluid, and esophageal biopsy samples were analyzed. The predisposing factors were cancer, transplant, surgical procedures, renal failure, use of venous catheters, mechanical ventilation, hospitalization in Intensive Care Unit, diabetes mellitus, chemotherapy, corticosteroid use, and parenteral nutrition. Amphotericin B and fluconazole were the treatments of choice. Three of the patients died and the other 3 were discharged from hospital. We must take special precautions in emerging infections, especially when there are predisposing conditions such as immunosuppression or patients with serious illnesses. The rapid and specific diagnosis of S. cerevisiae infections is important for therapeutic decision. Furthermore, epidemiological and efficacy studies of antifungal agents are necessary for a better therapeutic approach. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae variety diastaticus friend or foe?-spoilage potential and brewing ability of different Saccharomyces cerevisiae variety diastaticus yeast isolates by genetic, phenotypic and physiological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Dörnberg, Tim; Kory, Oliver Ingo; Jacob, Fritz; Michel, Maximilian; Hutzler, Mathias

    2018-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae variety diastaticus is generally considered to be an obligatory spoilage microorganism and spoilage yeast in beer and beer-mixed beverages. Their super-attenuating ability causes increased carbon dioxide concentrations, beer gushing and potential bottle explosion along with changes in flavor, sedimentation and increased turbidity. This research shows clear differences in the super-attenuating properties of S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus yeast strains and their potential for industrial brewing applications. Nineteen unknown spoilage yeast cultures were obtained as isolates and characterized using a broad spectrum of genetic and phenotypic methods. Results indicated that all isolates represent genetically different S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus strains except for strain TUM PI BA 124. Yeast strains were screened for their super-attenuating ability and sporulation. Even if the STA1 gene responsible for super-attenuation by encoding for the enzyme glucoamylase could be verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction, no correlation to the spoilage potential could be demonstrated. Seven strains were further characterized focusing on brewing and sensory properties according to the yeast characterization platform developed by Meier-Dörnberg. Yeast strain TUM 3-H-2 cannot metabolize dextrin and soluble starch and showed no spoilage potential or super-attenuating ability even when the strain belongs to the species S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus. Overall, the beer produced with S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus has a dry and winey body with noticeable phenolic off-flavors desirable in German wheat beers.

  15. Kinetics of formation of induced mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chepurnoj, A.I.; Levkovich, N.V.; Mikhova-Tsenova, N.; Mel'nikova, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    UV and γ-radiation mutagenic effect an various strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied by analyzing formation kinetics of induced mutants at the period of postirradiation incubation. Mechanisms of induced reverse formation was suggested. The presented analysis is considered to be differential taking account of more subtle aspects of induced mutagenesis. 8 refs.; 10 figs.; 3 tabs

  16. Reconstitution of an efficient thymidine salvage pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernis, L.; Piskur, Jure; Diffley, J.F.X.

    2003-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unable to incorporate exogenous nucleosides into DNA. We have made a number of improvements to existing strategies to reconstitute an efficient thymidine salvage pathway in yeast. We have constructed strains that express both a nucleoside kinase as well...

  17. Habitat Predicts Levels of Genetic Admixture in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viranga Tilakaratna

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic admixture can provide material for populations to adapt to local environments, and this process has played a crucial role in the domestication of plants and animals. The model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been domesticated multiple times for the production of wine, sake, beer, and bread, but the high rate of admixture between yeast lineages has so far been treated as a complication for population genomic analysis. Here, we make use of the low recombination rate at centromeres to investigate admixture in yeast using a classic Bayesian approach and a locus-by-locus phylogenetic approach. Using both approaches, we find that S. cerevisiae from stable oak woodland habitats are less likely to show recent genetic admixture compared with those isolated from transient habitats such as fruits, wine, or human infections. When woodland yeast strains do show recent genetic admixture, the degree of admixture is lower than in strains from other habitats. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae populations from oak woodlands are genetically isolated from each other, with only occasional migration between woodlands and local fruit habitats. Application of the phylogenetic approach suggests that there is a previously undetected population in North Africa that is the closest outgroup to the European S. cerevisiae, including the domesticated Wine population. Careful testing for admixture in S. cerevisiae leads to a better understanding of the underlying population structure of the species and will be important for understanding the selective processes underlying domestication in this economically important species.

  18. Habitat Predicts Levels of Genetic Admixture in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilakaratna, Viranga; Bensasson, Douda

    2017-09-07

    Genetic admixture can provide material for populations to adapt to local environments, and this process has played a crucial role in the domestication of plants and animals. The model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae , has been domesticated multiple times for the production of wine, sake, beer, and bread, but the high rate of admixture between yeast lineages has so far been treated as a complication for population genomic analysis. Here, we make use of the low recombination rate at centromeres to investigate admixture in yeast using a classic Bayesian approach and a locus-by-locus phylogenetic approach. Using both approaches, we find that S. cerevisiae from stable oak woodland habitats are less likely to show recent genetic admixture compared with those isolated from transient habitats such as fruits, wine, or human infections. When woodland yeast strains do show recent genetic admixture, the degree of admixture is lower than in strains from other habitats. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae populations from oak woodlands are genetically isolated from each other, with only occasional migration between woodlands and local fruit habitats. Application of the phylogenetic approach suggests that there is a previously undetected population in North Africa that is the closest outgroup to the European S. cerevisiae , including the domesticated Wine population. Careful testing for admixture in S. cerevisiae leads to a better understanding of the underlying population structure of the species and will be important for understanding the selective processes underlying domestication in this economically important species. Copyright © 2017 Tilakaratna and Bensasson.

  19. Enhancing Fatty Acid Production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an Animal Feed Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Seung Kyou; Joo, Young-Chul; Kang, Dae Hee; Shin, Sang Kyu; Hyeon, Jeong Eun; Woo, Han Min; Um, Youngsoon; Park, Chulhwan; Han, Sung Ok

    2017-12-20

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used for edible purposes, such as human food or as an animal feed supplement. Fatty acids are also beneficial as feed supplements, but S. cerevisiae produces small amounts of fatty acids. In this study, we enhanced fatty acid production of S. cerevisiae by overexpressing acetyl-CoA carboxylase, thioesterase, and malic enzyme associated with fatty acid metabolism. The enhanced strain pAMT showed 2.4-fold higher fatty acids than the wild-type strain. To further increase the fatty acids, various nitrogen sources were analyzed and calcium nitrate was selected as an optimal nitrogen source for fatty acid production. By concentration optimization, 672 mg/L of fatty acids was produced, which was 4.7-fold higher than wild-type strain. These results complement the low level fatty acid production and make it possible to obtain the benefits of fatty acids as an animal feed supplement while, simultaneously, maintaining the advantages of S. cerevisiae.

  20. Induction of homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J R; Moore, P D

    1988-09-01

    We have investigated the effects of UV irradiation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in order to distinguish whether UV-induced recombination results from the induction of enzymes required for homologous recombination, or the production of substrate sites for recombination containing regions of DNA damage. We utilized split-dose experiments to investigate the induction of proteins required for survival, gene conversion, and mutation in a diploid strain of S. cerevisiae. We demonstrate that inducing doses of UV irradiation followed by a 6 h period of incubation render the cells resistant to challenge doses of UV irradiation. The effects of inducing and challenge doses of UV irradiation upon interchromosomal gene conversion and mutation are strictly additive. Using the yeast URA3 gene cloned in non-replicating single- and double-stranded plasmid vectors that integrate into chromosomal genes upon transformation, we show that UV irradiation of haploid yeast cells and homologous plasmid DNA sequences each stimulate homologous recombination approximately two-fold, and that these effects are additive. Non-specific DNA damage has little effect on the stimulation of homologous recombination, as shown by studies in which UV-irradiated heterologous DNA was included in transformation/recombination experiments. We further demonstrate that the effect of competing single- and double-stranded heterologous DNA sequences differs in UV-irradiated and unirradiated cells, suggesting an induction of recombinational machinery in UV-irradiated S. cerevisiae cells.

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae show low levels of traversal across human endothelial barrier in vitro [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Pérez-Torrado

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Saccharomyces cerevisiae is generally considered safe, and is involved in the production of many types of foods and dietary supplements. However, some isolates, which are genetically related to strains used in brewing and baking, have shown virulent traits, being able to produce infections in humans, mainly in immunodeficient patients. This can lead to systemic infections in humans. Methods: In this work, we studied S. cerevisiae isolates in an in vitro human endothelial barrier model, comparing their behaviour with that of several strains of the related pathogens Candida glabrata and Candida albicans. Results: The results showed that this food related yeast is able to cross the endothelial barrier in vitro. However, in contrast to C. glabrata and C. albicans, S. cerevisiae showed very low levels of traversal. Conclusions: We conclude that using an in vitro human endothelial barrier model with S. cerevisiae can be useful to evaluate the safety of S. cerevisiae strains isolated from foods.

  2. Accumulation of gold using Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Kamalika; Lahiri, Susanta; Sinha, P.

    2006-01-01

    Authors have reported preconcentration of 152 Eu, a long-lived fission product, by yeast cells, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Gold being a precious metal is used in electroplating, hydrogenation catalyst, etc. Heterogeneous composition of samples and low concentration offers renewed interest in its selective extraction of gold using various extractants. Gold can be recovered from different solutions using various chemical reagents like amines, organophosphorus compounds, and extractants containing sulphur as donor atom, etc. In the present work, two different strains of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been used to study the preconcentration of gold at various experimental conditions

  3. Fumaric acid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by in silico aided metabolic engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Xu

    Full Text Available Fumaric acid (FA is a promising biomass-derived building-block chemical. Bio-based FA production from renewable feedstock is a promising and sustainable alternative to petroleum-based chemical synthesis. Here we report on FA production by direct fermentation using metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the aid of in silico analysis of a genome-scale metabolic model. First, FUM1 was selected as the target gene on the basis of extensive literature mining. Flux balance analysis (FBA revealed that FUM1 deletion can lead to FA production and slightly lower growth of S. cerevisiae. The engineered S. cerevisiae strain obtained by deleting FUM1 can produce FA up to a concentration of 610±31 mg L(-1 without any apparent change in growth in fed-batch culture. FT-IR and (1H and (13C NMR spectra confirmed that FA was synthesized by the engineered S. cerevisiae strain. FBA identified pyruvate carboxylase as one of the factors limiting higher FA production. When the RoPYC gene was introduced, S. cerevisiae produced 1134±48 mg L(-1 FA. Furthermore, the final engineered S. cerevisiae strain was able to produce 1675±52 mg L(-1 FA in batch culture when the SFC1 gene encoding a succinate-fumarate transporter was introduced. These results demonstrate that the model shows great predictive capability for metabolic engineering. Moreover, FA production in S. cerevisiae can be efficiently developed with the aid of in silico metabolic engineering.

  4. Genomic Evolution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Chinese Rice Wine Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yudong; Zhang, Weiping; Zheng, Daoqiong; Zhou, Zhan; Yu, Wenwen; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Lifang; Liang, Xinle; Guan, Wenjun; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian; Lin, Zhenguo

    2014-01-01

    Rice wine fermentation represents a unique environment for the evolution of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To understand how the selection pressure shaped the yeast genome and gene regulation, we determined the genome sequence and transcriptome of a S. cerevisiae strain YHJ7 isolated from Chinese rice wine (Huangjiu), a popular traditional alcoholic beverage in China. By comparing the genome of YHJ7 to the lab strain S288c, a Japanese sake strain K7, and a Chinese industrial bioethanol strain YJSH1, we identified many genomic sequence and structural variations in YHJ7, which are mainly located in subtelomeric regions, suggesting that these regions play an important role in genomic evolution between strains. In addition, our comparative transcriptome analysis between YHJ7 and S288c revealed a set of differentially expressed genes, including those involved in glucose transport (e.g., HXT2, HXT7) and oxidoredutase activity (e.g., AAD10, ADH7). Interestingly, many of these genomic and transcriptional variations are directly or indirectly associated with the adaptation of YHJ7 strain to its specific niches. Our molecular evolution analysis suggested that Japanese sake strains (K7/UC5) were derived from Chinese rice wine strains (YHJ7) at least approximately 2,300 years ago, providing the first molecular evidence elucidating the origin of Japanese sake strains. Our results depict interesting insights regarding the evolution of yeast during rice wine fermentation, and provided a valuable resource for genetic engineering to improve industrial wine-making strains. PMID:25212861

  5. An internal deletion in MTH1 enables growth on glucose of pyruvate-decarboxylase negative, non-fermentative Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, B.; Flores, C.L.; Gancedo, C.; Zhang, X.; Trueheart, J.; Daran, J.M.; Pronk, J.T.; Van Maris, A.J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pyruvate-decarboxylase negative (Pdc-) strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae combine the robustness and high glycolytic capacity of this yeast with the absence of alcoholic fermentation. This makes Pdc-S. cerevisiae an interesting platform for efficient conversion of glucose towards

  6. Directed Evolution towards Increased Isoprenoid Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Simon; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    production can easily be scaled to meet current demands and it is also an environmental benign production method compared to organic synthesis. Thus it would be attractive to engineer a microorganism to produce high amounts of IPP and other immediate prenyl precursors such as geranyl pyrophosphate, farnesyl...... for discovering new genetic perturbations, which would results in and increased production of isoprenoids by S. cerevisiae has been very limited. This project is focus on creating diversity within a lycopene producing S. cerevisiae strain by construction of gDNA-, cDNA-, and transposon-libraries. The diversified...... coloration which is the result of higher amount of lycopene is being produced and hence high amount of isoprenoid precursor being available. This will elucidate novel genetic targets for increasing isoprenoid production in S. cerevisiae...

  7. Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to cadmium stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Luciana Mara Costa; Ribeiro, Frederico Haddad; Neves, Maria Jose; Porto, Barbara Abranches Araujo; Amaral, Angela M.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C.; Rosa, Carlos Augusto

    2009-01-01

    The intensification of industrial activity has been greatly contributing with the increase of heavy metals in the environment. Among these heavy metals, cadmium becomes a serious pervasive environmental pollutant. The cadmium is a heavy metal with no biological function, very toxic and carcinogenic at low concentrations. The toxicity of cadmium and several other metals can be mainly attributed to the multiplicity of coordination complexes and clusters that they can form. Some aspects of the cellular response to cadmium were extensively investigated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The primary site of interaction between many toxic metals and microbial cells is the plasma membrane. Plasma-membrane permeabilisation has been reported in a variety of microorganisms following cadmium exposure, and is considered one mechanism of cadmium toxicity in the yeast. In this work, using the yeast strain S. cerevisiae W303-WT, we have investigated the relationships between Cd uptake and release of cellular metal ions (K + and Na + ) using neutron activation technique. The neutron activation was an easy, rapid and suitable technique for doing these metal determinations on yeast cells; was observed the change in morphology of the strains during the process of Cd accumulation, these alterations were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) during incorporation of cadmium. (author)

  8. Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to cadmium stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Luciana Mara Costa; Ribeiro, Frederico Haddad; Neves, Maria Jose [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: luamatu@uol.com.br; Porto, Barbara Abranches Araujo; Amaral, Angela M.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Ativacao Neutronica], e-mail: menezes@cdtn.br; Rosa, Carlos Augusto [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia], e-mail: carlrosa@icb.ufmg

    2009-07-01

    The intensification of industrial activity has been greatly contributing with the increase of heavy metals in the environment. Among these heavy metals, cadmium becomes a serious pervasive environmental pollutant. The cadmium is a heavy metal with no biological function, very toxic and carcinogenic at low concentrations. The toxicity of cadmium and several other metals can be mainly attributed to the multiplicity of coordination complexes and clusters that they can form. Some aspects of the cellular response to cadmium were extensively investigated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The primary site of interaction between many toxic metals and microbial cells is the plasma membrane. Plasma-membrane permeabilisation has been reported in a variety of microorganisms following cadmium exposure, and is considered one mechanism of cadmium toxicity in the yeast. In this work, using the yeast strain S. cerevisiae W303-WT, we have investigated the relationships between Cd uptake and release of cellular metal ions (K{sup +} and Na{sup +}) using neutron activation technique. The neutron activation was an easy, rapid and suitable technique for doing these metal determinations on yeast cells; was observed the change in morphology of the strains during the process of Cd accumulation, these alterations were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) during incorporation of cadmium. (author)

  9. Prevalence and susceptibility of Saccharomyces cerevisiae causing vaginitis in Greek women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaemmanouil, V; Georgogiannis, N; Plega, M; Lalaki, J; Lydakis, D; Dimitriou, M; Papadimitriou, A

    2011-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an ascomycetous yeast, that is traditionally used in wine bread and beer production. Vaginitis caused by S. cerevisiae is rare. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of S. cerevisiae isolation from the vagina in two groups of women and determined the in vitro susceptibility of this fungus. Vaginal samples were collected from a total of 262 (asymptomatic and symptomatic) women with vaginitis attending the centre of family planning of General hospital of Piraeus. All blastomycetes that isolated from the vaginal samples were examined for microscopic morphological tests and identified by conventional methods: By API 20 C AUX and ID 32 C (Biomerieux). Antifungal susceptibility testing for amphotericin B,fluconazole itraconazole,voriconazole, posaconazole and caspofungin was performed by E -test (Ab BIODIKS SWEDEN) against S. cerevisiae. A total of 16 isolates of S. cerevisiae derived from vaginal sample of the referred women, average 6.10%. Susceptibility of 16 isolates of S. cerevisiae to a variety of antimycotic agents were obtained. So all isolates of S. cerevisiae were resistant to fluconazole, posaconazole and intraconazole, but they were sensitive to voriconazole caspofungin and Amphotericin B which were found sensitive (except 1/16 strains). None of the 16 patients had a history of occupational domestic use of baker's yeast. Vaginitis caused by S. cerevisiae occur, is rising and cannot be ignored. Treatment of Saccharomyces vaginitis constitutes a major challenge and may require selected and often prolonged therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Modification of mutation frequency in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vashishat, R.K.; Kakar, S.N.

    1976-01-01

    In a reverse mutation system, using haploid, histidine-requirinq strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the frequency of uv-induced prototrophs increased if the post-irradiation minimal medium was supplemented with limited amounts of histidine. Addition of natural amino acids or RNA bases in the post-irradiation minimal medium, with or without histidine, also increased the uv-induced mutation frequency. Thus, post-irradiation conditions favouring protein and RNA synthesis, are effective in increasing uv-induced mutations in yeast. As compared to uv light, nitrous acid was more effective in inducing reversions in this strain and the frequency increased if the treated cells were plated on minimal medium supplemented with limited amounts of histidine. However, the addition of amino acids or RNA bases decreased the number of revertants. An additional inclusion of histidine reversed the suppressive effect of these metabolites. The mutation induction processes are thus different or differently modifiable in uv and nitrous acid. (author)

  11. Simultaneous overexpression of enzymes of the lower part of glycolysis can enhance the fermentative capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smits, H. P.; Hauf, J.; Muller, S.

    2000-01-01

    Recombinant S. cerevisiae strains, with elevated levels of the enzymes of lower glycolysis (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate mutase, phosphoglycerate kinase, enolase, pyruvate kinase, pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase) were physiologically characterized...

  12. Repair of UV-damaged incoming plasmid DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keszenman-Pereyra, David

    1990-01-01

    A whole-cell transformation assay was used for the repair of UV-damaged plasma DNA in highly-transformable haploid strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae having different repair capabilities. The experiments described demonstrate that three epistasis groups (Friedberg 1988) are involved in the repair of UV-incoming DNA and that the repair processes act less efficiently on incoming DNA than they do on chromosomal DNA. The implications of these findings for UV repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed. (author)

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the Production of Whisk(ey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme M. Walker

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Whisk(ey is a major global distilled spirit beverage. Whiskies are produced from cereal starches that are saccharified, fermented and distilled prior to spirit maturation. The strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae employed in whisky fermentations is crucially important not only in terms of ethanol yields, but also for production of minor yeast metabolites which collectively contribute to development of spirit flavour and aroma characteristics. Distillers must therefore pay very careful attention to the strain of yeast exploited to ensure consistency of fermentation performance and spirit congener profiles. In the Scotch whisky industry, initiatives to address sustainability issues facing the industry (for example, reduced energy and water usage have resulted in a growing awareness regarding criteria for selecting new distilling yeasts with improved efficiency. For example, there is now a desire for Scotch whisky distilling yeasts to perform under more challenging conditions such as high gravity wort fermentations. This article highlights the important roles of S. cerevisiae strains in whisky production (with particular emphasis on Scotch and describes key fermentation performance attributes sought in distiller’s yeast, such as high alcohol yields, stress tolerance and desirable congener profiles. We hope that the information herein will be useful for whisky producers and yeast suppliers in selecting new distilling strains of S. cerevisiae, and for the scientific community to stimulate further research in this area.

  14. Switching the mode of sucrose utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miletti Luiz C

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overflow metabolism is an undesirable characteristic of aerobic cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during biomass-directed processes. It results from elevated sugar consumption rates that cause a high substrate conversion to ethanol and other bi-products, severely affecting cell physiology, bioprocess performance, and biomass yields. Fed-batch culture, where sucrose consumption rates are controlled by the external addition of sugar aiming at its low concentrations in the fermentor, is the classical bioprocessing alternative to prevent sugar fermentation by yeasts. However, fed-batch fermentations present drawbacks that could be overcome by simpler batch cultures at relatively high (e.g. 20 g/L initial sugar concentrations. In this study, a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase activity was engineered to transport sucrose into the cells through a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity, and the growth kinetics and biomass yields on sucrose analyzed using simple batch cultures. Results We have deleted from the genome of a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase the high-affinity sucrose-H+ symporter encoded by the AGT1 gene. This strain could still grow efficiently on sucrose due to a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity mediated by the MALx1 maltose permeases, and its further intracellular hydrolysis by cytoplasmic maltases. Although sucrose consumption by this engineered yeast strain was slower than with the parental yeast strain, the cells grew efficiently on sucrose due to an increased respiration of the carbon source. Consequently, this engineered yeast strain produced less ethanol and 1.5 to 2 times more biomass when cultivated in simple batch mode using 20 g/L sucrose as the carbon source. Conclusion Higher cell densities during batch cultures on 20 g/L sucrose were achieved by using a S. cerevisiae strain engineered in the sucrose uptake system. Such result was accomplished by

  15. Switching the mode of sucrose utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badotti, Fernanda; Dário, Marcelo G; Alves, Sergio L; Cordioli, Maria Luiza A; Miletti, Luiz C; de Araujo, Pedro S; Stambuk, Boris U

    2008-02-27

    Overflow metabolism is an undesirable characteristic of aerobic cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during biomass-directed processes. It results from elevated sugar consumption rates that cause a high substrate conversion to ethanol and other bi-products, severely affecting cell physiology, bioprocess performance, and biomass yields. Fed-batch culture, where sucrose consumption rates are controlled by the external addition of sugar aiming at its low concentrations in the fermentor, is the classical bioprocessing alternative to prevent sugar fermentation by yeasts. However, fed-batch fermentations present drawbacks that could be overcome by simpler batch cultures at relatively high (e.g. 20 g/L) initial sugar concentrations. In this study, a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase activity was engineered to transport sucrose into the cells through a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity, and the growth kinetics and biomass yields on sucrose analyzed using simple batch cultures. We have deleted from the genome of a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase the high-affinity sucrose-H+ symporter encoded by the AGT1 gene. This strain could still grow efficiently on sucrose due to a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity mediated by the MALx1 maltose permeases, and its further intracellular hydrolysis by cytoplasmic maltases. Although sucrose consumption by this engineered yeast strain was slower than with the parental yeast strain, the cells grew efficiently on sucrose due to an increased respiration of the carbon source. Consequently, this engineered yeast strain produced less ethanol and 1.5 to 2 times more biomass when cultivated in simple batch mode using 20 g/L sucrose as the carbon source. Higher cell densities during batch cultures on 20 g/L sucrose were achieved by using a S. cerevisiae strain engineered in the sucrose uptake system. Such result was accomplished by effectively reducing sucrose uptake by the yeast cells

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mixed Culture of Blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius L.) Juice: Synergism in the Aroma Compounds Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzo-Sánchez, Juan Arturo; Ortiz-Basurto, Rosa Isela; Luna-Solano, Guadalupe; Calderón-Santoyo, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Blackberry (Rubus sp.) juice was fermented using four different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Vitilevure-CM4457, Enoferm-T306, ICV-K1, and Greroche Rhona-L3574) recognized because of their use in the wine industry. A medium alcoholic graduation spirit (component analysis (PCA), and factorial discriminant analysis (DFA) permit to demonstrate the synergism between the strains. PMID:25506606

  17. Fungal genomics beyond Saccharomyces cerevisiae?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, Gerald; Mcintyre, Mhairi; Nielsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Fungi are used extensively in both fundamental research and industrial applications. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been the model organism for fungal research for many years, particularly in functional genomics. However, considering the diversity within the fungal kingdom, it is obvious...

  18. Intracellular metabolite profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae evolved under furfural

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Young Hoon; Kim, Sooah; Yang, Jungwoo; Seo, Jin?Ho; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2016-01-01

    Summary Furfural, one of the most common inhibitors in pre?treatment hydrolysates, reduces the cell growth and ethanol production of yeast. Evolutionary engineering has been used as a selection scheme to obtain yeast strains that exhibit furfural tolerance. However, the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to furfural at the metabolite level during evolution remains unknown. In this study, evolutionary engineering and metabolomic analyses were applied to determine the effects of furfural on y...

  19. Sucrose fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking hexose transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Anderson S; Miletti, Luiz C; Stambuk, Boris U

    2004-01-01

    Sucrose is the major carbon source used by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during production of baker's yeast, fuel ethanol and several distilled beverages. It is generally accepted that sucrose fermentation proceeds through extracellular hydrolysis of the sugar, mediated by the periplasmic invertase, producing glucose and fructose that are transported into the cells and metabolized. In the present work we analyzed the contribution to sucrose fermentation of a poorly characterized pathway of sucrose utilization by S. cerevisiae cells, the active transport of the sugar through the plasma membrane and its intracellular hydrolysis. A yeast strain that lacks the major hexose transporters (hxt1-hxt7 and gal2) is incapable of growing on or fermenting glucose or fructose. Our results show that this hxt-null strain is still able to ferment sucrose due to direct uptake of the sugar into the cells. Deletion of the AGT1 gene, which encodes a high-affinity sucrose-H(+) symporter, rendered cells incapable of sucrose fermentation. Since sucrose is not an inducer of the permease, expression of the AGT1 must be constitutive in order to allow growth of the hxt-null strain on sucrose. The molecular characterization of active sucrose transport and fermentation by S. cerevisiae cells opens new opportunities to optimize yeasts for sugarcane-based industrial processes.

  20. Functional relevance of water and glycerol channels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Farzana; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C; Soveral, Graça; Prista, Catarina

    2017-05-01

    Our understanding of the functional relevance of orthodox aquaporins and aquaglyceroporins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is essentially based on phenotypic variations obtained by expression/overexpression/deletion of these major intrinsic proteins in selected strains. These water/glycerol channels are considered crucial during various life-cycle phases, such as sporulation and mating and in some life processes such as rapid freeze-thaw tolerance, osmoregulation and phenomena associated with cell surface. Despite their putative functional roles not only as channels but also as sensors, their underlying mechanisms and their regulation are still poorly understood. In the present review, we summarize and discuss the physiological relevance of S. cerevisiae aquaporins (Aqy1 and Aqy2) and aquaglyceroporins (Fps1 and Yfl054c). In particular, the fact that most S. cerevisiae laboratory strains harbor genes coding for non-functional aquaporins, while wild and industrial strains possess at least one functional aquaporin, suggests that aquaporin activity is required for cell survival under more harsh conditions. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Lactose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting cellobiose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Oh, Eun Joong; Pathanibul, Panchalee; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-09-20

    Lactose is an inevitable byproduct of the dairy industry. In addition to cheese manufacturing, the growing Greek yogurt industry generates excess acid whey, which contains lactose. Therefore, rapid and efficient conversion of lactose to fuels and chemicals would be useful for recycling the otherwise harmful acid whey. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a popular metabolic engineering host, cannot natively utilize lactose. However, we discovered that an engineered S. cerevisiae strain (EJ2) capable of fermenting cellobiose can also ferment lactose. This finding suggests that a cellobiose transporter (CDT-1) can transport lactose and a β-glucosidase (GH1-1) can hydrolyze lactose by acting as a β-galactosidase. While the lactose fermentation by the EJ2 strain was much slower than the cellobiose fermentation, a faster lactose-fermenting strain (EJ2e8) was obtained through serial subcultures on lactose. The EJ2e8 strain fermented lactose with a consumption rate of 2.16g/Lh. The improved lactose fermentation by the EJ2e8 strain was due to the increased copy number of cdt-1 and gh1-1 genes. Looking ahead, the EJ2e8 strain could be exploited for the production of other non-ethanol fuels and chemicals from lactose through further metabolic engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Interactions between Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mixed culture for kefiran production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheirsilp, Benjamas; Shoji, Hirofumi; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Shioya, Suteaki

    2003-01-01

    Since a positive effect on the growth and kefiran production of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens was observed in a mixed culture with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the elucidation of the interactions between L. kefiranofaciens and S. cerevisiae may lead to higher productivity. Hence, the microbial interaction of each strain was investigated. Apart from the positive effect of a reduction in the amount of lactic acid by S. cerevisiae, a positive effect of S. cerevisiae on the growth and kefiran production of L. kefiranofaciens in a mixed culture was observed. Various experiments were carried out to study this effect. In this study, the observed increase in capsular kefiran in a mixed culture with inactivated S. cerevisiae correlated well to that in an anaerobic mixed culture. Differences in capsular kefiran production were observed for different initial S. cerevisiae concentrations under anaerobic conditions. From these fermentation results, it was concluded that the physical contact with S. cerevisiae mainly enhanced the capsular kefiran production of L. kefiranofaciens in a mixed culture. Therefore, in an anaerobic mixed culture, this direct contact resulted in higher capsular kefiran production than that in pure culture.

  3. Secretory Overexpression of Bacillus thermocatenulatus Lipase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using Combinatorial Library Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Shota; Yamada, Ryosuke; Ogino, Hiroyasu

    2018-04-10

    Simple and cost-effective lipase expression host microorganisms are highly desirable. A combinatorial library strategy is used to improve the secretory expression of lipase from Bacillus thermocatenulatus (BTL2) in the culture supernatant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A plasmid library including expression cassettes composed of sequences encoding one of each 15 promoters, 15 secretion signals, and 15 terminators derived from yeast species, S. cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, and Hansenula polymorpha, is constructed. The S. cerevisiae transformant YPH499/D4, comprising H. polymorpha GAP promoter, S. cerevisiae SAG1 secretion signal, and P. pastoris AOX1 terminator, is selected by high-throughput screening. This transformant expresses BTL2 extra-cellularly with a 130-fold higher than the control strain, comprising S. cerevisiae PGK1 promoter, S. cerevisiae α-factor secretion signal, and S. cerevisiae PGK1 terminator, after cultivation for 72 h. This combinatorial library strategy holds promising potential for application in the optimization of the secretory expression of proteins in yeast. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) antibody (ASCA) test systems. 866.5785 Section 866.5785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system is...

  5. Genomic structural variation contributes to phenotypic change of industrial bioethanol yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Li-Jie; Fang, Ya-Hong; Jin, Xin-Na; Qi, Lei; Wu, Xue-Chang; Zheng, Dao-Qiong

    2016-03-01

    Genomic structural variation (GSV) is a ubiquitous phenomenon observed in the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different genetic backgrounds; however, the physiological and phenotypic effects of GSV are not well understood. Here, we first revealed the genetic characteristics of a widely used industrial S. cerevisiae strain, ZTW1, by whole genome sequencing. ZTW1 was identified as an aneuploidy strain and a large-scale GSV was observed in the ZTW1 genome compared with the genome of a diploid strain YJS329. These GSV events led to copy number variations (CNVs) in many chromosomal segments as well as one whole chromosome in the ZTW1 genome. Changes in the DNA dosage of certain functional genes directly affected their expression levels and the resultant ZTW1 phenotypes. Moreover, CNVs of large chromosomal regions triggered an aneuploidy stress in ZTW1. This stress decreased the proliferation ability and tolerance of ZTW1 to various stresses, while aneuploidy response stress may also provide some benefits to the fermentation performance of the yeast, including increased fermentation rates and decreased byproduct generation. This work reveals genomic characters of the bioethanol S. cerevisiae strain ZTW1 and suggests that GSV is an important kind of mutation that changes the traits of industrial S. cerevisiae strains. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Genomic evolution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Chinese rice wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yudong; Zhang, Weiping; Zheng, Daoqiong; Zhou, Zhan; Yu, Wenwen; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Lifang; Liang, Xinle; Guan, Wenjun; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian; Lin, Zhenguo

    2014-09-10

    Rice wine fermentation represents a unique environment for the evolution of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To understand how the selection pressure shaped the yeast genome and gene regulation, we determined the genome sequence and transcriptome of a S. cerevisiae strain YHJ7 isolated from Chinese rice wine (Huangjiu), a popular traditional alcoholic beverage in China. By comparing the genome of YHJ7 to the lab strain S288c, a Japanese sake strain K7, and a Chinese industrial bioethanol strain YJSH1, we identified many genomic sequence and structural variations in YHJ7, which are mainly located in subtelomeric regions, suggesting that these regions play an important role in genomic evolution between strains. In addition, our comparative transcriptome analysis between YHJ7 and S288c revealed a set of differentially expressed genes, including those involved in glucose transport (e.g., HXT2, HXT7) and oxidoredutase activity (e.g., AAD10, ADH7). Interestingly, many of these genomic and transcriptional variations are directly or indirectly associated with the adaptation of YHJ7 strain to its specific niches. Our molecular evolution analysis suggested that Japanese sake strains (K7/UC5) were derived from Chinese rice wine strains (YHJ7) at least approximately 2,300 years ago, providing the first molecular evidence elucidating the origin of Japanese sake strains. Our results depict interesting insights regarding the evolution of yeast during rice wine fermentation, and provided a valuable resource for genetic engineering to improve industrial wine-making strains. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  7. Antioxidant properties and global metabolite screening of the probiotic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Suprama; Timson, David J; Annapure, Uday S

    2017-07-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii is the only yeast species with probiotic properties. It is considered to have therapeutic significance in gastrointestinal disorders. In the present study, a comparative physiological study between this yeast and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (BY4742) was performed by evaluating two prominent traits of probiotic species, responses to different stress conditions and antioxidant capacity. A global metabolite profile was also developed aiming to identify which therapeutically important secondary metabolites are produced. Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii showed no significant difference in growth patterns but greater stress tolerance compared to S. cerevisiae. It also demonstrated a six- to 10-fold greater antioxidant potential (judged by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay), with a 70-fold higher total phenolic content and a 20-fold higher total flavonoid content in the extracellular fraction. These features were clearly differentiated by principal component analysis and further indicated by metabolite profiling. The extracellular fraction of the S. cerevisiae var. boulardii cultures was found to be rich in polyphenolic metabolites: vanillic acid, cinnamic acid, phenyl ethyl alcohol (rose oil), erythromycin, amphetamine and vitamin B 6 , which results in the antioxidant capacity of this strain. The present study presents a new perspective for differentiating the two genetically related strains of yeast, S. cerevisiae and S. cerevisiae var. boulardii by assessing their metabolome fingerprints. In addition to the correlation of the phenotypic properties with the secretory metabolites of these two yeasts, the present study also emphasizes the potential to exploit S. cerevisiae var. boulardii in the industrial production of these metabolites. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Pathways of ultraviolet mutability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemontt, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    Non-allelic mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with reduced capacity for ultraviolet light (UV)-induced forward mutation from CAN1 to can1 were assigned to seven distinct genetic loci, each with allele designations umr1-1, umr2-1, ..., umr7-1 to indicate UV mutation resistance. None conferred a great deal of UV sensitivity. When assayed on yeast extract-peptone-dextrose complex growth agar, umr1, umr3, and umr7 were the most UV-sensitive. When assayed on synthetic agar lacking arginine, however, umr3 was the most UV-sensitive. All strains carrying each of the seven umr genes exhibited varying degrees of defective UV mutability, compact with wild types. Normal UV revertibility of three different alleles was observed in strains carrying either umr4, umr5, umr6, or umr7. Five a/α homozygous umr diploids failed to sporulate. One of these, umr7, blocked normal secretion of alpha hormone in α segregants and could not conjugate with a strains. The phenotypes of umr mutants are consistent with the existence of branched UV mutation pathways of different specificity

  9. Copper Tolerance and Biosorption of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Alcoholic Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ling-ling; Jia, Bo; Zhao, Fang; Huang, Wei-dong; Zhan, Ji-cheng

    2015-01-01

    At high levels, copper in grape mash can inhibit yeast activity and cause stuck fermentations. Wine yeast has limited tolerance of copper and can reduce copper levels in wine during fermentation. This study aimed to understand copper tolerance of wine yeast and establish the mechanism by which yeast decreases copper in the must during fermentation. Three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (lab selected strain BH8 and industrial strains AWRI R2 and Freddo) and a simple model fermentation system containing 0 to 1.50 mM Cu2+ were used. ICP-AES determined Cu ion concentration in the must decreasing differently by strains and initial copper levels during fermentation. Fermentation performance was heavily inhibited under copper stress, paralleled a decrease in viable cell numbers. Strain BH8 showed higher copper-tolerance than strain AWRI R2 and higher adsorption than Freddo. Yeast cell surface depression and intracellular structure deformation after copper treatment were observed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy; electronic differential system detected higher surface Cu and no intracellular Cu on 1.50 mM copper treated yeast cells. It is most probably that surface adsorption dominated the biosorption process of Cu2+ for strain BH8, with saturation being accomplished in 24 h. This study demonstrated that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BH8 has good tolerance and adsorption of Cu, and reduces Cu2+ concentrations during fermentation in simple model system mainly through surface adsorption. The results indicate that the strain selected from China’s stress-tolerant wine grape is copper tolerant and can reduce copper in must when fermenting in a copper rich simple model system, and provided information for studies on mechanisms of heavy metal stress. PMID:26030864

  10. Copper Tolerance and Biosorption of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Alcoholic Fermentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Yu Sun

    Full Text Available At high levels, copper in grape mash can inhibit yeast activity and cause stuck fermentations. Wine yeast has limited tolerance of copper and can reduce copper levels in wine during fermentation. This study aimed to understand copper tolerance of wine yeast and establish the mechanism by which yeast decreases copper in the must during fermentation. Three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (lab selected strain BH8 and industrial strains AWRI R2 and Freddo and a simple model fermentation system containing 0 to 1.50 mM Cu2+ were used. ICP-AES determined Cu ion concentration in the must decreasing differently by strains and initial copper levels during fermentation. Fermentation performance was heavily inhibited under copper stress, paralleled a decrease in viable cell numbers. Strain BH8 showed higher copper-tolerance than strain AWRI R2 and higher adsorption than Freddo. Yeast cell surface depression and intracellular structure deformation after copper treatment were observed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy; electronic differential system detected higher surface Cu and no intracellular Cu on 1.50 mM copper treated yeast cells. It is most probably that surface adsorption dominated the biosorption process of Cu2+ for strain BH8, with saturation being accomplished in 24 h. This study demonstrated that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BH8 has good tolerance and adsorption of Cu, and reduces Cu2+ concentrations during fermentation in simple model system mainly through surface adsorption. The results indicate that the strain selected from China's stress-tolerant wine grape is copper tolerant and can reduce copper in must when fermenting in a copper rich simple model system, and provided information for studies on mechanisms of heavy metal stress.

  11. Growth of non-Saccharomyces yeasts affects nutrient availability for Saccharomyces cerevisiae during wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Karina; Boido, Eduardo; Dellacassa, Eduardo; Carrau, Francisco

    2012-07-02

    Yeast produces numerous secondary metabolites during fermentation that impact final wine quality. Although it is widely recognized that growth of diverse non-Saccharomyces (NS) yeast can positively affect flavor complexity during Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine fermentation, the inability to control spontaneous or co-fermentation processes by NS yeast has restricted their use in winemaking. We selected two NS yeasts from our Uruguayan native collection to study NS-S. cerevisiae interactions during wine fermentation. The selected strains of Hanseniaspora vineae and Metschnikowia pulcherrima had different yeast assimilable nitrogen consumption profiles and had different effects on S. cerevisiae fermentation and growth kinetics. Studies in which we varied inoculum size and using either simultaneous or sequential inoculation of NS yeast and S. cerevisiae suggested that competition for nutrients had a significant effect on fermentation kinetics. Sluggish fermentations were more pronounced when S. cerevisiae was inoculated 24h after the initial stage of fermentation with a NS strain compared to co-inoculation. Monitoring strain populations using differential WL nutrient agar medium and fermentation kinetics of mixed cultures allowed for a better understanding of strain interactions and nutrient addition effects. Limitation of nutrient availability for S. cerevisiae was shown to result in stuck fermentations as well as to reduce sensory desirability of the resulting wine. Addition of diammonium phosphate (DAP) and a vitamin mix to a defined medium allowed for a comparison of nutrient competition between strains. Addition of DAP and the vitamin mix was most effective in preventing stuck fermentations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Removal of Pyrimethanil and Fenhexamid from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Liquid Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etjen Bizaj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity for the removal of pyrimethanil and fenhexamid, two fungicides commonly used for the control of Botrytis cinerea in vineyards, has been evaluated during an alcoholic fermentation process in batch system. Commercial and wild strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used. Batch fermentations were carried out in yeast extract-malt extract medium (YM with 18.0 % (by mass glucose, and the fungicides were added separately at three concentrations: 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 mg/L. The removal capacity of yeast strains was also examined in stationary phase cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Stationary assays were performed with yeast biomass harvested from the stationary phase of an anaerobic fermentation process, with separate additions of 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 mg/L of both fungicides. Removal studies with stationary phase cells were performed with viable and non-viable cells inactivated with sodium azide. This study clearly shows that both Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were able to remove fenhexamid and pyrimethanil in stationary and fermentative assays. The removal potential is shown to be strain dependent in stationary but not in fermentative assays. However, the removal potential is dependent on the type of fungicide in both stationary and fermentative assays. In stationary phase cultures no significant difference in fungicide removal potential between viable and non-viable cells was observed, indicating that both pesticides were not degraded by metabolically active cells. However, the presence of both pesticides influenced fermentation kinetics and only pyrimethanil at 10.0 mg/L increased the production of volatile acidity of both strains.

  13. Zinc oxide and silver nanoparticles toxicity in the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván Márquez, Imelda; Ghiyasvand, Mergan; Massarsky, Andrey; Babu, Mohan; Samanfar, Bahram; Omidi, Katayoun; Moon, Thomas W; Smith, Myron L; Golshani, Ashkan

    2018-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly incorporated into a variety of commercial applications and consumer products; however, ENMs may possess cytotoxic properties due to their small size. This study assessed the effects of two commonly used ENMs, zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A collection of ≈4600 S. cerevisiae deletion mutant strains was used to deduce the genes, whose absence makes S. cerevisiae more prone to the cytotoxic effects of ZnONPs or AgNPs. We demonstrate that S. cerevisiae strains that lack genes involved in transmembrane and membrane transport, cellular ion homeostasis, and cell wall organization or biogenesis exhibited the highest sensitivity to ZnONPs. In contrast, strains that lack genes involved in transcription and RNA processing, cellular respiration, and endocytosis and vesicular transport exhibited the highest sensitivity to AgNPs. Secondary assays confirmed that ZnONPs affected cell wall function and integrity, whereas AgNPs exposure decreased transcription, reduced endocytosis, and led to a dysfunctional electron transport system. This study supports the use of S. cerevisiae Gene Deletion Array as an effective high-throughput technique to determine cellular targets of ENM toxicity.

  14. Improvement of Lead Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Random Mutagenesis of Transcription Regulator SPT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liying; Gao, Shan; Zhang, Hongman; Huang, He; Jiang, Ling

    2018-01-01

    Bioremediation of heavy metal pollution with biomaterials such as bacteria and fungi usually suffer from limitations because of microbial sensitivity to high concentration of heavy metals. Herein, we adopted a novel random mutagenesis technique called RAISE to manipulate the transcription regulator SPT3 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to improve cell lead tolerance. The best strain Mutant VI was selected from the random mutagenesis libraries on account of the growth performance, with higher specific growth rate than the control strain (0.068 vs. 0.040 h -1 ) at lead concentration as high as 1.8 g/L. Combined with the transcriptome analysis of S. cerevisiae, expressing the SPT3 protein was performed to make better sense of the global regulatory effects of SPT3. The data analysis revealed that 57 of S. cerevisiae genes were induced and 113 genes were suppressed, ranging from those for trehalose synthesis, carbon metabolism, and nucleotide synthesis to lead resistance. Especially, the accumulation of intracellular trehalose in S. cerevisiae under certain conditions of stress is considered important to lead resistance. The above results represented that SPT3 was acted as global transcription regulator in the exponential phase of strain and accordingly improved heavy metal tolerance in the heterologous host S. cerevisiae. The present study provides a route to complex phenotypes that are not readily accessible by traditional methods.

  15. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kayikci, Omur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluc......Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration...

  16. Modelling of Ethanol Production from Red Beet Juice by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Thermal and Acid Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donaji Jiménez-Islas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work the effects of pH and temperature on ethanol production from red beet juice by the strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae ITD00196 and S. cerevisiae ATCC 9763 are studied. Logistic, Pirt, and Luedeking-Piret equations were used to describe quantitatively the microbial growth, substrate consumption, and ethanol production, respectively. The two S. cerevisiae strains used in this study were able to produce ethanol with high yield and volumetric productivity under acid and thermal stress conditions. The equations used to model the fermentation kinetics fit very well with the experimental data, thus establishing that ethanol production was growth associated under the evaluated conditions. The yeast S. cerevisiae ITD00196 had the best fermentative capacity and could be considered as an interesting option to develop bioprocesses for ethanol production.

  17. ACTIVITY OF SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE ENZYME IN YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blažena Lavová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS with reactive nitrogen species (RNS are known to play dual role in biological systems, they can be harmful or beneficial to living systems. ROS can be important mediators of damage to cell structures, including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids termed as oxidative stress. The antioxidant enzymes protect the organism against the oxidative damage caused by active oxygen forms. The role of superoxide dismutase (SOD is to accelerate the dismutation of the toxic superoxide radical, produced during oxidative energy processes, to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. In this study, SOD activity of three yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae was determined. It was found that SOD activity was the highest (23.7 U.mg-1 protein in strain 612 after 28 hours of cultivation. The lowest SOD activity from all tested strains was found after 56 hours of cultivation of strain Gyöng (0.7 U.mg-1 protein.

  18. Molecular - and genetic aspects of the repair of the lesions induced by the furocoumarin photoaddition in Sacharomyces cerevisiae : role of the PSO genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, J.A.P.

    1982-01-01

    Experiences with strains of Sacharomyces cerevisiae with the aim to obtain informations about molecular steps and genetic control of the DNA photo-induced lesion repair by furocoumarins are described. (M.A.) [pt

  19. Breeding of lager yeast with Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves stress resistance and fermentation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Sanchez, Rosa; Solodovnikova, Natalia; Wendland, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Lager beer brewing relies on strains collectively known as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, which are hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus-like strains. Lager yeasts are particularly adapted to low-temperature fermentations. Selection of new yeast strains for improved traits or fermentation performance is laborious, due to the allotetraploid nature of lager yeasts. Initially, we have generated new F1 hybrids by classical genetics, using spore clones of lager yeast and S. cerevisiae and complementation of auxotrophies of the single strains upon mating. These hybrids were improved on several parameters, including growth at elevated temperature and resistance against high osmolarity or high ethanol concentrations. Due to the uncertainty of chromosomal make-up of lager yeast spore clones, we introduced molecular markers to analyse mating-type composition by PCR. Based on these results, new hybrids between a lager and an ale yeast strain were isolated by micromanipulation. These hybrids were not subject to genetic modification. We generated and verified 13 hybrid strains. All of these hybrid strains showed improved stress resistance as seen in the ale parent, including improved survival at the end of fermentation. Importantly, some of the strains showed improved fermentation rates using 18° Plato at 18-25°C. Uniparental mitochondrial DNA inheritance was observed mostly from the S. cerevisiae parent. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Heat shock response improves heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Österlund, Tobias; Liu, Zihe

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used platform for the production of heterologous proteins of medical or industrial interest. However, heterologous protein productivity is often low due to limitations of the host strain. Heat shock response (HSR) is an inducible, global, cellular...... stress response, which facilitates the cell recovery from many forms of stress, e.g., heat stress. In S. cerevisiae, HSR is regulated mainly by the transcription factor heat shock factor (Hsf1p) and many of its targets are genes coding for molecular chaperones that promote protein folding and prevent...... the accumulation of mis-folded or aggregated proteins. In this work, we over-expressed a mutant HSF1 gene HSF1-R206S which can constitutively activate HSR, so the heat shock response was induced at different levels, and we studied the impact of HSR on heterologous protein secretion. We found that moderate and high...

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a sexy yeast with a prion problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Amy C; Wickner, Reed B

    2013-01-01

    Yeast prions are infectious proteins that spread exclusively by mating. The frequency of prions in the wild therefore largely reflects the rate of spread by mating counterbalanced by prion growth slowing effects in the host. We recently showed that the frequency of outcross mating is about 1% of mitotic doublings with 23-46% of total matings being outcrosses. These findings imply that even the mildest forms of the [PSI+], [URE3] and [PIN+] prions impart > 1% growth/survival detriment on their hosts. Our estimate of outcrossing suggests that Saccharomyces cerevisiae is far more sexual than previously thought and would therefore be more responsive to the adaptive effects of natural selection compared with a strictly asexual yeast. Further, given its large effective population size, a growth/survival detriment of > 1% for yeast prions should strongly select against prion-infected strains in wild populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  2. Increasing cocoa butter-like lipid production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by expression of selected cocoa genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Yongjun; Gossing, Michael; Bergenholm, David

    2017-01-01

    for CB biosynthesis from the cocoa genome using a phylogenetic analysis approach. By expressing the selected cocoa genes in S. cerevisiae, we successfully increased total fatty acid production, TAG production and CBL production in some S. cerevisiae strains. The relative CBL content in three yeast...... higher level of CBL compared with the control strain. In summary, CBL production by S. cerevisiae were increased through expressing selected cocoa genes potentially involved in CB biosynthesis.......Cocoa butter (CB) extracted from cocoa beans mainly consists of three different kinds of triacylglycerols (TAGs), 1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (POP, C16:0-C18:1-C16:0), 1-palmitoyl-3-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol(POS,C16:0C18:1-C18:0) and 1,3-distearoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (SOS, C18:0-C18:1-C18...

  3. Comparison of heterologous xylose transporters in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been engineered for xylose utilization to enable production of fuel ethanol from lignocellulose raw material. One unresolved challenge is that S. cerevisiae lacks a dedicated transport system for pentose sugars, which means that xylose is transported by non-specific Hxt transporters with comparatively low transport rate and affinity for xylose. Results In this study, we compared three heterologous xylose transporters that have recently been shown to improve xylose uptake under different experimental conditions. The transporters Gxf1, Sut1 and At5g59250 from Candida intermedia, Pichia stipitis and Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively, were expressed in isogenic strains of S. cerevisiae and the transport kinetics and utilization of xylose was evaluated. Expression of the Gxf1 and Sut1 transporters led to significantly increased affinity and transport rates of xylose. In batch cultivation at 4 g/L xylose concentration, improved transport kinetics led to a corresponding increase in xylose utilization, whereas no correlation could be demonstrated at xylose concentrations greater than 15 g/L. The relative contribution of native sugar transporters to the overall xylose transport capacity was also estimated during growth on glucose and xylose. Conclusions Kinetic characterization and aerobic batch cultivation of strains expressing the Gxf1, Sut1 and At5g59250 transporters showed a direct relationship between transport kinetics and xylose growth. The Gxf1 transporter had the highest transport capacity and the highest xylose growth rate, followed by the Sut1 transporter. The range in which transport controlled the growth rate was determined to between 0 and 15 g/L xylose. The role of catabolite repression in regulation of native transporters was also confirmed by the observation that xylose transport by native S. cerevisiae transporters increased significantly during cultivation in xylose and

  4. levadura Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Aguilar Uscanga

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La pared celular de levaduras representa entre 20 a 30 % de la célula en peso seco. Está compuesta de polisacáridos complejos de β-glucanos, manoproteínas y quitina. Se estudió la composición de los polisacáridos contenidos en la pared celular de la Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK 113 y se observó el efecto de la variación de la fuente carbono (glucosa, sacarosa, galactosa, maltosa, manosa, etanol y pH (3, 4, 5, 6 en un medio mineral “cell factory”. Las células fueron recolectadas en fase exponencial y se extrajo la pared celular. Los extractos de pared se hidrolizaron con H2SO4 al 72% y las muestras fueron analizadas por cromatografía HPLC. Se realizó una prueba de resistencia al rompimiento celular con una β(1,3-glucanasa, y las células cultivadas a diferentes fuentes carbono y pH. Los resultados del análisis por HPLC, mostraron que la composición de los polisacáridos en la pared celular, varía considerablemente con las modificaciones del medio de cultivo. Se observó que las levaduras cultivadas en sacarosa tienen mayor porcentaje de pared celular (25% y mayor cantidad de glucanos (115µg/mg peso seco y mananos (131µg/mg peso seco, que aquellas levaduras cultivadas en etanol (13% en peso seco. Las levaduras cultivadas a pH 5 presentaron 19% de pared celular en peso seco, mientras que a pH 6 el porcentaje fue menor (14%. El análisis de resistencia al rompimiento celular, mostró que las células cultivadas en etanol y galactosa fueron resistentes al rompimiento enzimático. Se comparó este resultado con el contenido de polisacáridos en la pared celular y concluimos que la resistencia de la célula al rompimiento, no está ligada con la cantidad de β-glucanos contenidos en la pared celular, sino que va a depender del número de enlaces β(1,3 y β(1,6-glucanos, los cuales juegan un rol importante durante el ensamblaje de la pared

  5. The impact of respiration and oxidative stress response on recombinant α-amylase production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Ruiz, José Luis; Meza, Eugenio; Petranovic, Dina

    2016-01-01

    by overexpressing the endogenous HAP1 gene in a S. cerevisiae strain overproducing recombinant α-amylase. We demonstrate how Hap1p can activate a set of oxidative stress response genes and meanwhile contribute to increase the metabolic rate of the yeast strains, therefore mitigating the negative effect of the ROS...

  6. CRISPR/Cas9 : A molecular Swiss army knife for simultaneous introduction of multiple genetic modifications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mans, R.; Van Rossum, H.M.; Wijsman, M.; Backx, A.; Kuijpers, N.G.A.; van den Broek, M.; Daran-Lapujade, P.A.S.; Pronk, J.T.; Van Maris, A.J.A.; Daran, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of techniques for strain engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have recently been developed. However, especially when multiple genetic manipulations are required, strain construction is still a time-consuming process. This study describes new CRISPR/Cas9-based approaches for easy, fast

  7. Gains and Losses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefke, Bernhard; Wang, Tzi-Yuan; Wang, Chuen-Yi; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2015-07-27

    Gene expression evolution occurs through changes in cis- or trans-regulatory elements or both. Interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites (TFBSs) constitute one of the most important points where these two regulatory components intersect. In this study, we investigated the evolution of TFBSs in the promoter regions of different Saccharomyces strains and species. We divided the promoter of a gene into the proximal region and the distal region, which are defined, respectively, as the 200-bp region upstream of the transcription starting site and as the 200-bp region upstream of the proximal region. We found that the predicted TFBSs in the proximal promoter regions tend to be evolutionarily more conserved than those in the distal promoter regions. Additionally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used in the fermentation of alcoholic drinks have experienced more TFBS losses than gains compared with strains from other environments (wild strains, laboratory strains, and clinical strains). We also showed that differences in TFBSs correlate with the cis component of gene expression evolution between species (comparing S. cerevisiae and its sister species Saccharomyces paradoxus) and within species (comparing two closely related S. cerevisiae strains). © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  8. Gains and Losses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefke, Bernhard; Wang, Tzi-Yuan; Wang, Chuen-Yi; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression evolution occurs through changes in cis- or trans-regulatory elements or both. Interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites (TFBSs) constitute one of the most important points where these two regulatory components intersect. In this study, we investigated the evolution of TFBSs in the promoter regions of different Saccharomyces strains and species. We divided the promoter of a gene into the proximal region and the distal region, which are defined, respectively, as the 200-bp region upstream of the transcription starting site and as the 200-bp region upstream of the proximal region. We found that the predicted TFBSs in the proximal promoter regions tend to be evolutionarily more conserved than those in the distal promoter regions. Additionally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used in the fermentation of alcoholic drinks have experienced more TFBS losses than gains compared with strains from other environments (wild strains, laboratory strains, and clinical strains). We also showed that differences in TFBSs correlate with the cis component of gene expression evolution between species (comparing S. cerevisiae and its sister species Saccharomyces paradoxus) and within species (comparing two closely related S. cerevisiae strains). PMID:26220934

  9. In vivo dynamics of galactose metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Metabolic fluxes and metabolite levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Simon; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of galactose metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied by analyzing the metabolic response of the CEN.PK 113-7D wild-type strain when exposed to a galactose pulse during aerobic growth in a galactose-limited steady-state cultivation at a dilution rate of 0.097 h(-1). A fast...

  10. Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Efficient Anaerobic Alcoholic Fermentation of L-Arabinose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.W.; Toirkens, M.J.; Del Rosario Franco Berriel, M.; Winkler, A.A.; Van Dijken, J.P.; Pronk, J.T.; Van Maris, A.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    For cost-effective and efficient ethanol production from lignocellulosic fractions of plant biomass, the conversion of not only major constituents, such as glucose and xylose, but also less predominant sugars, such as L-arabinose, is required. Wild-type strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the

  11. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mixed Culture of Blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius L.) Juice: Synergism in the Aroma Compounds Production

    OpenAIRE

    Bautista-Rosales, Pedro Ulises; Ragazzo-Sánchez, Juan Arturo; Ruiz-Montañez, Gabriela; Ortiz-Basurto, Rosa Isela; Luna-Solano, Guadalupe; Calderón-Santoyo, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Blackberry (Rubus sp.) juice was fermented using four different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Vitilevure-CM4457, Enoferm-T306, ICV-K1, and Greroche Rhona-L3574) recognized because of their use in the wine industry. A medium alcoholic graduation spirit (

  12. Increased mannoprotein content in wines produced by Saccharomyces kudriavzevii×Saccharomyces cerevisiae hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Través, Laura; Querol, Amparo; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto

    2016-11-21

    Several wine quality aspects are influenced by yeast mannoproteins on account of aroma compounds retention, lactic-acid bacterial growth stimulation, protection against protein haze and astringency reduction. Thus selecting a yeast strain that produces high levels of mannoproteins is important for the winemaking industry. In this work, we observed increased levels of mannoproteins in S. cerevisiae×S. kudriavzevii hybrids, compared to the S. cerevisiae strain, in wine fermentations. Furthermore, the expression of a key gene related to mannoproteins biosynthesis, PMT1, increased in the S. cerevisiae×S. kudriavzevii hybrid. We showed that artificially constructed S. cerevisiae×S. kudriavzevii hybrids also increased the levels of mannoproteins. This work demonstrates that either natural or artificial S. cerevisiae×S. kudriavzevii hybrids present mannoprotein overproducing capacity under winemaking conditions, a desirable physiological feature for this industry. These results suggest that genome interaction in hybrids generates a physiological environment that enhances the release of mannoproteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to D-limonene-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jidong; Zhu, Yibo; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the mode of cell response induced by D-limonene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. D-limonene treatment was found to be accompanied by intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since ROS impair cell membranes, an engineered strain with enhanced membrane biosynthesis exhibited a higher tolerance to D-limonene. Subsequent addition of an ROS scavenger significantly reduced the ROS level and alleviated cell growth inhibition. Thus, D-limonene-induced ROS accumulation plays an important role in cell death in S. cerevisiae. In D-limonene-treated S. cerevisiae strains, higher levels of antioxidants, antioxidant enzymes, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) were synthesized. Quantitative real-time PCR results also verified that D-limonene treatment triggered upregulation of genes involved in the antioxidant system and the regeneration of NADPH at the transcription level in S. cerevisiae. These data indicate that D-limonene treatment results in intracellular ROS accumulation, an important factor in cell death, and several antioxidant mechanisms in S. cerevisiae were enhanced in response to D-limonene treatment.

  14. Bread, beer and wine: Saccharomyces cerevisiae diversity reflects human history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Merdinoglu, Didier; Cornuet, Jean-Marie; Karst, Francis

    2007-05-01

    Fermented beverages and foods have played a significant role in most societies worldwide for millennia. To better understand how the yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main fermenting agent, evolved along this historical and expansion process, we analysed the genetic diversity among 651 strains from 56 different geographical origins, worldwide. Their genotyping at 12 microsatellite loci revealed 575 distinct genotypes organized in subgroups of yeast types, i.e. bread, beer, wine, sake. Some of these groups presented unexpected relatedness: Bread strains displayed a combination of alleles intermediate between beer and wine strains, and strains used for rice wine and sake were most closely related to beer and bread strains. However, up to 28% of genetic diversity between these technological groups was associated with geographical differences which suggests local domestications. Focusing on wine yeasts, a group of Lebanese strains were basal in an F(ST) tree, suggesting a Mesopotamia-based origin of most wine strains. In Europe, migration of wine strains occurred through the Danube Valley, and around the Mediterranean Sea. An approximate Bayesian computation approach suggested a postglacial divergence (most probable period 10,000-12,000 bp). As our results suggest intimate association between man and wine yeast across centuries, we hypothesize that yeast followed man and vine migrations as a commensal member of grapevine flora.

  15. Expansion and contraction of the DUP240 multigene family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations.

    OpenAIRE

    Leh-Louis, Véronique; Wirth, Bénédicte; Potier, Serge; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Despons, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    The influence of duplicated sequences on chromosomal stability is poorly understood. To characterize chromosomal rearrangements involving duplicated sequences, we compared the organization of tandem repeats of the DUP240 gene family in 15 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains of various origins. The DUP240 gene family consists of 10 members of unknown function in the reference strain S288C. Five DUP240 paralogs on chromosome I and two on chromosome VII are arranged as tandem repeats that are highl...

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the Production of Fermented Beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme M Walker

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic beverages are produced following the fermentation of sugars by yeasts, mainly (but not exclusively strains of the species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The sugary starting materials may emanate from cereal starches (which require enzymatic pre-hydrolysis in the case of beers and whiskies, sucrose-rich plants (molasses or sugar juice from sugarcane in the case of rums, or from fruits (which do not require pre-hydrolysis in the case of wines and brandies. In the presence of sugars, together with other essential nutrients such as amino acids, minerals and vitamins, S. cerevisiae will conduct fermentative metabolism to ethanol and carbon dioxide (as the primary fermentation metabolites as the cells strive to make energy and regenerate the coenzyme NAD+ under anaerobic conditions. Yeasts will also produce numerous secondary metabolites which act as important beverage flavour congeners, including higher alcohols, esters, carbonyls and sulphur compounds. These are very important in dictating the final flavour and aroma characteristics of beverages such as beer and wine, but also in distilled beverages such as whisky, rum and brandy. Therefore, yeasts are of vital importance in providing the alcohol content and the sensory profiles of such beverages. This Introductory Chapter reviews, in general, the growth, physiology and metabolism of S. cerevisiae in alcoholic beverage fermentations.

  17. Osmo-, thermo- and ethanol- tolerances of Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1

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    Sandrasegarampillai Balakumar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1, which is a locally isolated and improved strain showed viability at 40, 45 and 50ºC and produced ethanol at 40, 43 and 45ºC. When the cells were given heat shock at 45ºC for 30min and grown at 40ºC, 100% viability was observed for 60h, and addition of 200gl-1 ethanol has led to complete cell death at 30h. Heat shock given at 45ºC (for 30min has improved the tolerance to temperature induced ethanol shock leading to 37% viability at 30h. when the cells were subjected to ethanol (200gl-1 for 30 min and osmotic shock (sorbitol 300gl-1, trehalose contents in the cells were increased. The heat shocked cells showed better viability in presence of added ethanol. Soy flour supplementation has improved the viability of S. cerevisiae S1 to 80% in presence of 100gl-1 added ethanol and to 60% in presence of 300gl-1 sorbitol. In presence of sorbitol (200gl-1 and ethanol (50gl-1 at 40ºC, 46% viability was retained by S. cerevisiae S1 at 48h and it was improved to 80% by soy flour supplementation.

  18. Intracellular metabolite profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae evolved under furfural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young Hoon; Kim, Sooah; Yang, Jungwoo; Seo, Jin-Ho; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2017-03-01

    Furfural, one of the most common inhibitors in pre-treatment hydrolysates, reduces the cell growth and ethanol production of yeast. Evolutionary engineering has been used as a selection scheme to obtain yeast strains that exhibit furfural tolerance. However, the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to furfural at the metabolite level during evolution remains unknown. In this study, evolutionary engineering and metabolomic analyses were applied to determine the effects of furfural on yeasts and their metabolic response to continuous exposure to furfural. After 50 serial transfers of cultures in the presence of furfural, the evolved strains acquired the ability to stably manage its physiological status under the furfural stress. A total of 98 metabolites were identified, and their abundance profiles implied that yeast metabolism was globally regulated. Under the furfural stress, stress-protective molecules and cofactor-related mechanisms were mainly induced in the parental strain. However, during evolution under the furfural stress, S. cerevisiae underwent global metabolic allocations to quickly overcome the stress, particularly by maintaining higher levels of metabolites related to energy generation, cofactor regeneration and recovery from cellular damage. Mapping the mechanisms of furfural tolerance conferred by evolutionary engineering in the present study will be led to rational design of metabolically engineered yeasts. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. A vaccine grade of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing mammalian myostatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Tingting

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely-used system for protein expression. We previously showed that heat-killed whole recombinant yeast vaccine expressing mammalian myostatin can modulate myostatin function in mice, resulting in increase of body weight and muscle composition in these animals. Foreign DNA introduced into yeast cells can be lost soon unless cells are continuously cultured in selection media, which usually contain antibiotics. For cost and safety concerns, it is essential to optimize conditions to produce quality food and pharmaceutical products. Results We developed a simple but effective method to engineer a yeast strain stably expressing mammalian myostatin. This method utilized high-copy-number integration of myostatin gene into the ribosomal DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the final step, antibiotic selection marker was removed using the Cre-LoxP system to minimize any possible side-effects for animals. The resulting yeast strain can be maintained in rich culture media and stably express mammalian myostatin for two years. Oral administration of the recombinant yeast was able to induce immune response to myostatin and modulated the body weight of mice. Conclusions Establishment of such yeast strain is a step further toward transformation of yeast cells into edible vaccine to improve meat production in farm animals and treat human muscle-wasting diseases in the future.

  20. Probiotic Activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii Against Human Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Rajkowska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diarrhoea is associated with a modification of the intestinal microflora and colonization of pathogenic bacteria. Tests were performed for seven probiotic yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii, designated for the prevention and treatment of diarrhoea. To check their possible effectiveness against diarrhoea of different etiologies, the activity against a variety of human pathogenic or opportunistic bacteria was investigated in vitro. In mixed cultures with S. cerevisiae var. boulardii, a statistically significant reduction was observed in the number of cells of Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, by even 55.9 % in the case of L. monocytogenes compared with bacterial monocultures. The influence of yeasts was mostly associated with the shortening of the bacterial lag phase duration, more rapid achievement of the maximum growth rates, and a decrease by 4.4–57.1 % (L. monocytogenes, P. aeruginosa, or an increase by 1.4–70.6 % (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella Typhimurium in the exponential growth rates. Another issue included in the research was the ability of S. cerevisiae var. boulardii to bind pathogenic bacteria to its cell surface. Yeasts have shown binding capacity of E. coli, S. Typhimurium and additionally of S. aureus, Campylobacter jejuni and E. faecalis. However, no adhesion of L. monocytogenes and P. aeruginosa to the yeast cell wall was noted. The probiotic activity of S. cerevisiae var. boulardii against human pathogens is related to a decrease in the number of viable and active cells of bacteria and the binding capacity of yeasts. These processes may limit bacterial invasiveness and prevent bacterial adherence and translocation in the human intestines.

  1. Dual utilization of NADPH and NADH cofactors enhances xylitol production in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jung-Hyun; Oh, Sun-Young; Lee, Hyeun-Soo; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    Xylitol, a natural sweetener, can be produced by hydrogenation of xylose in hemicelluloses. In microbial processes, utilization of only NADPH cofactor limited commercialization of xylitol biosynthesis. To overcome this drawback, Saccharomyces cerevisiae D452-2 was engineered to express two types of xylose reductase (XR) with either NADPH-dependence or NADH-preference. Engineered S. cerevisiae DWM expressing both the XRs exhibited higher xylitol productivity than the yeast strain expressing NADPH-dependent XR only (DWW) in both batch and glucose-limited fed-batch cultures. Furthermore, the coexpression of S. cerevisiae ZWF1 and ACS1 genes in the DWM strain increased intracellular concentrations of NADPH and NADH and improved maximum xylitol productivity by 17%, relative to that for the DWM strain. Finally, the optimized fed-batch fermentation of S. cerevisiae DWM-ZWF1-ACS1 resulted in 196.2 g/L xylitol concentration, 4.27 g/L h productivity and almost the theoretical yield. Expression of the two types of XR utilizing both NADPH and NADH is a promising strategy to meet the industrial demands for microbial xylitol production. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Bioprospecting and evolving alternative xylose and arabinose pathway enzymes for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Jellison, Taylor; Alper, Hal S

    2016-03-01

    Bioprospecting is an effective way to find novel enzymes from strains with desirable phenotypes. Such bioprospecting has enabled organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize nonnative pentose sugars. Yet, the efficiency of this pentose catabolism (especially for the case of arabinose) remains suboptimal. Thus, further pathway optimization or identification of novel, optimal pathways is needed. Previously, we identified a novel set of xylan catabolic pathway enzymes from a superior pentose-utilizing strain of Ustilago bevomyces. These enzymes were used to successfully engineer a xylan-utilizing S. cerevisiae through a blended approach of bioprospecting and evolutionary engineering. Here, we expanded this approach to xylose and arabinose catabolic pathway engineering and demonstrated that bioprospected xylose and arabinose catabolic pathways from U. bevomyces offer alternative choices for enabling efficient pentose catabolism in S. cerevisiae. By introducing a novel set of xylose catabolic genes from U. bevomyces, growth rates were improved up to 85 % over a set of traditional Scheffersomyces stipitis pathway genes. In addition, we suggested an alternative arabinose catabolic pathway which, after directed evolution and pathway engineering, enabled S. cerevisiae to grow on arabinose as a sole carbon source in minimal medium with growth rates upwards of 0.05 h(-1). This pathway represents the most efficient growth of yeast on pure arabinose minimal medium. These pathways provide great starting points for further strain development and demonstrate the utility of bioprospecting from U. bevomyces.

  3. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii CNCM I-3799 and reducing gastrointestinal discomfort pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    substantiation of a health claim related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii CNCM I-3799 and reducing gastro-intestinal discomfort. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim, S. cerevisiae var. boulardii CNCM I-3799, is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect, reduction of gastro....... cerevisiae var. boulardii CNCM I-3799), except for two animal studies and one in vitro study. Upon an EFSA request, the applicant indicated that the rest of the studies provided were conducted with the strain produced by Biocodex Laboratories (S. cerevisiae var. boulardii HANSEN CBS 5926). The applicant also...... stated that the strain, which is the subject of the claim, S. cerevisiae var. boulardii CNCM I-3799, is equivalent to S. cerevisiae var. boulardii HANSEN CBS 5926, based on a comparative PCR inter-delta element analysis of both strains provided in the application. The Panel considered that the evidence...

  4. Toxicity of isoproturon on Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing in mineral medium depends on glutathione-mediated antioxidant capacity.

    OpenAIRE

    Candeias, M; Alves-Pereira, I; Ferreira, Rui

    2011-01-01

    The results revealed an increase of viable cells, after 72 h of culture and an increase of antioxidant power mediated by GSH and GR activity in S. cerevisiae UE-ME3. The adaptive response of UE-ME3 strain to isoproturon, determined in MB, was clearly higher than observed in IGC-3507 strain. So, we presume that the extent of the toxic effect of isoproturon in both yeast strains depends on glutathione-mediated antioxidant capacity.

  5. Advances in metabolic engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up the deve......Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up...... the development of yeast cell factories. We also present an overview of metabolic engineering strategies for developing yeast strains for production of polymer monomers: lactic, succinic, and cis,cis-muconic acids. S. cerevisiae has already firmly established itself as a cell factory in industrial biotechnology...

  6. L-histidine inhibits biofilm formation and FLO11-associated phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Zeidan, Marc; Zara, Giacomo; Viti, Carlo; Decorosi, Francesca; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Budroni, Marilena; Giovannetti, Luciana; Zara, Severino

    2014-01-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an innate diversity of Flo11p which codes for a highly hydrophobic and anionic cell-wall glycoprotein with a fundamental role in biofilm formation. In this study, 380 nitrogen compounds were administered to three S. cerevisiae flor strains handling Flo11p alleles with different expression levels. S. cerevisiae strain S288c was used as the reference strain as it cannot produce Flo11p. The flor strains generally metabolized amino acids and dipeptides as the sole nitrogen source, although with some exceptions regarding L-histidine and histidine containing dipeptides. L-histidine completely inhibited growth and its effect on viability was inversely related to Flo11p expression. Accordingly, L-histidine did not affect the viability of the Δflo11 and S288c strains. Also, L-histidine dramatically decreased air-liquid biofilm formation and adhesion to polystyrene of the flor yeasts with no effect on the transcription level of the Flo11p gene. Moreover, L-histidine modified the chitin and glycans content on the cell-wall of flor yeasts. These findings reveal a novel biological activity of L-histidine in controlling the multicellular behavior of yeasts [corrected].

  7. Fatal Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Aortic Graft Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Smith, Davey; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast commonly used in baking and a frequent colonizer of human mucosal surfaces. It is considered relatively nonpathogenic in immunocompetent adults. We present a case of S. cerevisiae fungemia and aortic graft infection in an immunocompetent adult. This is the first reported case of S. cerevisiue fungemia where the identity of the pathogen was confirmed by rRNA sequencing.

  8. High level secretion of cellobiohydrolases by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlgren Simon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main technological impediment to widespread utilization of lignocellulose for the production of fuels and chemicals is the lack of low-cost technologies to overcome its recalcitrance. Organisms that hydrolyze lignocellulose and produce a valuable product such as ethanol at a high rate and titer could significantly reduce the costs of biomass conversion technologies, and will allow separate conversion steps to be combined in a consolidated bioprocess (CBP. Development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for CBP requires the high level secretion of cellulases, particularly cellobiohydrolases. Results We expressed various cellobiohydrolases to identify enzymes that were efficiently secreted by S. cerevisiae. For enhanced cellulose hydrolysis, we engineered bimodular derivatives of a well secreted enzyme that naturally lacks the carbohydrate-binding module, and constructed strains expressing combinations of cbh1 and cbh2 genes. Though there was significant variability in the enzyme levels produced, up to approximately 0.3 g/L CBH1 and approximately 1 g/L CBH2 could be produced in high cell density fermentations. Furthermore, we could show activation of the unfolded protein response as a result of cellobiohydrolase production. Finally, we report fermentation of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel™ to ethanol by CBH-producing S. cerevisiae strains with the addition of beta-glucosidase. Conclusions Gene or protein specific features and compatibility with the host are important for efficient cellobiohydrolase secretion in yeast. The present work demonstrated that production of both CBH1 and CBH2 could be improved to levels where the barrier to CBH sufficiency in the hydrolysis of cellulose was overcome.

  9. Alleviation of glucose repression of maltose metabolism by MIG1 disruption in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Christopher; Olsson, Lisbeth; Rønnow, B.

    1996-01-01

    The MIG1 gene was disrupted in a haploid laboratory strain (B224) and in an industrial polyploid strain (DGI 342) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The alleviation of glucose repression of the expression of MAL genes and alleviation of glucose control of maltose metabolism were investigated in batch...... cultivations on glucose-maltose mixtures. In the MIG1-disrupted haploid strain, glucose repression was partly alleviated; i.e., maltose metabolism was initiated at higher glucose concentrations than in the corresponding wild-type strain. In contrast, the polyploid Delta mig1 strain exhibited an even more...... stringent glucose control of maltose metabolism than the corresponding wild-type strain, which could be explained by a more rigid catabolite inactivation of maltose permease, affecting the uptake of maltose. Growth on the glucose-sucrose mixture showed that the polyploid Delta mig1 strain was relieved...

  10. Omics analysis of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Peng; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Gui Yang

    2017-05-01

    Acetic acid is an inhibitor in industrial processes such as wine making and bioethanol production from cellulosic hydrolysate. It causes energy depletion, inhibition of metabolic enzyme activity, growth arrest and ethanol productivity losses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of the yeast responses to acetic acid stress is essential for improving acetic acid tolerance and ethanol production. Although 329 genes associated with acetic acid tolerance have been identified in the Saccharomyces genome and included in the database ( http://www.yeastgenome.org/observable/resistance_to_acetic_acid/overview ), the cellular mechanistic responses to acetic acid remain unclear in this organism. Post-genomic approaches such as transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and chemogenomics are being applied to yeast and are providing insight into the mechanisms and interactions of genes, proteins and other components that together determine complex quantitative phenotypic traits such as acetic acid tolerance. This review focuses on these omics approaches in the response to acetic acid in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, several novel strains with improved acetic acid tolerance have been engineered by modifying key genes, and the application of these strains and recently acquired knowledge to industrial processes is also discussed.

  11. Improved cider fermentation performance and quality with newly generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces eubayanus hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Frederico; Krogerus, Kristoffer; Vidgren, Virve; Sandell, Mari; Gibson, Brian

    2017-08-01

    Yeast cryotolerance may be advantageous for cider making, where low temperatures are usually employed. Here, we crossed the cryotolerant S. eubayanus with a S. cerevisiae wine strain and assessed the suitability of the hybrids for low-temperature cider fermentation. All strains fermented the juice to 5% ABV, but at different rates; hybrid strains outperformed S. cerevisiae, which was sensitive to low temperatures. The best hybrid fermented similarly to S. eubayanus. S. eubayanus produced sulphurous off flavours which masked a high concentration of fruity ester notes. This phenotype was absent in the hybrid strains, resulting in distinctly fruitier ciders. Aroma was assessed by an independent consumer panel, which rated the hybrid ciders as identical to the wine strain cider. Both were significantly more pleasant than the S. eubayanus cider. Interspecific hybridization can apparently be used effectively to improve low-temperature fermentation performance without compromising product quality.

  12. Compositions and methods for modeling Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The invention provides an in silica model for determining a S. cerevisiae physiological function. The model includes a data structure relating a plurality of S. cerevisiae reactants to a plurality of S. cerevisiae reactions, a constraint set for the plurality of S. cerevisiae reactions, and comma...

  13. Progress in terpene synthesis strategies through engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramasivan, Kalaivani; Mutturi, Sarma

    2017-12-01

    (including patents) on this subject to understand the similarities, to identify novel strategies and to contemplate potential possibilities to build a robust yeast cell factory for terpene or terpenoid production. Emphasis is not restricted to metabolic engineering strategies pertaining to sterol and mevalonate pathway, but also other holistic approaches for elsewhere exploitation in the S. cerevisiae genome are discussed. This review also focuses on process considerations and challenges during the mass production of these potential compounds from the engineered strain for commercial exploitation.

  14. PRODUCTION, PROPERTIES AND APPLICATION OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE VGSH-2 INULINASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Shuvaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Experimental data on an acid and thermal inactivation of a high refined inulinase (2,1-β-D- fructanfructanohydrolase, KF 3.2.17, produced by the race of Saccharomyces cerevisiae VGSh-2 yeast are presented. The strain of S. cerevisiae VGSh-2 was produced by the method of the induced mutagenesis and deposited to the collection of pure cultures of the chair of biochemistry and biotechnology of Voronezh state university of engineering technologies. The cells of source culture (S. cerevisiae XII were affected step-by-step by the ultra-violet radiation (UFR and UFR in a complex with a chemical mutagen (etilenimine. The culture was grown up by the method of liquid-phase deep cultivation on a constant nutrient medium. Refining conditions for inulinase are sorted out. Activity of enzyme dependence on physical and chemical factors (рН and temperature is obtained and numerical values of the main kinetic constants – Km and Vmax are determined. The structure of enzyme molecule is studied by an infrared-spectroscopy method: the type and relative quantity of elements of secondary structure of protein are defined. Substrate binding groups of the active center of an inulinase are found. The comparative analysis of the ability to hydrolysis of inulin in several enzyme preparations from Jerusalem artichoke and to the subsequent their fermentation by the VGSh-2 and XI S. cerevisiae yeasts is carried out. Optimum conditions of enzyme hydrolysis of inulin are selected. Research of the fermentation process of starchcontaining raw materials by yeasts of VGSh-2 and XI races is done. It is established that the using of VGSh-2 S. cerevisiae yeast for a grain wort and the Jerusalem artichoke fermentation, allows to increase an extraction of ethyl alcohol comparing to control race, to improve its quality characteristics, and also allows to predict the using of new race in the food industry for production ethanol from grain raw materials and a fermentation of

  15. Bulk segregant analysis by high-throughput sequencing reveals a novel xylose utilization gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared W Wenger

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation of xylose is a fundamental requirement for the efficient production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass sources. Although they aggressively ferment hexoses, it has long been thought that native Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains cannot grow fermentatively or non-fermentatively on xylose. Population surveys have uncovered a few naturally occurring strains that are weakly xylose-positive, and some S. cerevisiae have been genetically engineered to ferment xylose, but no strain, either natural or engineered, has yet been reported to ferment xylose as efficiently as glucose. Here, we used a medium-throughput screen to identify Saccharomyces strains that can increase in optical density when xylose is presented as the sole carbon source. We identified 38 strains that have this xylose utilization phenotype, including strains of S. cerevisiae, other sensu stricto members, and hybrids between them. All the S. cerevisiae xylose-utilizing strains we identified are wine yeasts, and for those that could produce meiotic progeny, the xylose phenotype segregates as a single gene trait. We mapped this gene by Bulk Segregant Analysis (BSA using tiling microarrays and high-throughput sequencing. The gene is a putative xylitol dehydrogenase, which we name XDH1, and is located in the subtelomeric region of the right end of chromosome XV in a region not present in the S288c reference genome. We further characterized the xylose phenotype by performing gene expression microarrays and by genetically dissecting the endogenous Saccharomyces xylose pathway. We have demonstrated that natural S. cerevisiae yeasts are capable of utilizing xylose as the sole carbon source, characterized the genetic basis for this trait as well as the endogenous xylose utilization pathway, and demonstrated the feasibility of BSA using high-throughput sequencing.

  16. Cellular responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciesla, Z.; Sledziewska-Gojska, E.; Nowicka, A.; Mieczkowski, P.; Fikus, M.U.; Koprowski, P.

    1998-01-01

    Full text. Several experimental strategies have been used to study responses of S. cerevisiae cells to DNA damage. One approach was based on the isolation of novel genes, the expression of which is induced by lesions in DNA. One of these genes, DIN7, was cloned and partially characterized previously. The product of DIN7 belongs to a large family of proteins involved in DNA repair and mutagenesis. This family includes Rad2, Rad27 and ExoI proteins of S. cerevisiae and their respective human homologues, all of which are endowed with DNA nuclease activity. To study cellular function of Din7 we constructed the pPK3 plasmid carrying DIN7 fused to the GAL1 promoter. Effects of DIN7 overproduction on the phenotypes of wild-type cells and of rad27 and exoI mutants were examined. Overproduction of Din7 does not seem to affect the proficiency of wild-type S. cerevisiae cells in recombination and mutagenesis. Also, overexpression of DIN7 does not suppress the deficiency of the EXOI gene product, the closest homologue of Din7, both in recombination and in controlling the fidelity of DNA replication. Unexpectedly, we found that elevated levels of Din7 result in a very high frequency of mitochondrial rho - mutants. A high frequency of production of rho - mutants wa s also observed in strains defective in the functioning of the Dun1 protein kinase involved in signal transmission in cells exposed to DNA damaging agents. Interestingly, deficiency of Dun1 results also in a significant derepression of the DIN7 gene. Experiments are under way to distinguish whether a high cellular level of Din7 specifically decreases stability of mitochondrial DNA or affects stability of chromosomal DNA as well. Analysis of previously constructed S. cerevisiae strains carrying random geno mic fusions with reporter lacZ gene, allowed us to identify the reading frame YBR173c, on chromosome II as a novel damage inducible gene - DIN8. We have shown that DIN8-lacZ fusion is induced in yeast cells treated

  17. Fermentation of Apple Juice with a Selected Yeast Strain Isolated from the Fermented Foods of Himalayan Regions and Its Organoleptic Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Kanwar, S. S.; Keshani,

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from different fermented foods of Western Himalayas have been studied for strain level and functional diversity in our department. Among these 23 strains, 10 S. cerevisiae strains on the basis of variation in their brewing traits were selected to study their organoleptic effect at gene level by targeting ATF1 gene, which is responsible for ester synthesis during fermentation. Significant variation was observed in ATF1 gene sequences, sugg...

  18. Performance evaluation of Pichia kluyveri, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in industrial tequila fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Delgado, L; Herrera-López, E J; Arrizon, Javier; Arellano-Plaza, M; Gschaedler, A

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, industrial tequila production has used spontaneous fermentation or Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains. Despite the potential of non-Saccharomyces strains for alcoholic fermentation, few studies have been performed at industrial level with these yeasts. Therefore, in this work, Agave tequilana juice was fermented at an industrial level using two non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Pichia kluyveri and Kluyveromyces marxianus) with fermentation efficiency higher than 85 %. Pichia kluyveri (GRO3) was more efficient for alcohol and ethyl lactate production than S. cerevisiae (AR5), while Kluyveromyces marxianus (GRO6) produced more isobutanol and ethyl-acetate than S. cerevisiae (AR5). The level of volatile compounds at the end of fermentation was compared with the tequila standard regulation. All volatile compounds were within the allowed range except for methanol, which was higher for S. cerevisiae (AR5) and K. marxianus (GRO6). The variations in methanol may have been caused by the Agave tequilana used for the tests, since this compound is not synthesized by these yeasts.

  19. Genomic reconstruction to improve bioethanol and ergosterol production of industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Tong, Mengmeng; Gao, Kehui; Di, Yanan; Wang, Pinmei; Zhang, Chunfang; Wu, Xuechang; Zheng, Daoqiong

    2015-02-01

    Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is the common yeast used in the fields of bread making, brewing, and bioethanol production. Growth rate, stress tolerance, ethanol titer, and byproducts yields are some of the most important agronomic traits of S. cerevisiae for industrial applications. Here, we developed a novel method of constructing S. cerevisiae strains for co-producing bioethanol and ergosterol. The genome of an industrial S. cerevisiae strain, ZTW1, was first reconstructed through treatment with an antimitotic drug followed by sporulation and hybridization. A total of 140 mutants were selected for ethanol fermentation testing, and a significant positive correlation between ergosterol content and ethanol production was observed. The highest performing mutant, ZG27, produced 7.9 % more ethanol and 43.2 % more ergosterol than ZTW1 at the end of fermentation. Chromosomal karyotyping and proteome analysis of ZG27 and ZTW1 suggested that this breeding strategy caused large-scale genome structural variations and global gene expression diversities in the mutants. Genetic manipulation further demonstrated that the altered expression activity of some genes (such as ERG1, ERG9, and ERG11) involved in ergosterol synthesis partly explained the trait improvement in ZG27.

  20. The expression of glycerol facilitators from various yeast species improves growth on glycerol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Klein

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycerol is an abundant by-product during biodiesel production and additionally has several assets compared to sugars when used as a carbon source for growing microorganisms in the context of biotechnological applications. However, most strains of the platform production organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae grow poorly in synthetic glycerol medium. It has been hypothesized that the uptake of glycerol could be a major bottleneck for the utilization of glycerol in S. cerevisiae. This species exclusively relies on an active transport system for glycerol uptake. This work demonstrates that the expression of predicted glycerol facilitators (Fps1 homologues from superior glycerol-utilizing yeast species such as Pachysolen tannophilus, Komagataella pastoris, Yarrowia lipolytica and Cyberlindnera jadinii significantly improves the growth performance on glycerol of the previously selected glycerol-consuming S. cerevisiae wild-type strain (CBS 6412-13A. The maximum specific growth rate increased from 0.13 up to 0.18 h−1 and a biomass yield coefficient of 0.56 gDW/gglycerol was observed. These results pave the way for exploiting the assets of glycerol in the production of fuels, chemicals and pharmaceuticals based on baker's yeast. Keywords: Yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Glycerol, Transport, Glycerol facilitator, Fps1, Stl1

  1. Functional expression of a heterologous nickel-dependent, ATP-independent urease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, N; Luttik, M A H; Cueto Rojas, H F; Wahl, A; van Maris, A J A; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2015-07-01

    In microbial processes for production of proteins, biomass and nitrogen-containing commodity chemicals, ATP requirements for nitrogen assimilation affect product yields on the energy producing substrate. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a current host for heterologous protein production and potential platform for production of nitrogen-containing chemicals, uptake and assimilation of ammonium requires 1 ATP per incorporated NH3. Urea assimilation by this yeast is more energy efficient but still requires 0.5 ATP per NH3 produced. To decrease ATP costs for nitrogen assimilation, the S. cerevisiae gene encoding ATP-dependent urease (DUR1,2) was replaced by a Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene encoding ATP-independent urease (ure2), along with its accessory genes ureD, ureF and ureG. Since S. pombe ure2 is a Ni(2+)-dependent enzyme and Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not express native Ni(2+)-dependent enzymes, the S. pombe high-affinity nickel-transporter gene (nic1) was also expressed. Expression of the S. pombe genes into dur1,2Δ S. cerevisiae yielded an in vitro ATP-independent urease activity of 0.44±0.01 µmol min(-1) mg protein(-1) and restored growth on urea as sole nitrogen source. Functional expression of the Nic1 transporter was essential for growth on urea at low Ni(2+) concentrations. The maximum specific growth rates of the engineered strain on urea and ammonium were lower than those of a DUR1,2 reference strain. In glucose-limited chemostat cultures with urea as nitrogen source, the engineered strain exhibited an increased release of ammonia and reduced nitrogen content of the biomass. Our results indicate a new strategy for improving yeast-based production of nitrogen-containing chemicals and demonstrate that Ni(2+)-dependent enzymes can be functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiplex metabolic pathway engineering using CRISPR/Cas9 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakociunas, Tadas; Bonde, Ida; Herrgard, Markus

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 is a simple and efficient tool for targeted and marker-free genome engineering. Here, we report the development and successful application of a multiplex CRISPR/Cas9 system for genome engineering of up to 5 different genomic loci in one transformation step in baker's yeast Saccharomyces...... cerevisiae. To assess the specificity of the tool we employed genome re-sequencing to screen for off-target sites in all single knock-out strains targeted by different gRNAs. This extensive analysis identified no more genome variants in CRISPR/Cas9 engineered strains compared to wild-type reference strains...

  3. Bacterial xylose isomerases from the mammal gut Bacteroidetes cluster function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for effective xylose fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bingyin; Huang, Shuangcheng; Liu, Tingting; Geng, Anli

    2015-05-17

    Xylose isomerase (XI) catalyzes the conversion of xylose to xylulose, which is the key step for anaerobic ethanolic fermentation of xylose. Very few bacterial XIs can function actively in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we illustrate a group of XIs that would function for xylose fermentation in S. cerevisiae through phylogenetic analysis, recombinant yeast strain construction, and xylose fermentation. Phylogenetic analysis of deposited XI sequences showed that XI evolutionary relationship was highly consistent with the bacterial taxonomic orders and quite a few functional XIs in S. cerevisiae were clustered with XIs from mammal gut Bacteroidetes group. An XI from Bacteroides valgutus in this cluster was actively expressed in S. cerevisiae with an activity comparable to the fungal XI from Piromyces sp. Two XI genes were isolated from the environmental metagenome and they were clustered with XIs from environmental Bacteroidetes group. These two XIs could not be expressed in yeast with activity. With the XI from B. valgutus expressed in S. cerevisiae, background yeast strains were optimized by pentose metabolizing pathway enhancement and adaptive evolution in xylose medium. Afterwards, more XIs from the mammal gut Bacteroidetes group, including those from B. vulgatus, Tannerella sp. 6_1_58FAA_CT1, Paraprevotella xylaniphila and Alistipes sp. HGB5, were individually transformed into S. cerevisiae. The known functional XI from Orpinomyces sp. ukk1, a mammal gut fungus, was used as the control. All the resulting recombinant yeast strains were able to ferment xylose. The respiration-deficient strains harboring B. vulgatus and Alistipes sp. HGB5 XI genes respectively obtained specific xylose consumption rate of 0.662 and 0.704 g xylose gcdw(-1) h(-1), and ethanol specific productivity of 0.277 and 0.283 g ethanol gcdw(-1) h(-1), much comparable to those obtained by the control strain carrying Orpinomyces sp. ukk1 XI gene. This study demonstrated that XIs clustered in the

  4. Selection of inoculum size and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... The aim of this work was to select an inoculum concentration and a ... (UFPEDA 1238 and UFPEDA 1334) were used to ferment a culture medium containing .... quantified by HPLC (Agilent HP 1100, Germany) in an Aminex.

  5. Increased ethanol production by deletion of HAP4 in recombinant xylose-assimilating Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2015-12-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAP4 gene encodes a transcription activator that plays a key role in controlling the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial respiration and reductive pathways. This work examines the effect of knockout of the HAP4 gene on aerobic ethanol production in a xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae strain. A hap4-deleted recombinant yeast strain (B42-DHAP4) showed increased maximum concentration, production rate, and yield of ethanol compared with the reference strain MA-B42, irrespective of cultivation medium (glucose, xylose, or glucose/xylose mixtures). Notably, B42-DHAP4 was capable of producing ethanol from xylose as the sole carbon source under aerobic conditions, whereas no ethanol was produced by MA-B42. Moreover, the rate of ethanol production and ethanol yield (0.44 g/g) from the detoxified hydrolysate of wood chips was markedly improved in B42-DHAP4 compared to MA-B42. Thus, the results of this study support the view that deleting HAP4 in xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae strains represents a useful strategy in ethanol production processes.

  6. Role of hexose transport in control of glycolytic flux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Karin; Larsson, Christer; Bill, Roslyn M; Albers, Eva; Snoep, Jacky L; Boles, Eckhard; Hohmann, Stefan; Gustafsson, Lena

    2004-09-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae predominantly ferments glucose to ethanol at high external glucose concentrations, irrespective of the presence of oxygen. In contrast, at low external glucose concentrations and in the presence of oxygen, as in a glucose-limited chemostat, no ethanol is produced. The importance of the external glucose concentration suggests a central role for the affinity and maximal transport rates of yeast's glucose transporters in the control of ethanol production. Here we present a series of strains producing functional chimeras between the hexose transporters Hxt1 and Hxt7, each of which has distinct glucose transport characteristics. The strains display a range of decreasing glycolytic rates resulting in a proportional decrease in ethanol production. Using these strains, we show for the first time that at high glucose levels, the glucose uptake capacity of wild-type S. cerevisiae does not control glycolytic flux during exponential batch growth. In contrast, our chimeric Hxt transporters control the rate of glycolysis to a high degree. Strains whose glucose uptake is mediated by these chimeric transporters will undoubtedly provide a powerful tool with which to examine in detail the mechanism underlying the switch between fermentation and respiration in S. cerevisiae and will provide new tools for the control of industrial fermentations.

  7. Evaluation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an antiaflatoxicogenic agent in broiler feedstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolitto, R P; Armando, M R; Salvano, M A; Dalcero, A M; Rosa, C A

    2013-06-01

    Aflatoxins (AF) are the most important mycotoxins produced by toxigenic strains of various Aspergillus spp. Biological decontamination of mycotoxins using microorganisms is a well-known strategy for the management of mycotoxins in feeds. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains have been reported to bind aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of S. cerevisiae CECT 1891 in counteracting the deleterious effects of AFB1 in broiler chicks. Experimental aflatoxicosis was induced in 6-d-old broilers by feeding them 1.2 mg of AFB1/kg of feed for 3 wk, and the yeast strain was administrated in feed (10(10) cells/kg), in the drinking water (5 × 10(9) cells/L), or a combination of both treatments. A total of 160 chicks were randomly divided into 8 treatments (4 repetitions per treatment). Growth performance was measured weekly from d 7 to 28, and serum biochemical parameters, weights, and histopathological examination of livers were determined at d 28. The AFB1 significantly decreased the BW gain, feed intake, and impaired feed conversion rate. Moreover, AFB1 treatment decreased serum protein concentration and increased liver damage. The addition of S. cerevisiae strain to drinking water, to diets contaminated with AFB1, showed a positive protection effect on the relative weight of the liver, histopathology, and biochemical parameters. Furthermore, dietary addition of the yeast strain to drinking water alleviated the negative effects of AFB1 on growth performance parameters. In conclusion, this study suggests that in feed contaminated with AFB1, the use of S. cerevisiae is an alternative method to reduce the adverse effects of aflatoxicosis. Thus, apart from its excellent nutritional value, yeast can also be used as a mycotoxin adsorbent.

  8. Ultraviolet-endonuclease activity in cell extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants defective in excision of pyrimidine dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekker, M.L.; Kaboev, O.K.; Akhmedov, A.T.; Luchkina, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    Cell-free extracts of ultraviolet-sensitive mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae defective in excision of pyrimidine dimers, rad1, rad2, rad3, rad4, rad10, and rad16, as well as the extracts of the wild-type strain RAD+, display ultraviolet-endonuclease activity

  9. ISOLATION OF THE CANDIDA TROPICALIS GENE FOR P450 LANOSTEROL DEMETHYLASE AND ITS EXPRESSION IN SACCAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have isolated the gene for cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14-demethylase (14DM) from the yeast Candida tropicalis. This was accomplished by screening genomic libraries of strain ATCC750 in E. coli using a DNA fragment containing the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 14DM gene. Identi...

  10. Impact of overexpressing NADH kinase on glucose and xylose metabolism in recombinant xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Vemuri, G. N.; Bao, X. M.

    2009-01-01

    of overexpressing the native NADH kinase (encoded by the POS5 gene) in xylose-consuming recombinant S. cerevisiae directed either into the cytosol or to the mitochondria was evaluated. The physiology of the NADH kinase containing strains was also evaluated during growth on glucose. Overexpressing NADH kinase...

  11. Rapid and efficient galactose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarterman, Josh; Skerker, Jeffrey M; Feng, Xueyang; Liu, Ian Y; Zhao, Huimin; Arkin, Adam P; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-07-10

    In the important industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, galactose metabolism requires energy production by respiration; therefore, this yeast cannot metabolize galactose under strict anaerobic conditions. While the respiratory dependence of galactose metabolism provides benefits in terms of cell growth and population stability, it is not advantageous for producing fuels and chemicals since a substantial fraction of consumed galactose is converted to carbon dioxide. In order to force S. cerevisiae to use galactose without respiration, a subunit (COX9) of a respiratory enzyme was deleted, but the resulting deletion mutant (Δcox9) was impaired in terms of galactose assimilation. Interestingly, after serial sub-cultures on galactose, the mutant evolved rapidly and was able to use galactose via fermentation only. The evolved strain (JQ-G1) produced ethanol from galactose with a 94% increase in yield and 6.9-fold improvement in specific productivity as compared to the wild-type strain. (13)C-metabolic flux analysis demonstrated a three-fold reduction in carbon flux through the TCA cycle of the evolved mutant with redirection of flux toward the fermentation pathway. Genome sequencing of the JQ-G1 strain revealed a loss of function mutation in a master negative regulator of the Leloir pathway (Gal80p). The mutation (Glu348*) in Gal80p was found to act synergistically with deletion of COX9 for efficient galactose fermentation, and thus the double deletion mutant Δcox9Δgal80 produced ethanol 2.4 times faster and with 35% higher yield than a single knockout mutant with deletion of GAL80 alone. When we introduced a functional COX9 cassette back into the JQ-G1 strain, the JQ-G1-COX9 strain showed a 33% reduction in specific galactose uptake rate and a 49% reduction in specific ethanol production rate as compared to JQ-G1. The wild-type strain was also subjected to serial sub-cultures on galactose but we failed to isolate a mutant capable of utilizing galactose without

  12. Comparative study of bio-ethanol production from mahula (Madhuca latifolia L.) flowers by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behera, Shuvashish; Mohanty, Rama Chandra [Department of Botany, Utkal University, Vanivihar, Bhubaneswar 751004, Orissa (India); Ray, Ramesh Chandra [Microbiology Laboratory, Central Tuber Crops Research Institute (Regional Centre), Bhubaneswar 751019, Orissa (India)

    2010-07-15

    Mahula (Madhuca latifolia L.) flower is a suitable alternative cheaper carbohydrate source for production of bio-ethanol. Recent production of bio-ethanol by microbial fermentation as an alternative energy source has renewed research interest because of the increase in the fuel price. Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) and Zymomonas mobilis (bacteria) are two most widely used microorganisms for ethanol production. In this study, experiments were carried out to compare the potential of the yeast S. cerevisiae (CTCRI strain) with the bacterium Z. mobilis (MTCC 92) for ethanol fermentation from mahula flowers. The ethanol production after 96 h fermentation was 149 and 122.9 g kg{sup -1} flowers using free cells of S. cerevisiae and Z. mobilis, respectively. The S. cerevisiae strain showed 21.2% more final ethanol production in comparison to Z. mobilis. Ethanol yield (Yx/s), volumetric product productivity (Qp), sugar to ethanol conversion rate (%) and microbial biomass concentration (X) obtained by S. cerevisiae were found to be 5.2%, 21.1%, 5.27% and 134% higher than Z. mobilis, respectively after 96 h of fermentation. (author)

  13. Comparative study of bio-ethanol production from mahula (Madhuca latifolia L.) flowers by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behera, Shuvashish; Mohanty, Rama Chandra; Ray, Ramesh Chandra

    2010-01-01

    Mahula (Madhuca latifolia L.) flower is a suitable alternative cheaper carbohydrate source for production of bio-ethanol. Recent production of bio-ethanol by microbial fermentation as an alternative energy source has renewed research interest because of the increase in the fuel price. Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) and Zymomonas mobilis (bacteria) are two most widely used microorganisms for ethanol production. In this study, experiments were carried out to compare the potential of the yeast S. cerevisiae (CTCRI strain) with the bacterium Z. mobilis (MTCC 92) for ethanol fermentation from mahula flowers. The ethanol production after 96 h fermentation was 149 and 122.9 g kg -1 flowers using free cells of S. cerevisiae and Z. mobilis, respectively. The S. cerevisiae strain showed 21.2% more final ethanol production in comparison to Z. mobilis. Ethanol yield (Yx/s), volumetric product productivity (Qp), sugar to ethanol conversion rate (%) and microbial biomass concentration (X) obtained by S. cerevisiae were found to be 5.2%, 21.1%, 5.27% and 134% higher than Z. mobilis, respectively after 96 h of fermentation. (author)

  14. Advances in metabolic engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up the development of yeast cell factories. We also present an overview of metabolic engineering strategies for developing yeast strains for production of polymer monomers: lactic, succinic, and cis,cis-muconic acids. S. cerevisiae has already firmly established itself as a cell factory in industrial biotechnology and the advances in yeast strain engineering will stimulate development of novel yeast-based processes for chemicals production. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Biocatalytic production of adipic acid from glucose using engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Raj

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Adipic acid is an important industrial chemical used in the synthesis of nylon-6,6. The commercial synthesis of adipic acid uses petroleum-derived benzene and releases significant quantities of greenhouse gases. Biocatalytic production of adipic acid from renewable feedstocks could potentially reduce the environmental damage and eliminate the need for fossil fuel precursors. Recently, we have demonstrated the first enzymatic hydrogenation of muconic acid to adipic acid using microbial enoate reductases (ERs - complex iron-sulfur and flavin containing enzymes. In this work, we successfully expressed the Bacillus coagulans ER in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain producing muconic acid and developed a three-stage fermentation process enabling the synthesis of adipic acid from glucose. The ability to express active ERs and significant acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae highlight the applicability of the developed yeast strain for the biocatalytic production of adipic acid from renewable feedstocks. Keywords: Biosynthesis, Renewable resources, Yeast, Adipic acid, Synthetic biology

  16. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. © FEMS 2015.

  17. Acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinert, Brian Tate; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Moustafa, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification; however, little is known about the origin and regulation of most sites. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that acetylation...

  18. Isolation of glutathione-deficient mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistler, M.; Eckardt, F.; Summer, K.-H.

    1986-01-01

    Glutathione-deficient (gsh - ) mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated after UV treatment using MNNG as selective agent. For genetic and biochemical characterization 5 mutant strains were chosen which exhibited considerably decreased residual GSH contents varying from 2 to 6% of the wild-type levels. All 5 isolates showed a 2:2 segregation of the gsh - :GSH + phenotypes alluding to a monogenic recessive mutation. Complementation analysis indicates that all gsh - mutants belong to one complementation group. (Auth.)

  19. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase IV: possible involvement in double strand break DNA repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Leem, S H; Ropp, P A; Sugino, A

    1994-01-01

    We identified and purified a new DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase IV), which is similar to mammalian DNA polymerase beta, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and suggested that it is encoded by YCR14C (POLX) on chromosome III. Here, we provided a direct evidence that the purified DNA polymerase IV is indeed encoded by POLX. Strains harboring a pol4 deletion mutation exhibit neither mitotic growth defect nor a meiosis defect, suggesting that DNA polymerase IV participates in nonessential functions in ...

  20. Effect of aeration on the fermentative activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultured in apple juice

    OpenAIRE

    Estela-Escalante, W.; Rychtera, M.; Melzoch, K.; Hatta-Sakoda, B.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of aeration on the fermentative activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiaeRTVE V 15-1-416 was studied in order to evaluate the synthesis of fermentation by-products. To achieve this, the strain was cultured in Erlenmeyer flasks and bioreactor containing sterilized and aroma removed apple juice. The chemical compounds produced during fermentations in shaken (200 min-¹) and static (without agitation) flasks and bioreactor, all in batch mode, were determined by GC and HPLC. The results s...

  1. Phenotypic and metabolic traits of commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Catarina; Lage, Patrícia; Vilela, Alice; Mendes-Faia, Arlete; Mendes-Ferreira, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Currently, pursuing yeast strains that display both a high potential fitness for alcoholic fermentation and a favorable impact on quality is a major goal in the alcoholic beverage industry. This considerable industrial interest has led to many studies characterizing the phenotypic and metabolic traits of commercial yeast populations. In this study, 20 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from different geographical origins exhibited high phenotypic diversity when their response to nine biotechnologically relevant conditions was examined. Next, the fermentation fitness and metabolic traits of eight selected strains with a unique phenotypic profile were evaluated in a high-sugar synthetic medium under two nitrogen regimes. Although the strains exhibited significant differences in nitrogen requirements and utilization rates, a direct relationship between nitrogen consumption, specific growth rate, cell biomass, cell viability, acetic acid and glycerol formation was only observed under high-nitrogen conditions. In contrast, the strains produced more succinic acid under the low-nitrogen regime, and a direct relationship with the final cell biomass was established. Glucose and fructose utilization patterns depended on both yeast strain and nitrogen availability. For low-nitrogen fermentation, three strains did not fully degrade the fructose. This study validates phenotypic and metabolic diversity among commercial wine yeasts and contributes new findings on the relationship between nitrogen availability, yeast cell growth and sugar utilization. We suggest that measuring nitrogen during the stationary growth phase is important because yeast cells fermentative activity is not exclusively related to population size, as previously assumed, but it is also related to the quantity of nitrogen consumed during this growth phase.

  2. Assay for adhesion and agar invasion in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldal, Cemile G; Broach, James

    2006-11-08

    Yeasts are found in natural biofilms, where many microorganisms colonize surfaces. In artificial environments, such as surfaces of man-made objects, biofilms can reduce industrial productivity, destroy structures, and threaten human life. 1-3 On the other hand, harnessing the power of biofilms can help clean the environment and generate sustainable energy. 4-8 The ability of S. cerevisiae to colonize surfaces and participate in complex biofilms was mostly ignored until the rediscovery of the differentiation programs triggered by various signaling pathways and environmental cues in this organism. 9, 10 The continuing interest in using S. cerevisiae as a model organism to understand the interaction and convergence of signaling pathways, such as the Ras-PKA, Kss1 MAPK, and Hog1 osmolarity pathways, quickly placed S. cerevisiae in the junction of biofilm biology and signal transduction research. 11-20 To this end, differentiation of yeast cells into long, adhesive, pseudohyphal filaments became a convenient readout for the activation of signal transduction pathways upon various environmental changes. However, filamentation is a complex collection of phenotypes, which makes assaying for it as if it were a simple phenotype misleading. In the past decade, several assays were successfully adopted from bacterial biofilm studies to yeast research, such as MAT formation assays to measure colony spread on soft agar and crystal violet staining to quantitatively measure cell-surface adherence. 12, 21 However, there has been some confusion in assays developed to qualitatively assess the adhesive and invasive phenotypes of yeast in agar. Here, we present a simple and reliable method for assessing the adhesive and invasive quality of yeast strains with easy-to-understand steps to isolate the adhesion assessment from invasion assessment. Our method, adopted from previous studies, 10, 16 involves growing cells in liquid media and plating on differential nutrient conditions for growth

  3. The evolution of gene expression QTL in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Ronald

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the evolutionary forces that influence patterns of gene expression variation will provide insights into the mechanisms of evolutionary change and the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity. To date, studies of gene expression evolution have primarily been made by analyzing how gene expression levels vary within and between species. However, the fundamental unit of heritable variation in transcript abundance is the underlying regulatory allele, and as a result it is necessary to understand gene expression evolution at the level of DNA sequence variation. Here we describe the evolutionary forces shaping patterns of genetic variation for 1206 cis-regulatory QTL identified in a cross between two divergent strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that purifying selection against mildly deleterious alleles is the dominant force governing cis-regulatory evolution in S. cerevisiae and estimate the strength of selection. We also find that essential genes and genes with larger codon bias are subject to slightly stronger cis-regulatory constraint and that positive selection has played a role in the evolution of major trans-acting QTL.

  4. Improvement of lactic acid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a deletion of ssb1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinsuk J; Crook, Nathan; Sun, Jie; Alper, Hal S

    2016-01-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is an important renewable polymer, but current processes for producing its precursor, lactic acid, suffer from process inefficiencies related to the use of bacterial hosts. Therefore, improving the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce lactic acid is a promising approach to improve industrial production of lactic acid. As one such improvement required, the lactic acid tolerance of yeast must be significantly increased. To enable improved tolerance, we employed an RNAi-mediated genome-wide expression knockdown approach as a means to rapidly identify potential genetic targets. In this approach, several gene knockdown targets were identified which confer increased acid tolerance to S. cerevisiae BY4741, of which knockdown of the ribosome-associated chaperone SSB1 conferred the highest increase (52%). This target was then transferred into a lactic acid-overproducing strain of S. cerevisiae CEN.PK in the form of a knockout and the resulting strain demonstrated up to 33% increased cell growth, 58% increased glucose consumption, and 60% increased L-lactic acid production. As SSB1 contains a close functional homolog SSB2 in yeast, this result was counterintuitive and may point to as-yet-undefined functional differences between SSB1 and SSB2 related to lactic acid production. The final strain produced over 50 g/L of lactic acid in under 60 h of fermentation.

  5. Comparative proteomics analysis of engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced biofuel precursor production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Tang

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was metabolically modified for enhanced biofuel precursor production by knocking out genes encoding mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase and over-expression of a heterologous ATP-citrate lyase. A comparative iTRAQ-coupled 2D LC-MS/MS analysis was performed to obtain a global overview of ubiquitous protein expression changes in S. cerevisiae engineered strains. More than 300 proteins were identified. Among these proteins, 37 were found differentially expressed in engineered strains and they were classified into specific categories based on their enzyme functions. Most of the proteins involved in glycolytic and pyruvate branch-point pathways were found to be up-regulated and the proteins involved in respiration and glyoxylate pathway were however found to be down-regulated in engineered strains. Moreover, the metabolic modification of S. cerevisiae cells resulted in a number of up-regulated proteins involved in stress response and differentially expressed proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and protein biosynthesis pathways. These LC-MS/MS based proteomics analysis results not only offered extensive information in identifying potential protein-protein interactions, signal pathways and ubiquitous cellular changes elicited by the engineered pathways, but also provided a meaningful biological information platform serving further modification of yeast cells for enhanced biofuel production.

  6. Improving Saccharomyces cerevisiae ethanol production and tolerance via RNA polymerase II subunit Rpb7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zilong; Jiang, Rongrong

    2017-01-01

    Classical strain engineering methods often have limitations in altering multigenetic cellular phenotypes. Here we try to improve Saccharomyces cerevisiae ethanol tolerance and productivity by reprogramming its transcription profile through rewiring its key transcription component RNA polymerase II (RNAP II), which plays a central role in synthesizing mRNAs. This is the first report on using directed evolution method to engineer RNAP II to alter S. cerevisiae strain phenotypes. Error-prone PCR was employed to engineer the subunit Rpb7 of RNAP II to improve yeast ethanol tolerance and production. Based on previous studies and the presumption that improved ethanol resistance would lead to enhanced ethanol production, we first isolated variant M1 with much improved resistance towards 8 and 10% ethanol. The ethanol titers of M1 was ~122 g/L (96.58% of the theoretical yield) under laboratory very high gravity (VHG) fermentation, 40% increase as compared to the control. DNA microarray assay showed that 369 genes had differential expression in M1 after 12 h VHG fermentation, which are involved in glycolysis, alcoholic fermentation, oxidative stress response, etc. This is the first study to demonstrate the possibility of engineering eukaryotic RNAP to alter global transcription profile and improve strain phenotypes. Targeting subunit Rpb7 of RNAP II was able to bring differential expression in hundreds of genes in S. cerevisiae , which finally led to improvement in yeast ethanol tolerance and production.

  7. A novel approach for the improvement of ethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, L.; Cao, X.; Wang, C. [Tianjin Univ. of Science and Technology, Tianjin (China). Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety

    2010-06-15

    The partial substitution of fossil fuels with bioethanol has become an important strategy for the use of renewable energy. Ethanol production is generally achieved through fermentation of starch or sugar-based feedstock by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to meet the growing demand for ethanol, there is a need for new yeast strains that can produce ethanol more efficiently and cost effectively. This paper presented a new genome engineering approach that was developed to improve ethanol production by S. cerevisiae. In this study, the aneuploid strain constructed on the base of tetraploid cells was shown to have favourable metabolic traits in very high gravity (VHG) fermentation with 300 g/L glucose as the carbon source. The tetraploid strain was constructed using the plasmid YCplac33-GHK, which comprised the HO gene encoding the site-specific HO endonucleases. The aneuploid strain, WT4-M, was chosen and screened once the tetraploid cells were treated with methyl benzimidazole-2-yl-carbamate to induce loss of mitotic chromosomes. The aneuploid strain WT4-M increased ethanol production as well as osmotic and thermal tolerance. The sugar to ethanol conversion rate also improved. It was concluded that this new approach is valuable for creating yeast strains with better fermentation characteristics. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Selected non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts in controlled multistarter fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae on alcoholic fermentation behaviour and wine aroma of cherry wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shu Yang; Gong, Han Sheng; Jiang, Xiao Man; Zhao, Yu Ping

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the effect of mixed fermentation of non-Saccharomyces (Torulaspora delbrueckii ZYMAFLORE Alpha(TD n. Sacch) and Metschnikowia pulcherrima JS22) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts (D254 and EC1118) on the production of cherry wines, in comparison with commonly used mono-culture. Results obtained during AF demonstrated that negligible inhibitory effect was observed in S. cerevisiae/Alpha pair, whereas a strong antagonistic effect was detected between MJS22 and S. cerevisiae strain, resulting in an early death of MJS22. For volatile components determined, S. cerevisiae/MJS22 couple was found to significantly boost the production of most detected compounds, more particularly in higher alcohols, esters, acids and terpenes; while the characteristic of S. cerevisiae/Alpha pair is an increase in fruity esters, higher alcohols and decrease in acid production. Sensory evaluation revealed that S. cerevisiae/MJS22 pair reinforced sweet, green and fatty notes to the cherry wines, and S. cerevisiae/Alpha trial enhanced the fruity odour and reduced green note. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of Ethanol Production Activity by Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermenting Cellobiose through the Phosphorolytic Pathway in Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation of Cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Heong; Jin, Yong-Su

    2017-09-28

    In simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) for production of cellulosic biofuels, engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting cellobiose has provided several benefits, such as lower enzyme costs and faster fermentation rate compared with wild-type S. cerevisiae fermenting glucose. In this study, the effects of an alternative intracellular cellobiose utilization pathway-a phosphorolytic pathway based on a mutant cellodextrin transporter (CDT-1 (F213L)) and cellobiose phosphorylase (SdCBP)-was investigated by comparing with a hydrolytic pathway based on the same transporter and an intracellular β-glucosidase (GH1-1) for their SSF performances under various conditions. Whereas the phosphorolytic and hydrolytic cellobiose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strains performed similarly under the anoxic SSF conditions, the hydrolytic S. cerevisiae performed slightly better than the phosphorolytic S. cerevisiae under the microaerobic SSF conditions. Nonetheless, the phosphorolytic S. cerevisiae expressing the mutant CDT-1 showed better ethanol production than the glucose-fermenting S. cerevisiae with an extracellular β-glucosidase, regardless of SSF conditions. These results clearly prove that introduction of the intracellular cellobiose metabolic pathway into yeast can be effective on cellulosic ethanol production in SSF. They also demonstrate that enhancement of cellobiose transport activity in engineered yeast is the most important factor affecting the efficiency of SSF of cellulose.

  10. The fermentative activity and morphological specialitys of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y-503 at cultivation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ts. Kotenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of aerobic and anaerobic conditions of cultivation on structure of cells and enzymes` activity of yeast S. cerevisiae Y-503 is researched. The results of experiment have shown that nutrient medium containing geothermal water in aerobic conditions of cultivation improves biotechnological properties of yeast important for manufacturing bread, and anaerobic activates the enzymes participating in synthesis of ethanol. Strain S. cerevisiae Y-503 can successfully be used both in baking, and in the spirit industries

  11. Expression of a Dianthus flavonoid glucosyltransferase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for whole-cell biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Sean R; Morgan, John A

    2009-07-15

    Glycosyltransferases are promising biocatalysts for the synthesis of small molecule glycosides. In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing a flavonoid glucosyltransferase (GT) from Dianthus caryophyllus (carnation) was investigated as a whole-cell biocatalyst. Two yeast expression systems were compared using the flavonoid naringenin as a model substrate. Under in vitro conditions, naringenin-7-O-glucoside was formed and a higher specific glucosyl transfer activity was found using a galactose inducible expression system compared to a constitutive expression system. However, S. cerevisiae expressing the GT constitutively was significantly more productive than the galactose inducible system under in vivo conditions. Interestingly, the glycosides were recovered directly from the culture broth and did not accumulate intracellularly. A previously uncharacterized naringenin glycoside formed using the D. caryophyllus GT was identified as naringenin-4'-O-glucoside. It was found that S. cerevisiae cells hydrolyze naringenin-7-O-glucoside during whole-cell biocatalysis, resulting in a low final glycoside titer. When phloretin was added as a substrate to the yeast strain expressing the GT constitutively, the natural product phlorizin was formed. This study demonstrates S. cerevisiae is a promising whole-cell biocatalyst host for the production of valuable glycosides.

  12. [Molecular evolution of the sulphite efflux gene SSU1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li-Xin; Sun, Fei-Fei; Huang, Yan-Yan; Li, Zhen-Chong

    2013-11-01

    The SSU1 gene encoding a membrane sulfite pump is a main facilitator invovled in sulfite efflux. In Saccharomyce cerevisiae, various range of resistance to sulfite was observed among strains. To explore the evolution traits of SSU1 gene, the population data of S. cerevisiae were collected and analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that S. cerevisiae population can be classified into three sub-populations, and the positive selection was detected in population by McDonald-Kreitman test. The anaylsis of Ka/Ks ratios further showed that S. cerevisiae sub-population was undergoing positive selection. This finding was also supported by PAML branch model. Nine potential positive selection sites were predicted by branch-site model, and four sites exclusively belong to the sub-population under positive seletion. The data from ssulp protein structure demonstrated that three sites are substitutions between polar and hydrophobic amino acids, and only one site of substitutaion from basic amino acid to basic amino acid (345R/K). Because amino acid pKa values are crucial for sulfite pump to maintain their routine function, positive selection of these amino acid substitutions might affect sulfite efflux efficient.

  13. H. guilliermondii impacts growth kinetics and metabolic activity of S. cerevisiae: the role of initial nitrogen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, Patrícia; Barbosa, Catarina; Mateus, Beatriz; Vasconcelos, Isabel; Mendes-Faia, Arlete; Mendes-Ferreira, Ana

    2014-02-17

    Non-Saccharomyces yeasts include different species which comprise an ecologically and biochemically diverse group capable of altering fermentation dynamics and wine composition and flavour. In this study, single- and mixed-culture of Hanseniaspora guilliermondii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used to ferment natural grape-juice, under two nitrogen regimes. In single-culture the strain H. guilliermondii failed to complete total sugar breakdown even though the nitrogen available has not been a limiting factor of its growth or fermentative activity. In mixed-culture, that strain negatively interfered with the growth and fermentative performance of S. cerevisiae, resulting in lower fermentation rate and longer fermentation length, irrespective of the initial nitrogen concentration. The impact of co-inoculation on the volatile compounds profile was more evident in the wines obtained from DAP-supplemented musts, characterised by increased levels of ethyl and acetate esters, associated with fruity and floral character of wines. Moreover, the levels of fatty acids and sulphur compounds which are responsible for unpleasant odours that depreciate wine sensory quality were significantly lower. Accordingly, data obtained suggests that the strain H. guilliermondii has potential to be used as adjunct of S. cerevisiae in wine industry, although possible interactions with S. cerevisiae still need to be elucidated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Radioimmunoassay for yeast killer toxin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, F.A.; Bussey, H.

    1981-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay was developed for the K1 killer toxin from strain T158C/S14a of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Iodine 125-labelled toxin was made to a specific activity of 100 μCi/mg of protein. Antibody to purified toxin was prepared in rabbits using toxin cross-linked to itself. These antibodies, partially purified by 50 percent ammonium sulfate precipitation and Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography, produced one precipitation band with killer toxin and bound 125 I-labelled toxin in a radioimmunoassay. The antibody preparation also bound with the toxins from another K1 killer, A364A, and three chromosomal superkiller mutants derived from it. (auth)

  15. Higher-order structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowary, P.T.; Widom, J.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a method for partially purifying chromatin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) to a level suitable for studies of its higher-order folding. This has required the use of yeast strains that are free of the ubiquitous yeast killer virus. Results from dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction show that the yeast chromatin undergoes a cation-dependent folding into 30-nm filaments that resemble those characteristic of higher-cell chromatin; moreover, the packing of nucleosomes within the yeast 30-nm filaments is similar to that of higher cells. These results imply that yeast has a protein or protein domain that serves the role of the histone H 1 found in higher cells; physical and genetic studies of the yeast activity could help elucidate the structure and function of H 1. Images of the yeast 30-nm filaments can be used to test crossed-linker models for 30-nm filament structure

  16. Characteristics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts exhibiting rough colonies and pseudohyphal morphology with respect to alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Vanda Renata; Bassi, Ana Paula Guarnieri; da Silva, Jessica Carolina Gomes; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina

    2013-12-01

    Among the native yeasts found in alcoholic fermentation, rough colonies associated with pseudohyphal morphology belonging to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae are very common and undesirable during the process. The aim of this work was to perform morphological and physiological characterisations of S. cerevisiae strains that exhibited rough and smooth colonies in an attempt to identify alternatives that could contribute to the management of rough colony yeasts in alcoholic fermentation. Characterisation tests for invasiveness in Agar medium, killer activity, flocculation and fermentative capacity were performed on 22 strains (11 rough and 11 smooth colonies). The effects of acid treatment at different pH values on the growth of two strains ("52"--rough and "PE-02"--smooth) as well as batch fermentation tests with cell recycling and acid treatment of the cells were also evaluated. Invasiveness in YPD Agar medium occurred at low frequency; ten of eleven rough yeasts exhibited flocculation; none of the strains showed killer activity; and the rough strains presented lower and slower fermentative capacities compared to the smooth strains in a 48-h cycle in a batch system with sugar cane juice. The growth of the rough strain was severely affected by the acid treatment at pH values of 1.0 and 1.5; however, the growth of the smooth strain was not affected. The fermentative efficiency in mixed fermentation (smooth and rough strains in the same cell mass proportion) did not differ from the efficiency obtained with the smooth strain alone, most likely because the acid treatment was conducted at pH 1.5 in a batch cell-recycle test. A fermentative efficiency as low as 60% was observed with the rough colony alone.

  17. Overexpression of the truncated version of ILV2 enhances glycerol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashchenko, Lidiia; Abbas, Charles; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn; Sibirny, Andriy

    2016-08-01

    Acetolactate synthase is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyses the conversion of two pyruvate molecules to an acetolactate molecule with release of carbon dioxide. The overexpression of the truncated version of the corresponding gene, ILV2, that codes for presumably cytosolic acetolactate synthase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, led to a decrease in intracellular pyruvate concentration. This recombinant strain was also characterized by a four-fold increase in glycerol production, with a concomitant 1.8-fold reduction in ethanol production, when compared to that of the wild-type strain under anaerobic conditions in a glucose alcoholic fermentation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The Oenological Potential of Hanseniaspora uvarum in Simultaneous and Sequential Co-fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Industrial Wine Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristezza, Mariana; Tufariello, Maria; Capozzi, Vittorio; Spano, Giuseppe; Mita, Giovanni; Grieco, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In oenology, the utilization of mixed starter cultures composed by Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts is an approach of growing importance for winemakers in order to enhance sensory quality and complexity of the final product without compromising the general quality and safety of the oenological products. In fact, several non-Saccharomyces yeasts are already commercialized as oenological starter cultures to be used in combination with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while several others are the subject of various studies to evaluate their application. Our aim, in this study was to assess, for the first time, the oenological potential of H. uvarum in mixed cultures (co-inoculation) and sequential inoculation with S. cerevisiae for industrial wine production. Three previously characterized H. uvarum strains were separately used as multi-starter together with an autochthonous S. cerevisiae starter culture in lab-scale micro-vinification trials. On the basis of microbial development, fermentation kinetics and secondary compounds formation, the strain H. uvarum ITEM8795 was further selected and it was co- and sequentially inoculated, jointly with the S. cerevisiae starter, in a pilot scale wine production. The fermentation course and the quality of final product indicated that the co-inoculation was the better performing modality of inoculum. The above results were finally validated by performing an industrial scale vinification The mixed starter was able to successfully dominate the different stages of the fermentation process and the H. uvarum strain ITEM8795 contributed to increasing the wine organoleptic quality and to simultaneously reduce the volatile acidity. At the best of our knowledge, the present report is the first study regarding the utilization of a selected H. uvarum strain in multi-starter inoculation with S. cerevisiae for the industrial production of a wine. In addition, we demonstrated, at an industrial scale, the importance of non-Saccharomyces in

  19. Genome duplication and mutations in ACE2 cause multicellular, fast-sedimenting phenotypes in evolved Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Bart; Guadalupe-Medina, Victor; Nijkamp, Jurgen F; de Ridder, Dick; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2013-11-05

    Laboratory evolution of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in bioreactor batch cultures yielded variants that grow as multicellular, fast-sedimenting clusters. Knowledge of the molecular basis of this phenomenon may contribute to the understanding of natural evolution of multicellularity and to manipulating cell sedimentation in laboratory and industrial applications of S. cerevisiae. Multicellular, fast-sedimenting lineages obtained from a haploid S. cerevisiae strain in two independent evolution experiments were analyzed by whole genome resequencing. The two evolved cell lines showed different frameshift mutations in a stretch of eight adenosines in ACE2, which encodes a transcriptional regulator involved in cell cycle control and mother-daughter cell separation. Introduction of the two ace2 mutant alleles into the haploid parental strain led to slow-sedimenting cell clusters that consisted of just a few cells, thus representing only a partial reconstruction of the evolved phenotype. In addition to single-nucleotide mutations, a whole-genome duplication event had occurred in both evolved multicellular strains. Construction of a diploid reference strain with two mutant ace2 alleles led to complete reconstruction of the multicellular-fast sedimenting phenotype. This study shows that whole-genome duplication and a frameshift mutation in ACE2 are sufficient to generate a fast-sedimenting, multicellular phenotype in S. cerevisiae. The nature of the ace2 mutations and their occurrence in two independent evolution experiments encompassing fewer than 500 generations of selective growth suggest that switching between unicellular and multicellular phenotypes may be relevant for competitiveness of S. cerevisiae in natural environments.

  20. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii CNCM I-1079 and defence against pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms (ID 913, further assessment) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    . boulardii CNCM I-1079 and defence against pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim, Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii CNCM I-1079, is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect, defence against pathogenic gastro......-intestinal microorganisms, is a beneficial physiological effect. The proposed target population is the general population. The Panel notes that the evidence provided is not sufficient to establish that the strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii CNCM I-1079 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii Hansen CBS...... relationship has not been established between the consumption of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii CNCM I-1079 and defence against pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms....

  1. Interactions between Drosophila and its natural yeast symbionts-Is Saccharomyces cerevisiae a good model for studying the fly-yeast relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Don; Kopp, Artyom; Chandler, James Angus

    2015-01-01

    Yeasts play an important role in the biology of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. In addition to being a valuable source of nutrition, yeasts affect D. melanogaster behavior and interact with the host immune system. Most experiments investigating the role of yeasts in D. melanogaster biology use the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, S. cerevisiae is rarely found with natural populations of D. melanogaster or other Drosophila species. Moreover, the strain of S. cerevisiae used most often in D. melanogaster experiments is a commercially and industrially important strain that, to the best of our knowledge, was not isolated from flies. Since disrupting natural host-microbe interactions can have profound effects on host biology, the results from D. melanogaster-S. cerevisiae laboratory experiments may not be fully representative of host-microbe interactions in nature. In this study, we explore the D. melanogaster-yeast relationship using five different strains of yeast that were isolated from wild Drosophila populations. Ingested live yeasts have variable persistence in the D. melanogaster gastrointestinal tract. For example, Hanseniaspora occidentalis persists relative to S. cerevisiae, while Brettanomyces naardenensis is removed. Despite these differences in persistence relative to S. cerevisiae, we find that all yeasts decrease in total abundance over time. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are an important component of the D. melanogaster anti-microbial response and can inhibit S. cerevisiae growth in the intestine. To determine if sensitivity to ROS explains the differences in yeast persistence, we measured yeast growth in the presence and absence of hydrogen peroxide. We find that B. naardenesis is completely inhibited by hydrogen peroxide, while H. occidentalis is not, which is consistent with yeast sensitivity to ROS affecting persistence within the D. melanogaster gastrointestinal tract. We also compared the feeding preference of D

  2. Cellar-Associated Saccharomyces cerevisiae Population Structure Revealed High-Level Diversity and Perennial Persistence at Sauternes Wine Estates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börlin, Marine; Venet, Pauline; Claisse, Olivier; Salin, Franck

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Three wine estates (designated A, B, and C) were sampled in Sauternes, a typical appellation of the Bordeaux wine area producing sweet white wine. From those wine estates, 551 yeast strains were collected between 2012 and 2014, added to 102 older strains from 1992 to 2011 from wine estate C. All the strains were analyzed through 15 microsatellite markers, resulting in 503 unique Saccharomyces cerevisiae genotypes, revealing high genetic diversity and a low presence of commercial yeast starters. Population analysis performed using Fst genetic distance or ancestry profiles revealed that the two closest wine estates, B and C, which have juxtaposed vineyard plots and common seasonal staff, share more related isolates with each other than with wine estate A, indicating exchange between estates. The characterization of isolates collected 23 years ago at wine estate C in relation to recent isolates obtained at wine estate B revealed the long-term persistence of isolates. Last, during the 2014 harvest period, a temporal succession of ancestral subpopulations related to the different batches associated with the selective picking of noble rotted grapes was highlighted. IMPORTANCE High genetic diversity of S. cerevisiae isolates from spontaneous fermentation on wine estates in the Sauternes appellation of Bordeaux was revealed. Only 7% of all Sauternes strains were considered genetically related to specific commercial strains. The long-term persistence (over 20 years) of S. cerevisiae profiles on a given wine estate is highlighted. PMID:26969698

  3. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuza Nogueira Moysés

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review.

  4. Transcriptome-based characterization of interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in lactose-grown chemostat cocultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Filipa; Sieuwerts, Sander; de Hulster, Erik; Almering, Marinka J H; Luttik, Marijke A H; Pronk, Jack T; Smid, Eddy J; Bron, Peter A; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2013-10-01

    Mixed populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and lactic acid bacteria occur in many dairy, food, and beverage fermentations, but knowledge about their interactions is incomplete. In the present study, interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, two microorganisms that co-occur in kefir fermentations, were studied during anaerobic growth on lactose. By combining physiological and transcriptome analysis of the two strains in the cocultures, five mechanisms of interaction were identified. (i) Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus hydrolyzes lactose, which cannot be metabolized by S. cerevisiae, to galactose and glucose. Subsequently, galactose, which cannot be metabolized by Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, is excreted and provides a carbon source for yeast. (ii) In pure cultures, Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus grows only in the presence of increased CO2 concentrations. In anaerobic mixed cultures, the yeast provides this CO2 via alcoholic fermentation. (iii) Analysis of amino acid consumption from the defined medium indicated that S. cerevisiae supplied alanine to the bacterium. (iv) A mild but significant low-iron response in the yeast transcriptome, identified by DNA microarray analysis, was consistent with the chelation of iron by the lactate produced by Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. (v) Transcriptome analysis of Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in mixed cultures showed an overrepresentation of transcripts involved in lipid metabolism, suggesting either a competition of the two microorganisms for fatty acids or a response to the ethanol produced by S. cerevisiae. This study demonstrates that chemostat-based transcriptome analysis is a powerful tool to investigate microbial interactions in mixed populations.

  5. Endogenous lycopene improves ethanol production under acetic acid stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuo; Jia, Bin; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhen; Chai, Meng-Zhe; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Zhou, Xiao; Li, Xia; Li, Chun; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2018-01-01

    Acetic acid, generated from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, is a significant obstacle for lignocellulosic ethanol production. Reactive oxidative species (ROS)-mediated cell damage is one of important issues caused by acetic acid. It has been reported that decreasing ROS level can improve the acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Lycopene is known as an antioxidant. In the study, we investigated effects of endogenous lycopene on cell growth and ethanol production of S. cerevisiae in acetic acid media. By accumulating endogenous lycopene during the aerobic fermentation of the seed stage, the intracellular ROS level of strain decreased to 1.4% of that of the control strain during ethanol fermentation. In the ethanol fermentation system containing 100 g/L glucose and 5.5 g/L acetic acid, the lag phase of strain was 24 h shorter than that of control strain. Glucose consumption rate and ethanol titer of yPS002 got to 2.08 g/L/h and 44.25 g/L, respectively, which were 2.6- and 1.3-fold of the control strain. Transcriptional changes of INO1 gene and CTT1 gene confirmed that endogenous lycopene can decrease oxidative stress and improve intracellular environment. Biosynthesis of endogenous lycopene is first associated with enhancing tolerance to acetic acid in S. cerevisiae . We demonstrate that endogenous lycopene can decrease intracellular ROS level caused by acetic acid, thus increasing cell growth and ethanol production. This work innovatively   puts forward a new strategy for second generation bioethanol production during lignocellulosic fermentation.

  6. Effect of initial ph on growth characteristics and fermentation properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingyan; Jia, Bo; Sun, Xiangyu; Ai, Jingya; Wang, Lihua; Wang, Cheng; Zhao, Fang; Zhan, Jicheng; Huang, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    As the core microorganism of wine making, Saccharomyces cerevisiae encounter low pH stress at the beginning of fermentation. Effect of initial pH (4.50, 3.00, 2.75, 2.50) on growth and fermentation performance of 3 S. cerevisiae strains Freddo, BH8, Nº.7303, different tolerance at low pH, chosen from 12 strains, was studied. The values of yeast growth (OD600 , colony forming units, cell dry weight), fermentation efficiency (accumulated mass loss, change of total sugar concentration), and fermentation products (ethanol, glycerol, acetic acid, and l-succinic acid) at different pH stress were measured. The results showed that the initial pH of must was a vital factor influencing yeast growth and alcoholic fermentation. Among the 3 strains, strain Freddo and BH8 were more tolerant than Nº.7303, so they were affected slighter than the latter. Among the 4 pH values, all the 3 strains showed adaptation even at pH 2.50; pH 2.75 and 2.50 had more vital effect on yeast growth and fermentation products in contrast with pH 4.50 and 3.00. In general, low initial pH showed the properties of prolonging yeast lag phase, affecting accumulated mass loss, changing the consumption rate of total sugar, increasing final content of acetic acid and glycerol, and decreasing final content of ethanol and l- succinic acid, except some special cases. Based on this study, the effect of low pH on wine products would be better understood and the tolerance mechanism of low pH of S. cerevisiae could be better explored in future. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. [Urinary infection by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Emerging yeast?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhihal, B; Elhalimi, M; Ghfir, B; Mostachi, A; Lyagoubi, M; Aoufi, S

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a commensal yeast of the digestive, respiratory and genito-urinary tract. It is widely used as a probiotic for the treatment of post-antibiotic diarrhea. It most often occurs in immunocompromised patients frequently causing fungemia. We report the case of an adult diabetic patient who had a urinary tract infection due to S. cerevisiae. The disease started with urination associated with urinary frequency burns without fever. The diagnosis was established by the presence of yeasts on direct examination and positivity of culture on Sabouraud-chloramphenicol three times. The auxanogramme gallery (Auxacolor BioRad(®)) allowed the identification of S. cerevisiae. The patient was put on fluconazole with good outcome. This observation points out that this is an opportunistic yeast in immunocompromised patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Adaptive evolution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced ethanol tolerance for Chinese rice wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang; Xu, Yan

    2014-08-01

    High tolerance towards ethanol is a desirable property for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used in the alcoholic beverage industry. To improve the ethanol tolerance of an industrial Chinese rice wine yeast, a sequential batch fermentation strategy was used to adaptively evolve a chemically mutagenized Chinese rice wine G85 strain. The high level of ethanol produced under Chinese rice wine-like fermentation conditions was used as the selective pressure. After adaptive evolution of approximately 200 generations, mutant G85X-8 was isolated and shown to have markedly increased ethanol tolerance. The evolved strain also showed higher osmotic and temperature tolerances than the parental strain. Laboratory Chinese rice wine fermentation showed that the evolved G85X-8 strain was able to catabolize sugars more completely than the parental G85 strain. A higher level of yeast cell activity was found in the fermentation mash produced by the evolved strain, but the aroma profiles were similar between the evolved and parental strains. The improved ethanol tolerance in the evolved strain might be ascribed to the altered fatty acids composition of the cell membrane and higher intracellular trehalose concentrations. These results suggest that adaptive evolution is an efficient approach for the non-recombinant modification of industrial yeast strains.

  9. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Engineering a functional 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). California Institute of Quantitative Biosciences (QB3); Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Dietzel, Kevin L. [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Wichmann, Gale [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Chan, Rossana [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). California Institute of Quantitative Biosciences (QB3); Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Antipov, Eugene [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Moss, Nathan [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Baidoo, Edward E. K. [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Jackson, Peter [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Gaucher, Sara P. [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Gottlieb, Shayin [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); LaBarge, Jeremy [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Mahatdejkul, Tina [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Hawkins, Kristy M. [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Muley, Sheela [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Newman, Jack D. [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Liu, Pinghua [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Keasling, Jay D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). California Institute of Quantitative Biosciences (QB3); Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Depts. of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering and Bioengineering; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Biological Systems & Engineering Div.; Technical Univ. of Denmark, Hoesholm (Denmark). Novo Nodisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability; Zhao, Lishan [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States)

    2016-10-27

    Isoprenoids are made by all free-living organisms and range from essential metabolites like sterols and quinones to more complex compounds like pinene and rubber. They are used in many commercial applications and much work has gone into engineering microbial hosts for their production. Isoprenoids are produced either from acetyl-CoA via the mevalonate pathway or from pyruvate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate via the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) pathway. Saccharomyces cerevisiae exclusively utilizes the mevalonate pathway to synthesize native isoprenoids and in fact the alternative DXP pathway has never been found or successfully reconstructed in the eukaryotic cytosol. There are, however, several advantages to isoprenoid synthesis via the DXP pathway, such as a higher theoretical yield, and it has long been a goal to transplant the pathway into yeast. In this work, we investigate and address barriers to DXP pathway functionality in S. cerevisiae using a combination of synthetic biology, biochemistry and metabolomics. We report, for the first time, functional expression of the DXP pathway in S. cerevisiae. Under low aeration conditions, an engineered strain relying solely on the DXP pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis achieved an endpoint biomass 80% of that of the same strain using the mevalonate pathway.

  11. Atomic force microscopic study of the influence of physical stresses on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adya, Ashok K; Canetta, Elisabetta; Walker, Graeme M

    2006-01-01

    Morphological changes in the cell surfaces of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain NCYC 1681), and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (strain DVPB 1354), in response to thermal and osmotic stresses, were investigated using an atomic force microscope. With this microscope imaging, together with measurements of culture viability and cell size, it was possible to relate topological changes of the cell surface at nanoscale with cellular stress physiology. As expected, when the yeasts were exposed to thermostress or osmostress, their viability together with the mean cell volume decreased in conjunction with the increase in thermal or osmotic shock. Nevertheless, the viability of cells stressed for up to 1 h remained relatively high. For example, viabilities were >50% and >90% for the thermostressed, and >60% and >70% for the osmostressed S. cerevisiae and Schiz. pombe, respectively. Mean cell volume measurements, and bearing and roughness analyses of atomic force microscope images of stressed yeasts indicate that Schiz. pombe may be more resistant to physical stresses than S. cerevisiae. Overall, this study has highlighted the usefulness of atomic force microscope in studies of yeast stress physiology.

  12. Ecological and Genetic Barriers Differentiate Natural Populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clowers, Katie J; Heilberger, Justin; Piotrowski, Jeff S; Will, Jessica L; Gasch, Audrey P

    2015-09-01

    How populations that inhabit the same geographical area become genetically differentiated is not clear. To investigate this, we characterized phenotypic and genetic differences between two populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that in some cases inhabit the same environment but show relatively little gene flow. We profiled stress sensitivity in a group of vineyard isolates and a group of oak-soil strains and found several niche-related phenotypes that distinguish the populations. We performed bulk-segregant mapping on two of the distinguishing traits: The vineyard-specific ability to grow in grape juice and oak-specific tolerance to the cell wall damaging drug Congo red. To implicate causal genes, we also performed a chemical genomic screen in the lab-strain deletion collection and identified many important genes that fell under quantitative trait loci peaks. One gene important for growth in grape juice and identified by both the mapping and the screen was SSU1, a sulfite-nitrite pump implicated in wine fermentations. The beneficial allele is generated by a known translocation that we reasoned may also serve as a genetic barrier. We found that the translocation is prevalent in vineyard strains, but absent in oak strains, and presents a postzygotic barrier to spore viability. Furthermore, the translocation was associated with a fitness cost to the rapid growth rate seen in oak-soil strains. Our results reveal the translocation as a dual-function locus that enforces ecological differentiation while producing a genetic barrier to gene flow in these sympatric populations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Boulardii Reduces the Deoxynivalenol-Induced Alteration of the Intestinal Transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imourana Alassane-Kpembi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Type B trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON is one of the most frequently occurring food contaminants. By inducing trans-activation of a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increasing the stability of their mRNA, trichothecene can impair intestinal health. Several yeast products, especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have the potential for improving the enteric health of piglets, but little is known about the mechanisms by which the administration of yeast counteracts the DON-induced intestinal alterations. Using a pig jejunum explant model, a whole-transcriptome analysis was performed to decipher the early response of the small intestine to the deleterious effects of DON after administration of S. cerevisiae boulardii strain CNCM I-1079. Compared to the control condition, no differentially expressed gene (DE was observed after treatment by yeast only. By contrast, 3619 probes—corresponding to 2771 genes—were differentially expressed following exposure to DON, and 32 signaling pathways were identified from the IPA software functional analysis of the set of DE genes. When the intestinal explants were treated with S. cerevisiae boulardii prior to DON exposure, the number of DE genes decreased by half (1718 probes corresponding to 1384 genes. Prototypical inflammation signaling pathways triggered by DON, including NF-κB and p38 MAPK, were reversed, although the yeast demonstrated limited efficacy toward some other pathways. S. cerevisiae boulardii also restored the lipid metabolism signaling pathway, and reversed the down-regulation of the antioxidant action of vitamin C signaling pathway. The latter effect could reduce the burden of DON-induced oxidative stress. Altogether, the results show that S. cerevisiae boulardii reduces the DON-induced alteration of intestinal transcriptome, and point to new mechanisms for the healing of tissue injury by yeast.

  14. Transcriptome response to alkane biofuels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: identification of efflux pumps involved in alkane tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrocarbon alkanes have been recently considered as important next-generation biofuels because microbial production of alkane biofuels was demonstrated. However, the toxicity of alkanes to microbial hosts can possibly be a bottleneck for high productivity of alkane biofuels. To tackle this toxicity issue, it is essential to understand molecular mechanisms of interactions between alkanes and microbial hosts, and to harness these mechanisms to develop microbial host strains with improved tolerance against alkanes. In this study, we aimed to improve the tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model eukaryotic host of industrial significance, to alkane biofuels by exploiting cellular mechanisms underlying alkane response. Results To this end, we first confirmed that nonane (C9), decane (C10), and undecane (C11) were significantly toxic and accumulated in S. cerevisiae. Transcriptome analyses suggested that C9 and C10 induced a range of cellular mechanisms such as efflux pumps, membrane modification, radical detoxification, and energy supply. Since efflux pumps could possibly aid in alkane secretion, thereby reducing the cytotoxicity, we formed the hypothesis that those induced efflux pumps could contribute to alkane export and tolerance. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrated the roles of the efflux pumps Snq2p and Pdr5p in reducing intracellular levels of C10 and C11, as well as enhancing tolerance levels against C10 and C11. This result provided the evidence that Snq2p and Pdr5p were associated with alkane export and tolerance in S. cerevisiae. Conclusions Here, we investigated the cellular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae response to alkane biofuels at a systems level through transcriptome analyses. Based on these mechanisms, we identified efflux pumps involved in alkane export and tolerance in S. cerevisiae. We believe that the results here provide valuable insights into designing microbial engineering strategies to improve cellular tolerance for

  15. Characterization of the Viable but Nonculturable (VBNC State in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Salma

    Full Text Available The Viable But Non Culturable (VBNC state has been thoroughly studied in bacteria. In contrast, it has received much less attention in other microorganisms. However, it has been suggested that various yeast species occurring in wine may enter in VBNC following sulfite stress.In order to provide conclusive evidences for the existence of a VBNC state in yeast, the ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to enter into a VBNC state by applying sulfite stress was investigated. Viable populations were monitored by flow cytometry while culturable populations were followed by plating on culture medium. Twenty-four hours after the application of the stress, the comparison between the culturable population and the viable population demonstrated the presence of viable cells that were non culturable. In addition, removal of the stress by increasing the pH of the medium at different time intervals into the VBNC state allowed the VBNC S. cerevisiae cells to "resuscitate". The similarity between the cell cycle profiles of VBNC cells and cells exiting the VBNC state together with the generation rate of cells exiting VBNC state demonstrated the absence of cellular multiplication during the exit from the VBNC state. This provides evidence of a true VBNC state. To get further insight into the molecular mechanism pertaining to the VBNC state, we studied the involvement of the SSU1 gene, encoding a sulfite pump in S. cerevisiae. The physiological behavior of wild-type S. cerevisiae was compared to those of a recombinant strain overexpressing SSU1 and null Δssu1 mutant. Our results demonstrated that the SSU1 gene is only implicated in the first stages of sulfite resistance but not per se in the VBNC phenotype. Our study clearly demonstrated the existence of an SO2-induced VBNC state in S. cerevisiae and that the stress removal allows the "resuscitation" of VBNC cells during the VBNC state.

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Boulardii Reduces the Deoxynivalenol-Induced Alteration of the Intestinal Transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alassane-Kpembi, Imourana; Pinton, Philippe; Hupé, Jean-François; Neves, Manon; Lippi, Yannick; Combes, Sylvie; Castex, Mathieu; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2018-05-15

    Type B trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of the most frequently occurring food contaminants. By inducing trans-activation of a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increasing the stability of their mRNA, trichothecene can impair intestinal health. Several yeast products, especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae , have the potential for improving the enteric health of piglets, but little is known about the mechanisms by which the administration of yeast counteracts the DON-induced intestinal alterations. Using a pig jejunum explant model, a whole-transcriptome analysis was performed to decipher the early response of the small intestine to the deleterious effects of DON after administration of S. cerevisiae boulardii strain CNCM I-1079. Compared to the control condition, no differentially expressed gene (DE) was observed after treatment by yeast only. By contrast, 3619 probes-corresponding to 2771 genes-were differentially expressed following exposure to DON, and 32 signaling pathways were identified from the IPA software functional analysis of the set of DE genes. When the intestinal explants were treated with S. cerevisiae boulardii prior to DON exposure, the number of DE genes decreased by half (1718 probes corresponding to 1384 genes). Prototypical inflammation signaling pathways triggered by DON, including NF-κB and p38 MAPK, were reversed, although the yeast demonstrated limited efficacy toward some other pathways. S. cerevisiae boulardii also restored the lipid metabolism signaling pathway, and reversed the down-regulation of the antioxidant action of vitamin C signaling pathway. The latter effect could reduce the burden of DON-induced oxidative stress. Altogether, the results show that S. cerevisiae boulardii reduces the DON-induced alteration of intestinal transcriptome, and point to new mechanisms for the healing of tissue injury by yeast.

  17. Genomic diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts associated with alcoholic fermentation of bacanora produced by artisanal methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Ainza, M L; Zamora-Quiñonez, K A; Moreno-Ibarra, G M; Acedo-Félix, E

    2015-03-01

    Bacanora is a spirituous beverage elaborated with Agave angustifolia Haw in an artisanal process. Natural fermentation is mostly performed with native yeasts and bacteria. In this study, 228 strains of yeast like Saccharomyces were isolated from the natural alcoholic fermentation on the production of bacanora. Restriction analysis of the amplified region ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 of the ribosomal DNA genes (RFLPr) were used to confirm the genus, and 182 strains were identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These strains displayed high genomic variability in their chromosomes profiles by karyotyping. Electrophoretic profiles of the strains evaluated showed a large number of chromosomes the size of which ranged between 225 and 2200 kpb approximately.

  18. Major sulfonate transporter Soa1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and considerable substrate diversity in its fungal family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Sylvester; Kankipati, Harish; De Graeve, Stijn

    2017-01-01

    Sulfate is a well-established sulfur source for fungi; however, in soils sulfonates and sulfate esters, especially choline sulfate, are often much more prominent. Here we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae YIL166C(SOA1) encodes an inorganic sulfur (sulfate, sulfite and thiosulfate) transporter...... that also catalyses sulfonate and choline sulfate uptake. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal SOA1 orthologues and expression of 20 members in the sul1 Delta sul2 Delta soa1 Delta strain, which is deficient in inorganic and organic sulfur compound uptake, reveals that these transporters have diverse substrate...... preferences for sulfur compounds. We further show that SOA2, a S. cerevisiae SOA1 paralogue found in S. uvarum, S. eubayanus and S. arboricola is likely to be an evolutionary remnant of the uncharacterized open reading frames YOL163W and YOL162W. Our work highlights the importance of sulfonates and choline...

  19. Effects of aeration on formation and localization of the acetyl coenzyme A synthetases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H. P.; Jahnke, L.

    1979-01-01

    Previous studies on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that two different forms of the enzyme acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACS) are present, depending on the conditions under which the cells are grown. The paper evaluates the usefulness of a method designed to assay both synthetases simultaneously in yeast homogenates. The data presented confirm the possibility of simultaneous detection and estimation of the amount of both ACSs of S. cerevisiae in crude homogenates of this strain, making possible the study of physiological factors involved in the formation of these isoenzymes. One important factor for specifying which of the two enzymes is found in these yeast cells is the presence or absence of oxygen in their environment. Aeration not only affects the ratio of the two ACSs but also appears to affect the cellular distribution of these enzymes. Most of the data presented suggest the possibility that the nonaerobic ACS may serve as a precursor to the aerobic form.

  20. Expression of protein engineered NADP{sup +}-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase increases ethanol production from xylose in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Katsuji; Takimura, Osamu; Sawayama, Shigeki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Hiroshima (Japan). Biomass Technology Research Center; Watanabe, Seiya; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Makino, Keisuke [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Advanced Energy

    2008-11-15

    A recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain transformed with xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) genes from Pichia stipitis has the ability to convert xylose to ethanol together with the unfavorable excretion of xylitol, which may be due to cofactor imbalance between NADPH-preferring XR and NAD{sup +}-dependent XDH. To reduce xylitol formation, we have already generated several XDH mutants with a reversal of coenzyme specificity toward NADP{sup +}. In this study, we constructed a set of recombinant S. cerevisiae strains with xylose-fermenting ability, including protein-engineered NADP{sup +}-dependent XDH-expressing strains. The most positive effect on xylose-to-ethanol fermentation was found by using a strain named MA-N5, constructed by chromosomal integration of the gene for NADP{sup +}-dependent XDH along with XR and endogenous xylulokinase genes. The MA-N5 strain had an increase in ethanol production and decrease in xylitol excretion compared with the reference strain expressing wild-type XDH when fermenting not only xylose but also mixed sugars containing glucose and xylose. Furthermore, the MA-N5 strain produced ethanol with a high yield of 0.49 g of ethanol/g of total consumed sugars in the nonsulfuric acid hydrolysate of wood chips. The results demonstrate that glucose and xylose present in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate can be efficiently fermented by this redox-engineered strain. (orig.)

  1. Introducing a new breed of wine yeast: interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Jennifer R; Schmid, Frank; Capone, Dimitra L; Dunn, Barbara L; Chambers, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S. cerevisiae wine yeast and S. mikatae (closely-related but ecologically distant members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade), has identified progeny with robust fermentation properties and winemaking potential. Chemical analysis showed that, relative to the S. cerevisiae wine yeast parent, hybrids produced wines with different concentrations of volatile metabolites that are known to contribute to wine flavour and aroma, including flavour compounds associated with non-Saccharomyces species. The new S. cerevisiae x S. mikatae hybrids have the potential to produce complex wines akin to products of spontaneous fermentation while giving winemakers the safeguard of an inoculated ferment.

  2. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces yeasts in grape varieties of the São Francisco Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila M.P.B.S. de Ponzzes-Gomes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this work was to characterise indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in the naturally fermented juice of grape varieties Cabernet Sauvignon, Grenache, Tempranillo, Sauvignon Blanc and Verdejo used in the São Francisco River Valley, northeastern Brazil. In this study, 155 S. cerevisiae and 60 non-Saccharomyces yeasts were isolated and identified using physiological tests and sequencing of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene. Among the non-Saccharomyces species, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was the most common species, followed by Pichia kudriavzevii, Candida parapsilosis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Kloeckera apis, P. manshurica, C. orthopsilosis and C. zemplinina. The population counts of these yeasts ranged among 1.0 to 19 x 10(5 cfu/mL. A total of 155 isolates of S. cerevisiae were compared by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis, and five molecular mitochondrial DNA restriction profiles were detected. Indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from grapes of the São Francisco Valley can be further tested as potential starters for wine production.

  3. Chromosome VIII disomy influences the nonsense suppression efficiency and transition metal tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadorsky, S P; Sopova, Y V; Andreichuk, D Y; Startsev, V A; Medvedeva, V P; Inge-Vechtomov, S G

    2015-06-01

    The SUP35 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the translation termination factor eRF3. Mutations in this gene lead to the suppression of nonsense mutations and a number of other pleiotropic phenotypes, one of which is impaired chromosome segregation during cell division. Similar effects result from replacing the S. cerevisiae SUP35 gene with its orthologues. A number of genetic and epigenetic changes that occur in the sup35 background result in partial compensation for this suppressor effect. In this study we showed that in S. cerevisiae strains in which the SUP35 orthologue from the yeast Pichia methanolica replaces the S. cerevisiae SUP35 gene, chromosome VIII disomy results in decreased efficiency of nonsense suppression. This antisuppressor effect is not associated with decreased stop codon read-through. We identified SBP1, a gene that localizes to chromosome VIII, as a dosage-dependent antisuppressor that strongly contributes to the overall antisuppressor effect of chromosome VIII disomy. Disomy of chromosome VIII also leads to a change in the yeast strains' tolerance of a number of transition metal salts. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Introducing a new breed of wine yeast: interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Bellon

    Full Text Available Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S. cerevisiae wine yeast and S. mikatae (closely-related but ecologically distant members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade, has identified progeny with robust fermentation properties and winemaking potential. Chemical analysis showed that, relative to the S. cerevisiae wine yeast parent, hybrids produced wines with different concentrations of volatile metabolites that are known to contribute to wine flavour and aroma, including flavour compounds associated with non-Saccharomyces species. The new S. cerevisiae x S. mikatae hybrids have the potential to produce complex wines akin to products of spontaneous fermentation while giving winemakers the safeguard of an inoculated ferment.

  5. Introducing a New Breed of Wine Yeast: Interspecific Hybridisation between a Commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Jennifer R.; Schmid, Frank; Capone, Dimitra L.; Dunn, Barbara L.; Chambers, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S. cerevisiae wine yeast and S. mikatae (closely-related but ecologically distant members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade), has identified progeny with robust fermentation properties and winemaking potential. Chemical analysis showed that, relative to the S. cerevisiae wine yeast parent, hybrids produced wines with different concentrations of volatile metabolites that are known to contribute to wine flavour and aroma, including flavour compounds associated with non-Saccharomyces species. The new S. cerevisiae x S. mikatae hybrids have the potential to produce complex wines akin to products of spontaneous fermentation while giving winemakers the safeguard of an inoculated ferment. PMID:23614011

  6. Identification of target genes to control acetate yield during aerobic fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel, José Antonio; Salvadó, Zoel; Tronchoni, Jordi; Morales, Pilar; Rodrigues, Alda Joao; Quirós, Manuel; Gonzalez, Ramón

    2016-09-15

    Aerobic fermentation of grape must, leading to respiro-fermentative metabolism of sugars, has been proposed as way of reducing alcohol content in wines. Two factors limit the usefulness of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for this application, the Crabtree effect, and excess volatile acidity under aerobic conditions. This work aimed to explore the impact on ethanol acetate production of different S. cerevisiae strains deleted for genes previously related with the Crabtree phenotype. Recombinant strains were constructed on a wine industrial genetic background, FX10. All yeast strains, including FX10, showed respiro-fermentative metabolism in natural grape must under aerobic conditions, as well as a concomitant reduction in ethanol yield. This indicates that the Crabtree effect is not a major constrain for reaching relevant respiration levels in grape must. Indeed, only minor differences in ethanol yield were observed between the original and some of the recombinant strains. In contrast, some yeast strains showed a relevant reduction of acetic acid production. This was identified as a positive feature for the feasibility of alcohol level reduction by respiration. Reduced acetic acid production was confirmed by a thorough analysis of these and some additional deletion strains (involving genes HXK2, PYK1, REG1, PDE2 and PDC1). Some recombinant yeasts showed altered production of glycerol and pyruvate derived metabolites. REG1 and PDC1 deletion strains showed a strong reduction of acetic acid yield in aerobic fermentations. Since REG1 defective strains may be obtained by non-GMO approaches, these gene modifications show good promise to help reducing ethanol content in wines.

  7. Improving monoterpene geraniol production through geranyl diphosphate synthesis regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianzhi; Bao, Xiaoming; Li, Chen; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin

    2016-05-01

    Monoterpenes have wide applications in the food, cosmetics, and medicine industries and have recently received increased attention as advanced biofuels. However, compared with sesquiterpenes, monoterpene production is still lagging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, geraniol, a valuable acyclic monoterpene alcohol, was synthesized in S. cerevisiae. We evaluated three geraniol synthases in S. cerevisiae, and the geraniol synthase Valeriana officinalis (tVoGES), which lacked a plastid-targeting peptide, yielded the highest geraniol production. To improve geraniol production, synthesis of the precursor geranyl diphosphate (GPP) was regulated by comparing three specific GPP synthase genes derived from different plants and the endogenous farnesyl diphosphate synthase gene variants ERG20 (G) (ERG20 (K197G) ) and ERG20 (WW) (ERG20 (F96W-N127W) ), and controlling endogenous ERG20 expression, coupled with increasing the expression of the mevalonate pathway by co-overexpressing IDI1, tHMG1, and UPC2-1. The results showed that overexpressing ERG20 (WW) and strengthening the mevalonate pathway significantly improved geraniol production, while expressing heterologous GPP synthase genes or down-regulating endogenous ERG20 expression did not show positive effect. In addition, we constructed an Erg20p(F96W-N127W)-tVoGES fusion protein, and geraniol production reached 66.2 mg/L after optimizing the amino acid linker and the order of the proteins. The best strain yielded 293 mg/L geraniol in a fed-batch cultivation, a sevenfold improvement over the highest titer previously reported in an engineered S. cerevisiae strain. Finally, we showed that the toxicity of geraniol limited its production. The platform developed here can be readily used to synthesize other monoterpenes.

  8. Deoxyribonucleic acid-deficient strains of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaiya, A F; Steed, J R; Sogin, S J

    1980-03-01

    We analyzed a series of germ tube-negative variants isolated from Candida albicans 3153A for deoxyribonucleic acid content. As analyzed by flow microfluorometry, the deoxyribonucleic acid level in these variant strains was 50% of that of the parental strain and equivalent to that of haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This finding was confirmed by comparison of survival rates when exposed to the mutagens ultraviolet light, ethyl methane sulfonate, and methyl methane sulfonate. The diameter of the variant cells as compared to the diameter of the parental 3153A strain showed a relationship similar to that of the diameters of haploid versus diploid S. cerevisiae. These results indicate that those strains may be representative of the imperfect stage of C. albicans.

  9. Fatty acid metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roermund, C. W. T.; Waterham, H. R.; IJlst, L.; Wanders, R. J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Peroxisomes are essential subcellular organelles involved in a variety of metabolic processes. Their importance is underlined by the identification of a large group of inherited diseases in humans in which one or more of the peroxisomal functions are impaired. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has

  10. Ferrofluid modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells for biocatalysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafaříková, Miroslava; Maděrová, Zdeňka; Šafařík, Ivo

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 42, - (2009), s. 521-524 ISSN 0963-9969 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/094; GA MŠk(CZ) OC 157 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Saccharomyces cerevisiae * magnetic fluid * hydrogen peroxide Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.414, year: 2009

  11. Excision repair and mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilbey, Brian

    1987-01-01

    This and succeeding letters discuss the James and Kilbey (1977 and 1978) model for the initiation of u.v. mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its application to include a number of chemical mutagens. The Baranowska et al (1987) results indicating the role of DNA replication, the differing mechanisms in Escherichia coli, are all discussed. (UK)

  12. Nitrogen Catabolite Repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the expression of all known nitrogen catabolite pathways are regulated by four regulators known as Gln3, Gat1, Da180, and Deh1. This is known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). They bind to motifs in the promoter region to the consensus sequence S' GATAA 3'. Gln3...

  13. Effects of fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    yassine

    2013-02-13

    Feb 13, 2013 ... Full Length Research Paper. Effect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation on the ... 2003). Besides, several alcoholic beverages such as wine or liqueurs are obtained from fruit juices fermented by Saccharomyces ..... (2003). Kinetics of pigment release from hairy root cultures of Beta vulgaris under the ...

  14. Characterisation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae hybrids selected for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wine yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) vary in their ability to develop the full aroma potential of Sauvignon blanc wine due to an inability to release volatile thiols. Subsequently, the use of 'thiolreleasing' wine yeasts (TRWY) has increased in popularity. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that some commercially ...

  15. Substrate Channelling and Energetics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data collected during the high-cell-density cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DSM 2155 on glucose in a simulated five-phase feeding strategy of fed-batch process, executed on the Universal BIoprocess CONtrol (UBICON) system using 150L bioreactor over a period of 24h have been analysed. The consistency of the ...

  16. Correlation between Low Temperature Adaptation and Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estéfani García-Rios

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many factors, such as must composition, juice clarification, fermentation temperature or inoculated yeast strain, strongly affect the alcoholic fermentation and aromatic profile of wine. As fermentation temperature is effectively controlled by the wine industry, low-temperature fermentation (10-15 ºC is becoming more prevalent in order to produce white and rosé wines with more pronounced aromatic profiles. Elucidating the response to cold in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is of paramount importance for the selection or genetic improvement of wine strains. Previous research has shown the strong implication of oxidative stress response in adaptation to low temperature during the fermentation process. Here we aimed first to quantify the correlation between recovery after shock with different oxidants and cold, and then to detect the key genes involved in cold adaptation that belong to sulfur assimilation, peroxiredoxins, glutathione-glutaredoxins and thioredoxins pathways. To do so, we analyzed the growth of knockouts from the EUROSCARF collection S. cerevisiae BY4743 strain at low and optimal temperatures. The growth rate of these knockouts, compared with the control, enabled us to identify the genes involved, which were also deleted and validated as key genes in the background of two commercial wine strains with a divergent phenotype in their low-temperature growth. We identified three genes, AHP1, MUP1 and URM1, whose deletion strongly impaired low-temperature growth.

  17. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes involved in ethanol response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Agave tequilana juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Córdova, Jesús; Drnevich, Jenny; Madrigal-Pulido, Jaime Alberto; Arrizon, Javier; Allen, Kirk; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Alvarez-Maya, Ikuri

    2012-08-01

    During ethanol fermentation, yeast cells are exposed to stress due to the accumulation of ethanol, cell growth is altered and the output of the target product is reduced. For Agave beverages, like tequila, no reports have been published on the global gene expression under ethanol stress. In this work, we used microarray analysis to identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in the ethanol response. Gene expression of a tequila yeast strain of S. cerevisiae (AR5) was explored by comparing global gene expression with that of laboratory strain S288C, both after ethanol exposure. Additionally, we used two different culture conditions, cells grown in Agave tequilana juice as a natural fermentation media or grown in yeast-extract peptone dextrose as artificial media. Of the 6368 S. cerevisiae genes in the microarray, 657 genes were identified that had different expression responses to ethanol stress due to strain and/or media. A cluster of 28 genes was found over-expressed specifically in the AR5 tequila strain that could be involved in the adaptation to tequila yeast fermentation, 14 of which are unknown such as yor343c, ylr162w, ygr182c, ymr265c, yer053c-a or ydr415c. These could be the most suitable genes for transforming tequila yeast to increase ethanol tolerance in the tequila fermentation process. Other genes involved in response to stress (RFC4, TSA1, MLH1, PAU3, RAD53) or transport (CYB2, TIP20, QCR9) were expressed in the same cluster. Unknown genes could be good candidates for the development of recombinant yeasts with ethanol tolerance for use in industrial tequila fermentation.

  18. Identification and functional evaluation of the reductases and dehydrogenases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in vanillin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinning; Liang, Zhenzhen; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming; Shen, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Vanillin, a type of phenolic released during the pre-treatment of lignocellulosic materials, is toxic to microorganisms and therefore its presence inhibits the fermentation. The vanillin can be reduced to vanillyl alcohol, which is much less toxic, by the ethanol producer Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The reducing capacity of S. cerevisiae and its vanillin resistance are strongly correlated. However, the specific enzymes and their contribution to the vanillin reduction are not extensively studied. In our previous work, an evolved vanillin-resistant strain showed an increased vanillin reduction capacity compared with its parent strain. The transcriptome analysis suggested the reductases and dehydrogenases of this vanillin resistant strain were up-regulated. Using this as a starting point, 11 significantly regulated reductases and dehydrogenases were selected in the present work for further study. The roles of these reductases and dehydrogenases in the vanillin tolerance and detoxification abilities of S. cerevisiae are described. Among the candidate genes, the overexpression of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH6, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene ALD6, glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase gene ZWF1, NADH-dependent aldehyde reductase gene YNL134C, and aldo-keto reductase gene YJR096W increased 177, 25, 6, 15, and 18 % of the strain μmax in the medium containing 1 g L(-1) vanillin. The in vitro detected vanillin reductase activities of strain overexpressing ADH6, YNL134C and YJR096W were notably higher than control. The vanillin specific reduction rate increased by 8 times in ADH6 overexpressed strain but not in YNL134C and YJR096W overexpressed strain. This suggested that the enzymes encoded by YNL134C and YJR096W might prefer other substrate and/or could not show their effects on vanillin on the high background of Adh6p in vivo. Overexpressing ALD6 and ZWF1 mainly increased the [NADPH]/[NADP(+)] and [GSH]/[GSSG] ratios but not the vanillin reductase activities. Their

  19. Deoxyribonucleic acid-deficient strains of Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Olaiya, A F; Steed, J R; Sogin, S J

    1980-01-01

    We analyzed a series of germ tube-negative variants isolated from Candida albicans 3153A for deoxyribonucleic acid content. As analyzed by flow microfluorometry, the deoxyribonucleic acid level in these variant strains was 50% of that of the parental strain and equivalent to that of haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This finding was confirmed by comparison of survival rates when exposed to the mutagens ultraviolet light, ethyl methane sulfonate, and methyl methane sulfonate. The diameter of t...

  20. Dynamics of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Transcriptome during Bread Dough Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslankoohi, Elham; Zhu, Bo; Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Voordeckers, Karin; De Maeyer, Dries; Marchal, Kathleen; Dornez, Emmie

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of yeast cells during industrial processes such as the production of beer, wine, and bioethanol has been extensively studied. In contrast, our knowledge about yeast physiology during solid-state processes, such as bread dough, cheese, or cocoa fermentation, remains limited. We investigated changes in the transcriptomes of three genetically distinct Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during bread dough fermentation. Our results show that regardless of the genetic background, all three strains exhibit similar changes in expression patterns. At the onset of fermentation, expression of glucose-regulated genes changes dramatically, and the osmotic stress response is activated. The middle fermentation phase is characterized by the induction of genes involved in amino acid metabolism. Finally, at the latest time point, cells suffer from nutrient depletion and activate pathways associated with starvation and stress responses. Further analysis shows that genes regulated by the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway, the major pathway involved in the response to osmotic stress and glycerol homeostasis, are among the most differentially expressed genes at the onset of fermentation. More importantly, deletion of HOG1 and other genes of this pathway significantly reduces the fermentation capacity. Together, our results demonstrate that cells embedded in a solid matrix such as bread dough suffer severe osmotic stress and that a proper induction of the HOG pathway is critical for optimal fermentation. PMID:24056467

  1. Dynamics of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcriptome during bread dough fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslankoohi, Elham; Zhu, Bo; Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Voordeckers, Karin; De Maeyer, Dries; Marchal, Kathleen; Dornez, Emmie; Courtin, Christophe M; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2013-12-01

    The behavior of yeast cells during industrial processes such as the production of beer, wine, and bioethanol has been extensively studied. In contrast, our knowledge about yeast physiology during solid-state processes, such as bread dough, cheese, or cocoa fermentation, remains limited. We investigated changes in the transcriptomes of three genetically distinct Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during bread dough fermentation. Our results show that regardless of the genetic background, all three strains exhibit similar changes in expression patterns. At the onset of fermentation, expression of glucose-regulated genes changes dramatically, and the osmotic stress response is activated. The middle fermentation phase is characterized by the induction of genes involved in amino acid metabolism. Finally, at the latest time point, cells suffer from nutrient depletion and activate pathways associated with starvation and stress responses. Further analysis shows that genes regulated by the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway, the major pathway involved in the response to osmotic stress and glycerol homeostasis, are among the most differentially expressed genes at the onset of fermentation. More importantly, deletion of HOG1 and other genes of this pathway significantly reduces the fermentation capacity. Together, our results demonstrate that cells embedded in a solid matrix such as bread dough suffer severe osmotic stress and that a proper induction of the HOG pathway is critical for optimal fermentation.

  2. Antimutators of mitochodrial and nuclear DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, L.; Foury, F.

    1982-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae ten antimutator mutants have been isolated. The spontaneous occurrence of mitochondrial mutants resistant to erythromycin, oligomycin, and diuron is decreased 2-60-fold in these strains. The rate of forward and reverse spontaneous mutations of the nuclear genome is also reduced. The meiotic progenies arising from the crosses of seven mutants (LB 1 , LB 2 , LB 4 , LB 5 , LB 6 , LB 7 , LB 10 ) with an isogenic parental strain exhibit 2:2 segregations and therefore are the result of mutations in a single nuclear gene. The six mutants LB 1 , LB 2 , LB 4 , LB 6 , LB 7 , LB 10 are semidominant and determine six complementation groups. The mutant LB 5 is dominant and therefore cannot be assigned to any complementation group. The mutants. LB 1 , LB 4 and LB 1 0 are gamma-ray sensitive and, by tetrad analysis, it has been shown that gamma-ray sensitivity and spontaneous antimutability are the result of a single nuclear gene mutation. The other three mutants LB 3 , LB 8 and LB 9 exhibit complex tetrad segregations, typical of cytoplasmic inheritance and do not complement each other. However, although the mutations are semidominant, it has not been possible to detect any antimutator cytoductant among some 500 cytoductants carrying the karl 1-1 nucleus. (orig./AJ)

  3. Brazilian propolis protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. de Sá

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Propolis is a natural product widely used for humans. Due to its complex composition, a number of applications (antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, anesthetic, cytostatic and antioxidant have been attributed to this substance. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a eukaryotic model we investigated the mechanisms underlying the antioxidant effect of propolis from Guarapari against oxidative stress. Submitting a wild type (BY4741 and antioxidant deficient strains (ctt1∆, sod1∆, gsh1∆, gtt1∆ and gtt2∆ either to 15 mM menadione or to 2 mM hydrogen peroxide during 60 min, we observed that all strains, except the mutant sod1∆, acquired tolerance when previously treated with 25 µg/mL of alcoholic propolis extract. Such a treatment reduced the levels of ROS generation and of lipid peroxidation, after oxidative stress. The increase in Cu/Zn-Sod activity by propolis suggests that the protection might be acting synergistically with Cu/Zn-Sod.

  4. Reconstruction of cytosolic fumaric acid biosynthetic pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Guoqiang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fumaric acid is a commercially important component of foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals and industrial materials, yet the current methods of production are unsustainable and ecologically destructive. Results In this study, the fumarate biosynthetic pathway involving reductive reactions of the tricarboxylic acid cycle was exogenously introduced in S. cerevisiae by a series of simple genetic modifications. First, the Rhizopus oryzae genes for malate dehydrogenase (RoMDH and fumarase (RoFUM1 were heterologously expressed. Then, expression of the endogenous pyruvate carboxylase (PYC2 was up-regulated. The resultant yeast strain, FMME-001 ↑PYC2 + ↑RoMDH, was capable of producing significantly higher yields of fumarate in the glucose medium (3.18 ± 0.15 g liter-1 than the control strain FMME-001 empty vector. Conclusions The results presented here provide a novel strategy for fumarate biosynthesis, which represents an important advancement in producing high yields of fumarate in a sustainable and ecologically-friendly manner.

  5. Effects of low X-ray doses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, A.; Laskowski, W.

    1987-01-01

    Three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with different capacities for repair of radiation damage (RAD, rad18, and rad52) have been tested for their colony forming ability (CFA) and growth rates after application of small X-ray doses from 3.8 mGy to 40 Gy. There was no reproducible increase in CFA observable after application of doses between 3.8 mGy and 4.7 Gy.X-ray doses of 40 Gy causing an inactivation of CFA from 90% to 50%, depending on the repair capacity of the strains used, caused a reduced increase in optical density during 2 h buffer treatment in comparison to unirradiated cells. This reduction however, is reversible as soon as the cells are transferred into nutrient medium. One hour after transfer into growh medium the portions of cells with large buds (Gs and M phase) and cells with small buds (S phase) are drastically different in irradiated cells from those obtained in unirradiated cells. The time necessary for separation of mother and daughter cells is prolonged by X-ray irradiation and the formation of new buds is retarded. (orig.)

  6. Ethylene production in relation to nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Nina; Persson, Karl O; Quehl, Paul; Norbeck, Joakim; Larsson, Christer

    2014-11-01

    We have previously shown that ethylene production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the ethylene-forming enzyme (EFE) from Pseudomonas syringae is strongly influenced by variations in the mode of cultivation as well as the choice of nitrogen source. Here, we have studied the influence of nitrogen metabolism on the production of ethylene further. Using ammonium, glutamate, glutamate/arginine, and arginine as nitrogen sources, it was found that glutamate (with or without arginine) correlates with a high ethylene production, most likely linked to an observed increase in 2-oxoglutarate levels. Arginine as a sole nitrogen source caused a reduced ethylene production. A reduction of arginine levels, accomplished using an arginine auxotrophic ARG4-deletion strain in the presence of limiting amounts of arginine or through CAR1 overexpression, did however not correlate with an increased ethylene production. As expected, arginine was necessary for ethylene production as ethylene production in the ARG4-deletion strain ceased at the time when arginine was depleted. In conclusion, our data suggest that high levels of 2-oxoglutarate and a limited amount of arginine are required for successful ethylene production in yeast. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A reference model systesm of industrial yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae is needed for development of the next-generation biocatalyst toward advanced biofuels production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diploid industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has demonstrated distinct characteristics that differ from haploid laboratory model strains. However, as a workhorse for a broad range of fermentation-based industrial applications, it was poorly characterized at the genome level. Observations on the...

  8. Expression of a mutated SPT15 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae enhances both cell growth and ethanol production in microaerobic batch, fed-batch, and simultaneous saccharification and fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Yeong-Je; Park, Haeseong; Yang, Jungwoo; Kim, Soo-Jung; Choi, Wonja; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Park, Yong-Cheol

    2017-05-01

    The SPT15 gene encodes a Saccharomyces cerevisiae TATA-binding protein, which is able to globally control the transcription levels of various metabolic and regulatory genes. In this study, a SPT15 gene mutant (S42N, S78R, S163P, and I212N) was expressed in S. cerevisiae BY4741 (BSPT15-M3), of which effects on fermentative yeast properties were evaluated in a series of culture types. By applying different nitrogen sources and air supply conditions in batch culture, organic nitrogen sources and microaerobic condition were decided to be more favorable for both cell growth and ethanol production of the BSPT15-M3 strain than the control S. cerevisiae BY4741 strain expressing the SPT15 gene (BSPT15wt). Microaerobic fed-batch cultures of BSPT15-M3 with glucose shock in the presence of high ethanol content resulted in a 9.5-13.4% higher glucose consumption rate and ethanol productivity than those for the BSPT15wt strain. In addition, BSPT15-M3 showed 4.5 and 3.9% increases in ethanol productivity from cassava hydrolysates and corn starch in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation processes, respectively. It was concluded that overexpression of the mutated SPT15 gene would be a potent strategy to develop robust S. cerevisiae strains with enhanced cell growth and ethanol production abilities.

  9. Tolerant industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae posses a more robust cell wall integrity signaling pathway against 2-furaldehyde and 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cell wall integrity signaling pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a conserved function for detecting and responding to cell stress conditions but less understood for industrial yeast. We dissected gene expression dynamics for a tolerant industrial yeast strain NRRL Y-50049 in response to challeng...

  10. Expression of a codon-optimized β-glucosidase from Cellulomonas flavigena PR-22 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for bioethanol production from cellobiose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Fránquez, Francisco Javier; González-Bautista, Enrique; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana Carmela; Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor Mario; García-Mena, Jaime; Martinez, Alfredo

    2017-05-01

    Bioethanol is one of the main biofuels produced from the fermentation of saccharified agricultural waste; however, this technology needs to be optimized for profitability. Because the commonly used ethanologenic yeast strains are unable to assimilate cellobiose, several efforts have been made to express cellulose hydrolytic enzymes in these yeasts to produce ethanol from lignocellulose. The C. flavigenabglA gene encoding β-glucosidase catalytic subunit was optimized for preferential codon usage in S. cerevisiae. The optimized gene, cloned into the episomal vector pRGP-1, was expressed, which led to the secretion of an active β-glucosidase in transformants of the S. cerevisiae diploid strain 2-24D. The volumetric and specific extracellular enzymatic activities using pNPG as substrate were 155 IU L -1 and 222 IU g -1 , respectively, as detected in the supernatant of the cultures of the S. cerevisiae RP2-BGL transformant strain growing in cellobiose (20 g L -1 ) as the sole carbon source for 48 h. Ethanol production was 5 g L -1 after 96 h of culture, which represented a yield of 0.41 g g -1 of substrate consumed (12 g L -1 ), equivalent to 76% of the theoretical yield. The S. cerevisiae RP2-BGL strain expressed the β-glucosidase extracellularly and produced ethanol from cellobiose, which makes this microorganism suitable for application in ethanol production processes with saccharified lignocellulose.

  11. Improving ethanol yield in acetate-reducing Saccharomyces cerevisiae by cofactor engineering of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and deletion of ALD6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papapetridis, I.; van Dijk, M.; Dobbe, Arthur P A; Metz, B.; Pronk, J.T.; van Maris, A.J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acetic acid, an inhibitor of sugar fermentation by yeast, is invariably present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates which are used or considered as feedstocks for yeast-based bioethanol production. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains have been constructed, in which anaerobic reduction of

  12. Incipient balancing selection through adaptive loss of aquaporins in natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Will

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A major goal in evolutionary biology is to understand how adaptive evolution has influenced natural variation, but identifying loci subject to positive selection has been a challenge. Here we present the adaptive loss of a pair of paralogous genes in specific Saccharomyces cerevisiae subpopulations. We mapped natural variation in freeze-thaw tolerance to two water transporters, AQY1 and AQY2, previously implicated in freeze-thaw survival. However, whereas freeze-thaw-tolerant strains harbor functional aquaporin genes, the set of sensitive strains lost aquaporin function at least 6 independent times. Several genomic signatures at AQY1 and/or AQY2 reveal low variation surrounding these loci within strains of the same haplotype, but high variation between strain groups. This is consistent with recent adaptive loss of aquaporins in subgroups of strains, leading to incipient balancing selection. We show that, although aquaporins are critical for surviving freeze-thaw stress, loss of both genes provides a major fitness advantage on high-sugar substrates common to many strains' natural niche. Strikingly, strains with non-functional alleles have also lost the ancestral requirement for aquaporins during spore formation. Thus, the antagonistic effect of aquaporin function-providing an advantage in freeze-thaw tolerance but a fitness defect for growth in high-sugar environments-contributes to the maintenance of both functional and nonfunctional alleles in S. cerevisiae. This work also shows that gene loss through multiple missense and nonsense mutations, hallmarks of pseudogenization presumed to emerge after loss of constraint, can arise through positive selection.

  13. Incipient balancing selection through adaptive loss of aquaporins in natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Jessica L; Kim, Hyun Seok; Clarke, Jessica; Painter, John C; Fay, Justin C; Gasch, Audrey P

    2010-04-01

    A major goal in evolutionary biology is to understand how adaptive evolution has influenced natural variation, but identifying loci subject to positive selection has been a challenge. Here we present the adaptive loss of a pair of paralogous genes in specific Saccharomyces cerevisiae subpopulations. We mapped natural variation in freeze-thaw tolerance to two water transporters, AQY1 and AQY2, previously implicated in freeze-thaw survival. However, whereas freeze-thaw-tolerant strains harbor functional aquaporin genes, the set of sensitive strains lost aquaporin function at least 6 independent times. Several genomic signatures at AQY1 and/or AQY2 reveal low variation surrounding these loci within strains of the same haplotype, but high variation between strain groups. This is consistent with recent adaptive loss of aquaporins in subgroups of strains, leading to incipient balancing selection. We show that, although aquaporins are critical for surviving freeze-thaw stress, loss of both genes provides a major fitness advantage on high-sugar substrates common to many strains' natural niche. Strikingly, strains with non-functional alleles have also lost the ancestral requirement for aquaporins during spore formation. Thus, the antagonistic effect of aquaporin function-providing an advantage in freeze-thaw tolerance but a fitness defect for growth in high-sugar environments-contributes to the maintenance of both functional and nonfunctional alleles in S. cerevisiae. This work also shows that gene loss through multiple missense and nonsense mutations, hallmarks of pseudogenization presumed to emerge after loss of constraint, can arise through positive selection.

  14. Heterologous expression of a rice metallothionein isoform (OsMTI-1b in Saccharomyces cerevisiae enhances cadmium, hydrogen peroxide and ethanol tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ansarypour

    Full Text Available Abstract Metallothioneins are a superfamily of low-molecular-weight, cysteine (Cys-rich proteins that are believed to play important roles in protection against metal toxicity and oxidative stress. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of heterologous expression of a rice metallothionein isoform (OsMTI-1b on the tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Cd2+, H2O2 and ethanol stress. The gene encoding OsMTI-1b was cloned into p426GPD as a yeast expression vector. The new construct was transformed to competent cells of S. cerevisiae. After verification of heterologous expression of OsMTI-1b, the new strain and control were grown under stress conditions. In comparison to control strain, the transformed S. cerevisiae cells expressing OsMTI-1b showed more tolerance to Cd2+ and accumulated more Cd2+ ions when they were grown in the medium containing CdCl2. In addition, the heterologous expression of GST-OsMTI-1b conferred H2O2 and ethanol tolerance to S. cerevisiae cells. The results indicate that heterologous expression of plant MT isoforms can enhance the tolerance of S. cerevisiae to multiple stresses.

  15. The impact of respiration and oxidative stress response on recombinant α-amylase production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, José L; Meza, Eugenio; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-12-01

    Studying protein production is important for fundamental research on cell biology and applied research for biotechnology. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive workhorse for production of recombinant proteins as it does not secrete many endogenous proteins and it is therefore easy to purify a secreted product. However, recombinant production at high rates represents a significant metabolic burden for the yeast cells, which results in oxidative stress and ultimately affects the protein production capacity. Here we describe a method to reduce the overall oxidative stress by overexpressing the endogenous HAP1 gene in a S. cerevisiae strain overproducing recombinant α-amylase. We demonstrate how Hap1p can activate a set of oxidative stress response genes and meanwhile contribute to increase the metabolic rate of the yeast strains, therefore mitigating the negative effect of the ROS accumulation associated to protein folding and hence increasing the production capacity during batch fermentations.

  16. Engineering a functional 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirby, James; Dietzel, Kevin L.; Wichmann, Gale

    2016-01-01

    Isoprenoids are used in many commercial applications and much work has gone into engineering microbial hosts for their production. Isoprenoids are produced either from acetyl-CoA via the mevalonate pathway or from pyruvate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate via the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP......) pathway. Saccharomyces cerevisiae exclusively utilizes the mevalonate pathway to synthesize native isoprenoids and in fact the alternative DXP pathway has never been found or successfully reconstructed in the eukaryotic cytosol. There are, however, several advantages to isoprenoid synthesis via the DXP...... time, functional expression of the DXP pathway in S. cerevisiae. Under low aeration conditions, an engineered strain relying solely on the DXP pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis achieved an endpoint biomass 80% of that of the same strain using the mevalonate pathway....

  17. Impaired Uptake and/or Utilization of Leucine by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Suppressed by the SPT15-300 Allele of the TATA-Binding Protein Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baerends, RJ; Qiu, Jin-Long; Rasmussen, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Successful fermentations to produce ethanol require microbial strains that have a high tolerance to glucose and ethanol. Enhanced glucose/ethanol tolerance of the laboratory yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4741 under certain growth conditions as a consequence of the expression of a dominant...... us to examine the effect of expression of the SPT15-300 allele in various yeast species of industrial importance. Expression of SPT15-300 in leucine-prototrophic strains of S. cerevisiae, Saccharomyces bayanus, or Saccharomyces pastorianus (lager brewing yeast), however, did not improve tolerance...... to ethanol on complex rich medium (yeast extract-peptone-dextrose). The enhanced growth of the laboratory yeast strain BY4741 expressing the SPT15-300 mutant allele was seen only on defined media with low concentrations of leucine, indicating that the apparent improved growth in the presence of ethanol...

  18. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of genes in valine metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karhumaa Kaisa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isobutanol can be a better biofuel than ethanol due to its higher energy density and lower hygroscopicity. Furthermore, the branched-chain structure of isobutanol gives a higher octane number than the isomeric n-butanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was chosen as the production host because of its relative tolerance to alcohols, robustness in industrial fermentations, and the possibility for future combination of isobutanol production with fermentation of lignocellulosic materials. Results The yield of isobutanol was improved from 0.16 to 0.97 mg per g glucose by simultaneous overexpression of biosynthetic genes ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 in valine metabolism in anaerobic fermentation of glucose in mineral medium in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol yield was further improved by twofold by the additional overexpression of BAT2, encoding the cytoplasmic branched-chain amino-acid aminotransferase. Overexpression of ILV6, encoding the regulatory subunit of Ilv2, in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain decreased isobutanol production yield by threefold. In aerobic cultivations in shake flasks in mineral medium, the isobutanol yield of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain were 3.86 and 0.28 mg per g glucose, respectively. They increased to 4.12 and 2.4 mg per g glucose in yeast extract/peptone/dextrose (YPD complex medium under aerobic conditions, respectively. Conclusions Overexpression of genes ILV2, ILV3, ILV5, and BAT2 in valine metabolism led to an increase in isobutanol production in S. cerevisiae. Additional overexpression of ILV6 in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain had a negative effect, presumably by increasing the sensitivity of Ilv2 to valine inhibition, thus weakening the positive impact of overexpression of ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 on isobutanol production. Aerobic cultivations of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain showed that supplying amino acids in cultivation media

  19. Stress Tolerance in Doughs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Trehalase Mutants Derived from Commercial Baker’s Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Jun; Hino, Akihiro; Yamada-Iyo, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nakajima, Ryouichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Mori, Katsumi; Takano, Hiroyuki

    1999-01-01

    Accumulation of trehalose is widely believed to be a critical determinant in improving the stress tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is commonly used in commercial bread dough. To retain the accumulation of trehalose in yeast cells, we constructed, for the first time, diploid homozygous neutral trehalase mutants (Δnth1), acid trehalase mutants (Δath1), and double mutants (Δnth1 ath1) by using commercial baker’s yeast strains as the parent strains and the gene disruption method. During fermentation in a liquid fermentation medium, degradation of intracellular trehalose was inhibited with all of the trehalase mutants. The gassing power of frozen doughs made with these mutants was greater than the gassing power of doughs made with the parent strains. The Δnth1 and Δath1 strains also exhibited higher levels of tolerance of dry conditions than the parent strains exhibited; however, the Δnth1 ath1 strain exhibited lower tolerance of dry conditions than the parent strain exhibited. The improved freeze tolerance exhibited by all of the trehalase mutants may make these strains useful in frozen dough. PMID:10388673

  20. Direct stamp of technology or origin on the genotypic and phenotypic variation of indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae population in a natural model of boiled grape juice fermentation into traditional Msalais wine in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Xia; Wang, Guan-Qiong; Xue, Ju-Lan; Gou, Dong-Qi; Duan, Chang-Qing

    2017-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains worldwide show genetic and phenotypic diversity and their population substructures are greatly affected by their technological application or geographical origins. Msalais is a traditional wine obtained via a unique method of spontaneous fermentation of local boiled grape juice in Southern Xinjiang. We analyzed 436 indigenous S. cerevisiae strains associated with Msalais fermentation. These strains were highly diverse with respect to the interdelta region and 24 phenotypic traits, with apparent differentiation according to strain origins and technologies used to produce Msalais. The genetic and phenotypic diversity of strains from traditional workshops was higher than in strains from modern plants. These local strains had different origin- or technology-specific fermentative characteristics. Strains growing in large-scale fermentation tanks tolerated high temperature, whereas strains from traditional workshops tolerated high alcohol content (16%) and low temperature (13°C). Almost all the strains were characterized by the highest fermenting vigor, with weak H2S production and no histamine, cadaverine, phenethylamine and tryptamine production. Majority of strains had pronounced autolytic activity with high β-glucosidase and polygalacturonase activity and alcohol production. Our study reveals a direct stamp of technology or origin on genotypic and phenotypic variation of an indigenous S. cerevisiae population. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. An internal deletion in MTH1 enables growth on glucose of pyruvate-decarboxylase negative, non-fermentative Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Bart; Flores, Carmen-Lisset; Gancedo, Carlos; Zhang, Xiuying; Trueheart, Joshua; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2012-09-15

    Pyruvate-decarboxylase negative (Pdc⁻) strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae combine the robustness and high glycolytic capacity of this yeast with the absence of alcoholic fermentation. This makes Pdc⁻S. cerevisiae an interesting platform for efficient conversion of glucose towards pyruvate-derived products without formation of ethanol as a by-product. However, Pdc⁻ strains cannot grow on high glucose concentrations and require C₂-compounds (ethanol or acetate) for growth under conditions with low glucose concentrations, which hitherto has limited application in industry. Genetic analysis of a Pdc⁻ strain previously evolved to overcome these deficiencies revealed a 225 p in-frame internal deletion in MTH1, encoding a transcriptional regulator involved in glucose sensing. This internal deletion contains a phosphorylation site required for degradation, thereby hypothetically resulting in increased stability of the protein. Reverse engineering of this alternative MTH1 allele into a non-evolved Pdc⁻ strain enabled growth on 20 g l⁻¹ glucose and 0.3% (v/v) ethanol at a maximum specific growth rate (0.24 h⁻¹) similar to that of the evolved Pdc⁻ strain (0.23 h⁻¹). Furthermore, the reverse engineered Pdc⁻ strain grew on glucose as sole carbon source, albeit at a lower specific growth rate (0.10 h⁻¹) than the evolved strain (0.20 h⁻¹). The observation that overexpression of the wild-type MTH1 allele also restored growth of Pdc⁻S. cerevisiae on glucose is consistent with the hypothesis that the internal deletion results in decreased degradation of Mth1. Reduced degradation of Mth1 has been shown to result in deregulation of hexose transport. In Pdc⁻ strains, reduced glucose uptake may prevent intracellular accumulation of pyruvate and/or redox problems, while release of glucose repression due to the MTH1 internal deletion may contribute to alleviation of the C₂-compound auxotrophy. In this study we have discovered and characterised a

  2. An internal deletion in MTH1 enables growth on glucose of pyruvate-decarboxylase negative, non-fermentative Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oud Bart

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyruvate-decarboxylase negative (Pdc- strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae combine the robustness and high glycolytic capacity of this yeast with the absence of alcoholic fermentation. This makes Pdc-S. cerevisiae an interesting platform for efficient conversion of glucose towards pyruvate-derived products without formation of ethanol as a by-product. However, Pdc- strains cannot grow on high glucose concentrations and require C2-compounds (ethanol or acetate for growth under conditions with low glucose concentrations, which hitherto has limited application in industry. Results Genetic analysis of a Pdc- strain previously evolved to overcome these deficiencies revealed a 225bp in-frame internal deletion in MTH1, encoding a transcriptional regulator involved in glucose sensing. This internal deletion contains a phosphorylation site required for degradation, thereby hypothetically resulting in increased stability of the protein. Reverse engineering of this alternative MTH1 allele into a non-evolved Pdc- strain enabled growth on 20 g l-1 glucose and 0.3% (v/v ethanol at a maximum specific growth rate (0.24 h-1 similar to that of the evolved Pdc- strain (0.23 h-1. Furthermore, the reverse engineered Pdc- strain grew on glucose as sole carbon source, albeit at a lower specific growth rate (0.10 h-1 than the evolved strain (0.20 h-1. The observation that overexpression of the wild-type MTH1 allele also restored growth of Pdc-S. cerevisiae on glucose is consistent with the hypothesis that the internal deletion results in decreased degradation of Mth1. Reduced degradation of Mth1 has been shown to result in deregulation of hexose transport. In Pdc- strains, reduced glucose uptake may prevent intracellular accumulation of pyruvate and/or redox problems, while release of glucose repression due to the MTH1 internal deletion may contribute to alleviation of the C2-compound auxotrophy. Conclusions In this study we have discovered and

  3. The influence of solvent stress on MMS-induced genetic change in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, F K; Rohlfs, A

    1991-01-01

    MMS induced mitotic recombination but not mitotic chromosome loss when tested in pure form in strain D61.M of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, confirming previous results of Albertini (1991), whereas in Aspergillus nidulans it also induced chromosomal malsegregation in addition to mitotic recombination (Käfer, 1988). However, induction of mitotic chromosome loss was observed in combination with strong inducers of chromosome loss such as the aprotic polar solvents ethyl acetate and to a lesser extent methyl ethyl ketone but not with gamma-valerolactone and propionitrile. In addition to this, 4 solvents, dimethyl formamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, dioxane and pyridine, enhanced the MMS-induced mitotic recombination in strain D61.M. An enhancement of MMS-induced mitotic recombination and reverse mutation could be demonstrated for ethyl acetate and gamma-valerolactone in yeast strain D7.

  4. Expression of cocoa genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves cocoa butter production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Yongjun; Bergenholm, David; Gossing, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Background: Cocoa butter (CB) extracted from cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao) is the main raw material for chocolate production, but CB supply is insufficient due to the increased chocolate demand and limited CB production. CB is mainly composed of three different kinds of triacylglycerols (TAGs), 1......), and it is essential to modulate the yeast TAG biosynthetic pathway for higher CBL production.Results: We cloned seven GPAT genes and three LPAT genes from cocoa cDNA, in order to screen for CBL biosynthetic gene candidates. By expressing these cloned cocoa genes and two synthesized cocoa DGAT genes in S. cerevisiae......, we successfully increased total fatty acid production, TAG production and CBL production in some of the strains. In the best producer, the potential CBL content was eightfold higher than the control strain, suggesting the cocoa genes expressed in this strain were functional and might be responsible...

  5. The competitive action of UV of different wavelengths of the survival of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, Eh.V.; Pospelov, M.E.; Strakhovskaya, M.G.; Frajkin, G.Ya.

    1982-01-01

    During investigation into combined action of different wavelengths of UV spectrum on Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast (strains XII and CI-9) it was established that 334 nm preliminary irradiation causes photoprotection of cells from lethal action of 254 and 313 nm UV-rays. During 334 postradiation irradiation strengthening of lethal action of 254 and 313 nm UV-rays for strain XII, not capable of photoreactivation, is observed. Using specific inhibitor of serotonin-biosynthesis- parachlorophenyl alanine it is shown that 334 nm serotonin synthesis induced by light lies in the base of mechanism of both effects. The effect of postradiation action of 334 nm light for strain CI-9, capable of photoreactivation, depends on interaction of two different photobiological reactions caused by light, photoreactivation and photoinduced synthesis of serotonin

  6. Lactose/whey utilization and ethanol production by transformed Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porro, D; Martegani, E; Ranzi, B M; Alberghina, L

    1992-04-05

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae transformed with a multicopy expression vector bearing both the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene under the control of the upstream activating sequence of the GAL1-10 genes and the GAL4 activator gene release part of beta-galactosidase in the growth medium. This release is due to cell lysis of the older mother cells; the enzyme maintains its activity in buffered growth media. Fermentation studies with transformed yeast strains showed that the release of beta-galactosidase allowed an efficient growth on buffered media containing lactose as carbon source as well as on whey-based media. The transformed strains utilized up to 95% of the lactose and a high growth yield was obtained in rich media. High productions of ethanol were also observed in stationary phase after growth in lactose minimal media.

  7. Evidence that DNA polymerase δ contributes to initiating leading strand DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacz, Marta A; Lujan, Scott A; Burkholder, Adam B; Cox, Phillip B; Wu, Qiuqin; Zhou, Zhi-Xiong; Haber, James E; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2018-02-27

    To investigate nuclear DNA replication enzymology in vivo, we have studied Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains containing a pol2-16 mutation that inactivates the catalytic activities of DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε). Although pol2-16 mutants survive, they present very tiny spore colonies, increased doubling time, larger than normal cells, aberrant nuclei, and rapid acquisition of suppressor mutations. These phenotypes reveal a severe growth defect that is distinct from that of strains that lack only Pol ε proofreading (pol2-4), consistent with the idea that Pol ε is the major leading-strand polymerase used for unstressed DNA replication. Ribonucleotides are incorporated into the pol2-16 genome in patterns consistent with leading-strand replication by Pol δ when Pol ε is absent. More importantly, ribonucleotide distributions at replication origins suggest that in strains encoding all three replicases, Pol δ contributes to initiation of leading-strand replication. We describe two possible models.

  8. Engineering the fatty acid metabolic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for advanced biofuel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Tang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid-derived fuels and chemicals have attracted a great deal of attention in recent decades, due to their following properties of high compatibility to gasoline-based fuels and existing infrastructure for their direct utilization, storage and distribution. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the ideal biofuel producing candidate, based on the wealth of available genetic information and versatile tools designed to manipulate its metabolic pathways. Engineering the fatty acid metabolic pathways in S. cerevisiae is an effective strategy to increase its fatty acid biosynthesis and provide more pathway precursors for production of targeted products. This review summarizes the recent progress in metabolic engineering of yeast cells for fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives production, including the regulation of acetyl-CoA biosynthesis, NADPH production, fatty acid elongation, and the accumulation of activated precursors of fatty acids for converting enzymes. By introducing specific enzymes in the engineered strains, a powerful platform with a scalable, controllable and economic route for advanced biofuel production has been established. Keywords: Metabolic engineering, Fatty acid biosynthesis, Fatty acid derivatives, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  9. Enhanced kefiran production by mixed culture of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheirsilp, Benjamas; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Shioya, Suteaki

    2003-01-09

    In a batch mixed culture of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which could assimilate lactic acid, cell growth and kefiran production rates of L. kefiranofaciens significantly increased, compared with those in pure cultures. The kefiran production rate was 36 mg l(-1) h(-1) in the mixed culture under the anaerobic condition, which was greater than that in the pure culture (24 mg l(-1) h(-1)). Under the aerobic condition, a more intensive interaction between these two strains was observed and higher kefiran production rate (44 mg l(-1) h(-1)) was obtained compared with that under the anaerobic condition. Kefiran production was further enhanced by an addition of fresh medium in the fed-batch mixed culture. In the fed-batch mixed culture, a final kefiran concentration of 5.41 g l(-1) was achieved at 87 h, thereby attaining the highest productivity at 62 mg l(-1) h(-1). Simulation study considered the reduction of lactic acid in pure culture was performed to estimate the additional effect of coculture with S. cerevisiae. Slightly higher cell growth and kefiran production rates in the mixed culture than those expected from pure culture by simulation were observed. These results suggest that coculture of L. kefiranofaciens and S. cerevisiae not only reduces the lactic acid concentration by consumption but also stimulates cell growth and kefiran production of L. kefiranofaciens.

  10. Genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes regulated by vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2015-01-01

    During pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, a variety of fermentation inhibitors, including acetic acid and vanillin, are released. Using DNA microarray analysis, this study explored genes of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that respond to vanillin-induced stress. The expression of 273 genes was upregulated and that of 205 genes was downregulated under vanillin stress. Significantly induced genes included MCH2, SNG1, GPH1, and TMA10, whereas NOP2, UTP18, FUR1, and SPR1 were down regulated. Sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region of upregulated genes suggested that vanillin might regulate gene expression in a stress response element (STRE)-dependent manner, in addition to a pathway that involved the transcription factor Yap1p. Retardation in the cell growth of mutant strains indicated that MCH2, SNG1, and GPH1 are intimately involved in vanillin stress response. Deletion of the genes whose expression levels were decreased under vanillin stress did not result in a notable change in S. cerevisiae growth under vanillin stress. This study will provide the basis for a better understanding of the stress response of the yeast S. cerevisiae to fermentation inhibitors.

  11. ¹³C-based metabolic flux analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a reduced Crabtree effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihata, Shuichi; Matsuda, Fumio; Yoshimi, Mika; Hayakawa, Kenshi; Furusawa, Chikara; Kanda, Akihisa; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows a Crabtree effect that produces ethanol in a high glucose concentration even under fully aerobic condition. For efficient production of cake yeast or compressed yeast for baking, ethanol by-production is not desired since glucose limited chemostat or fed-batch cultivations are performed to suppress the Crabtree effect. In this study, the (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) was performed for the S288C derived S. cerevisiae strain to characterize a metabolic state under the reduced Crabtree effect. S. cerevisiae cells were cultured at a low dilution rate (0.1 h(-1)) under the glucose-limited chemostat condition. The estimated metabolic flux distribution showed that the acetyl-CoA in mitochondria was mainly produced from pyruvate by pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) reaction and that the level of the metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was much higher than that of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, which contributes to high biomass yield at low dilution rate by supplying NADPH required for cell growth. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Engineered Production of Short-Chain Acyl-Coenzyme A Esters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krink-Koutsoubelis, Nicolas; Loechner, Anne C.; Lechner, Anna

    2018-01-01

    Short-chain acyl-coenzyme A esters serve as intermediate compounds in fatty acid biosynthesis, and the production of polyketides, biopolymers and other value-added chemicals. S. cerevisiae is a model organism that has been utilized for the biosynthesis of such biologically and economically valuable...... compounds. However, its limited repertoire of short-chain acyl-CoAs effectively prevents its application as a production host for a plethora of natural products. Therefore, we introduced biosynthetic metabolic pathways to five different acyl-CoA esters into S. cerevisiae. Our engineered strains provide......-CoA at 0.5 μM; and isovaleryl-CoA, n-butyryl-CoA, and n-hexanoyl-CoA at 6 μM each. The acyl-CoAs produced in this study are common building blocks of secondary metabolites and will enable the engineered production of a variety of natural products in S. cerevisiae. By providing this toolbox of acyl...

  13. Terminal acidic shock inhibits sour beer bottle conditioning by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Cody M; Veatch, Devon; Covey, Adam; Staton, Caleb; Bochman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    During beer fermentation, the brewer's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae experiences a variety of shifting growth conditions, culminating in a low-oxygen, low-nutrient, high-ethanol, acidic environment. In beers that are bottle conditioned (i.e., carbonated in the bottle by supplying yeast with a small amount of sugar to metabolize into CO2), the S. cerevisiae cells must overcome these stressors to perform the ultimate act in beer production. However, medium shock caused by any of these variables can slow, stall, or even kill the yeast, resulting in production delays and economic losses. Here, we describe a medium shock caused by high lactic acid levels in an American sour beer, which we refer to as "terminal acidic shock". Yeast exposed to this shock failed to bottle condition the beer, though they remained viable. The effects of low pH/high [lactic acid] conditions on the growth of six different brewing strains of S. cerevisiae were characterized, and we developed a method to adapt the yeast to growth in acidic beer, enabling proper bottle conditioning. Our findings will aid in the production of sour-style beers, a trending category in the American craft beer scene. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of n-butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, EricJ.; Chan, Rossana; Prasad, Nilu; Myers, Samuel; Petzold, Christopher; Redding, Alyssa; Ouellet, Mario; Keasling, JayD.

    2008-11-25

    BackgroundIncreasing energy costs and environmental concerns have motivated engineering microbes for the production of ?second generation? biofuels that have better properties than ethanol.Results& ConclusionsSaccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered with an n-butanol biosynthetic pathway, in which isozymes from a number of different organisms (S. cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Ralstonia eutropha) were substituted for the Clostridial enzymes and their effect on n-butanol production was compared. By choosing the appropriate isozymes, we were able to improve production of n-butanol ten-fold to 2.5 mg/L. The most productive strains harbored the C. beijerinckii 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which uses NADH as a co-factor, rather than the R. eutropha isozyme, which uses NADPH, and the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase from S. cerevisiae or E. coli rather than that from R. eutropha. Surprisingly, expression of the genes encoding the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase from C. beijerinckii (bcd and etfAB) did not improve butanol production significantly as previously reported in E. coli. Using metabolite analysis, we were able to determine which steps in the n-butanol biosynthetic pathway were the most problematic and ripe for future improvement.

  15. Glycerol positive promoters for tailored metabolic engineering of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ping-Wei; Klein, Mathias; Futschik, Matthias; Nevoigt, Elke

    2018-05-01

    Glycerol offers several advantages as a substrate for biotechnological applications. An important step toward using the popular production host Saccharomyces cerevisiae for glycerol-based bioprocesses has been the fact that in recent studies commonly used S. cerevisiae strains were engineered to grow in synthetic medium containing glycerol as the sole carbon source. For metabolic engineering projects of S. cerevisiae growing on glycerol, characterized promoters are missing. In the current study, we used transcriptome analysis and a yECitrine-based fluorescence reporter assay to select and characterize 25 useful promoters. The promoters of the genes ALD4 and ADH2 showed 4.2-fold and 3-fold higher activities compared to the well-known strong TEF1 promoter. Moreover, the collection contains promoters with graded activities in synthetic glycerol medium and different degrees of glucose repression. To demonstrate the general applicability of the promoter collection, we successfully used a subset of the characterized promoters with graded activities in order to optimize growth on glycerol in an engineered derivative of CEN.PK, in which glycerol catabolism exclusively occurs via a non-native DHA pathway.

  16. Adaptive response to DNA-damaging agents in natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations from "Evolution Canyon", Mt. Carmel, Israel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel A Lidzbarsky

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural populations of most organisms, especially unicellular microorganisms, are constantly exposed to harsh environmental factors which affect their growth. UV radiation is one of the most important physical parameters which influences yeast growth in nature. Here we used 46 natural strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from several natural populations at the "Evolution Canyon" microsite (Nahal Oren, Mt. Carmel, Israel. The opposing slopes of this canyon share the same geology, soil, and macroclimate, but they differ in microclimatic conditions. The interslope differences in solar radiation (200%-800% more on the "African" slope caused the development of two distinct biomes. The south-facing slope is sunnier and has xeric, savannoid "African" environment while the north-facing slope is represented by temperate, "European" forested environment. Here we studied the phenotypic response of the S. cerevisiae strains to UVA and UVC radiations and to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS in order to evaluate the interslope effect on the strains' ability to withstand DNA-damaging agents.We exposed our strains to the different DNA-damaging agents and measured survival by counting colony forming units. The strains from the "African" slope were more resilient to both UVA and MMS than the strains from the "European" slope. In contrast, we found that there was almost no difference between strains (with similar ploidy from the opposite slopes, in their sensitivity to UVC radiation. These results suggest that the "African" strains are more adapted to higher solar radiation than the "European" strains. We also found that the tetraploids strains were more tolerant to all DNA-damaging agents than their neighboring diploid strains, which suggest that high ploidy level might be a mechanism of adaptation to high solar radiation.Our results and the results of parallel studies with several other organisms, suggest that natural selection appears to select, at a

  17. Iterative optimization of xylose catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using combinatorial expression tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Luke N; Dueber, John E

    2017-06-01

    A common challenge in metabolic engineering is rapidly identifying rate-controlling enzymes in heterologous pathways for subsequent production improvement. We demonstrate a workflow to address this challenge and apply it to improving xylose utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For eight reactions required for conversion of xylose to ethanol, we screened enzymes for functional expression in S. cerevisiae, followed by a combinatorial expression analysis to achieve pathway flux balancing and identification of limiting enzymatic activities. In the next round of strain engineering, we increased the copy number of these limiting enzymes and again tested the eight-enzyme combinatorial expression library in this new background. This workflow yielded a strain that has a ∼70% increase in biomass yield and ∼240% increase in xylose utilization. Finally, we chromosomally integrated the expression library. This library enriched for strains with multiple integrations of the pathway, which likely were the result of tandem integrations mediated by promoter homology. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1301-1309. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The genetic basis of natural variation in oenological traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Salinas

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main microorganism responsible for wine alcoholic fermentation. The oenological phenotypes resulting from fermentation, such as the production of acetic acid, glycerol, and residual sugar concentration are regulated by multiple genes and vary quantitatively between different strain backgrounds. With the aim of identifying the quantitative trait loci (QTLs that regulate oenological phenotypes, we performed linkage analysis using three crosses between highly diverged S. cerevisiae strains. Segregants from each cross were used as starter cultures for 20-day fermentations, in synthetic wine must, to simulate actual winemaking conditions. Linkage analysis on phenotypes of primary industrial importance resulted in the mapping of 18 QTLs. We tested 18 candidate genes, by reciprocal hemizygosity, for their contribution to the observed phenotypic variation, and validated five genes and the chromosome II right subtelomeric region. We observed that genes involved in mitochondrial metabolism, sugar transport, nitrogen metabolism, and the uncharacterized ORF YJR030W explained most of the phenotypic variation in oenological traits. Furthermore, we experimentally validated an exceptionally strong epistatic interaction resulting in high level of succinic acid between the Sake FLX1 allele and the Wine/European MDH2 allele. Overall, our work demonstrates the complex genetic basis underlying wine traits, including natural allelic variation, antagonistic linked QTLs and complex epistatic interactions between alleles from strains with different evolutionary histories.

  19. Metabolic engineering for high glycerol production by the anaerobic cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkiv, Marta V; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Abbas, Charles A; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2017-06-01

    Glycerol is used by the cosmetic, paint, automotive, food, and pharmaceutical industries and for production of explosives. Currently, glycerol is available in commercial quantities as a by-product from biodiesel production, but the purity and the cost of its purification are prohibitive. The industrial production of glycerol by glucose aerobic fermentation using osmotolerant strains of the yeasts Candida sp. and Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been described. A major drawback of the aerobic process is the high cost of production. For this reason, the development of yeast strains that effectively convert glucose to glycerol anaerobically is of great importance. Due to its ability to grow under anaerobic conditions, the yeast S. cerevisiae is an ideal system for the development of this new biotechnological platform. To increase glycerol production and accumulation from glucose, we lowered the expression of TPI1 gene coding for triose phosphate isomerase; overexpressed the fused gene consisting the GPD1 and GPP2 parts coding for glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase, respectively; overexpressed the engineered FPS1 gene that codes for aquaglyceroporin; and overexpressed the truncated gene ILV2 that codes for acetolactate synthase. The best constructed strain produced more than 20 g of glycerol/L from glucose under micro-aerobic conditions and 16 g of glycerol/L under anaerobic conditions. The increase in glycerol production led to a drop in ethanol and biomass accumulation.

  20. The effect of acetaminophen on ubiquitin homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina Huseinovic

    Full Text Available Acetaminophen (APAP, although considered a safe drug, is one of the major causes of acute liver failure by overdose, and therapeutic chronic use can cause serious health problems. Although the reactive APAP metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI is clearly linked to liver toxicity, toxicity of APAP is also found without drug metabolism of APAP to NAPQI. To get more insight into mechanisms of APAP toxicity, a genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for APAP-resistant deletion strains was performed. In this screen we identified genes related to the DNA damage response. Next, we investigated the link between genotype and APAP-induced toxicity or resistance by performing a more detailed screen with a library containing mutants of 1522 genes related to nuclear processes, like DNA repair and chromatin remodelling. We identified 233 strains that had an altered growth rate relative to wild type, of which 107 showed increased resistance to APAP and 126 showed increased sensitivity. Gene Ontology analysis identified ubiquitin homeostasis, regulation of transcription of RNA polymerase II genes, and the mitochondria-to-nucleus signalling pathway to be associated with APAP resistance, while histone exchange and modification, and vesicular transport were connected to APAP sensitivity. Indeed, we observed a link between ubiquitin levels and APAP resistance, whereby ubiquitin deficiency conferred resistance to APAP toxicity while ubiquitin overexpression resulted in sensitivity. The toxicity profile of various chemicals, APAP, and its positional isomer AMAP on a series of deletion strains with ubiquitin deficiency showed a unique resistance pattern for APAP. Furthermore, exposure to APAP increased the level of free ubiquitin and influenced the ubiquitination of proteins. Together, these results uncover a role for ubiquitin homeostasis in APAP-induced toxicity.

  1. Capturing of the monoterpene olefin limonene produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongedijk, Esmer; Cankar, Katarina; Ranzijn, Jorn; van der Krol, Sander; Bouwmeester, Harro; Beekwilder, Jules

    2015-01-01

    Monoterpene olefins such as limonene are plant compounds with applications as flavouring and fragrance agents, as solvents and potentially also in polymer and fuel chemistry. We engineered baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to express a (-)-limonene synthase from Perilla frutescens and a (+)-limonene synthase from Citrus limon. Both proteins were expressed either with their native plastid targeting signal or in a truncated form in which the plastidial sorting signal was removed. The yeast host strain for expression was AE9 K197G, which expresses a mutant Erg20 enzyme. This enzyme catalyses the formation of geranyl diphosphate, which is the precursor for monoterpenes. Several methods were tested to capture limonene produced by the yeast. Extraction from the culture medium by pentane, or by the addition of CaCl2 followed by solid-phase micro-extraction, did not lead to detectable limonene, indicating that limonene is rapidly lost from the culture medium. Volatile terpenes such as limonene may also be trapped in a dodecane phase added to the medium during fermentation. This method resulted in recovery of 0.028 mg/l (+)-limonene and 0.060 mg/l (-)-limonene in strains using the truncated Citrus and Perilla synthases, respectively. Trapping the headspace during culture of the limonene synthase-expressing strains resulted in higher titres, at 0.12 mg/l (+)-limonene and 0.49 mg/l (-)-limonene. These results show that the volatile properties of the olefins produced require specific methods for efficient recovery of these molecules from biotechnological production systems. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Sporulation in the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, Aaron M.

    2011-01-01

    In response to nitrogen starvation in the presence of a poor carbon source, diploid cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo meiosis and package the haploid nuclei produced in meiosis into spores. The formation of spores requires an unusual cell division event in which daughter cells are formed within the cytoplasm of the mother cell. This process involves the de novo generation of two different cellular structures: novel membrane compartments within the cell cytoplasm that give rise to the spore plasma membrane and an extensive spore wall that protects the spore from environmental insults. This article summarizes what is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling spore assembly with particular attention to how constitutive cellular functions are modified to create novel behaviors during this developmental process. Key regulatory points on the sporulation pathway are also discussed as well as the possible role of sporulation in the natural ecology of S. cerevisiae. PMID:22084423

  3. Cell cycle phases in the unequal mother/daughter cell cycles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, B J; Chlebowicz-Sledziewska, E; Fangman, W L

    1984-11-01

    During cell division in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mother cells produce buds (daughter cells) which are smaller and have longer cell cycles. We performed experiments to compare the lengths of cell cycle phases in mothers and daughters. As anticipated from earlier indirect observations, the longer cell cycle time of daughter cells is accounted for by a longer G1 interval. The S-phase and the G2-phase are of the same duration in mother and daughter cells. An analysis of five isogenic strains shows that cell cycle phase lengths are independent of cell ploidy and mating type.

  4. Implementation of communication-mediating domains for non-ribosomal peptide production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siewers, Verena; San-Bento, Rita; Nielsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has in several cases been proven to be a suitable host for the production of natural products and was recently exploited for the production of non-ribosomal peptides. Synthesis of non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) is mediated by NRP synthetases (NRPSs), modular enzymes, which...... are often organized in enzyme complexes. In these complexes, partner NRPSs interact via communication-mediating domains (COM domains). In order to test whether functional interaction between separate NRPS modules is possible in yeast we constructed a yeast strain expressing two modules with compatible COM...

  5. Functional screening of aldehyde decarbonylases for long-chain alkane production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Min-Kyoung; Zhou, Yongjin J.; Buijs, Nicolaas A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Low catalytic activities of pathway enzymes are often a limitation when using microbial based chemical production. Recent studies indicated that the enzyme activity of aldehyde decarbonylase (AD) is a critical bottleneck for alkane biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We therefore...... detected in other AD expressed yeast strains. Dynamic expression of SeADO and CwADO under GAL promoters increased alkane production to 0.20 mg/L/OD600 and no fatty alcohols, with even number chain lengths from C8 to C14, were detected in the cells. Conclusions: We demonstrated in vivo enzyme activities...

  6. Regularities of ''rapid'' repair in radiosensitive mutants of diploid yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazunov, A.V.; Kapul'tsevich, Yu.G.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made of ''rapid'' repair in radiosensitive mutants of diploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae after irradiation with ν-quanta and α-particles. It was shown that the capacity of ''rapid'' repair does not always correlate with the ability of ''slow'' postirradiation repair of viability of yeast cells. A conclusion is made that ''rapid'' and ''slow'' repair are independent processes. It was found that ''rapid'' repair of the studied strains of diploid yeast is more effective after exposure to ν-quanta than α-particles

  7. Repair of UV-irradiated plasmid DNA in excision repair deficient mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikai, K.; Tano, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Nozu, K.

    1985-01-01

    The repair of UV-irradiated DNA of plasmid YEp13 was studied in the incision defective strains by measurement of cell transformation frequency. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, rad1,2,3 and 4 mutants could repair UV-damaged plasmid DNA. In Escherichia coli, uvrA mutant was unable to repair UV-damaged plasmid DNA; however, pretreatment of the plasmid with Micrococcus luteus endonuclease increased repair. It was concluded that all the mutations of yeast were probably limited only to the nuclear DNA. (author)

  8. Industrial systems biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae enables novel succinic acid cell factory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Otero

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most well characterized eukaryote, the preferred microbial cell factory for the largest industrial biotechnology product (bioethanol, and a robust commerically compatible scaffold to be exploitted for diverse chemical production. Succinic acid is a highly sought after added-value chemical for which there is no native pre-disposition for production and accmulation in S. cerevisiae. The genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction of S. cerevisiae enabled in silico gene deletion predictions using an evolutionary programming method to couple biomass and succinate production. Glycine and serine, both essential amino acids required for biomass formation, are formed from both glycolytic and TCA cycle intermediates. Succinate formation results from the isocitrate lyase catalyzed conversion of isocitrate, and from the α-keto-glutarate dehydrogenase catalyzed conversion of α-keto-glutarate. Succinate is subsequently depleted by the succinate dehydrogenase complex. The metabolic engineering strategy identified included deletion of the primary succinate consuming reaction, Sdh3p, and interruption of glycolysis derived serine by deletion of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, Ser3p/Ser33p. Pursuing these targets, a multi-gene deletion strain was constructed, and directed evolution with selection used to identify a succinate producing mutant. Physiological characterization coupled with integrated data analysis of transcriptome data in the metabolically engineered strain were used to identify 2(nd-round metabolic engineering targets. The resulting strain represents a 30-fold improvement in succinate titer, and a 43-fold improvement in succinate yield on biomass, with only a 2.8-fold decrease in the specific growth rate compared to the reference strain. Intuitive genetic targets for either over-expression or interruption of succinate producing or consuming pathways, respectively, do not lead to increased succinate. Rather, we

  9. Isolation and characterization of PEP3, a gene required for vacuolar biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Preston, R A; Manolson, M F; Becherer, K; Weidenhammer, E; Kirkpatrick, D; Wright, R; Jones, E W

    1991-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae PEP3 gene was cloned from a wild-type genomic library by complementation of the carboxypeptidase Y deficiency in a pep3-12 strain. Subclone complementation results localized the PEP3 gene to a 3.8-kb DNA fragment. The DNA sequence of the fragment was determined; a 2,754-bp open reading frame predicts that the PEP3 gene product is a hydrophilic, 107-kDa protein that has no significant similarity to any known protein. The PEP3 predicted protein has a zinc finger (CX...

  10. Comparative metabolomics profiling of engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae lead to a strategy that improving β-carotene production by acetate supplementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Bu

    Full Text Available A comparative metabolomic analysis was conducted on recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain producing β-carotene and the parent strain cultivated with glucose as carbon source using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS, high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS based approach. The results showed that most of the central intermediates associated with amino acids, carbohydrates, glycolysis and TCA cycle intermediates (acetic acid, glycerol, citric acid, pyruvic acid and succinic acid, fatty acids, ergosterol and energy metabolites were produced in a lower amount in recombinant strain, as compared to the parent strain. To increase β-carotene production in recombinant strain, a strategy that exogenous addition of acetate (10 g/l in exponential phase was developed, which could enhance most intracellular metabolites levels and result in 39.3% and 14.2% improvement of β-carotene concentration and production, respectively, which was accompanied by the enhancement of acetyl-CoA, fatty acids, ergosterol and ATP contents in cells. These results indicated that the amounts of intracellular metabolites in engineered strain are largely consumed by carotenoid formation. Therefore, maintaining intracellular metabolites pool at normal levels is essential for carotenoid biosynthesis. To relieve this limitation, rational supplementation of acetate could be a potential way because it can partially restore the levels of intracellular metabolites and improve the production of carotenoid compounds in recombinant S. cerevisiae.

  11. Purification and properties of recombinant exopolyphosphatase PPN1 and effects of its overexpression on polyphosphate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Nadeshda; Trilisenko, Ludmila; Kulakovskaya, Tatiana; Dumina, Maria; Eldarov, Michail

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate performs many regulatory functions in living cells. The yeast exopolyphosphatase PPN1 is an enzyme with multiple cellular localization and probably variable functions. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with overexpressed PPN1 was constructed for large-scale production of the enzyme and for studying the effect of overproduction on polyphosphate metabolism. The ΔPPN1 strain was transformed by the vector containing this gene under a strong constitutive promoter of glycerol aldehyde-triphosphate dehydrogenase of S. cerevisiae. Exopolyphosphatase activity in the transformant increased 28- and 11-fold compared to the ΔPPN1 and parent strains, respectively. The content of acid-soluble polyphosphate decreased ∼6-fold and the content of acid-insoluble polyphosphate decreased ∼2.5-fold in the cells of the transformant compared to the ΔPPN1 strain. The recombinant enzyme was purified. The substrate specificity, cation requirement, and inhibition by heparin were found to be similar to native PPN1. The molecular mass of a subunit (∼33 kD) and the amino acid sequence of the recombinant enzyme were the same as in mature PPN1. The recombinant enzyme was localized mainly in the cytoplasm (40%) and vacuoles (20%). The overproducer strain had no growths defects under phosphate deficiency or phosphate excess. In contrast to the parent strains accumulating polyphosphate, the transformant accumulated orthophosphate under phosphate surplus. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism in ecological context

    OpenAIRE

    Jouhten, Paula; Ponomarova, Olga; González García, Ramón; Patil, Kiran R.

    2016-01-01

    The architecture and regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network are among the best studied owing to its widespread use in both basic research and industry. Yet, several recent studies have revealed notable limitations in explaining genotype?metabolic phenotype relations in this yeast, especially when concerning multiple genetic/environmental perturbations. Apparently unexpected genotype?phenotype relations may originate in the evolutionarily shaped cellular operating principles ...

  13. Lycopene overproduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through combining pathway engineering with host engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Xiao, Wenhai; Wang, Ying; Liu, Hong; Li, Xia; Yuan, Yingjin

    2016-06-21

    Microbial production of lycopene, a commercially and medically important compound, has received increasing concern in recent years. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regarded as a safer host for lycopene production than Escherichia coli. However, to date, the lycopene yield (mg/g DCW) in S. cerevisiae was lower than that in E. coli and did not facilitate downstream extraction process, which might be attributed to the incompatibility between host cell and heterologous pathway. Therefore, to achieve lycopene overproduction in S. cerevisiae, both host cell and heterologous pathway should be delicately engineered. In this study, lycopene biosynthesis pathway was constructed by integration of CrtE, CrtB and CrtI in S. cerevisiae CEN.PK2. When YPL062W, a distant genetic locus, was deleted, little acetate was accumulated and approximately 100 % increase in cytosolic acetyl-CoA pool was achieved relative to that in parental strain. Through screening CrtE, CrtB and CrtI from diverse species, an optimal carotenogenic enzyme combination was obtained, and CrtI from Blakeslea trispora (BtCrtI) was found to have excellent performance on lycopene production as well as lycopene proportion in carotenoid. Then, the expression level of BtCrtI was fine-tuned and the effect of cell mating types was also evaluated. Finally, potential distant genetic targets (YJL064W, ROX1, and DOS2) were deleted and a stress-responsive transcription factor INO2 was also up-regulated. Through the above modifications between host cell and carotenogenic pathway, lycopene yield was increased by approximately 22-fold (from 2.43 to 54.63 mg/g DCW). Eventually, in fed-batch fermentation, lycopene production reached 55.56 mg/g DCW, which is the highest reported yield in yeasts. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered to produce lycopene in this study. Through combining host engineering (distant genetic loci and cell mating types) with pathway engineering (enzyme screening and gene fine-tuning), lycopene yield was

  14. Bioconversion of lignocellulose-derived sugars to ethanol by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Anjali; Srivastava, Aradhana; Kondo, Akihiko; Bisaria, Virendra S

    2012-03-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass from agricultural and agro-industrial residues represents one of the most important renewable resources that can be utilized for the biological production of ethanol. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used for the commercial production of bioethanol from sucrose or starch-derived glucose. While glucose and other hexose sugars like galactose and mannose can be fermented to ethanol by S. cerevisiae, the major pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose remain unutilized. Nevertheless, D-xylulose, the keto isomer of xylose, can be fermented slowly by the yeast and thus, the incorporation of functional routes for the conversion of xylose and arabinose to xylulose or xylulose-5-phosphate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can help to improve the ethanol productivity and make the fermentation process more cost-effective. Other crucial bottlenecks in pentose fermentation include low activity of the pentose phosphate pathway enzymes and competitive inhibition of xylose and arabinose transport into the cell cytoplasm by glucose and other hexose sugars. Along with a brief introduction of the pretreatment of lignocellulose and detoxification of the hydrolysate, this review provides an updated overview of (a) the key steps involved in the uptake and metabolism of the hexose sugars: glucose, galactose, and mannose, together with the pentose sugars: xylose and arabinose, (b) various factors that play a major role in the efficient fermentation of pentose sugars along with hexose sugars, and (c) the approaches used to overcome the metabolic constraints in the production of bioethanol from lignocellulose-derived sugars by developing recombinant S. cerevisiae strains.

  15. Significant competitive advantage conferred by meiosis and syngamy in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsell, J; Wills, C

    1996-01-01

    The presumed advantages of genetic recombinations are difficult to demonstrate directly. To investigate the effects of recombination and background heterozygosity on competitive ability, we have performed serial-transfer competition experiments between isogenic sexual and asexual strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The members of these diploid pairs of strains differed only in being heterozygous (sexual) or homozygous (asexual) at the mating type or MAT locus. Competing pairs had either a completely homozygous or a heterozygous genetic background, the latter being heterozygous at many different loci throughout the genome. A round of meiotic recombination (automixis) conferred a large and statistically significant enhancement of competitive ability on sexual strains with a heterozygous genetic background. By contrast, in homozygous background competitions, meiosis decreased the sexual strains' initial relative competitive ability. In all cases, however, the sexual strains outcompeted their isogenic asexual counterparts, whether meiotic recombination had occurred or not. In some genetic backgrounds, this was due in part to an overdominance effect on competitive advantage of heterozygosity at the MAT locus. The advantage of the sexual strains also increased significantly during the course of the homozygous background competitions, particularly when meiosis had occurred. This latter effect either did not occur or was very weak in heterozygous background competitions. Overall, sexual strains with heterozygous genetic backgrounds had a significantly higher initial relative competitive ability than those with homozygous backgrounds. The advantage of mating type heterozygosity in this organism extends far beyond the ability to recombine meiotically. PMID:8570658

  16. Effects of NADH-preferring xylose reductase expression on ethanol production from xylose in xylose-metabolizing recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Haeng; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2012-04-30

    Efficient conversion of xylose to ethanol is an essential factor for commercialization of lignocellulosic ethanol. To minimize production of xylitol, a major by-product in xylose metabolism and concomitantly improve ethanol production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae D452-2 was engineered to overexpress NADH-preferable xylose reductase mutant (XR(MUT)) and NAD⁺-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) from Pichia stipitis and endogenous xylulokinase (XK). In vitro enzyme assay confirmed the functional expression of XR(MUT), XDH and XK in recombinant S. cerevisiae strains. The change of wild type XR to XR(MUT) along with XK overexpression led to reduction of xylitol accumulation in microaerobic culture. More modulation of the xylose metabolism including overexpression of XR(MUT) and transaldolase, and disruption of the chromosomal ALD6 gene encoding aldehyde dehydrogenase (SX6(MUT)) improved the performance of ethanol production from xylose remarkably. Finally, oxygen-limited fermentation of S. cerevisiae SX6(MUT) resulted in 0.64 g l⁻¹ h⁻¹ xylose consumption rate, 0.25 g l⁻¹ h⁻¹ ethanol productivity and 39% ethanol yield based on the xylose consumed, which were 1.8, 4.2 and 2.2 times higher than the corresponding values of recombinant S. cerevisiae expressing XR(MUT), XDH and XK only. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Niche-driven evolution of metabolic and life-history strategies in natural and domesticated populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sicard Delphine

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation of resource supply is one of the key factors that drive the evolution of life-history strategies, and hence the interactions between individuals. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two life-history strategies related to different resource utilization have been previously described in strains from different industrial origins. In this work, we analyzed metabolic traits and life-history strategies in a broader collection of yeast strains sampled in various ecological niches (forest, human body, fruits, laboratory and industrial environments. Results By analysing the genetic and plastic variation of six life-history and three metabolic traits, we showed that S. cerevisiae populations harbour different strategies depending on their ecological niches. On one hand, the forest and laboratory strains, referred to as extreme "ants", reproduce quickly, reach a large carrying capacity and a small cell size in fermentation, but have a low reproduction rate in respiration. On the other hand, the industrial strains, referred to as extreme "grasshoppers", reproduce slowly, reach a small carrying capacity but have a big cell size in fermentation and a high reproduction rate in respiration. "Grasshoppers" have usually higher glucose consumption rate than "ants", while they produce lower quantities of ethanol, suggesting that they store cell resources rather than secreting secondary products to cross-feed or poison competitors. The clinical and fruit strains are intermediate between these two groups. Conclusions Altogether, these results are consistent with a niche-driven evolution of S. cerevisiae, with phenotypic convergence of populations living in similar habitat. They also revealed that competition between strains having contrasted life-history strategies ("ants" and "grasshoppers" seems to occur at low frequency or be unstable since opposite life-history strategies appeared to be maintained in distinct ecological niches.

  18. Display of phytase on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to degrade phytate phosphorus and improve bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianzhong; Xiao, Yan; Shen, Wei; Govender, Algasan; Zhang, Liang; Fan, You; Wang, Zhengxiang

    2016-03-01

    Currently, development of biofuels as an alternative fuel has gained much attention due to resource and environmental challenges. Bioethanol is one of most important and dominant biofuels, and production using corn or cassava as raw materials has become a prominent technology. However, phytate contained in the raw material not only decreases the efficiency of ethanol production, but also leads to an increase in the discharge of phosphorus, thus impacting on the environment. In this study, to decrease phytate and its phosphorus content in an ethanol fermentation process, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered through a surface-displaying system utilizing the C-terminal half of the yeast α-agglutinin protein. The recombinant yeast strain, PHY, was constructed by successfully displaying phytase on the surface of cells, and enzyme activity reached 6.4 U/g wet biomass weight. Ethanol productions using various strains were compared, and the results demonstrated that the specific growth rate and average fermentation rate of the PHY strain were higher 20 and 18 %, respectively, compared to the control strain S. cerevisiae CICIMY0086, in a 5-L bioreactor process by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. More importantly, the phytate phosphorus concentration decreased by 89.8 % and free phosphorus concentration increased by 142.9 % in dry vinasse compared to the control in a 5-L bioreactor. In summary, we constructed a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain displaying phytase on the cell surface, which could improve ethanol production performance and effectively reduce the discharge of phosphorus. The strain reported here represents a useful novel engineering platform for developing an environment-friendly system for bioethanol production from a corn substrate.

  19. The ability to use nitrate confers advantage to Dekkera bruxellensis over S. cerevisiae and can explain its adaptation to industrial fermentation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros Pita, Will; Leite, Fernanda Cristina Bezerra; de Souza Liberal, Anna Theresa; Simões, Diogo Ardaillon; de Morais, Marcos Antonio

    2011-06-01

    The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis has been regarded as a contamination problem in industrial ethanol production because it can replace the originally inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The present study deals with the influence of nitrate on the relative competitiveness of D. bruxellensis and S. cerevisiae in sugar cane ethanol fermentations. The industrial strain D. bruxellensis GDB 248 showed higher growth rates than S. cerevisiae JP1 strain in mixed ammonia/nitrate media, and nitrate assimilation genes were only slightly repressed by ammonia. These characteristics rendered D. bruxellensis cells with an ability to overcome S. cerevisiae populations in both synthetic medium and in sugar cane juice. The results were corroborated by data from industrial fermentations that showed a correlation between high nitrate concentrations and high D. bruxellensis cell counts. Moreover, the presence of nitrate increased fermentation efficiency of D. bruxellensis cells in anaerobic conditions, which may explain the maintenance of ethanol production in the presence of D. bruxellensis in industrial processes. The presence of high levels of nitrate in sugar cane juice may be due to its inefficient conversion by plant metabolism in certain soil types and could explain the periodical episodes of D. bruxellensis colonization of Brazilian ethanol plants.

  20. Discriminative power of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis using the microbial identification system (MIS) for Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltroche-Llacsahuanga, H; Schmidt, S; Lütticken, R; Haase, G

    2000-12-01

    Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata is frequently isolated in cases of fungal infection and commonly shows acquired or innate fluconazole resistance. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an emerging opportunistic yeast pathogen, causes serious systemic infections in immunocompromised, and vaginitis and superficial infections in immunocompetent patients. For both species reliable identification in the routine laboratory is mandatory, but species identification of strains, e.g. trehalose-negative C. glabrata, may be difficult. Therefore, gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) of whole cell fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles, that is independent of assimilation profiles of strains and suitable for reliable and rapid identification of clinically important yeasts, was applied. However, frequent misidentification of C. glabrata as S. cerevisiae has been reported when using the Yeast Clinical Database of MIS. Accuracy of MIS identification may be strongly influenced by the amounts of cell mass analyzed. Therefore, the present study compared the MIS results of these two yeasts achieved with different cell masses. Primarily we optimized, especially with respect to cost-effectiveness, the recommended streaking technique yielding a maximal recovery of 90-130 mg of cell mass from one plate, enabling testing of poor growing strains of C. glabrata. For all C. glabrata strains tested (n = 10) the highest identification scores (SI [Similarity Index] range 0.525-0.963, median 0.832) were achieved with 30 to 45 mg of cell mass. Only 5 of 10 S. cerevisiae strains revealed good library comparisons (SI > or = 0.5) when using 30 mg of cell mass, whereas with 45 mg all strains but two revealed this SI-level. For S. cerevisiae a higher amount of cell mass processed (up to 90 mg) was correlated with better identification scores (SI range using 90 mg: 0.464-0.870, median, 0.737). Several passages prior to FAME analysis of C. glabrata strains on recommended media revealed narrowing of SI ranges, but

  1. Rational and evolutionary engineering approaches uncover a small set of genetic changes efficient for rapid xylose fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Rin Kim

    Full Text Available Economic bioconversion of plant cell wall hydrolysates into fuels and chemicals has been hampered mainly due to the inability of microorganisms to efficiently co-ferment pentose and hexose sugars, especially glucose and xylose, which are the most abundant sugars in cellulosic hydrolysates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot metabolize xylose due to a lack of xylose-metabolizing enzymes. We developed a rapid and efficient xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae through rational and inverse metabolic engineering strategies, comprising the optimization of a heterologous xylose-assimilating pathway and evolutionary engineering. Strong and balanced expression levels of the XYL1, XYL2, and XYL3 genes constituting the xylose-assimilating pathway increased ethanol yields and the xylose consumption rates from a mixture of glucose and xylose with little xylitol accumulation. The engineered strain, however, still exhibited a long lag time when metabolizing xylose above 10 g/l as a sole carbon source, defined here as xylose toxicity. Through serial-subcultures on xylose, we isolated evolved strains which exhibited a shorter lag time and improved xylose-fermenting capabilities than the parental strain. Genome sequencing of the evolved strains revealed that mutations in PHO13 causing loss of the Pho13p function are associated with the improved phenotypes of the evolved strains. Crude extracts of a PHO13-overexpressing strain showed a higher phosphatase activity on xylulose-5-phosphate (X-5-P, suggesting that the dephosphorylation of X-5-P by Pho13p might generate a futile cycle with xylulokinase overexpression. While xylose consumption rates by the evolved strains improved substantially as compared to the parental strain, xylose metabolism was interrupted by accumulated acetate. Deletion of ALD6 coding for acetaldehyde dehydrogenase not only prevented acetate accumulation, but also enabled complete and efficient fermentation of xylose as well as a mixture of glucose and

  2. Vph6 Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Require Calcineurin for Growth and Are Defective in Vacuolar H(+)-Atpase Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Hemenway, C. S.; Dolinski, K.; Cardenas, M. E.; Hiller, M. A.; Jones, E. W.; Heitman, J.

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain that is hypersensitive to cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506, immunosuppressants that inhibit calcineurin, a serine-threonine-specific phosphatase (PP2B). A single nuclear mutation, designated cev1 for calcineurin essential for viability, is responsible for the CsA-FK506-sensitive phenotype. The peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases cyclophilin A and FKBP12, respectively, mediate CsA and FK506 toxicity in the cev1 mutant strain. We demo...

  3. Glucose-based microbial production of the hormone melatonin in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, Susanne Manuela; Jacobsen, Simo Abdessamad; Schneider, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    performed by complex chemical synthesis. In this study, we demonstrate microbial production of melatonin and related compounds, such as serotonin and N-acetylserotonin. We generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that comprise heterologous genes encoding one or more variants of an L-tryptophan hydroxylase...... accomplished increased product titers by altering expression levels of selected pathway enzymes and boosting co-factor supply. The final yeast strain produced melatonin at a titer of 14.50 ± 0.57 mg L−1 in a 76h fermentation using simulated fed-batch medium with glucose as sole carbon source. Our study lays...

  4. Fermentative capabilities and volatile compounds produced by Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora and Saccharomyces yeast strains in pure and mixed cultures during Agave tequilana juice fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Robles, Ivonne Wendolyne; Estarrón-Espinosa, Mirna; Díaz-Montaño, Dulce María

    2015-09-01

    The fermentative and aromatic capabilities of Kloeckera africana/Hanseniaspora vineae K1, K. apiculata/H. uvarum K2, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1 and S2 were studied in pure and mixed culture fermentations using Agave tequila juice as the culture medium. In pure and mixed cultures, Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains showed limited growth and sugar consumption, as well as low ethanol yield and productivity, compared to S. cerevisiae, which yielded more biomass, ethanol and viable cell concentrations. In pure and mixed cultures, S. cerevisiae presented a similar behaviour reaching high biomass production, completely consuming the sugar, leading to high ethanol production. Furthermore, the presence of S. cerevisiae strains in the mixed cultures promoted the production of higher alcohols, acetaldehyde and ethyl esters, whereas Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains stimulated the production of ethyl acetate and 2-phenyl ethyl acetate compounds.

  5. The oenological potential of Hanseniaspora uvarum in simultaneous and sequential co-fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the industrial wine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana eTristezza

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In oenology, the utilization of mixed starter cultures composed by Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts is an approach of growing importance for winemakers in order to enhance sensory quality and complexity of the final product without compromising the general quality and safety of the oenological products. In fact, several non-Saccharomyces yeasts are already commercialized as oenological starter cultures to be used in combination with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while several others are the subject of various studies to evaluate their application. Our aim, in this study was to assess, for the first time, the oenological potential of H. uvarum in mixed cultures (co-inoculation and sequential inoculation with S. cerevisiae for industrial wine production. Three previously characterized H. uvarum strains were separately used as multi-starter together with an autochthonous S. cerevisiae starter culture in lab-scale micro-vinification trials. On the basis of microbial development, fermentation kinetics and secondary compounds formation, the strain H. uvarum ITEM8795 was further selected and it was co- and sequentially inoculated, jointly with the S. cerevisiae starter, in a pilot scale wine production. The fermentation course and the quality of final product indicated that the co-inoculation was the better performing modality of inoculum. The above results were finally validated by performing an industrial scale vinification The mixed starter was able to successfully dominate the different stages of the fermentation process and the H. uvarum strain ITEM8795 contributed to increasing the wine organoleptic quality and to simultaneously reduce the volatile acidity. At the best of our knowledge, the present report is the first study regarding the utilization of a selected H. uvarum strain in multi-starter inoculation with S. cerevisiae for the industrial production of a wine. In addition, we demonstrated, at an industrial scale, the importance of

  6. Comparing cell viability and ethanol fermentation of the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on steam-exploded biomass treated with laccase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Antonio D; Ibarra, David; Ballesteros, Ignacio; González, Alberto; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2013-05-01

    In this study, the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus CECT 10875 was compared to the industrial strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ethanol Red for lignocellulosic ethanol production. For it, whole slurry from steam-exploded wheat straw was used as raw material, and two process configurations, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) and presaccharification and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (PSSF), were evaluated. Compared to S. cerevisiae, which was able to produce ethanol in both process configurations, K. marxianus was inhibited, and neither growth nor ethanol production occurred during the processes. However, laccase treatment of the whole slurry removed specifically lignin phenols from the overall inhibitory compounds present in the slurry and triggered the fermentation by K. marxianus, attaining final ethanol concentrations and yields comparable to those obtained by S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spontaneous and radiation induced gene conversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, B.S.; Murthy, M.S.S.

    1977-01-01

    Spontaneous and radiation induced gene conversion to arginine independence was studied in a heteroallelic diploid strain of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae BZ 34. When stationary phase cells were incubated in phosphate buffer (pH 7 ) at 30 0 C under aerated condition for 48 hours, the conversion frequency increased by a factor of about 1000 times the background. This was found to be so even when the cells were incubated in saline (0.85%) or distilled water. Various conditions influencing this enhancement have been investigated. Conversion frequency enhancement was not significant under anoxic conditions and was absent at low temperatures and in log phase cells. Caffeine could inhibit this enhancement when present in the suspension medium. These results can be explained on the basis of the induction of meiosis in cells held in buffer. Microscopic examination confirmed this view. Under conditions not favourable for the onset of meiosis there is no significant enhancement in conversion frequency. In stationary phase cells exposed to series of gamma doses, the conversion frequency increases with dose. Post irradiation incubation in buffer further increases the conversion frequency. However, the increase expressed as the ratio of the conversion frequency on buffer holding to that on immediate plating decreased with increasing dose. This decrease in enhancement with increasing dose may be due to the dose dependent inhibition of meiosis. (author)

  8. Biosynthesis of diphthamide in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.Y.C.

    1985-01-01

    Inactivation of EF-2 by diphtheria toxin requires the presence of a posttranslationally synthesized amino acid residue, diphthamide. The present work was undertaken to study the biosynthetic mechanism of diphthamide synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in order to gain better understanding of the biological roles of this unique amino acid residue. Thirty-one haploid ADP-ribosylation-negative mutants, comprising 5 complementation groups, were obtained. One of these mutants contains a toxin-resistant form of EF-2 which can be converted to a toxin-sensitive form through the methylation reaction catalyzed by a S-AdoMet:EF-2 methyltransferase enzyme which is present in other yeast strains. The [ 3 He]methylated residue in the EF-2 modified by the methyltransferase in the presence of S-Ado-L-[ 3 H-methyl]-Met has been analyzed chromatographically following both acid and enzymatic hydrolysis. At the conclusion of the reaction, all of the radiolabel was recovered as diphthine (the unamidated form of diphthamide). The authors conclude that the S-AdoMet:EF-2-methyltransferase is specific for the addition of at least the last two of the three methyl groups present in diphthine

  9. Phosphatidylcholine Supply to Peroxisomes of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flis, Vid V; Fankl, Ariane; Ramprecht, Claudia; Zellnig, Günther; Leitner, Erich; Hermetter, Albin; Daum, Günther

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, phosphatidylcholine (PC), the major phospholipid (PL) of all organelle membranes, is synthesized via two different pathways. Methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) catalyzed by the methyl transferases Cho2p/Pem1p and Opi3p/Pem2p as well as incorporation of choline through the CDP (cytidine diphosphate)-choline branch of the Kennedy pathway lead to PC formation. To determine the contribution of these two pathways to the supply of PC to peroxisomes (PX), yeast mutants bearing defects in the two pathways were cultivated under peroxisome inducing conditions, i.e. in the presence of oleic acid, and subjected to biochemical and cell biological analyses. Phenotype studies revealed compromised growth of both the cho20Δopi3Δ (mutations in the methylation pathway) and the cki1Δdpl1Δeki1Δ (mutations in the CDP-choline pathway) mutant when grown on oleic acid. Analysis of peroxisomes from the two mutant strains showed that both pathways produce PC for the supply to peroxisomes, although the CDP-choline pathway seemed to contribute with higher efficiency than the methylation pathway. Changes in the peroxisomal lipid pattern of mutants caused by defects in the PC biosynthetic pathways resulted in changes of membrane properties as shown by anisotropy measurements with fluorescent probes. In summary, our data define the origin of peroxisomal PC and demonstrate the importance of PC for peroxisome membrane formation and integrity.

  10. Damage-induced ectopic recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupiec, M; Steinlauf, R

    1997-06-09

    Mitotic recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is induced when cells are irradiated with UV or X-rays, reflecting the efficient repair of damage by recombinational repair mechanisms. We have used multiply marked haploid strains that allow the simultaneous detection of several types of ectopic recombination events. We show that inter-chromosomal ectopic conversion of lys2 heteroalleles and, to a lesser extent, direct repeat recombination (DRR) between non-tandem repeats, are increased by DNA-damaging agents; in contrast, ectopic recombination of the naturally occurring Ty element is not induced. We have tested several hypotheses that could explain the preferential lack of induction of Ty recombination by DNA-damaging agents. We have found that the lack of induction cannot be explained by a cell cycle control or by an effect of the mating-type genes. We also found no role for the flanking long terminal repeats (LTRs) of the Ty in preventing the induction. Ectopic conversion, DRR, and forward mutation of artificial repeats show different kinetics of induction at various positions of the cell cycle, reflecting different mechanisms of recombination. We discuss the mechanistic and evolutionary aspects of these results.

  11. ORGANIC ACIDS CONCENTRATION IN WINE STOCKS AFTER Saccharomyces cerevisiae FERMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Bayraktar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical constituents in wine stocks that influence the flavor and quality of wine are investigated in the paper. The tested parameters consist of volume fraction of ethanol, residual sugar, phenolic compounds, tartaric, malic, citric, lactic, acetic acids, titratable acidity and volatile acids. The wine stocks that were received from white and red grape varieties Tairov`s selection were tested. There was a correlation between titratable acidity and volatile acids in the wine stocks from white and red grape varieties. High correlation was also found between lactic and acetic acids, between volatile acids, acetic acid and sugar. It was determined that wine stocks with a high concentration of ethanol originated from those yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in a fermented grape must of high speed of enzyme activity. The taste of wine stocks correlated with the ratio of tartaric to malic acid. Analysis showed significant differences between the varieties of white and red wine stocks in concentrations of organic acids, phenolic compounds, residual sugar, and volume fraction of ethanol. Positive correlation was indicated for both studied groups for volatile acids and acetic acid, tartaric, malic, lactic acids and total sugar. Prospective yeast cultures with high productivity of alcohol (ethanol were selected for winemaking biotechnology.

  12. Improved Xylose Metabolism by a CYC8 Mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijland, Jeroen G; Shin, Hyun Yong; Boender, Leonie G M; de Waal, Paul P; Klaassen, Paul; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2017-06-01

    Engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the utilization of pentose sugars is an important goal for the production of second-generation bioethanol and biochemicals. However, S. cerevisiae lacks specific pentose transporters, and in the presence of glucose, pentoses enter the cell inefficiently via endogenous hexose transporters (HXTs). By means of in vivo engineering, we have developed a quadruple hexokinase deletion mutant of S. cerevisiae that evolved into a strain that efficiently utilizes d-xylose in the presence of high d-glucose concentrations. A genome sequence analysis revealed a mutation (Y353C) in the general corepressor CYC8 , or SSN6 , which was found to be responsible for the phenotype when introduced individually in the nonevolved strain. A transcriptome analysis revealed altered expression of 95 genes in total, including genes involved in (i) hexose transport, (ii) maltose metabolism, (iii) cell wall function (mannoprotein family), and (iv) unknown functions (seripauperin multigene family). Of the 18 known HXTs, genes for 9 were upregulated, especially the low or nonexpressed HXT10 , HXT13 , HXT15 , and HXT16 Mutant cells showed increased uptake rates of d-xylose in the presence of d-glucose, as well as elevated maximum rates of metabolism ( V max ) for both d-glucose and d-xylose transport. The data suggest that the increased expression of multiple hexose transporters renders d-xylose metabolism less sensitive to d-glucose inhibition due to an elevated transport rate of d-xylose into the cell. IMPORTANCE The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used for second-generation bioethanol formation. However, growth on xylose is limited by pentose transport through the endogenous hexose transporters (HXTs), as uptake is outcompeted by the preferred substrate, glucose. Mutant strains were obtained with improved growth characteristics on xylose in the presence of glucose, and the mutations mapped to the regulator Cyc8. The inactivation of Cyc8 caused increased

  13. Functional expression of rat VPAC1 receptor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.K.; Tams, J.W.; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1999-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor; heterologous expression; membrane protein; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide; yeast mating factor-pre-pro *Ga-leader peptide......G protein-coupled receptor; heterologous expression; membrane protein; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide; yeast mating factor-pre-pro *Ga-leader peptide...

  14. Investigation of autonomous cell cycle oscillation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Skov

    2007-01-01

    Autonome Oscillationer i kontinuert kultivering af Saccharomyces cerevisiae Udgangspunktet for dette Ph.d. projekt var at søge at forstå, hvad der gør det muligt at opnå multiple statiske tilstande ved kontinuert kultivering af Saccharomyces cerevisiae med glukose som begrænsende substrat...

  15. Stoichiometric network constraints on xylose metabolism by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-Su Jin; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2004-01-01

    Metabolic pathway engineering is constrained by the thermodynamic and stoichiometric feasibility of enzymatic activities of introduced genes. Engineering of xylose metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has focused on introducing genes for the initial xylose assimilation steps from Pichia stipitis, a xylose-fermenting yeast, into S. cerevisiae, a yeast raditionally...

  16. Cell wall structure suitable for surface display of proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kazuya; Saijo, Aki; Takada, Yuki; Kondo, Akihiko; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Ooshima, Hiroshi; Tachibana, Taro; Azuma, Masayuki

    2014-02-01

    A display system for adding new protein functions to the cell surfaces of microorganisms has been developed, and applications of the system to various fields have been proposed. With the aim of constructing a cell surface environment suitable for protein display in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cell surface structures of cell wall mutants were investigated. Four cell wall mutant strains were selected by analyses using a GFP display system via a GPI anchor. β-Glucosidase and endoglucanase II were displayed on the cell surface in the four mutants, and their activities were evaluated. mnn2 deletion strain exhibited the highest activity for both the enzymes. In particular, endoglucanase II activity using carboxymethylcellulose as a substrate in the mutant strain was 1.9-fold higher than that of the wild-type strain. In addition, the activity of endoglucanase II released from the mnn2 deletion strain by Zymolyase 20T treatment was higher than that from the wild-type strain. The results of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and endoglucanase displays suggest that the amounts of enzyme displayed on the cell surface were increased by the mnn2 deletion. The enzyme activity of the mnn2 deletion strain was compared with that of the wild-type strain. The relative value (mnn2 deletion mutant/wild-type strain) of endoglucanase II activity using carboxymethylcellulose as a substrate was higher than that of β-glucosidase activity using p-nitrophenyl-β-glucopyranoside as a substrate, suggesting that the cell surface environment of the mnn2 deletion strain facilitates the binding of high-molecular-weight substrates to the active sites of the displayed enzymes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. K2 killer toxin-induced physiological changes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orentaite, Irma; Poranen, Minna M; Oksanen, Hanna M; Daugelavicius, Rimantas; Bamford, Dennis H

    2016-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells produce killer toxins, such as K1, K2 and K28, that can modulate the growth of other yeasts giving advantage for the killer strains. Here we focused on the physiological changes induced by K2 toxin on a non-toxin-producing yeast strain as well as K1, K2 and K28 killer strains. Potentiometric measurements were adjusted to observe that K2 toxin immediately acts on the sensitive cells leading to membrane permeability. This correlated with reduced respiration activity, lowered intracellular ATP content and decrease in cell viability. However, we did not detect any significant ATP leakage from the cells treated by killer toxin K2. Strains producing heterologous toxins K1 and K28 were less sensitive to K2 than the non-toxin producing one suggesting partial cross-protection between the different killer systems. This phenomenon may be connected to the observed differences in respiratory activities of the killer strains and the non-toxin-producing strain at low pH. This might also have practical consequences in wine industry; both as beneficial ones in controlling contaminating yeasts and non-beneficial ones causing sluggish fermentation. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Apoptosis - Triggering Effects: UVB-irradiation and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham

    2012-12-01

    The pathogenic disturbance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is known as a rare but invasive nosocomial fungal infection. This survey is focused on the evaluation of apoptosis-triggering effects of UVB-irradiation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The well-growth colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA) were irradiated within an interval of 10 minutes by UVB-light (302 nm). Subsequently, the harvested DNA molecules of control and UV-exposed yeast colonies were run through the 1% agarose gel electrophoresis comprising the luminescent dye of ethidium bromide. No unusual patterns including DNA laddering bands or smears were detected. The applied procedure for UV exposure was not effective for inducing apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. So, it needs another UV-radiation protocol for inducing apoptosis phenomenon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  19. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pdr16p restricts changes in ergosterol biosynthesis caused by the presence of azole antifungals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimová, Zuzana; Poloncová, Katarína; Tahotná, Dana; Holič, Roman; Hapala, Ivan; Smith, Adam R; White, Theodore C; Griač, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Pdr16p belongs to the family of phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins in yeast. The absence of Pdr16p results in enhanced susceptibility to azole antifungals in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the major fungal human pathogen Candida albicans, CaPDR16 is a contributing factor to clinical azole resistance. The current study was aimed at better understanding the function of Pdr16p, especially in relation to azole resistance in S. cerevisiae. We show that deletion of the PDR16 gene increased susceptibility of S. cerevisiae to azole antifungals that are used in clinical medicine and agriculture. Significant differences in the inhibition of the sterol biosynthetic pathway were observed between the pdr16Δ strain and its corresponding wild-type (wt) strain when yeast cells were challenged by sub-inhibitory concentrations of the azoles miconazole or fluconazole. The increased susceptibility to azoles, and enhanced changes in sterol biosynthesis upon exposure to azoles of the pdr16Δ strain compared to wt strain, are not the results of increased intracellular concentration of azoles in the pdr16Δ cells. We also show that overexpression of PDR17 complemented the azole susceptible phenotype of the pdr16Δ strain and corrected the enhanced sterol alterations in pdr16Δ cells in the presence of azoles. Pdr17p was found previously to be an essential part of a complex required for intermembrane transport of phosphatidylserine at regions of membrane apposition. Based on these observations, we propose a hypothesis that Pdr16p assists in shuttling sterols or their intermediates between membranes or, alternatively, between sterol biosynthetic enzymes or complexes. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The rad2 mutation affects the molecular nature of UV and acridine-mustard-induced mutations in the ADE2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, E.L.; Kovaltzova, S.V.; Kassinova, G.V.; Gracheva, L.M.; Korolev, V.G.; Zakharov, I.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have studied the molecular nature of ade2 mutations induced by UV light and bifunctional acridine-mustard (BAM) in wild-type (RAD) and in excision-deficient (rad2) strains of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the RAD strain, UV causes 45% GC → AT transitions among all mutations; in the rad2 strain this value is 77%. BAM was shown to be highly specific for frameshift mutagenesis: 60% frameshifts in the RAD strain, and as many as 84% frameshifts in the rad2 strain were induced. Therefore, the rad2 mutation affects the specificity of UV- and BAM-induced mutagenesis in yeast. Experimental data agree with the view that the majority of mutations in the RAD strain are induced by a prereplicative mechanism, whereas mutations in the rad2 strain are predominantly postreplicative events. (Auth.)

  1. Kinetics of phosphomevalonate kinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Garcia

    Full Text Available The mevalonate-based isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway is responsible for producing cholesterol in humans and is used commercially to produce drugs, chemicals, and fuels. Heterologous expression of this pathway in Escherichia coli has enabled high-level production of the antimalarial drug artemisinin and the proposed biofuel bisabolane. Understanding the kinetics of the enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway is critical to optimize the pathway for high flux. We have characterized the kinetic parameters of phosphomevalonate kinase (PMK, EC 2.7.4.2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a previously unstudied enzyme. An E. coli codon-optimized version of the S. cerevisiae gene was cloned into pET-52b+, then the C-terminal 6X His-tagged protein was expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3 and purified on a Ni²⁺ column. The KM of the ATP binding site was determined to be 98.3 µM at 30°C, the optimal growth temperature for S. cerevisiae, and 74.3 µM at 37°C, the optimal growth temperature for E. coli. The K(M of the mevalonate-5-phosphate binding site was determined to be 885 µM at 30°C and 880 µM at 37°C. The V(max was determined to be 4.51 µmol/min/mg enzyme at 30°C and 5.33 µmol/min/mg enzyme at 37°C. PMK is Mg²⁺ dependent, with maximal activity achieved at concentrations of 10 mM or greater. Maximum activity was observed at pH = 7.2. PMK was not found to be substrate inhibited, nor feedback inhibited by FPP at concentrations up to 10 µM FPP.

  2. Evaluation of Brachypodium distachyon L-Tyrosine Decarboxylase Using L-Tyrosine Over-Producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Noda

    Full Text Available To demonstrate that herbaceous biomass is a versatile gene resource, we focused on the model plant Brachypodium distachyon, and screened the B. distachyon for homologs of tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC, which is involved in the modification of aromatic compounds. A total of 5 candidate genes were identified in cDNA libraries of B. distachyon and were introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae to evaluate TDC expression and tyramine production. It is suggested that two TDCs encoded in the transcripts Bradi2g51120.1 and Bradi2g51170.1 have L-tyrosine decarboxylation activity. Bradi2g51170.1 was introduced into the L-tyrosine over-producing strain of S. cerevisiae that was constructed by the introduction of mutant genes that promote deregulated feedback inhibition. The amount of tyramine produced by the resulting transformant was 6.6-fold higher (approximately 200 mg/L than the control strain, indicating that B. distachyon TDC effectively converts L-tyrosine to tyramine. Our results suggest that B. distachyon possesses enzymes that are capable of modifying aromatic residues, and that S. cerevisiae is a suitable host for the production of L-tyrosine derivatives.