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Sample records for cerevisiae strain background

  1. The Flo11p-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain background S288c can adhere to plastic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Henrik Dam; Dupont, Kitt; Jespersen, Lene;

    2007-01-01

    The effects of four types of plastic surfaces and four pre-incubation media, containing high/low glucose and +/- amino acids, on adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4742 wild type and Deltaflo11 mutant (strain background S288c) were investigated. No difference in adhesive ability between the t...... and amino acid starvation induces other genes than FLO11 in S. cerevisiae S288c coding for hydrophobic cell surface constituents with adhesive properties to especially moderately hydrophobic plastic surfaces.......The effects of four types of plastic surfaces and four pre-incubation media, containing high/low glucose and +/- amino acids, on adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4742 wild type and Deltaflo11 mutant (strain background S288c) were investigated. No difference in adhesive ability between the two...... yeast strains was observed in any of our experiments, thus confirming that FLO11 is not operational in the S. cerevisiae S288c strain background. The adhesive abilities of both yeast strains depended on the plastic type and pre-incubation conditions. The poorest adhesion was observed on hydrophilic...

  2. Strain engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhanced xylose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Rin; Park, Yong-Cheol; Jin, Yong-Su; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2013-11-01

    Efficient and rapid fermentation of all sugars present in cellulosic hydrolysates is essential for economic conversion of renewable biomass into fuels and chemicals. Xylose is one of the most abundant sugars in cellulosic biomass but it cannot be utilized by wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which has been used for industrial ethanol production. Therefore, numerous technologies for strain development have been employed to engineer S. cerevisiae capable of fermenting xylose rapidly and efficiently. These include i) optimization of xylose-assimilating pathways, ii) perturbation of gene targets for reconfiguring yeast metabolism, and iii) simultaneous co-fermentation of xylose and cellobiose. In addition, the genetic and physiological background of host strains is an important determinant to construct efficient and rapid xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae. Vibrant and persistent researches in this field for the last two decades not only led to the development of engineered S. cerevisiae strains ready for industrial fermentation of cellulosic hydrolysates, but also deepened our understanding of operational principles underlying yeast metabolism. PMID:23524005

  3. Influence of genetic background on the occurrence of chromosomal rearrangements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Potier Serge

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and deletions are key factors in evolutionary processes because they promote genomic plasticity. Although the genetic variations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae species have been well documented, there is little known to date about the impact of the genetic background on the appearance of rearrangements. Results Using the same genetic screening, the type of rearrangements and the mutation rates observed in the S288c S. cerevisiae strain were compared to previous findings obtained in the FL100 background. Transposon-associated rearrangements, a major chromosomal rearrangement event selected in FL100, were not detected in S288c. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of deletions and duplications in the S288c strain were also tackled, using strains deleted for genes implicated in homologous recombination (HR or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ. Our results indicate that an Yku80p-independent NHEJ pathway is involved in the occurrence of these rearrangements in the S288c background. Conclusion The comparison of two different S. cerevisiae strains, FL100 and S288c, allowed us to conclude that intra-species genomic variations have an important impact on the occurrence of chromosomal rearrangement and that this variability can partly be explained by differences in Ty1 retrotransposon activity.

  4. Isolation, identification and characterization of regional indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

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    Hana Šuranská

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present work we isolated and identified various indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and screened them for the selected oenological properties. These S. cerevisiae strains were isolated from berries and spontaneously fermented musts. The grape berries (Sauvignon blanc and Pinot noir were grown under the integrated and organic mode of farming in the South Moravia (Czech Republic wine region. Modern genotyping techniques such as PCR-fingerprinting and interdelta PCR typing were employed to differentiate among indigenous S. cerevisiae strains. This combination of the methods provides a rapid and relatively simple approach for identification of yeast of S. cerevisiae at strain level. In total, 120 isolates were identified and grouped by molecular approaches and 45 of the representative strains were tested for selected important oenological properties including ethanol, sulfur dioxide and osmotic stress tolerance, intensity of flocculation and desirable enzymatic activities. Their ability to produce and utilize acetic/malic acid was examined as well; in addition, H2S production as an undesirable property was screened. The oenological characteristics of indigenous isolates were compared to a commercially available S. cerevisiae BS6 strain, which is commonly used as the starter culture. Finally, some indigenous strains coming from organically treated grape berries were chosen for their promising oenological properties and these strains will be used as the starter culture, because application of a selected indigenous S. cerevisiae strain can enhance the regional character of the wines.

  5. Improved xylose and arabinose utilization by an industrial recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain using evolutionary engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, R.G.; Karhumaa, Kaisa; Fonseca, C.;

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cost-effective fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysate to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires efficient mixed sugar utilization. Notably, the rate and yield of xylose and arabinose co-fermentation to ethanol must be enhanced. Results: Evolutionary engineering was used...... to improve the simultaneous conversion of xylose and arabinose to ethanol in a recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain carrying the heterologous genes for xylose and arabinose utilization pathways integrated in the genome. The evolved strain TMB3130 displayed an increased consumption rate...... of our knowledge, this is the first report that characterizes the molecular mechanisms for improved mixed-pentose utilization obtained by evolutionary engineering of a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain. Increased transport of pentoses and increased activities of xylose converting enzymes contributed...

  6. Evaluation of cytochrome P-450 concentration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

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    Míriam Cristina Sakuragui Matuo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been widely used in mutagenicity tests due to the presence of a cytochrome P-450 system, capable of metabolizing promutagens to active mutagens. There are a large number of S. cerevisiae strains with varying abilities to produce cytochrome P-450. However, strain selection and ideal cultivation conditions are not well defined. We compared cytochrome P-450 levels in four different S. cerevisiae strains and evaluated the cultivation conditions necessary to obtain the highest levels. The amount of cytochrome P-450 produced by each strain varied, as did the incubation time needed to reach the maximum level. The highest cytochrome P-450 concentrations were found in media containing fermentable sugars. The NCYC 240 strain produced the highest level of cytochrome P-450 when grown in the presence of 20 % (w/v glucose. The addition of ethanol to the media also increased cytochrome P-450 synthesis in this strain. These results indicate cultivation conditions must be specific and well-established for the strain selected in order to assure high cytochrome P-450 levels and reliable mutagenicity results.Linhagens de Saccharomyces cerevisiae tem sido amplamente empregadas em testes de mutagenicidade devido à presença de um sistema citocromo P-450 capaz de metabolizar substâncias pró-mutagênicas à sua forma ativa. Devido à grande variedade de linhagens de S. cerevisiae com diferentes capacidades de produção de citocromo P-450, torna-se necessária a seleção de cepas, bem como a definição das condições ideais de cultivo. Neste trabalho, foram comparados os níveis de citocromo P-450 em quatro diferentes linhagens de S. cerevisiae e avaliadas as condições de cultivo necessárias para obtenção de altas concentrações deste sistema enzimático. O maior nível enzimático foi encontrado na linhagem NCYC 240 em presença de 20 % de glicose (p/v. A adição de etanol ao meio de cultura também produziu um aumento na s

  7. Mead production: selection and characterization assays of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

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    Pereira, Ana Paula; Dias, Teresa; Andrade, João; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Estevinho, Letícia M

    2009-08-01

    Mead is a traditional drink, which results from the alcoholic fermentation of diluted honey carried out by yeasts. However, when it is produced in a homemade way, mead producers find several problems, namely, the lack of uniformity in the final product, delayed and arrested fermentations, and the production of "off-flavours" by the yeasts. These problems are usually associated with the inability of yeast strains to respond and adapt to unfavourable and stressful growth conditions. The main objectives of this work were to evaluate the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from honey of the Trás-os-Montes (Northeast Portugal), to produce mead. Five strains from honey, as well as one laboratory strain and one commercial wine strain, were evaluated in terms of their fermentation performance under ethanol, sulphur dioxide and osmotic stress. All the strains showed similar behaviour in these conditions. Two yeasts strains isolated from honey and the commercial wine strain were further tested for mead production, using two different honey (a dark and a light honey), enriched with two supplements (one commercial and one developed by the research team), as fermentation media. The results obtained in this work show that S. cerevisiae strains isolated from honey, are appropriate for mead production. However it is of extreme importance to take into account the characteristics of the honey, and supplements used in the fermentation medium formulation, in order to achieve the best results in mead production. PMID:19481129

  8. Divergence in wine characteristics produced by wild and domesticated strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Katie E Hyma; Saerens, Sofie M; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Justin C Fay

    2011-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the primary species used by wine makers to convert sugar into alcohol during wine fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is found in vineyards, but is also found in association with oak trees and other natural sources. Although wild strains of S. cerevisiae as well as other Saccharomyces species are also capable of wine fermentation, a genetically distinct group of S. cerevisiae strains is primarily used to produce wine, consistent with the idea t...

  9. In vitro screening of probiotic properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii and food-borne Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Aa Kuhle, Alis; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Jespersen, Lene

    2005-01-01

    .6-16.8%) recorded for two isolates from blue veined cheeses. Merely 25% of the S. cerevisiae var. boulardii strains displayed good adhesive properties (16.2-28.0%). The expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1α decreased strikingly in IPEC-J2 cells exposed to a Shiga-like toxin 2e producing Escherichia coli...... strain when the cells were pre- and coincubated with S. cerevisiae var. boulardii even though this yeast strain was low adhesive (5.4%), suggesting that adhesion is not a mandatory prerequisite for such a probiotic effect. A strain of S. cerevisiae isolated from West African sorghum beer exerted similar...... effects hence indicating that food-borne strains of S. cerevisiae may possess probiotic properties in spite of low adhesiveness. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  10. Heterologous expression of cellulase genes in natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

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    Davison, Steffi A; den Haan, Riaan; van Zyl, Willem Heber

    2016-09-01

    Enzyme cost is a major impediment to second-generation (2G) cellulosic ethanol production. One strategy to reduce enzyme cost is to engineer enzyme production capacity in a fermentative microorganism to enable consolidated bio-processing (CBP). Ideally, a strain with a high secretory phenotype, high fermentative capacity as well as an innate robustness to bioethanol-specific stressors, including tolerance to products formed during pre-treatment and fermentation of lignocellulosic substrates should be used. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a robust fermentative yeast but has limitations as a potential CBP host, such as low heterologous protein secretion titers. In this study, we evaluated natural S. cerevisiae isolate strains for superior secretion activity and other industrially relevant characteristics needed during the process of lignocellulosic ethanol production. Individual cellulases namely Saccharomycopsis fibuligera Cel3A (β-glucosidase), Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A (cellobiohydrolase), and Trichoderma reesei Cel5A (endoglucanase) were utilized as reporter proteins. Natural strain YI13 was identified to have a high secretory phenotype, demonstrating a 3.7- and 3.5-fold higher Cel7A and Cel5A activity, respectively, compared to the reference strain S288c. YI13 also demonstrated other industrially relevant characteristics such as growth vigor, high ethanol titer, multi-tolerance to high temperatures (37 and 40 °C), ethanol (10 % w/v), and towards various concentrations of a cocktail of inhibitory compounds commonly found in lignocellulose hydrolysates. This study accentuates the value of natural S. cerevisiae isolate strains to serve as potential robust and highly productive chassis organisms for CBP strain development. PMID:27470141

  11. Redox balancing in recombinant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderlund, M.

    1998-09-01

    In metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing Pichia stipitis XYL1 and XYL2 genes, encoding xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), respectively, xylitol is excreted as the major product during anaerobic xylose fermentation and only low yields of ethanol are produced. This has been interpreted as a result of the dual cofactor dependence of XR and the exclusive use of NAD{sup +} by XDH. The excretion of xylitol was completely stopped and the formation of glycerol and acetic acid were reduced in xylose utilising S. cerevisiae strains cultivated in oxygen-limited conditions by expressing lower levels of XR than of XDH. The expression level of XYL1 and XYL2 were controlled by changing the promoters and transcription directions of the genes. A new functional metabolic pathway was established when Thermus thermophilus xylA gene was expressed in S. cerevisiae. The recombinant strain was able to ferment xylose to ethanol when cultivated on a minimal medium containing xylose as only carbon source. In order to create a channeled metabolic transfer in the two first steps of the xylose metabolism, XYL1 and XYL2 were fused in-frame and expressed in S. cerevisiae. When the fusion protein, containing a linker of three amino acids, was co expressed together with native XR and XDH monomers, enzyme complexes consisting of chimeric and native subunits were formed. The total activity of these complexes exhibited 10 and 9 times higher XR and XDH activity, respectively, than the original conjugates, consisting of only chimeric subunits. This strain produced less xylitol and the xylitol yield was lower than with strains only expressing native XR and XDH monomers. In addition, more ethanol and less acetic acid were formed. A new gene encoding the cytoplasmic transhydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii was cloned. The enzyme showed high similarity to the family of pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductase. To analyse the physiological effect of

  12. Improved xylose and arabinose utilization by an industrial recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain using evolutionary engineering

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    Almeida João RM

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cost-effective fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysate to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires efficient mixed sugar utilization. Notably, the rate and yield of xylose and arabinose co-fermentation to ethanol must be enhanced. Results Evolutionary engineering was used to improve the simultaneous conversion of xylose and arabinose to ethanol in a recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain carrying the heterologous genes for xylose and arabinose utilization pathways integrated in the genome. The evolved strain TMB3130 displayed an increased consumption rate of xylose and arabinose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Improved anaerobic ethanol production was achieved at the expense of xylitol and glycerol but arabinose was almost stoichiometrically converted to arabitol. Further characterization of the strain indicated that the selection pressure during prolonged continuous culture in xylose and arabinose medium resulted in the improved transport of xylose and arabinose as well as increased levels of the enzymes from the introduced fungal xylose pathway. No mutation was found in any of the genes from the pentose converting pathways. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that characterizes the molecular mechanisms for improved mixed-pentose utilization obtained by evolutionary engineering of a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain. Increased transport of pentoses and increased activities of xylose converting enzymes contributed to the improved phenotype.

  13. Direct mating between diploid sake strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Hashimoto, Shinji; Aritomi, Kazuo; Minohara, Takafumi; Nishizawa, Yoshinori; Hoshida, Hisashi; Kashiwagi, Susumu; Akada, Rinji

    2006-02-01

    Various auxotrophic mutants of diploid heterothallic Japanese sake strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were utilized for selecting mating-competent diploid isolates. The auxotrophic mutants were exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and crossed with laboratory haploid tester strains carrying complementary auxotrophic markers. Zygotes were then selected on minimal medium. Sake strains exhibiting a MATa or MATalpha mating type were easily obtained at high frequency without prior sporulation, suggesting that the UV irradiation induced homozygosity at the MAT locus. Flow cytometric analysis of a hybrid showed a twofold higher DNA content than the sake diploid parent, consistent with tetraploidy. By crossing strains of opposite mating type in all possible combinations, a number of hybrids were constructed. Hybrids formed in crosses between traditional sake strains and between a natural nonhaploid isolate and traditional sake strains displayed equivalent fermentation ability without any apparent defects and produced comparable or improved sake. Isolation of mating-competent auxotrophic mutants directly from industrial yeast strains allows crossbreeding to construct polyploids suitable for industrial use without dependence on sporulation.

  14. Benchmarking two commonly used Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for heterologous vanillin-β-glucoside production

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    Tomas Strucko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used eukaryotic model organism and a key cell factory for production of biofuels and wide range of chemicals. From the broad palette of available yeast strains, the most popular are those derived from laboratory strain S288c and the industrially relevant CEN.PK strain series. Importantly, in recent years these two strains have been subjected to comparative “-omics” analyzes pointing out significant genotypic and phenotypic differences. It is therefore possible that the two strains differ significantly with respect to their potential as cell factories for production of specific compounds. To examine this possibility, we have reconstructed a de novo vanillin-β-glucoside pathway in an identical manner in S288c and CEN.PK strains. Characterization of the two resulting strains in two standard conditions revealed that the S288c background strain produced up to 10-fold higher amounts of vanillin-β-glucoside compared to CEN.PK. This study demonstrates that yeast strain background may play a major role in the outcome of newly developed cell factories for production of a given product.

  15. Co-utilization of L-arabinose and D-xylose by laboratory and industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

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    Boles Eckhard

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive alternative for the production of bioethanol. Traditionally, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used in industrial ethanol fermentations. However, S. cerevisiae is naturally not able to ferment the pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose, which are present in high amounts in lignocellulosic raw materials. Results We describe the engineering of laboratory and industrial S. cerevisiae strains to co-ferment the pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose. Introduction of a fungal xylose and a bacterial arabinose pathway resulted in strains able to grow on both pentose sugars. Introduction of a xylose pathway into an arabinose-fermenting laboratory strain resulted in nearly complete conversion of arabinose into arabitol due to the L-arabinose reductase activity of the xylose reductase. The industrial strain displayed lower arabitol yield and increased ethanol yield from xylose and arabinose. Conclusion Our work demonstrates simultaneous co-utilization of xylose and arabinose in recombinant strains of S. cerevisiae. In addition, the co-utilization of arabinose together with xylose significantly reduced formation of the by-product xylitol, which contributed to improved ethanol production.

  16. [Invertase Overproduction May Provide for Inulin Fermentation by Selection Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, G I; Naumova, E S

    2015-01-01

    In some recent publications, the ability of selection strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment inulin was attributed to inulinase activity. The review summarizes the literature data indicating that overproduction of invertase, an enzyme common to S. cerevisiae, may be responsible for this phenomenon. PMID:26263621

  17. Stress Tolerance Variations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Diverse Ecological Sources and Geographical Locations.

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    Yan-Lin Zheng

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a platform organism for bioethanol production from various feedstocks and robust strains are desirable for efficient fermentation because yeast cells inevitably encounter stressors during the process. Recently, diverse S. cerevisiae lineages were identified, which provided novel resources for understanding stress tolerance variations and related shaping factors in the yeast. This study characterized the tolerance of diverse S. cerevisiae strains to the stressors of high ethanol concentrations, temperature shocks, and osmotic stress. The results showed that the isolates from human-associated environments overall presented a higher level of stress tolerance compared with those from forests spared anthropogenic influences. Statistical analyses indicated that the variations of stress tolerance were significantly correlated with both ecological sources and geographical locations of the strains. This study provides guidelines for selection of robust S. cerevisiae strains for bioethanol production from nature.

  18. Transcriptomics in human blood incubation reveals the importance of oxidative stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae clinical strains

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    Llopis Silvia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years an increasing number of yeast infections in humans have been related to certain clinical isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Some clinical strains showed in vivo and in vitro virulence traits and were able to cause death in mice whereas other clinical strains were avirulent. Results In this work, we studied the transcriptional profiles of two S. cerevisiae clinical strains showing virulent traits and two control non-virulent strains during a blood incubation model and detected a specific transcriptional response of clinical strains. This response involves an mRNA levels increase of amino acid biosynthesis genes and especially oxidative stress related genes. We observed that the clinical strains were more resistant to reactive oxygen species in vitro. In addition, blood survival of clinical isolates was high, reaching similar levels to pathogenic Candida albicans strain. Furthermore, a virulent strain mutant in the transcription factor Yap1p, unable to grow in oxidative stress conditions, presented decreased survival levels in human blood compared with the wild type or YAP1 reconstituted strain. Conclusions Our data suggest that this enhanced oxidative stress response in virulent clinical isolates, presumably induced in response to oxidative burst from host defense cells, is important to increase survival in human blood and can help to infect and even produce death in mice models.

  19. Genome-wide transcriptional response of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with an altered redox metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Christoffer; Regenberg, Birgitte; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    The genome-wide transcriptional response of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain deleted in GDH1 that encodes a NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase was compared to a wild-type strain under anaerobic steady-state conditions. The GDH1-deleted strain has a significantly reduced NADPH requirement,...

  20. A coniferyl aldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 enhances the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Adeboye, Peter Temitope; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of coniferyl aldehyde to cinnamic acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic growth conditions was previously observed. Bacteria such as Pseudomonas have been shown to harbor specialized enzymes for converting coniferyl aldehyde but no comparable enzymes have been identified in S. cerevisiae. CALDH from Pseudomonas was expressed in S. cerevisiae. An acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Ald5) was also hypothesized to be actively involved in the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic growth conditions in S. cerevisiae. In a second S. cerevisiae strain, the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD5) was deleted. A prototrophic control strain was also engineered. The engineered S. cerevisiae strains were cultivated in the presence of 1.1mM coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic condition in bioreactors. The results confirmed that expression of CALDH increased endogenous conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae and ALD5 is actively involved with the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27070284

  1. Diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Isolated from Two Italian Wine-Producing Regions.

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    Capece, Angela; Granchi, Lisa; Guerrini, Simona; Mangani, Silvia; Romaniello, Rossana; Vincenzini, Massimo; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies, based on different molecular techniques analyzing DNA polymorphism, have provided evidence that indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations display biogeographic patterns. Since the differentiated populations of S. cerevisiae seem to be responsible for the regional identity of wine, the aim of this work was to assess a possible relationship between the diversity and the geographical origin of indigenous S. cerevisiae isolates from two different Italian wine-producing regions (Tuscany and Basilicata). For this purpose, sixty-three isolates from Aglianico del Vulture grape must (main cultivar in the Basilicata region) and from Sangiovese grape must (main cultivar in the Tuscany region) were characterized genotypically, by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis and MSP-PCR by using (GTG)5 primers, and phenotypically, by determining technological properties and metabolic compounds of oenological interest after alcoholic fermentation. All the S. cerevisiae isolates from each region were inoculated both in must obtained from Aglianico grape and in must obtained from Sangiovese grape to carry out fermentations at laboratory-scale. Numerical analysis of DNA patterns resulting from both molecular methods and principal component analysis of phenotypic data demonstrated a high diversity among the S. cerevisiae strains. Moreover, a correlation between genotypic and phenotypic groups and geographical origin of the strains was found, supporting the concept that there can be a microbial aspect to terroir. Therefore, exploring the diversity of indigenous S. cerevisiae strains can allow developing tailored strategies to select wine yeast strains better adapted to each viticultural area. PMID:27446054

  2. Diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Isolated from Two Italian Wine-Producing Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Angela; Granchi, Lisa; Guerrini, Simona; Mangani, Silvia; Romaniello, Rossana; Vincenzini, Massimo; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies, based on different molecular techniques analyzing DNA polymorphism, have provided evidence that indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations display biogeographic patterns. Since the differentiated populations of S. cerevisiae seem to be responsible for the regional identity of wine, the aim of this work was to assess a possible relationship between the diversity and the geographical origin of indigenous S. cerevisiae isolates from two different Italian wine-producing regions (Tuscany and Basilicata). For this purpose, sixty-three isolates from Aglianico del Vulture grape must (main cultivar in the Basilicata region) and from Sangiovese grape must (main cultivar in the Tuscany region) were characterized genotypically, by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis and MSP-PCR by using (GTG)5 primers, and phenotypically, by determining technological properties and metabolic compounds of oenological interest after alcoholic fermentation. All the S. cerevisiae isolates from each region were inoculated both in must obtained from Aglianico grape and in must obtained from Sangiovese grape to carry out fermentations at laboratory-scale. Numerical analysis of DNA patterns resulting from both molecular methods and principal component analysis of phenotypic data demonstrated a high diversity among the S. cerevisiae strains. Moreover, a correlation between genotypic and phenotypic groups and geographical origin of the strains was found, supporting the concept that there can be a microbial aspect to terroir. Therefore, exploring the diversity of indigenous S. cerevisiae strains can allow developing tailored strategies to select wine yeast strains better adapted to each viticultural area. PMID:27446054

  3. Benchmarking two commonly used Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for heterologous vanillin-β-glucoside production

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas Strucko; Olivera Magdenoska; Mortensen, Uffe H.

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used eukaryotic model organism and a key cell factory for production of biofuels and wide range of chemicals. From the broad palette of available yeast strains, the most popular are those derived from laboratory strain S288c and the industrially relevant CEN.PK strain series. Importantly, in recent years these two strains have been subjected to comparative “-omics” analyzes pointing out significant genotypic and phenotypic differences. It is ther...

  4. BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM (VI FROM INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENT BY WILD ANDMUTANT TYPE STRAIN OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE AND ITS IMMOBILIZED FORM

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    K Selvam, K Arungandhi, B Vishnupriya, T Shanmuga priya and M Yamuna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption of chromium was studied by wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, mutant strain, immobilized-wild type and mutant strain. Chromium absorption pattern was observed in all experimental conditions. Hexavalent chromium (VI was analyzed by diphenyl carbazide method, by oxidizing the trivalent chromium (III. The percentage efficiency of wild type S. cerevisiae and its mutant strain, immobilized-wild type and mutant strain were 94.8%, 98.7%, 97.4% and 100% respectively. S. cerevisiae mutant strain and their immobilized form was found to be effective in biosorption of chromium (VI than the wild type forms.

  5. BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM (VI) FROM INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENT BY WILD ANDMUTANT TYPE STRAIN OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE AND ITS IMMOBILIZED FORM

    OpenAIRE

    K Selvam, K Arungandhi, B Vishnupriya, T Shanmuga priya and M Yamuna

    2013-01-01

    Biosorption of chromium was studied by wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, mutant strain, immobilized-wild type and mutant strain. Chromium absorption pattern was observed in all experimental conditions. Hexavalent chromium (VI) was analyzed by diphenyl carbazide method, by oxidizing the trivalent chromium (III). The percentage efficiency of wild type S. cerevisiae and its mutant strain, immobilized-wild type and mutant strain were 94.8%, 98.7%, 97.4% and 100% respectively. S. cerevisi...

  6. Expression variability of co-regulated genes differentiates Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

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    Schuller Dorit

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast is found in diverse ecological niches and is characterized by high adaptive potential under challenging environments. In spite of recent advances on the study of yeast genome diversity, little is known about the underlying gene expression plasticity. In order to shed new light onto this biological question, we have compared transcriptome profiles of five environmental isolates, clinical and laboratorial strains at different time points of fermentation in synthetic must medium, during exponential and stationary growth phases. Results Our data unveiled diversity in both intensity and timing of gene expression. Genes involved in glucose metabolism and in the stress response elicited during fermentation were among the most variable. This gene expression diversity increased at the onset of stationary phase (diauxic shift. Environmental isolates showed lower average transcript abundance of genes involved in the stress response, assimilation of nitrogen and vitamins, and sulphur metabolism, than other strains. Nitrogen metabolism genes showed significant variation in expression among the environmental isolates. Conclusions Wild type yeast strains respond differentially to the stress imposed by nutrient depletion, ethanol accumulation and cell density increase, during fermentation of glucose in synthetic must medium. Our results support previous data showing that gene expression variability is a source of phenotypic diversity among closely related organisms.

  7. Investigation of the dominance behavior of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Benedetta; Giacosa, Simone; Rolle, Luca; Cocolin, Luca; Rantsiou, Kalliopi

    2013-07-15

    During wine fermentation, different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae compete in the same fermenting must and dominance takes place when one strain overcomes all the others. The purpose of this study was to investigate this phenomenon by identifying S. cerevisiae strains endowed with this feature and to test them in laboratory fermentations. First, autochthonous S. cerevisiae from Nebbiolo fermentations were isolated, molecularly identified and characterized. Genetically diverse S. cerevisiae strains were subsequently subjected to physiological characterization and to micro-scale fermentation, the weight loss kinetics was measured and HPLC analysis was performed at the end of the fermentation. Then, the strains that presented good fermentation characteristics were chosen for further analysis and to determine the dominance feature. For this purpose, couples of strains were co-inoculated in Nebbiolo must and the fermentations were monitored by microbiological and chemical analysis. Two different inoculation approaches were used: co-fermentations in flasks with mixed cells and reactor co-fermentations, in which the cells from the two different strains were kept separate by means of a 0.45 μm filter membrane, which allowed the fermenting must to move freely between the two compartments. During the flask co-fermentations, a minisatellite PCR protocol was applied, in order to differentiate the two strains and determine which one was able to dominate. The protocol included a culture-dependent approach and an independent one. In the first case, DNA extraction was performed on all the colonies scraped off the plates after sampling. In the second case, DNA extraction was performed directly on the fermenting must. The strains that were able to dominate were tested against several S. cerevisiae in order to confirm this dominance behavior. Dominance was observed in the early stages of fermentation, as early as 3days. Combinations of dominant and not-dominant strains were

  8. Genetic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from Palm Wine in Eastern Nigeria. Comparison with other African strains.

    OpenAIRE

    Ezeronye, O.U.; Legras, Jean Luc

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To study the yeast diversity of Nigerian palm wines by comparison with other African strains. Methods and Results: Twenty-three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were obtained from palm wine samples collected at four locations in eastern Nigeria, and characterized using different molecular techniques: internal transcribed spacer restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis, pulsed field gel electrophoresis, inter delta typing and microsatellite multilocus analysis...

  9. Glucose and maltose metabolism in MIG1-disrupted and MAL-constitutive strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Christopher; Olsson, Lisbeth; Rønnow, B;

    1997-01-01

    The alleviation of glucose control of maltose metabolism brought about by MIG1 disruption was compared to that by MAL overexpression in a haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. The sugar consumption profiles during cultivation of the wild type, single transformants and a double transformant in ...

  10. Physiological studies in aerobic batch cultivations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains harboring the MEL1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Simon; Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Ronnow, B.;

    2000-01-01

    Physiological studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains harboring the MEL1 gene were carried out in aerobic batch cultivations on glucose-galactose mixtures and on the disaccharide melibiose, which is hydrolyzed by the enzyme melibiase (Mel1, EC 3.2.1.22) into a glucose and a galactose moiety. ...

  11. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation is Species and Strain Specific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiao eWang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine or glutamine were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae.

  12. Selection of Indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Kutjevo Wine Growing Area at the Laboratoy Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandi Orlić

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of selected yeasts for winemaking has clear advantages over traditional spontaneous fermentation. Selection of wine yeasts is usually carried out within the Saccharomyces cerevisiae species. Yeast strains produce different amount of secondary compounds that impart specific characteristics to the wines. This suggests that it is necessary to isolate naturally occuring autochthone strains, which exhibit a metabolic profile that corresponds to each wine. Twenty two strains of S.cerevisiae, isolated from the Kutjevo region (Gornji and Donji Hrnjevec, Mitrovac, Graševina grapes, were tested for: fermentation vigor, ethanol resistance, volatile acidity, H2S production and β-glucosidase, polygalacturonase, and killer activity. From the results of this investigation we are able to select two yeast strains (RO 1272 and RO 1284 for more detailed fermentation trials and possible use as a starter culture in production of typical wines.

  13. A set of haploid strains available for genetic studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coi, Anna Lisa; Legras, Jean-Luc; Zara, Giacomo; Dequin, Sylvie; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-09-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been extensively studied for biofilm formation, however the lack of specific haploid model strains has limited the application of genetic approaches such as gene knockout, allelic replacement and Quantitative Trait Locus mapping for the deciphering of the molecular basis of velum formation under biological ageing. The aim of this work was to construct a set of flor isogenic haploid strains easy to manipulate genetically. The analysis of the allelic variations at 12 minisatellite loci of 174 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains allowed identifying three flor parental strains with different phylogenic positions. These strains were characterized for sporulation efficiency, growth on galactose, adherence to polystyrene, agar invasion, growth on wine and ability to develop a biofilm. Interestingly, the inability to grow on galactose was found associated with a frameshift in GAL4 gene that seems peculiar of flor strains. From these wild flor strains, isogenic haploid strains were constructed by deleting HO gene with a loxP-KanMX-loxP cassette followed by the removal of the kanamycin cassette. Haploid strains obtained were characterized for their phenotypic and genetic properties and compared with the parental strains. Preliminary results showed that the haploid strains represent new tools for genetic studies and breeding programs on biofilm formation. PMID:27527101

  14. Social wasp intestines host the local phenotypic variability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapporto, Leonardo; Stefanini, Irene; Rivero, Damariz; Polsinelli, Mario; Capretti, Paolo; De Marchi, Paolo; Viola, Roberto; Turillazzi, Stefano; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2016-07-01

    Nowadays, the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been assessed in both wild and human-related environments. Social wasps have been shown to maintain and vector S. cerevisiae among different environments. The availability of strains isolated from wasp intestines represents a striking opportunity to assess whether the strains found in wasp intestines are characterized by peculiar traits. We analysed strains isolated from the intestines of social wasps and compared them with strains isolated from other sources, all collected in a restricted geographic area. We evaluated the production of volatile metabolites during grape must fermentation, the resistance to different stresses and the ability to exploit various carbon sources. Wasp strains, in addition to representing a wide range of S. cerevisiae genotypes, also represent large part of the phenotypes characterizing the sympatric set of yeast strains; their higher production of acetic acid and ethyl acetate could reflect improved ability to attract insects. Our findings suggest that the relationship between yeasts and wasps should be preserved, to safeguard not only the natural variance of this microorganism but also the interests of wine-makers, who could take advantage from the exploitation of their phenotypic variability. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27168222

  15. Historical Evolution of Laboratory Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Budding yeast strains used in the laboratory have had a checkered past. Historically, the choice of strain for any particular experiment depended on the suitability of the strain for the topic of study (e.g., cell cycle vs. meiosis). Many laboratory strains had poor fermentation properties and were not representative of the robust strains used for domestic purposes. Most strains were related to each other, but investigators usually had only vague notions about the extent of their relationships. Isogenicity was difficult to confirm before the advent of molecular genetic techniques. However, their ease of growth and manipulation in laboratory conditions made them "the model" model organism, and they still provided a great deal of fundamental knowledge. Indeed, more than one Nobel Prize has been won using them. Most of these strains continue to be powerful tools, and isogenic derivatives of many of them-including entire collections of deletions, overexpression constructs, and tagged gene products-are now available. Furthermore, many of these strains are now sequenced, providing intimate knowledge of their relationships. Recent collections, new isolates, and the creation of genetically tractable derivatives have expanded the available strains for experiments. But even still, these laboratory strains represent a small fraction of the diversity of yeast. The continued development of new laboratory strains will broaden the potential questions that can be posed. We are now poised to take advantage of this diversity, rather than viewing it as a detriment to controlled experiments. PMID:27371602

  16. Comparing the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways in arabinose and xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettiga, Maurizio; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F

    2008-01-01

    Background Ethanolic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable option for the production of bioethanol. This process would greatly benefit from recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains also able to ferment, besides the hexose sugar fraction, the pentose sugars, arabinose and xylose. Different pathways can be introduced in S. cerevisiae to provide arabinose and xylose utilisation. In this study, the bacterial arabinose isomerase pathway was combined with two different xylose utilisation pathways: the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways, respectively, in genetically identical strains. The strains were compared with respect to aerobic growth in arabinose and xylose batch culture and in anaerobic batch fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose. Results The specific aerobic arabinose growth rate was identical, 0.03 h-1, for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase strain. The xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain displayed higher aerobic growth rate on xylose, 0.14 h-1, and higher specific xylose consumption rate in anaerobic batch fermentation, 0.09 g (g cells)-1 h-1 than the xylose isomerase strain, which only reached 0.03 h-1 and 0.02 g (g cells)-1h-1, respectively. Whereas the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain produced higher ethanol yield on total sugars, 0.23 g g-1 compared with 0.18 g g-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, the xylose isomerase strain achieved higher ethanol yield on consumed sugars, 0.41 g g-1 compared with 0.32 g g-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain. Anaerobic fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose resulted in higher final ethanol concentration, 14.7 g l-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain compared with 11.8 g l-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, and in higher specific ethanol productivity, 0.024 g (g cells)-1 h-1 compared with 0.01 g (g cells)-1 h-1 for the xylose reductase

  17. Comparing the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways in arabinose and xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethanolic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable option for the production of bioethanol. This process would greatly benefit from recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains also able to ferment, besides the hexose sugar fraction, the pentose sugars, arabinose and xylose. Different pathways can be introduced in S. cerevisiae to provide arabinose and xylose utilisation. In this study, the bacterial arabinose isomerase pathway was combined with two different xylose utilisation pathways: the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways, respectively, in genetically identical strains. The strains were compared with respect to aerobic growth in arabinose and xylose batch culture and in anaerobic batch fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose. Results The specific aerobic arabinose growth rate was identical, 0.03 h-1, for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase strain. The xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain displayed higher aerobic growth rate on xylose, 0.14 h-1, and higher specific xylose consumption rate in anaerobic batch fermentation, 0.09 g (g cells-1 h-1 than the xylose isomerase strain, which only reached 0.03 h-1 and 0.02 g (g cells-1h-1, respectively. Whereas the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain produced higher ethanol yield on total sugars, 0.23 g g-1 compared with 0.18 g g-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, the xylose isomerase strain achieved higher ethanol yield on consumed sugars, 0.41 g g-1 compared with 0.32 g g-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain. Anaerobic fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose resulted in higher final ethanol concentration, 14.7 g l-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain compared with 11.8 g l-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, and in higher specific ethanol productivity, 0.024 g (g cells-1 h-1 compared with 0.01 g (g cells-1 h-1

  18. Comparison between two selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains as fermentation starters in the production of traditional cachaça

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima de Cássia Oliveira Gomes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were tested as the starter yeasts in a traditional cachaça distillery. The strains used were S. cerevisiae UFMG-A829, isolated from a cachaça fermentation process, and S. cerevisiae K1-V1116, obtained from the wine industry. The permanence of each strain in the fermentation must was determined by RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-PCR, with primer M13. Both yeast strains were prevalent in the vats for approximately 30 days. Indigenous non-Saccharomyces and indigenous S. cerevisiae strains were isolated in lower counts during the fermentation period. Indigenous S. cerevisiae strains were molecularly distinct when compared to the starter yeasts. The two yeasts appeared promising starter yeasts in the fermentation process to produce traditional cachaça.Duas linhagens de Saccharomyces cerevisiae foram testadas como iniciadoras em uma destilaria de cachaça. Foram utilizadas as linhagens de S. cerevisiae UFMG-A829, isolada de fermentação de cachaça, e S. cerevisiae K1-V1116, de origem vinícola. A permanência de cada linhagem durante a fermentação foi determinada por RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-PCR, utilizando o iniciador M13. As duas linhagens predominaram nas dornas de fermentação por aproximadamente 30 dias. Leveduras não-Saccharomyces e S. cerevisiae indígenas foram isoladas em menor proporção durante o experimento. As linhagens de S. cerevisiae indígenas apresentaram perfis moleculares distintos em relação às linhagens iniciadoras. As duas linhagens foram promissoras para serem utilizadas como iniciadoras do processo fermentativo para a produção da cachaça.

  19. Selection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for efficient very high gravity bio-ethanol fermentation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Francisco B; Guimarães, Pedro M. R.; J. A. Teixeira; Domingues, Lucília

    2010-01-01

    Abstract An optimized very high gravity (VHG) glucose medium supplemented with low cost nutrient sources was used to evaluate bio-ethanol production by 11 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The industrial strains PE-2 and CA1185 exhibited the best overall fermentation performance, producing an ethanol titre of 19.2% (v/v) corresponding to a batch productivity of 2.5 g l?1 h?1, while the best laboratory strain (CEN.PK 113-7D) produced 17.5% (v/v) ethanol with a productivity of 1.7 g ...

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain NCIM3186 Used in the Production of Bioethanol from Sweet Sorghum

    OpenAIRE

    Sravanthi Goud, Burragoni; Ulaganathan, Kandasamy

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain NCIM3186 used in bioethanol production from sweet sorghum. The size of the genome is approximately 11.9 Mb and contains 5,347 protein-coding genes.

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus K; Andersen, Kaj Scherz; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    to produce an ECM and respond to quorum sensing, and multi-cellular aggregates have lowered susceptibility to antifungals. Adhesion is mediated by a family of cell surface proteins of which Flo11 has been shown to be essential for biofilm development. FLO11 expression is regulated via a number of regulatory...... pathways including the protein kinase A and a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Advanced genetic tools and resources have been developed for S. cerevisiae including a deletion mutant-strain collection in a biofilm-forming strain background and GFP-fusion protein collections. Furthermore, S...

  2. Production of volatile and sulfur compounds by ten Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains inoculated in Trebbiano must

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca ePatrignani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In wines, the presence of sulphur compounds is the resulting of several contributions among which yeast metabolism. The characterization of the starter Saccharomyces cerevisiae needs to be performed also taking into account this ability even if evaluated together with the overall metabolic profile. In this perspective, principal aim of this experimental research was the evaluation of the volatile profiles, throughout GC/MS technique coupled with solid phase micro extraction, of wines obtained throughout the fermentation of 10 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, the production of sulphur compounds was further evaluated by using a gas-chromatograph coupled with a Flame Photometric Detector. Specifically, the ten strains were inoculated in Trebbiano musts and the fermentations were monitored for 19 days. In the produced wines, volatile and sulphur compounds as well as amino acid concentrations were investigated. Also the physico-chemical characteristics of the wines and their electronic nose profiles were evaluated.

  3. Production of Volatile and Sulfur Compounds by 10 Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Inoculated in Trebbiano Must.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrignani, Francesca; Chinnici, Fabio; Serrazanetti, Diana I; Vernocchi, Pamela; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Riponi, Claudio; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    In wines, the presence of sulfur compounds is the resulting of several contributions among which yeast metabolism. The characterization of the starter Saccharomyces cerevisiae needs to be performed also taking into account this ability even if evaluated together with the overall metabolic profile. In this perspective, principal aim of this experimental research was the evaluation of the volatile profiles, throughout GC/MS technique coupled with solid phase micro extraction, of wines obtained throughout the fermentation of 10 strains of S. cerevisiae. In addition, the production of sulfur compounds was further evaluated by using a gas-chromatograph coupled with a Flame Photometric Detector. Specifically, the 10 strains were inoculated in Trebbiano musts and the fermentations were monitored for 19 days. In the produced wines, volatile and sulfur compounds as well as amino acid concentrations were investigated. Also the physico-chemical characteristics of the wines and their electronic nose profiles were evaluated. PMID:26973621

  4. Genome Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains of the Peterhof Genetic Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdova, Polina B.; Tarasov, Oleg V.; Matveenko, Andrew G.; Radchenko, Elina A.; Sopova, Julia V.; Polev, Dmitrii E.; Inge-Vechtomov, Sergey G.; Dobrynin, Pavel V.

    2016-01-01

    The Peterhof genetic collection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (PGC) is a large laboratory stock that has accumulated several thousands of strains for over than half a century. It originated independently of other common laboratory stocks from a distillery lineage (race XII). Several PGC strains have been extensively used in certain fields of yeast research but their genomes have not been thoroughly explored yet. Here we employed whole genome sequencing to characterize five selected PGC strains including one of the closest to the progenitor, 15V-P4, and several strains that have been used to study translation termination and prions in yeast (25-25-2V-P3982, 1B-D1606, 74-D694, and 6P-33G-D373). The genetic distance between the PGC progenitor and S288C is comparable to that between two geographically isolated populations. The PGC seems to be closer to two bakery strains than to S288C-related laboratory stocks or European wine strains. In genomes of the PGC strains, we found several loci which are absent from the S288C genome; 15V-P4 harbors a rare combination of the gene cluster characteristic for wine strains and the RTM1 cluster. We closely examined known and previously uncharacterized gene variants of particular strains and were able to establish the molecular basis for known phenotypes including phenylalanine auxotrophy, clumping behavior and galactose utilization. Finally, we made sequencing data and results of the analysis available for the yeast community. Our data widen the knowledge about genetic variation between Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and can form the basis for planning future work in PGC-related strains and with PGC-derived alleles. PMID:27152522

  5. Adaptation of a flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain to lignocellulosic inhibitors by cell recycle batch fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Landaeta, R.; Aroca, G.; Acevedo, F.; J. A. Teixeira; Mussatto, Solange I.

    2013-01-01

    The ethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstocks is considered a promising strategy to increase global production of biofuels without impacting food supplies. However, some compounds released during the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials are toxic for the microbial metabolism, causing low ethanol yield and productivity during the fermentation. As an attempt to overcome this problem, the present study evaluated the adaptation of a flocculent strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (NRRL ...

  6. Improving Stress Tolerance in Industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains for Ethanol Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    The present work was aimed at developing industrial S. cerevisiae strains with improved tolerance to two types of stressors encountered during the fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass that affect ethanol yield and productivity, namely hydrolysate-derived inhibitors and high temperature, and at understanding the response of yeast and mechanisms of adaptation to such stressors. In one part of the study, key amino acid substitutions that were responsible for the acquired ability of a mutated ...

  7. Genome-wide analysis of nucleotide-level variation in commonly used Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Schacherer

    Full Text Available Ten years have passed since the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae-more precisely, the S288c strain-was completely sequenced. However, experimental work in yeast is commonly performed using strains that are of unknown genetic relationship to S288c. Here, we characterized the nucleotide-level similarity between S288c and seven commonly used lab strains (A364A, W303, FL100, CEN.PK, summation 1278b, SK1 and BY4716 using 25mer oligonucleotide microarrays that provide complete and redundant coverage of the approximately 12 Mb Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Using these data, we assessed the frequency and distribution of nucleotide variation in comparison to the sequenced reference genome. These data allow us to infer the relationships between experimentally important strains of yeast and provide insight for experimental designs that are sensitive to sequence variation. We propose a rational approach for near complete sequencing of strains related to the reference using these data and directed re-sequencing. These data and new visualization tools are accessible online in a new resource: the Yeast SNPs Browser (YSB; http://gbrowse.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/gbrowse/yeast_strains_snps that is available to all researchers.

  8. Functional expression of xylose isomerase in flocculating industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Cheng; Li, Guo-Ying; Gou, Min; Xia, Zi-Yuan; Tang, Yue-Qin; Kida, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with xylose isomerase (XI) pathway were constructed using a flocculating industrial strain (YC-8) as the host. Both strains expressing wild-type xylA (coding XI) from the fungus Orpinomyces sp. and the bacterium Prevotella ruminicola, respectively, showed better growth ability and fermentation capacity when using xylose as the sole sugar than most of the reported strains expressing XI. Codon optimization of both XIs did not improve the xylose fermentation ability of the strains. Adaption significantly increased XI activity resulting in improved growth and fermentation. The strains expressing codon-optimized XI showed a higher increase in xylose consumption and ethanol production compared to strains expressing wild XI. Among all strains, the adapted strain YCPA2E expressing XI from P. ruminicola showed the best performance in the fermentation of xylose to ethanol. After 48 h of fermentation, YCPA2E assimilated 16.95 g/L xylose and produced 6.98 g/L ethanol. These results indicate that YC-8 is a suitable host strain for XI expression, especially for the codon-optimized XI originating from P. ruminicola. PMID:26645659

  9. Growth temperature exerts differential physiological and transcriptional responses in laboratory and wine strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizarra, Francisco J.; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Nielsen, Jens;

    2008-01-01

    environmental conditions and the organoleptic properties that they confer to wine. Here, we used a two-factor design to study the responses of a standard laboratory strain, CEN.PK113-7D, and an industrial wine yeast strain, EC1118, to growth temperatures of 15 degrees C and 30 degrees C in nitrogen......Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been widely used as a model for studying eukaryotic cells and mapping the molecular mechanisms of many different human diseases. Industrial wine yeasts, on the other hand, have been selected on the basis of their adaptation to stringent......-limited, anaerobic, steady-state chemostat cultures. Physiological characterization revealed that the growth temperature strongly impacted the biomass yield of both strains. Moreover, we found that the wine yeast was better adapted to mobilizing resources for biomass production and that the laboratory yeast...

  10. A fast method to diagnose chromosome and plasmid loss in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegemann, J H; Klein, S; Heck, S; Güldener, U; Niedenthal, R K; Fleig, U

    1999-07-01

    We have developed a simple, fast and reliable method for the analysis of genetic stability in budding yeast strains. The assay relies on our previous finding that cells expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) can be detected and counted by flow cytometric analysis (FACS) (Niedenthal et al., 1996). Expression of a gfp-carrying CEN-plasmid in a wild-type strain resulted in the emission of strong fluorescence from 80% of the cell population. Strong fluorescence and presence of the plasmid, determined by the presence of the URA3 genetic marker, was strictly correlated. Expression of this plasmid in 266 yeast strains, each carrying a complete deletion of a novel, non-essential gene identified in the S. cerevisiae sequencing project, pinpointed 12 strains with an increased level of mitotic plasmid loss. Finally we have shown that measurement of mitotic loss of artificial chromosome fragments equipped with the gfp expression cassette can be performed quantitatively using FACS.

  11. Thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains representing potentials for bioethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke by consolidated bioprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Nan [Agricultural Univ., Qingdao, SD (China). College of Animal Science and Technology; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, SD (China). Key Lab. of Biofuels; Yuan, Bo; Wang, Shi-An; Li, Fu-Li [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, SD (China). Key Lab. of Biofuels; Sun, Juan [Agricultural Univ., Qingdao, SD (China). College of Animal Science and Technology

    2012-09-15

    Thermotolerant inulin-utilizing yeast strains are desirable for ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). To obtain such strains, 21 naturally occurring yeast strains isolated by using an enrichment method and 65 previously isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were investigated in inulin utilization, extracellular inulinase activity, and ethanol fermentation from inulin and Jerusalem artichoke tuber flour at 40 C. The strains Kluyveromyces marxianus PT-1 (CGMCC AS2.4515) and S. cerevisiae JZ1C (CGMCC AS2.3878) presented the highest extracellular inulinase activity and ethanol yield in this study. The highest ethanol concentration in Jerusalem artichoke tuber flour fermentation (200 g L{sup -1}) at 40 C achieved by K. marxianus PT-1 and S. cerevisiae JZ1C was 73.6 and 65.2 g L{sup -1}, which corresponded to the theoretical ethanol yield of 90.0 and 79.7 %, respectively. In the range of 30 to 40 C, temperature did not have a significant effect on ethanol production for both strains. This study displayed the distinctive superiority of K. marxianus PT-1 and S. cerevisiae JZ1C in the thermotolerance and utilization of inulin-type oligosaccharides reserved in Jerusalem artichoke tubers. It is proposed that both K. marxianus and S. cerevisiae have considerable potential in ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by a high temperature CBP. (orig.)

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from different grape varieties and winemaking regions

    OpenAIRE

    Dorit Schuller; Filipa Cardoso; Susana Sousa; Paula Gomes; Gomes, Ana C.; Santos, Manuel A. S.; Margarida Casal

    2012-01-01

    We herein evaluate intraspecific genetic diversity of fermentative vineyard-associated S. cerevisiae strains and evaluate relationships between grape varieties and geographical location on populational structures. From the musts obtained from 288 grape samples, collected from two wine regions (16 vineyards, nine grape varieties), 94 spontaneous fermentations were concluded and 2820 yeast isolates were obtained that belonged mainly (92%) to the species S. cerevisiae. Isolates were classified i...

  13. Raspberry wine fermentation with suspended and immobilized yeast cells of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjević, Radovan; Gibson, Brian; Sandell, Mari; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Bugarski, Branko; Leskošek-Čukalović, Ida; Vunduk, Jovana; Nikićević, Ninoslav; Nedović, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the differences in fermentative behaviour of two different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (EC1118 and RC212) and to determine the differences in composition and sensory properties of raspberry wines fermented with immobilized and suspended yeast cells of both strains at 15 °C. Analyses of aroma compounds, glycerol, acetic acid and ethanol, as well as the kinetics of fermentation and a sensory evaluation of the wines, were performed. All fermentations with immobilized yeast cells had a shorter lag phase and faster utilization of sugars and ethanol production than those fermented with suspended cells. Slower fermentation kinetics were observed in all the samples that were fermented with strain RC212 (suspended and immobilized) than in samples fermented with strain EC1118. Significantly higher amounts of acetic acid were detected in all samples fermented with strain RC212 than in those fermented with strain EC1118 (0.282 and 0.602 g/l, respectively). Slightly higher amounts of glycerol were observed in samples fermented with strain EC1118 than in those fermented with strain RC212.

  14. Comparative Study on Two Commercial Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Optimum Ethanol Production on Industrial Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mukhtar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Two commercial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saf-Instant (Baker's yeast and Ethanol red (Mutant were compared for ethanol production during hot summer season, using molasses diluted up to 6-7∘ Brix containing 4%-5% sugars. The yeasts were then propagated in fermentation vessels to study the effects of yeast cell count and varying concentrations of Urea, DAP, inoculum size and Lactrol (Antibiotic. Continuous circulation of mash was maintained for 24 hours and after this fermenter was allowed to stay for a period of 16 hours to give time for maximum conversion of sugars into ethanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain (Saf-instant with cell concentration of 400 millions/mL at molasses sugar level of 13%–15% (pH 4.6±0.2, Temp. 32∘C±1, inoculum size of 25% (v/v, urea concentration, 150 ppm, DAP, 53.4 ppm and Lactrol,150 ppm supported maximum ethanol production (8.8% with YP/S=250 L ethanol per tone molasses (96.5% yield, and had significantly lower concentrations of byproducts. By selecting higher ethanol yielding yeast strain and optimizing the fermentation parameters both yield and economics of the fermentation process can be improved.

  15. Study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains for breeding through fermentation efficiency and tetrad analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-González, Mónica; Úbeda, Juan F; Briones, Ana I

    2015-03-01

    One of the issues that most concerns to both winemakers and producers of active dry yeasts is the stuck and sluggish fermentations of grape musts with high levels of sugar, reflecting the inability of inoculated yeast strain to complete the fermentation process. It is difficult to obtain a wine strain that possesses both adequate oenological and technological properties; thus, the correct approach to solving these problems is the application of breeding programs primarily focused on both properties. The first step toward this process is to characterize the phenotypic diversity between potential parental strains. In the present study, we have analyzed the fermentative behavior of 26 Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains in high-sugar conditions at 20 °C, using a range of tests, such as sporulation ability, spore viability, and tetrad analysis to determine the tolerance of these yeasts to several stress conditions. Most tested strains were homothallic and heterozygous for more than one character. Two auxotrophic derivatives with defects in amino acid or nucleic acid metabolism were obtained, and these strains could potentially be used for the development of hybridization techniques without using laboratory strains. PMID:25447272

  16. New integrative computational approaches unveil the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pheno-metabolomic fermentative profile and allow strain selection for winemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Duarte, Ricardo; Umek, Lan; Mendes, Inês; Castro, Cristiana C; Fonseca, Nuno; Martins, Rosa; Silva-Ferreira, António C; Sampaio, Paula; Pais, Célia; Schuller, Dorit

    2016-11-15

    During must fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains thousands of volatile aroma compounds are formed. The objective of the present work was to adapt computational approaches to analyze pheno-metabolomic diversity of a S. cerevisiae strain collection with different origins. Phenotypic and genetic characterization together with individual must fermentations were performed, and metabolites relevant to aromatic profiles were determined. Experimental results were projected onto a common coordinates system, revealing 17 statistical-relevant multi-dimensional modules, combining sets of most-correlated features of noteworthy biological importance. The present method allowed, as a breakthrough, to combine genetic, phenotypic and metabolomic data, which has not been possible so far due to difficulties in comparing different types of data. Therefore, the proposed computational approach revealed as successful to shed light into the holistic characterization of S. cerevisiae pheno-metabolome in must fermentative conditions. This will allow the identification of combined relevant features with application in selection of good winemaking strains. PMID:27283661

  17. Acetic acid inhibits nutrient uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: auxotrophy confounds the use of yeast deletion libraries for strain improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; Bierma, Jan; Smith, Mark R; Poliner, Eric; Wolfe, Carole; Hadduck, Alex N; Zara, Severino; Jirikovic, Mallori; van Zee, Kari; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2013-08-01

    Acetic acid inhibition of yeast fermentation has a negative impact in several industrial processes. As an initial step in the construction of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with increased tolerance for acetic acid, mutations conferring resistance were identified by screening a library of deletion mutants in a multiply auxotrophic genetic background. Of the 23 identified mutations, 11 were then introduced into a prototrophic laboratory strain for further evaluation. Because none of the 11 mutations was found to increase resistance in the prototrophic strain, potential interference by the auxotrophic mutations themselves was investigated. Mutants carrying single auxotrophic mutations were constructed and found to be more sensitive to growth inhibition by acetic acid than an otherwise isogenic prototrophic strain. At a concentration of 80 mM acetic acid at pH 4.8, the initial uptake of uracil, leucine, lysine, histidine, tryptophan, phosphate, and glucose was lower in the prototrophic strain than in a non-acetic acid-treated control. These findings are consistent with two mechanisms by which nutrient uptake may be inhibited. Intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were severely decreased upon acetic acid treatment, which likely slowed ATP-dependent proton symport, the major form of transport in yeast for nutrients other than glucose. In addition, the expression of genes encoding some nutrient transporters was repressed by acetic acid, including HXT1 and HXT3 that encode glucose transporters that operate by facilitated diffusion. These results illustrate how commonly used genetic markers in yeast deletion libraries complicate the effort to isolate strains with increased acetic acid resistance.

  18. Paclitaxel-induced microtubule stabilization causes mitotic block and apoptotic-like cell death in a paclitaxel-sensitive strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Foland, Travis B.; Dentler, William L.; SUPRENANT, KATHY A.; Gupta, Mohan L.; Himes, Richard H.

    2005-01-01

    Wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae tubulin does not bind the anti-mitotic microtubule stabilizing agent paclitaxel. Previously, we introduced mutations into the S. cerevisiae gene for β-tubulin that imparted paclitaxel binding to the protein, but the mutant strain was not sensitive to paclitaxel and other microtubule-stabilizing agents, due to the multiple ABC transporters in the membranes of budding yeast. Here, we introduced the mutated β-tubulin gene into a S. cerevisiae strain with dimini...

  19. Impact of different spray-drying conditions on the viability of wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte, Maria; Troianiello, Gabriele Danilo; Di Capua, Marika; Romano, Raffaele; Blaiotta, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Spray-drying (SD) is widely considered a suitable method to preserve microorganisms, but data regarding yeasts are still scanty. In this study, the effect of growing media, process variables and carriers over viability of a wild wine Saccharomyces (S.) cerevisiae LM52 was evaluated. For biomass production, the strain was grown (batch and fed-batch fermentation) in a synthetic, as well as in a beet sugar molasses based-medium. Drying of cells resuspended in several combinations of soluble starch and maltose was performed at different inlet and outlet temperatures. Under the best conditions-suspension in soluble starch plus maltose couplet to inlet and outlet temperatures of 110 and 55 °C, respectively-the loss of viability of S. cerevisiae LM52 was 0.8 ± 0.1 and 0.5 ± 0.2 Log c.f.u. g(-1) for synthetic and molasses-based medium, respectively. Similar results were obtained when S. cerevisiae strains Zymoflore F15 and EC1118, isolated from commercial active dry yeast (ADY), were tested. Moreover, powders retained a high vitality and showed good fermentation performances up to 6 month of storage, at both 4 and -20 °C. Finally, fermentation performances of different kinds of dried formulates (SD and ADY) compared with fresh cultures did not show significant differences. The procedure proposed allowed a small-scale production of yeast in continuous operation with relatively simple equipment, and may thus represent a rapid response-on-demand for the production of autochthonous yeasts for local wine-making. PMID:26712628

  20. EasyClone 2.0: expanded toolkit of integrative vectors for stable gene expression in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovicek, Vratislav; Borja, Gheorghe M; Forster, Jochen; Borodina, Irina

    2015-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the key cell factories for production of chemicals and active pharmaceuticals. For large-scale fermentations, particularly in biorefinery applications, it is desirable to use stress-tolerant industrial strains. However, such strains are less amenable for metabolic engineering than the standard laboratory strains. To enable easy delivery and overexpression of genes in a wide range of industrial S. cerevisiae strains, we constructed a set of integrative vectors with long homology arms and dominant selection markers. The vectors integrate into previously validated chromosomal locations via double cross-over and result in homogenous stable expression of the integrated genes, as shown for several unrelated industrial strains. Cre-mediated marker rescue is possible for removing markers positioned on different chromosomes. To demonstrate the applicability of the presented vector set for metabolic engineering of industrial yeast, we constructed xylose-utilizing strains overexpressing xylose isomerase, xylose transporter and five genes of the pentose phosphate pathway.

  1. High vanillin tolerance of an evolved Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain owing to its enhanced vanillin reduction and antioxidative capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu; Li, Hongxing; Wang, Xinning; Zhang, Xiaoran; Hou, Jin; Wang, Linfeng; Gao, Nan; Bao, Xiaoming

    2014-11-01

    The phenolic compounds present in hydrolysates pose significant challenges for the sustainable lignocellulosic materials refining industry. Three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with high tolerance to lignocellulose hydrolysate were obtained through ethyl methanesulfonate mutation and adaptive evolution. Among them, strain EMV-8 exhibits specific tolerance to vanillin, a phenolic compound common in lignocellulose hydrolysate. The EMV-8 maintains a specific growth rate of 0.104 h(-1) in 2 g L(-1) vanillin, whereas the reference strain cannot grow. Physiological studies revealed that the vanillin reduction rate of EMV-8 is 1.92-fold higher than its parent strain, and the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity of EMV-8 is 15 % higher than its parent strain. Transcriptional analysis results confirmed an up-regulated oxidoreductase activity and antioxidant activity in this strain. Our results suggest that enhancing the antioxidant capacity and oxidoreductase activity could be a strategy to engineer S. cerevisiae for improved vanillin tolerance.

  2. Fermentation of xylose to produce ethanol by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain containing XYLA and XKS1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaolin; JIANG Ning; HE Peng; LU Dajun; SHEN An

    2005-01-01

    Fermentation of the pentose sugar xylose to produce ethanol using lignocellulosic biomass would make bioethanol production economically more competitive. Saccharomyce cerevisise, an efficient ethanol producer, cannot utilize xylose because it lacks the ability to convert xylose to its isomer xylulose. In this study, XYLA gene encoding xylose isomerase (XI) from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4T and XKS1 gene encoding xylulokinase (XK) from Pichia stipitis were cloned and functionally coexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae EF-326 to construct a recombinant xylose-utilizing strain. The resulting strain S. cerevisiae EF 1014 not only grew on xylose as sole carbon source, but also produced ethanol under anaerobic conditions. Fermentations performed with different xylose concentrations at different temperatures demonstrated that the highest ethanol productivity was 0.11 g/g xylose when xylose concentration was provided at 50 g/L. Under this condition, 28.4% of xylose was consumed and 1.54 g/L xylitol was formed. An increasing fermentation temperature from 30℃ to 37℃ did not improve ethanol yield.

  3. Construction of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for bioethanol active dry yeast (ADY production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoqiong Zheng

    Full Text Available The application of active dry yeast (ADY in bioethanol production simplifies operation processes and reduces the risk of bacterial contamination. In the present study, we constructed a novel ADY strain with improved stress tolerance and ethanol fermentation performances under stressful conditions. The industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain ZTW1 showed excellent properties and thus subjected to a modified whole-genome shuffling (WGS process to improve its ethanol titer, proliferation capability, and multiple stress tolerance for ADY production. The best-performing mutant, Z3-86, was obtained after three rounds of WGS, producing 4.4% more ethanol and retaining 2.15-fold higher viability than ZTW1 after drying. Proteomics and physiological analyses indicated that the altered expression patterns of genes involved in protein metabolism, plasma membrane composition, trehalose metabolism, and oxidative responses contribute to the trait improvement of Z3-86. This work not only successfully developed a novel S. cerevisiae mutant for application in commercial bioethanol production, but also enriched the current understanding of how WGS improves the complex traits of microbes.

  4. Benchmarking two commonly used Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for heterologous vanillin-β-glucoside production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strucko, Tomas; Magdenoska, Olivera; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2015-01-01

    factories for production of specific compounds. To examine this possibility, we have reconstructed a de novo vanillin-β-glucoside pathway in an identical manner in S288c and CEN.PK strains. Characterization of the two resulting strains in two standard conditions revealed that the S288c background strain...... produced up to 10-fold higher amounts of vanillin-β-glucoside compared to CEN.PK. This study demonstrates that yeast strain background may play a major role in the outcome of newly developed cell factories for production of a given product....

  5. Production of fructanase by a wild strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on tequila agave fructan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-González, R I; Pelayo-Ortiz, C; Jacques, G; Guatemala, G; Arriola, E; Arias, J A; Toriz, G

    2015-01-01

    A new wild strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CF3) isolated from tequila must was evaluated for production of fructanase on Agave tequilana Weber fructan (FT). Fructanase activity (F) was assessed by a 3(3) factorial design (substrate, temperature and pH). High enzymatic activity (31.1 U/ml) was found at 30 °C, pH 5, using FT (10 g/l) as substrate. The effect of initial substrate concentration on F (FT0, 5.7-66 g/l) was studied and it was found that F was highest (44.8 U/ml) at FT0 25 g/l. A 2(2) factorial experimental design with five central points was utilized to study the effect of stirring and aeration on fructanase activity; stirring exhibited a stronger effect on F. The ratio fructanase to invertase (F/S) was 0.57, which confirms that the enzymes are fructanase. Crude fructanase reached high substrate hydrolysis (48 wt%) in 10 h. It is shown that S. cerevisiae CF3 was able to produce large amounts of fructanase by growing it on fructan from A. tequilana.

  6. Production of fructanase by a wild strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on tequila agave fructan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-González, R I; Pelayo-Ortiz, C; Jacques, G; Guatemala, G; Arriola, E; Arias, J A; Toriz, G

    2015-01-01

    A new wild strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CF3) isolated from tequila must was evaluated for production of fructanase on Agave tequilana Weber fructan (FT). Fructanase activity (F) was assessed by a 3(3) factorial design (substrate, temperature and pH). High enzymatic activity (31.1 U/ml) was found at 30 °C, pH 5, using FT (10 g/l) as substrate. The effect of initial substrate concentration on F (FT0, 5.7-66 g/l) was studied and it was found that F was highest (44.8 U/ml) at FT0 25 g/l. A 2(2) factorial experimental design with five central points was utilized to study the effect of stirring and aeration on fructanase activity; stirring exhibited a stronger effect on F. The ratio fructanase to invertase (F/S) was 0.57, which confirms that the enzymes are fructanase. Crude fructanase reached high substrate hydrolysis (48 wt%) in 10 h. It is shown that S. cerevisiae CF3 was able to produce large amounts of fructanase by growing it on fructan from A. tequilana. PMID:25432071

  7. CRISPR–Cas system enables fast and simple genome editing of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vratislav Stovicek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a demand to develop 3rd generation biorefineries that integrate energy production with the production of higher value chemicals from renewable feedstocks. Here, robust and stress-tolerant industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae will be suitable production organisms. However, their genetic manipulation is challenging, as they are usually diploid or polyploid. Therefore, there is a need to develop more efficient genetic engineering tools. We applied a CRISPR–Cas9 system for genome editing of different industrial strains, and show simultaneous disruption of two alleles of a gene in several unrelated strains with the efficiency ranging between 65% and 78%. We also achieved simultaneous disruption and knock-in of a reporter gene, and demonstrate the applicability of the method by designing lactic acid-producing strains in a single transformation event, where insertion of a heterologous gene and disruption of two endogenous genes occurred simultaneously. Our study provides a foundation for efficient engineering of industrial yeast cell factories.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae IR-2, a Useful Industrial Strain for Highly Efficient Production of Bioethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Sahara, Takehiko; Fujimori, Kazuhiro E.; Nezuo, Maiko; Tsukahara, Masatoshi; Tochigi, Yuki; Ohgiya, Satoru; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae IR-2, which is a diploid industrial strain with flocculation activity and the ability to efficiently produce bioethanol. The approximately 11.4-Mb draft genome information provides useful insights into metabolic engineering for the production of bioethanol from biomass.

  9. Key Process Conditions for Production of C4 Dicarboxylic Acids in Bioreactor Batch Cultures of an Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, R.M.; De Hulster, E.; Kloezen, W.; Pronk, J.T.; Van Maris, A.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    A recent effort to improve malic acid production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae by means of metabolic engineering resulted in a strain that produced up to 59 g liter−1 of malate at a yield of 0.42 mol (mol glucose)−1 in calcium carbonate-buffered shake flask cultures. With shake flasks, process paramet

  10. Key Process Conditions for Production of C4 Dicarboxylic Acids in Bioreactor Batch Cultures of an Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, R.M.; De Hulster, E.; Kloezen, W.; Pronk, J.T.; Van Maris, A.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    A recent effort to improve malic acid production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae by means of metabolic engineering resulted in a strain that produced up to 59 g liter(-1) of malate at a yield of 0.42 mol (mol glucose)(-1) in calcium carbonate-buffered shake flask cultures. With shake flasks, process par

  11. Engineering industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for xylose fermentation and comparison for switchgrass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccharomyces physiology and fermentation related properties vary broadly among industrial strains. In this study, six industrial strains of varied genetic background were engineered to ferment xylose. Aerobic growth rates on xylose were 0.040 h**-1 to 0.167 h**-1. Fermentation of xylose, glucose/xy...

  12. Development Of An Efficient Glycerol Utilizing Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Strain Via Adaptive Laboratory Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strucko, Tomas; Zirngibl, Katharina; Tharwat Tolba Mohamed, Elsayed;

    2015-01-01

    that popular wild-type laboratory yeast strains, commonly applied in metabolic engineering studies, did not grow or grew very slowly in glycerol medium.In this work, an adaptive laboratory evolution approach to obtain S. cerevisiae strains with an improved ability to grow on glycerol was applied. A broad array...... catabolism in yeast. The knowledge acquired in this study may be further applied for rational S. cerevisiae strain improvement for using glycerol as a carbon source in industrial biotechnology processes. This work is a part of the DeYeastLibrary consortium financed by ERA-IB DeYeastLibrary - Designer yeast...... strain library optimized for metabolic engineering applications http://www.era-ib.net/deyeast-library...

  13. IMPROVEMENT OF BORASSUS AKEASSII WINES QUALITY BY CONTROLLED FERMENTATION USING SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAPSOBA François

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Palm wine produced traditionally and consumed by many people around the world and specifically in Burkina Faso posed health risks because of questionable quality of wine produced by mix culture fermentation and the use of antiseptics for the stabilization. In order to improve its quality, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from Borassus akeassii wines and identified by amplification and RFLP analysis of the 5-8S-ITS region were used for in vitro fermentation of unfermented palm sap. The physicochemical characteristics of the sap were measured before and after fermentation process by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC and the microbiological quality were also performed. HPLC analysis showed that glucose and fructose concentration in palm sap were 37.0 and 27.6 g/L respectively, ethanol content was ranged between 2.76 and 5.31 % (g/mL for controlled fermentation and 2.20 % (g/mL for spontaneous fermentation. Lactic and acetic acids were ranged between 0.1 and 0.3 g/L and 1.5 and 1.6 g/L for controlled fermentation versus 2.5 and 3.1 g/L and the spontaneous fermentation respectively. Coliforms and Staphylococcus aureus were detected only in the unfermented palm sap and the wine fermented spontaneously. Principal component analysis showed a good separation between spontaneous and controlled fermentation. Sterilization and controlled fermentation of the unfermented sap with palm wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains led to the improvement of palm wine quality.

  14. Genome sequencing and comparative analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YJM789.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wu; McCusker, John H; Hyman, Richard W; Jones, Ted; Ning, Ye; Cao, Zhiwei; Gu, Zhenglong; Bruno, Dan; Miranda, Molly; Nguyen, Michelle; Wilhelmy, Julie; Komp, Caridad; Tamse, Raquel; Wang, Xiaojing; Jia, Peilin; Luedi, Philippe; Oefner, Peter J; David, Lior; Dietrich, Fred S; Li, Yixue; Davis, Ronald W; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2007-07-31

    We sequenced the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YJM789, which was derived from a yeast isolated from the lung of an AIDS patient with pneumonia. The strain is used for studies of fungal infections and quantitative genetics because of its extensive phenotypic differences to the laboratory reference strain, including growth at high temperature and deadly virulence in mouse models. Here we show that the approximately 12-Mb genome of YJM789 contains approximately 60,000 SNPs and approximately 6,000 indels with respect to the reference S288c genome, leading to protein polymorphisms with a few known cases of phenotypic changes. Several ORFs are found to be unique to YJM789, some of which might have been acquired through horizontal transfer. Localized regions of high polymorphism density are scattered over the genome, in some cases spanning multiple ORFs and in others concentrated within single genes. The sequence of YJM789 contains clues to pathogenicity and spurs the development of more powerful approaches to dissecting the genetic basis of complex hereditary traits.

  15. Biodiversity of autolytic ability in flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains suitable for traditional sparkling wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perpetuini, Giorgia; Di Gianvito, Paola; Arfelli, Giuseppe; Schirone, Maria; Corsetti, Aldo; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2016-07-01

    Yeasts involved in secondary fermentation of traditional sparkling wines should show specific characteristics, such as flocculation capacity and autolysis. Recently it has been postulated that autophagy may contribute to the outcome of autolysis. In this study, 28 flocculent wine Saccahromyces cerevisiae strains characterized by different flocculation degrees were studied for their autolytic and autophagic activities. Autolysis was monitored in synthetic medium through the determination of amino acid nitrogen and total proteins released. At the same time, novel primer sets were developed to determine the expression of the genes ATG1, ATG17 and ATG29. Twelve strains were selected on the basis of their autolytic rate and ATG gene expressions in synthetic medium and were inoculated in a base wine. After 30, 60 and 180 days the autolytic process and ATG gene expressions were evaluated. The obtained data showed that autolysis and ATG gene expressions differed among strains and were independent of the degree of flocculation. This biodiversity could be exploited to select new starter stains to improve sparkling wine production. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26804203

  16. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Strain Inhibits Growth and Decreases Ochratoxin A Biosynthesis by Aspergillus carbonarius and Aspergillus ochraceus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena Budroni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to select wine yeast strains as biocontrol agents against fungal contaminants responsible for the accumulation of ochratoxin A (OTA in grape and wine and to dissect the mechanism of OTA detoxification by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain (DISAABA1182, which had previously been reported to reduce OTA in a synthetic must. All of the yeast strains tested displayed an ability to inhibit the growth of Aspergillus carbonarius both in vivo and in vitro and addition of culture filtrates from the tested isolates led to complete inhibition of OTA production. S. cerevisiae DISAABA1182 was selected and further tested for its capacity to inhibit OTA production and pks (polyketide synthase transcription in A. carbonarius and Aspergillus ochraceus in vitro. In order to dissect the mechanism of OTA detoxification, each of these two fungi was co-cultured with living yeast cells exposed to yeast crude or to autoclaved supernatant: S. cerevisiae DISAABA1182 was found to inhibit mycelial growth and OTA production in both Aspergilli when co-cultured in the OTA-inducing YES medium. Moreover, a decrease in pks transcription was observed in the presence of living cells of S. cerevisiae DISAABA1182 or its supernatant, while no effects were observed on transcription of either of the constitutively expressed calmodulin and β-tubulin genes. This suggests that transcriptional regulation of OTA biosynthetic genes takes place during the interaction between DISAABA1182 and OTA-producing Aspergilli.

  17. Xylose fermentation efficiency and inhibitor tolerance of the recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain NAPX37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Cheng; Mitsumasu, Kanako; Gou, Zi-Xi; Gou, Min; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Guo-Ying; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Akamatsu, Takashi; Taguchi, Hisataka; Kida, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    Industrial yeast strains with good xylose fermentation ability and inhibitor tolerance are important for economical lignocellulosic bioethanol production. The flocculating industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain NAPX37, harboring the xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase (XR-XDH)-based xylose metabolic pathway, displayed efficient xylose fermentation during batch and continuous fermentation. During batch fermentation, the xylose consumption rates at the first 36 h were similar (1.37 g/L/h) when the initial xylose concentrations were 50 and 75 g/L, indicating that xylose fermentation was not inhibited even when the xylose concentration was as high as 75 g/L. The presence of glucose, at concentrations of up to 25 g/L, did not affect xylose consumption rate at the first 36 h. Strain NAPX37 showed stable xylose fermentation capacity during continuous ethanol fermentation using xylose as the sole sugar, for almost 1 year. Fermentation remained stable at a dilution rate of 0.05/h, even though the xylose concentration in the feed was as high as 100 g/L. Aeration rate, xylose concentration, and MgSO4 concentration were found to affect xylose consumption and ethanol yield. When the xylose concentration in the feed was 75 g/L, a high xylose consumption rate of 6.62 g/L/h and an ethanol yield of 0.394 were achieved under an aeration rate of 0.1 vvm, dilution rate of 0.1/h, and 5 mM MgSO4. In addition, strain NAPX37 exhibited good tolerance to inhibitors such as weak acids, furans, and phenolics during xylose fermentation. These findings indicate that strain NAPX37 is a promising candidate for application in the industrial production of lignocellulosic bioethanol. PMID:26603762

  18. Adjustment of Trehalose Metabolism in Wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains To Modify Ethanol Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossouw, D.; Heyns, E. H.; Setati, M. E.; Bosch, S.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to efficiently produce high levels of ethanol through glycolysis has been the focus of much scientific and industrial activity. Despite the accumulated knowledge regarding glycolysis, the modification of flux through this pathway to modify ethanol yields has proved difficult. Here, we report on the systematic screening of 66 strains with deletion mutations of genes encoding enzymes involved in central carbohydrate metabolism for altered ethanol yields. Five of these strains showing the most prominent changes in carbon flux were selected for further investigation. The genes were representative of trehalose biosynthesis (TPS1, encoding trehalose-6-phosphate synthase), central glycolysis (TDH3, encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (ZWF1, encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (ACO1 and ACO2, encoding aconitase isoforms 1 and 2). Two strains exhibited lower ethanol yields than the wild type (tps1Δ and tdh3Δ), while the remaining three showed higher ethanol yields. To validate these findings in an industrial yeast strain, the TPS1 gene was selected as a good candidate for genetic modification to alter flux to ethanol during alcoholic fermentation in wine. Using low-strength promoters active at different stages of fermentation, the expression of the TPS1 gene was slightly upregulated, resulting in a decrease in ethanol production and an increase in trehalose biosynthesis during fermentation. Thus, the mutant screening approach was successful in terms of identifying target genes for genetic modification in commercial yeast strains with the aim of producing lower-ethanol wines. PMID:23793638

  19. High ethanol fermentation performance of the dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover by an evolutionarily adapted Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Abdul Sattar; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol fermentation was investigated at the high solids content of the dry dilute sulfuric acid pretreated corn stover feedstock using an evolutionary adapted Saccharomyces cerevisiae DQ1 strain. The evolutionary adaptation was conducted by successively transferring the S. cerevisiae DQ1 cells into the inhibitors containing corn stover hydrolysate every 12h and finally a stable yeast strain was obtained after 65 days' continuous adaptation. The ethanol fermentation performance using the adapted strain was significantly improved with the high ethanol titer of 71.40 g/L and the high yield of 80.34% in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) at 30% solids content. No wastewater was generated from pretreatment to fermentation steps. The results were compared with the published cellulosic ethanol fermentation cases, and the obvious advantages of the present work were demonstrated not only at the high ethanol titer and yield, but also the significant reduction of wastewater generation and potential cost reduction.

  20. Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 and W303-1A laboratory strains differ in salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrezselyova, Silvia; Zahradka, Jaromir; Sychrova, Hana

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells serve as a model to elucidate the bases of salt tolerance and potassium homeostasis regulation in eukaryotic cells. In this study, we show that two widely used laboratory strains, BY4741 and W303-1A, differ not only in cell size and volume but also in their relative plasma-membrane potential (estimated with a potentiometric fluorescent dye diS-C3(3) and as Hygromycin B sensitivity) and tolerance to alkali-metal cations. W303-1A cells and their mutant derivatives lacking either uptake (trk1 trk2) or efflux (nha1) systems for alkali-metal cations are more tolerant to toxic sodium and lithium cations but also more sensitive to higher external concentrations of potassium than BY4741 cells and their mutants. Moreover, our results suggest that though the two strains do not differ in the total potassium content, the regulation of intracellular potassium homeostasis is probably not the same in BY4741 and W303-1A cells.

  1. Genome Sequence and Analysis of a Stress-Tolerant, Wild-Derived Strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Used in Biofuels Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlwain, Sean J; Peris, David; Sardi, Maria; Moskvin, Oleg V; Zhan, Fujie; Myers, Kevin S; Riley, Nicholas M; Buzzell, Alyssa; Parreiras, Lucas S; Ong, Irene M; Landick, Robert; Coon, Joshua J; Gasch, Audrey P; Sato, Trey K; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequences of more than 100 strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been published. Unfortunately, most of these genome assemblies contain dozens to hundreds of gaps at repetitive sequences, including transposable elements, tRNAs, and subtelomeric regions, which is where novel genes generally reside. Relatively few strains have been chosen for genome sequencing based on their biofuel production potential, leaving an additional knowledge gap. Here, we describe the nearly complete genome sequence of GLBRCY22-3 (Y22-3), a strain of S. cerevisiae derived from the stress-tolerant wild strain NRRL YB-210 and subsequently engineered for xylose metabolism. After benchmarking several genome assembly approaches, we developed a pipeline to integrate Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) and Illumina sequencing data and achieved one of the highest quality genome assemblies for any S. cerevisiae strain. Specifically, the contig N50 is 693 kbp, and the sequences of most chromosomes, the mitochondrial genome, and the 2-micron plasmid are complete. Our annotation predicts 92 genes that are not present in the reference genome of the laboratory strain S288c, over 70% of which were expressed. We predicted functions for 43 of these genes, 28 of which were previously uncharacterized and unnamed. Remarkably, many of these genes are predicted to be involved in stress tolerance and carbon metabolism and are shared with a Brazilian bioethanol production strain, even though the strains differ dramatically at most genetic loci. The Y22-3 genome sequence provides an exceptionally high-quality resource for basic and applied research in bioenergy and genetics. PMID:27172212

  2. Creation of an ethanol-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain by 266 nm laser radiation and repetitive cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Zhu, Rongrong; Zhang, Minfeng; Wang, Shilong

    2014-11-01

    Laser radiation is an efficient approach for rapid improvement of industrial microbial phenotypes. To improve ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, a 266 nm laser radiation with the use of repetitive cultivation was explored in this work. After irradiated by 266 nm laser radiation and repetitive cultivation, a genetically stable SM4 strain was obtained. The SM4 strain could grow on YPD plate with extra 15% (v/v) ethanol. Moreover, the ethanol production performance of SM4 strain was 29.25% more than that of the wild type strain when they were cultivated in 5% (v/v) ethanol fermentation medium for 72 h. The DNA mutation was the possible characters for the phenotype of SM4 strain. Overall, the 266 nm laser radiation and repetitive cultivation approach might be a novel and useful for breeding fermentation microorganisms.

  3. Diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from Borassus akeassii palm wines from Burkina Faso in comparison to other African beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapsoba, François; Legras, Jean-Luc; Savadogo, Aly; Dequin, Sylvie; Traore, Alfred Sababenedyo

    2015-10-15

    In South-West of Burkina Faso, palm wine is produced by spontaneous fermentation of the sap from a specific palm tree Borassus akeassii and plays an important role in people's lives. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main agent of this alcoholic fermentation but little is known about the diversity of the isolates from palm. In this work, 39 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were isolated from palm wine samples collected from 14 sites in Burkina Faso, as well as 7 isolates obtained from sorghum beer (Dolo) from 3 distant sites. Their diversity was analyzed at 12 microsatellite loci, and compared to the genotypes obtained for other African yeast populations isolated from Cocoa hulks from Ghana, sorghum beer from Ivory Coast, palm wine from Djibouti Republic, and to our database of strains from miscellaneous origins (bread, beer, wine, sake, oaks…). The ploidy of these strains has been assessed as well by flow cytometry. Our results show that B. akeassii palm wine contains a specific yeast population of diploid strains, different from Dolo produced in the same area and from other palm wine strains from Ivory Coast, Nigeria, or Djibouti Republic. In contrast, Dolo strains appeared as a group of related and mainly tetraploid strains despite being isolated from different countries. PMID:26202324

  4. Isolation and characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains of winery interest Isolamento e caracterização de cepas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae de interesse em produção de vinho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais M. Guimarães

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the availability of several Saccharomyces cerevisiae commercial strains intended for wine production, strains isolated from winery regions are usually more adapted to their own climatic conditions, grapes and also partially responsible for particular characteristics that frequently identify specific wines and regions. Thus the microbiota of an important winery region (Colombo was studied in order to isolate and characterize S. cerevisiae strains that could be used on wine production. From 61 yeasts isolated, 14 were identified as S. cerevisiae. Some of them showed fermentative characteristics even better than commercial strains indicating that they could be applied on wine production in order to increase the quality and assure the particular wine characteristics of that region.

  5. Systems biology approaches for the design of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae winemaking strains for enhanced flavour compounds synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, Inês Isabel Moreira Moutinho Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento em Biologia Ambiental e Molecular Wine flavour and aroma are the result of yeast metabolism and must compounds interactions. During must fermentation thousands of volatile aroma compounds are formed, with higher alcohols, acetate esters and ethyl esters being the main aromatic compounds contributing to a floral and fruity aroma. The action of yeast, in particular of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, on the must components will build the architecture of t...

  6. Physicochemical characterization of pomegranate wines fermented with three different Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguer, María; Vegara, Salud; Barrajón, Enrique; Saura, Domingo; Valero, Manuel; Martí, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Three commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains: Viniferm Revelación, Viniferm SV and Viniferm PDM were evaluated for the production of pomegranate wine from a juice coupage of the two well-known varieties Mollar and Wonderfull. Further malolactic fermentation was carried out spontaneously. The same fermentation patterns were observed for pH, titratable acidity, density, sugar consumption, and ethanol and glycerol production. Glucose was exhausted while fructose residues remained at the end of alcoholic fermentation. A high ethanol concentration (10.91 ± 0.27% v/v) in combination with 1.49 g/L glycerol was achieved. Citric acid concentration increased rapidly a 31.7%, malic acid disappeared as result of malolactic fermentation and the lactic acid levels reached values between 0.40 and 0.96 g/L. The analysis of CIEa parameter and total anthocyanin content highlights a lower degradation of monomeric anthocyanins during winemaking with Viniferm PDM yeast. The resulting wine retains a 34.5% of total anthocyanin content of pomegranate juice blend.

  7. Heterologous Expression of Amylase Gene from Saccharomycopsis fibuligera in an Industrial Strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zeng-ran; ZHANG Guang-yi; LONG Zhang-fu; LIU Shi-gui

    2005-01-01

    An α-amylase encoding gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction from Saccharomycopsis fibuligera and inserted into a shuttle vector YEp352,together with the yeast phosphoglycerate kinase 1 promoter and α-factor signal gene. The recombinant expression plasmid pLA8α was transformed into an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sc-11. The activity of the α-amylase produced by the transformant Sc-11-pLA8α was 6.3 U/mL and the starch utilization rate in YPS medium was 42 %. The purified amylase was analyzed by SDS-PAGE,showing a molecular weight of 55×103 protein band. Furthermore, the residual sugar, ethanol and some volatile compounds in the fermented worts under simulating brewing conditions were determined by chromatographic analyses. The fermentation characteristics of Sc-11-pLA8α were similar to that of Sc-11 and only minor changes in the concentration of flavor compounds could be observed.

  8. The level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity strongly influences xylose fermentation and inhibitor sensitivity in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppsson, M.; Johansson, B.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal;

    2003-01-01

    Disruption of the ZWF1 gene encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) has been shown to reduce the xylitol yield and the xylose consumption in the xylose-utilizing recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain TMB3255. In the present investigation we have studied the influence of different...... consumption, respectively, compared with the ZWF1-disrupted strain. Both strains exhibited decreased xylitol yields (0.13 and 0.19 g/g xylose) and enhanced ethanol yields (0.36 and 0.34 g/g xylose) compared with the control strain TMB3001 (0.29 g xylitol/g xylose, 0.31 g ethanol/g xylose). Cytoplasmic...... transhydrogenase (TH) from Azotobacter vinelandii has previously been shown to transfer NADPH and NAD(+) into NADP(+) and NADH, and TH-overproduction resulted in lower xylitol yield and enhanced glycerol yield during xylose utilization. Strains with low G6PDH-activity grew slower in a lignocellulose hydrolysate...

  9. Whole Genome Comparison Reveals High Levels of Inbreeding and Strain Redundancy Across the Spectrum of Commercial Wine Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R. Borneman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Humans have been consuming wines for more than 7000 yr . For most of this time, fermentations were presumably performed by strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that naturally found their way into the fermenting must . In contrast, most commercial wines are now produced by inoculation with pure yeast monocultures, ensuring consistent, reliable and reproducible fermentations, and there are now hundreds of these yeast starter cultures commercially available. In order to thoroughly investigate the genetic diversity that has been captured by over 50 yr of commercial wine yeast development and domestication, whole genome sequencing has been performed on 212 strains of S. cerevisiae, including 119 commercial wine and brewing starter strains, and wine isolates from across seven decades. Comparative genomic analysis indicates that, despite their large numbers, commercial strains, and wine strains in general, are extremely similar genetically, possessing all of the hallmarks of a population bottle-neck, and high levels of inbreeding. In addition, many commercial strains from multiple suppliers are nearly genetically identical, suggesting that the limits of effective genetic variation within this genetically narrow group may be approaching saturation.

  10. Whole Genome Comparison Reveals High Levels of Inbreeding and Strain Redundancy Across the Spectrum of Commercial Wine Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Anthony R; Forgan, Angus H; Kolouchova, Radka; Fraser, James A; Schmidt, Simon A

    2016-01-01

    Humans have been consuming wines for more than 7000 yr . For most of this time, fermentations were presumably performed by strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that naturally found their way into the fermenting must . In contrast, most commercial wines are now produced by inoculation with pure yeast monocultures, ensuring consistent, reliable and reproducible fermentations, and there are now hundreds of these yeast starter cultures commercially available. In order to thoroughly investigate the genetic diversity that has been captured by over 50 yr of commercial wine yeast development and domestication, whole genome sequencing has been performed on 212 strains of S. cerevisiae, including 119 commercial wine and brewing starter strains, and wine isolates from across seven decades. Comparative genomic analysis indicates that, despite their large numbers, commercial strains, and wine strains in general, are extremely similar genetically, possessing all of the hallmarks of a population bottle-neck, and high levels of inbreeding. In addition, many commercial strains from multiple suppliers are nearly genetically identical, suggesting that the limits of effective genetic variation within this genetically narrow group may be approaching saturation. PMID:26869621

  11. Whole Genome Comparison Reveals High Levels of Inbreeding and Strain Redundancy Across the Spectrum of Commercial Wine Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Anthony R.; Forgan, Angus H.; Kolouchova, Radka; Fraser, James A.; Schmidt, Simon A.

    2016-01-01

    Humans have been consuming wines for more than 7000 yr . For most of this time, fermentations were presumably performed by strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that naturally found their way into the fermenting must . In contrast, most commercial wines are now produced by inoculation with pure yeast monocultures, ensuring consistent, reliable and reproducible fermentations, and there are now hundreds of these yeast starter cultures commercially available. In order to thoroughly investigate the genetic diversity that has been captured by over 50 yr of commercial wine yeast development and domestication, whole genome sequencing has been performed on 212 strains of S. cerevisiae, including 119 commercial wine and brewing starter strains, and wine isolates from across seven decades. Comparative genomic analysis indicates that, despite their large numbers, commercial strains, and wine strains in general, are extremely similar genetically, possessing all of the hallmarks of a population bottle-neck, and high levels of inbreeding. In addition, many commercial strains from multiple suppliers are nearly genetically identical, suggesting that the limits of effective genetic variation within this genetically narrow group may be approaching saturation. PMID:26869621

  12. Increased resveratrol production in wines using engineered wine strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118 and relaxed antibiotic or auxotrophic selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Liang, Jing-Long; Kang, Lin-Zhi; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Jia-Jun; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Guo, Li-Qiong; Lin, Jun-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound with diverse beneficial effects on human health. Red wine is the major dietary source of resveratrol but the amount that people can obtain from wines is limited. To increase the resveratrol production in wines, two expression vectors carrying 4-coumarate: coenzyme A ligase gene (4CL) from Arabidopsis thaliana and resveratrol synthase gene (RS) from Vitis vinifera were transformed into industrial wine strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118. When cultured with 1 mM p-coumaric acid, the engineered strains grown with and without the addition of antibiotics produced 8.249 and 3.317 mg/L of trans-resveratrol in the culture broth, respectively. Resveratrol content of the wine fermented with engineered strains was twice higher than that of the control, indicating that our engineered strains could increase the production of resveratrol during wine fermentation.

  13. Engineering and two-stage evolution of a lignocellulosic hydrolysate-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for anaerobic fermentation of xylose from AFEX pretreated corn stover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas S Parreiras

    Full Text Available The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH. We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH.

  14. Engineering and two-stage evolution of a lignocellulosic hydrolysate-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for anaerobic fermentation of xylose from AFEX pretreated corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreiras, Lucas S; Breuer, Rebecca J; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; Higbee, Alan J; La Reau, Alex; Tremaine, Mary; Qin, Li; Willis, Laura B; Bice, Benjamin D; Bonfert, Brandi L; Pinhancos, Rebeca C; Balloon, Allison J; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Chenlin; Tanjore, Deepti; Ong, Irene M; Li, Haibo; Pohlmann, Edward L; Serate, Jose; Withers, Sydnor T; Simmons, Blake A; Hodge, David B; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Dale, Bruce E; Balan, Venkatesh; Keating, David H; Zhang, Yaoping; Landick, Robert; Gasch, Audrey P; Sato, Trey K

    2014-01-01

    The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH. PMID:25222864

  15. Engineering and Two-Stage Evolution of a Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate-Tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain for Anaerobic Fermentation of Xylose from AFEX Pretreated Corn Stover

    OpenAIRE

    Parreiras, Lucas S.; Rebecca J Breuer; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; Alan J Higbee; La Reau, Alex; Tremaine, Mary; Qin, Li; Willis, Laura B.; Bice, Benjamin D.; Bonfert, Brandi L.; Pinhancos, Rebeca C.; Balloon, Allison J.; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Chenlin

    2014-01-01

    The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules genera...

  16. Development of flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain GYK-10 for the selective fermentation of glucose/fructose in sugar mills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Taku; Ohara, Satoshi; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Sugimoto, Akira; Masuda, Takayuki; Yasuhara, Takaomi; Yamagishi, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    Advances in glucose/fructose-selective ethanol production have successfully enhanced raw sugar extraction from sugarcane juice by converting inhibitory substances (i.e., glucose/fructose) into ethanol, which is removed by subsequent operations in cane sugar mills. However, the commercial implementation of this breakthrough process in existing cane sugar mills requires a yeast strain that (i) can be used in food production processes, (ii) exhibits stable saccharometabolic selectivity, and (iii) can be easily separated from the saccharide solution. In this study, we developed a suitable saccharometabolism-selective and flocculent strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae GYK-10. We obtained a suitable yeast strain for selective fermentation in cane sugar mills using a yeast mating system. First, we crossed a haploid strain defective in sucrose utilization with a flocculent haploid strain. Next, we performed tetrad dissection of the resultant hybrid diploid strain and selected GYK-10 from various segregants by investigating the sucrose assimilation and flocculation capacity phenotypes. Ten consecutive fermentation tests of the GYK-10 strain using a bench-scale fermentor confirmed its suitability for the implementation of practical selective fermentation in a commercial sugar mill. The strain exhibited complete saccharometabolic selectivity and sustained flocculation, where it maintained a high ethanol yield and conversion rate throughout the test. PMID:26811219

  17. Increasing cell biomass in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases recombinant protein yield: the use of a respiratory strain as a microbial cell factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedfalk Kristina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant protein production is universally employed as a solution to obtain the milligram to gram quantities of a given protein required for applications as diverse as structural genomics and biopharmaceutical manufacture. Yeast is a well-established recombinant host cell for these purposes. In this study we wanted to investigate whether our respiratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, TM6*, could be used to enhance the productivity of recombinant proteins over that obtained from corresponding wild type, respiro-fermentative strains when cultured under the same laboratory conditions. Results Here we demonstrate at least a doubling in productivity over wild-type strains for three recombinant membrane proteins and one recombinant soluble protein produced in TM6* cells. In all cases, this was attributed to the improved biomass properties of the strain. The yield profile across the growth curve was also more stable than in a wild-type strain, and was not further improved by lowering culture temperatures. This has the added benefit that improved yields can be attained rapidly at the yeast's optimal growth conditions. Importantly, improved productivity could not be reproduced in wild-type strains by culturing them under glucose fed-batch conditions: despite having achieved very similar biomass yields to those achieved by TM6* cultures, the total volumetric yields were not concomitantly increased. Furthermore, the productivity of TM6* was unaffected by growing cultures in the presence of ethanol. These findings support the unique properties of TM6* as a microbial cell factory. Conclusions The accumulation of biomass in yeast cell factories is not necessarily correlated with a proportional increase in the functional yield of the recombinant protein being produced. The respiratory S. cerevisiae strain reported here is therefore a useful addition to the matrix of production hosts currently available as its improved biomass

  18. Genome Sequences of Industrially Relevant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain M3707, Isolated from a Sample of Distillers Yeast and Four Haploid Derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Courtney M.; Clum, Alicia; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Sharma, Aditi; Zane, Matthew; Barry, Kerrie; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Davison, Brian H.; Lynd, Lee R.; Gilna, Paul; Hau, Heidi; Hogsett, David A.; Froehlich, Allan C.

    2013-04-19

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain M3707 was isolated from a sample of commercial distillers yeast, and its genome sequence together with the genome sequences for the four derived haploid strains M3836, M3837, M3838, and M3839 has been determined. Yeasts have potential for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) for biofuel production, and access to these genome sequences will facilitate their development.

  19. Expression of the bacterial recA gene impairs genetic recombination and sporulation in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antonio de Morais Junior

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Escherichia coli RecA protein (RecAp has been demonstrated to induce mutagenesis in yeast cells, although there is still little information on the role of the RecAp in yeast recombination events. We evaluated spontaneous and induced general recombination in vegetative and meiotic cells of the XS2316 strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae bearing the recA gene. We found that RecAp decreased reciprocal recombination, gene conversion and intrachromosomal recombination and promoted an increase in error-prone processes in both vegetative and meiotic cells, while its negative effect on meiotic recombination blocked ascospore formation.

  20. High Level Ethanol from Sugar Cane Molasses by a New Thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain in Industrial Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Fadel, M.; Abeer A. Keera; Mouafi, Foukia E.; Tarek Kahil

    2013-01-01

    A new local strain of S. cerevisiae F-514, for ethanol production during hot summer season, using Egyptian sugar cane molasses was applied in Egyptian distillery factory. The inouluum was propagated through 300 L, 3 m3, and 12 m3 fermenters charged with diluted sugar cane molasses containing 4%-5% sugars. The yeast was applied in fermentation vessels 65 m3 working volume to study the varying concentrations of urea, DAP, orthophosphoric acid (OPA), and its combinations as well as magnesium sul...

  1. An efficient xylose-fermenting recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain obtained through adaptive evolution and its global transcription profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yu; Chen, Xiao; Peng, Bingyin; Chen, Liyuan; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China). State Key Lab. of Microbial Technology

    2012-11-15

    Factors related to ethanol production from xylose in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae that contain an exogenous initial metabolic pathway are still to be elucidated. In the present study, a strain that expresses the xylose isomerase gene of Piromyces sp. Pi-xylA and overexpresses XKS1, RPE1, RKI1, TAL1, and TKL1, with deleted GRE3 and COX4 genes was constructed. The xylose utilization capacity of the respiratory deficiency strain was poor but improved via adaptive evolution in xylose. The {mu}{sub max} of the evolved strain in 20 gl{sup -1} xylose is 0.11 {+-} 0.00 h{sup -1}, and the evolved strain consumed 17.83 gl{sup -1} xylose within 72 h, with an ethanol yield of 0.43 gg{sup -1} total consumed sugars during glucose-xylose cofermentation. Global transcriptional changes and effect of several specific genes were studied. The result revealed that the increased xylose isomerase activity, the upregulation of enzymes involved in glycolysis and glutamate synthesis, and the downregulation of trehalose and glycogen synthesis, may have contributed to the improved xylose utilization of the strain. Furthermore, the deletion of PHO13 decreased the xylose growth in the respiration deficiency strain although deleting PHO13 can improve the xylose metabolism in other strains. (orig.)

  2. The effect of hexose ratios on metabolite production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains obtained from the spontaneous fermentation of mezcal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva Hernández, Amanda A; Taillandier, Patricia; Reséndez Pérez, Diana; Narváez Zapata, José A; Larralde Corona, Claudia Patricia

    2013-04-01

    Mezcal from Tamaulipas (México) is produced by spontaneous alcoholic fermentation using Agave spp. musts, which are rich in fructose. In this study eight Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates obtained at the final stage of fermentation from a traditional mezcal winery were analysed in three semi-synthetic media. Medium M1 had a sugar content of 100 g l(-1) and a glucose/fructose (G/F) of 9:1. Medium M2 had a sugar content of 100 g l(-1) and a G/F of 1:9. Medium M3 had a sugar content of 200 g l(-1) and a G/F of 1:1. In the three types of media tested, the highest ethanol yield was obtained from the glucophilic strain LCBG-3Y5, while strain LCBG-3Y8 was highly resistant to ethanol and the most fructophilic of the mezcal strains. Strain LCBG-3Y5 produced more glycerol (4.4 g l(-1)) and acetic acid (1 g l(-1)) in M2 than in M1 (1.7 and 0.5 g l(-1), respectively), and the ethanol yields were higher for all strains in M1 except for LCBG-3Y5, -3Y8 and the Fermichamp strain. In medium M3, only the Fermichamp strain was able to fully consume the 100 g of fructose l(-1) but left a residual 32 g of glucose l(-1). Regarding the hexose transporters, a high number of amino acid polymorphisms were found in the Hxt1p sequences. Strain LCBG-3Y8 exhibited eight unique amino acid changes, followed by the Fermichamp strain with three changes. In Hxt3p, we observed nine amino acid polymorphisms unique for the Fermichamp strain and five unique changes for the mezcal strains.

  3. Construction of recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with bglS gene insertion into PEP4 locus by homologous recombination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang ZHANG; Qi-he CHEN; Ming-liang FU; Jin-ling WANG; Hong-bo ZHANG; Guo-qing HE

    2008-01-01

    The bglS gene encoding endo-1,3-1,4-β-glucanase from Bacillus subtilis was cloned and sequenced in this study. The bglS expression cassette, including PGK1 promoter, bglS gene fused to the signal sequence of the yeast mating pheromone α-factor (MFals), and ADH1 terminator with G418-resistance as the selected marker, was constructed. Then one of the PEP4 allele of Saccharomyces cerevisiae WZ65 strain was replaced by bglS expression cassette using chromosomal integration of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated homologous recombination, and the bglS gene was expressed simultaneously. The recombinant strain S. cerevisiae (SC-βG) was preliminarily screened by the clearing hydrolysis zone formed after the barley β-glucan was hydrolyzed in the plate and no proteinase A (PrA) activity was measured in fermenting liquor. The results of PCR analysis ofgenome DNA showed that one of the PEP4 allele had been replaced and bglS gene had been inserted into the locus of PEP4 gene in recombinant strains. Different endo-1,3-1,4-β-glucanase assay methods showed that the recombinant strain SC-βG had high endo-1,3-1,4-β-glucanase expression level with the maximum of 69.3 U/(h-ml) after 60 h of incubation. Meanwhile, the Congo Red method was suitable for the determination of endo-1,3-1,4-β-glucanase activity during the actual brewing process. The current research implies that the constructed yeast strain could be utilized to improve the industrial brewing property of beer.

  4. Anaplerotic Role for Cytosolic Malic Enzyme in Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, R.M.; Harrison, J.C.; Pronk, J.T.; Van Maris, A.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Malic enzyme catalyzes the reversible oxidative decarboxylation of malate to pyruvate and CO2. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MAE1 gene encodes a mitochondrial malic enzyme whose proposed physiological roles are related to the oxidative, malate-decarboxylating reaction. Hitherto, the inability of pyru

  5. Comparative study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains to identify potential marker genes correlated to desiccation stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Angela; Votta, Sonia; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zambuto, Marianna; Romaniello, Rossana; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-05-01

    The most diffused formulation of starter for winemaking is active dry yeast (ADY). ADYs production process is essentially characterized by air-drying stress, a combination of several stresses, including thermal, hyperosmotic and oxidative and cell capacity to counteract such multiple stresses will determine its survival. The molecular mechanisms underlying cell stress response to desiccation have been mostly studied in laboratory and commercial yeast strains, but a growing interest is currently developing for indigenous yeast strains which represent a valuable and alternative source of genetic and molecular biodiversity to be exploited. In this work, a comparative study of different Saccharomyces cerevisiae indigenous wine strains, previously selected for their technological traits, has been carried out to identify potentially relevant genes involved in desiccation stress tolerance. Cell viability was evaluated along desiccation treatment and gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR before and during the stress. Our data show that the observed differences in individual strain sensitivity to desiccation stress could be associated to specific gene expression over time. In particular, either the basal or the stress-induced mRNA levels of certain genes, such as HSP12, SSA3, TPS1, TPS2, CTT1 and SOD1, result tightly correlated to the strain survival advantage. This study provides a reliable and sensitive method to predict desiccation stress tolerance of indigenous wine yeast strains which could be preliminary to biotechnological applications. PMID:26882930

  6. Efficient Bioethanol Production by a Recombinant Flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain with a Genome-Integrated NADP+-Dependent Xylitol Dehydrogenase Gene▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Seiya; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Makino, Keisuke; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2009-01-01

    The recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain MA-R5 was engineered to express NADP+-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase using the flocculent yeast strain IR-2, which has high xylulose-fermenting ability, and both xylose consumption and ethanol production remarkably increased. Furthermore, the MA-R5 strain produced the highest ethanol yield (0.48 g/g) from nonsulfuric acid hydrolysate of wood chips. PMID:19329659

  7. Nuclear and mitochondrial genome instability induced by senna (Cassia angustifolia Vahl.) aqueous extract in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C R; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A; Leitão, A C; Pádula, M

    2014-11-27

    Cassia angustifolia Vahl. (senna) is commonly used in self-medication and is frequently used to treat intestine constipation. A previous study involving bacteria and plasmid DNA suggested the possible toxicity of the aqueous extract of senna (SAE). The aim of this study was to extend the knowledge concerning SAE genotoxicity mechanisms because of its widespread use and its risks to human health. We investigated the impact of SAE on nuclear DNA and on the stability of mitochondrial DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (wt, ogg1, msh6, and ogg1msh6) strains, monitoring the formation of petite mutants. Our results demonstrated that SAE specifically increased Can(R) mutagenesis only in the msh6 mutant, supporting the view that SAE can induce misincorporation errors in DNA. We observed a significant increase in the frequency of petite colonies in all studied strains. Our data indicate that SAE has genotoxic activity towards both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

  8. Disruption of seven hypothetical aryl alcohol dehydrogenase genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and construction of a multiple knock-out strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delneri, D; Gardner, D C; Bruschi, C V; Oliver, S G

    1999-11-01

    By in silicio analysis, we have discovered that there are seven open reading frames (ORFs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae whose protein products show a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity to the aryl alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) of the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Yeast cultures grown to stationary phase display a significant aryl alcohol dehydrogenase activity by degrading aromatic aldehydes to the corresponding alcohols. To study the biochemical and the biological role of each of the AAD genes, a series of mutant strains carrying deletion of one or more of the AAD-coding sequences was constructed by PCR-mediated gene replacement, using the readily selectable marker kanMX. The correct targeting of the PCR-generated disruption cassette into the genomic locus was verified by analytical PCR and by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) followed by Southern blot analysis. Double, triple and quadruple mutant strains were obtained by classical genetic methods, while the construction of the quintuple, sextuple and septuple mutants was achieved by using the marker URA3 from Kluyveromyces lactis, HIS3 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and TRP1 from S. cerevisiae. None of the knock-out strains revealed any mutant phenotype when tested for the degradation of aromatic aldehydes using both spectrophotometry and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Specific tests for changes in the ergosterol and phospholipids profiles did not reveal any mutant phenotype and mating and sporulation efficiencies were not affected in the septuple deletant. Compared to the wild-type strain, the septuple deletant showed an increased resistance to the anisaldehyde, but there is a possibility that the nutritional markers used for gene replacement are causing this effect.

  9. Zearalenone and Its Derivatives α-Zearalenol and β-Zearalenol Decontamination by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Isolated from Bovine Forage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Luiz; Abrunhosa, Luís; Keller, Kelly; Rosa, Carlos Alberto; Cavaglieri, Lilia; Venâncio, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) and its derivatives are mycotoxins with estrogenic effects on mammals. The biotransformation for ZEA in animals involves the formation of two major metabolites, α- and β-zearalenol (α-ZOL and β-ZOL), which are subsequently conjugated with glucuronic acid. The capability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from silage to eliminate ZEA and its derivatives α-ZOL and β-ZOL was investigated as, also, the mechanisms involved. Strains were grown on Yeast Extract-Peptone-Dextrose medium supplemented with the mycotoxins and their elimination from medium was quantified over time by HPLC-FL. A significant effect on the concentration of ZEA was observed, as all the tested strains were able to eliminate more than 90% of the mycotoxin from the culture medium in two days. The observed elimination was mainly due to ZEA biotransformation into β-ZOL (53%) and α-ZOL (8%) rather than to its adsorption to yeast cells walls. Further, the biotransformation of α-ZOL was not observed but a small amount of β-ZOL (6%) disappeared from culture medium. ZEA biotransformation by yeasts may not be regarded as a full detoxification process because both main end-products are still estrogenic. Nonetheless, it was observed that the biotransformation favors the formation of β-ZOL which is less estrogenic than ZEA and α-ZOL. This metabolic effect is only possible if active strains are used as feed additives and may play a role in the detoxification performance of products with viable S. cerevisiae cells. PMID:26308051

  10. Zearalenone and Its Derivatives α-Zearalenol and β-Zearalenol Decontamination by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Isolated from Bovine Forage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Keller

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Zearalenone (ZEA and its derivatives are mycotoxins with estrogenic effects on mammals. The biotransformation for ZEA in animals involves the formation of two major metabolites, α- and β-zearalenol (α-ZOL and β-ZOL, which are subsequently conjugated with glucuronic acid. The capability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from silage to eliminate ZEA and its derivatives α-ZOL and β-ZOL was investigated as, also, the mechanisms involved. Strains were grown on Yeast Extract-Peptone-Dextrose medium supplemented with the mycotoxins and their elimination from medium was quantified over time by HPLC-FL. A significant effect on the concentration of ZEA was observed, as all the tested strains were able to eliminate more than 90% of the mycotoxin from the culture medium in two days. The observed elimination was mainly due to ZEA biotransformation into β-ZOL (53% and α-ZOL (8% rather than to its adsorption to yeast cells walls. Further, the biotransformation of α-ZOL was not observed but a small amount of β-ZOL (6% disappeared from culture medium. ZEA biotransformation by yeasts may not be regarded as a full detoxification process because both main end-products are still estrogenic. Nonetheless, it was observed that the biotransformation favors the formation of β-ZOL which is less estrogenic than ZEA and α-ZOL. This metabolic effect is only possible if active strains are used as feed additives and may play a role in the detoxification performance of products with viable S. cerevisiae cells.

  11. Differing effects of 2 active dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strains on ruminal acidosis and methane production in nonlactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Y-H; Walker, N D; McGinn, S M; Beauchemin, K A

    2011-05-01

    Fifteen ruminally cannulated, nonlactating Holstein cows were used to measure the effects of 2 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fed as active dried yeasts, on ruminal pH and fermentation and enteric methane (CH(4)) emissions. Nonlactating cows were blocked by total duration (h) that their ruminal pH was below 5.8 during a 6-d pre-experimental period. Within each block, cows were randomly assigned to control (no yeast), yeast strain 1 (Levucell SC), or yeast strain 2 (a novel strain selected for enhanced in vitro fiber degradation), with both strains (Lallemand Animal Nutrition, Montréal, QC, Canada) providing 1 × 10(10) cfu/head per day. Cows were fed once daily a total mixed ration consisting of a 50:50 forage to concentrate ratio (dry matter basis). The yeast strains were dosed via the rumen cannula daily at the time of feeding. During the 35-d experiment, ruminal pH was measured continuously for 7 d (d 22 to 28) by using an indwelling system, and CH(4) gas was measured for 4 d (d 32 to 35) using the sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas technique (with halters and yokes). Rumen contents were sampled on 2 d (d 22 and 26) at 0, 3, and 6h after feeding. Dry matter intake, body weight, and apparent total-tract digestibility of nutrients were not affected by yeast feeding. Strain 2 decreased the average daily minimum (5.35 vs. 5.65 or 5.66), mean (5.98 vs. 6.24 or 6.34), and maximum ruminal pH (6.71 vs. 6.86 or 6.86), and prolonged the time that ruminal pH was below 5.8 (7.5 vs. 3.3 or 1.0 h/d) compared with the control or strain 1, respectively. The molar percentage of acetate was lower and that of propionate was greater in the ruminal fluid of cows receiving strain 2 compared with cows receiving no yeast or strain 1. Enteric CH(4) production adjusted for intake of dry matter or gross energy, however, did not differ between either yeast strain compared with the control but it tended to be reduced by 10% when strain 2 was compared with strain 1. The study shows that

  12. Vanadium pentoxide effects on stress responses in wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UE-ME3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Tânia; Conim, Ana; Alves-Pereira, Isabel; Ferreira, Rui

    2009-11-01

    Vanadium pentoxide mainly used as catalyst in sulphuric acid, maleic anhydride and ceramics industry, is a pollutant watering redistributed around the environment. Research on biological influence of vanadium pentoxide has gained major importance because it exerts toxic effects on a wide variety of biological systems. In this work we intent to evaluate the effects of vanadium pentoxide ranging from 0 to 2 mM in culture media on a wine wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae from Alentejo region of Portugal. Our results show that 2.0 mM vanadium pentoxide in culture medium induced a significant increase of malonaldehyde level and Glutathione peroxidase activity, a slightly increase of Catalase A activity as well as a decrease of wet weight and mitochondrial NADH cit c reductase of S. cerevisiae UE-ME(3). Also our results show that cycloheximide prevent cell death when cells grows 30 min in presence of 1.5 mM of vanadium pentoxide.

  13. Production of Volatile and Sulfur Compounds by 10 Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Inoculated in Trebbiano Must

    OpenAIRE

    Patrignani, Francesca; Chinnici, Fabio; Serrazanetti, Diana I.; Vernocchi, Pamela; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Riponi, Claudio; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    In wines, the presence of sulfur compounds is the resulting of several contributions among which yeast metabolism. The characterization of the starter Saccharomyces cerevisiae needs to be performed also taking into account this ability even if evaluated together with the overall metabolic profile. In this perspective, principal aim of this experimental research was the evaluation of the volatile profiles, throughout GC/MS technique coupled with solid phase micro extraction, of wines obtained ...

  14. Transcriptomes of a xylose-utilizing industrial flocculating Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain cultured in media containing different sugar sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei-Yi; Tang, Yue-Qin; Gou, Min; Xia, Zi-Yuan; Kida, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Lignocellulosic hydrolysates used for bioethanol production contain a mixture of sugars, with xylose being the second most abundant after glucose. Since xylose is not a natural substrate for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, recombinant S. cerevisiae strongly prefers glucose over xylose, and the fermentation rate and ethanol yield with xylose are both lower than those with glucose. To determine the molecular basis for glucose and xylose fermentation, we used microarrays to investigate the transcriptional difference of a xylose-utilizing industrial strain cultured in both single sugar media and a mixed sugar medium of glucose and xylose. The transcriptomes were nearly identical between glucose metabolizing cells in the glucose alone medium and those in the glucose fermentation phase in the mixed-sugar medium. Whereas the transcriptomes highly differed between the xylose metabolizing cells in the xylose alone medium and those in the xylose fermentation phase in the mixed sugar medium, and the differences mainly involved sulfur metabolism. When the transcriptional profiles were compared between glucose fermentation state and xylose fermentation state, we found the expression patterns of hexose transporters and glucose signaling pathway differed in response to different sugar sources, and the expression levels of the genes involved in gluconeogenesis, the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic acid cycles and respiration increased with xylose, indicating that the xylose-metabolizing cells had high requirements for maintenance energy and lacked the carbon catabolite repression capability. The effect of carbon catabolite repression by glucose lasted after glucose depletion for specific genes to different extents.

  15. Transcriptomes of a xylose-utilizing industrial flocculating Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain cultured in media containing different sugar sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei-Yi; Tang, Yue-Qin; Gou, Min; Xia, Zi-Yuan; Kida, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Lignocellulosic hydrolysates used for bioethanol production contain a mixture of sugars, with xylose being the second most abundant after glucose. Since xylose is not a natural substrate for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, recombinant S. cerevisiae strongly prefers glucose over xylose, and the fermentation rate and ethanol yield with xylose are both lower than those with glucose. To determine the molecular basis for glucose and xylose fermentation, we used microarrays to investigate the transcriptional difference of a xylose-utilizing industrial strain cultured in both single sugar media and a mixed sugar medium of glucose and xylose. The transcriptomes were nearly identical between glucose metabolizing cells in the glucose alone medium and those in the glucose fermentation phase in the mixed-sugar medium. Whereas the transcriptomes highly differed between the xylose metabolizing cells in the xylose alone medium and those in the xylose fermentation phase in the mixed sugar medium, and the differences mainly involved sulfur metabolism. When the transcriptional profiles were compared between glucose fermentation state and xylose fermentation state, we found the expression patterns of hexose transporters and glucose signaling pathway differed in response to different sugar sources, and the expression levels of the genes involved in gluconeogenesis, the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic acid cycles and respiration increased with xylose, indicating that the xylose-metabolizing cells had high requirements for maintenance energy and lacked the carbon catabolite repression capability. The effect of carbon catabolite repression by glucose lasted after glucose depletion for specific genes to different extents. PMID:27485516

  16. Improving the productivity of S-adenosyl-l-methionine by metabolic engineering in an industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weijun; Hang, Baojian; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Wang, Ri; Shen, Minjie; Huang, Lei; Xu, Zhinan

    2016-10-20

    S-Adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) is an important metabolite having prominent roles in treating various diseases. In order to improve the production of SAM, the regulation of three metabolic pathways involved in SAM biosynthesis were investigated in an industrial yeast strain ZJU001. GLC3 encoded glycogen-branching enzyme (GBE), SPE2 encoded SAM decarboxylase, as well as ERG4 and ERG6 encoded key enzymes in ergosterol biosynthesis, were knocked out in ZJU001 accordingly. The results indicated that blocking of either glycogen pathway or SAM decarboxylation pathway could improve the SAM accumulation significantly in ZJU001, while single disruption of either ERG4 or ERG6 gene had no obvious effect on SAM production. Moreover, the double mutant ZJU001-GS with deletion of both GLC3 and SPE2 genes was also constructed, which showed further improvement of SAM accumulation. Finally, SAM2 was overexpressed in ZJU001-GS to give the best SAM-producing recombinant strain ZJU001-GS-SAM2, in which 12.47g/L SAM was produced by following our developed pseudo-exponential fed-batch cultivation strategy, about 81.0% increase comparing to its parent strain ZJU001. The present work laid a solid base for large-scale SAM production with the industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

  17. Genetic engineering of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains using a selection/counter-selection approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyna, Dariusz R; Cordente, Antonio G; Varela, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Gene modification of laboratory yeast strains is currently a very straightforward task thanks to the availability of the entire yeast genome sequence and the high frequency with which yeast can incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome. Unfortunately, laboratory strains do not perform well in industrial settings, indicating the need for strategies to modify industrial strains to enable strain development for industrial applications. Here we describe approaches we have used to genetically modify industrial strains used in winemaking.

  18. Growth of catalase A and catalase T deficient mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ethanol and oleic acid : Growth profiles and catalase activities in relation to microbody proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, Ida J. van der; Rytka, Joanna; Kunau, Wolf H.; Veenhuis, Marten

    1990-01-01

    The parental strain (A+T+) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mutants, deficient in catalase T (A+T-), catalase A (A-T+) or both catalases (A-T-), grew on ethanol and oleic acid with comparable doubling times. Specific activities of catalase were low in glucose- and ethanol-grown cells. In the two olei

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCMI 885 secretes peptides that inhibit the growth of some non-Saccharomyces wine-related strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albergaria, Helena; Francisco, Diana; Gori, Klaus;

    2010-01-01

    The nature of the toxic compounds produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCMI 885 that induce the earlydeath of Hanseniaspora guilliermondii during mixed fermentations, as well as their ability to inhibit the growth of other non-Saccharomyces wine-related strains, was investigated. The killing effe...

  20. [Effect of radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation on physiological features of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UCM Y-517].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voĭchuk, S I; Podgorskiĭ, V S; Gromozova, E N

    2004-01-01

    Effect of electromagnetic radiation (40.68 MHz) on growth characteristics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UCM Y-517 has been studied. Reliable increase of the specific growth rate (by 7-15%) and change of duration of growth phases as a result of irradiation of yeast population has been shown. The EMR effect has been found to depend on physiological state of the irradiated cells and composition of the irradiation performance medium: reliable effects were found only for the cells preliminarily grown on the dense nutrition medium in the late phase of delayed growth or on achieving the stationary growth phase. The role of radiation term and power as well as of temperature factor in EMR effect on the cells is discussed. It has been noted that the dependence of specific growth rate of yeast on the initial density of cells population acquire the nonlinear character as affected by EMR of radiofrequency range.

  1. Mitotic chromosome loss in a radiation-sensitive strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortimer, R.K.; Contopoulou, R.; Schild, D.

    1981-09-01

    Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with mutations in the RAD52 gene have previously been shown to be defective in meiotic and mitotic recombination, in sporulation, and in repair of radiation-induced damage to DNA. In this study we show that diploid cells homozygous for rad52 lose chromosomes at high frequencies and that these frequencies of loss can be increased dramatically by exposure of these cells to x-rays. Genetic analyses of survivors of x-ray treatment demonstrate that chromosome loss events result in the conversion of diploid cells to cells with near haploid chromosome numbers.

  2. Xylose and xylose/glucose co-fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing individual hexose transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Davi L; Matsushika, Akinori; de Sales, Belisa B; Goshima, Tetsuya; Bon, Elba P S; Stambuk, Boris U

    2014-09-01

    Since the uptake of xylose is believed to be one of the rate-limiting steps for xylose ethanol fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, we transformed a hxt-null strain lacking the major hexose transporters (hxt1Δ-hxt7Δ and gal2Δ) with an integrative plasmid to overexpress the genes for xylose reductase (XYL1), xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2) and xylulokinase (XKS1), and analyzed the impact that overexpression of the HXT1, HXT2, HXT5 or HXT7 permeases have in anaerobic batch fermentations using xylose, glucose, or xylose plus glucose as carbon sources. Our results revealed that the low-affinity HXT1 permease allowed the maximal consumption of sugars and ethanol production rates during xylose/glucose co-fermentations, but was incapable to allow xylose uptake when this sugar was the only carbon source. The moderately high-affinity HXT5 permease was a poor glucose transporter, and it also did not allow significant xylose uptake by the cells. The moderately high-affinity HXT2 permease allowed xylose uptake with the same rates as those observed during glucose consumption, even under co-fermentation conditions, but had the drawback of producing incomplete fermentations. Finally, the high-affinity HXT7 permease allowed efficient xylose fermentation, but during xylose/glucose co-fermentations this permease showed a clear preference for glucose. Thus, our results indicate that approaches to engineer S. cerevisiae HXT transporters to improve second generation bioethanol production need to consider the composition of the biomass sugar syrup, whereby the HXT1 transporter seems more suitable for hydrolysates containing xylose/glucose blends, whereas the HXT7 permease would be a better choice for xylose-enriched sugar streams.

  3. High Level Ethanol from Sugar Cane Molasses by a New Thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain in Industrial Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, M; Keera, Abeer A; Mouafi, Foukia E; Kahil, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    A new local strain of S. cerevisiae F-514, for ethanol production during hot summer season, using Egyptian sugar cane molasses was applied in Egyptian distillery factory. The inouluum was propagated through 300 L, 3 m(3), and 12 m(3) fermenters charged with diluted sugar cane molasses containing 4%-5% sugars. The yeast was applied in fermentation vessels 65 m(3) working volume to study the varying concentrations of urea, DAP, orthophosphoric acid (OPA), and its combinations as well as magnesium sulfate and inoculum size. The fermenter was allowed to stay for a period of 20 hours to give time for maximum conversion of sugars into ethanol. S. cerevisiae F-514 at molasses sugar level of 18% (w/v), inoculum size of 20% (v/v) cell concentration of 3.0 × 10(8)/mL, and combinations of urea, diammonium phosphate (DAP), orthophosphoric acid (OPA), and magnesium sulfate at amounts of 20, 10, 5, and 10 kg/65 m(3) working volume fermenters, respectively, supported maximum ethanol production (9.8%, v/v), fermentation efficiency (FE) 88.1%, and remaining sugars (RS) 1.22%. The fermentation resulted 13.4 g dry yeast/L contained 34.6% crude protein and 8.2% ash. By selecting higher ethanol yielding yeast strain and optimizing, the fermentation parameters both yield and economics of the fermentation process can be improved. PMID:24363937

  4. Growth of catalase A and catalase T deficient mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ethanol and oleic acid: Growth profiles and catalase activities in relation to microbody proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    van der Klei, Ida J.; Rytka, Joanna; Kunau, Wolf H.; Veenhuis, Marten

    1990-01-01

    The parental strain (A+T+) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mutants, deficient in catalase T (A+T-), catalase A (A-T+) or both catalases (A-T-), grew on ethanol and oleic acid with comparable doubling times. Specific activities of catalase were low in glucose- and ethanol-grown cells. In the two oleic acid-grown A+-strains (A+T+ and A+T-) high catalase activities were found; catalase activity invariably remained low in the A-T+ strain and was never detected in the A-T- strain. The levels of β-...

  5. A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae evolved for fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass displays improved growth and fermentative ability in high solids concentrations and in the presence of inhibitory compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkins Gary M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Softwoods are the dominant source of lignocellulosic biomass in the northern hemisphere, and have been investigated worldwide as a renewable substrate for cellulosic ethanol production. One challenge to using softwoods, which is particularly acute with pine, is that the pretreatment process produces inhibitory compounds detrimental to the growth and metabolic activity of fermenting organisms. To overcome the challenge of bioconversion in the presence of inhibitory compounds, especially at high solids loading, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was subjected to evolutionary engineering and adaptation for fermentation of pretreated pine wood (Pinus taeda. Results An industrial strain of Saccharomyces, XR122N, was evolved using pretreated pine; the resulting daughter strain, AJP50, produced ethanol much more rapidly than its parent in fermentations of pretreated pine. Adaptation, by preculturing of the industrial yeast XR122N and the evolved strains in 7% dry weight per volume (w/v pretreated pine solids prior to inoculation into higher solids concentrations, improved fermentation performance of all strains compared with direct inoculation into high solids. Growth comparisons between XR122N and AJP50 in model hydrolysate media containing inhibitory compounds found in pretreated biomass showed that AJP50 exited lag phase faster under all conditions tested. This was due, in part, to the ability of AJP50 to rapidly convert furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural to their less toxic alcohol derivatives, and to recover from reactive oxygen species damage more quickly than XR122N. Under industrially relevant conditions of 17.5% w/v pretreated pine solids loading, additional evolutionary engineering was required to decrease the pronounced lag phase. Using a combination of adaptation by inoculation first into a solids loading of 7% w/v for 24 hours, followed by a 10% v/v inoculum (approximately equivalent to 1 g/L dry cell weight into 17

  6. Performance of the auxotrophic Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 as host for the production of IL-1β in aerated fed-batch reactor: role of ACA supplementation, strain viability, and maintenance energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zueco Jesus

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 is an auxotrophic commonly used strain. In this work it has been used as host for the expression and secretion of human interleukin-1β (IL1β, using the cell wall protein Pir4 as fusion partner. To achieve high cell density and, consequently, high product yield, BY4741 [PIR4-IL1β] was cultured in an aerated fed-batch reactor, using a defined mineral medium supplemented with casamino acids as ACA (auxotrophy-complementing amino acid source. Also the S. cerevisiae mutant BY4741 Δyca1 [PIR4-IL1β], carrying the deletion of the YCA1 gene coding for a caspase-like protein involved in the apoptotic response, was cultured in aerated fed-batch reactor and compared to the parental strain, to test the effect of this mutation on strain robustness. Viability of the producer strains was examined during the runs and a mathematical model, which took into consideration the viable biomass present in the reactor and the glucose consumption for both growth and maintenance, was developed to describe and explain the time-course evolution of the process for both, the BY4741 parental and the BY4741 Δyca1 mutant strain. Results Our results show that the concentrations of ACA in the feeding solution, corresponding to those routinely used in the literature, are limiting for the growth of S. cerevisiae BY4741 [PIR4-IL1β] in fed-batch reactor. Even in the presence of a proper ACA supplementation, S. cerevisiae BY4741 [PIR4-IL1β] did not achieve a high cell density. The Δyca1 deletion did not have a beneficial effect on the overall performance of the strain, but it had a clear effect on its viability, which was not impaired during fed-batch operations, as shown by the kd value (0.0045 h-1, negligible if compared to that of the parental strain (0.028 h-1. However, independently of their robustness, both the parental and the Δyca1 mutant ceased to grow early during fed-batch runs, both strains using most of the

  7. Novel starters for old processes: use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdough for craft beer production at a brewery scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marongiu, Antonella; Zara, Giacomo; Legras, Jean-Luc; Del Caro, Alessandra; Mascia, Ilaria; Fadda, Costantino; Budroni, Marilena

    2015-01-01

    The deliberate inoculation of yeast strains isolated from food matrices such as wine or bread, could allow the transfer of novel properties to beer. In this work, the feasibility of the use of baker's yeast strains as starters for craft beer production has been evaluated at laboratory and brewery scale. Nine out of 12 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdoughs metabolized 2 % maltose, glucose and trehalose and showed growth rates and cell populations higher than those of the brewer's strain Safbrew-S33. Analysis of allelic variation at 12 microsatellite loci clustered seven baker's strains and Safbrew-S33 in the main group of bread isolates. Chemical analyses of beers produced at a brewery scale showed significant differences among the beers produced with the baker's strain S38 or Safbrew-S33, while no significant differences were observed when S38 or the brewer's strain Safbrew-F2 was used for re-fermentation. The sensory profile of beers obtained with S38 or the brewer's yeasts did not show significant differences, thus suggesting that baker's strains of S. cerevisiae could represent a reservoir of biodiversity for the selection of starter strains for craft beer production. PMID:25387611

  8. Whole Genome Analysis of 132 Clinical Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Reveals Extensive Ploidy Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuan O.; Sherlock, Gavin; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2016-01-01

    Budding yeast has undergone several independent transitions from commercial to clinical lifestyles. The frequency of such transitions suggests that clinical yeast strains are derived from environmentally available yeast populations, including commercial sources. However, despite their important role in adaptive evolution, the prevalence of polyploidy and aneuploidy has not been extensively analyzed in clinical strains. In this study, we have looked for patterns governing the transition to clinical invasion in the largest screen of clinical yeast isolates to date. In particular, we have focused on the hypothesis that ploidy changes have influenced adaptive processes. We sequenced 144 yeast strains, 132 of which are clinical isolates. We found pervasive large-scale genomic variation in both overall ploidy (34% of strains identified as 3n/4n) and individual chromosomal copy numbers (36% of strains identified as aneuploid). We also found evidence for the highly dynamic nature of yeast genomes, with 35 strains showing partial chromosomal copy number changes and eight strains showing multiple independent chromosomal events. Intriguingly, a lineage identified to be baker’s/commercial derived with a unique damaging mutation in NDC80 was particularly prone to polyploidy, with 83% of its members being triploid or tetraploid. Polyploidy was in turn associated with a >2× increase in aneuploidy rates as compared to other lineages. This dataset provides a rich source of information on the genomics of clinical yeast strains and highlights the potential importance of large-scale genomic copy variation in yeast adaptation. PMID:27317778

  9. Using mixed inocula of Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer strains to improve the quality of traditional sparkling-wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Rocío; Zamora, Emiliano; Álvarez, Manuel; Álvarez, María L; Ramírez, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    The quality of traditional sparkling-wine depends on the aging process in the presence of dead yeast cells. These cells undergo a slow autolysis process thereby releasing some compounds, mostly colloidal polymers such as polysaccharides and mannoproteins, which influence the wine's foam properties and mouthfeel. Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer yeasts were tested to increase cell death and autolysis during mixed-yeast-inoculated second fermentation and aging. These yeasts killed sensitive strains in killer plate assays done under conditions of low pH and temperature similar to those used in sparkling-wine making, although some strains showed a different killer behaviour during the second fermentation. The fast killer effect improved the foam quality and mouthfeel of the mixed-inoculated wines, while the slow killer effect gave small improvements over single-inoculated wines. The effect was faster under high-pressure than under low-pressure conditions. Wine quality improvement did not correlate with the polysaccharide, protein, mannan, or aromatic compound concentrations, suggesting that the mouthfeel and foaming quality of sparkling wine are very complex properties influenced by other wine compounds and their interactions, as well as probably by the specific chemical composition of a given wine. PMID:27375256

  10. Evaluation of different Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains on the profile of volatile compounds and polyphenols in cherry wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shu Yang; Jiang, Wen Guang; Zhao, Yu Ping

    2011-07-15

    Tart cherries of 'Early Richmond', widely grown in Shandong (China), were fermented with six different Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (BM4×4, RA17, RC212, D254, D21 and GRE) to elucidate their influence on the production of volatiles and polyphenols. Acetic acid and 3-methylbutanol were found in the highest concentrations among all identified volatiles with all six yeast strains, followed by 2-methylpropanol and ethyl lactate. RA17 and GRE cherry wines were characterised by a higher amount of esters and acids. D254 wine contained a higher concentration of alcohols. With respect to polyphenols, five phenolic acids and four anthocyanins were identified among all tested samples, with chlorogenic and neochlorogenic acids, cyanidin 3-glucosylrutinoside and cyanidin 3-rutinoside being the major compounds. When using principal component analysis to classify the cherry wines according to the volatiles and polyphenols, they were divided into three groups: (1) RA17 and GRE, (2) RC212 and D254 and (3) BM4×4 and D21. PMID:23140699

  11. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals similarities and dissimilarities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains response to nitrogen availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Barbosa

    Full Text Available Nitrogen levels in grape-juices are of major importance in winemaking ensuring adequate yeast growth and fermentation performance. Here we used a comparative transcriptome analysis to uncover wine yeasts responses to nitrogen availability during fermentation. Gene expression was assessed in three genetically and phenotypically divergent commercial wine strains (CEG, VL1 and QA23, under low (67 mg/L and high nitrogen (670 mg/L regimes, at three time points during fermentation (12 h, 24 h and 96 h. Two-way ANOVA analysis of each fermentation condition led to the identification of genes whose expression was dependent on strain, fermentation stage and on the interaction of both factors. The high fermenter yeast strain QA23 was more clearly distinct from the other two strains, by differential expression of genes involved in flocculation, mitochondrial functions, energy generation and protein folding and stabilization. For all strains, higher transcriptional variability due to fermentation stage was seen in the high nitrogen fermentations. A positive correlation between maximum fermentation rate and the expression of genes involved in stress response was observed. The finding of common genes correlated with both fermentation activity and nitrogen up-take underlies the role of nitrogen on yeast fermentative fitness. The comparative analysis of genes differentially expressed between both fermentation conditions at 12 h, where the main difference was the level of nitrogen available, showed the highest variability amongst strains revealing strain-specific responses. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a small set of genes whose expression profiles can quantitatively assess the common response of the yeast strains to varying nitrogen conditions. The use of three contrasting yeast strains in gene expression analysis prompts the identification of more reliable, accurate and reproducible biomarkers that will facilitate the diagnosis of deficiency of this

  12. Study on the development of high yielding alcohol resistant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the Influence of Magnetic field on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Inoculum for the production of Alcohol and Vinegar from apple juice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabiul Haque

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural vinegar is one of the fermented products which has some potentiality with respect to a nutraceutical standpoint. The present study is an optimization of the fermentation conditions for apple juice vinegar production from aple juice wine, this biochemical process being aided by Acetobacter aceti.We have studied on the development of high yielding alcohol resistant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of alcohol. Overflow metabolism is an undesirable characteristic of aerobic cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during biomassdirected processes. It results from elevated apple juice containing sugar consumption rates that cause a high substrate conversion to ethanol and other bi-products, severely affecting cell physiology, bioprocess performance, and biomass yields. Fed-batch culture, where sucrose consumption rates are controlled by the external addition of sugar aiming at its low concentrations in the fermentor, is the classical bioprocessing alternative to prevent sugar fermentation by yeasts. However, fed-batch fermentations present drawbacks that could be overcome by simpler batch cultures at relatively high initial sugar concentrations From the results it is clear that strain T2. which has been exposed to 15% alcohol for 18 hrs is the high yielding strain, as it gives 16% alcohol after distillation. We also find that as the exposure is increased, that is, with increasing exposure to 20% alcohol for 5 hrs, 18 hrs, and 20 hrs, the production of alcohol decreases. Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells strain T2. which has been exposed to 15% alcohol for 18 hrs were exposed to a homogenous static magnetic field of 125 mT for periods of 24, 48 or 72 hours and then used as inoculum for the alcoholic fermentation. The exposure to the magnetic field improved the fermentation process kinetics. Biomass and ethanol yields of fermentations inoculated with treated inoculum were higher than those in the control fermentation, which

  13. Transcriptome analysis of a respiratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain suggests the expression of its phenotype is glucose insensitive and predominantly controlled by Hap4, Cat8 and Mig1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonander Nicklas

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously described the first respiratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, KOY.TM6*P, by integrating the gene encoding a chimeric hexose transporter, Tm6*, into the genome of an hxt null yeast. Subsequently we transferred this respiratory phenotype in the presence of up to 50 g/L glucose to a yeast strain, V5 hxt1-7Δ, in which only HXT1-7 had been deleted. In this study, we compared the transcriptome of the resultant strain, V5.TM6*P, with that of its wild-type parent, V5, at different glucose concentrations. Results cDNA array analyses revealed that alterations in gene expression that occur when transitioning from a respiro-fermentative (V5 to a respiratory (V5.TM6*P strain, are very similar to those in cells undergoing a diauxic shift. We also undertook an analysis of transcription factor binding sites in our dataset by examining previously-published biological data for Hap4 (in complex with Hap2, 3, 5, Cat8 and Mig1, and used this in combination with verified binding consensus sequences to identify genes likely to be regulated by one or more of these. Of the induced genes in our dataset, 77% had binding sites for the Hap complex, with 72% having at least two. In addition, 13% were found to have a binding site for Cat8 and 21% had a binding site for Mig1. Unexpectedly, both the up- and down-regulation of many of the genes in our dataset had a clear glucose dependence in the parent V5 strain that was not present in V5.TM6*P. This indicates that the relief of glucose repression is already operable at much higher glucose concentrations than is widely accepted and suggests that glucose sensing might occur inside the cell. Conclusion Our dataset gives a remarkably complete view of the involvement of genes in the TCA cycle, glyoxylate cycle and respiratory chain in the expression of the phenotype of V5.TM6*P. Furthermore, 88% of the transcriptional response of the induced genes in our dataset can be related to the potential

  14. Enological characterization of Spanish Saccharomyces kudriavzevii strains, one of the closest relatives to parental strains of winemaking and brewing Saccharomyces cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peris, D; Pérez-Través, L; Belloch, C; Querol, A

    2016-02-01

    Wine fermentation and innovation have focused mostly on Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. However, recent studies have shown that other Saccharomyces species can also be involved in wine fermentation or are useful for wine bouquet, such as Saccharomyces uvarum and Saccharomyces paradoxus. Many interspecies hybrids have also been isolated from wine fermentation, such as S. cerevisiae × Saccharomyces kudriavzevii hybrids. In this study, we explored the genetic diversity and fermentation performance of Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains, which we compared to other S. kudriavzevii strains. Fermentations of red and white grape musts were performed, and the phenotypic differences between Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains under different temperature conditions were examined. An ANOVA analysis suggested striking similarity between strains for glycerol and ethanol production, although a high diversity of aromatic profiles among fermentations was found. The sources of these phenotypic differences are not well understood and require further investigation. Although the Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains showed desirable properties, particularly must fermentations, the quality of their wines was no better than those produced with a commercial S. cerevisiae. We suggest hybridization or directed evolution as methods to improve and innovate wine.

  15. Metabolic pathway engineering based on metabolomics confers acetic and formic acid tolerance to a recombinant xylose-fermenting strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishii Jun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of novel yeast strains with increased tolerance toward inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates is highly desirable for the production of bio-ethanol. Weak organic acids such as acetic and formic acids are necessarily released during the pretreatment (i.e. solubilization and hydrolysis of lignocelluloses, which negatively affect microbial growth and ethanol production. However, since the mode of toxicity is complicated, genetic engineering strategies addressing yeast tolerance to weak organic acids have been rare. Thus, enhanced basic research is expected to identify target genes for improved weak acid tolerance. Results In this study, the effect of acetic acid on xylose fermentation was analyzed by examining metabolite profiles in a recombinant xylose-fermenting strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Metabolome analysis revealed that metabolites involved in the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP [e.g. sedoheptulose-7-phosphate, ribulose-5-phosphate, ribose-5-phosphate and erythrose-4-phosphate] were significantly accumulated by the addition of acetate, indicating the possibility that acetic acid slows down the flux of the pathway. Accordingly, a gene encoding a PPP-related enzyme, transaldolase or transketolase, was overexpressed in the xylose-fermenting yeast, which successfully conferred increased ethanol productivity in the presence of acetic and formic acid. Conclusions Our metabolomic approach revealed one of the molecular events underlying the response to acetic acid and focuses attention on the non-oxidative PPP as a target for metabolic engineering. An important challenge for metabolic engineering is identification of gene targets that have material importance. This study has demonstrated that metabolomics is a powerful tool to develop rational strategies to confer tolerance to stress through genetic engineering.

  16. Strain-dependent occurrence of functional GTP:AMP phosphotransferase (AK3) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schricker, R; Magdolen, V; Strobel, G; Bogengruber, E; Breitenbach, M; Bandlow, W

    1995-12-29

    The gene for yeast GTP:AMP phosphotransferase (PAK3) was found to encode a nonfunctional protein in 10 laboratory strains and one brewers' strain. The protein product showed high similarity to vertebrate AK3 and was located exclusively in the mitochondrial matrix. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed a protein that was shorter at the carboxyl terminus than all other known adenylate kinases. Introduction of a +1 frameshift into the 3'-terminal region of the gene extended homology of the deduced amino acid sequence to other members of the adenylate kinase family including vertebrate AK3. Frameshift mutations obtained after in vitro and in vivo mutagenesis were capable of complementing the adk1 temperature-conditional deficiency in Escherichia coli, indicating that the frameshift led to the expression of a protein that could phosphorylate AMP. Some yeasts, however, including strain D273-10B, two wine yeasts, and two more distantly related yeast genera, harbored an active allele, named AKY3, which contained a +1 frameshift close to the carboxyl terminus as compared with the laboratory strains. The encoded protein exhibited GTP:AMP and ITP:AMP phosphotransferase activities but did not accept ATP as phosphate donor. Although single copy in the haploid genome, disruption of the AKY3 allele displayed no phenotype, excluding the possibility that laboratory and brewers' strains had collected second site suppressors. It must be concluded that yeast mitochondria can completely dispense with GTP:AMP phosphotransferase activity.

  17. CRISPR–Cas system enables fast and simple genome editing of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovicek, Vratislav; Borodina, Irina; Förster, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    , their genetic manipulation is challenging, as they are usually diploid or polyploid. Therefore, there is a need to develop more efficient genetic engineering tools. We applied a CRISPR–Cas9 system for genome editing of different industrial strains, and show simultaneous disruption of two alleles of a gene...

  18. Growth-rate dependency of de novo resveratrol production in chemostat cultures of an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, T.; De la Torre Cortes, P.; Van Gulik, W.M.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran-Lapujade, P.A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become a popular host for production of non-native compounds. The metabolic pathways involved generally require a net input of energy. To maximize the ATP yield on sugar in S. cerevisiae, industrial cultivation is typically performed in aerobic, sugar-limit

  19. The fraction of cells that resume growth after acetic acid addition is a strain-dependent parameter of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Steve; Fernández-Niño, Miguel; González-Ramos, Daniel; van Maris, Antonius J A; Nevoigt, Elke

    2014-06-01

    High acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a relevant phenotype in industrial biotechnology when using lignocellulosic hydrolysates as feedstock. A screening of 38 S. cerevisiae strains for tolerance to acetic acid revealed considerable differences, particularly with regard to the duration of the latency phase. To understand how this phenotype is quantitatively manifested, four strains exhibiting significant differences were studied in more detail. Our data show that the duration of the latency phase is primarily determined by the fraction of cells within the population that resume growth. Only this fraction contributed to the exponential growth observed after the latency phase, while all other cells persisted in a viable but non-proliferating state. A remarkable variation in the size of the fraction was observed among the tested strains differing by several orders of magnitude. In fact, only 11 out of 10(7)  cells of the industrial bioethanol production strain Ethanol Red resumed growth after exposure to 157 mM acetic acid at pH 4.5, while this fraction was 3.6 × 10(6) (out of 10(7)  cells) in the highly acetic acid tolerant isolate ATCC 96581. These strain-specific differences are genetically determined and represent a valuable starting point to identify genetic targets for future strain improvement.

  20. Engineering of a Nepetalactol-Producing Platform Strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the Production of Plant Seco-Iridoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alex; Bauchart, Philippe; Gold, Nicholas D; Zhu, Yun; De Luca, Vincenzo; Martin, Vincent J J

    2016-05-20

    The monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) are a valuable family of chemicals that include the anticancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. These compounds are of global significance-appearing on the World Health Organization's list of model essential medicines-but remain exorbitantly priced due to low in planta levels. Chemical synthesis and genetic manipulation of MIA producing plants such as Catharanthus roseus have so far failed to find a solution to this problem. Synthetic biology holds a potential answer, by building the pathway into more tractable organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recent work has taken the first steps in this direction by producing small amounts of the intermediate strictosidine in yeast. In order to help improve on these titers, we aimed to optimize the early biosynthetic steps of the MIA pathway to the metabolite nepetalactol. We combined a number of strategies to create a base strain producing 11.4 mg/L of the precursor geraniol. We also show production of the critical intermediate 10-hydroxygeraniol and demonstrate nepetalactol production in vitro. Lastly we demonstrate that activity of the iridoid synthase toward the intermediates geraniol and 10-hydroxygeraniol results in the synthesis of the nonproductive intermediates citronellol and 10-hydroxycitronellol. This discovery has serious implications for the reconstruction of the MIA in heterologous organisms. PMID:26981892

  1. Proteins involved in wine aroma compounds metabolism by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor-velum yeast strain grown in two conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Millán, M Carmen; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan

    2015-10-01

    A proteomic and exometabolomic study was conducted on Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeast strain growing under biofilm formation condition (BFC) with ethanol and glycerol as carbon sources and results were compared with those obtained under no biofilm formation condition (NBFC) containing glucose as carbon source. By using modern techniques, OFFGEL fractionator and LTQ-Orbitrap for proteome and SBSE-TD-GC-MS for metabolite analysis, we quantified 84 proteins including 33 directly involved in the metabolism of glycerol, ethanol and 17 aroma compounds. Contents in acetaldehyde, acetic acid, decanoic acid, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde and 2-phenethyl acetate, changed above their odor thresholds under BFC, and those of decanoic acid, ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate and isoamyl acetate under NBFC. Of the twenty proteins involved in the metabolism of ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde, organic acids and ethyl esters, only Adh2p, Ald4p, Cys4p, Fas3p, Met2p and Plb1p were detected under BFC and as many Acs2p, Ald3p, Cem1p, Ilv2p, Ilv6p and Pox1p, only under NBFC. Of the eight proteins involved in glycerol metabolism, Gut2p was detected only under BFC while Pgs1p and Rhr2p were under NBFC. Finally, of the five proteins involved in the metabolism of higher alcohols, Thi3p was present under BFC, and Aro8p and Bat2p were under NBFC. PMID:26187821

  2. Proteins involved in wine aroma compounds metabolism by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor-velum yeast strain grown in two conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Millán, M Carmen; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan

    2015-10-01

    A proteomic and exometabolomic study was conducted on Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeast strain growing under biofilm formation condition (BFC) with ethanol and glycerol as carbon sources and results were compared with those obtained under no biofilm formation condition (NBFC) containing glucose as carbon source. By using modern techniques, OFFGEL fractionator and LTQ-Orbitrap for proteome and SBSE-TD-GC-MS for metabolite analysis, we quantified 84 proteins including 33 directly involved in the metabolism of glycerol, ethanol and 17 aroma compounds. Contents in acetaldehyde, acetic acid, decanoic acid, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde and 2-phenethyl acetate, changed above their odor thresholds under BFC, and those of decanoic acid, ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate and isoamyl acetate under NBFC. Of the twenty proteins involved in the metabolism of ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde, organic acids and ethyl esters, only Adh2p, Ald4p, Cys4p, Fas3p, Met2p and Plb1p were detected under BFC and as many Acs2p, Ald3p, Cem1p, Ilv2p, Ilv6p and Pox1p, only under NBFC. Of the eight proteins involved in glycerol metabolism, Gut2p was detected only under BFC while Pgs1p and Rhr2p were under NBFC. Finally, of the five proteins involved in the metabolism of higher alcohols, Thi3p was present under BFC, and Aro8p and Bat2p were under NBFC.

  3. Engineering of a Nepetalactol-Producing Platform Strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the Production of Plant Seco-Iridoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alex; Bauchart, Philippe; Gold, Nicholas D; Zhu, Yun; De Luca, Vincenzo; Martin, Vincent J J

    2016-05-20

    The monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) are a valuable family of chemicals that include the anticancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. These compounds are of global significance-appearing on the World Health Organization's list of model essential medicines-but remain exorbitantly priced due to low in planta levels. Chemical synthesis and genetic manipulation of MIA producing plants such as Catharanthus roseus have so far failed to find a solution to this problem. Synthetic biology holds a potential answer, by building the pathway into more tractable organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recent work has taken the first steps in this direction by producing small amounts of the intermediate strictosidine in yeast. In order to help improve on these titers, we aimed to optimize the early biosynthetic steps of the MIA pathway to the metabolite nepetalactol. We combined a number of strategies to create a base strain producing 11.4 mg/L of the precursor geraniol. We also show production of the critical intermediate 10-hydroxygeraniol and demonstrate nepetalactol production in vitro. Lastly we demonstrate that activity of the iridoid synthase toward the intermediates geraniol and 10-hydroxygeraniol results in the synthesis of the nonproductive intermediates citronellol and 10-hydroxycitronellol. This discovery has serious implications for the reconstruction of the MIA in heterologous organisms.

  4. Multiple Genome Sequences of Helicobacter pylori Strains of Diverse Disease and Antibiotic Resistance Backgrounds from Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Rehvathy, Vellaya; Tan, Mun Hua; Gunaletchumy, Selva Perumal; Teh, Xinsheng; Wang, Susana; Baybayan, Primo; Singh, Siddarth; Ashby, Meredith; Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Hazel M Mitchell; Croft, Laurence J.; Goh, Khean Lee; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes human gastroduodenal diseases, including chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. It is also a major microbial risk factor for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Twenty-one strains with different ethnicity, disease, and antimicrobial susceptibility backgrounds were sequenced by use of Illumina HiSeq and PacBio RS platforms.

  5. Enhanced 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol production in sequential mixed fermentation with Torulaspora delbrueckii/Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals a situation of synergistic interaction between two industrial strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eRenault

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the volatile thiol productions of 2 industrial strains of Torulaspora delbrueckii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation (AF of Sauvignon Blanc must. In order to evaluate the influence of the inoculation procedure, sequential and simultaneous mixed cultures were carried out and compared to pure cultures of T. delbrueckii and S. cerevisiae. The results confirmed the inability of T. delbrueckii to release 4-methyl-4-sulfanylpentan-2-one (4MSP and its low capacity to produce 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate (3SHA, as already reported in previous studies. A synergistic interaction was observed between the two species, resulting in higher levels of 3SH (3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol and its acetate when S. cerevisiae was inoculated 24 hours after T. delbrueckii, compared to the pure cultures. To elucidate the nature of the interactions between these 2 species, the yeast population kinetics were examined and monitored, as well as the production of 3SH, its acetate and their related non-odorous precursors: Glut-3SH (glutathionylated conjugate precursor and Cys-3SH (cysteinylated conjugate precursor. For the first time, it was suggested that, unlike, S. cerevisiae, which is able to metabolize the two precursor forms, T. delbrueckii was only able to metabolize the glutathionylated precursor. Consequently, the presence of T. delbrueckii during mixed fermentation led to an increase in Glut-3SH degradation and Cys-3SH production. This overproduction was dependent on the T. delbrueckii biomass. In sequential culture, thus favouring T. delbrueckii development, the higher availability of Cys-3SH throughout AF (alcoholic fermentation resulted in more abundant 3SH and 3SHA production by S. cerevisiae

  6. An event-specific method for the detection and quantification of ML01, a genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strain, using quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudano, Enrico; Costantini, Antonella; Garcia-Moruno, Emilia

    2016-10-01

    The availability of genetically modified (GM) yeasts for winemaking and, in particular, transgenic strains based on the integration of genetic constructs deriving from other organisms into the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been a reality for several years. Despite this, their use is only authorized in a few countries and limited to two strains: ML01, able to convert malic acid into lactic acid during alcoholic fermentation, and ECMo01 suitable for reducing the risk of carbamate production. In this work we propose a quali-quantitative culture-independent method for the detection of GM yeast ML01 in commercial preparations of ADY (Active Dry Yeast) consisting of efficient extraction of DNA and qPCR (quantitative PCR) analysis based on event-specific assay targeting MLC (malolactic cassette), and a taxon-specific S. cerevisiae assay detecting the MRP2 gene. The ADY DNA extraction methodology has been shown to provide good purity DNA suitable for subsequent qPCR. The MLC and MRP2 qPCR assay showed characteristics of specificity, dynamic range, limit of quantification (LOQ) limit of detection (LOD), precision and trueness, which were fully compliant with international reference guidelines. The method has been shown to reliably detect 0.005% (mass/mass) of GM ML01 S. cerevisiae in commercial preparations of ADY. PMID:27367966

  7. Alcoholic chestnut fermentation in mixed culture. Compatibility criteria between Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murado, Miguel Anxo; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Vázquez, José Antonio; Mirón, Jesús; González, María Pilar

    2008-10-01

    The main objective of the present work consisted in the transfer to the case of the chestnut of a rice fermentative process that carried out to the Japanese traditional way to lead to an alcoholic bagasse, the moromi, capable of obtaining distilled. This way, selection assays of amylolitic Aspergillus oryzae strains and studies of compatibility between microfungi and yeast were carried out. These mixed cultivations were performed operating in batch submerged culture. Later on, using solid state system (chestnut, microfungi, yeast), a fermentative fed-batch process (koji, moto, moromi) was defined. By means of this approach a yield of 70% was reached in the conversion of total carbohydrates in ethanol. Also, the time required by the traditional operation was reduced in half. PMID:18289846

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain improvement using selection, mutation, and adaptation for the resistance to lignocellulose-derived fermentation inhibitor for ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Youri; Lim, Younghoon; Kim, Keun

    2014-05-01

    Twenty-five Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were screened for the highest sugar tolerance, ethanol-tolerance, ethanol production, and inhibitor resistance, and S. cerevisiae KL5 was selected as the best strain. Inhibitor cocktail (100%) was composed of 75 mM formic acid, 75 mM acetic acid, 30 mM furfural, 30 mM hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF), and 2.7 mM vanillin. The cells of strain KL5 were treated with γ-irradiation, and among the survivals, KL5- G2 with improved inhibitor resistance and the highest ethanol yield in the presence of inhibitor cocktail was selected. The KL5-G2 strain was adapted to inhibitor cocktail by sequential transfer of cultures to a minimal YNB medium containing increasing concentrations of inhibitor cocktail. After 10 times of adaptation, most of the isolated colonies could grow in YNB with 80% inhibitor cocktail, whereas the parental KL5 strain could not grow at all. Among the various adapted strains, the best strain (KL5-G2-A9) producing the highest ethanol yield in the presence of inhibitor cocktail was selected. In a complex YP medium containing 60% inhibitor cocktail and 5% glucose, the theoretical yield and productivity (at 48 h) of KL5- G2-A9 were 81.3% and 0.304 g/l/h, respectively, whereas those of KL5 were 20.8% and 0.072 g/l/h, respectively. KL5-G2-A9 reduced the concentrations of HMF, furfural, and vanillin in the medium in much faster rates than KL5. PMID:24608567

  9. Fermentation of mixed glucose-xylose substrates by engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: role of the coenzyme specificity of xylose reductase, and effect of glucose on xylose utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimacek Mario

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of the substantial metabolic engineering effort previously devoted to the development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting both the hexose and pentose sugars present in lignocellulose hydrolysates, the productivity of reported strains for conversion of the naturally most abundant pentose, xylose, is still a major issue of process efficiency. Protein engineering for targeted alteration of the nicotinamide cofactor specificity of enzymes catalyzing the first steps in the metabolic pathway for xylose was a successful approach of reducing xylitol by-product formation and improving ethanol yield from xylose. The previously reported yeast strain BP10001, which expresses heterologous xylose reductase from Candida tenuis in mutated (NADH-preferring form, stands for a series of other yeast strains designed with similar rational. Using 20 g/L xylose as sole source of carbon, BP10001 displayed a low specific uptake rate qxylose (g xylose/g dry cell weight/h of 0.08. The study presented herein was performed with the aim of analysing (external factors that limit qxylose of BP10001 under xylose-only and mixed glucose-xylose substrate conditions. We also carried out a comprehensive investigation on the currently unclear role of coenzyme utilization, NADPH compared to NADH, for xylose reduction during co-fermentation of glucose and xylose. Results BP10001 and BP000, expressing C. tenuis xylose reductase in NADPH-preferring wild-type form, were used. Glucose and xylose (each at 10 g/L were converted sequentially, the corresponding qsubstrate values being similar for each strain (glucose: 3.0; xylose: 0.05. The distribution of fermentation products from glucose was identical for both strains whereas when using xylose, BP10001 showed enhanced ethanol yield (BP10001 0.30 g/g; BP000 0.23 g/g and decreased yields of xylitol (BP10001 0.26 g/g; BP000 0.36 g/g and glycerol (BP10001 0.023 g/g; BP000 0.072 g/g as compared

  10. The effects of dietary administration with chemical treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YG3-1 on the growth of aquatic invertebrates in Artemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Behnam Shekarchi; Ali Nekuiefard; Ramin Manaffar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the biological effects of β-glucans in cell wall of new identified strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YG3-1 on the growth of aquatic invertebrates, in Artemia as model organism. Methods: All yeasts used in the present study were isolated from Rainbow trout intestine and then cultured in yeast extract-peptone-glycerol medium. Activation of β-glucan in yeasts was performed by chemical treatment with 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) (3.5% v/v). Then nauplii and larvae individuals of Artemia urmiana and Artemia franciscana (two different species of Artemia as test organisms) were fed with 2ME-treated yeasts during the culture. At the end of experiment, after feeding individual length (total length and growth rate) in adult individuals of Artemia was measured. Results: Following this administration, growth in both species of Artemia was improved (P Conclusions: This study suggested that 2ME-treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YG3-1 yeasts can be used for enhancing the growth of other aquatic invertebrates like shrimps as probiotic supplement and growth promoter.

  11. The effects of dietary administration with chemical treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YG3-1 on the growth of aquatic invertebrates in Artemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Shekarchi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the biological effects of β-glucans in cell wall of new identified strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YG3-1 on the growth of aquatic invertebrates, in Artemia as model organism. Methods: All yeasts used in the present study were isolated from Rainbow trout intestine and then cultured in yeast extract-peptone-glycerol medium. Activation of β-glucan in yeasts was performed by chemical treatment with 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME (3.5% v/v. Then nauplii and larvae individuals of Artemia urmiana and Artemia franciscana (two different species of Artemia as test organisms were fed with 2ME-treated yeasts during the culture. At the end of experiment, after feeding individual length (total length and growth rate in adult individuals of Artemia was measured. Results: Following this administration, growth in both species of Artemia was improved (P < 0.05. So, the results showed that Artemia urmiana adults individuals that fed with 2MEtreated yeasts had the highest growth and total length. These results were confirmed with growth measurement in adult individuals of Artemia. Conclusions: This study suggested that 2ME-treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YG3-1 yeasts can be used for enhancing the growth of other aquatic invertebrates like shrimps as probiotic supplement and growth promoter.

  12. Differential Azole Antifungal Efficacies Contrasted Using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain Humanized for Sterol 14α-Demethylase at the Homologous Locus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, J. E.; Merkamm, M.; Manning, N J; Pompon, D; Kelly, S. L.; Kelly, D. E.

    2008-01-01

    Inhibition of sterol-14α-demethylase, a cytochrome P450 (CYP51, Erg11p), is the mode of action of azole antifungal drugs, and with high frequencies of fungal infections new agents are required. New drugs that target fungal CYP51 should not inhibit human CYP51, although selective inhibitors of the human target are also of interest as anticholesterol agents. A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that was humanized with respect to the amino acids encoded at the CYP51 (ERG11) yeast locus (BY4741:h...

  13. Anaerobic and sequential aerobic production of high-titer ethanol and single cell protein from NaOH-pretreated corn stover by a genome shuffling-modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xueliang; Wang, Juncong; Yu, Hui; Peng, Chunlan; Hu, Jinlong; Ruan, Zhiyong; Zhao, Shumiao; Liang, Yunxiang; Peng, Nan

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae recombinant strain 14 was constructed through genome shuffling method by transferring the whole genomic DNA of Candida intermedia strain 23 into a thermo-tolerant S. cerevisiae strain. The recombinant strain 14 combined the good natures of both parent strains that efficiently produced ethanol from glucose and single cell protein from xylose with 54.6% crude protein and all essential amino acids except cysteine at 35°C. Importantly, the recombinant strain 14 produced 64.07g/L ethanol from 25%(w/v) NaOH-pretreated and washed corn stover with the ethanol yield of 0.26g/g total stover by fed-batch simultaneous saccharification and fermentation and produced 66.50g/L dry cell mass subsequently from the residual hydrolysate and ethanol. Therefore, this study represents a feasible method to comprehensively utilize hexose and pentose in lignocellulosic materials. PMID:27416512

  14. De novo sequencing, assembly and analysis of the genome of the laboratory strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-7D, a model for modern industrial biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijkamp Jurgen F

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D is widely used for metabolic engineering and systems biology research in industry and academia. We sequenced, assembled, annotated and analyzed its genome. Single-nucleotide variations (SNV, insertions/deletions (indels and differences in genome organization compared to the reference strain S. cerevisiae S288C were analyzed. In addition to a few large deletions and duplications, nearly 3000 indels were identified in the CEN.PK113-7D genome relative to S288C. These differences were overrepresented in genes whose functions are related to transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodelling. Some of these variations were caused by unstable tandem repeats, suggesting an innate evolvability of the corresponding genes. Besides a previously characterized mutation in adenylate cyclase, the CEN.PK113-7D genome sequence revealed a significant enrichment of non-synonymous mutations in genes encoding for components of the cAMP signalling pathway. Some phenotypic characteristics of the CEN.PK113-7D strains were explained by the presence of additional specific metabolic genes relative to S288C. In particular, the presence of the BIO1 and BIO6 genes correlated with a biotin prototrophy of CEN.PK113-7D. Furthermore, the copy number, chromosomal location and sequences of the MAL loci were resolved. The assembled sequence reveals that CEN.PK113-7D has a mosaic genome that combines characteristics of laboratory strains and wild-industrial strains.

  15. Strain background influences neurotoxicity and behavioral abnormalities in mice expressing the tetracycline transactivator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Harry J; Allen, Carolyn C; Buchovecky, Christie M; Yetman, Michael J; Born, Heather A; Marin, Miguel A; Rodgers, Shaefali P; Song, Bryan J; Lu, Hui-Chen; Justice, Monica J; Probst, Frank J; Jankowsky, Joanna L

    2012-08-01

    The tet-off system has been widely used to create transgenic models of neurological disorders including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, and prion disease. The utility of this system lies in the assumption that the tetracycline transactivator (TTA) acts as an inert control element and does not contribute to phenotypes under study. Here we report that neuronal expression of TTA can affect hippocampal cytoarchitecture and behavior in a strain-dependent manner. While studying neurodegeneration in two tet-off Alzheimer's disease models, we unexpectedly discovered neuronal loss within the dentate gyrus of single transgenic TTA controls. Granule neurons appeared most sensitive to TTA exposure during postnatal development, and doxycycline treatment during this period was neuroprotective. TTA-induced degeneration could be rescued by moving the transgene onto a congenic C57BL/6J background and recurred on reintroduction of either CBA or C3H/He backgrounds. Quantitative trait analysis of B6C3 F2 TTA mice identified a region on Chromosome 14 that contains a major modifier of the neurodegenerative phenotype. Although B6 mice were resistant to degeneration, they were not ideal for cognitive testing. F1 offspring of TTA C57BL/6J and 129X1/SvJ, FVB/NJ, or DBA/1J showed improved spatial learning, but TTA expression caused subtle differences in contextual fear conditioning on two of these backgrounds, indicating that strain and genotype can interact independently under different behavioral settings. All model systems have limitations that should be recognized and mitigated where possible; our findings stress the importance of mapping the effects caused by TTA alone when working with tet-off models.

  16. Mutation Breeding of Salt-tolerant and Ethanol-producing Strain S. cerevisiae H058 by Low-energy Ion Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoubao Yan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To obtain an industrial strain with high ethanol fermentation efficiency under salted conditions, the wild strain H058 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was mutated by means of nitrogen ions implantation. Mutagenic effects of strain H058 by low energy N+ ion implantation were studied. A similar “saddle shape” survival curve due to ion beam irradiation appeared again in this study. By repeated screening, a high salt-tolerant and ethanol-producing strain M158 was obtained. Results showed that in medium contained 0, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0% NaCl, M158 produced maximal ethanol of 98.3, 97.2, 96.4, 95.6 and 78.3 g/L at 54, 54, 54 and 72 h, respectively. However, the original strain H058 maximal ethanol of 95.2, 90.9, 84.8, 79.4 and 67.5 g/L at 60, 60, 66 and 72 h, respectively. In addition, the ethanol yield (g/g in all of the NaCl concentrations for M158 is 0.492, 0.486, 0.482, 0.48 and 0.392 g/g, respectively, which were higher than those (0.476, 0.455, 0.424, 0.397 and 0.338 g/g, respectively of the original strain H058. The higher production and shorter fermentation period suggest that strain M158 is a good salt-tolerant and ethanol-producing strain.

  17. Identification of yeasts isolated from raffia wine (Raphia hookeri) produced in Côte d'Ivoire and genotyping of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains by PCR inter-delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tra Bi, Charles Y; N'guessan, Florent K; Kouakou, Clémentine A; Jacques, Noemie; Casaregola, Serge; Djè, Marcellin K

    2016-08-01

    Raffia wine is a traditional alcoholic beverage produced in several African countries where it plays a significant role in traditional customs and population diet. Alcoholic fermentation of this beverage is ensured by a complex natural yeast flora which plays a decisive role in the quality of the final product. This present study aims to evaluate the distribution and the diversity of the yeast strains isolated in raffia wine from four sampling areas (Abengourou, Alépé, Grand-Lahou and Adzopé) in Côte d'Ivoire. Based on the D1/D2 domain of the LSU rDNA sequence analysis, nine species belonging to six genera were distinguished. With a percentage of 69.5 % out of 171 yeast isolates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the predominant species in the raffia wine, followed by Kodamaea ohmeri (20.4 %). The other species isolated were Candida haemulonii (4.1 %), Candida phangngensis (1.8 %), Pichia kudriavzevii (1.2 %), Hanseniaspora jakobsenii (1.2 %), Candida silvae (0.6 %), Hanseniaspora guilliermondii (0.6 %) and Meyerozyma caribbica (0.6 %). The molecular characterization of S. cerevisiae isolates at the strain level using the PCR-interdelta method revealed the presence of 21 profiles (named I to XXI) within 115 isolates. Only four profiles (I, III, V and XI) were shared by the four areas under study. Phenotypic characterization of K. ohmeri strains showed two subgroups for sugar fermentation and no diversity for the nitrogen compound assimilations and the growth at different temperatures. PMID:27339306

  18. Systematic strain construction and process development: Xylitol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing Candida tenuis xylose reductase in wild-type or mutant form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratter, S M; Eixelsberger, T; Nidetzky, B

    2015-12-01

    A novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae whole-cell biocatalyst for xylitol production based on Candida tenuis xylose reductase (CtXR) is presented. Six recombinant strains expressing wild-type CtXR or an NADH-specific mutant were constructed and evaluated regarding effects of expression mode, promoter strength, biocatalyst concentration and medium composition. Intracellular XR activities ranged from 0.09 U mgProt(-1) to 1.05 U mgProt(-1) but did not correlate with the strains' xylitol productivities, indicating that other factors limited xylose conversion in the high-activity strains. The CtXR mutant decreased the biocatalyst's performance, suggesting use of the NADPH-preferring wild-type enzyme when (semi-)aerobic conditions are applied. In a bioreactor process, the best-performing strain converted 40 g L(-1) xylose with an initial productivity of 1.16 g L(-1)h(-1) and a xylitol yield of 100%. The obtained results underline the potential of CtXR wild-type for xylose reduction and point out parameters to improve "green" xylitol production. PMID:26452180

  19. Efficient construction of homozygous diploid strains identifies genes required for the hyper-filamentous phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Furukawa

    Full Text Available Yeast cells undergo diploid-specific developments such as spore formation via meiosis and pseudohyphal development under certain nutrient-limited conditions. Studies on these aspects require homozygous diploid mutants, which are generally constructed by crossing strains of opposite mating-type with the same genetic mutation. So far, there has been no direct way to generate and select diploids from haploid cells. Here, we developed a method for efficient construction of homozygous diploids using a PGAL1-HO gene (galactose-inducible mating-type switch and a PSTE18-URA3 gene (counter selection marker for diploids. Diploids are generated by transient induction of the HO endonuclease, which is followed by mating of part of the haploid population. Since the STE18 promoter is repressed in diploids, diploids carrying PSTE18-URA3 can be selected on 5-fluoroorotic acid (5-FOA plates where the uracil prototrophic haploids cannot grow. To demonstrate that this method is useful for genetic studies, we screened suppressor mutations of the complex colony morphology, strong agar invasion and/or hyper-filamentous growth caused by lack of the Hog1 MAPK in the diploid Σ1278b strain background. Following this approach, we identified 49 suppressor mutations. Those include well-known positive regulator genes for filamentous growth signaling pathways, genes involved in mitochondrial function, DNA damage checkpoint, chromatin remodeling, and cell cycle, and also previously uncharacterized genes. Our results indicate that combinatorial use of the PGAL1-HO and PSTE18-URA3 genes is suitable to efficiently construct and select diploids and that this approach is useful for genetic studies especially when combined with large-scale screening.

  20. Osmotolerance and leavening ability in sweet and frozen sweet dough. Comparative analysis between Torulaspora delbrueckii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Lopez, M J; Prieto, J A; Randez-Gil, F

    2003-01-01

    The response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and freeze-tolerant Torulaspora delbrueckii strains to osmotic stress and their CO2 production capacity in sweet and frozen-sweet dough has been examined. T. delbrueckii strains, IGC5321 and IGC5323 showed higher leavening ability than Saccharomyces, specially after exposure to hyperosmotic stress of bread dough containing 20% sucrose and 2% salt added. In addition, Torulaspora and especially T. delbrueckii IGC5321 exhibited no loss of CO2 production capacity during freeze-thaw stress. Overall, these results appeared to indicate that Torulaspora cells are more tolerant than Saccharomyces to osmotic stress of bread dough. This trait correlated with a low invertase activity, a slow rate of trehalose mobilisation and the ability to respond rapidly to osmotic stress. Growth behaviour on high osmotic synthetic media was also examined. Cells of the IGC5321 strain showed intrinsic osmotolerance and ion toxicity resistance. However, T. delbrueckii IGC5323 exhibited a clear phenotype of osmosensitivity. Hence, this characteristic may not be essential or the only determinant for leavening ability in salted high-sugar dough. PMID:14533716

  1. Applied systems biology - vanillin production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strucko, Tomas; Eriksen, Jens Christian; Nielsen, J.;

    2012-01-01

    Vanillin is the most important aroma compound based on market value, and natural vanillin is extracted from the cured seed pods of the Vanilla orchid. Most of the world’s vanillin, however, is obtained by chemical synthesis from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. As an alternative, de novo...... biosynthesis of vanillin in baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was recently demonstrated by successfully introducing the metabolic pathway for vanillin production in yeast. Nevertheless, the amount of vanillin produced in this S. cerevisiae strain is insufficient for commercial production and improvements...... need to be done. We have introduced the genes necessary for vanillin production in an identical manner in two different yeast strains S288c and CEN.PK,where comprehensive – omics datasets are available, hence, allowing vanillin production in the two strain backgrounds to be evaluated and compared...

  2. A novel wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain TSH1 in scaling-up of solid-state fermentation of ethanol from sweet sorghum stalks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Du

    Full Text Available The rising demand for bioethanol, the most common alternative to petroleum-derived fuel used worldwide, has encouraged a feedstock shift to non-food crops to reduce the competition for resources between food and energy production. Sweet sorghum has become one of the most promising non-food energy crops because of its high output and strong adaptive ability. However, the means by which sweet sorghum stalks can be cost-effectively utilized for ethanol fermentation in large-scale industrial production and commercialization remains unclear. In this study, we identified a novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, TSH1, from the soil in which sweet sorghum stalks were stored. This strain exhibited excellent ethanol fermentative capacity and ability to withstand stressful solid-state fermentation conditions. Furthermore, we gradually scaled up from a 500-mL flask to a 127-m3 rotary-drum fermenter and eventually constructed a 550-m3 rotary-drum fermentation system to establish an efficient industrial fermentation platform based on TSH1. The batch fermentations were completed in less than 20 hours, with up to 96 tons of crushed sweet sorghum stalks in the 550-m3 fermenter reaching 88% of relative theoretical ethanol yield (RTEY. These results collectively demonstrate that ethanol solid-state fermentation technology can be a highly efficient and low-cost solution for utilizing sweet sorghum, providing a feasible and economical means of developing non-food bioethanol.

  3. Live Attenuated Borrelia burgdorferi Targeted Mutants in an Infectious Strain Background Protect Mice from Challenge Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Beth L; Padmore, Lavinia J; Ristow, Laura C; Curtis, Michael W; Coburn, Jenifer

    2016-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, B. garinii, and B. afzelii are all agents of Lyme disease in different geographic locations. If left untreated, Lyme disease can cause significant and long-term morbidity, which may continue after appropriate antibiotic therapy has been administered and live bacteria are no longer detectable. The increasing incidence and geographic spread of Lyme disease are renewing interest in the vaccination of at-risk populations. We took the approach of vaccinating mice with two targeted mutant strains of B. burgdorferi that, unlike the parental strain, are avirulent in mice. Mice vaccinated with both strains were protected against a challenge with the parental strain and a heterologous B. burgdorferi strain by either needle inoculation or tick bite. In ticks, the homologous strain was eliminated but the heterologous strain was not, suggesting that the vaccines generated a response to antigens that are produced by the bacteria both early in mammalian infection and in the tick. Partial protection against B. garinii infection was also conferred. Protection was antibody mediated, and reactivity to a variety of proteins was observed. These experiments suggest that live attenuated B. burgdorferi strains may be informative regarding the identification of protective antigens produced by the bacteria and recognized by the mouse immune system in vivo Further work may illuminate new candidates that are effective and safe for the development of Lyme disease vaccines. PMID:27335385

  4. Analysis of the secondary compounds produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and wild yeast strains during the production of "cachaça" Análise dos componentes secundários produzidos por Saccharomyces cerevisiae e leveduras selvagens durante a produção de cachaça

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Fachine Dato

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare the composition of "cachaças" produced in 10 fermentation cycles by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc and wild yeast strains [Pichia silvicola (Ps, Pichia anomala 1 (Pa1, Pichia anomala 2 (Pa2 and Dekkera bruxelensis (Db], isolated from distilleries in Jaboticabal - SP, Brazil. The secondary components of the heart fraction were determined by gas chromatography. The levels of secondary components were influenced by the wine pH, which varied among yeast strains. S. cerevisiae showed slightly more secondary components, whereas wild strains produced more higher alcohols. Wild yeast strains were shown to be adequate for the production of a high quality "cachaça".O presente trabalho visou estabelecer uma comparação entre composição de cachaças produzidas por Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc e estirpes de leveduras selvagens [Pichia silvicola (Ps, Pichia anomala 1 (Pa1, Pichia anomala 2 (Pa2 e Dekkera bruxelensis (Db], isoladas em destilarias da região de Jaboticabal-SP. Os componentes secundários da fração denominada coração foram determinados por cromatografia gasosa. Os níveis dos componentes secundários foram influenciados pelo pH dos respectivos vinhos, os quais dependem da estirpe de levedura empregada no processo fermentativo. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae apresentou valores ligeiramente superiores de componentes secundários, enquanto as estirpes selvagens produziram maiores teores de álcoois superiores. As estirpes selvagens de leveduras mostraram-se adequadas para obtenção de uma cachaça de boa qualidade.

  5. Linking Genotype and Phenotype of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Reveals Metabolic Engineering Targets and Leads to Triterpene Hyper-Producers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karina Marie; Udatha, Gupta D. B. R. K.; Semba, Saori;

    2011-01-01

    S288C strain, we implemented a strategy for the construction of a beta-amyrin production platform. The genes Erg8, Erg9 and HFA1 contained non-silent SNPs that were computationally analyzed to evaluate the changes that cause in the respective protein structures. Subsequently, Erg8, Erg9 and HFA1...

  6. Aerobic physiology of redox-engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains modified in the ammonium assimilation for increased NADPH availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Maria Margarida M. dos; Thygesen, G.; Kotter, P.;

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant strains altered in the ammonium assimilation pathways were constructed with the purpose of increasing NADPH availability. The NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase encoded by GDH1, which accounts for a major fraction of the NADPH consumption during growth on ammonium, was deleted, a...

  7. Different response to acetic acid stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and l-ascorbic acid-producing strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martani, Francesca; Fossati, Tiziana; Posteri, Riccardo; Signori, Lorenzo; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2013-09-01

    Biotechnological processes are of increasing significance for industrial production of fine and bulk chemicals, including biofuels. Unfortunately, under operative conditions microorganisms meet multiple stresses, such as non-optimal pH, temperature, oxygenation and osmotic stress. Moreover, they have to face inhibitory compounds released during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomasses, which constitute the preferential substrate for second-generation processes. Inhibitors include furan derivatives, phenolic compounds and weak organic acids, among which acetic acid is one of the most abundant and detrimental for cells. They impair cellular metabolism and growth, reducing the productivity of the process: therefore, the development of robust cell factories with improved production rates and resistance is of crucial importance. Here we show that a yeast strain engineered to endogenously produce vitamin C exhibits an increased tolerance compared to the parental strain when exposed to acetic acid at moderately toxic concentrations, measured as viability on plates. Starting from this evidence, we investigated more deeply: (a) the nature and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS); (b) the activation of enzymes that act directly as detoxifiers of reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, in parental and engineered strains during acetic acid stress. The data indicate that the engineered strain can better recover from stress by limiting ROS accumulation, independently from SOD activation. The engineered yeast can be proposed as a model for further investigating direct and indirect mechanism(s) by which an antioxidant can rescue cells from organic acid damage; moreover, these studies will possibly provide additional targets for further strain improvements.

  8. Different response to acetic acid stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and l-ascorbic acid-producing strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martani, Francesca; Fossati, Tiziana; Posteri, Riccardo; Signori, Lorenzo; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2013-09-01

    Biotechnological processes are of increasing significance for industrial production of fine and bulk chemicals, including biofuels. Unfortunately, under operative conditions microorganisms meet multiple stresses, such as non-optimal pH, temperature, oxygenation and osmotic stress. Moreover, they have to face inhibitory compounds released during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomasses, which constitute the preferential substrate for second-generation processes. Inhibitors include furan derivatives, phenolic compounds and weak organic acids, among which acetic acid is one of the most abundant and detrimental for cells. They impair cellular metabolism and growth, reducing the productivity of the process: therefore, the development of robust cell factories with improved production rates and resistance is of crucial importance. Here we show that a yeast strain engineered to endogenously produce vitamin C exhibits an increased tolerance compared to the parental strain when exposed to acetic acid at moderately toxic concentrations, measured as viability on plates. Starting from this evidence, we investigated more deeply: (a) the nature and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS); (b) the activation of enzymes that act directly as detoxifiers of reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, in parental and engineered strains during acetic acid stress. The data indicate that the engineered strain can better recover from stress by limiting ROS accumulation, independently from SOD activation. The engineered yeast can be proposed as a model for further investigating direct and indirect mechanism(s) by which an antioxidant can rescue cells from organic acid damage; moreover, these studies will possibly provide additional targets for further strain improvements. PMID:23847041

  9. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of the active substance cerevisane (cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain LAS117

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessments carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State France for the pesticide active substance cerevisane (cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain LAS117, and the assessment of the proposal for inclusion of the substance in Annex IV of Regulation (EC No 396/2005, are reported. The context of the peer review was that required by Regulation (EC No 1107/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative uses of the active substance as a systemic resistance inducer against fungi and bacteria in lettuce and other salad crops. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the available studies and literature in the dossier peer reviewed, are presented. Missing information identified as being required by the regulatory framework is listed. No concerns are identified.

  10. Identification and classification of genes required for tolerance to freeze-thaw stress revealed by genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Akira; Nakamura, Toshihide; Murata, Yoshinori; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shima, Jun

    2007-03-01

    Yeasts used in bread making are exposed to freeze-thaw stress during frozen-dough baking. To clarify the genes required for freeze-thaw tolerance, genome-wide screening was performed using the complete deletion strain collection of diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screening identified 58 gene deletions that conferred freeze-thaw sensitivity. These genes were then classified based on their cellular function and on the localization of their products. The results showed that the genes required for freeze-thaw tolerance were frequently involved in vacuole functions and cell wall biogenesis. The highest numbers of gene products were components of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. Next, the cross-sensitivity of the freeze-thaw-sensitive mutants to oxidative stress and to cell wall stress was studied; both of these are environmental stresses closely related to freeze-thaw stress. The results showed that defects in the functions of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase conferred sensitivity to oxidative stress and to cell wall stress. In contrast, defects in gene products involved in cell wall assembly conferred sensitivity to cell wall stress but not to oxidative stress. Our results suggest the presence of at least two different mechanisms of freeze-thaw injury: oxidative stress generated during the freeze-thaw process, and defects in cell wall assembly. PMID:16989656

  11. Effect of Agave tequilana juice on cell wall polysaccharides of three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from different origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Uscanga, Blanca; Arrizon, Javier; Ramirez, Jesús; Solis-Pacheco, Josué

    2007-02-01

    In this study, a characterization of cell wall polysaccharide composition of three yeasts involved in the production of agave distilled beverages was performed. The three yeast strains were isolated from different media (tequila, mezcal and bakery) and were evaluated for the beta(1,3)-glucanase lytic activity and the beta-glucan/ mannan ratio during the fermentation of Agave tequilana juice and in YPD media (control). Fermentations were performed in shake flasks with 30 g l(-1) sugar concentration of A. tequilana juice and with the control YPD using 30 g l(-1) of glucose. The three yeasts strains showed different levels of beta-glucan and mannan when they were grown in A. tequilana juice in comparison to the YPD media. The maximum rate of cell wall lyses was 50% lower in fermentations with A. tequilana juice for yeasts isolated from tequila and mezcal than compared to the bakery yeast.

  12. Efeitos do cádmio sobre o crescimento das leveduras Saccharomyces cerevisiae PE-2 e Saccharomyces cerevisiae IZ-1904, e a capacidade da vinhaça em atenuar a toxicidade Effect of cadmium on the growth of two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, and the vinasse capacity to atenuate the toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Mariano-da-Silva

    2004-03-01

    , minimizando os efeitos deletérios do metal.The present study was carried out in order to evaluate the capability of different cadmium concentration (0; 0,05, 0,10 and 0,50mM to affect the growth of two S. cerevisiae strains (PE-2 and IZ-1904 in YED (yeast extract 1% and dextrose 2% medium, and to evaluate the three vinasse concentration capability (0,15 and 30% to attenuate the two cadmium concentration toxicity (0,1 and 0,5mM, using S. cerevisiae PE-2 strain in YED medium. In the first assay, the medium was inoculated in aseptic conditions with 1mL of 1% yeast suspension (PE-2 or IZ-1904 and incubated at 30ºC, 70 RPM for 18 hours. During anaerobic growth (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 and 18 hours, portions of cell suspension were taken out and biomass concentration was determined. At the end of fermentation, yeast viability, budding rate and bacterial contamination were determined. Both, initial and final trehalose, was measured. In the second assay, the medium was inoculated in aseptic conditions with 2mL of 1% PE-2 suspension and incubated at 30ºC, 120 rpm for 18 hours. During the anaerobic growth (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12,14, 16 and 18 hours portions of cell suspension were taken out and biomass concentration was determined. At the end of fermentation, alcohol production, yeast viability, budding rate and bacterial contamination were determined. Both, initial and final trehalose, was measured. The increase of cadmium levels showed a reduction on yeast growth and cell viability. Vinasse showed low toxicity, but protected yeast cells very effectively against the toxic effects of cadmium.

  13. Direct ethanol production from hemicellulosic materials of rice straw by use of an engineered yeast strain codisplaying three types of hemicellulolytic enzymes on the surface of xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Hori, Yoshimi; Yamada, Ryosuke; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-04-30

    The cost of the lignocellulose-hydrolyzing enzymes used in the saccharification process of ethanol production from biomass accounts for a relatively high proportion of total processing costs. Cell surface engineering technology has facilitated a reduction in these costs by integrating saccharification and fermentation processes into a recombinant microbe strain expressing heterologous enzymes on the cell surface. We constructed a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae that not only hydrolyzed hemicelluloses by codisplaying endoxylanase from Trichoderma reesei, β-xylosidase from Aspergillus oryzae, and β-glucosidase from Aspergillus aculeatus but that also assimilated xylose through the expression of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from Pichia stipitis and xylulokinase from S. cerevisiae. The recombinant strain successfully produced ethanol from rice straw hydrolysate consisting of hemicellulosic material containing xylan, xylooligosaccharides, and cellooligosaccharides without requiring the addition of sugar-hydrolyzing enzymes or detoxication. The ethanol titer of the strain was 8.2g/l after 72h fermentation, which was approximately 2.5-fold higher than that of the control strain. The yield (grams of ethanol per gram of total sugars in rice straw hydrolysate consumed) was 0.41g/g, which corresponded to 82% of the theoretical yield. The cell surface-engineered strain was thus highly effective for consolidating the process of ethanol production from hemicellulosic materials.

  14. Effects on Anthocyanin Composition in Red Wines Fermented by Different Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains%不同酿酒酵母发酵对红葡萄酒中花色苷组成的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李双石; 苏宁; 吴志明; 李淳; 兰蓉

    2012-01-01

    To explore wild yeast resources in China, the anthocyanin composition and content in the red wines fermented by different Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were compared. Two different Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain Y17, commercial active dry yeast F15) were separately used in red wines production. The anthocyanin components in wines were studied by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spec- trometry (HPLC-MS). The results showed that the diversities of anthocyanins in the wines fermented by different yeast strains were similar, but the contents of different anthocyanins in the wines were quite different. The indigenous yeast strain Y17 produced wines with higher concentrations of anthocyanins.%比较了不同酿酒酵母菌株发酵对红葡萄酒中花色苷组分的影响,为本土酵母的开发应用提供依据。采用本土自筛酿酒酵母菌株Y17和进口商业酵母菌株F15分别酿造干红葡萄酒,并利用高效液相色谱-质谱联用技术(HPLC-MS)对葡萄酒中的花色苷成分进行检测。结果表明,不同酵母发酵葡萄酒中的花色苷成分种类大体相同,但各种花色苷的含量具有较大差别,本土酵母菌株Y17在发酵生产高花色苷含量葡萄酒方面具有优势。

  15. Adenine auxotrophy--be aware: some effects of adenine auxotrophy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain W303-1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokina, Agnese; Kibilds, Juris; Liepins, Janis

    2014-08-01

    Adenine auxotrophy is a commonly used genetic marker in haploid yeast strains. Strain W303-1A, which carries the ade2-1 mutation, is widely used in physiological and genetic research. Yeast extract-based rich medium contains a low level of adenine, so that adenine is often depleted before glucose. This could affect the cell physiology of adenine auxotrophs grown in rich medium. The aim of our study was to assess the effects of adenine auxotrophy on cell morphology and stress physiology. Our results show that adenine depletion halts cell division, but that culture optical density continues to increase due to cell swelling. Accumulation of trehalose and a coincident 10-fold increase in desiccation stress tolerance is observed in adenine auxotrophs after adenine depletion, when compared to prototrophs. Under adenine starvation, long-term survival of W303-1A is lower than during carbon starvation, but higher than during leucine starvation. We observed drastic adenine-dependent changes in cell stress physiology, suggesting that results may be biased when adenine auxotrophs are grown in rich media without adenine supplementation.

  16. Sensitivities to monochromatic 254-nm and 365-nm radiation of closely related strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with differing repair capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitivity to monochromatic 254- and 365-nm radiation was compared in closely related yeast strains with defects in one or more of the excision-repair (rad1), error-prone repair (rad18), or recombinational-repair (rad51) pathways. At 254 nm, mutants defective in a single repair pathway exhibited slight to moderate UV sensitivity;,those defective in two separate pathways were somewhat more UV sensitive, while triple mutants defective in all three pathways exhibited extreme UV sensitivity with a lethal event corresponding to 0.05 J m-2. Repair defects also rendered mutants sensitive to 365-nm radiation: strains with single defects exhibited slight sensitivity, mutants with two defective pathways were more sensitive, and triple mutants exhibited maximal sensitivity with a lethal event corresponding to 2.4 x 104 J m-2. Evidence for dimer involvement in the yeast mutant was obtained by demonstrating that lethality at both 254 and 365 nm was photoreactivated by light at 405 nm. (author)

  17. Switching the mode of sucrose utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miletti Luiz C

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overflow metabolism is an undesirable characteristic of aerobic cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during biomass-directed processes. It results from elevated sugar consumption rates that cause a high substrate conversion to ethanol and other bi-products, severely affecting cell physiology, bioprocess performance, and biomass yields. Fed-batch culture, where sucrose consumption rates are controlled by the external addition of sugar aiming at its low concentrations in the fermentor, is the classical bioprocessing alternative to prevent sugar fermentation by yeasts. However, fed-batch fermentations present drawbacks that could be overcome by simpler batch cultures at relatively high (e.g. 20 g/L initial sugar concentrations. In this study, a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase activity was engineered to transport sucrose into the cells through a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity, and the growth kinetics and biomass yields on sucrose analyzed using simple batch cultures. Results We have deleted from the genome of a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase the high-affinity sucrose-H+ symporter encoded by the AGT1 gene. This strain could still grow efficiently on sucrose due to a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity mediated by the MALx1 maltose permeases, and its further intracellular hydrolysis by cytoplasmic maltases. Although sucrose consumption by this engineered yeast strain was slower than with the parental yeast strain, the cells grew efficiently on sucrose due to an increased respiration of the carbon source. Consequently, this engineered yeast strain produced less ethanol and 1.5 to 2 times more biomass when cultivated in simple batch mode using 20 g/L sucrose as the carbon source. Conclusion Higher cell densities during batch cultures on 20 g/L sucrose were achieved by using a S. cerevisiae strain engineered in the sucrose uptake system. Such result was accomplished by

  18. Strain background modifies phenotypes in the ATP8B1-deficient mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Shah; U.R. Sanford; J.C. Vargas; H. Xu; A. Groen; C.C. Paulusma; J.P. Grenert; L. Pawlikowska; S. Sen; R.P.J. Oude Elferink; L.N. Bull

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in ATP8B1 (FIC1) underlie cases of cholestatic disease, ranging from chronic and progressive (progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis) to intermittent (benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis). The ATP8B1-deficient mouse serves as an animal model of human ATP8B1 deficie

  19. Modulation of Chaperone Gene Expression in Mutagenized Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Developed for Recombinant Human Albumin Production Results in Increased Production of Multiple Heterologous Proteins▿

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, T.; Finnis, C.; Evans, L R; Mead, D. J.; Avery, S V; Archer, D. B.; Sleep, D.

    2008-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been successfully established as a commercially viable system for the production of recombinant proteins. Manipulation of chaperone gene expression has been utilized extensively to increase recombinant protein production from S. cerevisiae, focusing predominantly on the products of the protein disulfide isomerase gene PDI1 and the hsp70 gene KAR2. Here we show that the expression of the genes SIL1, LHS1, JEM1, and SCJ1, all of which are involved in regul...

  20. The effects of host age, host nuclear background and temperature on phenotypic effects of the virulent Wolbachia strain popcorn in Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, K Tracy; Thomson, Linda J; Ary A Hoffmann

    2003-01-01

    Because of their obligate endosymbiotic nature, Wolbachia strains by necessity are defined by their phenotypic effects upon their host. Nevertheless, studies on the influence of host background and environmental conditions upon the manifestation of Wolbachia effects are relatively uncommon. Here we examine the behavior of the overreplicating Wolbachia strain popcorn in four different Drosophila melanogaster backgrounds at two temperatures. Unlike other strains of Wolbachia in Drosophila, popc...

  1. Differential proteome analysis of a selected bacterial strain isolated from a high background radiation area in response to radium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Farideh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Kardan, Mohammad Reza; Shahbani Zahiri, Hossein; Ahmadian, Gholamreza; Masoumi, Fatemeh; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Rigi, Garshasb; Vali, Hojatollah; Akbari Noghabi, Kambiz

    2012-08-01

    The present study describes the response of a bacterial strain, isolated from a hot spring in an area with the highest levels of natural radiation, under radium ((226)Ra) stress. The bacterium has been characterized as a novel and efficient radium biosorbent and identified as a variant of Serratia marcescens by biochemical tests and molecular recognition. In order to gain insights into key cellular events that allow this strain to survive and undergo (226)Ra adaptation and biosorption, the strain was tested under two experimental conditions of 1000 and 6000 Bq (226)Ra stress. A proteomic approach involving two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins under (226)Ra stress. Functional assessment of identified proteins with significantly altered expression levels revealed several mechanisms thought to be involved in (226)Ra adaptation and conferring resistant phenotype to the isolate, including general stress adaptation, anti-oxidative stress, protein and nucleic acid synthesis, energy metabolism, efflux and transport proteins. It suggests that this strain through evolution is particularly well adapted to the high background radiation environment and could represent an alternative source to remove (226)Ra from such areas as well as industrial radionuclide polluted wastewaters.

  2. Cystathionine accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, B; Suruga, T; Yamamoto, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Murata, K; Kimura, A; Shinoda, S; Ohmori, S.

    1984-01-01

    A cysteine-dependent strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its prototrophic revertants accumulated cystathionine in cells. The cystathionine accumulation was caused by a single mutation having a high incidence of gene conversion. The mutation was designated cys3 and was shown to cause loss of gamma-cystathionase activity. Cysteine dependence of the initial strain was determined by two linked and interacting mutations, cys3 and cys1 . Since cys1 mutations cause a loss of serine acetyltransfer...

  3. A mathematical analysis of nuclear intensity dynamics for Mig1-GFP under consideration of bleaching effects and background noise in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Simone; Sott, Kristin; Smedh, Maria; Millat, Thomas; Dahl, Peter; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Goksör, Mattias

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is an imaging technique that provides insights into signal transduction pathways through the generation of quantitative data, such as the spatiotemporal distribution of GFP-tagged proteins in signaling pathways. The data acquired are, however, usually a composition of both the GFP-tagged proteins of interest and of an autofluorescent background, which both undergo photobleaching during imaging. We here present a mathematical model based on ordinary differential equations that successfully describes the shuttling of intracellular Mig1-GFP under changing environmental conditions regarding glucose concentration. Our analysis separates the different bleaching rates of Mig1-GFP and background, and the background-to-Mig1-GFP ratio. By applying our model to experimental data, we can thus extract the Mig1-GFP signal from the overall acquired signal and investigate the influence of kinase and phosphatase on Mig1. We found a stronger regulation of Mig1 through its kinase than through its phosphatase when controlled by the glucose concentration, with a constant (de)phosphorylation rate independent of the glucose concentration. By replacing the term for decreasing excited Mig1-GFP concentration with a constant, we were able to reconstruct the dynamics of Mig1-GFP, as it would occur without bleaching and background noise. Our model effectively demonstrates how data, acquired with an optical microscope, can be processed and used for a systems biology analysis of signal transduction pathways.

  4. 微波诱变选育低产高级醇啤酒酵母菌株%Breeding of A Low-Yield of Higher Alcohols Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Strain by Microwave-Induced Mution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱莉娜; 程殿林; 尹明浩; 王亚楠; 李静欣

    2011-01-01

    Higher alcohols is the by-product in the beer yeast fermentation process of normal metabolism, and the discretion of higher alcohols content has an important impact on beer flavor. In order to properly reduce beer higher alcohols and improve beer flavor, this experiment uses microwave mutation on saccha-romyces cerevisiae for a low-yield of higher alcohols strains. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CF - 1 was used as original strain for microwave-induced mutation and a low-yield of higher alcohols mutant strains were obtained through repeated selections. After genetic experiment of stability fermentation,it founds no fluctation of the yield of higher alcohols. Besides,the basic property of the mutant straiins has not changed greatly and they are the new strains of low-yield of higher alcohols.%高级醇是啤酒发酵过程中酵母正常代谢的副产物,高级醇质量分数的高低对啤酒风味有重要影响.为了适当地降低啤酒中高级醇的产量,改善啤酒的风味,采用微波诱变技术对啤酒酵母进行诱变.对出发菌株CF-1进行诱变处理,通过不同鉴别培养基进行反复筛选,得到高级醇产量低的目标菌株7种,经过遗传稳定性实验后进行发酵实验.实验结果表明,高级醇产量没有明显波动,且发现在基础性能测试中无较大差异,是适量低产高级醇啤酒酵母的新菌株.

  5. Genome and transcriptome analyses reveal that MAPK- and phosphatidylinositol-signaling pathways mediate tolerance to 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde for industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The industrial ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a promising biocatalyst for next-generation advanced biofuels applications including lignocellulose-to-ethanol conversion. Here we present the first insight into the genomic background of NRRL Y-12632, a type strain from a worldwide coll...

  6. Investigating xylose metabolism in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae via 13C metabolic flux analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Xueyang; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-01-01

    Background To engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient xylose utilization, a fungal pathway consisting of xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase, and xylulose kinase is often introduced to the host strain. Despite extensive in vitro studies on the xylose pathway, the intracellular metabolism rewiring in response to the heterologous xylose pathway remains largely unknown. In this study, we applied 13C metabolic flux analysis and stoichiometric modeling to systemically investigate the f...

  7. De novo sequencing, assembly and analysis of the genome of the laboratory strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-7D, a model for modern industrial biotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, J.F.; Broek, van den M.; Datema, E.; Kok, de S.; Bosman, L.; Luttik, M.A.; Daran-Lapujade, P.; Vongsangnak, W.; Nielsen, J.; Heijne, W.H.M.; Klaassen, P.; Paddon, C.J.; Platt, D.; Kotter, P.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Reinders, M.J.T.; Pronk, J.T.; Ridder, de D.; Daran, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D is widely used for metabolic engineering and systems biology research in industry and academia. We sequenced, assembled, annotated and analyzed its genome. Single-nucleotide variations (SNV), insertions/deletions (indels) and differences in genome organization

  8. Comparisons of radiosensitivity and damage repair potential between mutants from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain of yeast and laboratory-bred wild yeasts with particular attention being given to giant cell formation after X-radiation. Strahlenempfindlichkeit und Erholungsvermoegen von Mutanten der Hefe Saccharomyces cerevisiae im Vergleich zu Wildtyphefen unter Beruecksichtigung der Riesenzellbildung nach Roentgenbestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinen, A.

    1988-06-01

    Yeast cells were exposed to X-rays at dose levels up to 10 kGy to induce damage to the DNA and investigate its effects on cellular growth patterns. For this purpose, comparisons were carried out between one diploid strain and six haploid strains of the Saccharomyces uvarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae species, which permitted the individual recovery and damage repair pathways to be described in more detail. The laboratory-bred wild strains ATCC 9080, 211 and 706 were judged to have unimpaired repair mechanisms as compared to the auxotrophs, which fact was evident from the higher radiosensitivity of the latter. A further parameter in this evaluation of growth behaviours was giant cell formation. The results here provided evidence in confirmation of deviations between wild strains and mutants. Even though the ceiling values for the formation of giant cells were similarly high in all strains, impairments of cell division and initial development were observed for the mutants already at considerably lower dose levels. (orig./MG).

  9. L-Histidine Inhibits Biofilm Formation and FLO11-Associated Phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Flor Yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Marc Bou Zeidan; Giacomo Zara; Carlo Viti; Francesca Decorosi; Ilaria Mannazzu; Marilena Budroni; Luciana Giovannetti; Severino Zara

    2014-01-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an innate diversity of Flo11p which codes for a highly hydrophobic and anionic cell-wall glycoprotein with a fundamental role in biofilm formation. In this study, 380 nitrogen compounds were administered to three S. cerevisiae flor strains handling Flo11p alleles with different expression levels. S. cerevisiae strain S288c was used as the reference strain as it cannot produce Flo11p. The flor strains generally metabolized amino acids and dipeptides...

  10. Effects of spaceflight on polysaccharides of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Zhi; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Tan, Sze-Sze

    2008-12-01

    Freeze-dried samples of four Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, namely, FL01, FL03, 2.0016, and 2.1424, were subjected to spaceflight. After the satellite's landing on Earth, the samples were recovered and changes in yeast cell wall were analyzed. Spaceflight strains of all S. cerevisiae strains showed significant changes in cell wall thickness (P growth curve analysis showed spaceflight S. cerevisiae 2.0016 had a faster growth rate, shorter lag phase periods, higher final biomass, and higher content of beta-glucan. Genetic stability analysis showed that prolonged subculturing of spaceflight strain S. cerevisiae 2.0016 did not lead to the appearance of variants, indicating that the genetic stability of S. cerevisiae 2.0016 mutant could be sufficient for its exploitation of beta-glucan production. PMID:18797865

  11. Glycerol Overproduction by Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast Strains Leads to Substantial Changes in By-Product Formation and to a Stimulation of Fermentation Rate in Stationary Phase

    OpenAIRE

    Remize, F.; Roustan, J. L.; Sablayrolles, J. M.; P. Barre; Dequin, S.

    1999-01-01

    Six commercial wine yeast strains and three nonindustrial strains (two laboratory strains and one haploid strain derived from a wine yeast strain) were engineered to produce large amounts of glycerol with a lower ethanol yield. Overexpression of the GPD1 gene, encoding a glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, resulted in a 1.5- to 2.5-fold increase in glycerol production and a slight decrease in ethanol formation under conditions simulating wine fermentation. All the strains overexpressing GPD1 ...

  12. Directed evolution of pyruvate decarboxylase-negative Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yielding a C2-independent, glucose-tolerant, and pyruvate-hyperproducing yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van Maris; J.M. Geertman; A. Vermeulen; M.K. Groothuizen; A.A. Winkler; M.D. Piper; J.P. van Dijken; J.T. Pronk

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe absence of alcoholic fermentation makes pyruvate decarboxylase-negative (Pdc(-)) strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae an interesting platform for further metabolic engineering of central metabolism. However, Pdc(-) S. cerevisiae strains have two growth defects:

  13. A vaccine grade of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing mammalian myostatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Tingting

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely-used system for protein expression. We previously showed that heat-killed whole recombinant yeast vaccine expressing mammalian myostatin can modulate myostatin function in mice, resulting in increase of body weight and muscle composition in these animals. Foreign DNA introduced into yeast cells can be lost soon unless cells are continuously cultured in selection media, which usually contain antibiotics. For cost and safety concerns, it is essential to optimize conditions to produce quality food and pharmaceutical products. Results We developed a simple but effective method to engineer a yeast strain stably expressing mammalian myostatin. This method utilized high-copy-number integration of myostatin gene into the ribosomal DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the final step, antibiotic selection marker was removed using the Cre-LoxP system to minimize any possible side-effects for animals. The resulting yeast strain can be maintained in rich culture media and stably express mammalian myostatin for two years. Oral administration of the recombinant yeast was able to induce immune response to myostatin and modulated the body weight of mice. Conclusions Establishment of such yeast strain is a step further toward transformation of yeast cells into edible vaccine to improve meat production in farm animals and treat human muscle-wasting diseases in the future.

  14. Automated Yeast Transformation Protocol to Engineer S. cerevisiae Strains for Cellulosic Ethanol Production with Open Reading Frames that Express Proteins Binding to Xylose Isomerase Identified using Robotic Two-hybrid Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commercialization of fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass has focused on engineering the glucose-fermenting industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize pentose sugars. Since S. cerevisiae naturally metabolizes xylulose, one approach involves introducing xylose isomerase (XI...

  15. Comparison of the xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase and the xylose isomerase pathways for xylose fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhumaa, Kaisa; Sanchez, Rosa Garcia; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie-F

    2007-01-01

    Background Two heterologous pathways have been used to construct recombinant xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: i) the xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) pathway and ii) the xylose isomerase (XI) pathway. In the present study, the Pichia stipitis XR-XDH pathway and the Piromyces XI pathway were compared in an isogenic strain background, using a laboratory host strain with genetic modifications known to improve xylose fermentation (overexpressed xylulokinase, overexpressed non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and deletion of the aldose reductase gene GRE3). The two isogenic strains and the industrial xylose-fermenting strain TMB 3400 were studied regarding their xylose fermentation capacity in defined mineral medium and in undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysate. Results In defined mineral medium, the xylose consumption rate, the specific ethanol productivity, and the final ethanol concentration were significantly higher in the XR- and XDH-carrying strain, whereas the highest ethanol yield was achieved with the strain carrying XI. While the laboratory strains only fermented a minor fraction of glucose in the undetoxified lignocellulose hydrolysate, the industrial strain TMB 3400 fermented nearly all the sugar available. Xylitol was formed by the XR-XDH-carrying strains only in mineral medium, whereas in lignocellulose hydrolysate no xylitol formation was detected. Conclusion Despite by-product formation, the XR-XDH xylose utilization pathway resulted in faster ethanol production than using the best presently reported XI pathway in the strain background investigated. The need for robust industrial yeast strains for fermentation of undetoxified spruce hydrolysates was also confirmed. PMID:17280608

  16. High level secretion of cellobiohydrolases by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlgren Simon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main technological impediment to widespread utilization of lignocellulose for the production of fuels and chemicals is the lack of low-cost technologies to overcome its recalcitrance. Organisms that hydrolyze lignocellulose and produce a valuable product such as ethanol at a high rate and titer could significantly reduce the costs of biomass conversion technologies, and will allow separate conversion steps to be combined in a consolidated bioprocess (CBP. Development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for CBP requires the high level secretion of cellulases, particularly cellobiohydrolases. Results We expressed various cellobiohydrolases to identify enzymes that were efficiently secreted by S. cerevisiae. For enhanced cellulose hydrolysis, we engineered bimodular derivatives of a well secreted enzyme that naturally lacks the carbohydrate-binding module, and constructed strains expressing combinations of cbh1 and cbh2 genes. Though there was significant variability in the enzyme levels produced, up to approximately 0.3 g/L CBH1 and approximately 1 g/L CBH2 could be produced in high cell density fermentations. Furthermore, we could show activation of the unfolded protein response as a result of cellobiohydrolase production. Finally, we report fermentation of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel™ to ethanol by CBH-producing S. cerevisiae strains with the addition of beta-glucosidase. Conclusions Gene or protein specific features and compatibility with the host are important for efficient cellobiohydrolase secretion in yeast. The present work demonstrated that production of both CBH1 and CBH2 could be improved to levels where the barrier to CBH sufficiency in the hydrolysis of cellulose was overcome.

  17. Chromosome VIII disomy influences the nonsense suppression efficiency and transition metal tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadorsky, S P; Sopova, Y V; Andreichuk, D Y; Startsev, V A; Medvedeva, V P; Inge-Vechtomov, S G

    2015-06-01

    The SUP35 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the translation termination factor eRF3. Mutations in this gene lead to the suppression of nonsense mutations and a number of other pleiotropic phenotypes, one of which is impaired chromosome segregation during cell division. Similar effects result from replacing the S. cerevisiae SUP35 gene with its orthologues. A number of genetic and epigenetic changes that occur in the sup35 background result in partial compensation for this suppressor effect. In this study we showed that in S. cerevisiae strains in which the SUP35 orthologue from the yeast Pichia methanolica replaces the S. cerevisiae SUP35 gene, chromosome VIII disomy results in decreased efficiency of nonsense suppression. This antisuppressor effect is not associated with decreased stop codon read-through. We identified SBP1, a gene that localizes to chromosome VIII, as a dosage-dependent antisuppressor that strongly contributes to the overall antisuppressor effect of chromosome VIII disomy. Disomy of chromosome VIII also leads to a change in the yeast strains' tolerance of a number of transition metal salts.

  18. The mecA homolog mecC confers resistance against β-lactams in Staphylococcus aureus irrespective of the genetic strain background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballhausen, Britta; Kriegeskorte, André; Schleimer, Nina; Peters, Georg; Becker, Karsten

    2014-07-01

    In staphylococci, methicillin resistance is mediated by mecA-encoded penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a), which has a low affinity for beta-lactams. Recently, a novel PBP2a homolog was described as being encoded by mecC, which shares only 70% similarity to mecA. To prove that mecC is the genetic determinant that confers methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus, a mecC knockout strain was generated. The S. aureus ΔmecC strain showed considerably reduced oxacillin and cefoxitin MICs (0.25 and 4 μg/ml, respectively) compared to those of the corresponding wild-type methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain (8 and 16 μg/ml, respectively). Complementing the mutant in trans with wild-type mecC restored the resistance to oxacillin and cefoxitin. By expressing mecC and mecA in different S. aureus clonal lineages, we found that mecC mediates resistance irrespective of the genetic strain background, yielding oxacillin and cefoxitin MIC values comparable to those with mecA. In addition, we showed that mecC expression is inducible by oxacillin, which supports the assumption that a functional beta-lactam-dependent regulatory system is active in MRSA strains possessing staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type XI. In summary, we showed that mecC is inducible by oxacillin and mediates beta-lactam resistance in SCCmec type XI-carrying strains as well as in different S. aureus genetic backgrounds. Furthermore, our results could explain the comparatively low MICs for clinical mecC-harboring S. aureus isolates. PMID:24752255

  19. Colony formation of C57BL/6J mice in visible burrow system: Identification of eusocial behaviors in a background strain for genetic animal models of autism

    OpenAIRE

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Blanchard, D. Caroline; Blanchard, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Deficits in social interaction are primary characteristics of autism, which has strong genetic components. Genetically-manipulated mouse models may provide a useful research tool to advance the investigation of genes associated with autism. To identify these genes using mouse models, behavioral assays for social relationships in the background strains must be developed. The present study examined colony formation in groups of one male and three female mice (Experiment 1) and, groups of three ...

  20. Fluoroquinolone-resistance mechanisms and phylogenetic background of clinical Escherichia coli strains isolated in south-east Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korona-Glowniak, Izabela; Skrzypek, Kinga; Siwiec, Radosław; Wrobel, Andrzej; Malm, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Fluorochinolones are a class of broad-spectrum antimicrobials in the treatment of several infections, including those caused by Escherichia coli. Due to the increasing resistance of bacteria to antimicrobials, an understanding of fluoroquinolone resistance is important for infection control. The aim of this study was to determine susceptibility of clinical E. coli strains to fluoroquinolones and characterize their mechanisms of quinolone resistance. Totally, 79 non-duplicate clinical E. coli isolates included in this study were mainly from skin lesion -36 (45.6%) isolates; 54 (68.4%) isolates were assigned to phylogenetic B2 group. Resistance to ciprofloxacin was found in 20 isolates. In the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) region of gyrA and parC, 4 types of point mutations were detected. Mutations in parC gene were found in all strains with gyrA mutations. Predominance of double mutation in codon 83 and 87 of gyrA (90%) and in codon 80 of parC (90%) was found. Moreover, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMRQ) determinants (qnrA or qnrB and/or aac(6')-Ib-cr) were present in 5 (25%) out of 20 fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. Resistance to fluoroquinolones in all of the tested clinical E. coli isolates correlated with point mutations in both gyrA and parC. The majority of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains belonged to D and B2 phylogenetic groups. PMID:27602420

  1. Genome-Wide Transposon Mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Bharucha, Nikë; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    Transposon mutagenesis is an effective method for generating large sets of random mutations in target DNA, with applicability toward numerous types of genetic screens in prokaryotes, single-celled eukaryotes, and metazoans alike. Relative to methods of random mutagenesis by chemical/UV treatment, transposon insertions can be easily identified in mutants with phenotypes of interest. The construction of transposon insertion mutants is also less labor-intensive on a genome-wide scale than methods for targeted gene replacement, although transposon insertions are not precisely targeted to a specific residue, and thus coverage of the target DNA can be problematic. The collective advantages of transposon mutagenesis have been well demonstrated in studies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, as transposon mutagenesis has been used extensively for phenotypic screens in both yeasts. Consequently, we present here protocols for the generation and utilization of transposon-insertion DNA libraries in S. cerevisiae and C. albicans. Specifically, we present methods for the large-scale introduction of transposon insertion alleles in a desired strain of S. cerevisiae. Methods are also presented for transposon mutagenesis of C. albicans, encompassing both the construction of the plasmid-based transposon-mutagenized DNA library and its introduction into a desired strain of Candida. In total, these methods provide the necessary information to implement transposon mutagenesis in yeast, enabling the construction of large sets of identifiable gene disruption mutations, with particular utility for phenotypic screening in nonstandard genetic backgrounds. PMID:21815095

  2. Characterization of global yeast quantitative proteome data generated from the wild-type and glucose repression Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: The comparison of two quantitative methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usaite, Renata; Wohlschlegel, James; Venable, John D.;

    2008-01-01

    The quantitative proteomic analysis of complex protein mixtures is emerging as a technically challenging but viable systems-level approach for studying cellular function. This study presents a large-scale comparative analysis of protein abundances from yeast protein lysates derived from both wild......-type yeast and yeast strains lacking key components of the Snf1 kinase complex. Four different strains were grown under well-controlled chemostat conditions. Multidimensional protein identification technology followed by quantitation using either spectral counting or stable isotope labeling approaches...... labeling strategy. The stable isotope labeling based quantitative approach was found to be highly reproducible among biological replicates when complex protein mixtures containing small expression changes were analyzed. Where poor correlation between stable isotope labeling and spectral counting was found...

  3. Comparison of SHF and SSF processes from steam-exploded wheat straw for ethanol production by xylose-fermenting and robust glucose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas Pejo, Elia; Oliva, Jose M.; Ballesteros, Mercedes;

    2008-01-01

    amounts of pentoses. Red Star is a robust hexose-fermenting strain used for industrial fuel ethanol fermentations and it was used for comparative purposes. The highest ethanol concentration, 23.7 g/L, was reached using the whole slurry (10%, w/v) and the recombinant strain (F12) in an SSF process......, it showed an ethanol yield on consumed sugars of 0.43 g/g and a volumetric ethanol productivity of 0.7 g/Lh for the first 3 h. Ethanol concentrations obtained in SSF processes were in all cases higher than those from SHF at the same conditions. Furthermore, using the whole slurry, final ethanol...... concentration was improved in all tests due to the increase of potential fermentable sugars in the fermentation broth. Inhibitory compounds present in the pretreated wheat straw caused a significantly negative effect on the fermentation rate. However, it was found that the inhibitors furfural and HMF were...

  4. 高产酿酒酵母SCY6生长与发酵条件的优化%Optimization of Growth and Fermentation Conditions for High Ethanol-Producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain SCY6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾华祥; 宋晨; 李迅

    2012-01-01

    采用高产酿酒酵母(Saccharomyces cerevisiae)SCY6发酵葡萄糖产乙醇,设计单因素试验考察该酵母菌株适宜的生长条件,采用正交试验优化酵母发酵产乙醇的条件.结果表明,该酵母菌株的最适生长温度和pH分别为28℃、5.0,培养基中葡萄糖质量分数为15%时其生长状态较好.正交试验结果表明,最适合该酿酒酵母发酵产乙醇的条件为玉米浆和(NH4)2SO4作为氮源,用量分别为20 g/L和2 g/L,接种量为4%,pH 5.0.在此条件下进行发酵,发酵液中乙醇体积分数可达7.77%,葡萄糖转化率达83.82%.%The high ethanol-producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain SCY6 was used to ferment glucose to ethanol. Single factor tests were conducted to optimize the cultivation conditions; while orthogonal design was adopted to optimize ethanol fermentation conditions. The results showed that the optimum temperature and pH for yeast growth was 28℃ and 5.0, respectively. The yeast grew well when mass ratio of glucose in YPD medium was 15%. The result of orthogonal test showed that the optimal ethanol fermentation conditions were, 2 g/L (NH4)2SO4 and 20g/L corn syrup as N source; inoculation dose, 4% volume fraction; and pH 5.0. The yield of ethanol reached 7.77%; and the conversion rate of glucose was 83.82% under these conditions.

  5. L-Histidine inhibits biofilm formation and FLO11- associated phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Bou Zeidan, Marc; Zara, Giacomo; Viti, Carlo; Decorosi, Francesca; Mannazzu, Ilaria Maria; Budroni, Marilena; Giovannetti, Luciana; Zara, Severino

    2014-01-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an innate diversity of FLO11 which codes for a highly hydrophobic and anionic cell-wall glycoprotein with a fundamental role in biofilm formation. In this study, 380 nitrogen compounds were administered to three S. cerevisiae flor strains handling FLO11 alleles with different expression levels. S. cerevisiae strain S288c was used as the reference strain as it cannot produce FLO11p. The flor strains generally metabolized amino acids and dipeptides a...

  6. The genetic basis of variation in clean lineages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to stresses encountered during bioethanol fermentations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Greetham

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the micro-organism of choice for the conversion of monomeric sugars into bioethanol. Industrial bioethanol fermentations are intrinsically stressful environments for yeast and the adaptive protective response varies between strain backgrounds. With the aim of identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL's that regulate phenotypic variation, linkage analysis on six F1 crosses from four highly divergent clean lineages of S. cerevisiae was performed. Segregants from each cross were assessed for tolerance to a range of stresses encountered during industrial bioethanol fermentations. Tolerance levels within populations of F1 segregants to stress conditions differed and displayed transgressive variation. Linkage analysis resulted in the identification of QTL's for tolerance to weak acid and osmotic stress. We tested candidate genes within loci identified by QTL using reciprocal hemizygosity analysis to ascertain their contribution to the observed phenotypic variation; this approach validated a gene (COX20 for weak acid stress and a gene (RCK2 for osmotic stress. Hemizygous transformants with a sensitive phenotype carried a COX20 allele from a weak acid sensitive parent with an alteration in its protein coding compared with other S. cerevisiae strains. RCK2 alleles reveal peptide differences between parental strains and the importance of these changes is currently being ascertained.

  7. The deletion of YLR042c improves ethanolic xylose fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parachin, Nádia S; Bengtsson, Oskar; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie-F

    2010-09-01

    In a recent study combining transcriptome analyses of a number of recombinant laboratory and industrial S. cerevisiae strains with improved xylose utilization and their respective control strains, the ORF YLR042c was identified as a downregulated gene and it was shown that the gene deletion improved aerobic growth on xylose in the tested strain background. In the present study, the influence of deleting YLR042c on xylose fermentation was investigated in two different xylose-fermenting strains: TMB3001, which expresses genes from the initial xylose catabolizing pathway, including heterologous xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) and endogenous xylulokinase (XK); and TMB3057, which, in addition to the initial xylose catabolizing pathway, overexpresses the endogenous genes encoding the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway enzymes. The deletion of YLR042c led to improved aerobic growth on xylose in both strain backgrounds. However, the effect was more significant in the strain with the poorer growth rate on xylose (TMB3001). Under anaerobic conditions, the deletion of YLR042c increased the specific xylose consumption rate and the ethanol and xylitol yields. In strain TMB3057, xylose consumption was also improved at low concentrations and during co-fermentation of xylose and glucose. The effect of the gene deletion and overexpression was also tested for different carbon sources. Altogether, these results suggest that YLR042c influences xylose and the assimilation of carbon sources other than glucose, and that the effect could be at the level of sugar transport or sugar signalling. PMID:20641017

  8. Lycotoxin-1 insecticidal peptide optimized by amino acid scanning mutagenesis and expressed as a coproduct in an ethanologenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen R; Dowd, Patrick F; Hector, Ronald E; Panavas, Tadas; Sterner, David E; Qureshi, Nasib; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Bang, Sookie S; Mertens, Jeffrey A; Johnson, Eric T; Li, Xin-Liang; Jackson, John S; Caughey, Robert J; Riedmuller, Steven B; Bartolett, Scott; Liu, Siqing; Rich, Joseph O; Farrelly, Philip J; Butt, Tauseef R; Labaer, Joshua; Cotta, Michael A

    2008-09-01

    New methods of safe biological pest control are required as a result of evolution of insect resistance to current biopesticides. Yeast strains being developed for conversion of cellulosic biomass to ethanol are potential host systems for expression of commercially valuable peptides, such as bioinsecticides, to increase the cost-effectiveness of the process. Spider venom is one of many potential sources of novel insect-specific peptide toxins. Libraries of mutants of the small amphipathic peptide lycotoxin-1 from the wolf spider were produced in high throughput using an automated integrated plasmid-based functional proteomic platform and screened for ability to kill fall armyworms, a significant cause of damage to corn (maize) and other crops in the United States. Using amino acid scanning mutagenesis (AASM) we generated a library of mutagenized lycotoxin-1 open reading frames (ORF) in a novel small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) yeast expression system. The SUMO technology enhanced expression and improved generation of active lycotoxins. The mutants were engineered to be expressed at high level inside the yeast and ingested by the insect before being cleaved to the active form (so-called Trojan horse strategy). These yeast strains expressing mutant toxin ORFs were also carrying the xylose isomerase (XI) gene and were capable of aerobic growth on xylose. Yeast cultures expressing the peptide toxins were prepared and fed to armyworm larvae to identify the mutant toxins with greatest lethality. The most lethal mutations appeared to increase the ability of the toxin alpha-helix to interact with insect cell membranes or to increase its pore-forming ability, leading to cell lysis. The toxin peptides have potential as value-added coproducts to increase the cost-effectiveness of fuel ethanol bioproduction.

  9. TOTAL ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blažena Lavová

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are health beneficial compounds that can protect cells and macromolecules (e.g. fats, lipids, proteins and DNA from the damage of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Sacchamomyces cerevisiae are know as organisms with very important antioxidative enzyme systems such as superoxide dismutase or catalase. The total antioxidant activity (mmol Trolox equivalent – TE.g-1 d.w. of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was measured by 2,2´-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid during the yeast cultivation. It was found that the total antioxidant activity was the highest (1.08 mmol TE.g-1 d.w. in the strain Kolín after 32 hours of cultivation and the lowest (0.26 mmol TE.g-1 d.w. in the strain Gyöng after 12 hours of cultivation.

  10. An internal deletion in MTH1 enables growth on glucose of pyruvate-decarboxylase negative, non-fermentative Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Oud Bart

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyruvate-decarboxylase negative (Pdc- strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae combine the robustness and high glycolytic capacity of this yeast with the absence of alcoholic fermentation. This makes Pdc-S. cerevisiae an interesting platform for efficient conversion of glucose towards pyruvate-derived products without formation of ethanol as a by-product. However, Pdc- strains cannot grow on high glucose concentrations and require C2-compounds (ethanol or acetate for growth under conditions with low glucose concentrations, which hitherto has limited application in industry. Results Genetic analysis of a Pdc- strain previously evolved to overcome these deficiencies revealed a 225bp in-frame internal deletion in MTH1, encoding a transcriptional regulator involved in glucose sensing. This internal deletion contains a phosphorylation site required for degradation, thereby hypothetically resulting in increased stability of the protein. Reverse engineering of this alternative MTH1 allele into a non-evolved Pdc- strain enabled growth on 20 g l-1 glucose and 0.3% (v/v ethanol at a maximum specific growth rate (0.24 h-1 similar to that of the evolved Pdc- strain (0.23 h-1. Furthermore, the reverse engineered Pdc- strain grew on glucose as sole carbon source, albeit at a lower specific growth rate (0.10 h-1 than the evolved strain (0.20 h-1. The observation that overexpression of the wild-type MTH1 allele also restored growth of Pdc-S. cerevisiae on glucose is consistent with the hypothesis that the internal deletion results in decreased degradation of Mth1. Reduced degradation of Mth1 has been shown to result in deregulation of hexose transport. In Pdc- strains, reduced glucose uptake may prevent intracellular accumulation of pyruvate and/or redox problems, while release of glucose repression due to the MTH1 internal deletion may contribute to alleviation of the C2-compound auxotrophy. Conclusions In this study we have discovered and

  11. Isolation of the catalase T structural gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by functional complementation.

    OpenAIRE

    Spevak, W; Fessl, F; Rytka, J; Traczyk, A; Skoneczny, M; Ruis, H

    1983-01-01

    The catalase T structural gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cloned by functional complementation of a mutation causing specific lack of the enzyme (cttl). Catalase T-deficient mutants were obtained by UV mutagenesis of an S. cerevisiae strain bearing the cas1 mutation, which causes insensitivity of catalase T to glucose repression. Since the second catalase protein of S. cerevisiae, catalase A, is completely repressed on 10% glucose, catalase T-deficient mutant colonies could be detected u...

  12. Adaptive response to DNA-damaging agents in natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations from "Evolution Canyon", Mt. Carmel, Israel.

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    Gabriel A Lidzbarsky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural populations of most organisms, especially unicellular microorganisms, are constantly exposed to harsh environmental factors which affect their growth. UV radiation is one of the most important physical parameters which influences yeast growth in nature. Here we used 46 natural strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from several natural populations at the "Evolution Canyon" microsite (Nahal Oren, Mt. Carmel, Israel. The opposing slopes of this canyon share the same geology, soil, and macroclimate, but they differ in microclimatic conditions. The interslope differences in solar radiation (200%-800% more on the "African" slope caused the development of two distinct biomes. The south-facing slope is sunnier and has xeric, savannoid "African" environment while the north-facing slope is represented by temperate, "European" forested environment. Here we studied the phenotypic response of the S. cerevisiae strains to UVA and UVC radiations and to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS in order to evaluate the interslope effect on the strains' ability to withstand DNA-damaging agents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We exposed our strains to the different DNA-damaging agents and measured survival by counting colony forming units. The strains from the "African" slope were more resilient to both UVA and MMS than the strains from the "European" slope. In contrast, we found that there was almost no difference between strains (with similar ploidy from the opposite slopes, in their sensitivity to UVC radiation. These results suggest that the "African" strains are more adapted to higher solar radiation than the "European" strains. We also found that the tetraploids strains were more tolerant to all DNA-damaging agents than their neighboring diploid strains, which suggest that high ploidy level might be a mechanism of adaptation to high solar radiation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results and the results of parallel studies with several other

  13. Phosphate transport and sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Wykoff, D D; O'Shea, E K

    2001-01-01

    Cellular metabolism depends on the appropriate concentration of intracellular inorganic phosphate; however, little is known about how phosphate concentrations are sensed. The similarity of Pho84p, a high-affinity phosphate transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to the glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p has led to the hypothesis that Pho84p is an inorganic phosphate sensor. Furthermore, pho84Delta strains have defects in phosphate signaling; they constitutively express PHO5, a phosphate starvat...

  14. Genetic knockout of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene alters hippocampal long-term potentiation in a background strain-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Ronald K; Graw, Sharon; Choo, Kevin S; Stevens, Karen E; Leonard, Sherry; Dell'Acqua, Mark L

    2016-08-01

    Reduced α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function is linked to impaired hippocampal-dependent sensory processing and learning and memory in schizophrenia. While knockout of the Chrna7 gene encoding the α7nAChR on a C57/Bl6 background results in changes in cognitive measures, prior studies found little impact on hippocampal synaptic plasticity in these mice. However, schizophrenia is a multi-genic disorder where complex interactions between specific genetic mutations and overall genetic background may play a prominent role in determining phenotypic penetrance. Thus, we compared the consequences of knocking out the α7nAChR on synaptic plasticity in C57/Bl6 and C3H mice, which differ in their basal α7nAChR expression levels. Homozygous α7 deletion in C3H mice, which normally express higher α7nAChR levels, resulted in impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) at hippocampal CA1 synapses, while C3H α7 heterozygous mice maintained robust LTP. In contrast, homozygous α7 deletion in C57 mice, which normally express lower α7nAChR levels, did not alter LTP, as had been previously reported for this strain. Thus, the threshold of Chrna7 expression required for LTP may be different in the two strains. Measurements of auditory gating, a hippocampal-dependent behavioral paradigm used to identify schizophrenia-associated sensory processing deficits, was abnormal in C3H α7 knockout mice confirming that auditory gating also requires α7nAChR expression. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic background on the regulation of synaptic plasticity and could be relevant for understanding genetic and cognitive heterogeneity in human studies of α7nAChR dysfunction in mental disorders.

  15. Phenotypical signs and chemical composition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae – mannoprotein producers

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    Agafia USATII

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypical signs and chemical composition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-18 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-19 yeast strains are described in this article. The presence of protein complexes with high content of irreplaceable amino acids and antioxidant enzymes, as well as polysaccharides with predominance of mannoproteins allow to recommend these yeast strains for the utilization in biotechnology. Results are of interest for the standard description of yeast strains offered as object for industrial appointment.

  16. Selection of indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in Tianjin and their oenological characterization of low-alcohol white wine%本土酿酒酵母的筛选及其低醇葡萄酒特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔艳; 吕文; 王伟; 蒋珍珍; 刘金福

    2011-01-01

    以天津宝坻产区的三种葡萄为原料,分别从自然发酵的葡萄汁中筛选出340株酵母菌,经生理生化,产酸、酯、尿酶、H2S,发酵能力测定及26SrRNA测序,确定4株为酿酒酵母,用于贵人香低醇白葡萄酒的酿造。以商用酵母为对照,定量分析了不同酵母所酿酒中的香气成分、氨基甲酸乙酯含量,并进行了理化指标和感官测定,发现酵母C508和G611酿造的低醇酒具有更独特的香气特点,氨基甲酸乙酯的含量较低,微生物稳定性较高,更适合低醇酒的酿造。%In order to identify the Saccharomyces spp.associated with spontaneous fermentation of three different grape varieties(Italian Riesling,Muscat and Cabernet Sauvignon grapes)from Tianjin Baodi wine region and to evaluate the micro-fermentation performance of low-alcohol white wine.The indigeous yeast flora isolated during fermentation was studied and analyzed.Firstly,yeasts were identified to genus level by growth on WL nutrient agar and the tests of assimilation carbon and nitrogen source and so on.Later,formation of amyloid,acids,esters,H2S and urease and fermentation power were studied.Three hundred and forty strains were isolated,four of which were identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae by PCR of D1/D2 regions of the 26S rRNA gene and tested as starters in low-alcohol white wine fermentations for their satisfactory oenological properties.The quality of the produced wines was evaluated after determination of their physical-chemical parameters,volatile compounds and ethyl carbamate produced in wine fermentation.The results showed the potential of employing indigenous yeast strains for the production low-alcohol white wine with improved stability,a richer aromatic bouquet,less ethyl carbamate concentration.

  17. Enological profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast isolated from fermenting plum mashes

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    Ewelina Tomczyk

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Śliwowica Łącka is a strong plum brandy (slivovitz that is produced ina submontane region of Poland by means of spontaneous fermentation of Węgierka plums. The aim of this study was to evaluate enological profile of S. cerevisiae indigenous strains isolated from spontaneous plum mash fermentation. Material and methods. Fourteen strains obtained from three different stages of fermentation (initial, central and final and characterised by different killer profile were chosen for the analysis. Fermentation assays were performed on the basal synthetic medium with 10% glucose. The fermentation kinetics, basic enological parameters by OIV methods and selected volatile compounds concentration by GC-SPME were analysed. Results. Analysed strains exhibited different fermentation kinetics, as well as produced diversified amounts of studied volatile compounds. The highest ethanol synthesis (over  40 g·dm-3 and fermentation efficiency (over 80% was found in samples fermented with strains isolated from final stage of fermentation. Cultures from an initial stage were distinguished by higher production of acetaldehyde and acetic acid, and lower of isobutanol, ethanol and ethyl acetate, those originated from central stage showed increased synthesis of ethyl acetate and acetoine, whereas the strains isolated during final stage of fermentation formed more acetaldehyde, acetic acid and fusel alcohols and less esters. Strains that were present throughout the spontaneous fermentation were synthesized average amounts of compounds mentioned above. Conclusions. High diversity of enological profiles among isolated S. cerevisiae strains was determined. The composition of Sliwowica Łącka is strictly dependent on presence and amount of the individual profiles during spontaneous plums fermentation.

  18. Niche-driven evolution of metabolic and life-history strategies in natural and domesticated populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Sicard Delphine

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation of resource supply is one of the key factors that drive the evolution of life-history strategies, and hence the interactions between individuals. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two life-history strategies related to different resource utilization have been previously described in strains from different industrial origins. In this work, we analyzed metabolic traits and life-history strategies in a broader collection of yeast strains sampled in various ecological niches (forest, human body, fruits, laboratory and industrial environments. Results By analysing the genetic and plastic variation of six life-history and three metabolic traits, we showed that S. cerevisiae populations harbour different strategies depending on their ecological niches. On one hand, the forest and laboratory strains, referred to as extreme "ants", reproduce quickly, reach a large carrying capacity and a small cell size in fermentation, but have a low reproduction rate in respiration. On the other hand, the industrial strains, referred to as extreme "grasshoppers", reproduce slowly, reach a small carrying capacity but have a big cell size in fermentation and a high reproduction rate in respiration. "Grasshoppers" have usually higher glucose consumption rate than "ants", while they produce lower quantities of ethanol, suggesting that they store cell resources rather than secreting secondary products to cross-feed or poison competitors. The clinical and fruit strains are intermediate between these two groups. Conclusions Altogether, these results are consistent with a niche-driven evolution of S. cerevisiae, with phenotypic convergence of populations living in similar habitat. They also revealed that competition between strains having contrasted life-history strategies ("ants" and "grasshoppers" seems to occur at low frequency or be unstable since opposite life-history strategies appeared to be maintained in distinct ecological niches.

  19. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of n-butanol

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    Myers Samuel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing energy costs and environmental concerns have motivated engineering microbes for the production of "second generation" biofuels that have better properties than ethanol. Results and conclusion Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered with an n-butanol biosynthetic pathway, in which isozymes from a number of different organisms (S. cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Ralstonia eutropha were substituted for the Clostridial enzymes and their effect on n-butanol production was compared. By choosing the appropriate isozymes, we were able to improve production of n-butanol ten-fold to 2.5 mg/L. The most productive strains harbored the C. beijerinckii 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which uses NADH as a co-factor, rather than the R. eutropha isozyme, which uses NADPH, and the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase from S. cerevisiae or E. coli rather than that from R. eutropha. Surprisingly, expression of the genes encoding the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase from C. beijerinckii (bcd and etfAB did not improve butanol production significantly as previously reported in E. coli. Using metabolite analysis, we were able to determine which steps in the n-butanol biosynthetic pathway were the most problematic and ripe for future improvement.

  20. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of n-butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, EricJ.; Chan, Rossana; Prasad, Nilu; Myers, Samuel; Petzold, Christopher; Redding, Alyssa; Ouellet, Mario; Keasling, JayD.

    2008-11-25

    BackgroundIncreasing energy costs and environmental concerns have motivated engineering microbes for the production of ?second generation? biofuels that have better properties than ethanol.Results& ConclusionsSaccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered with an n-butanol biosynthetic pathway, in which isozymes from a number of different organisms (S. cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Ralstonia eutropha) were substituted for the Clostridial enzymes and their effect on n-butanol production was compared. By choosing the appropriate isozymes, we were able to improve production of n-butanol ten-fold to 2.5 mg/L. The most productive strains harbored the C. beijerinckii 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which uses NADH as a co-factor, rather than the R. eutropha isozyme, which uses NADPH, and the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase from S. cerevisiae or E. coli rather than that from R. eutropha. Surprisingly, expression of the genes encoding the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase from C. beijerinckii (bcd and etfAB) did not improve butanol production significantly as previously reported in E. coli. Using metabolite analysis, we were able to determine which steps in the n-butanol biosynthetic pathway were the most problematic and ripe for future improvement.

  1. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects

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    Danuza Nogueira Moysés

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review.

  2. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysés, Danuza Nogueira; Reis, Viviane Castelo Branco; de Almeida, João Ricardo Moreira; de Moraes, Lidia Maria Pepe; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review. PMID:26927067

  3. The genetic basis of natural variation in oenological traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Salinas

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main microorganism responsible for wine alcoholic fermentation. The oenological phenotypes resulting from fermentation, such as the production of acetic acid, glycerol, and residual sugar concentration are regulated by multiple genes and vary quantitatively between different strain backgrounds. With the aim of identifying the quantitative trait loci (QTLs that regulate oenological phenotypes, we performed linkage analysis using three crosses between highly diverged S. cerevisiae strains. Segregants from each cross were used as starter cultures for 20-day fermentations, in synthetic wine must, to simulate actual winemaking conditions. Linkage analysis on phenotypes of primary industrial importance resulted in the mapping of 18 QTLs. We tested 18 candidate genes, by reciprocal hemizygosity, for their contribution to the observed phenotypic variation, and validated five genes and the chromosome II right subtelomeric region. We observed that genes involved in mitochondrial metabolism, sugar transport, nitrogen metabolism, and the uncharacterized ORF YJR030W explained most of the phenotypic variation in oenological traits. Furthermore, we experimentally validated an exceptionally strong epistatic interaction resulting in high level of succinic acid between the Sake FLX1 allele and the Wine/European MDH2 allele. Overall, our work demonstrates the complex genetic basis underlying wine traits, including natural allelic variation, antagonistic linked QTLs and complex epistatic interactions between alleles from strains with different evolutionary histories.

  4. Functional co-operation between the nuclei of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mitochondria from other yeast species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spirek, M.; Horvath, A.; Piskur, Jure;

    2000-01-01

    We elaborated a simple method that allows the transfer of mitochondria from collection yeasts to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Protoplasts prepared from different yeasts were fused to the protoplasts of the ade2-1, ura3-52, kar1-1, rho (0) strain of S. cerevisiae and were selected for respiring cybrids...

  5. Multiple gene mediated aldehyde reduction is a mechanism of in situ detoxification of furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furfural and HMF (5-hydroxymethylfurfural) are representative inhibitors to ethanologenic yeast generated from biomass pretreatment using dilute acid hydrolysis. Few yeast strains tolerant to inhibitors are available. We have developed tolerant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced bio...

  6. Adaption of Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing a heterologous protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Astrid Mørkeberg; Beck, Vibe; Højlund Christensen, Lars;

    2008-01-01

    Production of the heterologous protein, bovine aprotinin, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was shown to affect the metabolism of the host cell to various extent depending on the strain genotype. Strains with different genotypes, industrial and laboroatory, respectively, were investigated. The maximal ...... result of the adaptation. Determination of the level of mRNA encoding aprotinin and the plasmid copy number pointed to different mechanisms responsible for the decline in aprotinin yield in the different strains. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  7. BioREFINE-2G project – Engineering of industrial yeast strains for production of dicarboxylic acids from side and waste streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovicek, Vratislav; Chen, Xiao; Borodina, Irina;

    2014-01-01

    compounds can be polymerised to biodegradable polymersthat can find application as plastics, coatings or adhesives. To reach the goals, the identification of relevant metabolic routes, strain engineering and the development of a toolbox for manipulation of industrial S. cerevisiae strains are required. Here......, we present advanced genetic engineering tools applicable for generally hardly amenable strains with industrial background. This involves tools forstable heterologous gene (over-)expression and a strategy for fast performance of gene disruption inmultiple ploidy strains. The use of the developed...... toolbox in metabolic engineering of various industrial yeast strains will be demonstrated....

  8. Expression of native and mutant extracellular lipases fromYarrowia lipolytica in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Darvishi, Farshad

    2012-01-01

    Summary Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot produce extracellular lipase and utilize low‐cost lipid substrates. This study aimed to express extracellular lipase from Yarrowia lipolytica in S. cerevisiae, construct recombinant oily substrate consumer strains, and compare the roles of native and mutant Y. lipolytica extracellular lipases in S. cerevisiae. The LIP2 gene of Y. lipolytica DSM3286 and its mutant Y. lipolytica U6 were isolated and cloned by expression vector in S. cerevisiae. New recomb...

  9. Comparison of the xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase and the xylose isomerase pathways for xylose fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two heterologous pathways have been used to construct recombinant xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: i the xylose reductase (XR and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH pathway and ii the xylose isomerase (XI pathway. In the present study, the Pichia stipitis XR-XDH pathway and the Piromyces XI pathway were compared in an isogenic strain background, using a laboratory host strain with genetic modifications known to improve xylose fermentation (overexpressed xylulokinase, overexpressed non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and deletion of the aldose reductase gene GRE3. The two isogenic strains and the industrial xylose-fermenting strain TMB 3400 were studied regarding their xylose fermentation capacity in defined mineral medium and in undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysate. Results In defined mineral medium, the xylose consumption rate, the specific ethanol productivity, and the final ethanol concentration were significantly higher in the XR- and XDH-carrying strain, whereas the highest ethanol yield was achieved with the strain carrying XI. While the laboratory strains only fermented a minor fraction of glucose in the undetoxified lignocellulose hydrolysate, the industrial strain TMB 3400 fermented nearly all the sugar available. Xylitol was formed by the XR-XDH-carrying strains only in mineral medium, whereas in lignocellulose hydrolysate no xylitol formation was detected. Conclusion Despite by-product formation, the XR-XDH xylose utilization pathway resulted in faster ethanol production than using the best presently reported XI pathway in the strain background investigated. The need for robust industrial yeast strains for fermentation of undetoxified spruce hydrolysates was also confirmed.

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism in ecological context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhten, Paula; Ponomarova, Olga; Gonzalez, Ramon; Patil, Kiran R.

    2016-01-01

    The architecture and regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network are among the best studied owing to its widespread use in both basic research and industry. Yet, several recent studies have revealed notable limitations in explaining genotype–metabolic phenotype relations in this yeast, especially when concerning multiple genetic/environmental perturbations. Apparently unexpected genotype–phenotype relations may originate in the evolutionarily shaped cellular operating principles being hidden in common laboratory conditions. Predecessors of laboratory S. cerevisiae strains, the wild and the domesticated yeasts, have been evolutionarily shaped by highly variable environments, very distinct from laboratory conditions, and most interestingly by social life within microbial communities. Here we present a brief review of the genotypic and phenotypic peculiarities of S. cerevisiae in the context of its social lifestyle beyond laboratory environments. Accounting for this ecological context and the origin of the laboratory strains in experimental design and data analysis would be essential in improving the understanding of genotype–environment–phenotype relationships. PMID:27634775

  11. Evolutionary engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient aerobic xylose consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scalcinati, Gionata; Otero, José Manuel; Van Vleet, Jennifer R. H.;

    2012-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology aims to develop robust microbial cell factories, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to produce an array of added value chemicals presently dominated by petrochemical processes. Xylose is the second most abundant monosaccharide after glucose and the most prevalent pentose...... sugar found in lignocelluloses. Significant research efforts have focused on the metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for fast and efficient xylose utilization. This study aims to metabolically engineer S. cerevisiae, such that it can consume xylose as the exclusive substrate while maximizing carbon...... of this strain was employed to further elucidate the observed physiology confirms a strongly up-regulated glyoxylate pathway enabling respiratory metabolism. The resulting strain is a desirable platform for the industrial production of biomass-related products using xylose as a sole carbon source....

  12. Biosorption of cadmium by Brevundimonas sp. ZF12 strain, a novel biosorbent isolated from hot-spring waters in high background radiation areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masoudzadeh, Nasrin [Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), P.O. Box 14155-6343, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Biology, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zakeri, Fardideh [Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), P.O. Box 14155-6343, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); National Radiation Protection Department - Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lotfabad, Tayebe bagheri [Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), P.O. Box 14155-6343, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sharafi, Hakimeh [Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), P.O. Box 14155-6343, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Biology, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Masoomi, Fatemeh; Zahiri, Hoseein Shahbani; Ahmadian, Gholamreza [Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), P.O. Box 14155-6343, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari, E-mail: Akbari@nigeb.ac.ir [Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), P.O. Box 14155-6343, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolation and characterization of a novel cadmium-biosorbent (Brevundimonas sp. ZF12) from high background radiation areas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brevundimonas sp. ZF12 caused 50% removal of cadmium at the concentration level of 250 ppm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solution pH values used for the reusability study have powerful desorptive features to recover Cd ions sorbed onto the biomass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first study carried out so far for the cadmium removal from aqueous solutions by a novel biosorbent Brevundimonas sp. ZF12. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In our opinion, the isolate can be an attractive alternative to remove the cadmium-containing wastewaters. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to screen cadmium biosorbing bacterial strains isolated from soils and hot-springs containing high concentrations of radium ({sup 226}Ra) in Ramsar using a batch system. Brevundimonas sp. ZF12 strain isolated from the water with high {sup 226}Ra content caused 50% removal of cadmium at a concentration level of 250 ppm. The biosorption equilibrium data are fitted well by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and kinetic studies indicated that the biosorption follows pseudo second-order model. The effect of different physico-chemical parameters like biomass concentration, pH, cadmium concentration, temperature and contact time on cadmium sorption was also investigated using FTIR, SEM and XRD analytical techniques. A high desorption efficiency (above 90%) was obtained using a pH range of 2.0-4.0. Reusability of the biomass was examined under consecutive biosorption-desorption cycles repeated thrice. In conclusion, Brevundimonas sp. ZF12 is proposed as an excellent cadmium biosorbent that may have important applications in Cd removal from wastewaters.

  13. Involvement of heme biosynthesis in control of sterol uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, T A; Taylor, F R; Parks, L W

    1985-01-01

    Wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae do not accumulate exogenous sterols under aerobic conditions, and a mutant allele conferring sterol auxotrophy (erg7) could be isolated only in strains with a heme deficiency. delta-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) fed to a hem1 (ALA synthetase-) erg7 (2,3-oxidosqualene cyclase-) sterol-auxotrophic strain of S. cerevisiae inhibited sterol uptake, and growth was negatively affected when intracellular sterol was depleted. The inhibition of sterol uptake (and growth o...

  14. High-level production of animal-free recombinant transferrin from saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldenberg Hans

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal-free recombinant proteins provide a safe and effective alternative to tissue or serum-derived products for both therapeutic and biomanufacturing applications. While recombinant insulin and albumin already exist to replace their human counterparts in cell culture media, until recently there has been no equivalent for serum transferrin. Results The first microbial system for the high-level secretion of a recombinant transferrin (rTf has been developed from Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains originally engineered for the commercial production of recombinant human albumin (Novozymes' Recombumin® USP-NF and albumin fusion proteins (Novozymes' albufuse®. A full-length non-N-linked glycosylated rTf was secreted at levels around ten-fold higher than from commonly used laboratory strains. Modification of the yeast 2 μm-based expression vector to allow overexpression of the ER chaperone, protein disulphide isomerase, further increased the secretion of rTf approximately twelve-fold in high cell density fermentation. The rTf produced was functionally equivalent to plasma-derived transferrin. Conclusions A Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression system has enabled the cGMP manufacture of an animal-free rTf for industrial cell culture application without the risk of prion and viral contamination, and provides a high-quality platform for the development of transferrin-based therapeutics.

  15. Isolation of peroxisome-deficient mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdmann, Ralf; Veenhuis, Marten; Mertens, Daphne; Kunau, Wolf-H.

    1989-01-01

    Two mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affected in peroxisomal assembly (pas mutants) have been isolated and characterized. Each strain contains a single mutation that results in (i) the inability to grow on oleic acid, (ii) accumulation of peroxisomal matrix enzymes in the cytosol, and (iii) absen

  16. Changes and roles of membrane compositions in the adaptation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfeng; Zhang, Shuxian; Liu, Huaqing; Zhang, Lei; Yi, Chenfeng; Li, Hao

    2015-12-01

    Bioethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often stressed by the accumulation of ethanol. Cell membrane is the first assaulting target of ethanol. Ethanol-adapted S. cerevisiae strains provide opportunity to shed light on membrane functions in the ethanol tolerance. This study aimed at clarifying the roles of cell membrane in the ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae through comparing membrane components between S. cerevisiae parental strain and ethanol-adapted strains. A directed evolutionary engineering was performed to obtain the ethanol-adapted S. cerevisiae strains. The parental, ethanol-adapted M5 and M10 strains were selected to be compared the percentage of viable cells after exposing to ethanol stress and cell membrane compositions (i.e., ergosterol, trehalose, and fatty acids). Compared with the parental strain, M5 or M10 strain had higher survival rate in the presence of 10% v/v ethanol. Compared with that in the parental strain, contents of trehalose, ergosterol, and fatty acids increased about 15.7, 12.1, and 29.3%, respectively, in M5 strain, and about 47.5, 107.8, and 61.5%, respectively, in M10 strain. Moreover, expression differences of genes involved in fatty acids metabolisms among the parental, M5 and M10 strains were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and results demonstrated that M5 or M10 strain had higher expression of ACC1 and OLE1 than the parental strain. These results indicated that although being exposed to step-wise increased ethanol, S. cerevisiae cells might remodel membrane components or structure to adapt to the ethanol stress.

  17. Mead production: selection and characterization assays of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    de Pereira, Ana Paula; Dias, Teresa; Andrade, João Verdial; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Mendes-Ferreira, Ana; Mendes-Faia, Arlete; Leticia M. Estevinho

    2009-01-01

    Mead is a traditional alcoholic drink which results from the fermentation of diluted honey. Yeasts used in mead production are, usually, wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. Most of these yeasts are not adapted to the conditions of mead production namely, high sugar levels, low pH values and reduced nitrogen concentrations. The inability of yeast strains to respond and adapt to unfavorable stressful growth conditions, leads to several problems, such as lack of uniformity of the final ...

  18. Heterooligomeric phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    2004-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains five phosphoribosyl diphosphate (PRPP) synthase-homologous genes (PRS1-5), which specify PRPP synthase subunits 1-5. Expression of the five S. cerevisiae PRS genes individually in an Escherichia coli PRPP-less strain (Deltaprs) showed that a single PRS...... gene product had no PRPP synthase activity. In contrast, expression of five pairwise combinations of PRS genes resulted in the formation of active PRPP synthase. These combinations were PRS1 PRS2, PRS1 PRS3, and PRS1 PRS4, as well as PRS5 PRS2 and PRS5 PRS4. None of the remaining five possible pairwise...... combinations of PRS genes appeared to produce active enzyme. Extract of an E. coli strain containing a plasmid-borne PRS1 gene and a chromosome-borne PRS3 gene contained detectable PRPP synthase activity, whereas extracts of strains containing PRS1 PRS2, PRS1 PRS4, PRS5 PRS2, or PRS5 PRS4 contained...

  19. In Vitro Fermentation Characteristics and Rumen Microbial Population of Diet Supplemented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Rumen Microbe Probiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Riyanti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to select three strains of probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to evaluate the effect of S. cerevisiae and rumen bacteria isolate (MR4 supplementation and their combination on rumen fermentability and rumen microbial population. Experiment 1 was designed in a 4 x 5 factorial randomized block design with 3 replications. The first factor was S. cerevisiae strain consisted of control treatment (without S. cerevisiae supplementation, NBRC 10217, NRRL Y 567 and NRRL 12618, and the second factor was incubation time consisted of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 h. Ration was basal ration for feedlot with forage to concentrate ratio (F:C= 60:40. Dosage of each treatment with S. cerevisiae was 5 x 1010 cfu/kg ration. Experiment 2 was designed in randomized block design with 4 treatments: P0= basal ration of feedlot; P1= P0 + S. cerevisiae; P2= P0 + MR4 isolate (5 x 107 cfu/kg ration; P3= P0 + S. cerevisiae and MR4 isolate. The result of experiment 1 showed that supplementation of S. cerevisiae NRRL 12618 had the highest S. cerevisiae population and increased rumen bacterial population. This strain was selected as probiotic in experiment 2. The result from experiment 2 showed that probiotic supplementation stabilized rumen pH and produced the highest NH3 concentration (P<0.05 and bacterial population (P<0.05. As compared with control, all treatments reduced protozoa population (P<0.05. Combination of S. cerevisiae and MR4 probiotics produced the highest total volatile fatty acids (VFA and isovalerate (P<0.05. It was concluded that strain S. cerevisiae NRRL 12618 had potential as probiotic yeast. Supplementation with this strain increased fermentability, rumen isoacid and decreased A:P ratio. Those abilities could be improved with MR4 rumen isolate probiotic.

  20. Accumulation of gold using Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors have reported preconcentration of 152Eu, a long-lived fission product, by yeast cells, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Gold being a precious metal is used in electroplating, hydrogenation catalyst, etc. Heterogeneous composition of samples and low concentration offers renewed interest in its selective extraction of gold using various extractants. Gold can be recovered from different solutions using various chemical reagents like amines, organophosphorus compounds, and extractants containing sulphur as donor atom, etc. In the present work, two different strains of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been used to study the preconcentration of gold at various experimental conditions

  1. Directed Evolution towards Increased Isoprenoid Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Simon; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Kielland-Brandt, Morten;

    diversity. The most common way of producing these compounds is by organic synthesis. Organic synthesis does however have several disadvantages for production of secondary metabolites such as low yields due to the complex structures, which makes this way of production economically unfeasible. Microbial...... for discovering new genetic perturbations, which would results in and increased production of isoprenoids by S. cerevisiae has been very limited. This project is focus on creating diversity within a lycopene producing S. cerevisiae strain by construction of gDNA-, cDNA-, and transposon-libraries. The diversified...

  2. Growth of non-Saccharomyces yeasts affects nutrient availability for Saccharomyces cerevisiae during wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Karina; Boido, Eduardo; Dellacassa, Eduardo; Carrau, Francisco

    2012-07-01

    Yeast produces numerous secondary metabolites during fermentation that impact final wine quality. Although it is widely recognized that growth of diverse non-Saccharomyces (NS) yeast can positively affect flavor complexity during Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine fermentation, the inability to control spontaneous or co-fermentation processes by NS yeast has restricted their use in winemaking. We selected two NS yeasts from our Uruguayan native collection to study NS-S. cerevisiae interactions during wine fermentation. The selected strains of Hanseniaspora vineae and Metschnikowia pulcherrima had different yeast assimilable nitrogen consumption profiles and had different effects on S. cerevisiae fermentation and growth kinetics. Studies in which we varied inoculum size and using either simultaneous or sequential inoculation of NS yeast and S. cerevisiae suggested that competition for nutrients had a significant effect on fermentation kinetics. Sluggish fermentations were more pronounced when S. cerevisiae was inoculated 24h after the initial stage of fermentation with a NS strain compared to co-inoculation. Monitoring strain populations using differential WL nutrient agar medium and fermentation kinetics of mixed cultures allowed for a better understanding of strain interactions and nutrient addition effects. Limitation of nutrient availability for S. cerevisiae was shown to result in stuck fermentations as well as to reduce sensory desirability of the resulting wine. Addition of diammonium phosphate (DAP) and a vitamin mix to a defined medium allowed for a comparison of nutrient competition between strains. Addition of DAP and the vitamin mix was most effective in preventing stuck fermentations. PMID:22687186

  3. Ploidy influences cellular responses to gross chromosomal rearrangements in saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemoine Sophie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs such as aneuploidy are key factors in genome evolution as well as being common features of human cancer. Their role in tumour initiation and progression has not yet been completely elucidated and the effects of additional chromosomes in cancer cells are still unknown. Most previous studies in which Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a model for cancer cells have been carried out in the haploid context. To obtain new insights on the role of ploidy, the cellular effects of GCRs were compared between the haploid and diploid contexts. Results A total number of 21 haploid and diploid S. cerevisiae strains carrying various types of GCRs (aneuploidies, nonreciprocal translocations, segmental duplications and deletions were studied with a view to determining the effects of ploidy on the cellular responses. Differences in colony and cell morphology as well as in the growth rates were observed between mutant and parental strains. These results suggest that cells are impaired physiologically in both contexts. We also investigated the variation in genomic expression in all the mutants. We observed that gene expression was significantly altered. The data obtained here clearly show that genes involved in energy metabolism, especially in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, are up-regulated in all these mutants. However, the genes involved in the composition of the ribosome or in RNA processing are down-regulated in diploids but up-regulated in haploids. Over-expression of genes involved in the regulation of the proteasome was found to occur only in haploid mutants. Conclusion The present comparisons between the cellular responses of strains carrying GCRs in different ploidy contexts bring to light two main findings. First, GCRs induce a general stress response in all studied mutants, regardless of their ploidy. Secondly, the ploidy context plays a crucial role in maintaining the stoichiometric balance

  4. Drug resistance is conferred on the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by expression of full-length melanoma-associated human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCB5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keniya, Mikhail V; Holmes, Ann R; Niimi, Masakazu; Lamping, Erwin; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Gottesman, Michael M; Cannon, Richard D

    2014-10-01

    ABCB5, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, is highly expressed in melanoma cells, and may contribute to the extreme resistance of melanomas to chemotherapy by efflux of anti-cancer drugs. Our goal was to determine whether we could functionally express human ABCB5 in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in order to demonstrate an efflux function for ABCB5 in the absence of background pump activity from other human transporters. Heterologous expression would also facilitate drug discovery for this important target. DNAs encoding ABCB5 sequences were cloned into the chromosomal PDR5 locus of a S. cerevisiae strain in which seven endogenous ABC transporters have been deleted. Protein expression in the yeast cells was monitored by immunodetection using both a specific anti-ABCB5 antibody and a cross-reactive anti-ABCB1 antibody. ABCB5 function in recombinant yeast cells was measured by determining whether the cells possessed increased resistance to known pump substrates, compared to the host yeast strain, in assays of yeast growth. Three ABCB5 constructs were made in yeast. One was derived from the ABCB5-β mRNA, which is highly expressed in human tissues but is a truncation of a canonical full-size ABC transporter. Two constructs contained full-length ABCB5 sequences: either a native sequence from cDNA or a synthetic sequence codon-harmonized for S. cerevisiae. Expression of all three constructs in yeast was confirmed by immunodetection. Expression of the codon-harmonized full-length ABCB5 DNA conferred increased resistance, relative to the host yeast strain, to the putative substrates rhodamine 123, daunorubicin, tetramethylrhodamine, FK506, or clorgyline. We conclude that full-length ABCB5 can be functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae and confers drug resistance.

  5. Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to cadmium stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Luciana Mara Costa; Ribeiro, Frederico Haddad; Neves, Maria Jose [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: luamatu@uol.com.br; Porto, Barbara Abranches Araujo; Amaral, Angela M.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Ativacao Neutronica], e-mail: menezes@cdtn.br; Rosa, Carlos Augusto [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia], e-mail: carlrosa@icb.ufmg

    2009-07-01

    The intensification of industrial activity has been greatly contributing with the increase of heavy metals in the environment. Among these heavy metals, cadmium becomes a serious pervasive environmental pollutant. The cadmium is a heavy metal with no biological function, very toxic and carcinogenic at low concentrations. The toxicity of cadmium and several other metals can be mainly attributed to the multiplicity of coordination complexes and clusters that they can form. Some aspects of the cellular response to cadmium were extensively investigated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The primary site of interaction between many toxic metals and microbial cells is the plasma membrane. Plasma-membrane permeabilisation has been reported in a variety of microorganisms following cadmium exposure, and is considered one mechanism of cadmium toxicity in the yeast. In this work, using the yeast strain S. cerevisiae W303-WT, we have investigated the relationships between Cd uptake and release of cellular metal ions (K{sup +} and Na{sup +}) using neutron activation technique. The neutron activation was an easy, rapid and suitable technique for doing these metal determinations on yeast cells; was observed the change in morphology of the strains during the process of Cd accumulation, these alterations were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) during incorporation of cadmium. (author)

  6. Role of Nitrogen and Carbon Transport, Regulation, and Metabolism Genes for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Survival In Vivo†

    OpenAIRE

    Joanne M Kingsbury; Goldstein, Alan L.; McCusker, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is both an emerging opportunistic pathogen and a close relative of pathogenic Candida species. To better understand the ecology of fungal infection, we investigated the importance of pathways involved in uptake, metabolism, and biosynthesis of nitrogen and carbon compounds for survival of a clinical S. cerevisiae strain in a murine host. Potential nitrogen sources in vivo include ammonium, urea, and amino acids, while potential carbon sources include glucose, lactate,...

  7. Biodiversity of a Natural Population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora uvarum from Aglianico del Vulture

    OpenAIRE

    Paraggio, Margherita

    2004-01-01

    A total of 140 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora uvarum, isolated from grapes and musts in the Basilicata region in Italy, were differentiated on the basis of fermentation behaviour and production of secondary compounds in Aglianico del Vulture must. A significant natural biodiversity of the strains was determined. In particular, within each species, the strains were differentiated for the fermentative activity and for the production of secondary compounds. Great strain va...

  8. An engineered cryptic Hxt11 sugar transporter facilitates glucose-xylose co-consumption in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shin, Hyun Yong; Nijland, Jeroen G; de Waal, Paul P; de Jong, René M; Klaassen, Paul; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unable to ferment pentose sugars like d-xylose. Through the introduction of the respective metabolic pathway, S. cerevisiae is able to ferment xylose but first utilizes d-glucose before the d-xylose can be transported and metabolized. Low affinity d-

  9. Fungal genomics beyond Saccharomyces cerevisiae?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, Gerald; Mcintyre, Mhairi; Nielsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Fungi are used extensively in both fundamental research and industrial applications. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been the model organism for fungal research for many years, particularly in functional genomics. However, considering the diversity within the fungal kingdom, it is obvious that the a......Fungi are used extensively in both fundamental research and industrial applications. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been the model organism for fungal research for many years, particularly in functional genomics. However, considering the diversity within the fungal kingdom, it is obvious...

  10. Shuttle mutagenesis: a method of transposon mutagenesis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Seifert, H S; Chen, E Y; So, M; Heffron, F

    1986-01-01

    We have extended the method of transposon mutagenesis to the eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A bacterial transposon containing a selectable yeast gene can be transposed into a cloned fragment of yeast DNA in Escherichia coli, and the transposon insertion can be returned to the yeast genome by homologous recombination. Initially, the cloned yeast DNA fragment to be mutagenized was transformed into an E. coli strain containing an F factor derivative carrying the transposable element. The c...

  11. Research Progress of "Omics" Technologies and Its Application in Construction of Engineering Strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae%酿酒酵母的"组学"技术研究进展及其在工程菌株构建中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓阳; 李余动; 吴雪昌

    2011-01-01

    酿酒酵母是真核模式生物,已被广泛用于"组学"水平的研究."组学"技术主要由基因组学、转录组学、蛋白质组学及代谢组学构成.综述了酵母菌"组学"的研究进展,并论述了酵母菌"组学"技术在酵母菌菌株改造中的应用,包括酒类及生物燃料乙醇工业生产菌株的基因工程改造等.%The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been used as eukaryotic model organism in "ome" level research. "Omics" technologies were mainly composed of genomics,transcriptomics,proteomics and metabolomics. The recent advancements of "ome" level research in yeast were surveyed,then their application in strain improvement by genetic engineering was discussed,including the industrial yeast strains in bioethanol and winemaking processes.

  12. Phenotypic landscape of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during wine fermentation: evidence for origin-dependent metabolic traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole Camarasa

    Full Text Available The species Saccharomyces cerevisiae includes natural strains, clinical isolates, and a large number of strains used in human activities. The aim of this work was to investigate how the adaptation to a broad range of ecological niches may have selectively shaped the yeast metabolic network to generate specific phenotypes. Using 72 S. cerevisiae strains collected from various sources, we provide, for the first time, a population-scale picture of the fermentative metabolic traits found in the S. cerevisiae species under wine making conditions. Considerable phenotypic variation was found suggesting that this yeast employs diverse metabolic strategies to face environmental constraints. Several groups of strains can be distinguished from the entire population on the basis of specific traits. Strains accustomed to growing in the presence of high sugar concentrations, such as wine yeasts and strains obtained from fruits, were able to achieve fermentation, whereas natural yeasts isolated from "poor-sugar" environments, such as oak trees or plants, were not. Commercial wine yeasts clearly appeared as a subset of vineyard isolates, and were mainly differentiated by their fermentative performances as well as their low acetate production. Overall, the emergence of the origin-dependent properties of the strains provides evidence for a phenotypic evolution driven by environmental constraints and/or human selection within S. cerevisiae.

  13. Lactose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting cellobiose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Oh, Eun Joong; Pathanibul, Panchalee; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-09-20

    Lactose is an inevitable byproduct of the dairy industry. In addition to cheese manufacturing, the growing Greek yogurt industry generates excess acid whey, which contains lactose. Therefore, rapid and efficient conversion of lactose to fuels and chemicals would be useful for recycling the otherwise harmful acid whey. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a popular metabolic engineering host, cannot natively utilize lactose. However, we discovered that an engineered S. cerevisiae strain (EJ2) capable of fermenting cellobiose can also ferment lactose. This finding suggests that a cellobiose transporter (CDT-1) can transport lactose and a β-glucosidase (GH1-1) can hydrolyze lactose by acting as a β-galactosidase. While the lactose fermentation by the EJ2 strain was much slower than the cellobiose fermentation, a faster lactose-fermenting strain (EJ2e8) was obtained through serial subcultures on lactose. The EJ2e8 strain fermented lactose with a consumption rate of 2.16g/Lh. The improved lactose fermentation by the EJ2e8 strain was due to the increased copy number of cdt-1 and gh1-1 genes. Looking ahead, the EJ2e8 strain could be exploited for the production of other non-ethanol fuels and chemicals from lactose through further metabolic engineering. PMID:27457698

  14. Immune Status, Strain Background, and Anatomic Site of Inoculation Affect Mouse Papillomavirus (MmuPV1) Induction of Exophytic Papillomas or Endophytic Trichoblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, John P.; Proctor, Mary; Ingle, Arvind; Silva, Kathleen A.; Dadras, Soheil S.; Jenson, A. Bennett; Ghim, Shin-je

    2014-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) induce papillomas, premalignant lesions, and carcinomas in a wide variety of species. PVs are classified first based on their host and tissue tropism and then their genomic diversities. A laboratory mouse papillomavirus, MmuPV1 (formerly MusPV), was horizontally transmitted within an inbred colony of NMRI-Foxn1nu/Foxn1nu (nude; T cell deficient) mice of an unknown period of time. A ground-up, filtered papilloma inoculum was not capable of infecting C57BL/6J wild-type mice; however, immunocompetent, alopecic, S/RV/Cri-ba/ba (bare) mice developed small papillomas at injection sites that regressed. NMRI-Foxn1nu and B6.Cg-Foxn1nu, but not NU/J-Foxn1nu, mice were susceptible to MmuPV1 infection. B6 congenic strains, but not other congenic strains carrying the same allelic mutations, lacking B- and T-cells, but not B-cells alone, were susceptible to infection, indicating that mouse strain and T-cell deficiency are critical to tumor formation. Lesions initially observed were exophytic papillomas around the muzzle, exophytic papillomas on the tail, and condylomas of the vaginal lining which could be induced by separate scarification or simultaneous scarification of MmuPV1 at all four sites. On the dorsal skin, locally invasive, poorly differentiated tumors developed with features similar to human trichoblastomas. Transcriptome analysis revealed significant differences between the normal skin in these anatomic sites and in papillomas versus trichoblastomas. The primarily dysregulated genes involved molecular pathways associated with cancer, cellular development, cellular growth and proliferation, cell morphology, and connective tissue development and function. Although trichoepitheliomas are benign, aggressive tumors, few of the genes commonly associated with basal cell carcinoma or squamous cells carcinoma were highly dysregulated. PMID:25474466

  15. "Ant" and "grasshopper" life-history strategies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Aymé Spor

    Full Text Available From the evolutionary and ecological points of view, it is essential to distinguish between the genetic and environmental components of the variability of life-history traits and of their trade-offs. Among the factors affecting this variability, the resource uptake rate deserves particular attention, because it depends on both the environment and the genetic background of the individuals. In order to unravel the bases of the life-history strategies in yeast, we grew a collection of twelve strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from different industrial and geographical origins in three culture media differing for their glucose content. Using a population dynamics model to fit the change of population size over time, we estimated the intrinsic growth rate (r, the carrying capacity (K, the mean cell size and the glucose consumption rate per cell. The life-history traits, as well as the glucose consumption rate, displayed large genetic and plastic variability and genetic-by-environment interactions. Within each medium, growth rate and carrying capacity were not correlated, but a marked trade-off between these traits was observed over the media, with high K and low r in the glucose rich medium and low K and high r in the other media. The cell size was tightly negatively correlated to carrying capacity in all conditions. The resource consumption rate appeared to be a clear-cut determinant of both the carrying capacity and the cell size in all media, since it accounted for 37% to 84% of the variation of those traits. In a given medium, the strains that consume glucose at high rate have large cell size and low carrying capacity, while the strains that consume glucose at low rate have small cell size but high carrying capacity. These two contrasted behaviors may be metaphorically defined as "ant" and "grasshopper" strategies of resource utilization. Interestingly, a strain may be "ant" in one medium and "grasshopper" in another. These life

  16. An improved method of xylose utilization by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tien-Yang; Lin, Ting-Hsiang; Hsu, Teng-Chieh; Huang, Chiung-Fang; Guo, Gia-Luen; Hwang, Wen-Song

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method to optimize expression levels of xylose-metabolizing enzymes to improve xylose utilization capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A xylose-utilizing recombinant S. cerevisiae strain YY2KL, able to express nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced (NADPH)-dependent xylose reductase (XR), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), and xylulokinase (XK), showed a low ethanol yield and sugar consumption rate. To optimize xylose utilization by YY2KL, a recombinant expression plasmid containing the XR gene was transformed and integrated into the aur1 site of YY2KL. Two recombinant expression plasmids containing an nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+))-dependent XDH mutant and XK genes were dually transformed and integrated into the 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sites of YY2KL. This procedure allowed systematic construction of an S. cerevisiae library with different ratios of genes for xylose-metabolizing enzymes, and well-grown colonies with different xylose fermentation capacities could be further selected in yeast protein extract (YPX) medium (1 % yeast extract, 2 % peptone, and 2 % xylose). We successfully isolated a recombinant strain with a superior xylose fermentation capacity and designated it as strain YY5A. The xylose consumption rate for strain YY5A was estimated to be 2.32 g/gDCW/h (g xylose/g dry cell weight/h), which was 2.34 times higher than that for the parent strain YY2KL (0.99 g/gDCW/h). The ethanol yield was also enhanced 1.83 times by this novel method. Optimal ratio and expression levels of xylose-metabolizing enzymes are important for efficient conversion of xylose to ethanol. This study provides a novel method that allows rapid and effective selection of ratio-optimized xylose-utilizing yeast strains. This method may be applicable to other multienzyme systems in yeast.

  17. Biosorption of cadmium by Brevundimonas sp. ZF12 strain, a novel biosorbent isolated from hot-spring waters in high background radiation areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudzadeh, Nasrin; Zakeri, Fardideh; Lotfabad, Tayebe bagheri; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Masoomi, Fatemeh; Zahiri, Hoseein Shahbani; Ahmadian, Gholamreza; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this study is to screen cadmium biosorbing bacterial strains isolated from soils and hot-springs containing high concentrations of radium ((226)Ra) in Ramsar using a batch system. Brevundimonas sp. ZF12 strain isolated from the water with high (226)Ra content caused 50% removal of cadmium at a concentration level of 250 ppm. The biosorption equilibrium data are fitted well by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and kinetic studies indicated that the biosorption follows pseudo second-order model. The effect of different physico-chemical parameters like biomass concentration, pH, cadmium concentration, temperature and contact time on cadmium sorption was also investigated using FTIR, SEM and XRD analytical techniques. A high desorption efficiency (above 90%) was obtained using a pH range of 2.0-4.0. Reusability of the biomass was examined under consecutive biosorption-desorption cycles repeated thrice. In conclusion, Brevundimonas sp. ZF12 is proposed as an excellent cadmium biosorbent that may have important applications in Cd removal from wastewaters.

  18. Identification and functional evaluation of the reductases and dehydrogenases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in vanillin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xinning; Liang, Zhenzhen; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming; Shen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background Vanillin, a type of phenolic released during the pre-treatment of lignocellulosic materials, is toxic to microorganisms and therefore its presence inhibits the fermentation. The vanillin can be reduced to vanillyl alcohol, which is much less toxic, by the ethanol producer Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The reducing capacity of S. cerevisiae and its vanillin resistance are strongly correlated. However, the specific enzymes and their contribution to the vanillin reduction are not extensiv...

  19. The study of the influence of temperature and initial glucose concentration on the fermentation process in the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain immobilized on starch gels by reversed-flow gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainioti, G Ch; Kapolos, J; Koliadima, A; Karaiskakis, G

    2012-01-01

    The technique of reversed-flow gas chromatography (RFGC) was employed for the determination of the alcoholic fermentation phases and of kinetic parameters for free and immobilized cell systems, at different initial glucose concentrations and temperature values. In addition to this, due to its considerable advantages over other techniques, RFGC was used for the characterization of a new biocatalyst, yeast cells immobilized on starch gel, and especially wheat starch gel. Immobilization of wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae AXAZ-1 was accomplished on wheat and corn starch gels in order to prepare new biocatalysts with great interest for the fermentation industry. The RFGC led with great accuracy, resulting from a literature review, to the determination of reaction rate constants and activation energies at each phase of the fermentation processes. A maximum value of rate constants was observed at initial glucose concentration of 205 g/L, where a higher number of yeast cells was observed. The increase of glucose concentrations had a negative influence on the growth of AXAZ-1 cells and rate constants were decreased. The decrease of fermentation temperature caused a substantial reduction in the viability of immobilized cells as well as in rate constant values. Activation energies of corn starch gel presented lower values than those of wheat starch gel. However, the two supports showed higher catalytic efficiency than free cell systems, proving that starch gels may act as a promoter of the catalytic activity of the yeast cells involved in the fermentation process.

  20. Dynamic metabolomics differentiates between carbon and energy starvation in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting xylose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergdahl Basti

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concerted effects of changes in gene expression due to changes in the environment are ultimately reflected in the metabolome. Dynamics of metabolite concentrations under a certain condition can therefore give a description of the cellular state with a high degree of functional information. We used this potential to evaluate the metabolic status of two recombinant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during anaerobic batch fermentation of a glucose/xylose mixture. Two isogenic strains were studied, differing only in the pathways used for xylose assimilation: the oxidoreductive pathway with xylose reductase (XR and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH or the isomerization pathway with xylose isomerase (XI. The isogenic relationship between the two strains ascertains that the observed responses are a result of the particular xylose pathway and not due to unknown changes in regulatory systems. An increased understanding of the physiological state of these strains is important for further development of efficient pentose-utilizing strains for bioethanol production. Results Using LC-MS/MS we determined the dynamics in the concentrations of intracellular metabolites in central carbon metabolism, nine amino acids, the purine nucleotides and redox cofactors. The general response to the transition from glucose to xylose was increased concentrations of amino acids and TCA-cycle intermediates, and decreased concentrations of sugar phosphates and redox cofactors. The two strains investigated had significantly different uptake rates of xylose which led to an enhanced response in the XI-strain. Despite the difference in xylose uptake rate, the adenylate energy charge remained high and stable around 0.8 in both strains. In contrast to the adenylate pool, large changes were observed in the guanylate pool. Conclusions The low uptake of xylose by the XI-strain led to several distinguished responses: depletion of key metabolites in glycolysis and NADPH

  1. Evaluating the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in refrigerated ready-to-eat frankfurters: influence of strain, temperature, packaging, lactate and diacetate, and background microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Amit; Labuza, Theodore P; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2008-09-01

    This research was conducted to study the growth of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated on frankfurters stored at different conditions as a basis for a safety-based consume by shelf life date label. Three L. monocytogenes strains were separately inoculated at 10 to 20 CFU/cm2 onto frankfurters that were previously formulated with or without high pressure and with or without added 2% potassium lactate (PL) and 0.2% sodium diacetate (SD). Inoculated frankfurters were air or vacuum packaged; stored at 4, 8, or 12 degrees C; and L. monocytogenes and psychrotrophic plate counts were determined for 90, 60, and 45 days, respectively, or until the stationary phase was reached. The data (log CFU per square centimeter versus time) were fitted using the Baranyi-Roberts model to determine maximum growth rates and lag-phase time. The maximum growth rates and the lag time under each growth condition were used to calculate the time to reach 100-fold the initial Listeria population. In frankfurters lacking PL and SD, the count of all strains increased by 2 log after 18 to 50 days at 4 degrees C and 4 to 13 days at 8 degrees C. The growth was inhibited at 4 and 8 degrees C in frankfurters containing PL and SD, but one ribotype was capable of growing, with the time to reach 100-fold the initial Listeria population ranging from 19 to 35 days at 12 degrees C. In most cases, the time to reach 100-fold the initial Listeria population of L. monocytogenes was significantly longer in vacuum-packaged frankfurters as compared with air-packaged samples. Inclusion of PL and SD also inhibited the growth of psychrotrophs, but at all temperatures the psychrotrophic plate counts were greater than 4 log CFU/cm2 at the end of the experiments. These results indicated that despite the use of antimicrobials, certain L. monocytogenes strains could be capable of growing under storage-abuse conditions. Growth kinetics data could be useful for establishing a shelf life date label protocol under different

  2. Evaluation of stress tolerance and fermentative behavior of indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Cíntia Lacerda Ramos; Whasley Ferreira Duarte; Ana Luiza Freire; Disney Ribeiro Dias; Elis Cristina Araújo Eleutherio; Rosane Freitas Schwan

    2013-01-01

    Sixty six indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were evaluated in stressful conditions (temperature, osmolarity, sulphite and ethanol tolerance) and also ability to flocculate. Eighteen strains showed tolerant characteristics to these stressful conditions, growing at 42 °C, in 0.04% sulphite, 1 mol L−1 NaCl and 12% ethanol. No flocculent characteristics were observed. These strains were evaluated according to their fermentative performance in sugar cane juice. The conversion factors of ...

  3. The role of cytoplasmic catalase in dehydration tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    França, Mauro Braga; Panek, Anita Dolly; Eleutherio, Elis Cristina Araujo

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role played by cytoplasmic catalase (Ctt1) in resistance against water loss using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as eukaryotic cell model. Comparing a mutant possessing a specific lesion in CTT1 with its parental strain, it was observed that both control and ctt1 strains exhibited increased levels of lipid peroxidation after dehydration, suggesting that catalase does not protect membranes during drying. Although the ctt1 strain has only 1 catalase isofor...

  4. Comparing the fermentation performance of Escherichia coli KO11, Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A(LNH-ST and Zymomonas mobilis AX101 for cellulosic ethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale Bruce E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fermentations using Escherichia coli KO11, Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A(LNH-ST, and Zymomonas mobilis AX101 are compared side-by-side on corn steep liquor (CSL media and the water extract and enzymatic hydrolysate from ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX-pretreated corn stover. Results The three ethanologens are able produce ethanol from a CSL-supplemented co-fermentation at a metabolic yield, final concentration and rate greater than 0.42 g/g consumed sugars, 40 g/L and 0.7 g/L/h (0-48 h, respectively. Xylose-only fermentation of the tested ethanologenic bacteria are five to eight times faster than 424A(LNH-ST in the CSL fermentation. All tested strains grow and co-ferment sugars at 15% w/v solids loading equivalent of ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX-pretreated corn stover water extract. However, both KO11 and 424A(LNH-ST exhibit higher growth robustness than AX101. In 18% w/w solids loading lignocellulosic hydrolysate from AFEX pretreatment, complete glucose fermentations can be achieved at a rate greater than 0.77 g/L/h. In contrast to results from fermentation in CSL, S. cerevisiae 424A(LNH-ST consumed xylose at the greatest extent and rate in the hydrolysate compared to the bacteria tested. Conclusions Our results confirm that glucose fermentations among the tested strains are effective even at high solids loading (18% by weight. However, xylose consumption in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate is the major bottleneck affecting overall yield, titer or rate of the process. In comparison, Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A(LNH-ST is the most relevant strains for industrial production for its ability to ferment both glucose and xylose from undetoxified and unsupplemented hydrolysate from AFEX-pretreated corn stover at high yield.

  5. Adaptive mutations in sugar metabolism restore growth on glucose in a pyruvate decarboxylase negative yeast strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yiming; Liu, Guodong; Engqvist, Martin K. M.;

    2015-01-01

    Background: A Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain carrying deletions in all three pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) genes (also called Pdc negative yeast) represents a non-ethanol producing platform strain for the production of pyruvate derived biochemicals. However, it cannot grow on glucose as the sole...... carbon source, and requires supplementation of C2 compounds to the medium in order to meet the requirement for cytosolic acetyl-CoA for biosynthesis of fatty acids and ergosterol. Results: In this study, a Pdc negative strain was adaptively evolved for improved growth in glucose medium via serial...... expression of several hexose transporter genes. The non-synonymous mutations in HXT2 and CIT1 may function in the presence of mutated MTH1 alleles and could be related to an altered central carbon metabolism in order to ensure production of cytosolic acetyl-CoA in the Pdc negative strain....

  6. A genome-wide deletion mutant screen identifies pathways affected by nickel sulfate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Wei

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The understanding of the biological function, regulation, and cellular interactions of the yeast genome and proteome, along with the high conservation in gene function found between yeast genes and their human homologues, has allowed for Saccharomyces cerevisiae to be used as a model organism to deduce biological processes in human cells. Here, we have completed a systematic screen of the entire set of 4,733 haploid S. cerevisiae gene deletion strains (the entire set of nonessential genes for this organism to identify gene products that modulate cellular toxicity to nickel sulfate (NiSO4. Results We have identified 149 genes whose gene deletion causes sensitivity to NiSO4 and 119 genes whose gene deletion confers resistance. Pathways analysis with proteins whose absence renders cells sensitive and resistant to nickel identified a wide range of cellular processes engaged in the toxicity of S. cerevisiae to NiSO4. Functional categories overrepresented with proteins whose absence renders cells sensitive to NiSO4 include homeostasis of protons, cation transport, transport ATPases, endocytosis, siderophore-iron transport, homeostasis of metal ions, and the diphthamide biosynthesis pathway. Functional categories overrepresented with proteins whose absence renders cells resistant to nickel include functioning and transport of the vacuole and lysosome, protein targeting, sorting, and translocation, intra-Golgi transport, regulation of C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism, transcriptional repression, and chromosome segregation/division. Interactome analysis mapped seven nickel toxicity modulating and ten nickel-resistance networks. Additionally, we studied the degree of sensitivity or resistance of the 111 nickel-sensitive and 72 -resistant strains whose gene deletion product has a similar protein in human cells. Conclusion We have undertaken a whole genome approach in order to further understand the mechanism(s regulating the cell

  7. The DNA-damage signature in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is associated with single-strand breaks in DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Begley Thomas J; Cosgrove Joseph P; DeMott Michael S; Fry Rebecca C; Samson Leona D; Dedon Peter C

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Upon exposure to agents that damage DNA, Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo widespread reprogramming of gene expression. Such a vast response may be due not only to damage to DNA but also damage to proteins, RNA, and lipids. Here the transcriptional response of S. cerevisiae specifically induced by DNA damage was discerned by exposing S. cerevisiae to a panel of three "radiomimetic" enediyne antibiotics (calicheamicin γ1I, esperamicin A1 and neocarzinostatin) that bind speci...

  8. Mixing of vineyard and oak-tree ecotypes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in North American vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyma, Katie E; Fay, Justin C

    2013-06-01

    Humans have had a significant impact on the distribution and abundance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through its widespread use in beer, bread and wine production. Yet, similar to other Saccharomyces species, S. cerevisiae has also been isolated from habitats unrelated to fermentations. Strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from grapes, wine must and vineyards worldwide are genetically differentiated from strains isolated from oak-tree bark, exudate and associated soil in North America. However, the causes and consequences of this differentiation have not yet been resolved. Historical differentiation of these two groups may have been influenced by geographic, ecological or human-associated barriers to gene flow. Here, we make use of the relatively recent establishment of vineyards across North America to identify and characterize any active barriers to gene flow between these two groups. We examined S. cerevisiae strains isolated from grapes and oak trees within three North American vineyards and compared them to those isolated from oak trees outside of vineyards. Within vineyards, we found evidence of migration between grapes and oak trees and potential gene flow between the divergent oak-tree and vineyard groups. Yet, we found no vineyard genotypes on oak trees outside of vineyards. In contrast, Saccharomyces paradoxus isolated from the same sources showed population structure characterized by isolation by distance. The apparent absence of ecological or genetic barriers between sympatric vineyard and oak-tree populations of S. cerevisiae implies that vineyards play an important role in the mixing between these two groups.

  9. Sucrose and Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a relationship most sweet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Wesley Leoricy; Raghavendran, Vijayendran; Stambuk, Boris Ugarte; Gombert, Andreas Karoly

    2016-02-01

    Sucrose is an abundant, readily available and inexpensive substrate for industrial biotechnology processes and its use is demonstrated with much success in the production of fuel ethanol in Brazil. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which naturally evolved to efficiently consume sugars such as sucrose, is one of the most important cell factories due to its robustness, stress tolerance, genetic accessibility, simple nutrient requirements and long history as an industrial workhorse. This minireview is focused on sucrose metabolism in S. cerevisiae, a rather unexplored subject in the scientific literature. An analysis of sucrose availability in nature and yeast sugar metabolism was performed, in order to understand the molecular background that makes S. cerevisiae consume this sugar efficiently. A historical overview on the use of sucrose and S. cerevisiae by humans is also presented considering sugarcane and sugarbeet as the main sources of this carbohydrate. Physiological aspects of sucrose consumption are compared with those concerning other economically relevant sugars. Also, metabolic engineering efforts to alter sucrose catabolism are presented in a chronological manner. In spite of its extensive use in yeast-based industries, a lot of basic and applied research on sucrose metabolism is imperative, mainly in fields such as genetics, physiology and metabolic engineering.

  10. Overproduction of fatty acids in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Guo, Daoyi; Cheng, Yongbo; Zhu, Fayin; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Tiangang

    2014-09-01

    The long hydrocarbon fatty acyl chain is energy rich, making it an ideal precursor for liquid transportation fuels and high-value oleo chemicals. As Saccharomyces cerevisiae has many advantages for industrial production compared to Escherichia coli. Here, we attempted to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae for overproduction of fatty acids. First, disruption of the beta-oxidation pathway, elimination of the acyl-CoA synthetases, overexpression of different thioesterases and acetyl-CoA carboxylase ACC1, and engineering the supply of precursor acetyl-CoA. The engineered strain XL122 produced more than 120 mg/L of fatty acids. In parallel, we inactivated ADH1, the dominant gene for ethanol production, to redirect the metabolic flux to fatty acids synthesis. The engineered strain DG005 produced about 140 mg/L fatty acids. Additionally, Acetyl-CoA carboxylase was identified as a critical bottleneck of fatty acids synthesis in S. cerevisiae with a cell-free system. However, overexpression of ACC1 has little effect on fatty acids biosynthesis. As it has been reported that phosphorylation of ACC1 may influent its activity, so phosphorylation sites of ACC1 were further identified. Although the regulatory mechanisms remain unclear, our results provide rationale for future studies to target this critical step. All these efforts, particularly the discovery of the limiting step are critical for developing a "cell factory" for the overproduction of fatty acids by using type I fatty acids synthase in yeast or other fungi. PMID:24752690

  11. Diversity of murine norovirus strains isolated from asymptomatic mice of different genetic backgrounds within a single U.S. research institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Elyssa L; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Bok, Karin; Prikhodko, Victor; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Rhodes, Crystal R; Hasenkrug, Kim; Carmody, Aaron B; Ward, Jerrold M; Perdue, Kathy; Green, Kim Y

    2011-01-01

    Antibody prevalence studies in laboratory mice indicate that murine norovirus (MNV) infections are common, but the natural history of these viruses has not been fully established. This study examined the extent of genetic diversity of murine noroviruses isolated from healthy laboratory mice housed in multiple animal facilities within a single, large research institute- the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (NIAID-NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S. Ten distinct murine norovirus strains were isolated from various tissues and feces of asymptomatic wild type sentinel mice as well as asymptomatic immunodeficient (RAG 2(-/-)) mice. The NIH MNV isolates showed little cytopathic effect in permissive RAW264.7 cells in early passages, but all isolates examined could be adapted to efficient growth in cell culture by serial passage. The viruses, although closely related in genome sequence, were distinguishable from each other according to facility location, likely due to the introduction of new viruses into each facility from separate sources or vendors at different times. Our study indicates that the murine noroviruses are widespread in these animal facilities, despite rigorous guidelines for animal care and maintenance. PMID:21738664

  12. Microarray karyotyping of commercial wine yeast strains reveals shared, as well as unique, genomic signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levine R Paul

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic differences between yeast strains used in wine-making may account for some of the variation seen in their fermentation properties and may also produce differing sensory characteristics in the final wine product itself. To investigate this, we have determined genomic differences among several Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains by using a "microarray karyotyping" (also known as "array-CGH" or "aCGH" technique. Results We have studied four commonly used commercial wine yeast strains, assaying three independent isolates from each strain. All four wine strains showed common differences with respect to the laboratory S. cerevisiae strain S288C, some of which may be specific to commercial wine yeasts. We observed very little intra-strain variation; i.e., the genomic karyotypes of different commercial isolates of the same strain looked very similar, although an exception to this was seen among the Montrachet isolates. A moderate amount of inter-strain genomic variation between the four wine strains was observed, mostly in the form of depletions or amplifications of single genes; these differences allowed unique identification of each strain. Many of the inter-strain differences appear to be in transporter genes, especially hexose transporters (HXT genes, metal ion sensors/transporters (CUP1, ZRT1, ENA genes, members of the major facilitator superfamily, and in genes involved in drug response (PDR3, SNQ1, QDR1, RDS1, AYT1, YAR068W. We therefore used halo assays to investigate the response of these strains to three different fungicidal drugs (cycloheximide, clotrimazole, sulfomethuron methyl. Strains with fewer copies of the CUP1 loci showed hypersensitivity to sulfomethuron methyl. Conclusion Microarray karyotyping is a useful tool for analyzing the genome structures of wine yeasts. Despite only small to moderate variations in gene copy numbers between different wine yeast strains and within different isolates of a given

  13. [Surface display of phytase on Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient bioethanol production from corn starch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Chen, Xianzhong; Shen, Wei; Yang, Haiquan; Fan, You

    2015-12-01

    Production of bioethanol using starch as raw material has become a very prominent technology. However, phytate in the raw material not only decreases ethanol production efficiency, but also increases phosphorus discharge. In this study, to decrease phytate content in an ethanol fermentationprocess, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered forheterologous expression of phytase on the cell surface. The phy gene encoding phytase gene was fused with the C-terminal-half region of α-agglutinin and then inserted downstream of the secretion signal gene, to produce a yeast surface-display expression vector pMGK-AG-phy, which was then transformed into S. cerevisiae. The recombinant yeast strain, PHY, successfully displayed phytase on the surface of cells producing 6.4 U/g wet cells and its properties were further characterized. The growthrate and ethanol production of the PHY strain were faster than the parent S. cerevisiae strain in the fermentation medium by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. Moreover, the phytate concentration decreased by 91% in dry vinasse compared to the control. In summary, we constructed recombinant S. cerevisiae strain displaying phytase on the cell surface, which could effectively reduce the content of phytate, improve the utilization value of vinasse and reduce the discharge of phosphorus. The strain reported here represents a useful novel engineering platform for developing an environment-friendly system for bioethanol production from a corn substrate. PMID:27093833

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a sexy yeast with a prion problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Amy C; Wickner, Reed B

    2013-01-01

    Yeast prions are infectious proteins that spread exclusively by mating. The frequency of prions in the wild therefore largely reflects the rate of spread by mating counterbalanced by prion growth slowing effects in the host. We recently showed that the frequency of outcross mating is about 1% of mitotic doublings with 23-46% of total matings being outcrosses. These findings imply that even the mildest forms of the [PSI+], [URE3] and [PIN+] prions impart > 1% growth/survival detriment on their hosts. Our estimate of outcrossing suggests that Saccharomyces cerevisiae is far more sexual than previously thought and would therefore be more responsive to the adaptive effects of natural selection compared with a strictly asexual yeast. Further, given its large effective population size, a growth/survival detriment of > 1% for yeast prions should strongly select against prion-infected strains in wild populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23764836

  15. Heat shock response improves heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Österlund, Tobias; Liu, Zihe;

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used platform for the production of heterologous proteins of medical or industrial interest. However, heterologous protein productivity is often low due to limitations of the host strain. Heat shock response (HSR) is an inducible, global, cellular...... stress response, which facilitates the cell recovery from many forms of stress, e.g., heat stress. In S. cerevisiae, HSR is regulated mainly by the transcription factor heat shock factor (Hsf1p) and many of its targets are genes coding for molecular chaperones that promote protein folding and prevent...... the accumulation of mis-folded or aggregated proteins. In this work, we over-expressed a mutant HSF1 gene HSF1-R206S which can constitutively activate HSR, so the heat shock response was induced at different levels, and we studied the impact of HSR on heterologous protein secretion. We found that moderate and high...

  16. ACTIVITY OF SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE ENZYME IN YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blažena Lavová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS with reactive nitrogen species (RNS are known to play dual role in biological systems, they can be harmful or beneficial to living systems. ROS can be important mediators of damage to cell structures, including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids termed as oxidative stress. The antioxidant enzymes protect the organism against the oxidative damage caused by active oxygen forms. The role of superoxide dismutase (SOD is to accelerate the dismutation of the toxic superoxide radical, produced during oxidative energy processes, to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. In this study, SOD activity of three yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae was determined. It was found that SOD activity was the highest (23.7 U.mg-1 protein in strain 612 after 28 hours of cultivation. The lowest SOD activity from all tested strains was found after 56 hours of cultivation of strain Gyöng (0.7 U.mg-1 protein.

  17. 高效表达木糖醇脱氢酶基因酿酒酵母的构建及木酮糖发酵的初步研究%Construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain Expressing Xylitol Dehydrogenase Gene Efficiently and Primary Study of Its Xylulose Fermentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈高云; 刘敏; 叶凯; 张元忠; 涂振东; 于孟斌

    2011-01-01

    通过RT—PCR方法克隆得到Candidatropicalis木糖醇脱氢酶基因xyl2,将该基因连入酵母表达载体pYES2的诱导型启动子GAL1下,构建表达质粒pYES2-xyl2;同时用从Pichiapastoris中克隆获取的甘油醛磷酸脱氢酶基因GAP换下GAL1基因,构建含组成型启动子GAP基因的表达质粒pYES2-GAP—xyl2;通过电转化法将其依次转入酿酒酵母S.cerevisiaeINVSc1,山梨醇培养基上筛选的转化子经木糖醇梯度驯化培养,筛选出1株耐木糖醇浓度为20%的酿酒酵母重组菌株ZCX4和1株在半乳糖诱导下耐木糖醇浓度为15%的重组菌株YDX2。酶活测定表明。重组菌株ZCX4比酶活0.621U/mg(蛋白),是YDX2比酶活的2.29倍。摇瓶发酵结果显示,重组菌株ZCX4木糖醇消耗76.46g/L,木糖醇消耗率为76.46%,是重组茵株YDX2木糖醇消耗率的1.63倍,说明木糖醇脱氢酶实现了高效表达。%Yeast expression vector pYES2-xyl2 was constructed by cloning xylitol dehydrogenase gene xyl2, which originated from Candida tropicalis and placed under the inducible promoter GALl of the vector. Meanwhile, the other yeast expression vector pYES2-GAP-xyI2 containing the constitutive strong promoter GAP gene instead ofGAL gene was constructed. The plasmids containing xyl2 gene were transformed into industrial strain of S.cerevisiae INVScl by electroporation. The recombinant transformants ZCX4 and YDX2 grew well on plates in condition of high-concentration xylitol. The xylitol dehydrogenase specific activity of recombinant strain ZCX4 was 0.621 U/mg protein, 2.39 times as much as the recombinant strain YDX2, In addition, flask-shaking fermentation results revealed that the consumption of xylitol for ZCX4 was 76.46 g/L, 1.63 times as much as the recombinant strain YDX2. The results demonstrated that the recombinant stain could utilize xylitol efficiently by xylulose fermentation.

  18. Construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Improved Stress Tolerance and Ethanol Fermentation Performance through Metabolic Engineering and Genome Recombination%代谢工程与全基因组重组构建酿酒酵母抗逆高产乙醇菌株

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓阳; 杜风光; 池小琴; 王品美; 郑道琼; 吴雪昌

    2011-01-01

    Some environmental stresses. i. e. , high osmotic stress, fluctuating temperature and ethanol concentration, will greatly influence the viability and capability of the yeast S. cerevisiae strains during ethanol fermentation. In this study, we constructed a series of yeast strains with improved stress tolerances and ethanol fermentation performance through trehalose metabolism engineering combined with hybridization-based whole genome recombination. Firstly, two haploid strains , Z1 and Z2 isolated from the diploid strain 2d4, were engineered to enhance the intracellular trehalose by ( 1 ) overexpression of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase gene TPS1 (Z1ptps1 and Z2ptps1 ) , (2) deletion of acidic trehalase gene ATH1 (Z1Δath1 and Z2Δath1 ) , and (3)TPS1 overexpression combined with ATH1 deletion ( Z1pTΔA and Z2pTΔA ) . We then obtained four recombination strains (Z12, Z12ptps1 , Z12Δath1 and Z12pTΔA) through the hybridization of Z1 and Z2 , and their engineered strains. The results of high-gravity fermentation (270 g/L glucose) showed that TPS1 overexpression combined with ATH1 deletion had a distinct advantage in the improvement of stress tolerance over the single genetic manipulation. Compared to the original strain Zd4 and Z12, the strain Z12pTΔA ( the hybrid of Z1pTΔA and Z2pTΔA) improved the fermentation rate by 11.4% and ethanol yield by 7. 0% , while the strain Z12 without metabolic engineering only increased the main fermentation rate by 4. 8% and ethanol yield by 2. 8% . These improvements of fermentation performance consisted with their tolerances of the constructed strains under the conditions with osmotic pressure, high temperature and high concentration of ethanol. The combination of trehalose metabolic engineering and genome recombinant technology could effectively improve the stress tolerance and the ethanol fermentation performance of the industrial S. cerevisiae strains is demonstrated, and an innovative strategy for industrial yeast

  19. Breeding of lager yeast with Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves stress resistance and fermentation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Sanchez, Rosa; Solodovnikova, Natalia; Wendland, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Lager beer brewing relies on strains collectively known as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, which are hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus-like strains. Lager yeasts are particularly adapted to low-temperature fermentations. Selection of new yeast strains for improved traits or fermentation performance is laborious, due to the allotetraploid nature of lager yeasts. Initially, we have generated new F1 hybrids by classical genetics, using spore clones of lager yeast and S. cerevisiae and complementation of auxotrophies of the single strains upon mating. These hybrids were improved on several parameters, including growth at elevated temperature and resistance against high osmolarity or high ethanol concentrations. Due to the uncertainty of chromosomal make-up of lager yeast spore clones, we introduced molecular markers to analyse mating-type composition by PCR. Based on these results, new hybrids between a lager and an ale yeast strain were isolated by micromanipulation. These hybrids were not subject to genetic modification. We generated and verified 13 hybrid strains. All of these hybrid strains showed improved stress resistance as seen in the ale parent, including improved survival at the end of fermentation. Importantly, some of the strains showed improved fermentation rates using 18° Plato at 18-25°C. Uniparental mitochondrial DNA inheritance was observed mostly from the S. cerevisiae parent.

  20. Advances in metabolic engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up the deve......Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up...... the development of yeast cell factories. We also present an overview of metabolic engineering strategies for developing yeast strains for production of polymer monomers: lactic, succinic, and cis,cis-muconic acids. S. cerevisiae has already firmly established itself as a cell factory in industrial biotechnology...... and the advances in yeast strain engineering will stimulate development of novel yeast-based processes for chemicals production....

  1. Whole Genome Analysis of a Wine Yeast Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Hauser, Nicole C.; Kurt Fellenberg; Rosario Gil; Sonja Bastuck; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Pérez-Ortín, José E.

    2001-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains frequently exhibit rather specific phenotypic features needed for adaptation to a special environment. Wine yeast strains are able to ferment musts, for example, while other industrial or laboratory strains fail to do so. The genetic differences that characterize wine yeast strains are poorly understood, however. As a first search of genetic differences between wine and laboratory strains, we performed DNA-array analyses on the typical wine yeast strain T73 an...

  2. Background Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Hyytiäinen, Kari; Saraiva, Sofia;

    2016-01-01

    This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders.......This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders....

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism: a comparative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiren Karathia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Model organisms are used for research because they provide a framework on which to develop and optimize methods that facilitate and standardize analysis. Such organisms should be representative of the living beings for which they are to serve as proxy. However, in practice, a model organism is often selected ad hoc, and without considering its representativeness, because a systematic and rational method to include this consideration in the selection process is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work we propose such a method and apply it in a pilot study of strengths and limitations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. The method relies on the functional classification of proteins into different biological pathways and processes and on full proteome comparisons between the putative model organism and other organisms for which we would like to extrapolate results. Here we compare S. cerevisiae to 704 other organisms from various phyla. For each organism, our results identify the pathways and processes for which S. cerevisiae is predicted to be a good model to extrapolate from. We find that animals in general and Homo sapiens in particular are some of the non-fungal organisms for which S. cerevisiae is likely to be a good model in which to study a significant fraction of common biological processes. We validate our approach by correctly predicting which organisms are phenotypically more distant from S. cerevisiae with respect to several different biological processes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The method we propose could be used to choose appropriate substitute model organisms for the study of biological processes in other species that are harder to study. For example, one could identify appropriate models to study either pathologies in humans or specific biological processes in species with a long development time, such as plants.

  4. Natural and modified promoters for tailored metabolic engineering of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubmann, Georg; Thevelein, Johan M; Nevoigt, Elke

    2014-01-01

    The ease of highly sophisticated genetic manipulations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has initiated numerous initiatives towards development of metabolically engineered strains for novel applications beyond its traditional use in brewing, baking, and wine making. In fact, baker's yeast has be

  5. Malic acid production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: engineering of pyruvate carbosylation, oxaloacetate reduction and malate export

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, R.M.; Hulster, de E.; Winden, van W.A.; Waard, de P.; Dijkema, C.; Winkler, A.A.; Geertman, J.M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Malic acid is a potential biomass-derivable "building block" for chemical synthesis. Since wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains produce only low levels of malate, metabolic engineering is required to achieve efficient malate production with this yeast. A promising pathway for malate production

  6. Ethanol Production from Sago Waste Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae Vits-M1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Subashini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the biotechnological production of ethanol from sago waste materials. As petroleum has become depleted, renewable energy production has started to gain attention all over the world, including the production of ethanol from sago wastes. In our research we have standardized the production of ethanol from sago wastes using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain isolated from molasses. The production of ethanol was carried out by means of simultaneous saccharification with acids, followed by fermentation. The yeast strains were isolated from either batter or molasses and the taxonomy was studied by phenotypic characters in comparison with the standard strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 173. Among the two isolated strains, S. cerevisiae VITS-M1 isolated from molasses showed better survival rate in different sugars such as glucose, sucrose, maltose and galactose except lactose; it also showed better survival rate at high ethanol concentration and at acidic pH. The saccharification process of sago liquid waste and solid waste was standardized using hydrochloric acid and sulphuric acid under different treatments. The fermented product, ethanol was distilled using laboratory model distillation unit and measured qualitatively using gas chromatography in comparison with the standard analytical grade ethanol. The overall experimental data indicates that the sago liquid waste yielded more ethanol by simultaneous saccharification with 0.3N HCl and 0.3N H2SO4 and fermentation with the S. cerevisiae VITS-M1 isolated from molasses.

  7. Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Double-Stranded RNA Virus L-A-28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalovas, Aleksandras; Serviené, Elena; Serva, Saulius

    2016-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced the complete genome of the L-A-28 virus from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K28 killer strain. This sequence completes the set of currently identified L-A helper viruses required for expression of double-stranded RNA-originated killer phenotypes in baking yeast. PMID:27313294

  8. Malic Acid Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Engineering of Pyruvate Carboxylation, Oxaloacetate Reduction, and Malate Export

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, R.M.; De Hulster, E.; Van Winden, W.A.; De Waard, P.; Dijkema, C.; Winkler, A.A.; Geertman, J.M.; Van Dijken, J.P.; Pronk, J.T.; Van Maris, A.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Malic acid is a potential biomass-derivable "building block" for chemical synthesis. Since wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains produce only low levels of malate, metabolic engineering is required to achieve efficient malate production with this yeast. A promising pathway for malate production

  9. Catalase Overexpression Reduces Lactic Acid-Induced Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, D.A.; Suir, E.; Duong, G.H.; De Hulster, E.; Pronk, J.T.; Van Maris, A.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Industrial production of lactic acid with the current pyruvate decarboxylase-negative Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains requires aeration to allow for respiratory generation of ATP to facilitate growth and, even under nongrowing conditions, cellular maintenance. In the current study, we observed an i

  10. Cytotoxicity mechanism of two naphthoquinones (menadione and plumbagin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Augusto Vieira Castro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Quinones are compounds extensively used in studies of oxidative stress due to their role in plants as chemicals for defense. These compounds are of great interest for pharmacologists and scientists, in general, because several cancer chemotherapeutic agents contain the quinone nucleus. However, due to differences in structures and diverse pharmacological effects, the exact toxicity mechanisms exerted by quinones are far from elucidatation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we evaluated the main mechanisms of toxicity of two naphthoquinones, menadione and plumbagin, by determining tolerance and oxidative stress biomarkers such as GSH and GSSG, lipid peroxidation levels, as well as aconitase activity. The importance of glutathione transferases (GST in quinone detoxification was also addressed. The GSSG/GSH ratio showed that menadione seemed to exert its toxicity mainly through the generation of ROS while plumbagin acted as an electrophile reacting with GSH. However, the results showed that, even by different pathways, both drugs were capable of generating oxidative stress through their toxic effects. Our results showed that the control strain, BY4741, and the glutathione transferase deficient strains (gtt1Delta and gtt2Delta were sensitive to both compounds. With respect to the role of GST isoforms in cellular protection against quinone toxicity, we observed that the Gtt2 deficient strain was unable to overcome lipid peroxidation, even after a plumbagin pre-treatment, indicating that this treatment did not improve tolerance when compared with the wild type strain. Cross-tolerance experiments confirmed distinct cytotoxicity mechanisms for these naphthoquinones since only a pre-treatment with menadione was able to induce acquisition of tolerance against stress with plumbagin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest different responses to menadione and plumbagin which could be due to the fact that

  11. Bread, beer and wine: Saccharomyces cerevisiae diversity reflects human history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Merdinoglu, Didier; Cornuet, Jean-Marie; Karst, Francis

    2007-05-01

    Fermented beverages and foods have played a significant role in most societies worldwide for millennia. To better understand how the yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main fermenting agent, evolved along this historical and expansion process, we analysed the genetic diversity among 651 strains from 56 different geographical origins, worldwide. Their genotyping at 12 microsatellite loci revealed 575 distinct genotypes organized in subgroups of yeast types, i.e. bread, beer, wine, sake. Some of these groups presented unexpected relatedness: Bread strains displayed a combination of alleles intermediate between beer and wine strains, and strains used for rice wine and sake were most closely related to beer and bread strains. However, up to 28% of genetic diversity between these technological groups was associated with geographical differences which suggests local domestications. Focusing on wine yeasts, a group of Lebanese strains were basal in an F(ST) tree, suggesting a Mesopotamia-based origin of most wine strains. In Europe, migration of wine strains occurred through the Danube Valley, and around the Mediterranean Sea. An approximate Bayesian computation approach suggested a postglacial divergence (most probable period 10,000-12,000 bp). As our results suggest intimate association between man and wine yeast across centuries, we hypothesize that yeast followed man and vine migrations as a commensal member of grapevine flora.

  12. Bread, beer and wine: Saccharomyces cerevisiae diversity reflects human history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Merdinoglu, Didier; Cornuet, Jean-Marie; Karst, Francis

    2007-05-01

    Fermented beverages and foods have played a significant role in most societies worldwide for millennia. To better understand how the yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main fermenting agent, evolved along this historical and expansion process, we analysed the genetic diversity among 651 strains from 56 different geographical origins, worldwide. Their genotyping at 12 microsatellite loci revealed 575 distinct genotypes organized in subgroups of yeast types, i.e. bread, beer, wine, sake. Some of these groups presented unexpected relatedness: Bread strains displayed a combination of alleles intermediate between beer and wine strains, and strains used for rice wine and sake were most closely related to beer and bread strains. However, up to 28% of genetic diversity between these technological groups was associated with geographical differences which suggests local domestications. Focusing on wine yeasts, a group of Lebanese strains were basal in an F(ST) tree, suggesting a Mesopotamia-based origin of most wine strains. In Europe, migration of wine strains occurred through the Danube Valley, and around the Mediterranean Sea. An approximate Bayesian computation approach suggested a postglacial divergence (most probable period 10,000-12,000 bp). As our results suggest intimate association between man and wine yeast across centuries, we hypothesize that yeast followed man and vine migrations as a commensal member of grapevine flora. PMID:17498234

  13. Osmo-, thermo- and ethanol- tolerances of Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrasegarampillai Balakumar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1, which is a locally isolated and improved strain showed viability at 40, 45 and 50ºC and produced ethanol at 40, 43 and 45ºC. When the cells were given heat shock at 45ºC for 30min and grown at 40ºC, 100% viability was observed for 60h, and addition of 200gl-1 ethanol has led to complete cell death at 30h. Heat shock given at 45ºC (for 30min has improved the tolerance to temperature induced ethanol shock leading to 37% viability at 30h. when the cells were subjected to ethanol (200gl-1 for 30 min and osmotic shock (sorbitol 300gl-1, trehalose contents in the cells were increased. The heat shocked cells showed better viability in presence of added ethanol. Soy flour supplementation has improved the viability of S. cerevisiae S1 to 80% in presence of 100gl-1 added ethanol and to 60% in presence of 300gl-1 sorbitol. In presence of sorbitol (200gl-1 and ethanol (50gl-1 at 40ºC, 46% viability was retained by S. cerevisiae S1 at 48h and it was improved to 80% by soy flour supplementation.

  14. Quantitative transcription dynamic analysis reveals candidate genes and key regulators for ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Menggen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Derived from our lignocellulosic conversion inhibitor-tolerant yeast, we generated an ethanol-tolerant strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-50316 by enforced evolutionary adaptation. Using a newly developed robust mRNA reference and a master equation unifying gene expression data analyses, we investigated comparative quantitative transcription dynamics of 175 genes selected from previous studies for an ethanol-tolerant yeast and its closely related parental strain. Results A highly fitted master equation was established and applied for quantitative gene expression analyses using pathway-based qRT-PCR array assays. The ethanol-tolerant Y-50316 displayed significantly enriched background of mRNA abundance for at least 35 genes without ethanol challenge compared with its parental strain Y-50049. Under the ethanol challenge, the tolerant Y-50316 responded in consistent expressions over time for numerous genes belonging to groups of heat shock proteins, trehalose metabolism, glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, pleiotropic drug resistance gene family and transcription factors. The parental strain showed repressed expressions for many genes and was unable to withstand the ethanol stress and establish a viable culture and fermentation. The distinct expression dynamics between the two strains and their close association with cell growth, viability and ethanol fermentation profiles distinguished the tolerance-response from the stress-response in yeast under the ethanol challenge. At least 82 genes were identified as candidate and key genes for ethanol-tolerance and subsequent fermentation under the stress. Among which, 36 genes were newly recognized by the present study. Most of the ethanol-tolerance candidate genes were found to share protein binding motifs of transcription factors Msn4p/Msn2p, Yap1p, Hsf1p and Pdr1p/Pdr3p. Conclusion Enriched background of transcription abundance

  15. Domestication and Divergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Beer Yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallone, Brigida; Steensels, Jan; Prahl, Troels; Soriaga, Leah; Saels, Veerle; Herrera-Malaver, Beatriz; Merlevede, Adriaan; Roncoroni, Miguel; Voordeckers, Karin; Miraglia, Loren; Teiling, Clotilde; Steffy, Brian; Taylor, Maryann; Schwartz, Ariel; Richardson, Toby; White, Christopher; Baele, Guy; Maere, Steven; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2016-09-01

    Whereas domestication of livestock, pets, and crops is well documented, it is still unclear to what extent microbes associated with the production of food have also undergone human selection and where the plethora of industrial strains originates from. Here, we present the genomes and phenomes of 157 industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. Our analyses reveal that today's industrial yeasts can be divided into five sublineages that are genetically and phenotypically separated from wild strains and originate from only a few ancestors through complex patterns of domestication and local divergence. Large-scale phenotyping and genome analysis further show strong industry-specific selection for stress tolerance, sugar utilization, and flavor production, while the sexual cycle and other phenotypes related to survival in nature show decay, particularly in beer yeasts. Together, these results shed light on the origins, evolutionary history, and phenotypic diversity of industrial yeasts and provide a resource for further selection of superior strains. PAPERCLIP.

  16. Genetic dissection of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Peng; Xiao, Yin; Hu, Yun; Sun, Haiye; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Gui-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Dissection of the hereditary architecture underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for ethanol fermentation. In this work, a genomics approach was used to dissect hereditary variations in acetic acid tolerance between two phenotypically different strains. A total of 160 segregants derived from these two strains were obtained. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the acetic acid tolerance displayed a normal distribution in these segregants, and suggested that the acetic acid tolerant traits were controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Thus, 220 SSR markers covering the whole genome were used to detect QTLs of acetic acid tolerant traits. As a result, three QTLs were located on chromosomes 9, 12, and 16, respectively, which explained 38.8-65.9 % of the range of phenotypic variation. Furthermore, twelve genes of the candidates fell into the three QTL regions by integrating the QTL analysis with candidates of acetic acid tolerant genes. These results provided a novel avenue to obtain more robust strains.

  17. Domestication and Divergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Beer Yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallone, Brigida; Steensels, Jan; Prahl, Troels; Soriaga, Leah; Saels, Veerle; Herrera-Malaver, Beatriz; Merlevede, Adriaan; Roncoroni, Miguel; Voordeckers, Karin; Miraglia, Loren; Teiling, Clotilde; Steffy, Brian; Taylor, Maryann; Schwartz, Ariel; Richardson, Toby; White, Christopher; Baele, Guy; Maere, Steven; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2016-09-01

    Whereas domestication of livestock, pets, and crops is well documented, it is still unclear to what extent microbes associated with the production of food have also undergone human selection and where the plethora of industrial strains originates from. Here, we present the genomes and phenomes of 157 industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. Our analyses reveal that today's industrial yeasts can be divided into five sublineages that are genetically and phenotypically separated from wild strains and originate from only a few ancestors through complex patterns of domestication and local divergence. Large-scale phenotyping and genome analysis further show strong industry-specific selection for stress tolerance, sugar utilization, and flavor production, while the sexual cycle and other phenotypes related to survival in nature show decay, particularly in beer yeasts. Together, these results shed light on the origins, evolutionary history, and phenotypic diversity of industrial yeasts and provide a resource for further selection of superior strains. PAPERCLIP. PMID:27610566

  18. Outcrossing, mitotic recombination, and life-history trade-offs shape genome evolution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Magwene, Paul M.; Kayıkçı, Ömür; Granek, Joshua A.; Reininga, Jennifer M.; Scholl, Zackary; Murray, Debra

    2011-01-01

    We carried out a population genomic survey of Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid isolates and find that many budding yeast strains have high levels of genomic heterozygosity, much of which is likely due to outcrossing. We demonstrate that variation in heterozygosity among strains is correlated with a life-history trade-off that involves how readily yeast switch from asexual to sexual reproduction under nutrient stress. This trade-off is reflected in a negative relationship between sporulation e...

  19. Metabolomic approach for improving ethanol stress tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Erika; Nakayama, Yasumune; Mukai, Yukio; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2016-04-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used for brewing and ethanol production. The ethanol sensitivity of yeast cells is still a serious problem during ethanol fermentation, and a variety of genetic approaches (e.g., random mutant screening under selective pressure of ethanol) have been developed to improve ethanol tolerance. In this study, we developed a strategy for improving ethanol tolerance of yeast cells based on metabolomics as a high-resolution quantitative phenotypic analysis. We performed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis to identify and quantify 36 compounds on 14 mutant strains including knockout strains for transcription factor and metabolic enzyme genes. A strong relation between metabolome of these mutants and their ethanol tolerance was observed. Data mining of the metabolomic analysis showed that several compounds (such as trehalose, valine, inositol and proline) contributed highly to ethanol tolerance. Our approach successfully detected well-known ethanol stress related metabolites such as trehalose and proline thus, to further prove our strategy, we focused on valine and inositol as the most promising target metabolites in our study. Our results show that simultaneous deletion of LEU4 and LEU9 (leading to accumulation of valine) or INM1 and INM2 (leading to reduction of inositol) significantly enhanced ethanol tolerance. This study shows the potential of the metabolomic approach to identify target genes for strain improvement of S. cerevisiae with higher ethanol tolerance.

  20. Symmetric cell division in pseudohyphae of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Kron, S J; Styles, C. A.; Fink, G R

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are dimorphic; in response to nitrogen starvation they switch from a yeast form (YF) to a filamentous pseudohyphal (PH) form. Time-lapse video microscopy of dividing cells reveals that YF and PH cells differ in their cell cycles and budding polarity. The YF cell cycle is controlled at the G1/S transition by the cell-size checkpoint Start. YF cells divide asymmetrically, producing small daughters from full-sized mothers. As a result, mothers and d...

  1. Laboratory evolution of copper tolerant yeast strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamo Giusy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast strains endowed with robustness towards copper and/or enriched in intracellular Cu might find application in biotechnology processes, among others in the production of functional foods. Moreover, they can contribute to the study of human diseases related to impairments of copper metabolism. In this study, we investigated the molecular and physiological factors that confer copper tolerance to strains of baker's yeasts. Results We characterized the effects elicited in natural strains of Candida humilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the exposure to copper in the culture broth. We observed that, whereas the growth of Saccharomyces cells was inhibited already at low Cu concentration, C. humilis was naturally robust and tolerated up to 1 g · L-1 CuSO4 in the medium. This resistant strain accumulated over 7 mg of Cu per gram of biomass and escaped severe oxidative stress thanks to high constitutive levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase. Both yeasts were then "evolved" to obtain hyper-resistant cells able to proliferate in high copper medium. While in S. cerevisiae the evolution of robustness towards Cu was paralleled by the increase of antioxidative enzymes, these same activities decreased in evolved hyper-resistant Candida cells. We also characterized in some detail changes in the profile of copper binding proteins, that appeared to be modified by evolution but, again, in a different way in the two yeasts. Conclusions Following evolution, both Candida and Saccharomyces cells were able to proliferate up to 2.5 g · L-1 CuSO4 and to accumulate high amounts of intracellular copper. The comparison of yeasts differing in their robustness, allowed highlighting physiological and molecular determinants of natural and acquired copper tolerance. We observed that different mechanisms contribute to confer metal tolerance: the control of copper uptake, changes in the levels of enzymes involved in oxidative stress response and

  2. Molecular and process design for rotavirus-like particle production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palomares Laura A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virus-like particles (VLP have an increasing range of applications including vaccination, drug delivery, diagnostics, gene therapy and nanotechnology. These developments require large quantities of particles that need to be obtained in efficient and economic processes. Production of VLP in yeast is attractive, as it is a low-cost protein producer able to assemble viral structural proteins into VLP. However, to date only single-layered VLP with simple architecture have been produced in this system. In this work, the first steps required for the production of rotavirus-like particles (RLP in S. cerevisiae were implemented and improved, in order to obtain the recombinant protein concentrations required for VLP assembly. Results The genes of the rotavirus structural proteins VP2, VP6 and VP7 were cloned in four Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains using different plasmid and promoter combinations to express one or three proteins in the same cell. Performance of the best constructs was evaluated in batch and fed-batch cultures using a complete synthetic media supplemented with leucine, glutamate and succinate. The strain used had an important effect on recombinant protein concentration, while the type of plasmid, centromeric (YCp or episomal (YEp, did not affect protein yields. Fed-batch culture of the PD.U-267 strain resulted in the highest concentration of rotavirus proteins. Volumetric and specific productivities increased 28.5- and 11-fold, respectively, in comparison with batch cultures. Expression of the three rotavirus proteins was confirmed by immunoblotting and RLP were detected using transmission electron microscopy. Conclusions We present for the first time the use of yeast as a platform to express multilayered rotavirus-like particles. The present study shows that the combined use of molecular and bioprocess tools allowed the production of triple-layered rotavirus RLP. Production of VLP with complex architecture in yeasts

  3. Engineering the pentose phosphate pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of ethanol and xylitol

    OpenAIRE

    Toivari, Mervi

    2007-01-01

    The baker s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a long tradition in alcohol production from D-glucose of e.g. starch. However, without genetic modifications it is unable to utilise the 5-carbon sugars D-xylose and L arabinose present in plant biomass. In this study, one key metabolic step of the catabolic D-xylose pathway in recombinant D-xylose-utilising S. cerevisiae strains was studied. This step, carried out by xylulokinase (XK), was shown to be rate-limiting, because overexpression of the...

  4. Engineering of carbon catabolite repression in recombinant xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Haack, Martin Brian; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2004-01-01

    Two xylose-fermenting glucose-derepressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were constructed in order to investigate the influence of carbon catabolite repression on xylose metabolism. S. cerevisiae CPB.CR2 (Deltamig1, XYL1, XYL2, XKS1) and CPB.MBH2 (Deltamig1, Deltamig2, XYL1, XYL2, XKS1) were...... of CPB.CR2, where the cells are assumed to grow under non-repressive conditions as they sense almost no glucose, invertase activity was lower during growth on xylose and glucose than on glucose only. The 3-fold reduction in invertase activity could only be attributed to the presence of xylose, suggesting...

  5. A trans-acting Variant within the Transcription Factor RIM101 Interacts with Genetic Background to Determine its Regulatory Capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Read

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most genetic variants associated with disease occur within regulatory regions of the genome, underscoring the importance of defining the mechanisms underlying differences in regulation of gene expression between individuals. We discovered a pair of co-regulated, divergently oriented transcripts, AQY2 and ncFRE6, that are expressed in one strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ∑1278b, but not in another, S288c. By combining classical genetics techniques with high-throughput sequencing, we identified a trans-acting single nucleotide polymorphism within the transcription factor RIM101 that causes the background-dependent expression of both transcripts. Subsequent RNA-seq experiments revealed that RIM101 regulates many more targets in S288c than in ∑1278b and that deletion of RIM101 in both backgrounds abrogates the majority of differential expression between the strains. Strikingly, only three transcripts undergo a significant change in expression after swapping RIM101 alleles between backgrounds, implying that the differences in the RIM101 allele lead to a remarkably focused transcriptional response. However, hundreds of RIM101-dependent targets undergo a subtle but consistent shift in expression in the S288c RIM101-swapped strain, but not its ∑1278b counterpart. We conclude that ∑1278b may harbor a variant(s that buffers against widespread transcriptional dysregulation upon introduction of a non-native RIM101 allele, emphasizing the importance of accounting for genetic background when assessing the impact of a regulatory variant.

  6. A trans-acting Variant within the Transcription Factor RIM101 Interacts with Genetic Background to Determine its Regulatory Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Timothy; Richmond, Phillip A; Dowell, Robin D

    2016-01-01

    Most genetic variants associated with disease occur within regulatory regions of the genome, underscoring the importance of defining the mechanisms underlying differences in regulation of gene expression between individuals. We discovered a pair of co-regulated, divergently oriented transcripts, AQY2 and ncFRE6, that are expressed in one strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ∑1278b, but not in another, S288c. By combining classical genetics techniques with high-throughput sequencing, we identified a trans-acting single nucleotide polymorphism within the transcription factor RIM101 that causes the background-dependent expression of both transcripts. Subsequent RNA-seq experiments revealed that RIM101 regulates many more targets in S288c than in ∑1278b and that deletion of RIM101 in both backgrounds abrogates the majority of differential expression between the strains. Strikingly, only three transcripts undergo a significant change in expression after swapping RIM101 alleles between backgrounds, implying that the differences in the RIM101 allele lead to a remarkably focused transcriptional response. However, hundreds of RIM101-dependent targets undergo a subtle but consistent shift in expression in the S288c RIM101-swapped strain, but not its ∑1278b counterpart. We conclude that ∑1278b may harbor a variant(s) that buffers against widespread transcriptional dysregulation upon introduction of a non-native RIM101 allele, emphasizing the importance of accounting for genetic background when assessing the impact of a regulatory variant.

  7. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae fungemia in an elderly patient following probiotic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Zehra; Gurol, Yeşim; Sonmezoglu, Meral; Eren, Hatice Seyma; Celik, Gülden; Kantarci, Gülçin

    2014-04-01

    caspofungin 1 x 50 mg on the fifth day. After seven days of therapy CRP and serum creatinine levels decreased to 9.1 mg/L and 1.2 mg/dl, respectively; and she was discharged from the hospital with improvement. The probiotic capsules were used unopen, thus, it was proposed that S.cerevisiae fungemia originated from translocation from the intestinal mucosa. Since it was not possible to investigate the molecular genetics of the strain isolated from the blood culture and the strain present in the probiotic, a definite conclusion about the origin of the strain could not be reached. It was thought that old age and underlying disease of the patient were the related predisposing factors for S.cerevisiae fungemia. This case emphasized that clinicians should be cautious in case of probiotic application even though in encapsulated form, even in immunocompetent patients with a history of long-term hospital stay and use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials since there may be a risk of S.cerevisiae fungemia development. PMID:24819274

  8. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae fungemia in an elderly patient following probiotic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Zehra; Gurol, Yeşim; Sonmezoglu, Meral; Eren, Hatice Seyma; Celik, Gülden; Kantarci, Gülçin

    2014-04-01

    caspofungin 1 x 50 mg on the fifth day. After seven days of therapy CRP and serum creatinine levels decreased to 9.1 mg/L and 1.2 mg/dl, respectively; and she was discharged from the hospital with improvement. The probiotic capsules were used unopen, thus, it was proposed that S.cerevisiae fungemia originated from translocation from the intestinal mucosa. Since it was not possible to investigate the molecular genetics of the strain isolated from the blood culture and the strain present in the probiotic, a definite conclusion about the origin of the strain could not be reached. It was thought that old age and underlying disease of the patient were the related predisposing factors for S.cerevisiae fungemia. This case emphasized that clinicians should be cautious in case of probiotic application even though in encapsulated form, even in immunocompetent patients with a history of long-term hospital stay and use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials since there may be a risk of S.cerevisiae fungemia development.

  9. Improvement of galactose uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through overexpression of phosphoglucomutase: Example of transcript analysis as a tool in inverse metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Christoffer; Knudsen, S.; Regenberg, Birgitte;

    2005-01-01

    Through genome-wide transcript analysis of a reference strain and two recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different rates of galactose uptake, we obtained information about the global transcriptional response to metabolic engineering of the GAL gene regulatory network. One of the re......Through genome-wide transcript analysis of a reference strain and two recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different rates of galactose uptake, we obtained information about the global transcriptional response to metabolic engineering of the GAL gene regulatory network. One...

  10. Dual utilization of NADPH and NADH cofactors enhances xylitol production in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jung-Hyun; Oh, Sun-Young; Lee, Hyeun-Soo; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    Xylitol, a natural sweetener, can be produced by hydrogenation of xylose in hemicelluloses. In microbial processes, utilization of only NADPH cofactor limited commercialization of xylitol biosynthesis. To overcome this drawback, Saccharomyces cerevisiae D452-2 was engineered to express two types of xylose reductase (XR) with either NADPH-dependence or NADH-preference. Engineered S. cerevisiae DWM expressing both the XRs exhibited higher xylitol productivity than the yeast strain expressing NADPH-dependent XR only (DWW) in both batch and glucose-limited fed-batch cultures. Furthermore, the coexpression of S. cerevisiae ZWF1 and ACS1 genes in the DWM strain increased intracellular concentrations of NADPH and NADH and improved maximum xylitol productivity by 17%, relative to that for the DWM strain. Finally, the optimized fed-batch fermentation of S. cerevisiae DWM-ZWF1-ACS1 resulted in 196.2 g/L xylitol concentration, 4.27 g/L h productivity and almost the theoretical yield. Expression of the two types of XR utilizing both NADPH and NADH is a promising strategy to meet the industrial demands for microbial xylitol production. PMID:26470683

  11. Cytosolic re-localization and optimization of valine synthesis and catabolism enables inseased isobutanol production with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Brat Dawid; Weber Christian; Lorenzen Wolfram; Bode Helge B; Boles Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The branched chain alcohol isobutanol exhibits superior physicochemical properties as an alternative biofuel. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae naturally produces low amounts of isobutanol as a by-product during fermentations, resulting from the catabolism of valine. As S. cerevisiae is widely used in industrial applications and can easily be modified by genetic engineering, this microorganism is a promising host for the fermentative production of higher amounts of isobut...

  12. Cytosolic re-localization and optimization of valine synthesis and catabolism enables increased isobutanol production with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Brat, Dawid; Weber, Christian; Lorenzen, Wolfram; Bode, Helge Björn; Boles, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    Background: The branched chain alcohol isobutanol exhibits superior physicochemical properties as an alternative biofuel. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae naturally produces low amounts of isobutanol as a by-product during fermentations, resulting from the catabolism of valine. As S. cerevisiae is widely used in industrial applications and can easily be modified by genetic engineering, this microorganism is a promising host for the fermentative production of higher amounts of isobutanol. ...

  13. The resistance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the biocide polyhexamethylene biguanide: involvement of cell wall integrity pathway and emerging role for YAP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Morais Marcos A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB is an antiseptic polymer that is mainly used for cleaning hospitals and pools and combating Acantamoeba infection. Its fungicide activity was recently shown by its lethal effect on yeasts that contaminate the industrial ethanol process, and on the PE-2 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the main fermenting yeasts in Brazil. This pointed to the need to know the molecular mechanism that lay behind the cell resistance to this compound. In this study, we examined the factors involved in PHMB-cell interaction and the mechanisms that respond to the damage caused by this interaction. To achieve this, two research strategies were employed: the expression of some genes by RT-qPCR and the analysis of mutant strains. Results Cell Wall integrity (CWI genes were induced in the PHMB-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain JP-1, although they are poorly expressed in the PHMB-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae PE2 strain. This suggested that PHMB damages the glucan structure on the yeast cell wall. It was also confirmed by the observed sensitivity of the yeast deletion strains, Δslg1, Δrom2, Δmkk2, Δslt2, Δknr4, Δswi4 and Δswi4, which showed that the protein kinase C (PKC regulatory mechanism is involved in the response and resistance to PHMB. The sensitivity of the Δhog1 mutant was also observed. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity assay and gene expression analysis showed that the part played by YAP1 and CTT1 genes in cell resistance to PHMB is unrelated to oxidative stress response. Thus, we suggested that Yap1p can play a role in cell wall maintenance by controlling the expression of the CWI genes. Conclusion The PHMB treatment of the yeast cells activates the PKC1/Slt2 (CWI pathway. In addition, it is suggested that HOG1 and YAP1 can play a role in the regulation of CWI genes.

  14. Growth and Glucose Repression Are Controlled by Glucose Transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells Containing Only One Glucose Transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Ling; Kruckeberg, Arthur L.; Berden, Jan A.; van Dam, Karel

    1999-01-01

    A set of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with variable expression of only the high-affinity Hxt7 glucose transporter was constructed by partial deletion of the HXT7 promoter in vitro and integration of the gene at various copy numbers into the genome of an hxt1-7 gal2 deletion strain. The glucose transport capacity increased in strains with higher levels of HXT7 expression. The consequences for various physiological properties of varying the glucose transport capacity were examined. The cont...

  15. Horizontal and vertical growth of S. cerevisiae metabolic network.

    KAUST Repository

    Grassi, Luigi

    2011-10-14

    BACKGROUND: The growth and development of a biological organism is reflected by its metabolic network, the evolution of which relies on the essential gene duplication mechanism. There are two current views about the evolution of metabolic networks. The retrograde model hypothesizes that a pathway evolves by recruiting novel enzymes in a direction opposite to the metabolic flow. The patchwork model is instead based on the assumption that the evolution is based on the exploitation of broad-specificity enzymes capable of catalysing a variety of metabolic reactions. RESULTS: We analysed a well-studied unicellular eukaryotic organism, S. cerevisiae, and studied the effect of the removal of paralogous gene products on its metabolic network. Our results, obtained using different paralog and network definitions, show that, after an initial period when gene duplication was indeed instrumental in expanding the metabolic space, the latter reached an equilibrium and subsequent gene duplications were used as a source of more specialized enzymes rather than as a source of novel reactions. We also show that the switch between the two evolutionary strategies in S. cerevisiae can be dated to about 350 million years ago. CONCLUSIONS: Our data, obtained through a novel analysis methodology, strongly supports the hypothesis that the patchwork model better explains the more recent evolution of the S. cerevisiae metabolic network. Interestingly, the effects of a patchwork strategy acting before the Euascomycete-Hemiascomycete divergence are still detectable today.

  16. Progress in Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Nevoigt, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The traditional use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation has, over time, resulted in substantial accumulated knowledge concerning genetics, physiology, and biochemistry as well as genetic engineering and fermentation technologies. S. cerevisiae has become a platform organism for developing metabolic engineering strategies, methods, and tools. The current review discusses the relevance of several engineering strategies, such as rational and inverse metabolic...

  17. Monitoring of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell proliferation on thiol-modified planar gold microelectrodes using impedance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Spegel, Christer F; Kostesha, Natalie;

    2008-01-01

    value of R,, showed over 560% increase with respect to the value obtained on the same thiol-modified electrode without cells. It was demonstrated that real-time monitoring of S. cerevisiae proliferation, with frequency-normalized imaginary admittance (real capacitance) as the indicator, was possible......An impedance spectroscopic study of the interaction between thiol-modified Au electrodes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae of strain EBY44 revealed that the cells formed an integral part of the interface, modulating the capacitive properties until a complete monolayer was obtained, whereas the charge...... transfer resistance (R-ct) to the redox process of [Fe(CN)6](3-14-) showed a linear relationship to the number of cells even beyond the monolayer coverage. R,, showed strong pH dependence upon increasing the pH of the utilized buffer to 7.2. Upon addition of S. cerevisiae cells at pH 7.2, the obtained...

  18. Functional profiling of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaever, Guri; Chu, Angela M; Ni, Li; Connelly, Carla; Riles, Linda; Véronneau, Steeve; Dow, Sally; Lucau-Danila, Ankuta; Anderson, Keith; André, Bruno; Arkin, Adam P; Astromoff, Anna; El-Bakkoury, Mohamed; Bangham, Rhonda; Benito, Rocio; Brachat, Sophie; Campanaro, Stefano; Curtiss, Matt; Davis, Karen; Deutschbauer, Adam; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Flaherty, Patrick; Foury, Francoise; Garfinkel, David J; Gerstein, Mark; Gotte, Deanna; Güldener, Ulrich; Hegemann, Johannes H; Hempel, Svenja; Herman, Zelek; Jaramillo, Daniel F; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L; Kötter, Peter; LaBonte, Darlene; Lamb, David C; Lan, Ning; Liang, Hong; Liao, Hong; Liu, Lucy; Luo, Chuanyun; Lussier, Marc; Mao, Rong; Menard, Patrice; Ooi, Siew Loon; Revuelta, Jose L; Roberts, Christopher J; Rose, Matthias; Ross-Macdonald, Petra; Scherens, Bart; Schimmack, Greg; Shafer, Brenda; Shoemaker, Daniel D; Sookhai-Mahadeo, Sharon; Storms, Reginald K; Strathern, Jeffrey N; Valle, Giorgio; Voet, Marleen; Volckaert, Guido; Wang, Ching-yun; Ward, Teresa R; Wilhelmy, Julie; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Yang, Yonghong; Yen, Grace; Youngman, Elaine; Yu, Kexin; Bussey, Howard; Boeke, Jef D; Snyder, Michael; Philippsen, Peter; Davis, Ronald W; Johnston, Mark

    2002-07-25

    Determining the effect of gene deletion is a fundamental approach to understanding gene function. Conventional genetic screens exhibit biases, and genes contributing to a phenotype are often missed. We systematically constructed a nearly complete collection of gene-deletion mutants (96% of annotated open reading frames, or ORFs) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA sequences dubbed 'molecular bar codes' uniquely identify each strain, enabling their growth to be analysed in parallel and the fitness contribution of each gene to be quantitatively assessed by hybridization to high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We show that previously known and new genes are necessary for optimal growth under six well-studied conditions: high salt, sorbitol, galactose, pH 8, minimal medium and nystatin treatment. Less than 7% of genes that exhibit a significant increase in messenger RNA expression are also required for optimal growth in four of the tested conditions. Our results validate the yeast gene-deletion collection as a valuable resource for functional genomics.

  19. Effects of proteinase A on cultivation and viability characteristics of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae WZ65

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-bo ZHANG; Hai-feng ZHANG; Qi-he CHEN; Hui RUAN; Ming-liang FU; Guo-qing HE

    2009-01-01

    Proteinase A (PrA), encoded by PEP4 gene, is a key enzyme in the vacuoles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We characterized the effects of PrA on cell growth and glucose metabolism in the industrial S. cerevisiae WZ65. It was observed that the lag phase of cell growth of partial PEP4 gene deletion mutant (36 h) and PrA-negative mutant (48 h) was significantly ex-tended, compared with the wild type strain (24 h) (P<0.05), but PrA had no effect on glucose metabolism either under shaking or steady state cultivations. The logistic model was chosen to evaluate the effect of PrA on S. cerevisiae cell growth, and PrA was found to promote cell growth against insufficient oxygen condition in steady state cultivation, but had no effect in shaking culti-vation. The effects of glucose starvation on cell growth of partial PEP4 gene deletion strain and PrA-negative mutant were also evaluated. The results show that PrA partial deficiency increased the adaption ofS. cerevisiae to unfavorable nutrient environment, but had no effect on glucose metabolism under the stress of low glucose. During heat shock test, at 60 ℃ the reduced cell viability rate (RCVR) was 10% for the wild type S. cerevisiae and 90% for both mutant strains (P<0.01), suggesting that PrA was a negative factor for S. cerevisiae cells to survive under heat shock. As temperatures rose from 60 ℃ to 70 ℃, the wild type S. cerevisiae had significantly lower relative glucose consumption rate (RGCR) (61.0% and 80.0%) than the partial mutant (78.0% and 98.5%) and the complete mutant (80.0% and 98.0%) (P<0.05), suggesting that, in coping with heat shock, cells of the PrA mutants increased their glucose consumption to survive. The present study may provide meaningful information for brewing industry; however, the role of PrA in industrial S. cerevisiae physiology is complex and needs to be further investigated.

  20. L-histidine inhibits biofilm formation and FLO11-associated phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Bou Zeidan

    Full Text Available Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an innate diversity of Flo11p which codes for a highly hydrophobic and anionic cell-wall glycoprotein with a fundamental role in biofilm formation. In this study, 380 nitrogen compounds were administered to three S. cerevisiae flor strains handling Flo11p alleles with different expression levels. S. cerevisiae strain S288c was used as the reference strain as it cannot produce Flo11p. The flor strains generally metabolized amino acids and dipeptides as the sole nitrogen source, although with some exceptions regarding L-histidine and histidine containing dipeptides. L-histidine completely inhibited growth and its effect on viability was inversely related to Flo11p expression. Accordingly, L-histidine did not affect the viability of the Δflo11 and S288c strains. Also, L-histidine dramatically decreased air-liquid biofilm formation and adhesion to polystyrene of the flor yeasts with no effect on the transcription level of the Flo11p gene. Moreover, L-histidine modified the chitin and glycans content on the cell-wall of flor yeasts. These findings reveal a novel biological activity of L-histidine in controlling the multicellular behavior of yeasts [corrected].

  1. AGAPE (Automated Genome Analysis PipelinE for pan-genome analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giltae Song

    Full Text Available The characterization and public release of genome sequences from thousands of organisms is expanding the scope for genetic variation studies. However, understanding the phenotypic consequences of genetic variation remains a challenge in eukaryotes due to the complexity of the genotype-phenotype map. One approach to this is the intensive study of model systems for which diverse sources of information can be accumulated and integrated. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an extensively studied model organism, with well-known protein functions and thoroughly curated phenotype data. To develop and expand the available resources linking genomic variation with function in yeast, we aim to model the pan-genome of S. cerevisiae. To initiate the yeast pan-genome, we newly sequenced or re-sequenced the genomes of 25 strains that are commonly used in the yeast research community using advanced sequencing technology at high quality. We also developed a pipeline for automated pan-genome analysis, which integrates the steps of assembly, annotation, and variation calling. To assign strain-specific functional annotations, we identified genes that were not present in the reference genome. We classified these according to their presence or absence across strains and characterized each group of genes with known functional and phenotypic features. The functional roles of novel genes not found in the reference genome and associated with strains or groups of strains appear to be consistent with anticipated adaptations in specific lineages. As more S. cerevisiae strain genomes are released, our analysis can be used to collate genome data and relate it to lineage-specific patterns of genome evolution. Our new tool set will enhance our understanding of genomic and functional evolution in S. cerevisiae, and will be available to the yeast genetics and molecular biology community.

  2. AGAPE (Automated Genome Analysis PipelinE) for pan-genome analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Giltae; Dickins, Benjamin J A; Demeter, Janos; Engel, Stacia; Gallagher, Jennifer; Choe, Kisurb; Dunn, Barbara; Snyder, Michael; Cherry, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    The characterization and public release of genome sequences from thousands of organisms is expanding the scope for genetic variation studies. However, understanding the phenotypic consequences of genetic variation remains a challenge in eukaryotes due to the complexity of the genotype-phenotype map. One approach to this is the intensive study of model systems for which diverse sources of information can be accumulated and integrated. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an extensively studied model organism, with well-known protein functions and thoroughly curated phenotype data. To develop and expand the available resources linking genomic variation with function in yeast, we aim to model the pan-genome of S. cerevisiae. To initiate the yeast pan-genome, we newly sequenced or re-sequenced the genomes of 25 strains that are commonly used in the yeast research community using advanced sequencing technology at high quality. We also developed a pipeline for automated pan-genome analysis, which integrates the steps of assembly, annotation, and variation calling. To assign strain-specific functional annotations, we identified genes that were not present in the reference genome. We classified these according to their presence or absence across strains and characterized each group of genes with known functional and phenotypic features. The functional roles of novel genes not found in the reference genome and associated with strains or groups of strains appear to be consistent with anticipated adaptations in specific lineages. As more S. cerevisiae strain genomes are released, our analysis can be used to collate genome data and relate it to lineage-specific patterns of genome evolution. Our new tool set will enhance our understanding of genomic and functional evolution in S. cerevisiae, and will be available to the yeast genetics and molecular biology community.

  3. Whole genome sequencing of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: from genotype to phenotype for improved metabolic engineering applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadollahi Mohammad A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The need for rapid and efficient microbial cell factory design and construction are possible through the enabling technology, metabolic engineering, which is now being facilitated by systems biology approaches. Metabolic engineering is often complimented by directed evolution, where selective pressure is applied to a partially genetically engineered strain to confer a desirable phenotype. The exact genetic modification or resulting genotype that leads to the improved phenotype is often not identified or understood to enable further metabolic engineering. Results In this work we performed whole genome high-throughput sequencing and annotation can be used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains S288c and CEN.PK113-7D. The yeast strain S288c was the first eukaryote sequenced, serving as the reference genome for the Saccharomyces Genome Database, while CEN.PK113-7D is a preferred laboratory strain for industrial biotechnology research. A total of 13,787 high-quality SNPs were detected between both strains (reference strain: S288c. Considering only metabolic genes (782 of 5,596 annotated genes, a total of 219 metabolism specific SNPs are distributed across 158 metabolic genes, with 85 of the SNPs being nonsynonymous (e.g., encoding amino acid modifications. Amongst metabolic SNPs detected, there was pathway enrichment in the galactose uptake pathway (GAL1, GAL10 and ergosterol biosynthetic pathway (ERG8, ERG9. Physiological characterization confirmed a strong deficiency in galactose uptake and metabolism in S288c compared to CEN.PK113-7D, and similarly, ergosterol content in CEN.PK113-7D was significantly higher in both glucose and galactose supplemented cultivations compared to S288c. Furthermore, DNA microarray profiling of S288c and CEN.PK113-7D in both glucose and galactose batch cultures did not provide a clear hypothesis for major phenotypes observed, suggesting that

  4. Impact of systems biology on metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Jewett, Michael Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is extremely well suited for this objective. As one of the most intensely studied eukaryotic model organisms, a rich density of knowledge detailing its genetics, biochemistry, physiology, and large-scale fermentation performance can be capitalized upon to enable a substantial increase...... in the industrial application of this yeast. Developments in genomics and high-throughput systems biology tools are enhancing one's ability to rapidly characterize cellular behaviour, which is valuable in the field of metabolic engineering where strain characterization is often the bottleneck in strain development...... programmes. Here, the impact of systems biology on metabolic engineering is reviewed and perspectives on the role of systems biology in the design of cell factories are given....

  5. Bulk segregant analysis by high-throughput sequencing reveals a novel xylose utilization gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared W Wenger

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation of xylose is a fundamental requirement for the efficient production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass sources. Although they aggressively ferment hexoses, it has long been thought that native Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains cannot grow fermentatively or non-fermentatively on xylose. Population surveys have uncovered a few naturally occurring strains that are weakly xylose-positive, and some S. cerevisiae have been genetically engineered to ferment xylose, but no strain, either natural or engineered, has yet been reported to ferment xylose as efficiently as glucose. Here, we used a medium-throughput screen to identify Saccharomyces strains that can increase in optical density when xylose is presented as the sole carbon source. We identified 38 strains that have this xylose utilization phenotype, including strains of S. cerevisiae, other sensu stricto members, and hybrids between them. All the S. cerevisiae xylose-utilizing strains we identified are wine yeasts, and for those that could produce meiotic progeny, the xylose phenotype segregates as a single gene trait. We mapped this gene by Bulk Segregant Analysis (BSA using tiling microarrays and high-throughput sequencing. The gene is a putative xylitol dehydrogenase, which we name XDH1, and is located in the subtelomeric region of the right end of chromosome XV in a region not present in the S288c reference genome. We further characterized the xylose phenotype by performing gene expression microarrays and by genetically dissecting the endogenous Saccharomyces xylose pathway. We have demonstrated that natural S. cerevisiae yeasts are capable of utilizing xylose as the sole carbon source, characterized the genetic basis for this trait as well as the endogenous xylose utilization pathway, and demonstrated the feasibility of BSA using high-throughput sequencing.

  6. Two small molecule lead compounds as new antifungal agents effective against Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yones Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available  Background: Antifungal drug resistance and few numbers of available drugs limit therapeutic options against fungal infections. The present study was designed to discover new antifungal drugs. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in two separate steps, that is, in silico lead identification and in vitro assaying of antifungal potential. A structural data file of a ternary complex of fusicuccin (legend, C terminus of H+-ATPase and 14-3-3 regulatory protein (1o9F.pdb file was used as a model. Computational screening of a virtual 3D database of drug-like molecules was performed and selected small molecules, resembling the functional part of the ligand performing ligand docking, were tested using ArgusLab (4.0.1. Two lead compounds, 3-Cyclohexan propionic acid (CXP and 4-phenyl butyric acid (PBA were selected according to their ligation scores. Standard Strains of Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used to measure the antifungal potential of the two identified lead compounds against the fungi using micro-well plate dilution assay. Results: Ligation scores for CXP and PBA were -9.33744 and -10.7259 kcal/mol, respectively, and MIC and MFC of CXP and PBA against the two yeasts were promising. Conclusion: The evidence from the present study suggests that CXP and PBA possess potentially antifungals properties. 

  7. Performance evaluation of Pichia kluyveri, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in industrial tequila fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Delgado, L; Herrera-López, E J; Arrizon, Javier; Arellano-Plaza, M; Gschaedler, A

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, industrial tequila production has used spontaneous fermentation or Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains. Despite the potential of non-Saccharomyces strains for alcoholic fermentation, few studies have been performed at industrial level with these yeasts. Therefore, in this work, Agave tequilana juice was fermented at an industrial level using two non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Pichia kluyveri and Kluyveromyces marxianus) with fermentation efficiency higher than 85 %. Pichia kluyveri (GRO3) was more efficient for alcohol and ethyl lactate production than S. cerevisiae (AR5), while Kluyveromyces marxianus (GRO6) produced more isobutanol and ethyl-acetate than S. cerevisiae (AR5). The level of volatile compounds at the end of fermentation was compared with the tequila standard regulation. All volatile compounds were within the allowed range except for methanol, which was higher for S. cerevisiae (AR5) and K. marxianus (GRO6). The variations in methanol may have been caused by the Agave tequilana used for the tests, since this compound is not synthesized by these yeasts.

  8. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transcriptional response of ADH-genes to glucose stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-Garda José

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The large sensitivity, high reproducibility and essentially unlimited dynamic range of real-time PCR to measure gene expression in complex samples provides the opportunity for powerful multivariate and multiway studies of biological phenomena. In multiway studies samples are characterized by their expression profiles to monitor changes over time, effect of treatment, drug dosage etc. Here we perform a multiway study of the temporal response of four yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different glucose uptake rates upon altered metabolic conditions. Results We measured the expression of 18 genes as function of time after addition of glucose to four strains of yeast grown in ethanol. The data are analyzed by matrix-augmented PCA, which is a generalization of PCA for 3-way data, and the results are confirmed by hierarchical clustering and clustering by Kohonen self-organizing map. Our approach identifies gene groups that respond similarly to the change of nutrient, and genes that behave differently in mutant strains. Of particular interest is our finding that ADH4 and ADH6 show a behavior typical of glucose-induced genes, while ADH3 and ADH5 are repressed after glucose addition. Conclusion Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling is a powerful technique which can be utilized to characterize functions of new genes by, for example, comparing their temporal response after perturbation in different genetic variants of the studied subject. The technique also identifies genes that show perturbed expression in specific strains.

  9. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transcriptional response of ADH-genes to glucose stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Elbing, Karin; Andrade-Garda, José Manuel; Sjögreen, Björn; Forootan, Amin; Kubista, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Background The large sensitivity, high reproducibility and essentially unlimited dynamic range of real-time PCR to measure gene expression in complex samples provides the opportunity for powerful multivariate and multiway studies of biological phenomena. In multiway studies samples are characterized by their expression profiles to monitor changes over time, effect of treatment, drug dosage etc. Here we perform a multiway study of the temporal response of four yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different glucose uptake rates upon altered metabolic conditions. Results We measured the expression of 18 genes as function of time after addition of glucose to four strains of yeast grown in ethanol. The data are analyzed by matrix-augmented PCA, which is a generalization of PCA for 3-way data, and the results are confirmed by hierarchical clustering and clustering by Kohonen self-organizing map. Our approach identifies gene groups that respond similarly to the change of nutrient, and genes that behave differently in mutant strains. Of particular interest is our finding that ADH4 and ADH6 show a behavior typical of glucose-induced genes, while ADH3 and ADH5 are repressed after glucose addition. Conclusion Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling is a powerful technique which can be utilized to characterize functions of new genes by, for example, comparing their temporal response after perturbation in different genetic variants of the studied subject. The technique also identifies genes that show perturbed expression in specific strains. PMID:18412983

  10. Multiplex metabolic pathway engineering using CRISPR/Cas9 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakociunas, Tadas; Bonde, Ida; Herrgard, Markus;

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 is a simple and efficient tool for targeted and marker-free genome engineering. Here, we report the development and successful application of a multiplex CRISPR/Cas9 system for genome engineering of up to 5 different genomic loci in one transformation step in baker's yeast Saccharomyces...... cerevisiae. To assess the specificity of the tool we employed genome re-sequencing to screen for off-target sites in all single knock-out strains targeted by different gRNAs. This extensive analysis identified no more genome variants in CRISPR/Cas9 engineered strains compared to wild-type reference strains...

  11. Increased ethanol production by deletion of HAP4 in recombinant xylose-assimilating Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2015-12-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAP4 gene encodes a transcription activator that plays a key role in controlling the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial respiration and reductive pathways. This work examines the effect of knockout of the HAP4 gene on aerobic ethanol production in a xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae strain. A hap4-deleted recombinant yeast strain (B42-DHAP4) showed increased maximum concentration, production rate, and yield of ethanol compared with the reference strain MA-B42, irrespective of cultivation medium (glucose, xylose, or glucose/xylose mixtures). Notably, B42-DHAP4 was capable of producing ethanol from xylose as the sole carbon source under aerobic conditions, whereas no ethanol was produced by MA-B42. Moreover, the rate of ethanol production and ethanol yield (0.44 g/g) from the detoxified hydrolysate of wood chips was markedly improved in B42-DHAP4 compared to MA-B42. Thus, the results of this study support the view that deleting HAP4 in xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae strains represents a useful strategy in ethanol production processes.

  12. Ecological and Genetic Barriers Differentiate Natural Populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clowers, Katie J; Heilberger, Justin; Piotrowski, Jeff S; Will, Jessica L; Gasch, Audrey P

    2015-09-01

    How populations that inhabit the same geographical area become genetically differentiated is not clear. To investigate this, we characterized phenotypic and genetic differences between two populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that in some cases inhabit the same environment but show relatively little gene flow. We profiled stress sensitivity in a group of vineyard isolates and a group of oak-soil strains and found several niche-related phenotypes that distinguish the populations. We performed bulk-segregant mapping on two of the distinguishing traits: The vineyard-specific ability to grow in grape juice and oak-specific tolerance to the cell wall damaging drug Congo red. To implicate causal genes, we also performed a chemical genomic screen in the lab-strain deletion collection and identified many important genes that fell under quantitative trait loci peaks. One gene important for growth in grape juice and identified by both the mapping and the screen was SSU1, a sulfite-nitrite pump implicated in wine fermentations. The beneficial allele is generated by a known translocation that we reasoned may also serve as a genetic barrier. We found that the translocation is prevalent in vineyard strains, but absent in oak strains, and presents a postzygotic barrier to spore viability. Furthermore, the translocation was associated with a fitness cost to the rapid growth rate seen in oak-soil strains. Our results reveal the translocation as a dual-function locus that enforces ecological differentiation while producing a genetic barrier to gene flow in these sympatric populations.

  13. Multiple Gene Mediated NAD(P)H-Dependent Aldehyde Reduction is a Mechanism of in situ Detoxification of Furfural and HMF by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are representative inhibitors to ethanologenic yeast generated from biomass pretreatment using dilute acid hydrolysis. Few yeast strains tolerant to inhibitors are available. In this study, we report a tolerant strain 12HF10 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ha...

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycerol/H+ symporter Stl1p is essential for cold/near-freeze and freeze stress adaptation. A simple recipe with high biotechnological potential is given

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Célia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freezing is an increasingly important means of preservation and storage of microbial strains used for many types of industrial applications including food processing. However, the yeast mechanisms of tolerance and sensitivity to freeze or near-freeze stress are still poorly understood. More knowledge on this regard would improve their biotechnological potential. Glycerol, in particular intracellular glycerol, has been assigned as a cryoprotectant, also important for cold/near-freeze stress adaptation. The S. cerevisiae glycerol active transporter Stl1p plays an important role on the fast accumulation of glycerol. This gene is expressed under gluconeogenic conditions, under osmotic shock and stress, as well as under high temperatures. Results We found that cells grown on STL1 induction medium (YPGE and subjected to cold/near-freeze stress, displayed an extremely high expression of this gene, also visible at glycerol/H+ symporter activity level. Under the same conditions, the strains harbouring this transporter accumulated more than 400 mM glycerol, whereas the glycerol/H+ symporter mutant presented less than 1 mM. Consistently, the strains able to accumulate glycerol survive 25-50% more than the stl1Δ mutant. Conclusions In this work, we report the contribution of the glycerol/H+ symporter Stl1p for the accumulation and maintenance of glycerol intracellular levels, and consequently cell survival at cold/near-freeze and freeze temperatures. These findings have a high biotechnological impact, as they show that any S. cerevisiae strain already in use can become more resistant to cold/freeze-thaw stress just by simply adding glycerol to the broth. The combination of low temperatures with extracellular glycerol will induce the transporter Stl1p. This solution avoids the use of transgenic strains, in particular in food industry.

  15. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kayikci, Omur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and...... gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression...... on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression....

  16. Mead production: selection and characterization assays of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    OpenAIRE

    de Pereira, Ana Paula; Dias, Teresa; Andrade, João Verdial; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Leticia M. Estevinho

    2009-01-01

    http://apps.isiknowledge.com/full_record.do?product=UA&search_mode=GeneralSearch&qid=10&SID=V12mKh9k9n8jHN@CK7o&page=1&doc=1&colname=WOS Mead is a traditional drink, which results from the alcoholic fermentation of diluted honey carried out by yeasts. However, when it is produced in a homemade way, mead producers find several problems, namely, the lack of uniformity in the final product, delayed and arrested fermentations, and the production of “off-flavours” by the yeasts. These problems ...

  17. Acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinert, Brian Tate; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Moustafa, Tarek;

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification; however, little is known about the origin and regulation of most sites. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that acetylation...

  18. Ultraviolet-endonuclease activity in cell extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants defective in excision of pyrimidine dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell-free extracts of ultraviolet-sensitive mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae defective in excision of pyrimidine dimers, rad1, rad2, rad3, rad4, rad10, and rad16, as well as the extracts of the wild-type strain RAD+, display ultraviolet-endonuclease activity

  19. Kluyveromyces lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two potent deacidifying and volatile-sulphur-aroma-producing microorganisms of the cheese ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagkli, Dafni-Maria; Tâche, Roselyne; Cogan, Timothy M; Hill, Colin; Casaregola, Serge; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2006-11-01

    Cheese flavour is the result of complex biochemical transformations attributed to bacteria and yeasts grown on the curd of smear-ripened cheeses. Volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs) are responsible for the characteristic aromatic notes of several cheeses. In the present study, we have assessed the ability of Kluyveromyces lactis, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, which are frequently isolated from smear-ripened cheeses, to grow and deacidify a cheese medium and generate VSCs resulting from L-methionine degradation. The Kluyveromyces strains produced a wider variety and higher amounts of VSCs than the S. cerevisiae ones. We have shown that the pathway is likely to be proceeding differently in these two yeast genera. The VSCs are mainly generated through the degradation of 4-methylthio-oxobutyric acid in the Kluyveromyces strains, in contrast to the S. cerevisiae ones which have higher L-methionine demethiolating activity, resulting in a direct conversion of L-methionine to methanethiol. The deacidification activity which is of major importance in the early stages of cheese-ripening was also compared in S. cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces strains.

  20. TOTAL ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    OpenAIRE

    Blažena Lavová; Dana Urminská

    2013-01-01

    Antioxidants are health beneficial compounds that can protect cells and macromolecules (e.g. fats, lipids, proteins and DNA) from the damage of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Sacchamomyces cerevisiae are know as organisms with very important antioxidative enzyme systems such as superoxide dismutase or catalase. The total antioxidant activity (mmol Trolox equivalent – TE.g-1 d.w.) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was measured by 2,2´-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) during the yeas...

  1. Comparative study of bio-ethanol production from mahula (Madhuca latifolia L.) flowers by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behera, Shuvashish; Mohanty, Rama Chandra [Department of Botany, Utkal University, Vanivihar, Bhubaneswar 751004, Orissa (India); Ray, Ramesh Chandra [Microbiology Laboratory, Central Tuber Crops Research Institute (Regional Centre), Bhubaneswar 751019, Orissa (India)

    2010-07-15

    Mahula (Madhuca latifolia L.) flower is a suitable alternative cheaper carbohydrate source for production of bio-ethanol. Recent production of bio-ethanol by microbial fermentation as an alternative energy source has renewed research interest because of the increase in the fuel price. Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) and Zymomonas mobilis (bacteria) are two most widely used microorganisms for ethanol production. In this study, experiments were carried out to compare the potential of the yeast S. cerevisiae (CTCRI strain) with the bacterium Z. mobilis (MTCC 92) for ethanol fermentation from mahula flowers. The ethanol production after 96 h fermentation was 149 and 122.9 g kg{sup -1} flowers using free cells of S. cerevisiae and Z. mobilis, respectively. The S. cerevisiae strain showed 21.2% more final ethanol production in comparison to Z. mobilis. Ethanol yield (Yx/s), volumetric product productivity (Qp), sugar to ethanol conversion rate (%) and microbial biomass concentration (X) obtained by S. cerevisiae were found to be 5.2%, 21.1%, 5.27% and 134% higher than Z. mobilis, respectively after 96 h of fermentation. (author)

  2. Comparative study of bio-ethanol production from mahula (Madhuca latifolia L.) flowers by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahula (Madhuca latifolia L.) flower is a suitable alternative cheaper carbohydrate source for production of bio-ethanol. Recent production of bio-ethanol by microbial fermentation as an alternative energy source has renewed research interest because of the increase in the fuel price. Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) and Zymomonas mobilis (bacteria) are two most widely used microorganisms for ethanol production. In this study, experiments were carried out to compare the potential of the yeast S. cerevisiae (CTCRI strain) with the bacterium Z. mobilis (MTCC 92) for ethanol fermentation from mahula flowers. The ethanol production after 96 h fermentation was 149 and 122.9 g kg-1 flowers using free cells of S. cerevisiae and Z. mobilis, respectively. The S. cerevisiae strain showed 21.2% more final ethanol production in comparison to Z. mobilis. Ethanol yield (Yx/s), volumetric product productivity (Qp), sugar to ethanol conversion rate (%) and microbial biomass concentration (X) obtained by S. cerevisiae were found to be 5.2%, 21.1%, 5.27% and 134% higher than Z. mobilis, respectively after 96 h of fermentation. (author)

  3. The Bioconversion of Red Ginseng Ethanol Extract into Compound K by Saccharomyces cerevisiae HJ-014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hak Joo; Kim, Eun A; Kim, Dong Hee; Shin, Kwang-Soo

    2014-09-01

    A β-glucosidase producing yeast strain was isolated from Korean traditional rice wine. Based on the sequence of the YCL008c gene and analysis of the fatty acid composition, the isolate was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain HJ-014. S. cerevisiae HJ-014 produced ginsenoside Rd, F2, and compound K from the ethanol extract of red ginseng. The production was increased by shaking culture, where the bioconversion efficiency was increased 2-fold compared to standing culture. The production of ginsenoside F2 and compound K was time-dependent and thought to proceed by the transformation pathway of: red ginseng extract→Rd→F2→compound K. The optimum incubation time and concentration of red ginseng extract for the production of compound K was 96 hr and 4.5% (w/v), respectively.

  4. Programmed cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is hampered by the deletion of GUP1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulha Joana

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past years, yeast has been successfully established as a model to study mechanisms of programmed cell death regulation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae commits to cell death showing typical hallmarks of metazoan apoptosis, in response to different stimuli. Gup1p, an O-acyltransferase, is required for several cellular processes that are related to apoptosis development, such as rafts integrity and stability, lipid metabolism including GPI anchor correct remodeling, proper mitochondrial and vacuole function, bud site selection and actin dynamics. Therefore, we hypothesize that apoptotic process would be affected by GUP1 deletion. Results In the present work we used two known apoptosis inducing conditions, chronological aging and acetic acid, to assess several apoptotic markers in gup1∆ mutant strain. We found that this mutant presents a significantly reduced chronological lifespan as compared to Wt and it is also highly sensitive to acetic acid treatment. In addition, it presents extremely high levels of ROS. There were notorious differences on apoptotic markers between Wt and gup1∆ mutant strains, namely on the maintenance of plasma membrane integrity, on the phosphatidylserine externalization, on the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane and on the chromatin condensation. Those suggested that the mutant, under either condition, probably dies of necrosis and not from apoptosis. Conclusions To Gup1p has been assigned an important function on lipid rafts assembly/integrity, lipid metabolism and GPI anchor remodeling. Our results provide, for the first time, the connection of the integrity of yeast lipid rafts and apoptosis induction and/or signaling, giving new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying this process in yeast.

  5. Members of the Hsp70 family of proteins in the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    López-Ribot, J L; Chaffin, W L

    1996-01-01

    Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of cell wall and cytosolic extracts obtained from parental and ssa1 and ssa2 single- and double-mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) products of these genes, previously thought to be restricted to the cell interior, are also present in the cell wall. A cell wall location was further confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence with intact cells and biotinylation of extracellular Hsp70. Hsp70s have been implicat...

  6. High-cell-density fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the optimisation of mead production

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Ana Paula; Mendes-Ferreira, Alexandra; de Oliveira, José M.; Leticia M. Estevinho; Mendes-Faia, Arlete

    2013-01-01

    Mead is a traditional drink that contains 8 % and 18 % (v/v) of ethanol, resulting from the alcoholic fermentation of diluted honey by yeasts. Mead fermentation is a time-consuming process and the quality of the final product is highly variable. Therefore, the present investigation had two main objectives: first, to determine the adequate inoculum size of two commercial wine-making strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the optimisation of mead fermentation; and second, to determine if an in...

  7. Identification and analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae copper homeostasis gene encoding a homeodomain protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, S A; Tamai, K T; Kosman, D J; Thiele, D J

    1994-01-01

    Yeast metallothionein, encoded by the CUP1 gene, and its copper-dependent transcriptional activator ACE1 play a key role in mediating copper resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant of a yeast strain in which CUP1 and ACE1 were deleted, we isolated a gene, designated CUP9, which permits yeast cells to grow at high concentrations of environmental copper, most notably when lactate is the sole carbon source. Disruption of CUP9, which is located on chromosome...

  8. Glutamine synthesis is a regulatory signal controlling glucose catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Flores-Samaniego, B; Olivera, H; González, A.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of glutamine biosynthesis and degradation on glucose catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied. A wild-type strain and mutants altered in glutamine biosynthesis and degradation were analyzed. Cells having low levels of glutamine synthetase activity showed high ATP/ADP ratios and a diminished rate of glucose metabolism. It is proposed that glutamine biosynthesis plays a role in the regulation of glucose catabolism.

  9. Abundant Gene-by-Environment Interactions in Gene Expression Reaction Norms to Copper within Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgins-Davis, Andrea; Adomas, Aleksandra B; Warringer, Jonas; Townsend, Jeffrey P.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variation for plastic phenotypes potentially contributes phenotypic variation to populations that can be selected during adaptation to novel ecological contexts. However, the basis and extent of plastic variation that manifests in diverse environments remains elusive. Here, we characterize copper reaction norms for mRNA abundance among five Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains to 1) describe population variation across the full range of ecologically relevant copper concentrations, from st...

  10. The utilization of some iron and zinc compounds as regulators of catalase activity at Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Efremova, N.; Molodoi, E.; Usatîi, A.; Fulga, L.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the impact of some zinc and iron compounds as oxidative stress factors on catalase activity, which is known to be important defense system of microorganisms to metal stress. For the investigation was used baker's yeast strain - Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-11 previously selected as a source of protein and catalase. The obtained results have revealed that compounds of iron and zinc with citrate and acetate contributes to the accumulation of yeast bi...

  11. The Using of Millimeter Waves for Biosynthetic Processes Stimulation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Usatîi Agafia; Chiseliţa Natalia; Efremova Nadejda; Borisova Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The results of influence of three frequencies of electromagnetic radiation of highfrequency range (EMR EHF) on the biosynthesis of carbohydrates, β-glucan, proteins, catalase activity by Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN -Y-20 yeast strain were analysed. It was established that frequency of f= 53,33 GHz stimulates the biosynthesis of carbohydrates, including β-glucan and frequency of f= 42,19 GHz promotes the increase of protein content and catalase. The indicated frequencies of EMR EHF are offer...

  12. Identification and characterization of a novel biotin biosynthesis gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Ito, Kiyoshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2005-11-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells generally cannot synthesize biotin, a vitamin required for many carboxylation reactions. Although sake yeasts, which are used for Japanese sake brewing, are classified as S. cerevisiae, they do not require biotin for their growth. In this study, we identified a novel open reading frame (ORF) in the genome of one strain of sake yeast that we speculated to be involved in biotin synthesis. Homologs of this gene are widely distributed in the genomes of sake yeasts. However, they are not found in many laboratory strains and strains used for wine making and beer brewing. This ORF was named BIO6 because it has 52% identity with BIO3, a biotin biosynthesis gene of a laboratory strain. Further research showed that yeasts without the BIO6 gene are auxotrophic for biotin, whereas yeasts holding the BIO6 gene are prototrophic for biotin. The BIO6 gene was disrupted in strain A364A, which is a laboratory strain with one copy of the BIO6 gene. Although strain A364A is prototrophic for biotin, a BIO6 disrupted mutant was found to be auxotrophic for biotin. The BIO6 disruptant was able to grow in biotin-deficient medium supplemented with 7-keto-8-amino-pelargonic acid (KAPA), while the bio3 disruptant was not able to grow in this medium. These results suggest that Bio6p acts in an unknown step of biotin synthesis before KAPA synthesis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that expression of the BIO6 gene, like that of other biotin synthesis genes, was upregulated by depletion of biotin. We conclude that the BIO6 gene is a novel biotin biosynthesis gene of S. cerevisiae.

  13. The evolution of gene expression QTL in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Ronald

    Full Text Available Understanding the evolutionary forces that influence patterns of gene expression variation will provide insights into the mechanisms of evolutionary change and the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity. To date, studies of gene expression evolution have primarily been made by analyzing how gene expression levels vary within and between species. However, the fundamental unit of heritable variation in transcript abundance is the underlying regulatory allele, and as a result it is necessary to understand gene expression evolution at the level of DNA sequence variation. Here we describe the evolutionary forces shaping patterns of genetic variation for 1206 cis-regulatory QTL identified in a cross between two divergent strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that purifying selection against mildly deleterious alleles is the dominant force governing cis-regulatory evolution in S. cerevisiae and estimate the strength of selection. We also find that essential genes and genes with larger codon bias are subject to slightly stronger cis-regulatory constraint and that positive selection has played a role in the evolution of major trans-acting QTL.

  14. CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Owen W; Poddar, Snigdha; Cate, Jamie H D

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes a method for CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing that results in scarless and marker-free integrations of DNA into Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes. DNA integration results from cotransforming (1) a single plasmid (pCAS) that coexpresses the Cas9 endonuclease and a uniquely engineered single guide RNA (sgRNA) expression cassette and (2) a linear DNA molecule that is used to repair the chromosomal DNA damage by homology-directed repair. For target specificity, the pCAS plasmid requires only a single cloning modification: replacing the 20-bp guide RNA sequence within the sgRNA cassette. This CRISPR-Cas9 protocol includes methods for (1) cloning the unique target sequence into pCAS, (2) assembly of the double-stranded DNA repair oligonucleotides, and (3) cotransformation of pCAS and linear repair DNA into yeast cells. The protocol is technically facile and requires no special equipment. It can be used in any S. cerevisiae strain, including industrial polyploid isolates. Therefore, this CRISPR-Cas9-based DNA integration protocol is achievable by virtually any yeast genetics and molecular biology laboratory. PMID:27250940

  15. Post-transcriptional regulation in the myo1Δ mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akamine Pearl

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae myosin type II-deficient (myo1Δ strains remain viable and divide, despite the absence of a cytokinetic ring, by activation of the PKC1-dependent cell wall integrity pathway (CWIP. Since the myo1Δ transcriptional fingerprint is a subset of the CWIP fingerprint, the myo1Δ strain may provide a simplified paradigm for cell wall stress survival. Results To explore the post-transcriptional regulation of the myo1Δ stress response, 1,301 differentially regulated ribosome-bound mRNAs were identified by microarray analysis of which 204 were co-regulated by transcription and translation. Four categories of mRNA were significantly affected - protein biosynthesis, metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and unknown functions. Nine genes of the 20 CWIP fingerprint genes were post-transcriptionally regulated. Down and up regulation of selected ribosomal protein and cell wall biosynthesis mRNAs was validated by their distribution in polysomes from wild type and myo1Δ strains. Western blot analysis revealed accumulation of the phosphorylated form of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α-P and a reduction in the steady state levels of the translation initiation factor eIF4Gp in myo1Δ strains. Deletion of GCN2 in myo1Δ abolished eIF2αp phosphorylation, and showed a severe growth defect. The presence of P-bodies in myo1Δ strains suggests that the process of mRNA sequestration is active, however, the three representative down regulated RP mRNAs, RPS8A, RPL3 and RPL7B were present at equivalent levels in Dcp2p-mCh-positive immunoprecipitated fractions from myo1Δ and wild type cells. These same RP mRNAs were also selectively co-precipitated with eIF2α-P in myo1Δ strains. Conclusions Quantitative analysis of ribosome-associated mRNAs and their polyribosome distributions suggests selective regulation of mRNA translation efficiency in myo1Δ strains. Inhibition of translation initiation factor eIF2α (e

  16. Xylitol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae overexpressing different xylose reductases using non-detoxified hemicellulosic hydrolysate of corncob

    OpenAIRE

    Kogje, Anushree; Ghosalkar, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Xylitol production was compared in fed batch fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains overexpressing xylose reductase (XR) genes from Candida tropicalis, Pichia stipitis, Neurospora crassa, and an endogenous gene GRE3. The gene encoding a xylose specific transporter (SUT1) from P. stipitis was cloned to improve xylose transport and fed batch fermentation was used with glucose as a cosubstrate to regenerate NADPH. Xylitol yield was near theoretical for all the strains in fed batch ferm...

  17. [Regulation of isoprenoid pathway for enhanced production of linalool in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingxue; Liu, Jidong; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2013-06-01

    Linalool is an important monoterpene, and widely used in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry. The low concentration in plants and the difficulties in extraction restrict its large scale production. Saccharomyces cerevisiae can provide the monoterpene precursor, geranyl diphosphate (GPP) through its endogenous isoprenoid pathway. Therefore, it could be used as the host for monoterpene production. However, the weak metabolic flux through the isoprenoid pathway leads to the insufficient supply of GPP, and results in low monoterpene productivity. In order to increase the metabolic flux, we constructed the integrated expression plasmid pRS305-tHMG1 and free expression plasmid pYLIS-IDI1 to enhance the expression levels of isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI1) and a truncated 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase gene (tHMG1). The two plasmids were separately transformed into S. cerevisiae CEN.PK2-1C, resulting in strains LS01 and LS02. The plasmid pYLIS-IDI1 was further transformed into strain LS01, resulting in strain LS03. GC-MS analysis showed that the linalool concentration was increased by 1.3 times and reached (127.71 +/- 7.68) microg/L. In conclusion, enhancement of the supply of GPP precursors through the regulation of isoprenoid pathway could increase the linalool production in S. cerevisiae.

  18. Molecular characterization of propolis-induced cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Savoldi, Marcela; Bonatto, Diego; Barros, Mário Henrique; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Berretta, Andresa A; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2011-03-01

    Propolis, a natural product of plant resins, is used by the bees to seal holes in their honeycombs and protect the hive entrance. However, propolis has also been used in folk medicine for centuries. Here, we apply the power of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism for studies of genetics, cell biology, and genomics to determine how propolis affects fungi at the cellular level. Propolis is able to induce an apoptosis cell death response. However, increased exposure to propolis provides a corresponding increase in the necrosis response. We showed that cytochrome c but not endonuclease G (Nuc1p) is involved in propolis-mediated cell death in S. cerevisiae. We also observed that the metacaspase YCA1 gene is important for propolis-mediated cell death. To elucidate the gene functions that may be required for propolis sensitivity in eukaryotes, the full collection of about 4,800 haploid S. cerevisiae deletion strains was screened for propolis sensitivity. We were able to identify 138 deletion strains that have different degrees of propolis sensitivity compared to the corresponding wild-type strains. Systems biology revealed enrichment for genes involved in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, vacuolar acidification, negative regulation of transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter, regulation of macroautophagy associated with protein targeting to vacuoles, and cellular response to starvation. Validation studies indicated that propolis sensitivity is dependent on the mitochondrial function and that vacuolar acidification and autophagy are important for yeast cell death caused by propolis.

  19. Comparative proteomics analysis of engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced biofuel precursor production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Tang

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was metabolically modified for enhanced biofuel precursor production by knocking out genes encoding mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase and over-expression of a heterologous ATP-citrate lyase. A comparative iTRAQ-coupled 2D LC-MS/MS analysis was performed to obtain a global overview of ubiquitous protein expression changes in S. cerevisiae engineered strains. More than 300 proteins were identified. Among these proteins, 37 were found differentially expressed in engineered strains and they were classified into specific categories based on their enzyme functions. Most of the proteins involved in glycolytic and pyruvate branch-point pathways were found to be up-regulated and the proteins involved in respiration and glyoxylate pathway were however found to be down-regulated in engineered strains. Moreover, the metabolic modification of S. cerevisiae cells resulted in a number of up-regulated proteins involved in stress response and differentially expressed proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and protein biosynthesis pathways. These LC-MS/MS based proteomics analysis results not only offered extensive information in identifying potential protein-protein interactions, signal pathways and ubiquitous cellular changes elicited by the engineered pathways, but also provided a meaningful biological information platform serving further modification of yeast cells for enhanced biofuel production.

  20. Comparative Lipidomic Profiling of S. cerevisiae and Four Other Hemiascomycetous Yeasts

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    Eva-Maria Hein

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Glycerophospholipids (GP are the building blocks of cellular membranes and play essential roles in cell compartmentation, membrane fluidity or apoptosis. In addition, GPs are sources for multifunctional second messengers. Whereas the genome and proteome of the most intensively studied eukaryotic model organism, the baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are well characterized, the analysis of its lipid composition is still at the beginning. Moreover, different yeast species can be distinguished on the DNA, RNA and protein level, but it is currently unknown if they can also be differentiated by determination of their GP pattern. Therefore, the GP compositions of five different yeast strains, grown under identical environmental conditions, were elucidated using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to negative electrospray ionization-hybrid linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry in single and multistage mode. Using this approach, relative quantification of more than 100 molecular species belonging to nine GP classes was achieved. The comparative lipidomic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces bayanus, Kluyveromyces thermotolerans, Pichia angusta, and Yarrowia lipolytica revealed characteristic GP profiles for each strain. However, genetically related yeast strains show similarities in their GP compositions, e.g., Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus.

  1. Characterization of Cell Wall Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Clinical Isolates Elucidates Hsp150p in Virulence.

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    Pang-Hung Hsu

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been described as an emerging opportunistic fungal pathogen. Fungal cell wall mannoproteins have been demonstrated to be involved in adhesion to inert surfaces and might be engaged in virulence. In this study, we observed four clinical isolates of S. cerevisiae with relatively hydrophobic cell surfaces. Yeast cell wall subproteome was evaluated quantitatively by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. We identified totally 25 cell wall proteins (CWPs from log-phase cells, within which 15 CWPs were quantified. The abundance of Scw10p, Pst1p, and Hsp150p/Pir2p were at least 2 folds higher in the clinical isolates than in S288c lab strain. Hsp150p is one of the members in Pir family conserved in pathogenic fungi Candida glabrata and Candida albicans. Overexpression of Hsp150p in lab strain increased cell wall integrity and potentially enhanced the virulence of yeast. Altogether, these results demonstrated that quantitative cell wall subproteome was analyzed in clinical isolates of S. cerevisiae, and several CWPs, especially Hsp150p, were found to be expressed at higher levels which presumably contribute to strain virulence and fungal pathogenicity.

  2. Selected non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts in controlled multistarter fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae on alcoholic fermentation behaviour and wine aroma of cherry wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shu Yang; Gong, Han Sheng; Jiang, Xiao Man; Zhao, Yu Ping

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the effect of mixed fermentation of non-Saccharomyces (Torulaspora delbrueckii ZYMAFLORE Alpha(TD n. Sacch) and Metschnikowia pulcherrima JS22) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts (D254 and EC1118) on the production of cherry wines, in comparison with commonly used mono-culture. Results obtained during AF demonstrated that negligible inhibitory effect was observed in S. cerevisiae/Alpha pair, whereas a strong antagonistic effect was detected between MJS22 and S. cerevisiae strain, resulting in an early death of MJS22. For volatile components determined, S. cerevisiae/MJS22 couple was found to significantly boost the production of most detected compounds, more particularly in higher alcohols, esters, acids and terpenes; while the characteristic of S. cerevisiae/Alpha pair is an increase in fruity esters, higher alcohols and decrease in acid production. Sensory evaluation revealed that S. cerevisiae/MJS22 pair reinforced sweet, green and fatty notes to the cherry wines, and S. cerevisiae/Alpha trial enhanced the fruity odour and reduced green note.

  3. Human G protein-coupled receptor studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rongfang; Wong, Winsy; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-08-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the largest families of membrane proteins, with approximately 800 different GPCRs in the human genome. Signaling via GPCRs regulates many biological processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and development. In addition, many receptors have a pivotal role in immunophysiology. Many hormones and neurotransmitters are ligands for these receptors, and hence it is not surprising that many drugs, either mimicking or blocking the action of the bodily substances, have been developed. It is estimated that 30-40% of current drugs on the market target GPCRs. Further identifying and elucidating the functions of GPCRs will provide opportunities for novel drug discovery, including for immunotherapy. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) is a very important and useful platform in this respect. There are many advantages of using a yeast assay system, as it is cheap, safe and stable; it is also convenient for rapid feasibility and optimization studies. Moreover, it offers a "null" background when studying human GPCRs. New developments regarding human GPCRs expressed in a yeast platform are providing insight into GPCR activation and signaling, and facilitate agonist and antagonist identification. In this review we summarize the latest findings regarding human G-protein-coupled receptors in studies using S. cerevisiae, ever since the year 2005 when we last published a review on this topic. We describe 11 families of GPCRs in detail, while including the principles and developments of each yeast system applied to these different GPCRs and highlight and generalize the experimental findings of GPCR function in these systems. PMID:26920251

  4. Expression of a Dianthus flavonoid glucosyltransferase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for whole-cell biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Sean R; Morgan, John A

    2009-07-15

    Glycosyltransferases are promising biocatalysts for the synthesis of small molecule glycosides. In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing a flavonoid glucosyltransferase (GT) from Dianthus caryophyllus (carnation) was investigated as a whole-cell biocatalyst. Two yeast expression systems were compared using the flavonoid naringenin as a model substrate. Under in vitro conditions, naringenin-7-O-glucoside was formed and a higher specific glucosyl transfer activity was found using a galactose inducible expression system compared to a constitutive expression system. However, S. cerevisiae expressing the GT constitutively was significantly more productive than the galactose inducible system under in vivo conditions. Interestingly, the glycosides were recovered directly from the culture broth and did not accumulate intracellularly. A previously uncharacterized naringenin glycoside formed using the D. caryophyllus GT was identified as naringenin-4'-O-glucoside. It was found that S. cerevisiae cells hydrolyze naringenin-7-O-glucoside during whole-cell biocatalysis, resulting in a low final glycoside titer. When phloretin was added as a substrate to the yeast strain expressing the GT constitutively, the natural product phlorizin was formed. This study demonstrates S. cerevisiae is a promising whole-cell biocatalyst host for the production of valuable glycosides.

  5. Production of bioethanol and associated by-products from potato starch residue stream by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashem, Mohamed [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Biological Science Department, P.O. Box 10255, Abha 61321 (Saudi Arabia); Darwish, Soumia M.I. [Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Assiut University (Egypt)

    2010-07-15

    Potato starch residue stream produced during chips manufacturing was used as an economical source for biomass and bioethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results demonstrated that 1% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 100 C for 1 h was enough to hydrolyze all starch contained in the residue stream. Two strains of S. cerevisiae (y-1646 and commercial one) were able to utilize and ferment the acid-treated residue stream under both aerobic and semi-anaerobic conditions. The maximum yield of ethanol (5.52 g L{sup -1}) was achieved at 35 C by S. cerevisiae y-1646 after 36 h when ZnCl{sub 2} (0.4 g L{sup -1}) was added. Addition of NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} as a source of nitrogen did not significantly affect either growth or ethanol production by S. cerevisiae y-1646. Some secondary by-products including alcohol derivatives and medical active compound were found to be associated with the ethanol production process. (author)

  6. SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE AND ITS VALIDATION

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    Miroslav Ondrejovič

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to optimize of independent variables as temperature, time and reaction ratio to output parameter of simultaneous enzyme saccharification and fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae of pretreated wheat straw as model substrate via RSM (response surface methodology approach. As dependent variable, it was chosen ethanol yields characterizing effectivity of process. The optimal conditions were approximately temperature 100 °C, time 1 hour and reaction ratio 26 mL to 1 g of treated wheat straw with ethanol yields 141.9 mg.g-1. After calculating the optimal values, the validation analyze was carried out and it was found out that the predicted and experimentally verified dependent variable was in agreement with the optimal parameters (~ 95 %. Proposed model was tested for three lignocellulosic materials (winter wheat straw, alfalfa hay and maize straw as wheat straw used as model substrate and it was confirmed the possibility of its use for other agricultural residues with similar content of lignocellulose.

  7. A genome shuffling-generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolate that ferments xylose and glucose to produce high levels of ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingping, Ge; Hongbing, Sun; Gang, Song; Hongzhi, Ling; Wenxiang, Ping

    2012-05-01

    Genome shuffling is an efficient approach for the rapid improvement of industrially important microbial phenotypes. This report describes optimized conditions for protoplast preparation, regeneration, inactivation, and fusion using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae W5 strain. Ethanol production was confirmed by TTC (triphenyl tetrazolium chloride) screening and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A genetically stable, high ethanol-producing strain that fermented xylose and glucose was obtained following three rounds of genome shuffling. After fermentation for 84 h, the high ethanol-producing S. cerevisiae GS3-10 strain (which utilized 69.48 and 100% of the xylose and glucose stores, respectively) produced 26.65 g/L ethanol, i.e., 47.08% higher than ethanol production by S. cerevisiae W5 (18.12 g/L). The utilization ratios of xylose and glucose were 69.48 and 100%, compared to 14.83 and 100% for W5, respectively. The ethanol yield was 0.40 g/g (ethanol/consumed glucose and xylose), i.e., 17.65% higher than the yield by S. cerevisiae W5 (0.34 g/g). PMID:22270888

  8. Improved Acetic Acid Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Overexpression of the WHI2 Gene Identified through Inverse Metabolic Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingying; Stabryla, Lisa; Wei, Na

    2016-01-29

    Development of acetic acid-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for economically viable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, but the goal remains a critical challenge due to limited information on effective genetic perturbation targets for improving acetic acid resistance in the yeast. This study employed a genomic-library-based inverse metabolic engineering approach to successfully identify a novel gene target, WHI2 (encoding a cytoplasmatic globular scaffold protein), which elicited improved acetic acid resistance in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of WHI2 significantly improved glucose and/or xylose fermentation under acetic acid stress in engineered yeast. The WHI2-overexpressing strain had 5-times-higher specific ethanol productivity than the control in glucose fermentation with acetic acid. Analysis of the expression of WHI2 gene products (including protein and transcript) determined that acetic acid induced endogenous expression of Whi2 in S. cerevisiae. Meanwhile, the whi2Δ mutant strain had substantially higher susceptibility to acetic acid than the wild type, suggesting the important role of Whi2 in the acetic acid response in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, overexpression of WHI2 and of a cognate phosphatase gene, PSR1, had a synergistic effect in improving acetic acid resistance, suggesting that Whi2 might function in combination with Psr1 to elicit the acetic acid resistance mechanism. These results improve our understanding of the yeast response to acetic acid stress and provide a new strategy to breed acetic acid-resistant yeast strains for renewable biofuel production.

  9. Genome-wide RNAi screen reveals the E3 SUMO-protein ligase gene SIZ1 as a novel determinant of furfural tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Han; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    Background Furfural is a major growth inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates and improving furfural tolerance of microorganisms is critical for rapid and efficient fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, we used the RNAi-Assisted Genome Evolution (RAGE) method to select for furfural resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified a new determinant of furfural tolerance. Results By using a genome-wide RNAi (RNA-interference) screen in S. cerevisiae for genes in...

  10. Modeling competition between yeast strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gee, Maarten; van Mourik, Hilda; de Visser, Arjan; Molenaar, Jaap

    2016-04-01

    We investigate toxin interference competition between S. cerevisiae colonies grown on a solid medium. In vivo experiments show that the outcome of this competition depends strongly on nutrient availability and cell densities. Here we present a new model for S. cerevisiae colonies, calculating the local height and composition of the colonies. The model simulates yeast colonies that show a good fit to experimental data. Simulations of colonies that start out with a homogeneous mixture of toxin producing and toxin sensitive cells can display remarkable pattern formation, depending on the initial ratio of the strains. Simulations in which the toxin producing and toxin sensitive species start at nearby positions clearly show that toxin production is advantageous.

  11. Exogenous Valine Reduces Conversion of Leucine to 3-Methyl-1-Butanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Mutant strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that require branched-chain amino acids must be supplemented with large concentrations (up to 10 mM) of these amino acids to satisfy their nutritional requirement. The utilization of one branched-chain amino acid, leucine, was examined in several leul strains of yeast grown aerobically in a glucose-ammonium salts minimal medium containing a limiting concentration (0.2 mM) of leucine. In this medium, the leucine requirement of the auxotrophi...

  12. The Using of Millimeter Waves for Biosynthetic Processes Stimulation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usatîi Agafia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of influence of three frequencies of electromagnetic radiation of highfrequency range (EMR EHF on the biosynthesis of carbohydrates, β-glucan, proteins, catalase activity by Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN -Y-20 yeast strain were analysed. It was established that frequency of f= 53,33 GHz stimulates the biosynthesis of carbohydrates, including β-glucan and frequency of f= 42,19 GHz promotes the increase of protein content and catalase. The indicated frequencies of EMR EHF are offered for the use in the biotechnology of cultivation of yeasts with the purpose to increase biosynthetic properties of yeast strain

  13. [The cloning and expression of the gene for beta-galactosidase from Candida pseudotropicalis yeasts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretiak, K A; Zakal'skiĭ, A E; Gudz', S P

    1998-01-01

    The gene of beta-galactosidase of lactose-assimilating yeast Candida pseudotropicalis was cloned in pG2 and pBG2-3 hybrid shuttle vectors and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains under the control of own promoter. The plasmids were able to replicate autonomously with relative stability in transformants of baker's yeasts. The availability of glucose or lactose in the medium influenced the recombinant plasmid stability and the expression of the cloned gene. A number of experiments have shown that the LAC+ phenotype in pG2-transformed Saccharomyces cerevisiae was due to the expression of the Candida pseudotropicalis lactose permease gene that is probably located in SaIG1/XhoI DNA fragment about 4.3 kb long. Southern hybridization experiments showed that LAC(+)-transformants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contained both autonomously-replicative, and integrative pG2 plasmid.

  14. The Oenological Potential of Hanseniaspora uvarum in Simultaneous and Sequential Co-fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Industrial Wine Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristezza, Mariana; Tufariello, Maria; Capozzi, Vittorio; Spano, Giuseppe; Mita, Giovanni; Grieco, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In oenology, the utilization of mixed starter cultures composed by Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts is an approach of growing importance for winemakers in order to enhance sensory quality and complexity of the final product without compromising the general quality and safety of the oenological products. In fact, several non-Saccharomyces yeasts are already commercialized as oenological starter cultures to be used in combination with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while several others are the subject of various studies to evaluate their application. Our aim, in this study was to assess, for the first time, the oenological potential of H. uvarum in mixed cultures (co-inoculation) and sequential inoculation with S. cerevisiae for industrial wine production. Three previously characterized H. uvarum strains were separately used as multi-starter together with an autochthonous S. cerevisiae starter culture in lab-scale micro-vinification trials. On the basis of microbial development, fermentation kinetics and secondary compounds formation, the strain H. uvarum ITEM8795 was further selected and it was co- and sequentially inoculated, jointly with the S. cerevisiae starter, in a pilot scale wine production. The fermentation course and the quality of final product indicated that the co-inoculation was the better performing modality of inoculum. The above results were finally validated by performing an industrial scale vinification The mixed starter was able to successfully dominate the different stages of the fermentation process and the H. uvarum strain ITEM8795 contributed to increasing the wine organoleptic quality and to simultaneously reduce the volatile acidity. At the best of our knowledge, the present report is the first study regarding the utilization of a selected H. uvarum strain in multi-starter inoculation with S. cerevisiae for the industrial production of a wine. In addition, we demonstrated, at an industrial scale, the importance of non-Saccharomyces in

  15. Enhanced cell-surface display and secretory production of cellulolytic enzymes with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sed1 signal peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuma, Kentaro; Bamba, Takahiro; Ishii, Jun; Ito, Yoichiro; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-11-01

    Recombinant yeast strains displaying aheterologous cellulolytic enzymes on their cell surfaces using a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring system are a promising strategy for bioethanol production from lignocellulosic materials. A crucial step for cell wall localization of the enzymes is the intracellular transport of proteins in yeast cells. Therefore, the addition of a highly efficient secretion signal sequence is important to increase the amount of the enzymes on the yeast cell surface. In this study, we demonstrated the effectiveness of a novel signal peptide (SP) sequence derived from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SED1 gene for cell-surface display and secretory production of cellulolytic enzymes. Gene cassettes with SP sequences derived from S. cerevisiae SED1 (SED1SP), Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (GLUASP), and S. cerevisiae α-mating pheromone (MFα1SP) were constructed for cell-surface display of Aspergillus aculeatus β-glucosidase (BGL1) and Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase II (EGII). These gene cassettes were integrated into the S. cerevisiae genome. The recombinant strains with the SED1SP showed higher cell-surface BGL and EG activities than those with the conventional SP sequences (GLUASP and MFα1SP). The novel SP sequence also improved the secretory production of BGL and EG in S. cerevisiae. The extracellular BGL activity of the recombinant strains with the SED1SP was 1.3- and 1.9-fold higher than the GLUASP and MFα1SP strains, respectively. Moreover, the utilization of SED1SP successfully enhanced the secretory production of BGL in Pichia pastoris. The utilization of the novel SP sequence is a promising option for highly efficient cell-surface display and secretory production of heterologous proteins in various yeast species. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2358-2366. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27183011

  16. The Oenological Potential of Hanseniaspora uvarum in Simultaneous and Sequential Co-fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Industrial Wine Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristezza, Mariana; Tufariello, Maria; Capozzi, Vittorio; Spano, Giuseppe; Mita, Giovanni; Grieco, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In oenology, the utilization of mixed starter cultures composed by Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts is an approach of growing importance for winemakers in order to enhance sensory quality and complexity of the final product without compromising the general quality and safety of the oenological products. In fact, several non-Saccharomyces yeasts are already commercialized as oenological starter cultures to be used in combination with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while several others are the subject of various studies to evaluate their application. Our aim, in this study was to assess, for the first time, the oenological potential of H. uvarum in mixed cultures (co-inoculation) and sequential inoculation with S. cerevisiae for industrial wine production. Three previously characterized H. uvarum strains were separately used as multi-starter together with an autochthonous S. cerevisiae starter culture in lab-scale micro-vinification trials. On the basis of microbial development, fermentation kinetics and secondary compounds formation, the strain H. uvarum ITEM8795 was further selected and it was co- and sequentially inoculated, jointly with the S. cerevisiae starter, in a pilot scale wine production. The fermentation course and the quality of final product indicated that the co-inoculation was the better performing modality of inoculum. The above results were finally validated by performing an industrial scale vinification The mixed starter was able to successfully dominate the different stages of the fermentation process and the H. uvarum strain ITEM8795 contributed to increasing the wine organoleptic quality and to simultaneously reduce the volatile acidity. At the best of our knowledge, the present report is the first study regarding the utilization of a selected H. uvarum strain in multi-starter inoculation with S. cerevisiae for the industrial production of a wine. In addition, we demonstrated, at an industrial scale, the importance of non-Saccharomyces in

  17. Interactions between Drosophila and its natural yeast symbionts-Is Saccharomyces cerevisiae a good model for studying the fly-yeast relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Don; Kopp, Artyom; Chandler, James Angus

    2015-01-01

    Yeasts play an important role in the biology of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. In addition to being a valuable source of nutrition, yeasts affect D. melanogaster behavior and interact with the host immune system. Most experiments investigating the role of yeasts in D. melanogaster biology use the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, S. cerevisiae is rarely found with natural populations of D. melanogaster or other Drosophila species. Moreover, the strain of S. cerevisiae used most often in D. melanogaster experiments is a commercially and industrially important strain that, to the best of our knowledge, was not isolated from flies. Since disrupting natural host-microbe interactions can have profound effects on host biology, the results from D. melanogaster-S. cerevisiae laboratory experiments may not be fully representative of host-microbe interactions in nature. In this study, we explore the D. melanogaster-yeast relationship using five different strains of yeast that were isolated from wild Drosophila populations. Ingested live yeasts have variable persistence in the D. melanogaster gastrointestinal tract. For example, Hanseniaspora occidentalis persists relative to S. cerevisiae, while Brettanomyces naardenensis is removed. Despite these differences in persistence relative to S. cerevisiae, we find that all yeasts decrease in total abundance over time. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are an important component of the D. melanogaster anti-microbial response and can inhibit S. cerevisiae growth in the intestine. To determine if sensitivity to ROS explains the differences in yeast persistence, we measured yeast growth in the presence and absence of hydrogen peroxide. We find that B. naardenesis is completely inhibited by hydrogen peroxide, while H. occidentalis is not, which is consistent with yeast sensitivity to ROS affecting persistence within the D. melanogaster gastrointestinal tract. We also compared the feeding preference of D

  18. Transfer RNA pseudouridine synthases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, T; Olsson, M

    1990-05-25

    A transfer RNA lacking modified nucleosides was produced by transcription in vitro of a cloned gene that encodes a Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycine tRNA. At least three different uridines (in nucleotide positions 13, 32, and 55) of this transcript tRNA are modified to pseudouridine by an extract of S. cerevisiae. Variants of the RNA substrate were also constructed that each had only one of these sites, thus allowing specific monitoring of pseudouridylation at different nucleotide positions. Using such RNAs to assay pseudouridine synthesis, enzymes producing this nucleoside were purified from an extract of S. cerevisiae. The activities corresponding to positions 13, 32, and 55 in the tRNA substrate could all be separated chromatographically, indicating that there is a separate enzyme for each of these sites. The enzyme specific for position 55 (denoted pseudouridine synthase 55) was purified approximately 4000-fold using a combination of DEAE-Sepharose, heparin-Sepharose, and hydroxylapatite.

  19. Systematic identification of balanced transposition polymorphisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina A Faddah

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput techniques for detecting DNA polymorphisms generally do not identify changes in which the genomic position of a sequence, but not its copy number, varies among individuals. To explore such balanced structural polymorphisms, we used array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH to conduct a genome-wide screen for single-copy genomic segments that occupy different genomic positions in the standard laboratory strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S90 and a polymorphic wild isolate (Y101 through analysis of six tetrads from a cross of these two strains. Paired-end high-throughput sequencing of Y101 validated four of the predicted rearrangements. The transposed segments contained one to four annotated genes each, yet crosses between S90 and Y101 yielded mostly viable tetrads. The longest segment comprised 13.5 kb near the telomere of chromosome XV in the S288C reference strain and Southern blotting confirmed its predicted location on chromosome IX in Y101. Interestingly, inter-locus crossover events between copies of this segment occurred at a detectable rate. The presence of low-copy repetitive sequences at the junctions of this segment suggests that it may have arisen through ectopic recombination. Our methodology and findings provide a starting point for exploring the origins, phenotypic consequences, and evolutionary fate of this largely unexplored form of genomic polymorphism.

  20. Genetic dissection of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Peng; Xiao, Yin; Hu, Yun; Sun, Haiye; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Gui-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Dissection of the hereditary architecture underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for ethanol fermentation. In this work, a genomics approach was used to dissect hereditary variations in acetic acid tolerance between two phenotypically different strains. A total of 160 segregants derived from these two strains were obtained. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the acetic acid tolerance displayed a normal distribution in these segregants, and suggested that the acetic acid tolerant traits were controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Thus, 220 SSR markers covering the whole genome were used to detect QTLs of acetic acid tolerant traits. As a result, three QTLs were located on chromosomes 9, 12, and 16, respectively, which explained 38.8-65.9 % of the range of phenotypic variation. Furthermore, twelve genes of the candidates fell into the three QTL regions by integrating the QTL analysis with candidates of acetic acid tolerant genes. These results provided a novel avenue to obtain more robust strains. PMID:27430512

  1. Role of cultivation media in the development of yeast strains for large scale industrial use

    OpenAIRE

    Görgens Johann; Gorwa-Grauslund Marie; Larsson Christer U; Karhumaa Kaisa; Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel; van Zyl Willem H

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The composition of cultivation media in relation to strain development for industrial application is reviewed. Heterologous protein production and pentose utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae are used to illustrate the influence of media composition at different stages of strain construction and strain development. The effects of complex, defined and industrial media are compared. Auxotrophic strains and strain stability are discussed. Media for heterologous protein production and...

  2. Cell Surface Display of Four Types of Solanum nigrum Metallothionein on Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Biosorption of Cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qinguo; Zhang, Honghai; Guo, Dongge; Ma, Shisheng

    2016-05-28

    We displayed four types of Solanum nigrum metallothionein (SMT) for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using an α-agglutinin-based display system. The SMT genes were amplified by RT-PCR. The plasmid pYES2 was used to construct the expression vector. Transformed yeast strains were confirmed by PCR amplification and custom sequencing. Surface-expressed metallothioneins were indirectly indicated by the enhanced cadmium sorption capacity. Flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to examine the concentration of Cd(2+) in this study. The transformed yeast strains showed much higher resistance ability to Cd(2+) compared with the control. Strikingly, their Cd(2+) accumulation was almost twice as much as that of the wild-type yeast cells. Furthermore, surface-engineered yeast strains could effectively adsorb ultra-trace cadmium and accumulate Cd(2+) under a wide range of pH levels, from 3 to 7, without disturbing the Cu(2+) and Hg(2+). Four types of surfaceengineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were constructed and they could be used to purify Cd(2+)-contaminated water and adsorb ultra-trace cadmium effectively. The surface-engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains would be useful tools for the bioremediation and biosorption of environmental cadmium contaminants. PMID:26838339

  3. Comparative genomic analysis reveals a critical role of de novo nucleotide biosynthesis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Pérez-Torrado

    Full Text Available In recent years, the number of human infection cases produced by the food related species Saccharomyces cerevisiae has increased. Whereas many strains of this species are considered safe, other 'opportunistic' strains show a high degree of potential virulence attributes and can cause infections in immunocompromised patients. Here we studied the genetic characteristics of selected opportunistic strains isolated from dietary supplements and also from patients by array comparative genomic hybridization. Our results show increased copy numbers of IMD genes in opportunistic strains, which are implicated in the de novo biosynthesis of the purine nucleotides pathway. The importance of this pathway for virulence of S. cerevisiae was confirmed by infections in immunodeficient murine models using a GUA1 mutant, a key gene of this pathway. We show that exogenous guanine, an end product of this pathway in its triphosphorylated form, increases the survival of yeast strains in ex vivo blood infections. Finally, we show the importance of the DNA damage response that activates dNTP biosynthesis in yeast cells during ex vivo blood infections. We conclude that opportunistic yeasts may use an enhanced de novo biosynthesis of the purine nucleotides pathway to increase survival and favor infections in the host.

  4. Optimizing promoters and secretory signal sequences for producing ethanol from inulin by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying Kluyveromyces marxianus inulinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soo-Jeong; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Jin-Woo; Lee, Dae-Hee; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-02-01

    Inulin is a polyfructan that is abundant in plants such as Jerusalem artichoke, chicory and dahlia. Inulinase can easily hydrolyze inulin to fructose, which is consumed by microorganisms. Generally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an industrial workhorse strain for bioethanol production, is known for not having inulinase activity. The inulinase gene from Kluyveromyces marxianus (KmINU), with the ability of converting inulin to fructose, was introduced into S. cerevisiae D452-2. The inulinase gene was fused to three different types of promoter (GPD, PGK1, truncated HXT7) and secretory signal sequence (KmINU, MFα1, SUC2) to generate nine expression cassettes. The inulin fermentation performance of the nine transformants containing different promoter and signal sequence combinations for inulinase production were compared to select an optimized expression system for efficient inulin fermentation. Among the nine inulinase-producing transformants, the S. cerevisiae carrying the PGK1 promoter and MFα1 signal sequence (S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM) showed not only the highest specific KmINU activity, but also the best inulin fermentation capability. Finally, a batch fermentation of the selected S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM in a bioreactor with 188.2 g/L inulin was performed to produce 80.2 g/L ethanol with 0.43 g ethanol/g inulin of ethanol yield and 1.22 g/L h of ethanol productivity.

  5. Optimizing promoters and secretory signal sequences for producing ethanol from inulin by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying Kluyveromyces marxianus inulinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soo-Jeong; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Jin-Woo; Lee, Dae-Hee; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-02-01

    Inulin is a polyfructan that is abundant in plants such as Jerusalem artichoke, chicory and dahlia. Inulinase can easily hydrolyze inulin to fructose, which is consumed by microorganisms. Generally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an industrial workhorse strain for bioethanol production, is known for not having inulinase activity. The inulinase gene from Kluyveromyces marxianus (KmINU), with the ability of converting inulin to fructose, was introduced into S. cerevisiae D452-2. The inulinase gene was fused to three different types of promoter (GPD, PGK1, truncated HXT7) and secretory signal sequence (KmINU, MFα1, SUC2) to generate nine expression cassettes. The inulin fermentation performance of the nine transformants containing different promoter and signal sequence combinations for inulinase production were compared to select an optimized expression system for efficient inulin fermentation. Among the nine inulinase-producing transformants, the S. cerevisiae carrying the PGK1 promoter and MFα1 signal sequence (S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM) showed not only the highest specific KmINU activity, but also the best inulin fermentation capability. Finally, a batch fermentation of the selected S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM in a bioreactor with 188.2 g/L inulin was performed to produce 80.2 g/L ethanol with 0.43 g ethanol/g inulin of ethanol yield and 1.22 g/L h of ethanol productivity. PMID:25142154

  6. Transcriptome-based characterization of interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in lactose-grown chemostat cocultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Filipa; Sieuwerts, Sander; de Hulster, Erik; Almering, Marinka J H; Luttik, Marijke A H; Pronk, Jack T; Smid, Eddy J; Bron, Peter A; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2013-10-01

    Mixed populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and lactic acid bacteria occur in many dairy, food, and beverage fermentations, but knowledge about their interactions is incomplete. In the present study, interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, two microorganisms that co-occur in kefir fermentations, were studied during anaerobic growth on lactose. By combining physiological and transcriptome analysis of the two strains in the cocultures, five mechanisms of interaction were identified. (i) Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus hydrolyzes lactose, which cannot be metabolized by S. cerevisiae, to galactose and glucose. Subsequently, galactose, which cannot be metabolized by Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, is excreted and provides a carbon source for yeast. (ii) In pure cultures, Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus grows only in the presence of increased CO2 concentrations. In anaerobic mixed cultures, the yeast provides this CO2 via alcoholic fermentation. (iii) Analysis of amino acid consumption from the defined medium indicated that S. cerevisiae supplied alanine to the bacterium. (iv) A mild but significant low-iron response in the yeast transcriptome, identified by DNA microarray analysis, was consistent with the chelation of iron by the lactate produced by Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. (v) Transcriptome analysis of Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in mixed cultures showed an overrepresentation of transcripts involved in lipid metabolism, suggesting either a competition of the two microorganisms for fatty acids or a response to the ethanol produced by S. cerevisiae. This study demonstrates that chemostat-based transcriptome analysis is a powerful tool to investigate microbial interactions in mixed populations.

  7. Characteristics of sterol uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenz, R T; Rodriguez, R J; Lewis, T A; Parks, L W

    1986-01-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae sterol auxotroph, FY3 (alpha hem1 erg7 ura), was used to probe the characteristics of sterol uptake in S. cerevisiae. The steady-state cellular concentration of free sterol at the late exponential phase of growth could be adjusted within a 10-fold range by varying the concentration of exogenously supplied sterol. When cultured on 1 microgram of sterol ml-1, the cells contained a minimal cellular free-cholesterol concentration of 0.85 nmol/mg (dry weight) and were te...

  8. Changes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell membrane components and promotion to ethanol tolerance during the bioethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shi-Jun; Yi, Chen-Feng; Li, Hao

    2015-12-01

    During bioethanol fermentation process, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell membrane might provide main protection to tolerate accumulated ethanol, and S. cerevisiae cells might also remodel their membrane compositions or structure to try to adapt to or tolerate the ethanol stress. However, the exact changes and roles of S. cerevisiae cell membrane components during bioethanol fermentation still remains poorly understood. This study was performed to clarify changes and roles of S. cerevisiae cell membrane components during bioethanol fermentation. Both cell diameter and membrane integrity decreased as fermentation time lasting. Moreover, compared with cells at lag phase, cells at exponential and stationary phases had higher contents of ergosterol and oleic acid (C18:1) but lower levels of hexadecanoic (C16:0) and palmitelaidic (C16:1) acids. Contents of most detected phospholipids presented an increase tendency during fermentation process. Increased contents of oleic acid and phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids might indicate enhanced cell membrane fluidity. Compared with cells at lag phase, cells at exponential and stationary phases had higher expressions of ACC1 and HFA1. However, OLE1 expression underwent an evident increase at exponential phase but a decrease at following stationary phase. These results indicated that during bioethanol fermentation process, yeast cells remodeled membrane and more changeable cell membrane contributed to acquiring higher ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae cells. These results highlighted our knowledge about relationship between the variation of cell membrane structure and compositions and ethanol tolerance, and would contribute to a better understanding of bioethanol fermentation process and construction of industrial ethanologenic strains with higher ethanol tolerance.

  9. Characterization of the Viable but Nonculturable (VBNC State in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Salma

    Full Text Available The Viable But Non Culturable (VBNC state has been thoroughly studied in bacteria. In contrast, it has received much less attention in other microorganisms. However, it has been suggested that various yeast species occurring in wine may enter in VBNC following sulfite stress.In order to provide conclusive evidences for the existence of a VBNC state in yeast, the ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to enter into a VBNC state by applying sulfite stress was investigated. Viable populations were monitored by flow cytometry while culturable populations were followed by plating on culture medium. Twenty-four hours after the application of the stress, the comparison between the culturable population and the viable population demonstrated the presence of viable cells that were non culturable. In addition, removal of the stress by increasing the pH of the medium at different time intervals into the VBNC state allowed the VBNC S. cerevisiae cells to "resuscitate". The similarity between the cell cycle profiles of VBNC cells and cells exiting the VBNC state together with the generation rate of cells exiting VBNC state demonstrated the absence of cellular multiplication during the exit from the VBNC state. This provides evidence of a true VBNC state. To get further insight into the molecular mechanism pertaining to the VBNC state, we studied the involvement of the SSU1 gene, encoding a sulfite pump in S. cerevisiae. The physiological behavior of wild-type S. cerevisiae was compared to those of a recombinant strain overexpressing SSU1 and null Δssu1 mutant. Our results demonstrated that the SSU1 gene is only implicated in the first stages of sulfite resistance but not per se in the VBNC phenotype. Our study clearly demonstrated the existence of an SO2-induced VBNC state in S. cerevisiae and that the stress removal allows the "resuscitation" of VBNC cells during the VBNC state.

  10. Lachancea thermotolerans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in simultaneous and sequential co-fermentation: a strategy to enhance acidity and improve the overall quality of wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, Mirko; Comitini, Francesca; Domizio, Paola; Romani, Cristina; Lencioni, Livio; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Ciani, Maurizio

    2013-04-01

    In the last few years there is an increasing interest on the use of mixed fermentation of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts for inoculation of wine fermentations to enhance the quality and improve complexity of wines. In the present work Lachancea (Kluyveromyces) thermotolerans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were evaluated in simultaneous and sequential fermentation with the aim to enhance acidity and improve the quality of wine. In this specific pairing of yeast strains in mixed fermentations (S. cerevisiae EC1118 and L. thermotolerans 101), this non-Saccharomyces yeast showed a high level of competitiveness. Nevertheless the S. cerevisiae strain dominated the fermentation over the spontaneous S. cerevisiae strains also under the industrial fermentation conditions. The different condition tested (modalities of inoculum, temperature of fermentation, different grape juice) influenced the specific interactions and the fermentation behaviour of the co-culture of S. cerevisiae and L. thermotolerans. However, some metabolic behaviours such as pH reduction and enhancement of 2-phenylethanol and glycerol, were shown here under all of the conditions tested. The specific chemical profiles of these wines were confirmed by the sensory analysis test, which expressed these results at the tasting level as significant increases in the spicy notes and in terms of total acidity increases. PMID:23200661

  11. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

  12. Isobutanol production in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of 2-ketoisovalerate decarboxylase and valine biosynthetic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Heong; Seo, Seung-Oh; Bae, Yi-Hyun; Nan, Hong; Jin, Yong-Su; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2012-11-01

    Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce advanced biofuels such as isobutanol has received much attention because this yeast has a natural capacity to produce higher alcohols. In this study, construction of isobutanol production systems was attempted by overexpression of effective 2-keto acid decarboxylase (KDC) and combinatorial overexpression of valine biosynthetic enzymes in S. cerevisiae D452-2. Among the six putative KDC enzymes from various microorganisms, 2-ketoisovalerate decarboxylase (Kivd) from L. lactis subsp. lactis KACC 13877 was identified as the most suitable KDC for isobutanol production in the yeast. Isobutanol production by the engineered S. cerevisiae was assessed in micro-aerobic batch fermentations using glucose as a sole carbon source. 93 mg/L isobutanol was produced in the Kivd overexpressing strain, which corresponds to a fourfold improvement as compared with the control strain. Isobutanol production was further enhanced to 151 mg/L by additional overexpression of acetolactate synthase (Ilv2p), acetohydroxyacid reductoisomerase (Ilv5p), and dihydroxyacid dehydratase (Ilv3p) in the cytosol.

  13. Effects of Potentised Substances on Growth Kinetics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    OpenAIRE

    Scherr, Claudia; Baumgartner, Stephan; Spranger, Jörg; Simon, Meinhard

    2006-01-01

    Background: Homeopathic potencies are used as specific remedies in complementary medicine. Since the mode of action is unknown, the presumed specificity is discussed controversially. Objective: This study investigated the effects of potentised substances on two yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in a stable and reliable test system with systematic negative controls. Materials and Methods: Yeast cells were cultivated in either potentised substances or ...

  14. A vaccine grade of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing mammalian myostatin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Tingting; Sun Lin; Xin Ying; Ma Lixia; Zhang Youyou; Wang Xin; Xu Kun; Ren Chonghua; Zhang Cunfang; Chen Zhilong; Yang Hanjiang; Zhang Zhiying

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely-used system for protein expression. We previously showed that heat-killed whole recombinant yeast vaccine expressing mammalian myostatin can modulate myostatin function in mice, resulting in increase of body weight and muscle composition in these animals. Foreign DNA introduced into yeast cells can be lost soon unless cells are continuously cultured in selection media, which usually contain antibiotics. For cost and safety concern...

  15. Topological basis of signal integration in the transcriptional-regulatory network of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Chennubhotla Chakra; Wu Chuang; Farkas Illés J; Bahar Ivet; Oltvai Zoltán N

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Signal recognition and information processing is a fundamental cellular function, which in part involves comprehensive transcriptional regulatory (TR) mechanisms carried out in response to complex environmental signals in the context of the cell's own internal state. However, the network topological basis of developing such integrated responses remains poorly understood. Results By studying the TR network of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that an intermediate l...

  16. Impact of assimilable nitrogen availability in glucose uptake kinetics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Palma Margarida; Madeira Sara; Mendes-Ferreira Ana; Sá-Correia Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The expression and activity of the different Saccharomyces cerevisiae hexose uptake systems (Hxt) and the kinetics of glucose uptake are considered essential to industrial alcoholic fermentation performance. However, the dynamics of glucose uptake kinetics during the different stages of fermentation, depending on glucose and nitrogen availability, is very poorly characterized. The objective of the present work was to examine thoroughly the alterations occurring in glucose ...

  17. Scheffersomyces stipitis: a comparative systems biology study with the Crabtree positive yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papini, Marta; Nookaew, Intawat; Uhlén, Mathias;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Scheffersomyces stipitis is a Crabtree negative yeast, commonly known for its capacity to ferment pentose sugars. Differently from Crabtree positive yeasts such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the onset of fermentation in S. stipitis is not dependent on the sugar concentration...... for the possibility to incorporate these data into recently developed genome-scaled metabolic, thus contributing to improve future industrial applications of S. stipitis as cell factory....

  18. Construction of Killer Wine Yeast Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Seki, Tetsuji; Choi, Eon-Ho; Ryu, Dewey

    1985-01-01

    A double-stranded RNA plasmid which confers the superkiller phenotype was transferred into a wine yeast (Montrachet strain 522) and its leucine-requiring derivative (strain 694) by cytoduction, using the protoplast fusion technique. The killer wine yeast constructed completely suppressed the growth of killer-sensitive strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in yeast extract-peptone-glucose medium at pH 4.5, whereas the killer effect was somewhat decreased at pH 3.5. The wine yeast harboring the k...

  19. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eGiannattasio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications.

  20. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of genes in valine metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiao; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Borodina, Irina;

    2011-01-01

    overexpression of biosynthetic genes ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 in valine metabolism in anaerobic fermentation of glucose in mineral medium in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol yield was further improved by twofold by the additional overexpression of BAT2, encoding the cytoplasmic branched-chain amino-acid aminotransferase...... were 3.86 and 0.28 mg per g glucose, respectively. They increased to 4.12 and 2.4 mg per g glucose in yeast extract/peptone/dextrose (YPD) complex medium under aerobic conditions, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Overexpression of genes ILV2, ILV3, ILV5, and BAT2 in valine metabolism led to an increase...... in isobutanol production in S. cerevisiae. Additional overexpression of ILV6 in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain had a negative effect, presumably by increasing the sensitivity of Ilv2 to valine inhibition, thus weakening the positive impact of overexpression of ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 on isobutanol...

  1. Effects of aeration on formation and localization of the acetyl coenzyme A synthetases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H. P.; Jahnke, L.

    1979-01-01

    Previous studies on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that two different forms of the enzyme acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACS) are present, depending on the conditions under which the cells are grown. The paper evaluates the usefulness of a method designed to assay both synthetases simultaneously in yeast homogenates. The data presented confirm the possibility of simultaneous detection and estimation of the amount of both ACSs of S. cerevisiae in crude homogenates of this strain, making possible the study of physiological factors involved in the formation of these isoenzymes. One important factor for specifying which of the two enzymes is found in these yeast cells is the presence or absence of oxygen in their environment. Aeration not only affects the ratio of the two ACSs but also appears to affect the cellular distribution of these enzymes. Most of the data presented suggest the possibility that the nonaerobic ACS may serve as a precursor to the aerobic form.

  2. Microsatellite marker-based assessment of the biodiversity of native bioethanol yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonangelo, Ana Teresa B F; Alonso, Diego P; Ribolla, Paulo E M; Colombi, Débora

    2013-08-01

    Although many Brazilian sugar mills initiate the fermentation process by inoculating selected commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, the unsterile conditions of the industrial sugar cane ethanol fermentation process permit the constant entry of native yeast strains. Certain of those native strains are better adapted and tend to predominate over the initial strain, which may cause problems during fermentation. In the industrial fermentation process, yeast cells are often exposed to stressful environmental conditions, including prolonged cell recycling, ethanol toxicity and osmotic, oxidative or temperature stress. Little is known about these S. cerevisiae strains, although recent studies have demonstrated that heterogeneous genome architecture is exhibited by some selected well-adapted Brazilian indigenous yeast strains that display high performance in bioethanol fermentation. In this study, 11 microsatellite markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and population structure of the native autochthonous S. cerevisiae strains in various Brazilian sugar mills. The resulting multilocus data were used to build a similarity-based phenetic tree and to perform a Bayesian population structure analysis. The tree revealed the presence of great genetic diversity among the strains, which were arranged according to the place of origin and the collection year. The population structure analysis revealed genotypic differences among populations; in certain populations, these genotypic differences are combined to yield notably genotypically diverse individuals. The high yeast diversity observed among native S. cerevisiae strains provides new insights on the use of autochthonous high-fitness strains with industrial characteristics as starter cultures at bioethanol plants. PMID:23765797

  3. Polyphosphates and Polyphosphatase Activity in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Overexpression of the DDP1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilisenko, L V; Andreeva, N A; Eldarov, M A; Dumina, M V; Kulakovskaya, T V

    2015-10-01

    The effects of overexpression of yeast diphosphoinositol polyphosphate phosphohydrolase (DDP1) having endopolyphosphatase activity on inorganic polyphosphate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. The endopolyphosphatase activity in the transformed strain significantly increased compared to the parent strain. This activity was observed with polyphosphates of different chain length, being suppressed by 2 mM tripolyphosphate or ATP. The content of acid-soluble and acid-insoluble polyphosphates under DDP1 overexpression decreased by 9 and 28%, respectively. The average chain length of salt-soluble and alkali-soluble fractions did not change in the overexpressing strain, and that of acid-soluble polyphosphate increased under phosphate excess. At the initial stage of polyphosphate recovery after phosphorus starvation, the chain length of the acid-soluble fraction in transformed cells was lower compared to the recipient strain. This observation suggests the complex nature of DDP1 involvement in the regulation of polyphosphate content and chain length in yeasts.

  4. Starmerella bombicola influences the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase level during mixed wine fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanovic Vesna

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of a multistarter fermentation process with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts has been proposed to simulate natural must fermentation and to confer greater complexity and specificity to wine. In this context, the combined use of S. cerevisiae and immobilized Starmerella bombicola cells (formerly Candida stellata was assayed to enhance glycerol concentration, reduce ethanol content and to improve the analytical composition of wine. In order to investigate yeast metabolic interaction during controlled mixed fermentation and to evaluate the influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae, the gene expression and enzymatic activity of two key enzymes of the alcoholic fermentation pathway such as pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc1 and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1 were studied. Results The presence of S. bombicola immobilized cells in a mixed fermentation trial confirmed an increase in fermentation rate, a combined consumption of glucose and fructose, an increase in glycerol and a reduction in the production of ethanol as well as a modification in the fermentation of by products. The alcoholic fermentation of S. cerevisiae was also influenced by S. bombicola immobilized cells. Indeed, Pdc1 activity in mixed fermentation was lower than that exhibited in pure culture while Adh1 activity showed an opposite behavior. The expression of both PDC1 and ADH1 genes was highly induced at the initial phase of fermentation. The expression level of PDC1 at the end of fermentation was much higher in pure culture while ADH1 level was similar in both pure and mixed fermentations. Conclusion In mixed fermentation, S. bombicola immobilized cells greatly affected the fermentation behavior of S. cerevisiae and the analytical composition of wine. The influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae was not limited to a simple additive contribution. Indeed, its presence caused metabolic modifications during S. cerevisiae fermentation

  5. Starmerella bombicola influences the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase level during mixed wine fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of a multistarter fermentation process with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts has been proposed to simulate natural must fermentation and to confer greater complexity and specificity to wine. In this context, the combined use of S. cerevisiae and immobilized Starmerella bombicola cells (formerly Candida stellata) was assayed to enhance glycerol concentration, reduce ethanol content and to improve the analytical composition of wine. In order to investigate yeast metabolic interaction during controlled mixed fermentation and to evaluate the influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae, the gene expression and enzymatic activity of two key enzymes of the alcoholic fermentation pathway such as pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc1) and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1) were studied. Results The presence of S. bombicola immobilized cells in a mixed fermentation trial confirmed an increase in fermentation rate, a combined consumption of glucose and fructose, an increase in glycerol and a reduction in the production of ethanol as well as a modification in the fermentation of by products. The alcoholic fermentation of S. cerevisiae was also influenced by S. bombicola immobilized cells. Indeed, Pdc1 activity in mixed fermentation was lower than that exhibited in pure culture while Adh1 activity showed an opposite behavior. The expression of both PDC1 and ADH1 genes was highly induced at the initial phase of fermentation. The expression level of PDC1 at the end of fermentation was much higher in pure culture while ADH1 level was similar in both pure and mixed fermentations. Conclusion In mixed fermentation, S. bombicola immobilized cells greatly affected the fermentation behavior of S. cerevisiae and the analytical composition of wine. The influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae was not limited to a simple additive contribution. Indeed, its presence caused metabolic modifications during S. cerevisiae fermentation causing variation in the gene

  6. The pol3-t Hyperrecombination Phenotype and DNA Damage-Induced Recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is RAD50 Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Galli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The DNA polymerase δ (POL3/CDC2 allele pol3-t of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has previously been shown to be sensitive to methylmethanesulfonate (MMS and has been proposed to be involved in base excision repair. Our results, however, show that the pol3-t mutation is synergistic for MMS sensitivity with MAG1, a known base excision repair gene, but it is epistatic with rad50Δ, suggesting that POL3 may be involved not only in base excision repair but also in a RAD50 dependent function. We further studied the interaction of pol3-t with rad50Δ by examining their effect on spontaneous, MMS-, UV-, and ionizing radiation-induced intrachromosomal recombination. We found that rad50Δ completely abolishes the elevated spontaneous frequency of intrachromosomal recombination in the pol3-t mutant and significantly decreases UV- and MMS-induced recombination in both POL3 and pol3-t strains. Interestingly, rad50Δ had no effect on γ-ray-induced recombination in both backgrounds between 0 and 50 Gy. Finally, the deletion of RAD50 had no effect on the elevated frequency of homologous integration conferred by the pol3-t mutation. RAD50 is possibly involved in resolution of replication forks that are stalled by mutagen-induced external DNA damage, or internal DNA damage produced by growing the pol3-t mutant at the restrictive temperature.

  7. Introducing a new breed of wine yeast: interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Bellon

    Full Text Available Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S. cerevisiae wine yeast and S. mikatae (closely-related but ecologically distant members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade, has identified progeny with robust fermentation properties and winemaking potential. Chemical analysis showed that, relative to the S. cerevisiae wine yeast parent, hybrids produced wines with different concentrations of volatile metabolites that are known to contribute to wine flavour and aroma, including flavour compounds associated with non-Saccharomyces species. The new S. cerevisiae x S. mikatae hybrids have the potential to produce complex wines akin to products of spontaneous fermentation while giving winemakers the safeguard of an inoculated ferment.

  8. Genome-wide gene expression of a natural hybrid between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii under enological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combina, Mariana; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Tronchoni, Jordi; Belloch, Carmela; Querol, Amparo

    2012-07-16

    The species Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a predominant role in the wine making process. However, other species have been associated with must fermentation, such as Saccharomyces uvarum (Saccharomyces bayanus var. uvarum) or Saccharomyces paradoxus. Recently, yeast hybrids of different Saccharomyces species have also been reported as responsible for wine production. Yeast hybrids between the species S. cerevisiae×S. kudriavzevii isolated in wine fermentations show enhanced performance in low temperature enological conditions and increased production of interesting aroma compounds. In this work, we have studied the transcriptomic response in enological conditions of a S. cerevisiae×S. kudriavzevii hybrid strain and compared it with the reference species of S. cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii. The results show that the hybrid strain presents an up-regulation of genes belonging to functional group translation and amino-acid metabolism. Moreover, key genes related to cold stress and production of glycerol and aroma compounds were also up-regulated. While some genes inherited regulation patterns from one of the parents, most of the up-regulated genes presented a new gene expression pattern, probably generated during the hybridization and adaptation process.

  9. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces yeasts in grape varieties of the São Francisco Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ponzzes-Gomes, Camila M.P.B.S.; de Mélo, Dângelly L.F.M.; Santana, Caroline A.; Pereira, Giuliano E.; Mendonça, Michelle O.C.; Gomes, Fátima C.O.; Oliveira, Evelyn S.; Barbosa, Antonio M.; Trindade, Rita C.; Rosa, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this work was to characterise indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in the naturally fermented juice of grape varieties Cabernet Sauvignon, Grenache, Tempranillo, Sauvignon Blanc and Verdejo used in the São Francisco River Valley, northeastern Brazil. In this study, 155 S. cerevisiae and 60 non-Saccharomyces yeasts were isolated and identified using physiological tests and sequencing of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene. Among the non-Saccharomyces species, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was the most common species, followed by Pichia kudriavzevii, Candida parapsilosis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Kloeckera apis, P. manshurica, C. orthopsilosis and C. zemplinina. The population counts of these yeasts ranged among 1.0 to 19 × 105 cfu/mL. A total of 155 isolates of S. cerevisiae were compared by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis, and five molecular mitochondrial DNA restriction profiles were detected. Indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from grapes of the São Francisco Valley can be further tested as potential starters for wine production. PMID:25242923

  10. Tangential Ultrafiltration of Aqueous "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae" Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carlos M.; Neves, Patricia S.; Da Silva, Francisco A.; Xavier, Ana M. R. B.; Eusebio, M. F. J.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental work on ultrafiltration is presented to illustrate the practical and theoretical principles of this separation technique. The laboratory exercise comprises experiments with pure water and with aqueous "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" (from commercial Baker's yeast) suspensions. With this work students detect the characteristic phenomena…

  11. Expression of protein engineered NADP{sup +}-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase increases ethanol production from xylose in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Katsuji; Takimura, Osamu; Sawayama, Shigeki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Hiroshima (Japan). Biomass Technology Research Center; Watanabe, Seiya; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Makino, Keisuke [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Advanced Energy

    2008-11-15

    A recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain transformed with xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) genes from Pichia stipitis has the ability to convert xylose to ethanol together with the unfavorable excretion of xylitol, which may be due to cofactor imbalance between NADPH-preferring XR and NAD{sup +}-dependent XDH. To reduce xylitol formation, we have already generated several XDH mutants with a reversal of coenzyme specificity toward NADP{sup +}. In this study, we constructed a set of recombinant S. cerevisiae strains with xylose-fermenting ability, including protein-engineered NADP{sup +}-dependent XDH-expressing strains. The most positive effect on xylose-to-ethanol fermentation was found by using a strain named MA-N5, constructed by chromosomal integration of the gene for NADP{sup +}-dependent XDH along with XR and endogenous xylulokinase genes. The MA-N5 strain had an increase in ethanol production and decrease in xylitol excretion compared with the reference strain expressing wild-type XDH when fermenting not only xylose but also mixed sugars containing glucose and xylose. Furthermore, the MA-N5 strain produced ethanol with a high yield of 0.49 g of ethanol/g of total consumed sugars in the nonsulfuric acid hydrolysate of wood chips. The results demonstrate that glucose and xylose present in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate can be efficiently fermented by this redox-engineered strain. (orig.)

  12. EVALUACIÓN DE LA CAPACIDAD PROBIÓTICA “IN VITRO” DE UNA CEPA NATIVA DE Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Ángela Ortiz; Joanna Reuto; Erika Fajardo; Sandra Sarmiento; Andrea Aguirre; Gustavo Arbeláez; David Gómez; Balkys Quevedo-Hidalgo

    2008-01-01

    The in vitro probiotic capacity of a native strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (A) was evaluated and comparedwith a commercial strain (B) used as a probiotic. The effect of the concentration of sugarcane molasses (10, 20and 30% (w/v)) on the biomass production was investigated and kinetic parameters were determined. The bestmolasses concentration was 20% (w/v) and differences in biomass production on molasses medium betweenstrain A (28 g/L) and control strain B (3 g/L) were observed. In vitro...

  13. Improvement of oxidative stress tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through global transcription machinery engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongwei; Li, Jingyuan; Han, Beizhong; Li, Xuan; Chen, Jingyu

    2014-05-01

    Excessive oxidative stress poses significant damage to yeast cells during fermentation process, and finally affects fermentation efficiency and the quality of products. In this paper, global transcription machinery engineering was employed to elicit Saccharomyces cerevisiae phenotypes of higher tolerance against oxidative stress caused by H2O2. Two strains from two plasmid-based mutagenesis libraries (Spt15 and Taf25), which exhibited significant increases in oxidative stress tolerance, were successfully isolated. At moderate H2O2 shock (≤3.5 mM), a positive correlation was found between the outperformance in cell growth of the oxidation-tolerate strains and H2O2 concentration. Several mutations were observed in the native transcription factors, which resulted in a different transcriptional profile compared with the control. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities of the two mutants increased under H2O2 stress conditions. Fermentation experiments revealed that the mutant strain taf25-3 has a shorter lag phase compared to the control one, indicating that taf25-3 had improved adaptation ability to H2O2-induced oxidative stress and higher fermentation efficiency. Our study demonstrated that several amino acid substitutions in general transcription factors (Spt15 and Taf25) could modify the cellular oxidation defense systems and improve the anti-oxidation ability of S. cerevisiae. It could make the industrial ethanol fermentation more efficient and cost-effective by using the strain of higher stress tolerance. PMID:24633583

  14. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes involved in ethanol response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Agave tequilana juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Córdova, Jesús; Drnevich, Jenny; Madrigal-Pulido, Jaime Alberto; Arrizon, Javier; Allen, Kirk; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Alvarez-Maya, Ikuri

    2012-08-01

    During ethanol fermentation, yeast cells are exposed to stress due to the accumulation of ethanol, cell growth is altered and the output of the target product is reduced. For Agave beverages, like tequila, no reports have been published on the global gene expression under ethanol stress. In this work, we used microarray analysis to identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in the ethanol response. Gene expression of a tequila yeast strain of S. cerevisiae (AR5) was explored by comparing global gene expression with that of laboratory strain S288C, both after ethanol exposure. Additionally, we used two different culture conditions, cells grown in Agave tequilana juice as a natural fermentation media or grown in yeast-extract peptone dextrose as artificial media. Of the 6368 S. cerevisiae genes in the microarray, 657 genes were identified that had different expression responses to ethanol stress due to strain and/or media. A cluster of 28 genes was found over-expressed specifically in the AR5 tequila strain that could be involved in the adaptation to tequila yeast fermentation, 14 of which are unknown such as yor343c, ylr162w, ygr182c, ymr265c, yer053c-a or ydr415c. These could be the most suitable genes for transforming tequila yeast to increase ethanol tolerance in the tequila fermentation process. Other genes involved in response to stress (RFC4, TSA1, MLH1, PAU3, RAD53) or transport (CYB2, TIP20, QCR9) were expressed in the same cluster. Unknown genes could be good candidates for the development of recombinant yeasts with ethanol tolerance for use in industrial tequila fermentation.

  15. Influence of cell surface characteristics on adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the biomaterial hydroxylapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jane S; Walker, Graeme M

    2011-02-01

    The influence of the physicochemical properties of biomaterials on microbial cell adhesion is well known, with the extent of adhesion depending on hydrophobicity, surface charge, specific functional groups and acid-base properties. Regarding yeasts, the effect of cell surfaces is often overlooked, despite the fact that generalisations may not be made between closely related strains. The current investigation compared adhesion of three industrially relevant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (M-type, NCYC 1681 and ALY, strains used in production of Scotch whisky, ale and lager, respectively) to the biomaterial hydroxylapatite (HAP). Adhesion of the whisky yeast was greatest, followed by the ale strain, while adhesion of the lager strain was approximately 10-times less. According to microbial adhesion to solvents (MATS) analysis, the ale strain was hydrophobic while the whisky and lager strains were moderately hydrophilic. This contrasted with analyses of water contact angles where all strains were characterised as hydrophilic. All yeast strains were electron donating, with low electron accepting potential, as indicated by both surface energy and MATS analysis. Overall, there was a linear correlation between adhesion to HAP and the overall surface free energy of the yeasts. This is the first time that the relationship between yeast cell surface energy and adherence to a biomaterial has been described.

  16. Gpx3-dependent responses against oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Chang Won; Lee, Phil Young; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Kang, Sunghyun; Cho, Sayeon; Lee, Do Hee; Sun, Choong-Hyun; Yi, Gwan-Su; Park, Byoung Chul; Park, Sung Goo

    2008-02-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has defense mechanisms identical to higher eukaryotes. It offers the potential for genome-wide experimental approaches owing to its smaller genome size and the availability of the complete sequence. It therefore represents an ideal eukaryotic model for studying cellular redox control and oxidative stress responses. S. cerevisiae Yap1 is a well-known transcription factor that is required for H2O2-dependent stress responses. Yap1 is involved in various signaling pathways in an oxidative stress response. The Gpx3 (Orp1/PHGpx3) protein is one of the factors related to these signaling pathways. It plays the role of a transducer that transfers the hydroperoxide signal to Yap1. In this study, using extensive proteomic and bioinformatics analyses, the function of the Gpx3 protein in an adaptive response against oxidative stress was investigated in wild-type, gpx3-deletion mutant, and gpx3-deletion mutant overexpressing Gpx3 protein strains. We identified 30 proteins that are related to the Gpx3- dependent oxidative stress responses and 17 proteins that are changed in a Gpx3-dependent manner regardless of oxidative stress. As expected, H2O2-responsive Gpx3-dependent proteins include a number of antioxidants related with cell rescue and defense. In addition, they contain a variety of proteins related to energy and carbohydrate metabolism, transcription, and protein fate. Based upon the experimental results, it is suggested that Gpx3-dependent stress adaptive response includes the regulation of genes related to the capacity to detoxify oxidants and repair oxidative stress-induced damages affected by Yap1 as well as metabolism and protein fate independent from Yap1. PMID:18309271

  17. Flavour formation in fungi: characterisation of KlAtf, the Kluyveromyces lactis orthologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol acetyltransferases Atf1 and Atf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laere, Stijn D M; Saerens, Sofie M G; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Van Dijck, Patrick; Thevelein, Johan M; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2008-04-01

    Volatile aroma-active esters are responsible for the fruity character of fermented alcoholic beverages, such as beer and wine. In the brewers' yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the major part of these esters is formed by two alcohol acetyltransferases, Atf1 and Atf2. In this paper, the existence of orthologues of these S. cerevisiae alcohol acetyltransferases in several ascomycetous fungi was investigated. Bioinformatic analysis of sequenced fungal genomes revealed the presence of multiple orthologues. The Saccharomyces sensu stricto yeasts all have two genes coding for orthologues. More distantly related fungi like Saccharomyces castelii, Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces waltii and Kluyveromyces lactis have only one orthologue in their genome. The homology between the identified proteins and the S. cerevisiae alcohol acetyltransferases suggests a role for these orthologues in the aroma-active ester formation. To verify this, the K. lactis orthologue KlAtf was cloned and expressed in S. cerevisiae. Gas chromatographic analysis of small-scale fermentations with the transformant strains showed that, while S. cerevisiae ATF1 overexpression resulted in a substantial increase in acetate ester levels, S. cerevisiae ATF2 and K. lactis ATF overexpression only caused a moderate increase in acetate esters. This study is the first report of the presence of an ester synthesis gene in K. lactis.

  18. Natural computation meta-heuristics for the in silico optimization of microbial strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Miguel; Maia, Paulo; Mendes, Rui;

    2008-01-01

    deletions necessary for achieving a given productivity goal. The work presents extensive computational experiments, involving four case studies that consider the production of succinic and lactic acid as the targets, by using S. cerevisiae and E. coli as model organisms. The proposed algorithms are able......Background: One of the greatest challenges in Metabolic Engineering is to develop quantitative models and algorithms to identify a set of genetic manipulations that will result in a microbial strain with a desirable metabolic phenotype which typically means having a high yield....../productivity. This challenge is not only due to the inherent complexity of the metabolic and regulatory networks, but also to the lack of appropriate modelling and optimization tools. To this end, Evolutionary Algorithms (EAs) have been proposed for in silico metabolic engineering, for example, to identify sets of gene...

  19. Effects of low X-ray doses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with different capacities for repair of radiation damage (RAD, rad18, and rad52) have been tested for their colony forming ability (CFA) and growth rates after application of small X-ray doses from 3.8 mGy to 40 Gy. There was no reproducible increase in CFA observable after application of doses between 3.8 mGy and 4.7 Gy.X-ray doses of 40 Gy causing an inactivation of CFA from 90% to 50%, depending on the repair capacity of the strains used, caused a reduced increase in optical density during 2 h buffer treatment in comparison to unirradiated cells. This reduction however, is reversible as soon as the cells are transferred into nutrient medium. One hour after transfer into growh medium the portions of cells with large buds (Gs and M phase) and cells with small buds (S phase) are drastically different in irradiated cells from those obtained in unirradiated cells. The time necessary for separation of mother and daughter cells is prolonged by X-ray irradiation and the formation of new buds is retarded. (orig.)

  20. Protective Effects of Arginine on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Against Ethanol Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanfei; Du, Zhaoli; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Xuena; He, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells are challenged by various environmental stresses in the process of industrial fermentation. As the currently main organism for bio-ethanol production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae suffers from ethanol stress. Some amino acids have been reported to be related to yeast tolerance to stresses. Here the relationship between arginine and yeast response to ethanol stress was investigated. Marked inhibitions of ethanol on cell growth, expression of genes involved in arginine biosynthesis and intracellular accumulation of arginine were observed. Furthermore, extracellular addition of arginine can abate the ethanol damage largely. To further confirm the protective effects of arginine on yeast cells, yeast strains with different levels of arginine content were constructed by overexpression of ARG4 involved in arginine biosynthesis or CAR1 encoding arginase. Intracellular arginine was increased by 18.9% or 13.1% respectively by overexpression of ARG4 or disruption of CAR1, which enhanced yeast tolerance to ethanol stress. Moreover, a 41.1% decrease of intracellular arginine was observed in CAR1 overexpressing strain, which made yeast cells keenly sensitive to ethanol. Further investigations indicated that arginine protected yeast cells from ethanol damage by maintaining the integrity of cell wall and cytoplasma membrane, stabilizing the morphology and function of organellae due to low ROS generation. PMID:27507154

  1. Systematic analysis of S. cerevisiae chromosome VIII genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedenthal, R; Riles, L; Güldener, U; Klein, S; Johnston, M; Hegemann, J H

    1999-12-01

    To begin genome-wide functional analysis, we analysed the consequences of deleting each of the 265 genes of chromosome VIII of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For 33% of the deletion strains a growth phenotype could be detected: 18% of the genes are essential for growth on complete glucose medium, and 15% grow significantly more slowly than the wild-type strain or exhibit a conditional phenotype when incubated under one of 20 different growth conditions. Two-thirds of the mutants that exhibit conditional phenotypes are pleiotropic; about one-third of the mutants exhibit only one phenotype. We also measured the level of expression directed by the promoter of each gene. About half of the promoters direct detectable transcription in rich glucose medium, and most of these exhibited only low or medium activity. Only 1% of the genes are expressed at about the same level as ACT1. The number of active promoters increased to 76% upon growth on a non-fermentable carbon source, and to 93% in minimal glucose medium. The majority of promoters fluctuated in strength, depending on the medium.

  2. Hanford Site background: Part 3, Groundwater background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents and interprets groundwater background data collected from the unconfined aquifer beneath the Hanford Site, a U.S. Department of Energy complex located near Richland, Washington. Characterization of background composition is an important component of environmental characterization activities and serves as a basis for distinguishing the presence and significance of contamination. Background data can also be used to assess the levels of baseline risk to which humans or other receptors are typically exposed and to establish remediation goals. Evaluating background on a sitewide basis provides a consistent, technically defensible definition of background as opposed to determining area-specific background compositions for each waste management unit being considered for remediation across the Hanford Site

  3. Strain-engineered MOSFETs

    CERN Document Server

    Maiti, CK

    2012-01-01

    Currently strain engineering is the main technique used to enhance the performance of advanced silicon-based metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Written from an engineering application standpoint, Strain-Engineered MOSFETs introduces promising strain techniques to fabricate strain-engineered MOSFETs and to methods to assess the applications of these techniques. The book provides the background and physical insight needed to understand new and future developments in the modeling and design of n- and p-MOSFETs at nanoscale. This book focuses on recent developments in st

  4. Real-time detection of cofactor availability in genetically modified living Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells - Simultaneous probing of different geno- and phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostesha, Natalie; Heiskanen, Arto; Spegel, C.;

    2009-01-01

    This work describes a mediated amperometric method for simultaneous real-time probing of the NAD(P)H availability in two different phenotypes, fermentative and respiratory, of the phosphoglucose isomerase deletion mutant strain of S. cerevisiae. EBY44 [ENY.WA-1A pgi1-1D::URA3], and its parental s...

  5. Incipient balancing selection through adaptive loss of aquaporins in natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Will

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A major goal in evolutionary biology is to understand how adaptive evolution has influenced natural variation, but identifying loci subject to positive selection has been a challenge. Here we present the adaptive loss of a pair of paralogous genes in specific Saccharomyces cerevisiae subpopulations. We mapped natural variation in freeze-thaw tolerance to two water transporters, AQY1 and AQY2, previously implicated in freeze-thaw survival. However, whereas freeze-thaw-tolerant strains harbor functional aquaporin genes, the set of sensitive strains lost aquaporin function at least 6 independent times. Several genomic signatures at AQY1 and/or AQY2 reveal low variation surrounding these loci within strains of the same haplotype, but high variation between strain groups. This is consistent with recent adaptive loss of aquaporins in subgroups of strains, leading to incipient balancing selection. We show that, although aquaporins are critical for surviving freeze-thaw stress, loss of both genes provides a major fitness advantage on high-sugar substrates common to many strains' natural niche. Strikingly, strains with non-functional alleles have also lost the ancestral requirement for aquaporins during spore formation. Thus, the antagonistic effect of aquaporin function-providing an advantage in freeze-thaw tolerance but a fitness defect for growth in high-sugar environments-contributes to the maintenance of both functional and nonfunctional alleles in S. cerevisiae. This work also shows that gene loss through multiple missense and nonsense mutations, hallmarks of pseudogenization presumed to emerge after loss of constraint, can arise through positive selection.

  6. Co-expression of TAL1 and ADH1 in recombinant xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves ethanol production from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the presence of furfural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Ismail, Ku Syahidah Ku; Nambu, Yumiko; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-02-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass dedicated to bioethanol production usually contains pentoses and inhibitory compounds such as furfural that are not well tolerated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thus, S. cerevisiae strains with the capability of utilizing both glucose and xylose in the presence of inhibitors such as furfural are very important in industrial ethanol production. Under the synergistic conditions of transaldolase (TAL) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) overexpression, S. cerevisiae MT8-1X/TAL-ADH was able to produce 1.3-fold and 2.3-fold more ethanol in the presence of 70 mM furfural than a TAL-expressing strain and a control strain, respectively. We also tested the strains' ability by mimicking industrial ethanol production from hemicellulosic hydrolysate containing fermentation inhibitors, and ethanol production was further improved by 16% when using MT8-1X/TAL-ADH compared to the control strain. Transcript analysis further revealed that besides the pentose phosphate pathway genes TKL1 and TAL1, ADH7 was also upregulated in response to furfural stress, which resulted in higher ethanol production compared to the TAL-expressing strain. The improved capability of our modified strain was based on its capacity to more quickly reduce furfural in situ resulting in higher ethanol production. The co-expression of TAL/ADH genes is one crucial strategy to fully utilize undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysate, leading to cost-competitive ethanol production.

  7. Data set for cloning and characterization of heterologous transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identification of important amino acids for xylose utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengqiang Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficient uptake is important for the xylose utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A heterogenous transporter Mgt05196p was cloned from Meyerozyma guilliermondii and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [1]. This data article contains the transport characteristics of Mgt05196p in S. cerevisiae. The fluorescence of fusion protein Mgt05196p-GFP expressing strain was located on the cell surface demonstrated that the heterogenous transporter Mgt05196p was targeted to the plasma membrane of S. cerevisiae. The expressing of Mgt05196p in the hxt null S. cerevisiae endowed the strain with the glucose and d-xylose absorption capacity, as well as expressing the native d-xylose transporter Gal2p. The transmembrane domains of Mgt05196p were predicted and compared with the XylEp, whose crystal structure was revealed. And then, the homologous modeling of Mgt05196p was built basing on the XylEp to find out the crucial amino acid residues for sugars binding and transport.

  8. Function of SSA subfamily of Hsp70 within and across species varies widely in complementing Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell growth and prion propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cytosol of most eukaryotic cells contains multiple highly conserved Hsp70 orthologs that differ mainly by their spatio-temporal expression patterns. Hsp70s play essential roles in protein folding, transport or degradation, and are major players of cellular quality control processes. However, while several reports suggest that specialized functions of Hsp70 orthologs were selected through evolution, few studies addressed systematically this issue. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared the ability of Ssa1p-Ssa4p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Ssa5p-Ssa8p from the evolutionary distant yeast Yarrowia lipolytica to perform Hsp70-dependent tasks when expressed as the sole Hsp70 for S. cerevisiae in vivo. We show that Hsp70 isoforms (i supported yeast viability yet with markedly different growth rates, (ii influenced the propagation and stability of the [PSI(+] and [URE3] prions, but iii did not significantly affect the proteasomal degradation rate of CFTR. Additionally, we show that individual Hsp70 orthologs did not induce the formation of different prion strains, but rather influenced the aggregation properties of Sup35 in vivo. Finally, we show that [URE3] curing by the overexpression of Ydj1p is Hsp70-isoform dependent. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Despite very high homology and overlapping functions, the different Hsp70 orthologs have evolved to possess distinct activities that are required to cope with different types of substrates or stress situations. Yeast prions provide a very sensitive model to uncover this functional specialization and to explore the intricate network of chaperone/co-chaperone/substrates interactions.

  9. Integration of new alternative reference strain genome sequences into the Saccharomyces genome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Giltae; Balakrishnan, Rama; Binkley, Gail; Costanzo, Maria C; Dalusag, Kyla; Demeter, Janos; Engel, Stacia; Hellerstedt, Sage T; Karra, Kalpana; Hitz, Benjamin C; Nash, Robert S; Paskov, Kelley; Sheppard, Travis; Skrzypek, Marek; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith; Michael Cherry, J

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org/) is the authoritative community resource for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation. To provide a wider scope of genetic and phenotypic variation in yeast, the genome sequences and their corresponding annotations from 11 alternative S. cerevisiae reference strains have been integrated into SGD. Genomic and protein sequence information for genes from these strains are now available on the Sequence and Protein tab of the corresponding Locus Summary pages. We illustrate how these genome sequences can be utilized to aid our understanding of strain-specific functional and phenotypic differences.Database URL: www.yeastgenome.org. PMID:27252399

  10. New hybrids between Saccharomyces sensu stricto yeast species found among wine and cider production strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masneuf, I; Hansen, J.; Groth, C;

    1998-01-01

    Two yeast isolates, a wine-making yeast first identified as a Mel(+) strain (ex. S. uvarum) and a cider-making yeast, were characterized for their nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, Electrophoretic karyotyping analyses, restriction fragment length polymorphism maps of PCR-amplified MET2 gene...... as different sequences of the OLI1 gene. The sequence of the OLI1 gene from the wine hybrid strain appeared to be the same as that of the S. cerevisiae gene, whereas the OLI1 gene of the cider hybrid strain its equally divergent from both putative parents, S. bayanus and S, cerevisiae, Some fermentative...

  11. Molecular Monitoring of Wine Fermentations Conducted by Active Dry Yeast Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Querol, Amparo; Barrio, Eladio; Huerta, Tomás; Ramón, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    A simple and rapid method of yeast strain characterization based on mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis was applied to the control of wine fermentations conducted by active dry yeast strains. This molecular approach allows us to understand several important aspects of this process, such as the role of the active dry yeast strain and that of the natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae flora during vinification. In this paper, we demonstrate that the inoculated strain is really responsible for the ...

  12. Computational models for prediction of yeast strain potential for winemaking from phenotypic profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, Ines; Franco-Duarte, Ricardo; Umek, Lan; Fonseca, Elza; Drumonde-Neves, Joao; Dequin, Sylvie; Zupan, Blaz; Schuller, Dorit

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from diverse natural habitats harbour a vast amount of phenotypic diversity, driven by interactions between yeast and the respective environment. In grape juice fermentations, strains are exposed to a wide array of biotic and abiotic stressors, which may lead to strain selection and generate naturally arising strain diversity. Certain phenotypes are of particular interest for the winemaking industry and could be identified by screening of large number of diffe...

  13. Computational models for prediction of yeast strain potential for winemaking from phenotypic profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Inês Mendes; Ricardo Franco-Duarte; Lan Umek; Elza Fonseca; João Drumonde-Neves; Sylvie Dequin; Blaz Zupan; Dorit Schuller

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from diverse natural habitats harbour a vast amount of phenotypic diversity, driven by interactions between yeast and the respective environment. In grape juice fermentations, strains are exposed to a wide array of biotic and abiotic stressors, which may lead to strain selection and generate naturally arising strain diversity. Certain phenotypes are of particular interest for the winemaking industry and could be identified by screening of large number of diffe...

  14. Impact of assimilable nitrogen availability in glucose uptake kinetics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palma Margarida

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression and activity of the different Saccharomyces cerevisiae hexose uptake systems (Hxt and the kinetics of glucose uptake are considered essential to industrial alcoholic fermentation performance. However, the dynamics of glucose uptake kinetics during the different stages of fermentation, depending on glucose and nitrogen availability, is very poorly characterized. The objective of the present work was to examine thoroughly the alterations occurring in glucose uptake kinetics during alcoholic fermentation, by the wine strain S. cerevisiae PYCC 4072, of a synthetic grape juice basal medium with either a limiting or non-limiting initial nitrogen concentration and following nitrogen supplementation of the nitrogen-depleted sluggish fermentation. Results Independently of the initial concentration of the nitrogen source, glucose transport capacity is maximal during the early stages of fermentation and presumably sustained by the low-affinity and high-capacity glucose transporter Hxt1p. During nitrogen-limited sluggish fermentation, glucose uptake capacity was reduced to approximately 20% of its initial values (Vmax = 4.9 ± 0.8 compared to 21.9 ± 1.2 μmol h-1 10-8 cells, being presumably sustained by the low-affinity glucose transporter Hxt3p (considering the calculated Km = 39.2 ± 8.6 mM. The supplementation of the sluggish fermentation broth with ammonium led to the increase of glucose transport capacity associated to the expression of different glucose uptake systems with low and high affinities for glucose (Km = 58.2 ± 9.1 and 2.7 ± 0.4 mM. A biclustering analysis carried out using microarray data, previously obtained for this yeast strain transcriptional response to equivalent fermentation conditions, indicates that the activation of the expression of genes encoding the glucose transporters Hxt2p (during the transition period to active fermentation and Hxt3p, Hxt4p, Hxt6

  15. Stress tolerance in doughs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae trehalase mutants derived from commercial Baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, J; Hino, A; Yamada-Iyo, C; Suzuki, Y; Nakajima, R; Watanabe, H; Mori, K; Takano, H

    1999-07-01

    Accumulation of trehalose is widely believed to be a critical determinant in improving the stress tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is commonly used in commercial bread dough. To retain the accumulation of trehalose in yeast cells, we constructed, for the first time, diploid homozygous neutral trehalase mutants (Deltanth1), acid trehalase mutants (Deltaath1), and double mutants (Deltanth1 ath1) by using commercial baker's yeast strains as the parent strains and the gene disruption method. During fermentation in a liquid fermentation medium, degradation of intracellular trehalose was inhibited with all of the trehalase mutants. The gassing power of frozen doughs made with these mutants was greater than the gassing power of doughs made with the parent strains. The Deltanth1 and Deltaath1 strains also exhibited higher levels of tolerance of dry conditions than the parent strains exhibited; however, the Deltanth1 ath1 strain exhibited lower tolerance of dry conditions than the parent strain exhibited. The improved freeze tolerance exhibited by all of the trehalase mutants may make these strains useful in frozen dough. PMID:10388673

  16. EasyClone: method for iterative chromosomal integration of multiple genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Bjerg; Strucko, Tomas; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin;

    2014-01-01

    Development of strains for efficient production of chemicals and pharmaceuticals requires multiple rounds of genetic engineering. In this study, we describe construction and characterization of EasyClone vector set for baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which enables simultaneous expression...... in the chromosome and show unchanged expression levels. Hence, this system is suitable for metabolic engineering in yeast where multiple rounds of gene introduction and marker recycling can be carried out....

  17. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of carboxylic acids: current status and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Derek A; Zelle, Rintze M; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2009-12-01

    To meet the demands of future generations for chemicals and energy and to reduce the environmental footprint of the chemical industry, alternatives for petrochemistry are required. Microbial conversion of renewable feedstocks has a huge potential for cleaner, sustainable industrial production of fuels and chemicals. Microbial production of organic acids is a promising approach for production of chemical building blocks that can replace their petrochemically derived equivalents. Although Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not naturally produce organic acids in large quantities, its robustness, pH tolerance, simple nutrient requirements and long history as an industrial workhorse make it an excellent candidate biocatalyst for such processes. Genetic engineering, along with evolution and selection, has been successfully used to divert carbon from ethanol, the natural endproduct of S. cerevisiae, to pyruvate. Further engineering, which included expression of heterologous enzymes and transporters, yielded strains capable of producing lactate and malate from pyruvate. Besides these metabolic engineering strategies, this review discusses the impact of transport and energetics as well as the tolerance towards these organic acids. In addition to recent progress in engineering S. cerevisiae for organic acid production, the key limitations and challenges are discussed in the context of sustainable industrial production of organic acids from renewable feedstocks. PMID:19566685

  18. Terminal acidic shock inhibits sour beer bottle conditioning by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Cody M; Veatch, Devon; Covey, Adam; Staton, Caleb; Bochman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    During beer fermentation, the brewer's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae experiences a variety of shifting growth conditions, culminating in a low-oxygen, low-nutrient, high-ethanol, acidic environment. In beers that are bottle conditioned (i.e., carbonated in the bottle by supplying yeast with a small amount of sugar to metabolize into CO2), the S. cerevisiae cells must overcome these stressors to perform the ultimate act in beer production. However, medium shock caused by any of these variables can slow, stall, or even kill the yeast, resulting in production delays and economic losses. Here, we describe a medium shock caused by high lactic acid levels in an American sour beer, which we refer to as "terminal acidic shock". Yeast exposed to this shock failed to bottle condition the beer, though they remained viable. The effects of low pH/high [lactic acid] conditions on the growth of six different brewing strains of S. cerevisiae were characterized, and we developed a method to adapt the yeast to growth in acidic beer, enabling proper bottle conditioning. Our findings will aid in the production of sour-style beers, a trending category in the American craft beer scene. PMID:27052714

  19. Genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes regulated by vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2015-01-01

    During pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, a variety of fermentation inhibitors, including acetic acid and vanillin, are released. Using DNA microarray analysis, this study explored genes of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that respond to vanillin-induced stress. The expression of 273 genes was upregulated and that of 205 genes was downregulated under vanillin stress. Significantly induced genes included MCH2, SNG1, GPH1, and TMA10, whereas NOP2, UTP18, FUR1, and SPR1 were down regulated. Sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region of upregulated genes suggested that vanillin might regulate gene expression in a stress response element (STRE)-dependent manner, in addition to a pathway that involved the transcription factor Yap1p. Retardation in the cell growth of mutant strains indicated that MCH2, SNG1, and GPH1 are intimately involved in vanillin stress response. Deletion of the genes whose expression levels were decreased under vanillin stress did not result in a notable change in S. cerevisiae growth under vanillin stress. This study will provide the basis for a better understanding of the stress response of the yeast S. cerevisiae to fermentation inhibitors.

  20. ¹³C-based metabolic flux analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a reduced Crabtree effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihata, Shuichi; Matsuda, Fumio; Yoshimi, Mika; Hayakawa, Kenshi; Furusawa, Chikara; Kanda, Akihisa; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows a Crabtree effect that produces ethanol in a high glucose concentration even under fully aerobic condition. For efficient production of cake yeast or compressed yeast for baking, ethanol by-production is not desired since glucose limited chemostat or fed-batch cultivations are performed to suppress the Crabtree effect. In this study, the (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) was performed for the S288C derived S. cerevisiae strain to characterize a metabolic state under the reduced Crabtree effect. S. cerevisiae cells were cultured at a low dilution rate (0.1 h(-1)) under the glucose-limited chemostat condition. The estimated metabolic flux distribution showed that the acetyl-CoA in mitochondria was mainly produced from pyruvate by pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) reaction and that the level of the metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was much higher than that of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, which contributes to high biomass yield at low dilution rate by supplying NADPH required for cell growth. PMID:25634548

  1. Deletion of host histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases strongly affects Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Jalal; van Heusden, Gerard Paul H; Hooykaas, Paul J J

    2009-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a plant pathogen that genetically transforms plant cells by transferring a part of its Ti-plasmid, the T-strand, to the host cell. Under laboratory conditions, it can also transform cells from many different nonplant organisms, including the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Collections of S. cerevisiae strains have been developed with systematic deletion of all coding sequences. Here, we used these collections to identify genes involved in the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) of S. cerevisiae. We found that deletion of genes (GCN5, NGG1, YAF9 and EAF7) encoding subunits of the SAGA, SLIK, ADA and NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complexes highly increased the efficiency of AMT, while deletion of genes (HDA2, HDA3 and HST4) encoding subunits of histone deacetylase complexes decreased AMT. These effects are specific for AMT as the efficiency of chemical (lithium acetate) transformation was not or only slightly affected by these deletions. Our data are consistent with a positive role of host histone deacetylation in AMT.

  2. Cell Wall Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Lesage, Guillaume; Bussey, Howard

    2006-01-01

    An extracellular matrix composed of a layered meshwork of β-glucans, chitin, and mannoproteins encapsulates cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This organelle determines cellular morphology and plays a critical role in maintaining cell integrity during cell growth and division, under stress conditions, upon cell fusion in mating, and in the durable ascospore cell wall. Here we assess recent progress in understanding the molecular biology and biochemistry of cell wall synthesis and it...

  3. Viruses and prions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Wickner, Reed B.; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Esteban, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a key experimental organism for the study of infectious diseases, including dsRNA viruses, ssRNA viruses, and prions. Studies of the mechanisms of virus and prion replication, virus structure, and structure of the amyloid filaments that are the basis of yeast prions have been at the forefront of such studies in these classes of infectious entities. Yeast has been particularly useful in defining the interactions of the infectious elements with cellular compone...

  4. Stationary phase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Werner-Washburne, M; Braun, E.; Johnston, G C; Singer, R A

    1993-01-01

    Growth and proliferation of microorganisms such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are controlled in part by the availability of nutrients. When proliferating yeast cells exhaust available nutrients, they enter a stationary phase characterized by cell cycle arrest and specific physiological, biochemical, and morphological changes. These changes include thickening of the cell wall, accumulation of reserve carbohydrates, and acquisition of thermotolerance. Recent characterization of mutant c...

  5. Identification of coated vesicles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Clathrin-coated vesicles were found in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and enriched from spheroplasts by a rapid procedure utilizing gel filtration on Sephacryl S-1000. The coated vesicles (62-nm diam) were visualized by negative stain electron microscopy and clathrin triskelions were observed by rotary shadowing. The contour length of a triskelion leg was 490 nm. Coated vesicle fractions contain a prominent band with molecular weight of approximately 185,000 when analyzed by SDS PAGE. The p...

  6. Furfural induces reactive oxygen species accumulation and cellular damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slininger Patricia J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biofuels offer a viable alternative to petroleum-based fuel. However, current methods are not sufficient and the technology required in order to use lignocellulosic biomass as a fermentation substrate faces several challenges. One challenge is the need for a robust fermentative microorganism that can tolerate the inhibitors present during lignocellulosic fermentation. These inhibitors include the furan aldehyde, furfural, which is released as a byproduct of pentose dehydration during the weak acid pretreatment of lignocellulose. In order to survive in the presence of furfural, yeast cells need not only to reduce furfural to the less toxic furan methanol, but also to protect themselves and repair any damage caused by the furfural. Since furfural tolerance in yeast requires a functional pentose phosphate pathway (PPP, and the PPP is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS tolerance, we decided to investigate whether or not furfural induces ROS and its related cellular damage in yeast. Results We demonstrated that furfural induces the accumulation of ROS in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, furfural was shown to cause cellular damage that is consistent with ROS accumulation in cells which includes damage to mitochondria and vacuole membranes, the actin cytoskeleton and nuclear chromatin. The furfural-induced damage is less severe when yeast are grown in a furfural concentration (25 mM that allows for eventual growth after an extended lag compared to a concentration of furfural (50 mM that prevents growth. Conclusion These data suggest that when yeast cells encounter the inhibitor furfural, they not only need to reduce furfural into furan methanol but also to protect themselves from the cellular effects of furfural and repair any damage caused. The reduced cellular damage seen at 25 mM furfural compared to 50 mM furfural may be linked to the observation that at 25 mM furfural yeast were able to exit the furfural

  7. Capturing of the monoterpene olefin limonene produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongedijk, Esmer; Cankar, Katarina; Ranzijn, Jorn; van der Krol, Sander; Bouwmeester, Harro; Beekwilder, Jules

    2015-01-01

    Monoterpene olefins such as limonene are plant compounds with applications as flavouring and fragrance agents, as solvents and potentially also in polymer and fuel chemistry. We engineered baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to express a (-)-limonene synthase from Perilla frutescens and a (+)-limonene synthase from Citrus limon. Both proteins were expressed either with their native plastid targeting signal or in a truncated form in which the plastidial sorting signal was removed. The yeast host strain for expression was AE9 K197G, which expresses a mutant Erg20 enzyme. This enzyme catalyses the formation of geranyl diphosphate, which is the precursor for monoterpenes. Several methods were tested to capture limonene produced by the yeast. Extraction from the culture medium by pentane, or by the addition of CaCl2 followed by solid-phase micro-extraction, did not lead to detectable limonene, indicating that limonene is rapidly lost from the culture medium. Volatile terpenes such as limonene may also be trapped in a dodecane phase added to the medium during fermentation. This method resulted in recovery of 0.028 mg/l (+)-limonene and 0.060 mg/l (-)-limonene in strains using the truncated Citrus and Perilla synthases, respectively. Trapping the headspace during culture of the limonene synthase-expressing strains resulted in higher titres, at 0.12 mg/l (+)-limonene and 0.49 mg/l (-)-limonene. These results show that the volatile properties of the olefins produced require specific methods for efficient recovery of these molecules from biotechnological production systems.

  8. PHO13 deletion-induced transcriptional activation prevents sedoheptulose accumulation during xylose metabolism in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiqing; Kim, Sooah; Sorek, Hagit; Lee, Youngsuk; Jeong, Deokyeol; Kim, Jungyeon; Oh, Eun Joong; Yun, Eun Ju; Wemmer, David E; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-03-01

    The deletion of PHO13 (pho13Δ) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding a phosphatase enzyme of unknown specificity, results in the transcriptional activation of genes related to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) such as TAL1 encoding transaldolase. It has been also reported that the pho13Δ mutant of S. cerevisiae expressing a heterologous xylose pathway can metabolize xylose efficiently compared to its parental strain. However, the interaction between the pho13Δ-induced transcriptional changes and the phenotypes of xylose fermentation was not understood. Thus we investigated the global metabolic changes in response to pho13Δ when cells were exponentially growing on xylose. Among the 134 intracellular metabolites that we identified, the 98% reduction of sedoheptulose was found to be the most significant change in the pho13Δ mutant as compared to its parental strain. Because sedoheptulose-7-phosphate (S7P), a substrate of transaldolase, reduced significantly in the pho13Δ mutant as well, we hypothesized that limited transaldolase activity in the parental strain might cause dephosphorylation of S7P, leading to carbon loss and inefficient xylose metabolism. Mutants overexpressing TAL1 at different degrees were constructed, and their TAL1 expression levels and xylose consumption rates were positively correlated. Moreover, as TAL1 expression levels increased, intracellular sedoheptulose concentration dropped significantly. Therefore, we concluded that TAL1 upregulation, preventing the accumulation of sedoheptulose, is the most critical mechanism for the improved xylose metabolism by the pho13Δ mutant of engineered S. cerevisiae.

  9. Lactic acid production from cellobiose and xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Timothy L; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Oh, Eun Joong; Subramaniam, Vijay; Adiputra, Andrew; Subramaniam, Vimal; Skory, Christopher D; Jang, Ji Yeon; Yu, Byung Jo; Park, In; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-05-01

    Efficient and rapid production of value-added chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass is an important step toward a sustainable society. Lactic acid, used for synthesizing the bioplastic polylactide, has been produced by microbial fermentation using primarily glucose. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates contain high concentrations of cellobiose and xylose. Here, we constructed a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain capable of fermenting cellobiose and xylose into lactic acid. Specifically, genes (cdt-1, gh1-1, XYL1, XYL2, XYL3, and ldhA) coding for cellobiose transporter, β-glucosidase, xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase, xylulokinase, and lactate dehydrogenase were integrated into the S. cerevisiae chromosomes. The resulting strain produced lactic acid from cellobiose or xylose with high yields. When fermenting a cellulosic sugar mixture containing 10 g/L glucose, 40 g/L xylose, and 80 g/L cellobiose, the engineered strain produced 83 g/L of lactic acid with a yield of 0.66 g lactic acid/g sugar (66% theoretical maximum). This study demonstrates initial steps toward the feasibility of sustainable production of lactic acid from lignocellulosic sugars by engineered yeast. PMID:26524688

  10. Surface display of malolactic enzyme from Oenococcus oeni on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuyan; Hou, Xiaoyan; Liang, Fang; Chen, Fusheng; Wang, Xiaohong

    2013-04-01

    In order to display malolactic enzyme (MLE) on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a yeast cell surface display plasmid pADH1-AGG was constructed by fusing the α-factor signal encoding sequence (267 bp) and the C-terminal half of α-agglutinin encoding sequence (1,645 bp) into the plasmid pADH1. The pADH1-AGG could successfully express and anchor the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) onto the yeast cell surface when the EGFP was used to verify its function. Then the pADH1-MLE was constructed by inserting the MLE encoding sequence (1,600 bp) into the pADH1-AGG and introduced into S. cerevisiae cells. The positive strain carrying pADH1-MLE was confirmed by use of the 6× His monoclonal antibody and fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG. All results indicated that the MLE was displayed successfully on the cell surface of positive transformant. The MLE activity of genetically engineered yeast strain could turn 21.11 % L-malate into lactic acid after 12 h reaction with L-malate. The constructed yeast strain might be used to conduct malolactic fermentation (MLF) in wine to solve the important issues of sluggish MLF, microbial spoilage, and adverse metabolic substances produced by the lactic acid bacteria. PMID:23446978

  11. Anaerobic and aerobic batch cultivations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants impaired in glycerol synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Torben Lauesgaard; Hamann, Claus Wendelboe; Kielland-Brandt, M. C.;

    2000-01-01

    Glycerol is formed as a by-product in production of ethanol and baker's yeast during fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under anaerobic and aerobic growth conditions, respectively. One physiological role of glycerol formation by yeast is to reoxidize NADH, formed in synthesis of biomass...... and secondary fermentation products, to NAD(+). The objective of this study was to evaluate whether introduction of a new pathway for reoxidation of NADH, in a yeast strain where glycerol synthesis had been impaired, would result in elimination of glycerol production and lead to increased yields of ethanol...

  12. Characterization of chromosomal integration sites for heterologous gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bai, Dongmei; Siewers, Verena; Huang, Le;

    2009-01-01

    The construction of mitotically stable yeast strains for heterologous gene or pathway expression often requires chromosomal integration. However, transcription levels vary between different chromosome regions. We therefore characterized 20 different integration sites of the Sacchromyces cerevisiae...... genome by inserting lacZ as a reporter gene under the control of two different promoters and determining expression levels through enzyme activity measurement. An up to 8.7-fold difference was detected between the sites conferring lowest and highest expression, respectively. This opens the opportunity...

  13. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a wild-type control strain, suggesting that Acs2-mediated consumption of acetic acid during fermentation contributes to acetic acid detoxification.

  14. Population heterogeneity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli lab scale cultivations simulating industrial scale bioprocesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena

    . This thesis aimed at reaching a deeper understanding of how microbial physiology and cell dynamics are affected by the spatial heterogeneity in a bioreactor. Therefore large scale fermentation was simulated in laboratory scale using two of the most industrially relevant organisms E. coli and S. cerevisiae...... in a quantitative manner through newly developed parameters, using percentile analysis followed by multivariate statistics as well as using a modeling approach. In general the applied reporter strains as well as fluorescence stains in combination with flow cytometry showed to be valuable tools to study population...

  15. Industrial systems biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae enables novel succinic acid cell factory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Otero

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most well characterized eukaryote, the preferred microbial cell factory for the largest industrial biotechnology product (bioethanol, and a robust commerically compatible scaffold to be exploitted for diverse chemical production. Succinic acid is a highly sought after added-value chemical for which there is no native pre-disposition for production and accmulation in S. cerevisiae. The genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction of S. cerevisiae enabled in silico gene deletion predictions using an evolutionary programming method to couple biomass and succinate production. Glycine and serine, both essential amino acids required for biomass formation, are formed from both glycolytic and TCA cycle intermediates. Succinate formation results from the isocitrate lyase catalyzed conversion of isocitrate, and from the α-keto-glutarate dehydrogenase catalyzed conversion of α-keto-glutarate. Succinate is subsequently depleted by the succinate dehydrogenase complex. The metabolic engineering strategy identified included deletion of the primary succinate consuming reaction, Sdh3p, and interruption of glycolysis derived serine by deletion of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, Ser3p/Ser33p. Pursuing these targets, a multi-gene deletion strain was constructed, and directed evolution with selection used to identify a succinate producing mutant. Physiological characterization coupled with integrated data analysis of transcriptome data in the metabolically engineered strain were used to identify 2(nd-round metabolic engineering targets. The resulting strain represents a 30-fold improvement in succinate titer, and a 43-fold improvement in succinate yield on biomass, with only a 2.8-fold decrease in the specific growth rate compared to the reference strain. Intuitive genetic targets for either over-expression or interruption of succinate producing or consuming pathways, respectively, do not lead to increased succinate. Rather, we

  16. The CDC25 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae promotes exchange of guanine nucleotides bound to ras.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, S; Vignais, M L; Broach, J R

    1991-01-01

    The product of the CDC25 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in its capacity as an activator of the RAS/cyclic AMP pathway, is required for initiation of the cell cycle. In this report, we provide an identification of Cdc25p, the product of the CDC25 gene, and evidence that it promotes exchange of guanine nucleotides bound to Ras in vitro. Extracts of strains containing high levels of Cdc25p catalyze both removal of GDP from and the concurrent binding of GTP to Ras. This same activity is also o...

  17. Cloning and Expression of a Schwanniomyces occidentalis α-Amylase Gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tsung Tsan; Lin, Long Liu; Hsu, Wen Hwei

    1989-01-01

    An α-amylase gene (AMY) was cloned from Schwanniomyces occidentalis CCRC 21164 into Saccharomyces cerevisiae AH22 by inserting Sau3AI-generated DNA fragments into the BamHI site of YEp16. The 5-kilobase insert was shown to direct the synthesis of α-amylase. After subclones containing various lengths of restricted fragments were screened, a 3.4-kilobase fragment of the donor strain DNA was found to be sufficient for α-amylase synthesis. The concentration of α-amylase in culture broth produced ...

  18. SLA2 mutations cause SWE1-mediated cell cycle phenotypes in Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Gale, Cheryl A.; Leonard, Michelle D.; Finley, Kenneth R.; Christensen, Leah; McClellan, Mark; Abbey, Darren; Kurischko, Cornelia; Bensen, Eric; Tzafrir, Iris; Kauffman, Sarah; Becker, Jeff; Berman, Judith

    2009-01-01

    The early endocytic patch protein Sla2 is important for morphogenesis and growth rates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans, but the mechanism that connects these processes is not clear. Here we report that growth defects in cells lacking CaSLA2 or ScSLA2 are associated with a cell cycle delay that is influenced by Swe1, a morphogenesis checkpoint kinase. To establish how Swe1 monitors Sla2 function, we compared actin organization and cell cycle dynamics in strains lacking other c...

  19. Impact of commercial yeast strains on wine fermentation and formation of metabolites of yellow passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims F. flavicarpa Degner)

    OpenAIRE

    Srisamatthakarn, Pattharaporn; Rauhut, Doris; Brückner, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Juice of yellow passion fruit (YPF) was fermented with different commercial yeast strains of Saccharomyces. This research aimed to investigate the impact of one commercial strain of Saccharomyces bayanus (Strain A) and two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Strain B and C) on the fermentation kinetics and formation of metabolites produced by wine yeast in YPF wines. The results showed that most parameters were significantly different depending on the yeast strain used. The YP...

  20. Display of phytase on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to degrade phytate phosphorus and improve bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianzhong; Xiao, Yan; Shen, Wei; Govender, Algasan; Zhang, Liang; Fan, You; Wang, Zhengxiang

    2016-03-01

    Currently, development of biofuels as an alternative fuel has gained much attention due to resource and environmental challenges. Bioethanol is one of most important and dominant biofuels, and production using corn or cassava as raw materials has become a prominent technology. However, phytate contained in the raw material not only decreases the efficiency of ethanol production, but also leads to an increase in the discharge of phosphorus, thus impacting on the environment. In this study, to decrease phytate and its phosphorus content in an ethanol fermentation process, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered through a surface-displaying system utilizing the C-terminal half of the yeast α-agglutinin protein. The recombinant yeast strain, PHY, was constructed by successfully displaying phytase on the surface of cells, and enzyme activity reached 6.4 U/g wet biomass weight. Ethanol productions using various strains were compared, and the results demonstrated that the specific growth rate and average fermentation rate of the PHY strain were higher 20 and 18 %, respectively, compared to the control strain S. cerevisiae CICIMY0086, in a 5-L bioreactor process by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. More importantly, the phytate phosphorus concentration decreased by 89.8 % and free phosphorus concentration increased by 142.9 % in dry vinasse compared to the control in a 5-L bioreactor. In summary, we constructed a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain displaying phytase on the cell surface, which could improve ethanol production performance and effectively reduce the discharge of phosphorus. The strain reported here represents a useful novel engineering platform for developing an environment-friendly system for bioethanol production from a corn substrate. PMID:26610799

  1. Rational and evolutionary engineering approaches uncover a small set of genetic changes efficient for rapid xylose fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Rin Kim

    Full Text Available Economic bioconversion of plant cell wall hydrolysates into fuels and chemicals has been hampered mainly due to the inability of microorganisms to efficiently co-ferment pentose and hexose sugars, especially glucose and xylose, which are the most abundant sugars in cellulosic hydrolysates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot metabolize xylose due to a lack of xylose-metabolizing enzymes. We developed a rapid and efficient xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae through rational and inverse metabolic engineering strategies, comprising the optimization of a heterologous xylose-assimilating pathway and evolutionary engineering. Strong and balanced expression levels of the XYL1, XYL2, and XYL3 genes constituting the xylose-assimilating pathway increased ethanol yields and the xylose consumption rates from a mixture of glucose and xylose with little xylitol accumulation. The engineered strain, however, still exhibited a long lag time when metabolizing xylose above 10 g/l as a sole carbon source, defined here as xylose toxicity. Through serial-subcultures on xylose, we isolated evolved strains which exhibited a shorter lag time and improved xylose-fermenting capabilities than the parental strain. Genome sequencing of the evolved strains revealed that mutations in PHO13 causing loss of the Pho13p function are associated with the improved phenotypes of the evolved strains. Crude extracts of a PHO13-overexpressing strain showed a higher phosphatase activity on xylulose-5-phosphate (X-5-P, suggesting that the dephosphorylation of X-5-P by Pho13p might generate a futile cycle with xylulokinase overexpression. While xylose consumption rates by the evolved strains improved substantially as compared to the parental strain, xylose metabolism was interrupted by accumulated acetate. Deletion of ALD6 coding for acetaldehyde dehydrogenase not only prevented acetate accumulation, but also enabled complete and efficient fermentation of xylose as well as a mixture of glucose and

  2. Contribution by Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast to fermentative flavour compounds in wines from cv. Albariño.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Mar; Sieiro, Carmen

    2006-11-01

    A comparative study was made of the fermentation products of Spanish Albariño wines produced with spontaneous yeast flora and an indigenous selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain (Alb16). The content of fermentative volatile compounds was determined by gas-chromatography-FID. Fifteen compounds (5 alcohols, 7 esters and 3 acetates) were identified in the two Albariño wines studied. Higher alcohols, ethyl esters (except ethyl hexanoate and ethyl octanoate) and acetates were in greater concentration in the spontaneous fermentation wine than in that with selected Alb16 strain. Principal components analysis showed good separation between the different wines.

  3. Kluyveromyces lactis maintains Saccharomyces cerevisiae intron-encoded splicing signals.

    OpenAIRE

    Deshler, J O; Larson, G P; Rossi, J J

    1989-01-01

    The actin (ACT) gene from the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis was cloned, and the nucleotide sequence was determined. The gene had a single intron 778 nucleotides in length which possessed the highly conserved splicing signals found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae introns. We demonstrated splicing of heterologous ACT transcripts in both K. lactis and S. cerevisiae.

  4. Building Background Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Susan B.; Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    This article make a case for the importance of background knowledge in children's comprehension. It suggests that differences in background knowledge may account for differences in understanding text for low- and middle-income children. It then describes strategies for building background knowledge in the age of common core standards.

  5. Overexpressing enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway and deleting genes of the competing pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for increasing 2-phenylethanol production from glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Nishimura, Yuya; Matsuda, Fumio; Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-07-01

    2-Phenylethanol (2-PE) is a higher aromatic alcohol that is used in the cosmetics and food industries. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is considered to be a suitable host for the industrial production of higher alcohols, including 2-PE. To produce 2-PE from glucose in S. cerevisiae, we searched for suitable 2-keto acid decarboxylase (KDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway for overexpression in strain YPH499, and found that overexpression of the ARO10 and/or ADH1 genes increased 2-PE production from glucose. Further, we screened ten BY4741 single-deletion mutants of genes involved in the competing pathways for 2-PE production, and found that strains aro8Δ and aat2Δ displayed increased 2-PE production. Based on these results, we engineered a BY4741 strain that overexpressed ARO10 and contained an aro8Δ deletion, and demonstrated that the strain produced 96 mg/L 2-PE from glucose as the sole carbon source. As this engineered S. cerevisiae strain showed a significant increase in 2-PE production from glucose without the addition of an intermediate carbon substrate, it is a promising candidate for the large-scale production of 2-PE. PMID:26975754

  6. Nanofiltration concentration of extracellular glutathione produced by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kengo; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Sazuka, Takashi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to optimize extracellular glutathione production by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered strain and to concentrate the extracellular glutathione by membrane separation processes, including ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF). Synthetic defined (SD) medium containing 20 g L(-1) glucose was fermented for 48 h; the fermentation liquid was passed through an UF membrane to remove macromolecules. Glutathione in this permeate was concentrated for 48 h to 545.1 ± 33.6 mg L(-1) using the NF membrane; this was a significantly higher concentration than that obtained with yeast extract peptone dextrose (YPD) medium following 96 h NF concentration (217.9 ± 57.4 mg L(-1)). This higher glutathione concentration results from lower cellular growth in SD medium (final OD600 = 6.9 ± 0.1) than in YPD medium (final OD600 = 11.0 ± 0.6) and thus higher production of extracellular glutathione (16.0 ± 1.3 compared to 9.2 ± 2.1 mg L(-1) in YPD medium, respectively). Similar fermentation and membrane processing of sweet sorghum juice containing 20 g L(-1) total sugars provided 240.3 ± 60.6 mg L(-1) glutathione. Increased extracellular production of glutathione by this engineered strain in SD medium and subsequent UF permeation and NF concentration in shortend time may help realize industrial recovery of extracellular glutathione.

  7. Nanofiltration concentration of extracellular glutathione produced by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kengo; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Sazuka, Takashi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to optimize extracellular glutathione production by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered strain and to concentrate the extracellular glutathione by membrane separation processes, including ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF). Synthetic defined (SD) medium containing 20 g L(-1) glucose was fermented for 48 h; the fermentation liquid was passed through an UF membrane to remove macromolecules. Glutathione in this permeate was concentrated for 48 h to 545.1 ± 33.6 mg L(-1) using the NF membrane; this was a significantly higher concentration than that obtained with yeast extract peptone dextrose (YPD) medium following 96 h NF concentration (217.9 ± 57.4 mg L(-1)). This higher glutathione concentration results from lower cellular growth in SD medium (final OD600 = 6.9 ± 0.1) than in YPD medium (final OD600 = 11.0 ± 0.6) and thus higher production of extracellular glutathione (16.0 ± 1.3 compared to 9.2 ± 2.1 mg L(-1) in YPD medium, respectively). Similar fermentation and membrane processing of sweet sorghum juice containing 20 g L(-1) total sugars provided 240.3 ± 60.6 mg L(-1) glutathione. Increased extracellular production of glutathione by this engineered strain in SD medium and subsequent UF permeation and NF concentration in shortend time may help realize industrial recovery of extracellular glutathione. PMID:26105794

  8. Ergosterol production from molasses by genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuping; Guo, Xuena; Liu, Nan; Zhang, Borun

    2007-05-01

    Ergosterol is an economically important metabolite produced by fungi. Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae YEH56(pHXA42) with increased capacity of ergosterol formation was constructed by combined overexpression of sterol C-24(28) reductase and sterol acyltransferase in the yeast strain YEH56. The production of ergosterol by this recombinant strain using cane molasses (CM) as an inexpensive carbon source was investigated. An ergosterol content of 52.6 mg/g was obtained with 6.1 g/l of biomass from CM medium containing 60 g/l of total sugar in 30 h in shake flask. The ergosterol yield was enhanced through the increasing cell biomass by supplementation of urea to a concentration of 6 g/l in molasses medium. Fermentation was performed in 5-l bioreactor using the optimized molasses medium. In batch fermentation, the effect of agitation velocity on ergosterol production was examined. The highest ergosterol yield was obtained at 400 rpm that increased 60.4 mg/l in comparison with the shake flask culture. In fed-batch fermentation, yeast cells were cultivated, firstly, in the starting medium containing molasses with 20 g/l of total sugar, 1.68 g/l of phosphate acid, and 6 g/l of urea (pH 5.4) for 5 h, then molasses containing 350 g/l of total sugar was fed exponentially into the bioreactor to keep the ethanol level in the broth below 0.5%. After 40 h of cultivation, the ergosterol yield reached 1,707 mg/l, which was 3.1-fold of that in the batch fermentation. PMID:17225097

  9. Isocitrate lyase localisation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, R S; Herrero, P; Ordiz, I; Angeles del Brio, M; Moreno, F

    1997-10-01

    The isocitrate lyase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was only located in the cell cytoplasm. This protein was found not to be associated with cell organelles, even under growth conditions that induce peroxisome proliferation. This conclusion is supported by experiments carried out by damaging the protoplast plasma membrane with DEAE-dextran, by differential centrifugation of osmotically lysed protoplast and by using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of Aequorea victoria as a reporter fusion tag to localise the subcellular compartment to which isocitrate lyase is targeted.

  10. Effect of copper stress on growth characteristics and fermentation properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the pathway of copper adsorption during wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangyu; Liu, Lingling; Zhao, Yu; Ma, Tingting; Zhao, Fang; Huang, Weidong; Zhan, Jicheng

    2016-02-01

    The effect of copper stress on the fermentation performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its copper adsorption pathway during alcoholic fermentation were investigated in this study. At the limits imposed by the regulations of the European Union and South African (⩽ 20 mg/l), copper had no effect on the cell growth of S. cerevisiae, but its fermentation performance was inhibited to a certain extent. Therefore, the regulated limit should be further reduced (⩽ 12.8 mg/l). Under 9.6-19.2 mg/l copper stress, S. cerevisiae could absorb copper; the copper removal ratio and the unit strain adsorption were 60-81% and 2.72-9.65 mg/g, respectively. S. cerevisiae has a non-biological adsorption of copper, but compared with biological (living yeast) adsorption, the non-biological adsorption was very low. The copper adsorption way of S. cerevisiae was primarily via biological (living yeast) adsorption, which was a two-step process.

  11. K2 killer toxin-induced physiological changes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orentaite, Irma; Poranen, Minna M; Oksanen, Hanna M; Daugelavicius, Rimantas; Bamford, Dennis H

    2016-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells produce killer toxins, such as K1, K2 and K28, that can modulate the growth of other yeasts giving advantage for the killer strains. Here we focused on the physiological changes induced by K2 toxin on a non-toxin-producing yeast strain as well as K1, K2 and K28 killer strains. Potentiometric measurements were adjusted to observe that K2 toxin immediately acts on the sensitive cells leading to membrane permeability. This correlated with reduced respiration activity, lowered intracellular ATP content and decrease in cell viability. However, we did not detect any significant ATP leakage from the cells treated by killer toxin K2. Strains producing heterologous toxins K1 and K28 were less sensitive to K2 than the non-toxin producing one suggesting partial cross-protection between the different killer systems. This phenomenon may be connected to the observed differences in respiratory activities of the killer strains and the non-toxin-producing strain at low pH. This might also have practical consequences in wine industry; both as beneficial ones in controlling contaminating yeasts and non-beneficial ones causing sluggish fermentation. PMID:26818855

  12. Multiplex metabolic pathway engineering using CRISPR/Cas9 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakočiūnas, Tadas; Bonde, Ida; Herrgård, Markus; Harrison, Scott J; Kristensen, Mette; Pedersen, Lasse E; Jensen, Michael K; Keasling, Jay D

    2015-03-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 is a simple and efficient tool for targeted and marker-free genome engineering. Here, we report the development and successful application of a multiplex CRISPR/Cas9 system for genome engineering of up to 5 different genomic loci in one transformation step in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To assess the specificity of the tool we employed genome re-sequencing to screen for off-target sites in all single knock-out strains targeted by different gRNAs. This extensive analysis identified no more genome variants in CRISPR/Cas9 engineered strains compared to wild-type reference strains. We applied our genome engineering tool for an exploratory analysis of all possible single, double, triple, quadruple and quintuple gene disruption combinations to search for strains with high mevalonate production, a key intermediate for the industrially important isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway. Even though we did not overexpress any genes in the mevalonate pathway, this analysis identified strains with mevalonate titers greater than 41-fold compared to the wild-type strain. Our findings illustrate the applicability of this highly specific and efficient multiplex genome engineering approach to accelerate functional genomics and metabolic engineering efforts.

  13. Lipidomic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii reveals critical changes in lipid composition in response to acetic acid stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Lindberg

    Full Text Available When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555 cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L(-1, while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L(-1 acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP2C 2.2× and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP2C 2.7×, when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to

  14. Non-enzymatic roles for the URE2 glutathione S-transferase in the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorova, Tatina T; Kujumdzieva, Anna V; Vuilleumier, Stéphane

    2010-11-01

    The response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to arsenic involves a large ensemble of genes, many of which are associated with glutathione-related metabolism. The role of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) product of the URE2 gene involved in resistance of S. cerevisiae to a broad range of heavy metals was investigated. Glutathione peroxidase activity, previously reported for the Ure2p protein, was unaffected in cell-free extracts of an ure2Δ mutant of S. cerevisiae. Glutathione levels in the ure2Δ mutant were lowered about threefold compared to the isogenic wild-type strain but, as in the wild-type strain, increased 2-2.5-fold upon addition of either arsenate (As(V)) or arsenite (As(III)). However, lack of URE2 specifically caused sensitivity to arsenite but not to arsenate. The protective role of URE2 against arsenite depended solely on the GST-encoding 3'-end portion of the gene. The nitrogen source used for growth was suggested to be an important determinant of arsenite toxicity, in keeping with non-enzymatic roles of the URE2 gene product in GATA-type regulation. PMID:20740275

  15. Evaluation of Brachypodium distachyon L-Tyrosine Decarboxylase Using L-Tyrosine Over-Producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Noda

    Full Text Available To demonstrate that herbaceous biomass is a versatile gene resource, we focused on the model plant Brachypodium distachyon, and screened the B. distachyon for homologs of tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC, which is involved in the modification of aromatic compounds. A total of 5 candidate genes were identified in cDNA libraries of B. distachyon and were introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae to evaluate TDC expression and tyramine production. It is suggested that two TDCs encoded in the transcripts Bradi2g51120.1 and Bradi2g51170.1 have L-tyrosine decarboxylation activity. Bradi2g51170.1 was introduced into the L-tyrosine over-producing strain of S. cerevisiae that was constructed by the introduction of mutant genes that promote deregulated feedback inhibition. The amount of tyramine produced by the resulting transformant was 6.6-fold higher (approximately 200 mg/L than the control strain, indicating that B. distachyon TDC effectively converts L-tyrosine to tyramine. Our results suggest that B. distachyon possesses enzymes that are capable of modifying aromatic residues, and that S. cerevisiae is a suitable host for the production of L-tyrosine derivatives.

  16. Expression of functional pentameric heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit of Escherichia coli in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung-Gu; Kim, Jung-Ae; Chung, Hea-Jong; Kim, Tae-Geum; Kim, Jung-Mi; Lee, Kyung-Ryul; Park, Seung-Moon; Yang, Moon-Sik; Kim, Dae-Hyuk

    2009-05-01

    Although the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) has already been expressed in several different systems, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, studies regarding the synthesis of LTB into oligomeric structures of pentameric size in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been limited. Therefore, this study used a functional signal peptide of the amylase 1A protein from rice to direct the yeast-expressed LTB towards the endoplasmic reticulum to oligomerize with the expected pentameric size. The expression and assembly of the recombinant LTB were confirmed in both the cell-free extract and culture media of the recombinant strain using a Western blot analysis. The binding of the LTB pentamers to intestinal epithelial cell membrane glycolipid receptors was further verified using a GM1-ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (GM1-ELISA). On the basis of the GM1-ELISA results, pentameric LTB proteins comprised approximately 0.5-2.0% of the total soluble proteins, and the maximum quantity of secreted LTB was estimated to be 3 mg/l after a 3-day cultivation period. Consequently, the synthesis of LTB monomers and their assembly into biologically active oligomers in a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain demonstrated the feasibility of using a GRAS microorganism-based adjuvant, as well as the development of carriers against mucosal disease. PMID:19494699

  17. [Involvement of PHO80 and PHO85 genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ion tolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xi-Cheng; Xia, Yu-Lei; Hu, Ya-Fang; Lu, Chang-De

    2003-01-01

    PHO85 is a versatile gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is involved in metabolism of inorganic phosphate and usage of carbon source, accumulation of glycogen, regulation of protein stability and cell cycle control. The viability of wild type budding yeast strain YPH499 and its derivative pho85Delta mutant, pho80 mutant, and pap1(pcl-7)Delta mutant in different cations were investigated and their tolerance to the cations(LC(50)) was measured. The results showed that the deletion of PHO85 or PHO80 gene both increased sensibility of Sacchromyces cerevisiae to ions K(+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), Ca(2+) and Mn(2+), while the deletion of pap1(pcl-7) gene did not lead to such phenotype. The difference between the patterns of relative growth curve of the mutants and wild type strain in the above ions also implied that PHO80 was the unique PCLs in complex with PHO85 CDK, that were contributed to K(+) and Mg(2+) ion homeostasis control and there were some other PCLs besides PHO80 that were involved in Zn(2+), Ca(2+) and Mn(2+) tolerance regulation as cyclin of PHO85 CDK. Furthermore, the amount of the total cellular calcium of pho85Delta mutant, pho80Delta mutant and YPH499 indicated that the ability of calcium accumulation of pho85 mutant and pho80Delta mutant was impaired. PMID:12518234

  18. Fermentative capabilities and volatile compounds produced by Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora and Saccharomyces yeast strains in pure and mixed cultures during Agave tequilana juice fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Robles, Ivonne Wendolyne; Estarrón-Espinosa, Mirna; Díaz-Montaño, Dulce María

    2015-09-01

    The fermentative and aromatic capabilities of Kloeckera africana/Hanseniaspora vineae K1, K. apiculata/H. uvarum K2, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1 and S2 were studied in pure and mixed culture fermentations using Agave tequila juice as the culture medium. In pure and mixed cultures, Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains showed limited growth and sugar consumption, as well as low ethanol yield and productivity, compared to S. cerevisiae, which yielded more biomass, ethanol and viable cell concentrations. In pure and mixed cultures, S. cerevisiae presented a similar behaviour reaching high biomass production, completely consuming the sugar, leading to high ethanol production. Furthermore, the presence of S. cerevisiae strains in the mixed cultures promoted the production of higher alcohols, acetaldehyde and ethyl esters, whereas Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains stimulated the production of ethyl acetate and 2-phenyl ethyl acetate compounds. PMID:26108494

  19. Cholesterol-Lowering Effect of Beta Glucan Extracted from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmiati; Dhewantara, F X Rizky

    2016-01-01

    Glucans are present in fungi, plants, algae, and bacteria. β-Glucan, one of the major cell wall components of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been found to enhance immune functions. Glucans are glucose polymers with an α- or β-type glycosidic chain. The role of (1→3)-β-D-glucan is in the maintenance of yeast cell wall shape and rigidity. Studies reveal that soluble glucans can lower total cholesterol and LDL levels in patients with hypercholesterolemia. The important benefit of β-glucan is to improve the immune system and to decrease cholesterol levels in the blood. Several studies have reported the benefits of β-glucan as: antiseptic, antioxidant, anti-aging, immune system activators, protection against radiation, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, anti-cholesterol etc. In this research S. cerevisiae was cultured in yeast extract-peptone-glucose (YPG) broth medium to produce beta-glucan. Cells were harvested at the stationary phase, washed, and disrupted by means of sonication method. The obtained cell walls were used to prepare alkali-soluble β-glucan (glucan-S1). In this regard, 2% sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and 3% acetic acid were used in alkaline-acid extraction, respectively. Potential use of beta-glucan extract as an anticholesterol agent was tested using Sprague dawley strain rats. The experiments were divided into eight groups with four replicates: Group I (normal control), group II (fed with cholesterol without beta-glucan), group III (fed with cholesterol + atorvastatin), group IV (fed with cholesterol + β-glucan standard), group V-VIII (fed of cholesterol + β-glucan of S. cerevisiae with each dose of 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg / BW. Rats were fed with cholesterol for 14 days, except for group I. Analysis of blood was carried out to determine total cholesterol, triglycerides, and malondialdehyde. The results showed that beta-glucan crude obtained from S. cerevisiae cultures was 6.890g.L(-1). Βeta-glucan extract of S. cerevisiae can reduce total

  20. Cholesterol-Lowering Effect of Beta Glucan Extracted from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmiati; Dhewantara, F X Rizky

    2016-01-01

    Glucans are present in fungi, plants, algae, and bacteria. β-Glucan, one of the major cell wall components of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been found to enhance immune functions. Glucans are glucose polymers with an α- or β-type glycosidic chain. The role of (1→3)-β-D-glucan is in the maintenance of yeast cell wall shape and rigidity. Studies reveal that soluble glucans can lower total cholesterol and LDL levels in patients with hypercholesterolemia. The important benefit of β-glucan is to improve the immune system and to decrease cholesterol levels in the blood. Several studies have reported the benefits of β-glucan as: antiseptic, antioxidant, anti-aging, immune system activators, protection against radiation, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, anti-cholesterol etc. In this research S. cerevisiae was cultured in yeast extract-peptone-glucose (YPG) broth medium to produce beta-glucan. Cells were harvested at the stationary phase, washed, and disrupted by means of sonication method. The obtained cell walls were used to prepare alkali-soluble β-glucan (glucan-S1). In this regard, 2% sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and 3% acetic acid were used in alkaline-acid extraction, respectively. Potential use of beta-glucan extract as an anticholesterol agent was tested using Sprague dawley strain rats. The experiments were divided into eight groups with four replicates: Group I (normal control), group II (fed with cholesterol without beta-glucan), group III (fed with cholesterol + atorvastatin), group IV (fed with cholesterol + β-glucan standard), group V-VIII (fed of cholesterol + β-glucan of S. cerevisiae with each dose of 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg / BW. Rats were fed with cholesterol for 14 days, except for group I. Analysis of blood was carried out to determine total cholesterol, triglycerides, and malondialdehyde. The results showed that beta-glucan crude obtained from S. cerevisiae cultures was 6.890g.L(-1). Βeta-glucan extract of S. cerevisiae can reduce total

  1. 乙醇发酵过程中酿酒酵母的磷脂组变化%Phospholipidome alterations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in bioethanol fermentation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨洁; 丁明珠; 李炳志; 元英进

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipid, a key functional component of cell membrane, plays a critical role in bioethanol fermentation using yeast. In this study, the LC-MS approach for the identification and quantification of the phospholipidome of two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, the industrial strain O and laboratory strain S was employed. The chemometrics tools including principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial linear squares (OPLS) were used for the pattern recognition on strain O and strain S, in the lag and exponential phases. These studies showed that during the fermentation of bioethanol, the phospholipidome varied significantly between samples of the lag and exponential phases. The content of phospholipid species with saturated short fatty acyl chain increased and that with unsaturated long fatty acyl chain decreased when cells grew into the exponential phase. Particularly, compared to strain O, strain S that grew slower was with a higher amount of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) molecules at the lag phase.

  2. Barosensitivity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is Closely Associated with a Deletion of the COX1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazuki; Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Iguchi, Akinori; Shigematsu, Toru

    2015-05-01

    High hydrostatic pressure causes physical stress to microorganisms; therefore, this technology may be applied to food pasteurization without introducing the unfavorable effects of thermal denaturation. However, its application is limited to high-value foods because the treatment requires a robust steel vessel and expensive pressurization equipment. To reduce these costs, we studied the pasteurization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using relatively moderate high-pressure levels. A mutant strain isolated by ultraviolet mutagenesis showed significant loss of viability under high-pressure conditions. Gene expression analysis of the mutant strain revealed that it incurred a deletion of the COX1 gene. Our results suggest that the pressure-sensitivity can readily be introduced into industrial/food microorganisms by complementing a COX1 deleted mitochondria. PMID:25881710

  3. Increasing galactose consumption by Saccharomyces cerevisiae through metabolic engineering of the GAL gene regulatory network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Simon; Olsson, Lisbeth; Johnston, M.;

    2000-01-01

    by eliminating three known negative regulators of the GAL system: Gale, Gal80, and Mig1. This led to a 41% increase in flux through the galactose utilization pathway compared with the wild-type strain. This is of significant interest within the field of biotechnology since galactose is present in many industrial...... in the pathway, and ultimately, increasing metabolic flux through the pathway of interest, By manipulating the GAL gene regulatory network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is a tightly regulated system, we produced prototroph mutant strains, which increased the flux through the galactose utilization pathway...... media. The improved galactose consumption of the gal mutants did not favor biomass formation, but rather caused excessive respiro-fermentative metabolism, with the ethanol production rate increasing linearly with glycolytic flux....

  4. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mixed Culture of Blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius L. Juice: Synergism in the Aroma Compounds Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Ulises Bautista-Rosales

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blackberry (Rubus sp. juice was fermented using four different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Vitilevure-CM4457, Enoferm-T306, ICV-K1, and Greroche Rhona-L3574 recognized because of their use in the wine industry. A medium alcoholic graduation spirit (<6GL° with potential to be produced at an industrial scale was obtained. Alcoholic fermentations were performed at 28C°, 200 rpm, and noncontrolled pH. The synergistic effect on the aromatic compounds production during fermentation in mixed culture was compared with those obtained by monoculture and physic mixture of spirits produced in monoculture. The aromatic composition was determined by HS-SPME-GC. The differences in aromatic profile principally rely on the proportions in aromatic compounds and not on the number of those compounds. The multivariance analysis, principal component analysis (PCA, and factorial discriminant analysis (DFA permit to demonstrate the synergism between the strains.

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mixed Culture of Blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius L.) Juice: Synergism in the Aroma Compounds Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzo-Sánchez, Juan Arturo; Ortiz-Basurto, Rosa Isela; Luna-Solano, Guadalupe; Calderón-Santoyo, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Blackberry (Rubus sp.) juice was fermented using four different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Vitilevure-CM4457, Enoferm-T306, ICV-K1, and Greroche Rhona-L3574) recognized because of their use in the wine industry. A medium alcoholic graduation spirit (<6°GL) with potential to be produced at an industrial scale was obtained. Alcoholic fermentations were performed at 28°C, 200 rpm, and noncontrolled pH. The synergistic effect on the aromatic compounds production during fermentation in mixed culture was compared with those obtained by monoculture and physic mixture of spirits produced in monoculture. The aromatic composition was determined by HS-SPME-GC. The differences in aromatic profile principally rely on the proportions in aromatic compounds and not on the number of those compounds. The multivariance analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and factorial discriminant analysis (DFA) permit to demonstrate the synergism between the strains. PMID:25506606

  6. The utilization of some iron and zinc compounds as regulators of catalase activity at Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efremova, N.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to examine the impact of some zinc and iron compounds as oxidative stress factors on catalase activity, which is known to be important defense system of microorganisms to metal stress. For the investigation was used baker's yeast strain - Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-11 previously selected as a source of protein and catalase. The obtained results have revealed that compounds of iron and zinc with citrate and acetate contributes to the accumulation of yeast biomass and have beneficial effect on the catalase activity at selected yeast strain. The maximum increase of catalase activity in yeast biomass was established in case of iron and zinc citrate supplementation to the nutritive medium in optimal concentration of 15.0 mg/l. Results of the present study could be used for the elaboration of new procedures of catalase obtaining by directed synthesis with the utilization of selected metal compounds.

  7. Transcription factor control of growth rate dependent genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A three factor design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazio, Alessandro; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Characterization of cellular growth is central to understanding living systems. Here, we applied a three-factor design to study the relationship between specific growth rate and genome-wide gene expression in 36 steady-state chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The three...... factors we considered were specific growth rate, nutrient limitation, and oxygen availability. Results: We identified 268 growth rate dependent genes, independent of nutrient limitation and oxygen availability. The transcriptional response was used to identify key areas in metabolism around which m...

  8. Replication and transcription of human papillomavirus type 58 genome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To establish a convenient system for the study of human papillomavirus (HPV, we inserted a Saccharomyces cerevisiae selectable marker, Ura, into HPV58 genome and transformed it into yeast. Results HPV58 genome could replicate extrachromosomally in yeast, with transcription of its early and late genes. However, with mutation of the viral E2 gene, HPV58 genome lost its mitotic stability, and the transcription levels of E6 and E7 genes were upregulated. Conclusions E2 protein could participate in viral genome maintenance, replication and transcription regulation. This yeast model could be used for the study of certain aspects of HPV life cycle.

  9. Biosorption of cesium by saccharomyces cerevisia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of Cs+ biosorption by Saccharornyces cerevisia was investigated, including the biosorption kinetics, biosorption equilibrium, isotherm as well as the IR spectrum of biomass pre- and post-biosorption. The experimental results show that the process of Cs+ biosorption onto the biomass of Saccharornyces cerevisia can be devided into two stages, the first stage is physical sorption and the sorption equilibrium is very quickly reached (within 20 min). The biosorption kinetics can be described by the pseudo second-order equation quite well (R2=0.989), the kinetic parameters k2 and qe are 3.56 x 10-3 g/(mg·min) and 7.18 mg/g, respectively. The equilibrium isotherm data can be fitted with Langmuir and Freundlich models, with the maximum biosorptive capacity of 10.13 mg/g. Both the IR spectra of the biomass pre- and post-biosorption almost are same, and it indicates that the biosorption of Cs+ does not change the structure of the biomass, however, some adsorptive peaks shift. (authors)

  10. The GDI1 genes from Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris: cloning and functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummer, M H; Richard, P; Sundqvist, L; Väänänen, R; Keränen, S

    2001-07-01

    The nucleotide sequences of 2.8 kb and 2.9 kb fragments containing the Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris GDI1 genes, respectively, were determined. K. lactis GDI1 was found during sequencing of a genomic library clone, whereas the P. pastoris GDI1 was obtained from a genomic library by complementing a Saccharomyces cerevisiae sec19-1 mutant strain. The sequenced DNA fragments contain open reading frames of 1338 bp (K.lactis) and 1344 bp (P. pastoris), coding for polypeptides of 445 and 447 residues, respectively. Both sequences fully complement the S. cerevisiae sec19-1 mutation. They have high degrees of homology with known GDP dissociation inhibitors from yeast species and other eukaryotes. PMID:11447595

  11. Vacuolar carboxypeptidase Y of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is glycosylated, sorted and matured in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, A; Egner, R; Gascon, S; Suarez-Rendueles, P

    1995-03-01

    Vacuolar carboxypeptidase Y of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CPYsc) has been expressed in a Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain devoid of the endogenous equivalent peptidase, employing a 2 mu derived plasmid. Immunoblot analysis revealed that CPYsc produced in the fission yeast has a higher molecular mass than mature CPYsc produced by the budding yeast. CPYsc is glycosylated when expressed in S. pombe and uses four N-linked glycosylation sites as shown by endoglycosidase H digestion. Carbohydrate removal leads to a protein moiety which is indistinguishable in size from deglycosylated CPYsc produced by S. cerevisiae. CPYsc isolated from S. pombe soluble extracts is enzymatically active and thus is presumed to undergo correct proteolytic maturation. Subcellular fractionation experiments showed a cofractionation of CPYsc with the S. pombe endoproteinases PrA and PrB, suggesting that the protein is correctly sorted to the vacuole and that these peptidases might be responsible for zymogen activation.

  12. Combined metabolic engineering of precursor and co-factor supply to increase α-santalene production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scalcinati Gionata

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sesquiterpenes are a class of natural products with a diverse range of attractive industrial proprieties. Due to economic difficulties of sesquiterpene production via extraction from plants or chemical synthesis there is interest in developing alternative and cost efficient bioprocesses. The hydrocarbon α-santalene is a precursor of sesquiterpenes with relevant commercial applications. Here, we construct an efficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell factory for α-santalene production. Results A multistep metabolic engineering strategy targeted to increase precursor and cofactor supply was employed to manipulate the yeast metabolic network in order to redirect carbon toward the desired product. To do so, genetic modifications were introduced acting to optimize the farnesyl diphosphate branch point, modulate the mevalonate pathway, modify the ammonium assimilation pathway and enhance the activity of a transcriptional activator. The approach employed resulted in an overall α-santalene yield of a 0.0052 Cmmol (Cmmol glucose-1 corresponding to a 4-fold improvement over the reference strain. This strategy, combined with a specifically developed continuous fermentation process, led to a final α-santalene productivity of 0.036 Cmmol (g biomass-1 h-1. Conclusions The results reported in this work illustrate how the combination of a metabolic engineering strategy with fermentation technology optimization can be used to obtain significant amounts of the high-value sesquiterpene α-santalene. This represents a starting point toward the construction of a yeast “sesquiterpene factory” and for the development of an economically viable bio-based process that has the potential to replace the current production methods.

  13. Cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae differentially modulated innate immunity and glucose metabolism during late systemic inflammation.

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    Bushansingh Baurhoo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salmonella causes acute systemic inflammation by using its virulence factors to invade the intestinal epithelium. But, prolonged inflammation may provoke severe body catabolism and immunological diseases. Salmonella has become more life-threatening due to emergence of multiple-antibiotic resistant strains. Mannose-rich oligosaccharides (MOS from cells walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown to bind mannose-specific lectin of Gram-negative bacteria including Salmonella, and prevent their adherence to intestinal epithelial cells. However, whether MOS may potentially mitigate systemic inflammation is not investigated yet. Moreover, molecular events underlying innate immune responses and metabolic activities during late inflammation, in presence or absence of MOS, are unknown. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a Salmonella LPS-induced systemic inflammation chicken model and microarray analysis, we investigated the effects of MOS and virginiamycin (VIRG, a sub-therapeutic antibiotic on innate immunity and glucose metabolism during late inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that MOS and VIRG modulated innate immunity and metabolic genes differently. Innate immune responses were principally mediated by intestinal IL-3, but not TNF-α, IL-1 or IL-6, whereas glucose mobilization occurred through intestinal gluconeogenesis only. MOS inherently induced IL-3 expression in control hosts. Consequent to LPS challenge, IL-3 induction in VIRG hosts but not differentially expressed in MOS hosts revealed that MOS counteracted LPS's detrimental inflammatory effects. Metabolic pathways are built to elucidate the mechanisms by which VIRG host's higher energy requirements were met: including gene up-regulations for intestinal gluconeogenesis (PEPCK and liver glycolysis (ENO2, and intriguingly liver fatty acid synthesis through ATP citrate synthase (CS down-regulation and ATP citrate lyase (ACLY and malic enzyme (ME up-regulations. However, MOS host

  14. Improving the iMM904 S. cerevisiae metabolic model using essentiality and synthetic lethality data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maranas Costas D

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the first eukaryotic organism for which a multi-compartment genome-scale metabolic model was constructed. Since then a sequence of improved metabolic reconstructions for yeast has been introduced. These metabolic models have been extensively used to elucidate the organizational principles of yeast metabolism and drive yeast strain engineering strategies for targeted overproductions. They have also served as a starting point and a benchmark for the reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic models for other eukaryotic organisms. In spite of the successive improvements in the details of the described metabolic processes, even the recent yeast model (i.e., iMM904 remains significantly less predictive than the latest E. coli model (i.e., iAF1260. This is manifested by its significantly lower specificity in predicting the outcome of grow/no grow experiments in comparison to the E. coli model. Results In this paper we make use of the automated GrowMatch procedure for restoring consistency with single gene deletion experiments in yeast and extend the procedure to make use of synthetic lethality data using the genome-scale model iMM904 as a basis. We identified and vetted using literature sources 120 distinct model modifications including various regulatory constraints for minimal and YP media. The incorporation of the suggested modifications led to a substantial increase in the fraction of correctly predicted lethal knockouts (i.e., specificity from 38.84% (87 out of 224 to 53.57% (120 out of 224 for the minimal medium and from 24.73% (45 out of 182 to 40.11% (73 out of 182 for the YP medium. Synthetic lethality predictions improved from 12.03% (16 out of 133 to 23.31% (31 out of 133 for the minimal medium and from 6.96% (8 out of 115 to 13.04% (15 out of 115 for the YP medium. Conclusions Overall, this study provides a roadmap for the computationally driven correction of multi-compartment genome

  15. Competition between pentoses and glucose during uptake and catabolism in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subtil Thorsten

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mixed sugar fermentations with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains able to ferment D-xylose and L-arabinose the pentose sugars are normally only utilized after depletion of D-glucose. This has been attributed to competitive inhibition of pentose uptake by D-glucose as pentose sugars are taken up into yeast cells by individual members of the yeast hexose transporter family. We wanted to investigate whether D-glucose inhibits pentose utilization only by blocking its uptake or also by interfering with its further metabolism. Results To distinguish between inhibitory effects of D-glucose on pentose uptake and pentose catabolism, maltose was used as an alternative carbon source in maltose-pentose co-consumption experiments. Maltose is taken up by a specific maltose transport system and hydrolyzed only intracellularly into two D-glucose molecules. Pentose consumption decreased by about 20 - 30% during the simultaneous utilization of maltose indicating that hexose catabolism can impede pentose utilization. To test whether intracellular D-glucose might impair pentose utilization, hexo-/glucokinase deletion mutants were constructed. Those mutants are known to accumulate intracellular D-glucose when incubated with maltose. However, pentose utilization was not effected in the presence of maltose. Addition of increasing concentrations of D-glucose to the hexo-/glucokinase mutants finally completely blocked D-xylose as well as L-arabinose consumption, indicating a pronounced inhibitory effect of D-glucose on pentose uptake. Nevertheless, constitutive overexpression of pentose-transporting hexose transporters like Hxt7 and Gal2 could improve pentose consumption in the presence of D-glucose. Conclusion Our results confirm that D-glucose impairs the simultaneous utilization of pentoses mainly due to inhibition of pentose uptake. Whereas intracellular D-glucose does not seem to have an inhibitory effect on pentose utilization

  16. Improvement of acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a zinc-finger-based artificial transcription factor and identification of novel genes involved in acetic acid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cui; Wei, Xiaowen; Sun, Cuihuan; Zhang, Fei; Xu, Jianren; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2015-03-01

    Acetic acid is present in cellulosic hydrolysate as a potent inhibitor, and the superior acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ensures good cell viability and efficient ethanol production when cellulosic raw materials are used as substrates. In this study, a mutant strain of S. cerevisiae ATCC4126 (Sc4126-M01) with improved acetic acid tolerance was obtained through screening strains transformed with an artificial zinc finger protein transcription factor (ZFP-TF) library. Further analysis indicated that improved acetic acid tolerance was associated with improved catalase (CAT) activity. The ZFP coding sequence associated with the improved phenotype was identified, and real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that three of the possible genes involved in the enhanced acetic acid tolerance regulated by this ZFP-TF, namely YFL040W, QDR3, and IKS1, showed decreased transcription levels in Sc4126-M01 in the presence of acetic acid, compared to those in the control strain. Sc4126-M01 mutants having QDR3 and IKS1 deletion (ΔQDR3 and ΔIKS1) exhibited higher acetic acid tolerance than the wild-type strain under acetic acid treatment. Glucose consumption rate and ethanol productivity in the presence of 5 g/L acetic acid were improved in the ΔQDR3 mutant compared to the wild-type strain. Our studies demonstrated that the synthetic ZFP-TF library can be used to improve acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae and that the employment of an artificial transcription factor can facilitate the exploration of novel functional genes involved in stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae. PMID:25698512

  17. Ethanol production from D-lactic acid by lactic acid-assimilating Saccharomyces cerevisiae NAM34-4C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamatsu, Makoto; Tani, Tatsunori; Taguchi, Hisataka; Matsuoka, Masayoshi; Kida, Kenji; Akamatsu, Takashi

    2013-07-01

    The lactic acid-assimilating yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae NAM34-4C grew rapidly in minimal D-lactate medium (pH 3.5) at 35°C, compared with minimal L-lactate medium. A laboratory strain, S. cerevisiae S288C, did not grow in either medium at pH 3.5. Strain NAM34-4C produced remarkably high levels of ethanol in YPDL medium at pH 3.5, but not at pH 5.5, when D-lactate was provided as the carbon source. Optimal cultivation conditions for ethanol production from D-lactate by strain NAM34-4C were as follows: shaking speed, 60 rpm; initial pH, 3.0; cultivation temperature, 35°C; yeast extract, 5 g/L; peptone, 10 g/L; and D-lactate, 30 g/L. Under these conditions, strain NAM34-4C produced 2.7 g/L ethanol, which is 18% of the theoretical maximal yield (0.51 3 initial D-lactate concentration).

  18. Supersymmetric heterotic string backgrounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gran, U.; Papadopoulos, G.; Roest, D.; Cvetič, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present the main features of the solution of the gravitino and dilatino Killing spinor equations derived in hep-th/0510176 and hep-th/0703143 which have led to the classification of geometric types of all type I backgrounds. We then apply these results to the supersymmetric backgrounds of the het

  19. The Cosmic Microwave Background

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    This set of lectures provides an overview of the basic theory and phenomenology of the cosmic microwave background. Topics include a brief historical review; the physics of temperature and polarization fluctuations; acoustic oscillations of the primordial plasma; the space of inflationary cosmological models; current and potential constraints on these models from the microwave background; and constraints on inflation.

  20. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase IV: possible involvement in double strand break DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, S H; Ropp, P A; Sugino, A

    1994-08-11

    We identified and purified a new DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase IV), which is similar to mammalian DNA polymerase beta, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and suggested that it is encoded by YCR14C (POLX) on chromosome III. Here, we provided a direct evidence that the purified DNA polymerase IV is indeed encoded by POLX. Strains harboring a pol4 deletion mutation exhibit neither mitotic growth defect nor a meiosis defect, suggesting that DNA polymerase IV participates in nonessential functions in DNA metabolism. The deletion strains did not exhibit UV-sensitivity. However, they did show weak sensitivity to MMS-treatment and exhibited a hyper-recombination phenotype when intragenic recombination was measured during meiosis. Furthermore, MAT alpha pol4 delta segregants had a higher frequency of illegitimate mating with a MAT alpha tester strain than that of wild-type cells. These results suggest that DNA polymerase IV participates in a double-strand break repair pathway. A 3.2kb of the POL4 transcript was weakly expressed in mitotically growing cells. During meiosis, a 2.2 kb POL4 transcript was greatly induced, while the 3.2 kb transcript stayed at constant levels. This induction was delayed in a swi4 delta strain during meiosis, while no effect was observed in a swi6 delta strain.