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Sample records for cerevisiae mag1 gene

  1. Eukaryotic expression of bovine Neospora caninumMAG1 gene in Vero cells%牛源犬新孢子虫MAG1基因的克隆及在Vero细胞中表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦石; 贾立军; 刘明明; 黄国明; 张守发

    2011-01-01

    为了解牛源犬新孢子虫MAG1基因的生物学特性,本实验应用PCR技术扩增牛源犬新孢子虫MAG1基因,构建真核表达重组质粒pVAX-MAG1,将鉴定正确的pVAX-MAG1重组质粒转染Vero细胞,应用间接荧光检测方法(1FA)和western blot技术检测MAG1基因在Vero细胞中的表达.结果显示,扩增的牛源犬新孢子虫MAG1基因长度为1047bp,与GenBank中登录的MAG1 (EF580924.1)核苷酸序列同源性为99%,IFA检测MAG1基因在Vero细胞中获得瞬时表达,western blot分析表达蛋白的分子量为39 ku,具有较好的反应原性.本实验为新孢子虫病核酸疫苗与诊断试剂盒的研究奠定了基础.%To inestigate the biological characteristics of bovine Neospora caninum MAGI gene, the gene was amplified by PCR and inserted into eukaryotic expression vector. The resultant recombinant plasmid of pVAX-MAG 1 was transfected into Vero cells and the expression of MAGI was detected by indirect immunofluorescent assay, and western blot showed that the molecular weight of the protein was 39 ku and the protein had a positve reaction with anti MAGI serum. The results could be useful to DNA vaccine development.

  2. 牛源犬新孢手虫MAG1基因的克隆及原核表达%Cloning and prokaryotic expression of MAG1 gene of bovine Neospora caninum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦石; 贾立军; 薛书江; 刘明明; 黄国明; 张守发

    2012-01-01

    为了解牛源犬新孢子虫MAG1基因的免疫学特性,根据MAGl基因序列,设计并合成了1对用于扩增MAG1基因的引物。将PCR扩增产物连接到原核表达载体pGEX-4T-2上,转化大肠杆菌BL21(DE3)中。SDS—PAGE结果显示,MAG1在大肠杆菌中获得了较高水平的表达,表达蛋白的分子质量为65ku。Western-blot结果显示,表达的MAG1蛋白可被牛源犬新孢子虫阳性血清特异性识别,表明该MAG1蛋白具有较好的反应原性。本研究为新孢子虫病疫苗及诊断试剂盒的研究奠定了基础。%To understand immunological characteristics of MAG1 gene of bovine Neospora caninurn ,a pair of primers for MAG1 gene was designed according to the sequence of MAG1 gene. The MAG1 gene was amplified,and cloned into the pGEX-4T-2 vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). SDSPAGE analysis result indicated that MAG1 could be expressed high level in E. coli,the molecular weight of expressed protein was 65 ku. Western-blot analysis showed that the expressed MAG1 protein could specifically react with the positive serum against bovine N. caninum,indicating the protein had good reactinogenicity. The present study provided the foundation for the development of vaccines and diagnostic kits of neosporaosis.

  3. Prokaryotic co-expression of MAG1 of Neospora caninum and IFN-γ gene%犬新孢子虫MAG1与IFN-γ融合基因重组质粒的构建及原核共表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦石; 贾立军; 张立霞; 钱年超; 刘明明; 黄国明; 张守发

    2013-01-01

    Two pairs of primers were designed according to the Neospora caninum MAG1 gene (EF580924. 1) and Bov IFN-γ gene (M29867. 1)sequence. MAG1 gene and IFN-γ gene were connected by SOE-PCR. The recombinant plasmid pMD18-T-MAG1-IFN-y and pGEX-4T-MAG1-IFN-γ were constructed. The pGEX-4T-MAG1-IFN-y plasmid was transformed into E. coli BL21. The expression products were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western-blotting. The results show that the size of two-gene fusion fragment is 1 491 bp. The gene shared 99% nucleotide sequence homology with MAG1 (EF580924. 1) and IFN-γ (M29867. 1) in GenBank. The molecular weight of MAG1-IFN-γ fusion protein is 82 000. The protein can be recognized by positive serum of Neospora caninum and it has strong reactiity.%根据发表的犬新孢子虫MAG1基因序列(EF580924.1)和Bov IFN-γ基因序列(M29867.1)设计2对引物.分别以犬新孢子虫基因组DNA和pET28α-IFN-γ重组质粒为模板,通过重叠延伸拼接聚合酶链式反应(SOE-PCR)将犬新孢子虫MAG1基因与IFN-γ基因拼接,构建pMD18-T MAG1-IFN γ克隆质粒和pGEX-4T-MAG1-IFN-γ重组表达质粒,将鉴定正确的pGEX-4T-MAG1-IFN-γ重组表达质粒转化大肠杆菌BL21感受态细胞,IPTG诱导表达,SDS-PAGE和Western-blotting分析表达产物.结果表明,SOE PCR扩增获得双基因融合片段大小为1 491 bp,与GenBank中发表的MAG1 (EF580924.1)和IFN-γ(M29867.1)核苷酸序列的同源性为99%;MAG1-IFN-γ融合基因表达蛋白大小为82 000,具有较好的反应原性.

  4. Eukaryotic co-expression of MAG1 of Neospora caninum and IFN-γ gene and immunological evaluation%犬新孢子虫MAG1与IFN-γ融合基因重组真核质粒的真核共表达及免疫学评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦石; 贾立军; 张立霞; 钱年超; 刘明明; 黄国明; 张守发

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate immune responses of the recombinant plasmid co-expressing MAGI gene of Neospora caninum and IFN-γ, the recombinant plasmid of pVAX-MAGl-IFN-γ was constructed and transfected into Vero cells. The expression of MAGl gene was identified by indirect immunofluorescent assay and western blot. The results showed that MAG l-IFN-γ gene was transiently expressed in Vero cells and the protein expressed in Vero cells had good reactogenicity. Furthermore, BALB/c mice were immunized by pVAX-MAGl-IFN-γ. Indirect ELISA and determination of T lymphocyte subsets showed that the recombinant plasmid was able to induce efficient immune responses in inoculated mice. These results laid the foundation for the further research of DNA vaccine against Neospora caninum.%为对犬孢子虫MAG1与IFN-γ融合基因重组真核质粒进行免疫学评价,本实验以含有MAG1-IFN-γ基因片段的克隆质粒为模板,扩增MAGI-IFN-γ目的片段,构建pVAX-MAG1-IFN-γ重组真核表达质粒,将其转染Vero细胞,采用间接免疫荧光(IFA)和western blot技术检测MAG1基因在Vero细胞中的表达,并免疫BALB/c小鼠,进行免疫学评价.结果表明,PCR扩增获得基因片段大小为1536bp,与GenBank中登录的MAG1和IFN-γ核苷酸序列的同源性为99%;IFA检测MAG1基因在Vero细胞中获得瞬时表达,转染的Vero细胞呈现特异性绿色荧光;western blot分析表达蛋白的分子量为57ku,具有较好的反应原性.将构建的重组真核表达质粒免疫BALB/c小鼠,经间接ELISA和T淋巴细胞亚群含量测定表明,重组质粒具有较好的免疫原性.本实验为新孢子虫病核酸疫苗的深入研究奠定了基础.

  5. Analysis of substrate specificity of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mag1 alkylpurine DNA glycosylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikary, Suraj; Eichman, Brandt F. (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    DNA glycosylases specialized for the repair of alkylation damage must identify, with fine specificity, a diverse array of subtle modifications within DNA. The current mechanism involves damage sensing through interrogation of the DNA duplex, followed by more specific recognition of the target base inside the active site pocket. To better understand the physical basis for alkylpurine detection, we determined the crystal structure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mag1 (spMag1) in complex with DNA and performed a mutational analysis of spMag1 and the close homologue from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (scMag). Despite strong homology, spMag1 and scMag differ in substrate specificity and cellular alkylation sensitivity, although the enzymological basis for their functional differences is unknown. We show that Mag preference for 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine ({var_epsilon}A) is influenced by a minor groove-interrogating residue more than the composition of the nucleobase-binding pocket. Exchanging this residue between Mag proteins swapped their {var_epsilon}A activities, providing evidence that residues outside the extrahelical base-binding pocket have a role in identification of a particular modification in addition to sensing damage.

  6. Growth impairment of small-cell cancer by targeting provasopressin with MAG-1 antibody

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    William George North

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPreviously we demonstrated that human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC seems to universally express the vasopressin gene, and this leads to the presence of a cell-surface marker representing the entire prohormone precursor. In this study we show this marker can be targeted with MAG-1, a mouse monoclonal antibody against a C-terminal moiety on provasopressin. In vitro targeting of cell lines derived from primary and recurrent disease demonstrates attachment of antibody to the cell surface followed by internalization. In vivo targeting with 99Tc-labeled Fab fragments of MAG-1 shows selective attachment to xenografts. In vivo treatment of tumors from classical cell line, NCI H345, with either ~1.65 µCi (~1.65 mg/kg bw of 90 Yttrium-labeled MAG-1, or ~1.65 mg/kg bw native MAG-1, delivered every second day for 6 days produced similar reductions in the growth rate to ~50% (p

  7. Promotion of MAG-1 on Metastasis of Lung Cancer Cells in vitro and Its Expression in Lung Cancer Tissue of 24 Cases

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    Jinqiang ZHANG

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Tumor metastasis is a multistep process with many genes involved in. A novel gene MAG-1 , identified by suppression subtractive hybridization from lung cancer cells was found to be associated with tumor metastasis. The aims of this work are to investigate the metastasis related effects of MAG-1 on human lunggiant-cell line PLA801, and to compare the expression rate of MAG-1 in cancer tissue from lung cancer patients with different metastatic status. Methods Sense and anti-sense expressing vectors of MAG-1 were constructed and transfected into PLA801C and PLA801D respectively. Colony forming, adherence assay, MTT assay and Transwell experiments were used to evaluate the alterations of clone forming, cell-matrix adherence, proliferating and invasion of the stable transfected cell strains. Western blot was employed to detect the proteins levels of CD44, and MMP-2 in cell strains and mRNAstate of MAG-1 in lung cancer tissue from patients with or without pathological metastasis were also analyzed by RTPCR. Results MAG-1 could increase cell-ECM (Extracellular Matrix adhesive capacity, promote invasion, enhance cell proliferation and had no effects on clone forming ability of PLA801 cells in soft agar. MAG-1 was also found have positive effects on the protein level of CD44 and MMP-2 in PLA801 cells, and the detection rate of MAG-1 mRNA was much higher in cancer tissue from metastatic patients (7/12 than that in non-metastatic patients (2/12. Conclusion MAG-1 could promote lung cancer metastasis and might be a metastasis associated gene of lung cancer.

  8. The evolution of gene expression QTL in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    James Ronald

    Full Text Available Understanding the evolutionary forces that influence patterns of gene expression variation will provide insights into the mechanisms of evolutionary change and the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity. To date, studies of gene expression evolution have primarily been made by analyzing how gene expression levels vary within and between species. However, the fundamental unit of heritable variation in transcript abundance is the underlying regulatory allele, and as a result it is necessary to understand gene expression evolution at the level of DNA sequence variation. Here we describe the evolutionary forces shaping patterns of genetic variation for 1206 cis-regulatory QTL identified in a cross between two divergent strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that purifying selection against mildly deleterious alleles is the dominant force governing cis-regulatory evolution in S. cerevisiae and estimate the strength of selection. We also find that essential genes and genes with larger codon bias are subject to slightly stronger cis-regulatory constraint and that positive selection has played a role in the evolution of major trans-acting QTL.

  9. New recombinant chimeric antigens, P35-MAG1, MIC1-ROP1, and MAG1-ROP1, for the serodiagnosis of human toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapała, Dorota; Holec-Gąsior, Lucyna; Kur, Józef

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of 3 chimeric Toxoplasma gondii antigens, P35-MAG1, MIC1-ROP1 and MAG1-ROP1, in the serodiagnosis of an acute toxoplasmosis in humans. Proteins were produced as fusion proteins containing His tags ends and then further purified by metal affinity chromatography. Their application for the diagnosis of recently acquired T. gondii infection was tested in IgG and IgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). At 100%, 77.3%, and 86.4%, respectively, the reactivity of the IgG ELISA using P35-MAG1, MIC1-ROP1, and MAG1-ROP1 for sera from patients where acute toxoplasmosis was suspected was significantly higher than for the samples from people with a chronic infection, at 26.2%, 36.1%, and 32.8%, respectively. Moreover, P35-MAG1, MIC1-ROP1, and MAG1-ROP1 detected IgM antibodies with a reactivity at 81.8%, 72.7%, and 59.1%, respectively. The results presented in the article show that, particularly, P35-MAG1 may be useful in the preliminary detection of recent T. gondii infection.

  10. Behavioral Abnormalities in a Mouse Model of Chronic Toxoplasmosis Are Associated with MAG1 Antibody Levels and Cyst Burden.

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    Xiao, Jianchun; Li, Ye; Prandovszky, Emese; Kannan, Geetha; Viscidi, Raphael P; Pletnikov, Mikhail V; Yolken, Robert H

    2016-04-01

    There is marked variation in the human response to Toxoplasma gondii infection. Epidemiological studies indicate associations between strain virulence and severity of toxoplasmosis. Animal studies on the pathogenic effect of chronic infection focused on relatively avirulent strains (e.g. type II) because they can easily establish latent infections in mice, defined by the presence of bradyzoite-containing cysts. To provide insight into virulent strain-related severity of human toxoplasmosis, we established a chronic model of the virulent type I strain using outbred mice. We found that type I-exposed mice displayed variable outcomes ranging from aborted to severe infections. According to antibody profiles, we found that most of mice generated antibodies against T. gondii organism but varied greatly in the production of antibodies against matrix antigen MAG1. There was a strong correlation between MAG1 antibody level and brain cyst burden in chronically infected mice (r = 0.82, p = 0.0021). We found that mice with high MAG1 antibody level displayed lower weight, behavioral changes, altered levels of gene expression and immune activation. The most striking change in behavior we discovered was a blunted response to amphetamine-trigged locomotor activity. The extent of most changes was directly correlated with levels of MAG1 antibody. These changes were not found in mice with less cyst burden or mice that were acutely but not chronically infected. Our finding highlights the critical role of cyst burden in a range of disease severity during chronic infection, the predictive value of MAG1 antibody level to brain cyst burden and to changes in behavior or other pathology in chronically infected mice. Our finding may have important implications for understanding the heterogeneous effects of T. gondii infections in human.

  11. Isolation of the catalase T structural gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by functional complementation.

    OpenAIRE

    Spevak, W; Fessl, F; Rytka, J; Traczyk, A; Skoneczny, M; Ruis, H

    1983-01-01

    The catalase T structural gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cloned by functional complementation of a mutation causing specific lack of the enzyme (cttl). Catalase T-deficient mutants were obtained by UV mutagenesis of an S. cerevisiae strain bearing the cas1 mutation, which causes insensitivity of catalase T to glucose repression. Since the second catalase protein of S. cerevisiae, catalase A, is completely repressed on 10% glucose, catalase T-deficient mutant colonies could be detected u...

  12. [Expression of inulinase genes in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolenko, G G; Karpechenko, N A

    2015-01-01

    Expression of the genes encoding the enzymes involved in inulin, sucrose, and glucose metabolism in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus was studied. The exon-intron structure of the relevant genes was identified and the primers for quantitative PCR were optimized. Expression of the genes was found to depend on the carbon source. Glucose was shown to exhibit a repressive effect on inulinase synthesis by K. marxianus, while in S. cerevisiae glucose and sucrose were inulinase inducer and repressor, respectively.

  13. Systematic analysis of S. cerevisiae chromosome VIII genes.

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    Niedenthal, R; Riles, L; Güldener, U; Klein, S; Johnston, M; Hegemann, J H

    1999-12-01

    To begin genome-wide functional analysis, we analysed the consequences of deleting each of the 265 genes of chromosome VIII of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For 33% of the deletion strains a growth phenotype could be detected: 18% of the genes are essential for growth on complete glucose medium, and 15% grow significantly more slowly than the wild-type strain or exhibit a conditional phenotype when incubated under one of 20 different growth conditions. Two-thirds of the mutants that exhibit conditional phenotypes are pleiotropic; about one-third of the mutants exhibit only one phenotype. We also measured the level of expression directed by the promoter of each gene. About half of the promoters direct detectable transcription in rich glucose medium, and most of these exhibited only low or medium activity. Only 1% of the genes are expressed at about the same level as ACT1. The number of active promoters increased to 76% upon growth on a non-fermentable carbon source, and to 93% in minimal glucose medium. The majority of promoters fluctuated in strength, depending on the medium.

  14. Regulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD16.

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    Bang, D D; Timmermans, V; Verhage, R; Zeeman, A M; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1995-05-25

    The RAD16 gene product has been shown to be essential for the repair of the silenced mating type loci [Bang et al. (1992) Nucleic Acids Res. 20, 3925-3931]. More recently we demonstrated that the RAD16 and RAD7 proteins are also required for repair of non-transcribed strands of active genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Waters et al. (1993) Mol. Gen. Genet. 239, 28-32]. We have studied the regulation of the RAD16 gene and found that the RAD16 transcript levels increased up to 7-fold upon UV irradiation. Heat shock at 42 degrees C also results in elevated levels of RAD16 mRNA. In sporulating MAT alpha/MATa diploid cells RAD16 mRNA is also induced. The basal level of the RAD16 transcript is constant during the mitotic cell cycle. G1-arrested cells show normal induction of RAD16 mRNA upon UV irradiation demonstrating that the induction is not a secondary consequence of G2 cell cycle arrest following UV irradiation. However, in cells arrested in G1 the induction of RAD16 mRNA after UV irradiation is not followed by a rapid decline as occurs in normal growing cells suggesting that the down regulation of RAD16 transcription is dependent on progression into the cell cycle.

  15. Assembly of evolved ligninolytic genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Gonzalez-Perez, David; Alcalde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The ligninolytic enzymatic consortium produced by white-rot fungi is one of the most efficient oxidative systems found in nature, with many potential applications that range from the production of 2nd generation biofuels to chemicals synthesis. In the current study, two high redox potential oxidoreductase fusion genes (laccase -Lac- and versatile peroxidase -Vp-) that had been evolved in the laboratory were re-assembled in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. First, cell viability and secretion were assessed after co-transforming the Lac and Vp genes into yeast. Several expression cassettes were inserted in vivo into episomal bi-directional vectors in order to evaluate inducible promoter and/or terminator pairs of different strengths in an individual and combined manner. The synthetic white-rot yeast model harboring Vp(GAL1/CYC1)-Lac(GAL10/ADH1) displayed up to 1000 and 100 Units per L of peroxidase and laccase activity, respectively, representing a suitable point of departure for future synthetic biology studies. PMID:24830983

  16. The RFC2 gene encoding a subunit of replication factor C of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Noskov, V; Maki, S.; Kawasaki, Y.; Leem, S H; Ono, B; Araki, H; Pavlov, Y; Sugino, A

    1994-01-01

    Replication Factor C (RF-C) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a complex that consists of several different polypeptides ranging from 120- to 37 kDa (Yoder and Burgers, 1991; Fien and Stillman, 1992), similar to human RF-C. We have isolated a gene, RFC2, that appears to be a component of the yeast RF-C. The RFC2 gene is located on chromosome X of S. cerevisiae and is essential for cell growth. Disruption of the RFC2 gene led to a dumbbell-shaped terminal morphology, common to mutants having a def...

  17. Sensitivity to Lovastatin of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Deleted for Pleiotropic Drug Resistance (PDR) Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Formenti, Luca Riccardo; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    2011-01-01

    based on the use of statins. We investigated the susceptibility to lovastatin of S. cerevisiae strains deleted for PDR genes, responsible for exporting hydrophobic and amphi-philic drugs, such as lovastatin. Strains deleted for the genes tested, PDR1, PDR3, PDR5 and SNQ2, exhibited remarkably different...

  18. PRIMARY STRUCTURE OF THE P450 LANOSTEROL DEMETHYLASE GENE FROM SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have sequenced the structural gene and flanking regions for lanosterol 14 alpha-demethylase (14DM) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An open reading frame of 530 codons encodes a 60.7-kDa protein. When this gene is disrupted by integrative transformation, the resulting strain req...

  19. Structure and functional analysis of the multistress response gene DDR2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, N; McClanahan, T K; Simon, J R; Treger, J M; McEntee, K

    1996-12-13

    The DDR2 gene is a multistress response gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is transcriptionally activated by more than thirteen xenobiotic agents and environmental or physiological stresses. The DDR2 gene encodes a small hydrophobic 61 amino acid polypeptide located on chromosome XV adjacent to the SPE2 locus. Disruption alleles of the DDR2 gene have been constructed and these ddr2 delta mutants show no defect in heat shock recovery or thermotolerance and appear normal for DNA damage sensitivity and mutagenesis.

  20. Expression of an Aspergillus niger Phytase Gene (phyA) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Yanming; Wilson, David B.; Lei, Xin Gen

    1999-01-01

    Phytase improves the bioavailability of phytate phosphorus in plant foods to humans and animals and reduces phosphorus pollution of animal waste. Our objectives were to express an Aspergillus niger phytase gene (phyA) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to determine the effects of glycosylation on the phytase’s activity and thermostability. A 1.4-kb DNA fragment containing the coding region of the phyA gene was inserted into the expression vector pYES2 and was expressed in S. cerevisiae as an act...

  1. Modeling Gene Networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Based on Gene Expression Profiles

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    Yulin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed and innovative analysis of gene regulatory network structures may reveal novel insights to biological mechanisms. Here we study how gene regulatory network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can differ under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To achieve this, we discretized the gene expression profiles and calculated the self-entropy of down- and upregulation of gene expression as well as joint entropy. Based on these quantities the uncertainty coefficient was calculated for each gene triplet, following which, separate gene logic networks were constructed for the aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Four structural parameters such as average degree, average clustering coefficient, average shortest path, and average betweenness were used to compare the structure of the corresponding aerobic and anaerobic logic networks. Five genes were identified to be putative key components of the two energy metabolisms. Furthermore, community analysis using the Newman fast algorithm revealed two significant communities for the aerobic but only one for the anaerobic network. David Gene Functional Classification suggests that, under aerobic conditions, one such community reflects the cell cycle and cell replication, while the other one is linked to the mitochondrial respiratory chain function.

  2. Increasing cocoa butter-like lipid production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by expression of selected cocoa genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Yongjun; Gossing, Michael; Bergenholm, David

    2017-01-01

    Cocoa butter (CB) extracted from cocoa beans mainly consists of three different kinds of triacylglycerols (TAGs), 1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (POP, C16:0-C18:1-C16:0), 1-palmitoyl-3-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol(POS,C16:0C18:1-C18:0) and 1,3-distearoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (SOS, C18:0-C18:1-C18....... TAG synthesis is mainly catalyzed by three enzymes: glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), lysophospholipid acyltransferase (LPAT) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT). In order to produce CBL in S. cerevisiae, we selected six cocoa genes encoding GPAT, LPAT and DGAT potentially responsible...... for CB biosynthesis from the cocoa genome using a phylogenetic analysis approach. By expressing the selected cocoa genes in S. cerevisiae, we successfully increased total fatty acid production, TAG production and CBL production in some S. cerevisiae strains. The relative CBL content in three yeast...

  3. Development of a system for multicopy gene integration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkiv, Marta V; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2016-01-01

    In this study we describe construction and evaluation of a vector for multicopy integration in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this vector a modified selective marker and a reporter gene PHO8 (encoding alkaline phosphatase) were flanked with delta sequences of the Ty1 transposon. Modified by error-prone PCR version of selection marker kanMX4 was obtained from Escherichia coli clone with impaired geneticin (G418) resistance. The attenuation of kanMX4 gene provides an opportunity to select for explicitly multicopy integration of the module in S. cerevisiae using moderate (200 mg L(-1)) antibiotic concentrations. The developed system provided integration of 3-10 copies of the module in the genome of S. cerevisiae. High copy integration events were confirmed by qRT-PCR, Southern hybridization and reporter enzyme activity measurements.

  4. Classifying genes to the correct Gene Ontology Slim term in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using neighbouring genes with classification learning

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    Tsatsoulis Costas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that gene location and surrounding genes influence the functionality of genes in the eukaryotic genome. Knowing the Gene Ontology Slim terms associated with a gene gives us insight into a gene's functionality by informing us how its gene product behaves in a cellular context using three different ontologies: molecular function, biological process, and cellular component. In this study, we analyzed if we could classify a gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to its correct Gene Ontology Slim term using information about its location in the genome and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes using classification learning. Results We performed experiments to establish that the MultiBoostAB algorithm using the J48 classifier could correctly classify Gene Ontology Slim terms of a gene given information regarding the gene's location and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes for training. Different neighbourhood sizes were examined to determine how many nearest neighbours should be included around each gene to provide better classification rules. Our results show that by just incorporating neighbour information from each gene's two-nearest neighbours, the percentage of correctly classified genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term for each ontology reaches over 80% with high accuracy (reflected in F-measures over 0.80 of the classification rules produced. Conclusions We confirmed that in classifying genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term, the inclusion of neighbour information from those genes is beneficial. Knowing the location of a gene and the Gene Ontology Slim information from neighbouring genes gives us insight into that gene's functionality. This benefit is seen by just including information from a gene's two-nearest neighbouring genes.

  5. IMP2, a gene involved in the expression of glucose-repressible genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Lodi, T; Goffrini, P; Ferrero, I; Donnini, C

    1995-09-01

    Two mutants carrying different deletions of the IMP2 coding sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, delta T1, which encodes a protein lacking the last 26 C-terminal amino acids, and delta T2, which completely lacks the coding region, were analysed for derepression of glucose-repressible maltose, galactose, raffinose and ethanol utilization pathways in response to glucose limitation. The role of the IMP2 gene product in the regulation of carbon catabolite repressible enzymes maltase, invertase, alcohol dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) and L-lactate:ferricytochrome-c oxidoreductase (L-LCR) was also analysed. The IMP2 gene product is required for the rapid glucose derepression of all above-mentioned carbon source utilization pathways and of all the enzymes except for L-LCR. NAD-GDH is regulated by IMP2 in the opposite way and, in fact, this enzyme was released at higher levels in both imp2 mutants than in the wild-type strain. Therefore, the product of IMP2 appears to be involved in positive and negative regulation. Both deletions result in growth and catalytic defects; in some cases partial modification of the gene product yielded more dramatic effects than its complete absence. Moreover, evidence is provided that the IMP2 gene product regulates galactose- and maltose-inducible genes at the transcriptional level and is a positive regulator of maltase, maltose permease and galactose permease gene expression.

  6. [HSM6 gene is identical to PSY4 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, D V; Koval'tsova, S V; Evstukhina, T A; Peshekhonov, V T; Chernenkov, A Iu; Korolev, V G

    2013-03-01

    Previously, we isolated mutant yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae with an increased rate of spontaneous mutagenesis. Here, we studied the properties of HSM6 gene, the hsm6-1 mutation of which increased the frequency of UV-induced mutagenesis and decreased the level of UV-induced mitotic crossover at the centromere gene region, ADE2. HSM6 gene was mapped on the left arm of chromosome 11 in the region where the PSY4 gene is located. The epistatic analysis has shown that the hsm6-1 mutation represents an allele of PSY4 gene. Sequencing of hsm6-1 mutant allele has revealed a frameshift mutation, which caused the substitution of Lys218Glu and the generation of a stop codon in the next position. The interactions of hsm6-1 and rad52 mutations were epistatic. Our data show that the PSY4 gene plays a key role in the regulation of cell withdrawal from checkpoint induced by DNA disturbances.

  7. Use of MAG1 recombinant antigen for diagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holec, Lucyna; Hiszczyńska-Sawicka, Elzbieta; Gasior, Artur; Brillowska-Dabrowska, Anna; Kur, Józef

    2007-03-01

    This paper describes the cloning, purification, and serological applications of matrix antigen MAG1 of Toxoplasma gondii. The expression system used allows the production of a large amount of T. gondii recombinant protein, which was assessed for its potential use in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of T. gondii infection in humans. Serum samples from 117 patients with different stages of infection, along with 10 serum samples from seronegative patients obtained for routine diagnostic tests, were used. The results were compared with those of an ELISA that uses a native T. gondii antigen extract. The MAG1 antigen detected antibodies more frequently from the acute stage (97.3%) than from the chronic stage (7.5%) of toxoplasmosis. Hence, this antigen may be used as a tool for detection of T. gondii immunoglobulin G antibodies in persons with acute toxoplasmosis.

  8. High-level production of beta-carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by successive transformation with carotenogenic genes from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwaal, R.; Wang, J.; Meijnen, J.P.; Visser, H.; Sandmann, G.; Berg, van den J.A.; Ooyen, van A.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether Saccharomyces cerevisiae can serve as a host for efficient carotenoid and especially ß-carotene production, carotenogenic genes from the carotenoid-producing yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous were introduced and overexpressed in S. cerevisiae. Because overexpression of these g

  9. Heterologous expression of cellulase genes in natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Steffi A; den Haan, Riaan; van Zyl, Willem Heber

    2016-09-01

    Enzyme cost is a major impediment to second-generation (2G) cellulosic ethanol production. One strategy to reduce enzyme cost is to engineer enzyme production capacity in a fermentative microorganism to enable consolidated bio-processing (CBP). Ideally, a strain with a high secretory phenotype, high fermentative capacity as well as an innate robustness to bioethanol-specific stressors, including tolerance to products formed during pre-treatment and fermentation of lignocellulosic substrates should be used. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a robust fermentative yeast but has limitations as a potential CBP host, such as low heterologous protein secretion titers. In this study, we evaluated natural S. cerevisiae isolate strains for superior secretion activity and other industrially relevant characteristics needed during the process of lignocellulosic ethanol production. Individual cellulases namely Saccharomycopsis fibuligera Cel3A (β-glucosidase), Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A (cellobiohydrolase), and Trichoderma reesei Cel5A (endoglucanase) were utilized as reporter proteins. Natural strain YI13 was identified to have a high secretory phenotype, demonstrating a 3.7- and 3.5-fold higher Cel7A and Cel5A activity, respectively, compared to the reference strain S288c. YI13 also demonstrated other industrially relevant characteristics such as growth vigor, high ethanol titer, multi-tolerance to high temperatures (37 and 40 °C), ethanol (10 % w/v), and towards various concentrations of a cocktail of inhibitory compounds commonly found in lignocellulose hydrolysates. This study accentuates the value of natural S. cerevisiae isolate strains to serve as potential robust and highly productive chassis organisms for CBP strain development.

  10. Genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes regulated by vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2015-01-01

    During pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, a variety of fermentation inhibitors, including acetic acid and vanillin, are released. Using DNA microarray analysis, this study explored genes of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that respond to vanillin-induced stress. The expression of 273 genes was upregulated and that of 205 genes was downregulated under vanillin stress. Significantly induced genes included MCH2, SNG1, GPH1, and TMA10, whereas NOP2, UTP18, FUR1, and SPR1 were down regulated. Sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region of upregulated genes suggested that vanillin might regulate gene expression in a stress response element (STRE)-dependent manner, in addition to a pathway that involved the transcription factor Yap1p. Retardation in the cell growth of mutant strains indicated that MCH2, SNG1, and GPH1 are intimately involved in vanillin stress response. Deletion of the genes whose expression levels were decreased under vanillin stress did not result in a notable change in S. cerevisiae growth under vanillin stress. This study will provide the basis for a better understanding of the stress response of the yeast S. cerevisiae to fermentation inhibitors.

  11. Increasing cocoa butter-like lipid production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by expression of selected cocoa genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yongjun; Gossing, Michael; Bergenholm, David; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-12-01

    Cocoa butter (CB) extracted from cocoa beans mainly consists of three different kinds of triacylglycerols (TAGs), 1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (POP, C16:0-C18:1-C16:0), 1-palmitoyl-3-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (POS, C16:0-C18:1-C18:0) and 1,3-distearoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (SOS, C18:0-C18:1-C18:0), but CB supply is limited. Therefore, CB-like lipids (CBL, which are composed of POP, POS and SOS) are in great demand. Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces TAGs as storage lipids, which are also mainly composed of C16 and C18 fatty acids. However, POP, POS and SOS are not among the major TAG forms in yeast. TAG synthesis is mainly catalyzed by three enzymes: glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), lysophospholipid acyltransferase (LPAT) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT). In order to produce CBL in S. cerevisiae, we selected six cocoa genes encoding GPAT, LPAT and DGAT potentially responsible for CB biosynthesis from the cocoa genome using a phylogenetic analysis approach. By expressing the selected cocoa genes in S. cerevisiae, we successfully increased total fatty acid production, TAG production and CBL production in some S. cerevisiae strains. The relative CBL content in three yeast strains harboring cocoa genes increased 190, 230 and 196% over the control strain, respectively; especially, the potential SOS content of the three yeast strains increased 254, 476 and 354% over the control strain. Moreover, one of the three yeast strains had a 2.25-fold increased TAG content and 6.7-fold higher level of CBL compared with the control strain. In summary, CBL production by S. cerevisiae were increased through expressing selected cocoa genes potentially involved in CB biosynthesis.

  12. Identification and characterization of a novel biotin biosynthesis gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Ito, Kiyoshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2005-11-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells generally cannot synthesize biotin, a vitamin required for many carboxylation reactions. Although sake yeasts, which are used for Japanese sake brewing, are classified as S. cerevisiae, they do not require biotin for their growth. In this study, we identified a novel open reading frame (ORF) in the genome of one strain of sake yeast that we speculated to be involved in biotin synthesis. Homologs of this gene are widely distributed in the genomes of sake yeasts. However, they are not found in many laboratory strains and strains used for wine making and beer brewing. This ORF was named BIO6 because it has 52% identity with BIO3, a biotin biosynthesis gene of a laboratory strain. Further research showed that yeasts without the BIO6 gene are auxotrophic for biotin, whereas yeasts holding the BIO6 gene are prototrophic for biotin. The BIO6 gene was disrupted in strain A364A, which is a laboratory strain with one copy of the BIO6 gene. Although strain A364A is prototrophic for biotin, a BIO6 disrupted mutant was found to be auxotrophic for biotin. The BIO6 disruptant was able to grow in biotin-deficient medium supplemented with 7-keto-8-amino-pelargonic acid (KAPA), while the bio3 disruptant was not able to grow in this medium. These results suggest that Bio6p acts in an unknown step of biotin synthesis before KAPA synthesis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that expression of the BIO6 gene, like that of other biotin synthesis genes, was upregulated by depletion of biotin. We conclude that the BIO6 gene is a novel biotin biosynthesis gene of S. cerevisiae.

  13. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes involved in ethanol response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Agave tequilana juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Córdova, Jesús; Drnevich, Jenny; Madrigal-Pulido, Jaime Alberto; Arrizon, Javier; Allen, Kirk; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Alvarez-Maya, Ikuri

    2012-08-01

    During ethanol fermentation, yeast cells are exposed to stress due to the accumulation of ethanol, cell growth is altered and the output of the target product is reduced. For Agave beverages, like tequila, no reports have been published on the global gene expression under ethanol stress. In this work, we used microarray analysis to identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in the ethanol response. Gene expression of a tequila yeast strain of S. cerevisiae (AR5) was explored by comparing global gene expression with that of laboratory strain S288C, both after ethanol exposure. Additionally, we used two different culture conditions, cells grown in Agave tequilana juice as a natural fermentation media or grown in yeast-extract peptone dextrose as artificial media. Of the 6368 S. cerevisiae genes in the microarray, 657 genes were identified that had different expression responses to ethanol stress due to strain and/or media. A cluster of 28 genes was found over-expressed specifically in the AR5 tequila strain that could be involved in the adaptation to tequila yeast fermentation, 14 of which are unknown such as yor343c, ylr162w, ygr182c, ymr265c, yer053c-a or ydr415c. These could be the most suitable genes for transforming tequila yeast to increase ethanol tolerance in the tequila fermentation process. Other genes involved in response to stress (RFC4, TSA1, MLH1, PAU3, RAD53) or transport (CYB2, TIP20, QCR9) were expressed in the same cluster. Unknown genes could be good candidates for the development of recombinant yeasts with ethanol tolerance for use in industrial tequila fermentation.

  14. Comparative analysis of the transcription-factor gene regulatory networks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santillán Moisés

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulatory interactions between transcription factors (TF and regulated genes (RG in a species genome can be lumped together in a single directed graph. The TF's and RG's conform the nodes of this graph, while links are drawn whenever a transcription factor regulates a gene's expression. Projections onto TF nodes can be constructed by linking every two nodes regulating a common gene. Similarly, projections onto RG nodes can be made by linking every two regulated genes sharing at least one common regulator. Recent studies of the connectivity pattern in the transcription-factor regulatory network of many organisms have revealed some interesting properties. However, the differences between TF and RG nodes have not been widely explored. Results After analysing the RG and TF projections of the transcription-factor gene regulatory networks of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found several common characteristic as well as some noticeable differences. To better understand these differences, we compared the properties of the E. coli and S. cerevisiae RG- and TF-projected networks with those of the corresponding projections built from randomized versions of the original bipartite networks. These last results indicate that the observed differences are mostly due to the very different ratios of TF to RG counts of the E. coli and S. cerevisiae bipartite networks, rather than to their having different connectivity patterns. Conclusion Since E. coli is a prokaryotic organism while S. cerevisiae is eukaryotic, there are important differences between them concerning processing of mRNA before translation, DNA packing, amount of junk DNA, and gene regulation. From the results in this paper we conclude that the most important effect such differences have had on the development of the corresponding transcription-factor gene regulatory networks is their very different ratios of TF to RG numbers. This ratio is more than three

  15. Expression of α-Amylase Gene of Bacillus licheniformis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗进贤; 黎杨; 李文清; 张添元; 何鸣

    1994-01-01

    The secretive expression vector has been constructed using the promoter and signal se-quence of yeast MF-α1 factor,and the Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase gene without promoter and signal se-quence has been inserted into the downstream of the signal sequence on the vector.After the readjustment ofthe reading frame,the amylase gene was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the product was secretedfrom it.The properties of enzymes secreted from yeast and B.subtilis are compared,and the mechanism ofthe gene expression and product secretion are discussed.

  16. Increasing galactose consumption by Saccharomyces cerevisiae through metabolic engineering of the GAL gene regulatory network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Simon; Olsson, Lisbeth; Johnston, M.

    2000-01-01

    in the pathway, and ultimately, increasing metabolic flux through the pathway of interest, By manipulating the GAL gene regulatory network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is a tightly regulated system, we produced prototroph mutant strains, which increased the flux through the galactose utilization pathway...... media. The improved galactose consumption of the gal mutants did not favor biomass formation, but rather caused excessive respiro-fermentative metabolism, with the ethanol production rate increasing linearly with glycolytic flux....

  17. New Genes Involved in Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Ramon; Morales, Pilar; Tronchoni, Jordi; Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Vaudano, Enrico; Quirós, Manuel; Novo, Maite; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Valero, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to changes in osmolarity is fundamental for the survival of living cells, and has implications in food and industrial biotechnology. It has been extensively studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the Hog1 stress activated protein kinase was discovered about 20 years ago. Hog1 is the core of the intracellular signaling pathway that governs the adaptive response to osmotic stress in this species. The main endpoint of this program is synthesis and intracellular retention of glycerol, as a compatible osmolyte. Despite many details of the signaling pathways and yeast responses to osmotic challenges have already been described, genome-wide approaches are contributing to refine our knowledge of yeast adaptation to hypertonic media. In this work, we used a quantitative fitness analysis approach in order to deepen our understanding of the interplay between yeast cells and the osmotic environment. Genetic requirements for proper growth under osmotic stress showed both common and specific features when hypertonic conditions were induced by either glucose or sorbitol. Tolerance to high-glucose content requires mitochondrial function, while defective protein targeting to peroxisome, GID-complex function (involved in negative regulation of gluconeogenesis), or chromatin dynamics, result in poor survival to sorbitol-induced osmotic stress. On the other side, the competitive disadvantage of yeast strains defective in the endomembrane system is relieved by hypertonic conditions. This finding points to the Golgi-endosome system as one of the main cell components negatively affected by hyperosmolarity. Most of the biological processes highlighted in this analysis had not been previously related to osmotic stress but are probably relevant in an ecological and evolutionary context. PMID:27733850

  18. Gene delivery to dendritic cells by orally administered recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiflmariam, Meron G; Yang, Hanjiang; Zhang, Zhiying

    2013-02-27

    DNA vaccination has caught the attention of many for triggering humoral as well as cellular immune responses. And delivering DNA into the antigen presenting cells (APCs) in order to induce efficient immunoresponse has become the backbone of this field. It has been confirmed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae, though non-pathogenic, is being engulfed by the dendritic cells and macrophages and delivers not only proteins, but also DNA materials (already confirmed in vitro). In this research, S. cerevisiae is used to deliver green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene controlled under cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter in living organism (mice). The recombinant yeast, transfected with the plasmid containing the GFP gene, was heat killed and orally administered to mice. After 60 h of yeast administration, mice were sacrificed and intestine was separated, washed and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissues were cut at the size of 10 μm using Cryostat machine, and GFP expression was successfully detected under a fluorescence microscope. After 45 days Western blot was able to detect GFP antibody in the blood of mice. These results imply that S. cerevisiae, being non-pathogenic, cheap, and easy to culture could be a good candidate to deliver DNA materials to the immune cells for vaccination.

  19. Cloning and expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of chit2 gene from Beauveria bassiana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jin-zhu; YANG Xiao-xue; WANG Yun; YANG Qian

    2009-01-01

    To study recycled trashes from shrimps and crabs in the sea through chitinase secreted by microor-ganisms, the chitinase gene chit2 was cloned and sequenced from Beauveria bassiana by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and was ligated into the yeast expression vector pYES2. The expression vector plasmid was transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae H158. Gene expression took place upon induction with 2% galac-tose. The measurement of enzyme activity shows that the expression production can be expressed in active forms and secreted to the medium. The enzyme activity approaches the peak of 0. 63 U/mL when the culture time is 36 h.

  20. Accelerated alcoholic fermentation caused by defective gene expression related to glucose derepression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Naoya; Mizuno, Megumi; Zhou, Yan; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Sake yeast strains maintain high fermentation rates, even after the stationary growth phase begins. To determine the molecular mechanisms underlying this advantageous brewing property, we compared the gene expression profiles of sake and laboratory yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the stationary growth phase. DNA microarray analysis revealed that the sake yeast strain examined had defects in expression of the genes related to glucose derepression mediated by transcription factors Adr1p and Cat8p. Furthermore, deletion of the ADR1 and CAT8 genes slightly but statistically significantly improved the fermentation rate of a laboratory yeast strain. We also identified two loss-of-function mutations in the ADR1 gene of existing sake yeast strains. Taken together, these results indicate that the gene expression program associated with glucose derepression for yeast acts as an impediment to effective alcoholic fermentation under glucose-rich fermentative conditions.

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression changes during rotating wall vessel suspension culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Kelly; Allen, Patricia L.; Lewis, Fawn; Cubano, Luis A.; Hyman, Linda E.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2002-01-01

    This study utilizes Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study genetic responses to suspension culture. The suspension culture system used in this study is the high-aspect-ratio vessel, one type of the rotating wall vessel, that provides a high rate of gas exchange necessary for rapidly dividing cells. Cells were grown in the high-aspect-ratio vessel, and DNA microarray and metabolic analyses were used to determine the resulting changes in yeast gene expression. A significant number of genes were found to be up- or downregulated by at least twofold as a result of rotational growth. By using Gibbs promoter alignment, clusters of genes were examined for promoter elements mediating these genetic changes. Candidate binding motifs similar to the Rap1p binding site and the stress-responsive element were identified in the promoter regions of differentially regulated genes. This study shows that, as in higher order organisms, S. cerevisiae changes gene expression in response to rotational culture and also provides clues for investigations into the signaling pathways involved in gravitational response.

  2. 3' Untranslated regions mediate transcriptional interference between convergent genes both locally and ectopically in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luwen; Jiang, Ning; Wang, Lin; Fang, Ou; Leach, Lindsey J; Hu, Xiaohua; Luo, Zewei

    2014-01-01

    Paired sense and antisense (S/AS) genes located in cis represent a structural feature common to the genomes of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and produce partially complementary transcripts. We used published genome and transcriptome sequence data and found that over 20% of genes (645 pairs) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome are arranged in convergent pairs with overlapping 3'-UTRs. Using published microarray transcriptome data from the standard laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae, our analysis revealed that expression levels of convergent pairs are significantly negatively correlated across a broad range of environments. This implies an important role for convergent genes in the regulation of gene expression, which may compensate for the absence of RNA-dependent mechanisms such as micro RNAs in budding yeast. We selected four representative convergent gene pairs and used expression assays in wild type yeast and its genetically modified strains to explore the underlying patterns of gene expression. Results showed that convergent genes are reciprocally regulated in yeast populations and in single cells, whereby an increase in expression of one gene produces a decrease in the expression of the other, and vice-versa. Time course analysis of the cell cycle illustrated the functional significance of this relationship for the three pairs with relevant functional roles. Furthermore, a series of genetic modifications revealed that the 3'-UTR sequence plays an essential causal role in mediating transcriptional interference, which requires neither the sequence of the open reading frame nor the translation of fully functional proteins. More importantly, transcriptional interference persisted even when one of the convergent genes was expressed ectopically (in trans) and therefore does not depend on the cis arrangement of convergent genes; we conclude that the mechanism of transcriptional interference cannot be explained by the transcriptional collision

  3. 3' Untranslated regions mediate transcriptional interference between convergent genes both locally and ectopically in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luwen Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paired sense and antisense (S/AS genes located in cis represent a structural feature common to the genomes of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and produce partially complementary transcripts. We used published genome and transcriptome sequence data and found that over 20% of genes (645 pairs in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome are arranged in convergent pairs with overlapping 3'-UTRs. Using published microarray transcriptome data from the standard laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae, our analysis revealed that expression levels of convergent pairs are significantly negatively correlated across a broad range of environments. This implies an important role for convergent genes in the regulation of gene expression, which may compensate for the absence of RNA-dependent mechanisms such as micro RNAs in budding yeast. We selected four representative convergent gene pairs and used expression assays in wild type yeast and its genetically modified strains to explore the underlying patterns of gene expression. Results showed that convergent genes are reciprocally regulated in yeast populations and in single cells, whereby an increase in expression of one gene produces a decrease in the expression of the other, and vice-versa. Time course analysis of the cell cycle illustrated the functional significance of this relationship for the three pairs with relevant functional roles. Furthermore, a series of genetic modifications revealed that the 3'-UTR sequence plays an essential causal role in mediating transcriptional interference, which requires neither the sequence of the open reading frame nor the translation of fully functional proteins. More importantly, transcriptional interference persisted even when one of the convergent genes was expressed ectopically (in trans and therefore does not depend on the cis arrangement of convergent genes; we conclude that the mechanism of transcriptional interference cannot be explained by the

  4. ISOLATION OF THE CANDIDA TROPICALIS GENE FOR P450 LANOSTEROL DEMETHYLASE AND ITS EXPRESSION IN SACCAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have isolated the gene for cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14-demethylase (14DM) from the yeast Candida tropicalis. This was accomplished by screening genomic libraries of strain ATCC750 in E. coli using a DNA fragment containing the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 14DM gene. Identi...

  5. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ICL2 Gene Encodes a Mitochondrial 2-Methylisocitrate Lyase Involved in Propionyl-Coenzyme A Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttik, Marijke A.H.; Kötter, Peter; Salomons, Florian A.; Klei, Ida J. van der; Dijken, Johannes P. van; Pronk, Jack T.

    2000-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ICL1 gene encodes isocitrate lyase, an essential enzyme for growth on ethanol and acetate. Previous studies have demonstrated that the highly homologous ICL2 gene (YPR006c) is transcribed during the growth of wild-type cells on ethanol. However, even when multiple copies

  6. The Phenotypic Plasticity of Duplicated Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the Origin of Adaptations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Mattenberger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene and genome duplication are the major sources of biological innovations in plants and animals. Functional and transcriptional divergence between the copies after gene duplication has been considered the main driver of innovations . However, here we show that increased phenotypic plasticity after duplication plays a more major role than thought before in the origin of adaptations. We perform an exhaustive analysis of the transcriptional alterations of duplicated genes in the unicellular eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae when challenged with five different environmental stresses. Analysis of the transcriptomes of yeast shows that gene duplication increases the transcriptional response to environmental changes, with duplicated genes exhibiting signatures of adaptive transcriptional patterns in response to stress. The mechanism of duplication matters, with whole-genome duplicates being more transcriptionally altered than small-scale duplicates. The predominant transcriptional pattern follows the classic theory of evolution by gene duplication; with one gene copy remaining unaltered under stress, while its sister copy presents large transcriptional plasticity and a prominent role in adaptation. Moreover, we find additional transcriptional profiles that are suggestive of neo- and subfunctionalization of duplicate gene copies. These patterns are strongly correlated with the functional dependencies and sequence divergence profiles of gene copies. We show that, unlike singletons, duplicates respond more specifically to stress, supporting the role of natural selection in the transcriptional plasticity of duplicates. Our results reveal the underlying transcriptional complexity of duplicated genes and its role in the origin of adaptations.

  7. Population genetic variation in gene expression is associated withphenotypic variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fay, Justin C.; McCullough, Heather L.; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-02-25

    The relationship between genetic variation in gene expression and phenotypic variation observable in nature is not well understood. Identifying how many phenotypes are associated with differences in gene expression and how many gene-expression differences are associated with a phenotype is important to understanding the molecular basis and evolution of complex traits. Results: We compared levels of gene expression among nine natural isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown either in the presence or absence of copper sulfate. Of the nine strains, two show a reduced growth rate and two others are rust colored in the presence of copper sulfate. We identified 633 genes that show significant differences in expression among strains. Of these genes,20 were correlated with resistance to copper sulfate and 24 were correlated with rust coloration. The function of these genes in combination with their expression pattern suggests the presence of both correlative and causative expression differences. But the majority of differentially expressed genes were not correlated with either phenotype and showed the same expression pattern both in the presence and absence of copper sulfate. To determine whether these expression differences may contribute to phenotypic variation under other environmental conditions, we examined one phenotype, freeze tolerance, predicted by the differential expression of the aquaporin gene AQY2. We found freeze tolerance is associated with the expression of AQY2. Conclusions: Gene expression differences provide substantial insight into the molecular basis of naturally occurring traits and can be used to predict environment dependent phenotypic variation.

  8. Design and engineering of intracellular-metabolite-sensing/regulation gene circuits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Li, Sijin; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    The development of high-throughput phenotyping tools is lagging far behind the rapid advances of genotype generation methods. To bridge this gap, we report a new strategy for design, construction, and fine-tuning of intracellular-metabolite-sensing/regulation gene circuits by repurposing bacterial transcription factors and eukaryotic promoters. As proof of concept, we systematically investigated the design and engineering of bacterial repressor-based xylose-sensing/regulation gene circuits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrated that numerous properties, such as induction ratio and dose-response curve, can be fine-tuned at three different nodes, including repressor expression level, operator position, and operator sequence. By applying these gene circuits, we developed a cell sorting based, rapid and robust high-throughput screening method for xylose transporter engineering and obtained a sugar transporter HXT14 mutant with 6.5-fold improvement in xylose transportation capacity. This strategy should be generally applicable and highly useful for evolutionary engineering of proteins, pathways, and genomes in S. cerevisiae.

  9. [The cloning and expression of the gene for beta-galactosidase from Candida pseudotropicalis yeasts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretiak, K A; Zakal'skiĭ, A E; Gudz', S P

    1998-01-01

    The gene of beta-galactosidase of lactose-assimilating yeast Candida pseudotropicalis was cloned in pG2 and pBG2-3 hybrid shuttle vectors and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains under the control of own promoter. The plasmids were able to replicate autonomously with relative stability in transformants of baker's yeasts. The availability of glucose or lactose in the medium influenced the recombinant plasmid stability and the expression of the cloned gene. A number of experiments have shown that the LAC+ phenotype in pG2-transformed Saccharomyces cerevisiae was due to the expression of the Candida pseudotropicalis lactose permease gene that is probably located in SaIG1/XhoI DNA fragment about 4.3 kb long. Southern hybridization experiments showed that LAC(+)-transformants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contained both autonomously-replicative, and integrative pG2 plasmid.

  10. Transcription factor control of growth rate dependent genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A three factor design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazio, Alessandro; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Characterization of cellular growth is central to understanding living systems. Here, we applied a three-factor design to study the relationship between specific growth rate and genome-wide gene expression in 36 steady-state chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The three...... factors we considered were specific growth rate, nutrient limitation, and oxygen availability. Results: We identified 268 growth rate dependent genes, independent of nutrient limitation and oxygen availability. The transcriptional response was used to identify key areas in metabolism around which m...... transcription factor target sets, transcription factors that coordinate balanced growth were also identified. Our analysis shows that FhII, Rap1, and Sfp1, regulating protein biosynthesis, have significantly enriched target sets for genes up-regulated with increasing growth rate. Cell cycle regulators...

  11. Introduction and expression of genes for metabolic engineering applications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Nancy A; Srikrishnan, Sneha

    2012-03-01

    Metabolic pathway engineering in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to improved production of a wide range of compounds, ranging from ethanol (from biomass) to natural products such as sesquiterpenes. The introduction of multienzyme pathways requires precise control over the level and timing of expression of the associated genes. Gene number and promoter strength/regulation are two critical control points, and multiple studies have focused on modulating these in yeast. This MiniReview focuses on methods for introducing genes and controlling their copy number and on the many promoters (both constitutive and inducible) that have been successfully employed. The advantages and disadvantages of the methods will be presented, and applications to pathway engineering will be highlighted.

  12. PRS1 is a key member of the gene family encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Andrew T.; Beiche, Flora; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne;

    1997-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the metabolite phosphoribosyl-pyrophosphate (PRPP) is required for purine, pyrimidine, tryptophan and histidine biosynthesis. Enzymes that can synthesize PRPP can be encoded by at least four genes. We have studied 5-phospho-ribosyl-1(α)-pyrophosphate synthetases (PRS......) genetically and biochemically. Each of the four genes, all of which are transcribed, has been disrupted in haploid yeast strains of each mating type and although all disruptants are able to grow on complete medium, differences in growth rate and enzyme activity suggest that disruption of PRS1 or PRS3 has...... a significant effect on cell metabolism, whereas disruption of PRS2 or PRS4 has little measurable effect. Using Western blot analysis with antisera raised against peptides derived from the non-homology region (NHR) and the N-terminal half of the PRS1 gene product it has been shown that the NHR is not removed...

  13. Loss of lager specific genes and subtelomeric regions define two different Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineages for Saccharomyces pastorianus Group I and II strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monerawela, Chandre; James, Tharappel C; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Bond, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Lager yeasts, Saccharomyces pastorianus, are interspecies hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus and are classified into Group I and Group II clades. The genome of the Group II strain, Weihenstephan 34/70, contains eight so-called 'lager-specific' genes that are located in subtelomeric regions. We evaluated the origins of these genes through bioinformatic and PCR analyses of Saccharomyces genomes. We determined that four are of cerevisiae origin while four originate from S. eubayanus. The Group I yeasts contain all four S. eubayanus genes but individual strains contain only a subset of the cerevisiae genes. We identified S. cerevisiae strains that contain all four cerevisiae 'lager-specific' genes, and distinct patterns of loss of these genes in other strains. Analysis of the subtelomeric regions uncovered patterns of loss in different S. cerevisiae strains. We identify two classes of S. cerevisiae strains: ale yeasts (Foster O) and stout yeasts with patterns of 'lager-specific' genes and subtelomeric regions identical to Group I and II S. pastorianus yeasts, respectively. These findings lead us to propose that Group I and II S. pastorianus strains originate from separate hybridization events involving different S. cerevisiae lineages. Using the combined bioinformatic and PCR data, we describe a potential classification map for industrial yeasts.

  14. High-level production of beta-carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by successive transformation with carotenogenic genes from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwaal, René; Wang, Jing; Meijnen, Jean-Paul; Visser, Hans; Sandmann, Gerhard; van den Berg, Johan A; van Ooyen, Albert J J

    2007-07-01

    To determine whether Saccharomyces cerevisiae can serve as a host for efficient carotenoid and especially beta-carotene production, carotenogenic genes from the carotenoid-producing yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous were introduced and overexpressed in S. cerevisiae. Because overexpression of these genes from an episomal expression vector resulted in unstable strains, the genes were integrated into genomic DNA to yield stable, carotenoid-producing S. cerevisiae cells. Furthermore, carotenoid production levels were higher in strains containing integrated carotenogenic genes. Overexpression of crtYB (which encodes a bifunctional phytoene synthase and lycopene cyclase) and crtI (phytoene desaturase) from X. dendrorhous was sufficient to enable carotenoid production. Carotenoid production levels were increased by additional overexpression of a homologous geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) synthase from S. cerevisiae that is encoded by BTS1. Combined overexpression of crtE (heterologous GGPP synthase) from X. dendrorhous with crtYB and crtI and introduction of an additional copy of a truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase gene (tHMG1) into carotenoid-producing cells resulted in a successive increase in carotenoid production levels. The strains mentioned produced high levels of intermediates of the carotenogenic pathway and comparable low levels of the preferred end product beta-carotene, as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. We finally succeeded in constructing an S. cerevisiae strain capable of producing high levels of beta-carotene, up to 5.9 mg/g (dry weight), which was accomplished by the introduction of an additional copy of crtI and tHMG1 into carotenoid-producing yeast cells. This transformant is promising for further development toward the biotechnological production of beta-carotene by S. cerevisiae.

  15. Changes of trehalose content and expression of relative genes during the bioethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chenfeng; Wang, Fenglian; Dong, Shijun; Li, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally, trehalose is considered as a protectant to improve the ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, to clarify the changes and roles of trehalose during the bioethanol fermentation, trehalose content and expression of related genes at lag, exponential, and stationary phases (i.e., 2, 8, and 16 h of batch fermentation process) were determined. Although yeast cells at exponential and stationary phase had higher trehalose content than cells at lag phase (P 0.05). Moreover, expression of the trehalose degradation-related genes NTH1 and NTH2 decreased at exponential phase in comparison with that at lag phase; compared with cells at lag phase, cells at stationary phase had higher expression of TPS1, ATH1, NTH1, and NTH2 but lower expression of TPS2. During the lag-exponential phase transition, downregulation of NTH1 and NTH2 promoted accumulation of trehalose, and to some extent, trehalose might confer ethanol tolerance to S. cerevisiae before stationary phase. During the exponential-stationary phase transition, upregulation of TPS1 contributed to accumulation of trehalose, and Tps1 protein might be indispensable in yeast cells to withstand ethanol stress at the stationary phase. Moreover, trehalose would be degraded to supply carbon source at stationary phase.

  16. Altered Phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Heterologous Expression of Basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa SOD2 Gene

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    Sônia C. Melo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Heterologous expression of a putative manganese superoxide dismutase gene (SOD2 of the basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa complemented the phenotypes of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae sod2Δ mutant. Sequence analysis of the cloned M. perniciosa cDNA revealed an open reading frame (ORF coding for a 176 amino acid polypeptide with the typical metal-binding motifs of a SOD2 gene, named MpSOD2. Phylogenetic comparison with known manganese superoxide dismutases (MnSODs located the protein of M. perniciosa (MpSod2p in a clade with the basidiomycete fungi Coprinopsis cinerea and Laccaria bicolor. Haploid wild-type yeast transformants containing a single copy of MpSOD2 showed increased resistance phenotypes against oxidative stress-inducing hydrogen peroxide and paraquat, but had unaltered phenotype against ultraviolet–C (UVC radiation. The same transformants exhibited high sensitivity against treatment with the pro-mutagen diethylnitrosamine (DEN that requires oxidation to become an active mutagen/carcinogen. Absence of MpSOD2 in the yeast sod2Δ mutant led to DEN hyper-resistance while introduction of a single copy of this gene restored the yeast wild-type phenotype. The haploid yeast wild-type transformant containing two SOD2 gene copies, one from M. perniciosa and one from its own, exhibited DEN super-sensitivity. This transformant also showed enhanced growth at 37 °C on the non-fermentable carbon source lactate, indicating functional expression of MpSod2p. The pro-mutagen dihydroethidium (DHE-based fluorescence assay monitored basal level of yeast cell oxidative stress. Compared to the wild type, the yeast sod2Δ mutant had a much higher level of intrinsic oxidative stress, which was reduced to wild type (WT level by introduction of one copy of the MpSOD2 gene. Taken together our data indicates functional expression of MpSod2 protein in the yeast S. cerevisiae.

  17. Expression variability of co-regulated genes differentiates Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

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    Schuller Dorit

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast is found in diverse ecological niches and is characterized by high adaptive potential under challenging environments. In spite of recent advances on the study of yeast genome diversity, little is known about the underlying gene expression plasticity. In order to shed new light onto this biological question, we have compared transcriptome profiles of five environmental isolates, clinical and laboratorial strains at different time points of fermentation in synthetic must medium, during exponential and stationary growth phases. Results Our data unveiled diversity in both intensity and timing of gene expression. Genes involved in glucose metabolism and in the stress response elicited during fermentation were among the most variable. This gene expression diversity increased at the onset of stationary phase (diauxic shift. Environmental isolates showed lower average transcript abundance of genes involved in the stress response, assimilation of nitrogen and vitamins, and sulphur metabolism, than other strains. Nitrogen metabolism genes showed significant variation in expression among the environmental isolates. Conclusions Wild type yeast strains respond differentially to the stress imposed by nutrient depletion, ethanol accumulation and cell density increase, during fermentation of glucose in synthetic must medium. Our results support previous data showing that gene expression variability is a source of phenotypic diversity among closely related organisms.

  18. Genome-wide gene expression of a natural hybrid between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii under enological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combina, Mariana; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Tronchoni, Jordi; Belloch, Carmela; Querol, Amparo

    2012-07-16

    The species Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a predominant role in the wine making process. However, other species have been associated with must fermentation, such as Saccharomyces uvarum (Saccharomyces bayanus var. uvarum) or Saccharomyces paradoxus. Recently, yeast hybrids of different Saccharomyces species have also been reported as responsible for wine production. Yeast hybrids between the species S. cerevisiae×S. kudriavzevii isolated in wine fermentations show enhanced performance in low temperature enological conditions and increased production of interesting aroma compounds. In this work, we have studied the transcriptomic response in enological conditions of a S. cerevisiae×S. kudriavzevii hybrid strain and compared it with the reference species of S. cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii. The results show that the hybrid strain presents an up-regulation of genes belonging to functional group translation and amino-acid metabolism. Moreover, key genes related to cold stress and production of glycerol and aroma compounds were also up-regulated. While some genes inherited regulation patterns from one of the parents, most of the up-regulated genes presented a new gene expression pattern, probably generated during the hybridization and adaptation process.

  19. GAL promoter-driven heterologous gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δ strain at anaerobic alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jungoh; Park, Kyung-Min; Lee, Hongweon; Son, Yeo-Jin; Choi, Eui-Sung

    2013-02-01

    The removal of Gal80 protein by gene disruption turned into efficient GAL promoter-driven heterologous gene expression under anaerobic alcoholic fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using lipase B from Candida antarctica as a reporter, the relative strength of GAL10 promoter (P(GAL10) ) in Δgal80 mutant that does not require galactose as an inducer was compared to those of ADH1, PDC1, and PGK promoters, which have been known to work well anaerobically in actively fermenting yeast cells under high glucose concentration. P(GAL10) in the Δgal80 mutant showed 0.8-fold (ADH1), fourfold (PDC1), and 50-fold (PGK) in promoter strength.

  20. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of genes in valine metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiao; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Borodina, Irina;

    2011-01-01

    of its relative tolerance to alcohols, robustness in industrial fermentations, and the possibility for future combination of isobutanol production with fermentation of lignocellulosic materials. RESULTS: The yield of isobutanol was improved from 0.16 to 0.97 mg per g glucose by simultaneous...... overexpression of biosynthetic genes ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 in valine metabolism in anaerobic fermentation of glucose in mineral medium in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol yield was further improved by twofold by the additional overexpression of BAT2, encoding the cytoplasmic branched-chain amino-acid aminotransferase...... were 3.86 and 0.28 mg per g glucose, respectively. They increased to 4.12 and 2.4 mg per g glucose in yeast extract/peptone/dextrose (YPD) complex medium under aerobic conditions, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Overexpression of genes ILV2, ILV3, ILV5, and BAT2 in valine metabolism led to an increase...

  1. Time-Course Analysis of Gene Expression During the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hypoxic Response

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    Nasrine Bendjilali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many cells experience hypoxia, or low oxygen, and respond by dramatically altering gene expression. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, genes that respond are required for many oxygen-dependent cellular processes, such as respiration, biosynthesis, and redox regulation. To more fully characterize the global response to hypoxia, we exposed yeast to hypoxic conditions, extracted RNA at different times, and performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq analysis. Time-course statistical analysis revealed hundreds of genes that changed expression by up to 550-fold. The genes responded with varying kinetics suggesting that multiple regulatory pathways are involved. We identified most known oxygen-regulated genes and also uncovered new regulated genes. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR analysis confirmed that the lysine methyltransferase EFM6 and the recombinase DMC1, both conserved in humans, are indeed oxygen-responsive. Looking more broadly, oxygen-regulated genes participate in expected processes like respiration and lipid metabolism, but also in unexpected processes like amino acid and vitamin metabolism. Using principle component analysis, we discovered that the hypoxic response largely occurs during the first 2 hr and then a new steady-state expression state is achieved. Moreover, we show that the oxygen-dependent genes are not part of the previously described environmental stress response (ESR consisting of genes that respond to diverse types of stress. While hypoxia appears to cause a transient stress, the hypoxic response is mostly characterized by a transition to a new state of gene expression. In summary, our results reveal that hypoxia causes widespread and complex changes in gene expression to prepare the cell to function with little or no oxygen.

  2. Repression of nitrogen catabolic genes by ammonia and glutamine in nitrogen-limited continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Vermeulen, E E; Kalhorn, J W; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1998-01-01

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ammonia and glutamine decreases the expression of many nitrogen catabolic genes to low levels. To discriminate between ammonia- and glutamine-driven repression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1, a gln1-37 mutant was used. This mutant is not able to convert ammonia in

  3. DISRUPTION OF THE SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE GENE FOR NADPH-CYTOCHROME P450-REDUCTASE CAUSES INCREASED SENSITIVITY TO KETOCONAZOLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae deleted in the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase gene by transplacement are 200-fold more sensitive to ketoconazole, an inhibitor of the cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14-demethylase. Resistance is restored through complementation by the plasmid-born...

  4. Integrated Expression of the Oenococcus oeni mleA Gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan-lin; LI Hua

    2009-01-01

    Malolactic enzyme is the function enzyme which catalyses the reaction for L-malate converting to L-lactic during malolactic fermentation (MLF). In this paper, researches concerning the malolactic enzyme gene mleA cloned from a patent strain Oenococcus oeni SD-2a screened in Chinese wine and integrated expressing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were performed in order to carry out both alcoholic fermentation (AF) and malolactic fermentation (MLF) during winemaking, with a view to achieving a better control of MLF in enology. To construct the expression plasmid named pYILmleA, cloned mleA gene, PGKI promoter, and ADHl terminator were ligated and inserted into integrating vector YIpS. Yeast transformants were screened on SD/-Ura and identified by auxotrophic test, mating type test, and colony PCR. Target protein was detected by SDS-PAGE and the targeted gene integrated to the chromosome was detected by dot bloting hybridization. After the transformant was cultured in SD/-Ura adding glucose (10%) and L-malate (5 648 mg L-1) for 4 d, the culture supematant was collected and L-malate and L-lactic acid contents were detected by HPLC. 1 278-1 312 mg L-1 L-lactic acids were detected, while the comparative drop rates of L-malate were 20.18-20.85%. L-malate and L-lactic contents of the transformants showed extra significant difference and significant difference with the control ones by t-test respectively. The result indicated that the functional expression was achieved in recombinants S. cerevisiae.

  5. Identification of Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that Are Haploinsufficient for Overcoming Amino Acid Starvation

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    Nancy S. Bae

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to amino acid deprivation by activating a pathway conserved in eukaryotes to overcome the starvation stress. We have screened the entire yeast heterozygous deletion collection to identify strains haploinsufficient for growth in the presence of sulfometuron methyl, which causes starvation for isoleucine and valine. We have discovered that cells devoid of MET15 are sensitive to sulfometuron methyl, and loss of heterozygosity at the MET15 locus can complicate screening the heterozygous deletion collection. We identified 138 cases of loss of heterozygosity in this screen. After eliminating the issues of the MET15 loss of heterozygosity, strains isolated from the collection were retested on sulfometuron methyl. To determine the general effect of the mutations for a starvation response, SMM-sensitive strains were tested for the ability to grow in the presence of canavanine, which induces arginine starvation, and strains that were MET15 were also tested for growth in the presence of ethionine, which causes methionine starvation. Many of the genes identified in our study were not previously identified as starvation-responsive genes, including a number of essential genes that are not easily screened in a systematic way. The genes identified span a broad range of biological functions, including many involved in some level of gene expression. Several unnamed proteins have also been identified, giving a clue as to possible functions of the encoded proteins.

  6. PKA-chromatin association at stress responsive target genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccarini, Leticia; Martínez-Montañés, Fernando; Rossi, Silvia; Proft, Markus; Portela, Paula

    2015-11-01

    Gene expression regulation by intracellular stimulus-activated protein kinases is essential for cell adaptation to environmental changes. There are three PKA catalytic subunits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Tpk1, Tpk2, and Tpk3 and one regulatory subunit: Bcy1. Previously, it has been demonstrated that Tpk1 and Tpk2 are associated with coding regions and promoters of target genes in a carbon source and oxidative stress dependent manner. Here we studied five genes, ALD6, SED1, HSP42, RPS29B, and RPL1B whose expression is regulated by saline stress. We found that PKA catalytic and regulatory subunits are associated with both coding regions and promoters of the analyzed genes in a stress dependent manner. Tpk1 and Tpk2 recruitment was completely abolished in catalytic inactive mutants. BCY1 deletion changed the binding kinetic to chromatin of each Tpk isoform and this strain displayed a deregulated gene expression in response to osmotic stress. In addition, yeast mutants with high PKA activity exhibit sustained association to target genes of chromatin-remodeling complexes such as Snf2-catalytic subunit of the SWI/SNF complex and Arp8-component of INO80 complex, leading to upregulation of gene expression during osmotic stress. Tpk1 accumulation in the nucleus was stimulated upon osmotic stress, while the nuclear localization of Tpk2 and Bcy1 showed no change. We found that each PKA subunit is transported into the nucleus by a different β-karyopherin pathway. Moreover, β-karyopherin mutant strains abolished the chromatin association of Tpk1 or Tpk2, suggesting that nuclear localization of PKA catalytic subunits is required for its association to target genes and properly gene expression.

  7. Improved Acetic Acid Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Overexpression of the WHI2 Gene Identified through Inverse Metabolic Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingying; Stabryla, Lisa; Wei, Na

    2016-01-29

    Development of acetic acid-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for economically viable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, but the goal remains a critical challenge due to limited information on effective genetic perturbation targets for improving acetic acid resistance in the yeast. This study employed a genomic-library-based inverse metabolic engineering approach to successfully identify a novel gene target, WHI2 (encoding a cytoplasmatic globular scaffold protein), which elicited improved acetic acid resistance in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of WHI2 significantly improved glucose and/or xylose fermentation under acetic acid stress in engineered yeast. The WHI2-overexpressing strain had 5-times-higher specific ethanol productivity than the control in glucose fermentation with acetic acid. Analysis of the expression of WHI2 gene products (including protein and transcript) determined that acetic acid induced endogenous expression of Whi2 in S. cerevisiae. Meanwhile, the whi2Δ mutant strain had substantially higher susceptibility to acetic acid than the wild type, suggesting the important role of Whi2 in the acetic acid response in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, overexpression of WHI2 and of a cognate phosphatase gene, PSR1, had a synergistic effect in improving acetic acid resistance, suggesting that Whi2 might function in combination with Psr1 to elicit the acetic acid resistance mechanism. These results improve our understanding of the yeast response to acetic acid stress and provide a new strategy to breed acetic acid-resistant yeast strains for renewable biofuel production.

  8. Local synteny and codon usage contribute to asymmetric sequence divergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene duplicates

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    Bergthorsson Ulfar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duplicated genes frequently experience asymmetric rates of sequence evolution. Relaxed selective constraints and positive selection have both been invoked to explain the observation that one paralog within a gene-duplicate pair exhibits an accelerated rate of sequence evolution. In the majority of studies where asymmetric divergence has been established, there is no indication as to which gene copy, ancestral or derived, is evolving more rapidly. In this study we investigated the effect of local synteny (gene-neighborhood conservation and codon usage on the sequence evolution of gene duplicates in the S. cerevisiae genome. We further distinguish the gene duplicates into those that originated from a whole-genome duplication (WGD event (ohnologs versus small-scale duplications (SSD to determine if there exist any differences in their patterns of sequence evolution. Results For SSD pairs, the derived copy evolves faster than the ancestral copy. However, there is no relationship between rate asymmetry and synteny conservation (ancestral-like versus derived-like in ohnologs. mRNA abundance and optimal codon usage as measured by the CAI is lower in the derived SSD copies relative to ancestral paralogs. Moreover, in the case of ohnologs, the faster-evolving copy has lower CAI and lowered expression. Conclusions Together, these results suggest that relaxation of selection for codon usage and gene expression contribute to rate asymmetry in the evolution of duplicated genes and that in SSD pairs, the relaxation of selection stems from the loss of ancestral regulatory information in the derived copy.

  9. Saccharomyces cerevisiae FLO1 Gene Demonstrates Genetic Linkage to Increased Fermentation Rate at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deed, Rebecca C.; Fedrizzi, Bruno; Gardner, Richard C.

    2017-01-01

    Low fermentation temperatures are of importance to food and beverage industries working with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, the identification of genes demonstrating a positive impact on fermentation kinetics is of significant interest. A set of 121 mapped F1 progeny, derived from a cross between haploid strains BY4716 (a derivative of the laboratory yeast S288C) and wine yeast RM11-1a, were fermented in New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc grape juice at 12.5°. Analyses of five key fermentation kinetic parameters among the F1 progeny identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome I with a significant degree of linkage to maximal fermentation rate (Vmax) at low temperature. Independent deletions of two candidate genes within the region, FLO1 and SWH1, were constructed in the parental strains (with S288C representing BY4716). Fermentation of wild-type and deletion strains at 12.5 and 25° confirmed that the genetic linkage to Vmax corresponds to the S288C version of the FLO1 allele, as the absence of this allele reduced Vmax by ∼50% at 12.5°, but not at 25°. Reciprocal hemizygosity analysis (RHA) between S288C and RM11-1a FLO1 alleles did not confirm the prediction that the S288C version of FLO1 was promoting more rapid fermentation in the opposing strain background, suggesting that the positive effect on Vmax derived from S288C FLO1 may only provide an advantage in haploids, or is dependent on strain-specific cis or trans effects. This research adds to the growing body of evidence demonstrating the role of FLO1 in providing stress tolerance to S. cerevisiae during fermentation. PMID:28143947

  10. Poly purine.pyrimidine sequences upstream of the beta-galactosidase gene affect gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Brahmachari Samir K

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poly purine.pyrimidine sequences have the potential to adopt intramolecular triplex structures and are overrepresented upstream of genes in eukaryotes. These sequences may regulate gene expression by modulating the interaction of transcription factors with DNA sequences upstream of genes. Results A poly purine.pyrimidine sequence with the potential to adopt an intramolecular triplex DNA structure was designed. The sequence was inserted within a nucleosome positioned upstream of the β-galactosidase gene in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, between the cycl promoter and gal 10Upstream Activating Sequences (UASg. Upon derepression with galactose, β-galactosidase gene expression is reduced 12-fold in cells carrying single copy poly purine.pyrimidine sequences. This reduction in expression is correlated with reduced transcription. Furthermore, we show that plasmids carrying a poly purine.pyrimidine sequence are not specifically lost from yeast cells. Conclusion We propose that a poly purine.pyrimidine sequence upstream of a gene affects transcription. Plasmids carrying this sequence are not specifically lost from cells and thus no additional effort is needed for the replication of these sequences in eukaryotic cells.

  11. Multiple GCD genes required for repression of GCN4, a transcriptional activator of amino acid biosynthetic genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harashima, S; Hinnebusch, A G

    1986-11-01

    GCN4 encodes a positive regulator of multiple unlinked genes encoding amino acid biosynthetic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of GCN4 is coupled to amino acid availability by a control mechanism involving GCD1 as a negative effector and GCN1, GCN2, and GCN3 as positive effectors of GCN4 expression. We used reversion of a gcn2 gcn3 double mutation to isolate new alleles of GCD1 and mutations in four additional GCD genes which we designate GCD10, GCD11, GCD12, and GCD13. All of the mutations lead to constitutive derepression of HIS4 transcription in the absence of the GCN2+ and GCN3+ alleles. By contrast, the gcd mutations require the wild-type GCN4 allele for their derepressing effect, suggesting that each acts by influencing the level of GCN4 activity in the cell. Consistent with this interpretation, mutations in each GCD gene lead to constitutive derepression of a GCN4::lacZ gene fusion. Thus, at least five gene products are required to maintain the normal repressed level of GCN4 expression in nonstarvation conditions. Interestingly, the gcd mutations are pleiotropic and also affect growth rate in nonstarvation conditions. In addition, certain alleles lead to a loss of M double-stranded RNA required for the killer phenotype. This pleiotropy suggests that the GCD gene products contribute to an essential cellular function, in addition to, or in conjunction with, their role in GCN4 regulation.

  12. Bulk segregant analysis by high-throughput sequencing reveals a novel xylose utilization gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Jared W Wenger

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation of xylose is a fundamental requirement for the efficient production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass sources. Although they aggressively ferment hexoses, it has long been thought that native Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains cannot grow fermentatively or non-fermentatively on xylose. Population surveys have uncovered a few naturally occurring strains that are weakly xylose-positive, and some S. cerevisiae have been genetically engineered to ferment xylose, but no strain, either natural or engineered, has yet been reported to ferment xylose as efficiently as glucose. Here, we used a medium-throughput screen to identify Saccharomyces strains that can increase in optical density when xylose is presented as the sole carbon source. We identified 38 strains that have this xylose utilization phenotype, including strains of S. cerevisiae, other sensu stricto members, and hybrids between them. All the S. cerevisiae xylose-utilizing strains we identified are wine yeasts, and for those that could produce meiotic progeny, the xylose phenotype segregates as a single gene trait. We mapped this gene by Bulk Segregant Analysis (BSA using tiling microarrays and high-throughput sequencing. The gene is a putative xylitol dehydrogenase, which we name XDH1, and is located in the subtelomeric region of the right end of chromosome XV in a region not present in the S288c reference genome. We further characterized the xylose phenotype by performing gene expression microarrays and by genetically dissecting the endogenous Saccharomyces xylose pathway. We have demonstrated that natural S. cerevisiae yeasts are capable of utilizing xylose as the sole carbon source, characterized the genetic basis for this trait as well as the endogenous xylose utilization pathway, and demonstrated the feasibility of BSA using high-throughput sequencing.

  13. Quantitative transcription dynamic analysis reveals candidate genes and key regulators for ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Ma Menggen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Derived from our lignocellulosic conversion inhibitor-tolerant yeast, we generated an ethanol-tolerant strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-50316 by enforced evolutionary adaptation. Using a newly developed robust mRNA reference and a master equation unifying gene expression data analyses, we investigated comparative quantitative transcription dynamics of 175 genes selected from previous studies for an ethanol-tolerant yeast and its closely related parental strain. Results A highly fitted master equation was established and applied for quantitative gene expression analyses using pathway-based qRT-PCR array assays. The ethanol-tolerant Y-50316 displayed significantly enriched background of mRNA abundance for at least 35 genes without ethanol challenge compared with its parental strain Y-50049. Under the ethanol challenge, the tolerant Y-50316 responded in consistent expressions over time for numerous genes belonging to groups of heat shock proteins, trehalose metabolism, glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, pleiotropic drug resistance gene family and transcription factors. The parental strain showed repressed expressions for many genes and was unable to withstand the ethanol stress and establish a viable culture and fermentation. The distinct expression dynamics between the two strains and their close association with cell growth, viability and ethanol fermentation profiles distinguished the tolerance-response from the stress-response in yeast under the ethanol challenge. At least 82 genes were identified as candidate and key genes for ethanol-tolerance and subsequent fermentation under the stress. Among which, 36 genes were newly recognized by the present study. Most of the ethanol-tolerance candidate genes were found to share protein binding motifs of transcription factors Msn4p/Msn2p, Yap1p, Hsf1p and Pdr1p/Pdr3p. Conclusion Enriched background of transcription abundance

  14. EasyClone 2.0: expanded toolkit of integrative vectors for stable gene expression in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovicek, Vratislav; Borja, Gheorghe M; Forster, Jochen; Borodina, Irina

    2015-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the key cell factories for production of chemicals and active pharmaceuticals. For large-scale fermentations, particularly in biorefinery applications, it is desirable to use stress-tolerant industrial strains. However, such strains are less amenable for metabolic engineering than the standard laboratory strains. To enable easy delivery and overexpression of genes in a wide range of industrial S. cerevisiae strains, we constructed a set of integrative vectors with long homology arms and dominant selection markers. The vectors integrate into previously validated chromosomal locations via double cross-over and result in homogenous stable expression of the integrated genes, as shown for several unrelated industrial strains. Cre-mediated marker rescue is possible for removing markers positioned on different chromosomes. To demonstrate the applicability of the presented vector set for metabolic engineering of industrial yeast, we constructed xylose-utilizing strains overexpressing xylose isomerase, xylose transporter and five genes of the pentose phosphate pathway.

  15. An improved, bias-reduced probabilistic functional gene network of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insuk Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Probabilistic functional gene networks are powerful theoretical frameworks for integrating heterogeneous functional genomics and proteomics data into objective models of cellular systems. Such networks provide syntheses of millions of discrete experimental observations, spanning DNA microarray experiments, physical protein interactions, genetic interactions, and comparative genomics; the resulting networks can then be easily applied to generate testable hypotheses regarding specific gene functions and associations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report a significantly improved version (v. 2 of a probabilistic functional gene network of the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We describe our optimization methods and illustrate their effects in three major areas: the reduction of functional bias in network training reference sets, the application of a probabilistic model for calculating confidences in pair-wise protein physical or genetic interactions, and the introduction of simple thresholds that eliminate many false positive mRNA co-expression relationships. Using the network, we predict and experimentally verify the function of the yeast RNA binding protein Puf6 in 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: YeastNet v. 2, constructed using these optimizations together with additional data, shows significant reduction in bias and improvements in precision and recall, in total covering 102,803 linkages among 5,483 yeast proteins (95% of the validated proteome. YeastNet is available from http://www.yeastnet.org.

  16. Efficient production of lycopene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by expression of synthetic crt genes from a plasmid harboring the ADH2 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahieldin, Ahmed; Gadalla, Nour O; Al-Garni, Saleh M; Almehdar, Hussein; Noor, Samah; Hassan, Sabah M; Shokry, Ahmed M; Sabir, Jamal S M; Murata, Norio

    2014-03-01

    Lycopene is an effective antioxidant proposed as a possible treatment for some cancers and other degenerative human conditions. This study aims at generation of a yeast strain (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) of efficient productivity of lycopene by overexpressing synthetic genes derived from crtE, crtB and crtI genes of Erwinia uredovora. These synthetic genes were constructed in accordance with the preferred codon usage in S. cerevisiae but with no changes in amino acid sequences of the gene products. S. cerevisiae cells were transformed with these synthetic crt genes, whose expression was regulated by the ADH2 promoter, which is de-repressed upon glucose depletion. The RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses indicated that the synthetic crt genes were efficiently transcribed and translated in crt-transformed S. cerevisiae cells. The highest level of lycopene in one of the transformed lines was 3.3mglycopene/g dry cell weight, which is higher than the previously reported levels of lycopene in other microorganisms transformed with the three genes. These results suggest the excellence of using the synthetic crt genes and the ADH2 promoter in generation of recombinant S. cerevisiae that produces a high level of lycopene. The level of ergosterol was reversely correlated to that of lycopene in crt-transformed S. cerevisiae cells, suggesting that two pathways for lycopene and ergosterol syntheses compete for the use of farnesyl diphosphate.

  17. Unconventional genomic architecture in the budding yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae masks the nested antisense gene NAG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Dobry, Craig J; Krysan, Damian J; Kumar, Anuj

    2008-08-01

    The genomic architecture of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is typical of other eukaryotes in that genes are spatially organized into discrete and nonoverlapping units. Inherent in this organizational model is the assumption that protein-coding sequences do not overlap completely. Here, we present evidence to the contrary, defining a previously overlooked yeast gene, NAG1 (for nested antisense gene) nested entirely within the coding sequence of the YGR031W open reading frame in an antisense orientation on the opposite strand. NAG1 encodes a 19-kDa protein, detected by Western blotting of hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged Nag1p with anti-HA antibodies and by beta-galactosidase analysis of a NAG1-lacZ fusion. NAG1 is evolutionarily conserved as a unit with YGR031W in bacteria and fungi. Unlike the YGR031WP protein product, however, which localizes to the mitochondria, Nag1p localizes to the cell periphery, exhibiting properties consistent with those of a plasma membrane protein. Phenotypic analysis of a site-directed mutant (nag1-1) disruptive for NAG1 but silent with respect to YGR031W, defines a role for NAG1 in yeast cell wall biogenesis; microarray profiling of nag1-1 indicates decreased expression of genes contributing to cell wall organization, and the nag1-1 mutant is hypersensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent calcofluor white. Furthermore, production of Nag1p is dependent upon the presence of the cell wall integrity pathway mitogen-activated protein kinase Slt2p and its downstream transcription factor Rlm1p. Thus, NAG1 is important for two reasons. First, it contributes to yeast cell wall biogenesis. Second, its genomic context is novel, raising the possibility that other nested protein-coding genes may exist in eukaryotic genomes.

  18. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae promoters for heterologous gene expression in Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Sung; Kim, Jun-Seob; Heo, Paul; Yang, Tae-Jun; Sung, Young-Je; Cheon, Yuna; Koo, Hyun Min; Yu, Byung Jo; Seo, Jin-Ho; Jin, Yong-Su; Park, Jae Chan; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2013-03-01

    Kluyveromyces marxianus is now considered one of the best choices of option for industrial applications of yeast because the strain is able to grow at high temperature, utilizes various carbon sources, and grows fast. However, the use of K. marxianus as a host for industrial applications is still limited. This limitation is largely due to a lack of knowledge on the characteristics of the promoters since the time and amount of protein expression is strongly dependent on the promoter employed. In this study, four well-known constitutive promoters (P(CYC), P(TEF), P(GPD), and P(ADH)) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were characterized in K. marxianus in terms of protein expression level and their stochastic behavior. After constructing five URA3-auxotrophic K. marxianus strains and a plasmid vector, four cassettes each comprising one of the promoters--the gene for the green fluorescence protein (GFP)--CYC1 terminator (T(CYC)) were inserted into the vector. GFP expression under the control of each one of the promoters was analyzed by reverse transcription PCR, fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometer. Using these combined methods, the promoter strength was determined to be in the order of P(GPD) > P(ADH) ∼ P(TEF) > P(CYC). All promoters except for the P(CYC) exhibited three distinctive populations, including non-expressing cells, weakly expressing cells, and strongly expressing cells. The relative ratios between populations were strongly dependent on the promoter and culture time. Forward scattering was independent of GFP fluorescence intensity, indicating that the different fluorescence intensities were not just due to different cell sizes derived from budding. It also excluded the possibility that the non-expressing cells resulted from plasmid loss because plasmid stability was maintained at almost 100 % over the culture time. The same cassettes, cloned into a single copy plasmid pRS416 and transformed into S. cerevisiae, showed only one population. When the

  19. Review: the dominant flocculation genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae constitute a new subtelomeric gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen, A W; Steensma, H Y

    1995-09-15

    The quality of brewing strains is, in large part, determined by their flocculation properties. By classical genetics, several dominant, semidominant and recessive flocculation genes have been recognized. Recent results of experiments to localize the flocculation genes FLO5 and FLO8, combined with the in silicio analysis of the available sequence data of the yeast genome, have revealed that the flocculation genes belong to a family which comprises at least four genes and three pseudogenes. All members of this gene family are located near the end of chromosomes, just like the SUC, MEL and MAL genes, which are also important for good quality baking or brewing strains. Transcription of the flocculation genes is repressed by several regulatory genes. In addition, a number of genes have been found which cause cell aggregation upon disruption or overexpression in an as yet unknown manner. In total, 33 genes have been reported that are involved in flocculation or cell aggregation.

  20. A Candida albicans gene expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a distinct pattern of mRNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iborra, A; Sentandreu, R; Gozalbo, D

    1996-09-01

    Two plasmids (derived from YCplac22 and YEplac112) carrying a Candida albicans gene (including the 5' non-coding promoter sequences) coding for a 30 kDa membrane-bound protein, were used to transform Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. A 30 kDa protein was immunodetected by Western blot in the membrane fraction of transformants. Northern analysis showed the presence of three mRNA species (of about 1.1, 0.7 and 0.5 kb) hybridizing with the C. albicans gene as a probe. The same result was obtained using the 5' and 3' regions of the gene as probes, whereas only a 1.1 kb mRNA was found in C. albicans and none was detected in S. cerevisiae control transformants. Thus, heterologous expression of this gene in S. cerevisiae results in a distinct pattern of mRNA processing, either due to the location on plasmid vectors and/or to differences in the mRNA processing systems in the two microorganisms.

  1. Synthetic Transcription Amplifier System for Orthogonal Control of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anssi Rantasalo

    Full Text Available This work describes the development and characterization of a modular synthetic expression system that provides a broad range of adjustable and predictable expression levels in S. cerevisiae. The system works as a fixed-gain transcription amplifier, where the input signal is transferred via a synthetic transcription factor (sTF onto a synthetic promoter, containing a defined core promoter, generating a transcription output signal. The system activation is based on the bacterial LexA-DNA-binding domain, a set of modified, modular LexA-binding sites and a selection of transcription activation domains. We show both experimentally and computationally that the tuning of the system is achieved through the selection of three separate modules, each of which enables an adjustable output signal: 1 the transcription-activation domain of the sTF, 2 the binding-site modules in the output promoter, and 3 the core promoter modules which define the transcription initiation site in the output promoter. The system has a novel bidirectional architecture that enables generation of compact, yet versatile expression modules for multiple genes with highly diversified expression levels ranging from negligible to very strong using one synthetic transcription factor. In contrast to most existing modular gene expression regulation systems, the present system is independent from externally added compounds. Furthermore, the established system was minimally affected by the several tested growth conditions. These features suggest that it can be highly useful in large scale biotechnology applications.

  2. Heterologous Expression of Amylase Gene from Saccharomycopsis fibuligera in an Industrial Strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zeng-ran; ZHANG Guang-yi; LONG Zhang-fu; LIU Shi-gui

    2005-01-01

    An α-amylase encoding gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction from Saccharomycopsis fibuligera and inserted into a shuttle vector YEp352,together with the yeast phosphoglycerate kinase 1 promoter and α-factor signal gene. The recombinant expression plasmid pLA8α was transformed into an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sc-11. The activity of the α-amylase produced by the transformant Sc-11-pLA8α was 6.3 U/mL and the starch utilization rate in YPS medium was 42 %. The purified amylase was analyzed by SDS-PAGE,showing a molecular weight of 55×103 protein band. Furthermore, the residual sugar, ethanol and some volatile compounds in the fermented worts under simulating brewing conditions were determined by chromatographic analyses. The fermentation characteristics of Sc-11-pLA8α were similar to that of Sc-11 and only minor changes in the concentration of flavor compounds could be observed.

  3. Quorum-Sensing Kinetics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Symphony of ARO Genes and Aromatic Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avbelj, Martina; Zupan, Jure; Kranjc, Luka; Raspor, Peter

    2015-09-30

    The kinetics of quorum sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied using a mini-fermentation platform. The quorum-sensing molecules were monitored using our previous HPLC approach that is here supported by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the quorum-sensing genes. We thus initially confirm correlations between peak production rates of the monitored quorum-sensing molecules 2-phenylethanol, tryptophol, and tyrosol and peak expression of the genes responsible for their synthesis: ARO8, ARO9, and ARO10. This confirms the accuracy of our previously implemented kinetic model, thus favoring its use in further studies in this field. We also show that the quorum-sensing kinetics are precisely dependent on the population growth phase and that tyrosol production is also regulated by cell concentration, which has not been reported previously. Additionally, we show that during wine fermentation, ethanol stress reduces the production of 2-phenylethanol, tryptophol, and tyrosol, which opens new challenges in the control of wine fermentation.

  4. Synthetic Transcription Amplifier System for Orthogonal Control of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantasalo, Anssi; Czeizler, Elena; Virtanen, Riitta; Rousu, Juho; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Penttilä, Merja

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development and characterization of a modular synthetic expression system that provides a broad range of adjustable and predictable expression levels in S. cerevisiae. The system works as a fixed-gain transcription amplifier, where the input signal is transferred via a synthetic transcription factor (sTF) onto a synthetic promoter, containing a defined core promoter, generating a transcription output signal. The system activation is based on the bacterial LexA-DNA-binding domain, a set of modified, modular LexA-binding sites and a selection of transcription activation domains. We show both experimentally and computationally that the tuning of the system is achieved through the selection of three separate modules, each of which enables an adjustable output signal: 1) the transcription-activation domain of the sTF, 2) the binding-site modules in the output promoter, and 3) the core promoter modules which define the transcription initiation site in the output promoter. The system has a novel bidirectional architecture that enables generation of compact, yet versatile expression modules for multiple genes with highly diversified expression levels ranging from negligible to very strong using one synthetic transcription factor. In contrast to most existing modular gene expression regulation systems, the present system is independent from externally added compounds. Furthermore, the established system was minimally affected by the several tested growth conditions. These features suggest that it can be highly useful in large scale biotechnology applications. PMID:26901642

  5. ISOLATION OF A CYTOCHROME P-450 STRUCTURAL GENE FROM SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have transformed a Saccharomyces cerevisiae host with an S. cerevisiae genomic library contained in the shuttle vector YEp24 and screened the resultant transformants for resistance to ketoconazole (Kc), an inhibitor of the cytochrome P-450 (P-450) enzyme lanosterol 14-demethyl...

  6. Targeted proteome analysis of single-gene deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking enzymes in the central carbon metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Syohei; Nishino, Shunsuke; Tomita, Atsumi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Central carbon metabolism is controlled by modulating the protein abundance profiles of enzymes that maintain the essential systems in living organisms. In this study, metabolic adaptation mechanisms in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated by direct determination of enzyme abundance levels in 30 wild type and mutant strains. We performed a targeted proteome analysis using S. cerevisiae strains that lack genes encoding the enzymes responsible for central carbon metabolism. Our analysis revealed that at least 30% of the observed variations in enzyme abundance levels could be explained by global regulatory mechanisms. A enzyme-enzyme co-abundance analysis revealed that the abundances of enzyme proteins involved in the trehalose metabolism and glycolysis changed in a coordinated manner under the control of the transcription factors for global regulation. The remaining variations were derived from local mechanisms such as a mutant-specific increase in the abundances of remote enzymes. The proteome data also suggested that, although the functional compensation of the deficient enzyme was attained by using more resources for protein biosynthesis, available resources for the biosynthesis of the enzymes responsible for central metabolism were not abundant in S. cerevisiae cells. These results showed that global and local regulation of enzyme abundance levels shape central carbon metabolism in S. cerevisiae by using a limited resource for protein biosynthesis. PMID:28241048

  7. Nucleotide sequence of the GDH gene coding for the NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasu, T; Hall, B D

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene for NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) by cross hybridization to the Neurospora crassa am gene, known to encode for NADP-GDH is described. Two DNA fragments selected from a yeast genomic library in phage lambda gt11 were shown by restriction analysis to share 2.5 kb of common sequence. A yeast shuttle vector (CV13) carrying either to the cloned fragments complements the gdh- strain of S. cerevisiae and directs substantial overproduction of NADP-GDH. One of the cloned fragments was sequenced, and the deduced amino acid (aa) sequence of the yeast NADP-GDH is 64% homologous to N. crassa, 51% to Escherichia coli and 24% to bovine NADP-GDHs.

  8. Partial Rescue of pos5 Mutants by YEF1 and UTR1 Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Fu LI; Feng SHI

    2006-01-01

    Three NAD kinase homologs, encoded by UTR1, POS5 and YEF1 genes, are found in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and proven to be important sources of NADPH for the cell. Pos5p, existing in the mitochondrial matrix, is critical for higher temperature endurance and mitochondrial functions, such as glycerol usability and arginine biosynthesis. Through constructing the high-copy expression plasmids of YEF1 and UTR1, which contained the green fluorescent protein reporter tag at their 3' terminus, and introducing them into POS5 gene deletion mutants (i.e. pos5, utr1pos5, yef1pos5 and utr1yef1pos5), the high-copy YEF1 and UTR1 plasmids carrying transformants for pos5 mutants were obtained. Their temperature sensitivity and growth phenotype on media with glycerol as the sole carbon source, or on media without arginine, were checked. Results showed the partial rescue of mitochondrial dysfunctions and temperature sensitivity of pos5 mutants by the high-copy YEF1 gene, and of glycerol growth defect and temperature sensitivity by the high-copy UTR1 gene, which confirmed the potential supplying ability of Yef1p and Utr1p for mitochondrial NADP(H) and implied the weak transport of NADP from cytosol to mitochondria. However, even through the green fluorescent protein reporter label, the subcellular localization of Yef1p and Utr1p in yeast cells could not be observed, which indicated the low expression level of these two NAD kinase homologs.

  9. Molecular cloning and expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RFC3 gene, an essential component of replication factor C.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, X.; Burgers, P M

    1994-01-01

    Yeast replication factor C (RF-C) is a multi-polypeptide complex required for processive DNA replication by DNA polymerases delta and epsilon. The gene encoding the 40-kDa subunit of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RF-C (RFC3) has been cloned. The RFC3 gene is required for yeast cell growth and has been mapped to the left arm of chromosome XIV. The deduced amino acid sequence of the RFC3 gene shows a high homology to the 36-, 37-, and 40-kDa subunits of human RF-C (also called activator 1), with...

  10. GAP1, a novel selection and counter-selection marker for multiple gene disruptions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regenberg, Birgitte; Hansen, J.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the use of a new homologous marker for use in multiple gene deletions in S, cerevisiae, the general amino acid permease gene (GAP1), A GAP1 strain can utilize L-citrulline as the sole nitrogen source but cannot grow in the presence of the toxic amino acid D-histidine, L-citrulline as......We report on the use of a new homologous marker for use in multiple gene deletions in S, cerevisiae, the general amino acid permease gene (GAP1), A GAP1 strain can utilize L-citrulline as the sole nitrogen source but cannot grow in the presence of the toxic amino acid D-histidine, L......-citrulline as well as D-histidine uptake is mediated solely by the general amino acid permease, and a gap1 strain is therefore able to grow in the presence of D-histidine but cannot utilize L-citrulline, Gene disruption is effected by transforming a gap1 strain with a gene cassette generated by PCR, containing GAP1...... the GAP1 gene. This is caused by recombination between two Salmonella typuimurium hisG direct repeats embracing GAP1, and will result in a sub-population of gap1 cells. Such cells are selected on a medium containing D-histidine, and may subsequently be used for a second gene disruption. Hence, multiple...

  11. Scarless Gene Tagging with One-Step Transformation and Two-Step Selection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Dann; Hallacli, Erinc; Lindquist, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Gene tagging with fluorescent proteins is commonly applied to investigate the localization and dynamics of proteins in their cellular environment. Ideally, a fluorescent tag is genetically inserted at the endogenous locus at the N- or C- terminus of the gene of interest without disrupting regulatory sequences including the 5’ and 3’ untranslated region (UTR) and without introducing any extraneous unwanted “scar” sequences, which may create unpredictable transcriptional or translational effects. We present a reliable, low-cost, and highly efficient method for the construction of such scarless C-terminal and N-terminal fusions with fluorescent proteins in yeast. The method relies on sequential positive and negative selection and uses an integration cassette with long flanking regions, which is assembled by two-step PCR, to increase the homologous recombination frequency. The method also enables scarless tagging of essential genes with no need for a complementing plasmid. To further ease high-throughput strain construction, we have computationally automated design of the primers, applied the primer design code to all open reading frames (ORFs) of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. pombe), and provide here the computed sequences. To illustrate the scarless N- and C-terminal gene tagging methods in S. cerevisiae, we tagged various genes including the E3 ubiquitin ligase RSP5, the proteasome subunit PRE1, and the eleven Rab GTPases with yeast codon-optimized mNeonGreen or mCherry; several of these represent essential genes. We also implemented the scarless C-terminal gene tagging method in the distantly related organism S. pombe using kanMX6 and HSV1tk as positive and negative selection markers, respectively, as well as ura4. The scarless gene tagging methods presented here are widely applicable to visualize and investigate the functional roles of proteins in living cells. PMID:27736907

  12. MIP1, a new yeast gene homologous to the rat mitochondrial intermediate peptidase gene, is required for oxidative metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaya, G; Miklos, D; Rollins, R A

    1994-01-01

    Cleavage of amino-terminal octapeptides, F/L/IXXS/T/GXXXX, by mitochondrial intermediate peptidase (MIP) is typical of many mitochondrial precursor proteins imported to the matrix and the inner membrane. We previously described the molecular characterization of rat liver MIP (RMIP) and indicated a putative homolog in the sequence predicted from gene YCL57w of yeast chromosome III. A new yeast gene, MIP1, has now been isolated by screening a Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic library with an RMI...

  13. Promoter strength of folic acid synthesis genes affects sulfa drug resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliades, Peter; Berglez, Janette; Meshnick, Steven; Macreadie, Ian

    2003-01-01

    The enzyme dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) is an important target for sulfa drugs in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes. However, the understanding of DHPS function and the action of antifolates in eukaryotes has been limited due to technical difficulties and the complexity of DHPS being a part of a bifunctional or trifunctional protein that comprises the upstream enzymes involved in folic acid synthesis (FAS). Here, yeast strains have been constructed to study the effects of FOL1 expression on growth and sulfa drug resistance. A DHPS knockout yeast strain was complemented by yeast vectors expressing the FOL1 gene under the control of promoters of different strengths. An inverse relationship was observed between the growth rate of the strains and FOL1 expression levels. The use of stronger promoters to drive FOL1 expression led to increased sulfamethoxazole resistance when para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA) levels were elevated. However, high FOL1 expression levels resulted in increased susceptibility to sulfamethoxazole in pABA free media. These data suggest that up-regulation of FOL1 expression can lead to sulfa drug resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  14. A Cas9-based toolkit to program gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reider Apel, Amanda; d'Espaux, Leo; Wehrs, Maren; Sachs, Daniel; Li, Rachel A.; Tong, Gary J.; Garber, Megan; Nnadi, Oge; Zhuang, William; Hillson, Nathan J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2017-01-01

    Despite the extensive use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a platform for synthetic biology, strain engineering remains slow and laborious. Here, we employ CRISPR/Cas9 technology to build a cloning-free toolkit that addresses commonly encountered obstacles in metabolic engineering, including chromosomal integration locus and promoter selection, as well as protein localization and solubility. The toolkit includes 23 Cas9-sgRNA plasmids, 37 promoters of various strengths and temporal expression profiles, and 10 protein-localization, degradation and solubility tags. We facilitated the use of these parts via a web-based tool, that automates the generation of DNA fragments for integration. Our system builds upon existing gene editing methods in the thoroughness with which the parts are standardized and characterized, the types and number of parts available and the ease with which our methodology can be used to perform genetic edits in yeast. We demonstrated the applicability of this toolkit by optimizing the expression of a challenging but industrially important enzyme, taxadiene synthase (TXS). This approach enabled us to diagnose an issue with TXS solubility, the resolution of which yielded a 25-fold improvement in taxadiene production. PMID:27899650

  15. Genetic mapping of the alpha-galactosidase MEL gene family on right and left telomeres of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, G I; Naumova, E S; Louis, E J

    1995-04-30

    The alpha-galactosidase MEL2-MEL10 genes have been genetically mapped to right and left telomere regions of the following chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: MEL2 at VII L, MEL3 at XVI L, MEL4 at XI L, MEL5 at IV L, MEL6 at XIII R, MEL7 at VI R, MEL8 at XV R, MEL9 at X R and MEL10 at XII R. A set of tester strains with URA3 inserted into individual telomeres and no MEL genes was used for mapping.

  16. Two DNA repair and recombination genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RAD52 and RAD54, are induced during meiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, G.M.; Mortimer, R.K. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)); Schild, D. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1989-07-01

    The DNA repair and recombination genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RAD52 and RAD54, were transcriptionally induced approximately 10- to 15-fold in sporulating MATa/{alpha} cells. Congenic MATa/a cells, which did not sporulate, did not show similar increases. Assays of {beta}-galactosidase activity in strains harboring either a RAD52- or RAD54-lacZ gene fusion indicated that this induction occurred at a time concomitant with a commitment to meiotic recombination, as measured by prototroph formation from his1 heteroalleles.

  17. Genome-wide RNAi screen reveals the E3 SUMO-protein ligase gene SIZ1 as a novel determinant of furfural tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Han; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    Background Furfural is a major growth inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates and improving furfural tolerance of microorganisms is critical for rapid and efficient fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, we used the RNAi-Assisted Genome Evolution (RAGE) method to select for furfural resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified a new determinant of furfural tolerance. Results By using a genome-wide RNAi (RNA-interference) screen in S. cerevisiae for genes in...

  18. A new MIC1-MAG1 recombinant chimeric antigen can be used instead of the Toxoplasma gondii lysate antigen in serodiagnosis of human toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holec-Gąsior, Lucyna; Ferra, Bartłomiej; Drapała, Dorota; Lautenbach, Dariusz; Kur, Józef

    2012-01-01

    This study presents an evaluation of the MIC1 (microneme protein 1)-MAG1 (matrix antigen 1) Toxoplasma gondii recombinant chimeric antigen for the serodiagnosis of human toxoplasmosis for the first time. The recombinant MIC1-MAG1 antigen was obtained as a fusion protein containing His tags at the N- and C-terminal ends using an Escherichia coli expression system. After purification by metal affinity chromatography, the chimeric protein was tested for usefulness in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of anti-T. gondii immunoglobulin G (IgG). One hundred ten sera from patients at different stages of infection and 40 sera from seronegative patients were examined. The results obtained for the MIC1-MAG1 chimeric antigen were compared with those of IgG ELISAs using a Toxoplasma lysate antigen (TLA), a combination of recombinant antigens (rMIC1ex2-rMAG1) and single recombinant proteins (rMIC1ex2 and rMAG1). The sensitivity of the IgG ELISA calculated from all of the positive serum samples was similar for the MIC1-MAG1 chimeric antigen (90.8%) and the TLA (91.8%), whereas the sensitivities of the other antigenic samples used were definitely lower, at 69.1% for the mixture of antigens, 75.5% for the rMIC1ex2, and 60% for rMAG1. This study demonstrates that the MIC1-MAG1 recombinant chimeric antigen can be used instead of the TLA in the serodiagnosis of human toxoplasmosis.

  19. Analysis of carbon source-regulated gene expression by the upstream region of the Candida tropicalis malate synthase gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, K; Atomi, H; Izuta, M; Kanai, T; Takeshita, S; Ueda, M; Tanaka, A

    1997-01-03

    We investigated the regulation of expression of a gene encoding malate synthase (MS) of an n-alkane-utilizable yeast Candida tropicalis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where its expression is highly induced by acetate. By comparing levels of gene expression in cells grown on glucose, acetate, lactate, and oleic acid, we found that the increase in gene expression was due to a glucose repression-derepression mechanism. In order to obtain information concerning the regulation of the gene expression, a fusion gene which consists of the 5'-upstream region of MS-2 (UPR-MS-2) and the lacZ gene (encoding Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase), was introduced into S. cerevisiae, and beta-galactosidase activities were measured with cells grown on glucose or acetate. Deletion analysis of UPR-MS-2 revealed that the region between -777 and -448 (against the translation initiation codon) enhanced the level of gene expression in both glucose- and acetate-grown cells. In this region, sequences which resemble binding sites of Rap1p/Grf1p/Tufp, a global transcription activator, were found at seven locations and one was found for another pleiotropic activator Abf1p. The result also suggested the presence of multiple upstream repression sequences (URSs), which function specifically in glucose-grown cells, in the region between -368 and -126. In the repressing region, there were three tandem C(A/T)CTCCC sequences and also a putative binding site of Mig1p, a transcriptional repressor which mediates glucose repression of several other genes. When MIG1 gene of S. cerevisiae was disrupted, the expression of the UPR-MS-2-lacZ gene in glucose-grown cells increased approx. 10-fold. Furthermore, the effect of deletion of a putative Mig1p binding site was abolished in the MIG1-disrupted strain, suggesting Mig1p binds to this site and brings about glucose repression. When the SNF1 gene was disrupted, the high level gene expression observed in acetate-grown cells bearing UPR-MS-2 was

  20. Molecular and genetic analysis of the gene encoding the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strand exchange protein Sep1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishkoff, D X; Johnson, A W; Kolodner, R D

    1991-05-01

    Vegetatively grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells contain an activity that promotes a number of homologous pairing reactions. A major portion of this activity is due to strand exchange protein 1 (Sep1), which was originally purified as a 132,000-Mr species (R. Kolodner, D. H. Evans, and P. T. Morrison, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:5560-5564, 1987). The gene encoding Sep1 was cloned, and analysis of the cloned gene revealed a 4,587-bp open reading frame capable of encoding a 175,000-Mr protein. The protein encoded by this open reading frame was overproduced and purified and had a relative molecular weight of approximately 160,000. The 160,000-Mr protein was at least as active in promoting homologous pairing as the original 132,000-Mr species, which has been shown to be a fragment of the intact 160,000-Mr Sep1 protein. The SEP1 gene mapped to chromosome VII within 20 kbp of RAD54. Three Tn10LUK insertion mutations in the SEP1 gene were characterized. sep1 mutants grew more slowly than wild-type cells, showed a two- to fivefold decrease in the rate of spontaneous mitotic recombination between his4 heteroalleles, and were delayed in their ability to return to growth after UV or gamma irradiation. Sporulation of sep1/sep1 diploids was defective, as indicated by both a 10- to 40-fold reduction in spore formation and reduced spore viability of approximately 50%. The majority of sep1/sep1 diploid cells arrested in meiosis after commitment to recombination but prior to the meiosis I cell division. Return-to-growth experiments showed that sep1/sep1 his4X/his4B diploids exhibited a five- to sixfold greater meiotic induction of His+ recombinants than did isogenic SEP1/SEP1 strains. sep1/sep1 mutants also showed an increased frequency of exchange between HIS4, LEU2, and MAT and a lack of positive interference between these markers compared with wild-type controls. The interaction between sep1, rad50, and spo13 mutations suggested that SEP1 acts in meiosis in a pathway that is

  1. Deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARO8 gene, encoding an aromatic amino acid transaminase, enhances phenylethanol production from glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, Gabriele; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Liti, Gianni; Louis, Edward J; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Phenylethanol has a characteristic rose-like aroma that makes it a popular ingredient in foods, beverages and cosmetics. Microbial production of phenylethanol currently relies on whole-cell bioconversion of phenylalanine with yeasts that harbour an Ehrlich pathway for phenylalanine catabolism. Complete biosynthesis of phenylethanol from a cheap carbon source, such as glucose, provides an economically attractive alternative for phenylalanine bioconversion. In this study, synthetic genetic array (SGA) screening was applied to identify genes involved in regulation of phenylethanol synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screen focused on transcriptional regulation of ARO10, which encodes the major decarboxylase involved in conversion of phenylpyruvate to phenylethanol. A deletion in ARO8, which encodes an aromatic amino acid transaminase, was found to underlie the transcriptional upregulation of ARO10 during growth, with ammonium sulphate as the sole nitrogen source. Physiological characterization revealed that the aro8Δ mutation led to substantial changes in the absolute and relative intracellular concentrations of amino acids. Moreover, deletion of ARO8 led to de novo production of phenylethanol during growth on a glucose synthetic medium with ammonium as the sole nitrogen source. The aro8Δ mutation also stimulated phenylethanol production when combined with other, previously documented, mutations that deregulate aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae. The resulting engineered S. cerevisiae strain produced >3 mm phenylethanol from glucose during growth on a simple synthetic medium. The strong impact of a transaminase deletion on intracellular amino acid concentrations opens new possibilities for yeast-based production of amino acid-derived products.

  2. A MultiSite GatewayTM vector set for the functional analysis of genes in the model Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagels Durand Astrid

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinatorial cloning using the GatewayTM technology has been the method of choice for high-throughput omics projects, resulting in the availability of entire ORFeomes in GatewayTM compatible vectors. The MultiSite GatewayTM system allows combining multiple genetic fragments such as promoter, ORF and epitope tag in one single reaction. To date, this technology has not been accessible in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the most widely used experimental systems in molecular biology, due to the lack of appropriate destination vectors. Results Here, we present a set of three-fragment MultiSite GatewayTM destination vectors that have been developed for gene expression in S. cerevisiae and that allow the assembly of any promoter, open reading frame, epitope tag arrangement in combination with any of four auxotrophic markers and three distinct replication mechanisms. As an example of its applicability, we used yeast three-hybrid to provide evidence for the assembly of a ternary complex of plant proteins involved in jasmonate signalling and consisting of the JAZ, NINJA and TOPLESS proteins. Conclusion Our vectors make MultiSite GatewayTM cloning accessible in S. cerevisiae and implement a fast and versatile cloning method for the high-throughput functional analysis of (heterologous proteins in one of the most widely used model organisms for molecular biology research.

  3. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Leu3 protein activates expression of GDH1, a key gene in nitrogen assimilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Y.; Cooper, T. G.; Kohlhaw, G B

    1995-01-01

    The Leu3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown to be a transcriptional regulator of genes encoding enzymes of the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic pathways. Leu3 binds to upstream activating sequences (UASLEU) found in the promoters of LEU1, LEU2, LEU4, ILV2, and ILV5. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that activation by Leu3 requires the presence of alpha-isopropylmalate. In at least one case (LEU2), Leu3 actually represses basal-level transcription when alpha-isopro...

  4. Identification of reference genes suitable for normalization of RT-qPCR expression data in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudano, Enrico; Noti, Olta; Costantini, Antonella; Garcia-Moruno, Emilia

    2011-08-01

    Expression data from RT-qPCR (reverse transcription quantitative PCR) needs to be normalized to account for experimental variability among samples caused by differential yields of the transcripts in RNA extraction or in the reverse transcription. The most common method is to normalize against one or more reference genes (RG). We have selected RGs suitable for normalization of RT-qPCR raw data in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. The RGs were evaluated by three different statistical methods. The suitability of the selected RG sets was compared with ACT1, a commonly used non-validated single RG, by normalizing the expression of two target genes. Expression profiles of the target genes revealed the risk of misleading interpretation of expression data due to an unreliable RG.

  5. Growth-rate regulated genes have profound impact on interpretation of transcriptome profiling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regenberg, Birgitte; Grotkjaer, Thomas; Winther, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Growth rate is central to the development of cells in all organisms. However, little is known about the impact of changing growth rates. We used continuous cultures to control growth rate and studied the transcriptional program of the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with generation time...

  6. Dissection of transcriptional regulation networks and prediction of gene functions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boorsma, A.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular biology aims to unravel the functions of cells by studying cellular processes at the molecular level. Amodel organism that is well established in molecular biology is bakers yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Bakers yeast cells are remarkably similar to human cells, but much easier to grow

  7. Disruption of six open reading frames on chromosome X of Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals a cluster of four essential genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, K; Scholle, B; Michaelis, G

    1999-07-01

    In this study we report the construction and basic phenotypic analysis of six Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion mutants. The open reading frames (ORFs) YJL008C (gene symbol CCT8), YJL010C, YJL011C, YJL012C, YJL017W, and YJL020C from chromosome X have been disrupted by integration of deletion cassettes, comprising the bacterial KanMX4 marker gene and terminal long (LFH) or short (SFH) flanking sequences that are homologous to the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the respective ORFs. For correct disruption of ORF YJL008C, it was necessary to construct a deletion cassette flanked by 300-350 bp long target guide sequences by LFH-PCR. Transformations using ORF YJL008C gene disruption cassettes synthesized by standard SFH-PCR exclusively resulted in false-positive or multiple integration events, probably because seven additional genes homologous to CCT8 exist in the yeast genome. The other five ORFs have been disrupted using cassettes generated by SFH-PCR, comprising terminal homologous regions of approximately 50 bp to each target site. Correct genomic integration of the reporter modules was verified by analytical PCR and Southern hybridization. Deletion of YJL008C, YJL010C, YJL011C, and YJL012C was found to be lethal, as shown by sporulation and tetrad analysis. This result is in contrast to the finding that only 16-20% of the genes in S. cerevisiae are estimated to be essential. The four essential genes described in this work are clustered, while the two other non-essential ORFs are separated by further ORFs. Although the two viable deletion mutants were tested against 60 different inhibitors, heavy metal ions and salts, no phenotype could be detected that co-segregated with the deletion during meiosis.

  8. Regulation of RAD54- and RAD52-lacZ gene fusions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, G.M.; Schild, D.; Lovett, S.T.; Mortimer, R.K.

    1987-03-01

    The RAD52 and RAD54 genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are involved in both DNA repair and DNA recombination. RAD54 has recently been shown to be inducible by X-rays, while RAD52 is not. To further investigate the regulation of these genes, we constructed gene fusions using 5' regions upstream of the RAD52 and RAD54 genes and a 3'-terminal fragment of the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene. Yeast transformants with either an integrated or an autonomously replicating plasmid containing these fusions expressed beta-galactosidase activity constitutively. In addition, the RAD54 gene fusion was inducible in both haploid and diploid cells in response to the DNA-damaging agents X-rays, UV light, and methyl methanesulfonate, but not in response to heat shock. The RAD52-lacZ gene fusion showed little or no induction in response to X-ray or UV radiation nor methyl methanesulfonate. Typical induction levels for RAD54 in cells exposed to such agents were from 3- to 12-fold, in good agreement with previous mRNA analyses. When MATa cells were arrested in G1 with alpha-factor, RAD54 was still inducible after DNA damage, indicating that the observed induction is independent of the cell cycle. Using a yeast vector containing the EcoRI structural gene fused to the GAL1 promoter, we showed that double-strand breaks alone are sufficient in vivo for induction of RAD54.

  9. Construction of recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with bglS gene insertion into PEP4 locus by homologous recombination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang ZHANG; Qi-he CHEN; Ming-liang FU; Jin-ling WANG; Hong-bo ZHANG; Guo-qing HE

    2008-01-01

    The bglS gene encoding endo-1,3-1,4-β-glucanase from Bacillus subtilis was cloned and sequenced in this study. The bglS expression cassette, including PGK1 promoter, bglS gene fused to the signal sequence of the yeast mating pheromone α-factor (MFals), and ADH1 terminator with G418-resistance as the selected marker, was constructed. Then one of the PEP4 allele of Saccharomyces cerevisiae WZ65 strain was replaced by bglS expression cassette using chromosomal integration of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated homologous recombination, and the bglS gene was expressed simultaneously. The recombinant strain S. cerevisiae (SC-βG) was preliminarily screened by the clearing hydrolysis zone formed after the barley β-glucan was hydrolyzed in the plate and no proteinase A (PrA) activity was measured in fermenting liquor. The results of PCR analysis ofgenome DNA showed that one of the PEP4 allele had been replaced and bglS gene had been inserted into the locus of PEP4 gene in recombinant strains. Different endo-1,3-1,4-β-glucanase assay methods showed that the recombinant strain SC-βG had high endo-1,3-1,4-β-glucanase expression level with the maximum of 69.3 U/(h-ml) after 60 h of incubation. Meanwhile, the Congo Red method was suitable for the determination of endo-1,3-1,4-β-glucanase activity during the actual brewing process. The current research implies that the constructed yeast strain could be utilized to improve the industrial brewing property of beer.

  10. Isolation of the GFA1 gene encoding glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase of Sporothrix schenckii and its expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-López, Juan Francisco; González-Ibarra, Joaquín; Álvarez-Vargas, Aurelio; Milewski, Slawomir; Villagómez-Castro, Julio César; Cano-Canchola, Carmen; López-Romero, Everardo

    2015-06-01

    Glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase (GlcN-6-P synthase) is an essential enzyme involved in cell wall biogenesis that has been proposed as a strategic target for antifungal chemotherapy. Here we describe the cloning and functional characterization of Sporothrix schenckii GFA1 gene which was isolated from a genomic library of the fungus. The gene encodes a predicted protein of 708 amino acids that is homologous to GlcN-6-P synthases from other sources. The recombinant enzyme restored glucosamine prototrophy of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gfa1 null mutant. Purification and biochemical analysis of the recombinant enzyme revealed some differences from the wild type enzyme, such as improved stability and less sensitivity to UDP-GlcNAc. The sensitivity of the recombinant enzyme to the selective inhibitor FMDP [N(3)-(4-methoxyfumaroyl)-l-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid] and other properties were similar to those previously reported for the wild type enzyme.

  11. Regulated expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD7 in response to DNA damage and during sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J S; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1990-06-11

    The RAD7 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affects the proficiency of excision repair of DNA damaged by UV light. Here, we report our studies on the regulation of the RAD7 gene in response to UV irradiation and during sporulation. RAD7 transcript levels increased 6-fold within 40 min of exposure of cells to 37 J/m2 of UV light. Higher UV doses also elicited rapid increases in the level of RAD7 mRNA. RAD7 mRNA levels increased in sporulating MATa/MAT alpha diploid cells, but not in the asporogenous MATa/MATa strain exposed to sporulation conditions. The increase in RAD7 mRNA level in MATa/MAT alpha cells was 15-fold after 6 h and 9-fold after 7 h in sporulation medium; thereafter, RAD7 mRNA levels declined. Periodic transcription of RAD7 during sporulation suggests a role for RAD7 in this process.

  12. Repression of nitrogen catabolic genes by ammonia and glutamine in nitrogen-limited continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Vermeulen, E E; Kalhorn, J W; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1998-05-01

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ammonia and glutamine decreases the expression of many nitrogen catabolic genes to low levels. To discriminate between ammonia- and glutamine-driven repression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1, a gln1-37 mutant was used. This mutant is not able to convert ammonia into glutamine. Glutamine-limited continuous cultures were used to completely derepress the expression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1. Following an ammonia pulse, the expression of GAP1, PUT4 and GDH1 decreased while the intracellular glutamine concentration remained constant, both in the cytoplasm and in the vacuole. Therefore, it was concluded that ammonia causes gene repression independent of the intracellular glutamine concentration. The expression of GLN1 was not decreased by an ammonia pulse but solely by a glutamine pulse. Analysis of the mRNA levels of ILV5 and HIS4 showed that the response of the two biosynthetic genes, GDH1 and GLN1, to ammonia and glutamine in the wild-type and gln1-37 was not due to changes in general transcription of biosynthetic genes. Ure2p has been shown to be an essential element for nitrogen-regulated gene expression. Deletion of URE2 in the gln1-37 background prevented repression of gene expression by ammonia, showing that the ammonia-induced repression is not caused by a general stress response but represents a specific signal for nitrogen catabolite regulation.

  13. Failure to induce a DNA repair gene, RAD54, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not affect DNA repair or recombination phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, G.M.; Mortimer, R.K. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD54 gene is transcriptionally regulated by a broad spectrum of DNA-damaging agents. Induction of RAD54 by DNA-damaging agents is under positive control. Sequences responsible for DNA damage induction (the DRS element) lie within a 29-base-pair region from -99 to -70 from the most proximal transcription start site. This inducible promoter element is functionally separable from a poly(dA-dT) region immediately downstream which is required for constitutive expression. Deletions which eliminate induction of RAD54 transcription by DNA damage but do not affect constitutive expression have no effect on growth or survival of noninducible strains relative to wild-type strains in the presence of DNA-damaging agents. The DRS element is also not required for homothallic mating type switching, transcriptional induction of RAD54 during meiosis, meiotic recombination, or spontaneous or X-ray-induced mitotic recombination. We find no phenotype for a lack of induction of RAD54 message via the damage-inducible DRS, which raises significant questions about the physiology of DNA damage induction in S. cerevisiae.

  14. Molecular analysis of the genes involved in aroma synthesis in the species S. cerevisiae, S. kudriavzevii and S. bayanus var. uvarum in winemaking conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero, Amparo; Belloch, Carmela; Ibáñez, Clara; Querol, Amparo

    2014-01-01

    The Saccharomyces genus is the main yeast involved in wine fermentations to play a crucial role in the production and release of aromatic compounds. Despite the several studies done into the genome-wide expression analysis using DNA microarray technology in wine S. cerevisiae strains, this is the first to investigate other species of the Saccharomyces genus. This research work investigates the expression of the genes involved in flavor compound production in three different Saccharomyces species (S. cerevisiae, S. bayanus var. uvarum and S. kudriavzevii) under low (12°C) and moderate fermentation temperatures (28°C). The global genes analysis showed that 30% of genes appeared to be differently expressed in the three cryophilic strains if compared to the reference strain (mesophilic S. cerevisiae), suggesting a very close cold adaptation response. Remarkable differences in the gene expression level were observed when comparing the three species, S. cerevisiae, S. bayanus var. uvarum and S. kudriavzevii, which will result in different aroma profiles. Knowledge of these differences in the transcriptome can be a tool to help modulate aroma to create wines with the desired aromatic traits.

  15. Heterooligomeric phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: combinatorial expression of the five PRS genes in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    2004-09-24

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains five phosphoribosyl diphosphate (PRPP) synthase-homologous genes (PRS1-5), which specify PRPP synthase subunits 1-5. Expression of the five S. cerevisiae PRS genes individually in an Escherichia coli PRPP-less strain (Deltaprs) showed that a single PRS gene product had no PRPP synthase activity. In contrast, expression of five pairwise combinations of PRS genes resulted in the formation of active PRPP synthase. These combinations were PRS1 PRS2, PRS1 PRS3, and PRS1 PRS4, as well as PRS5 PRS2 and PRS5 PRS4. None of the remaining five possible pairwise combinations of PRS genes appeared to produce active enzyme. Extract of an E. coli strain containing a plasmid-borne PRS1 gene and a chromosome-borne PRS3 gene contained detectable PRPP synthase activity, whereas extracts of strains containing PRS1 PRS2, PRS1 PRS4, PRS5 PRS2, or PRS5 PRS4 contained no detectable PRPP synthase activity. In contrast PRPP could be detected in growing cells containing PRS1 PRS2, PRS1 PRS3, PRS5 PRS2, or PRS5 PRS4. These apparent conflicting results indicate that, apart from the PRS1 PRS3-specified enzyme, PRS-specified enzyme is functional in vivo but unstable when released from the cell. Certain combinations of three PRS genes appeared to produce an enzyme that is stable in vitro. Thus, extracts of strains harboring PRS1 PRS2 PRS5, PRS1 PRS4 PRS5, or PRS2 PRS4 PRS5 as well as extracts of strains harboring combinations with PRS1 PRS3 contained readily assayable PRPP synthase activity. The data indicate that although certain pairwise combinations of subunits produce an active enzyme, yeast PRPP synthase requires at least three different subunits to be stable in vitro. The activity of PRPP synthases containing subunits 1 and 3 or subunits 1, 2, and 5 was found to be dependent on Pi, to be temperature-sensitive, and inhibited by ADP.

  16. Disruption of seven hypothetical aryl alcohol dehydrogenase genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and construction of a multiple knock-out strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delneri, D; Gardner, D C; Bruschi, C V; Oliver, S G

    1999-11-01

    By in silicio analysis, we have discovered that there are seven open reading frames (ORFs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae whose protein products show a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity to the aryl alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) of the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Yeast cultures grown to stationary phase display a significant aryl alcohol dehydrogenase activity by degrading aromatic aldehydes to the corresponding alcohols. To study the biochemical and the biological role of each of the AAD genes, a series of mutant strains carrying deletion of one or more of the AAD-coding sequences was constructed by PCR-mediated gene replacement, using the readily selectable marker kanMX. The correct targeting of the PCR-generated disruption cassette into the genomic locus was verified by analytical PCR and by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) followed by Southern blot analysis. Double, triple and quadruple mutant strains were obtained by classical genetic methods, while the construction of the quintuple, sextuple and septuple mutants was achieved by using the marker URA3 from Kluyveromyces lactis, HIS3 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and TRP1 from S. cerevisiae. None of the knock-out strains revealed any mutant phenotype when tested for the degradation of aromatic aldehydes using both spectrophotometry and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Specific tests for changes in the ergosterol and phospholipids profiles did not reveal any mutant phenotype and mating and sporulation efficiencies were not affected in the septuple deletant. Compared to the wild-type strain, the septuple deletant showed an increased resistance to the anisaldehyde, but there is a possibility that the nutritional markers used for gene replacement are causing this effect.

  17. Expression of the Photorhabdus luminescens lux genes (luxA, B, C, D, and E) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rakesh K; Patterson, Stacey S; Ripp, Steven; Simpson, Michael L; Sayler, Gary S

    2003-12-01

    The luxA, B, C, D, and E genes from Photorhabdus luminescens were cloned and functionally expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to construct a bacterial lux-based yeast bioreporter capable of autonomous bioluminescence emission. The bioreporter was engineered using a series of pBEVY yeast expression vectors that allowed for bi-directional constitutive or inducible expression of the individual luxA, B, C, and E genes. The luxD gene, encoding the acyl-ACP transferase that ultimately supplies the requisite aldehyde substrate for the bioluminescent reaction, was fused to a yeast internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) sequence to ensure high bi-cistronic expression. Although self-generation of bioluminescence was achieved by the bioreporter, the signal was relatively weak and decayed rapidly. To overcome this instability, a flavin oxidoreductase gene (frp) from Vibrio harveyi was co-expressed to provide sufficient concentrations of the FMNH(2) co-factor required for the bioluminescent reaction. Expression of frp with the lux genes not only stabilized but also enhanced bioluminescence to levels approaching 9.0x10(5) times above background.

  18. Promoter engineering of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RIM15 gene for improvement of alcoholic fermentation rates under stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Kaneko, Akie; Sugimoto, Yukiko; Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Takagi, Hiroshi; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2017-02-01

    A loss-of-function mutation in the RIM15 gene, which encodes a Greatwall-like protein kinase, is one of the major causes of the high alcoholic fermentation rates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake strains closely related to Kyokai no. 7 (K7). However, impairment of Rim15p may not be beneficial under more severe fermentation conditions, such as in the late fermentation stage, as it negatively affects stress responses. To balance stress tolerance and fermentation performance, we inserted the promoter of a gluconeogenic gene, PCK1, into the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the RIM15 gene in a laboratory strain to achieve repression of RIM15 gene expression in the glucose-rich early stage with its induction in the stressful late stage of alcoholic fermentation. The promoter-engineered strain exhibited a fermentation rate comparable to that of the RIM15-deleted strain with no decrease in cell viability. The engineered strain achieved better alcoholic fermentation performance than the RIM15-deleted strain under repetitive and high-glucose fermentation conditions. These data demonstrated the validity of promoter engineering of the RIM15 gene that governs inhibitory control of alcoholic fermentation.

  19. Global gene expression analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown under redox potential-controlled very-high-gravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2013-11-01

    Redox potential (ORP) plays a pivotal role in yeast viability and ethanol production during very-high-gravity (VHG) ethanol fermentation. In order to identify the correlation between redox potential profiles and gene expression patterns, global gene expression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. Results indicated that significant changes in gene expression occurred at the periods of 0 - 6 h and 30 - 36 h, respectively. Changes noted in the period of 0 - 6 h were mainly related to carbohydrate metabolism. In contrast, gene expression variation at 30 - 36 h could be attributed primarily to stress response. Although CDC19 was down-regulated, expression of PYK2, PDC6 and ADH2 correlated inversely with ORP. Meanwhile, expression of GPD1 decreased due to the depletion of dissolved oxygen in the fermentation broth, but expression of GPD2 correlated with ORP. Transcription of genes encoding heat shock proteins was characterized by uphill, downhill, valley and plateau expression profiles, accordingly to specific function in stress response. These results highlight the role of ORP in modulating yeast physiology and metabolism under VHG conditions.

  20. Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae kap108Δ Mutants upon Addition of Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Kenneth D; Larson, Nathaniel; Kahn, Jonathan; Tkachev, Dmitry; Ay, Ahmet

    2016-04-07

    Protein transport between the nucleus and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells is tightly regulated, providing a mechanism for controlling intracellular localization of proteins, and regulating gene expression. In this study, we have investigated the importance of nucleocytoplasmic transport mediated by the karyopherin Kap108 in regulating cellular responses to oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae We carried out microarray analyses on wild-type and kap108 mutant cells grown under normal conditions, shortly after introduction of oxidative stress, after 1 hr of oxidative stress, and 1 hr after oxidative stress was removed. We observe more than 500 genes that undergo a 40% or greater change in differential expression between wild-type and kap108Δ cells under at least one of these conditions. Genes undergoing changes in expression can be categorized in two general groups: 1) those that are differentially expressed between wild-type and kap108Δ cells, no matter the oxidative stress conditions; and 2) those that have patterns of response dependent upon both the absence of Kap108, and introduction or removal of oxidative stress. Gene ontology analysis reveals that, among the genes whose expression is reduced in the absence of Kap108 are those involved in stress response and intracellular transport, while those overexpressed are largely involved in mating and pheromone response. We also identified 25 clusters of genes that undergo similar patterns of change in gene expression when oxidative stresses are added and subsequently removed, including genes involved in stress response, oxidation-reduction processing, iron homeostasis, ascospore wall assembly, transmembrane transport, and cell fusion during mating. These data suggest that Kap108 is important for regulating expression of genes involved in a variety of specific cell functions.

  1. Regulation of Expression of GLT1, the Gene Encoding Glutamate Synthase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela, Lourdes; Ballario, Paola; Aranda, Cristina; Filetici, Patrizia; González, Alicia

    1998-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate synthase (GOGAT) is an oligomeric enzyme composed of three 199-kDa identical subunits encoded by GLT1. In this work, we analyzed GLT1 transcriptional regulation. GLT1-lacZ fusions were prepared and GLT1 expression was determined in a GDH1 wild-type strain and in a gdh1 mutant derivative grown in the presence of various nitrogen sources. Null mutants impaired in GCN4, GLN3, GAT1/NIL1, or UGA43/DAL80 were transformed with a GLT1-lacZ fusion to determine whethe...

  2. Abolishment of N-glycan mannosylphosphorylation in glyco-engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae by double disruption of MNN4 and MNN14 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong Hun; Kang, Ji-Yeon; Gil, Jin Young; Kim, Sang-Yoon; Shin, Keun Koo; Kang, Hyun Ah; Kim, Jeong-Yoon; Kwon, Ohsuk; Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2017-04-01

    Mannosylphosphorylated glycans are found only in fungi, including yeast, and the elimination of mannosylphosphates from glycans is a prerequisite for yeast glyco-engineering to produce human-compatible glycoproteins. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, MNN4 and MNN6 genes are known to play roles in mannosylphosphorylation, but disruption of these genes does not completely remove the mannosylphosphates in N-glycans. This study was performed to find unknown key gene(s) involved in N-glycan mannosylphosphorylation in S. cerevisiae. For this purpose, each of one MNN4 and five MNN6 homologous genes were deleted from the och1Δmnn1Δmnn4Δmnn6Δ strain, which lacks yeast-specific hyper-mannosylation and the immunogenic α(1,3)-mannose structure. N-glycan profile analysis of cell wall mannoproteins and a secretory recombinant protein produced in mutants showed that the MNN14 gene, an MNN4 paralog with unknown function, is essential for N-glycan mannosylphosphorylation. Double disruption of MNN4 and MNN14 genes was enough to eliminate N-glycan mannosylphosphorylation. Our results suggest that the S. cerevisiae och1Δmnn1Δmnn4Δmnn14Δ strain, in which all yeast-specific N-glycan structures including mannosylphosphorylation are abolished, may have promise as a useful platform for glyco-engineering to produce therapeutic glycoproteins with human-compatible N-glycans.

  3. The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase complex mediates glucose regulation of gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tian; Bendrioua, Loubna; Carmena, David; García-Salcedo, Raúl; Dahl, Peter; Carling, David; Hohmann, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls energy homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Here we expressed hetero-trimeric mammalian AMPK complexes in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking all five genes encoding yeast AMPK/SNF1 components. Certain mammalian complexes complemented the growth defect of the yeast mutant on non-fermentable carbon sources. Phosphorylation of the AMPK α1-subunit was glucose-regulated, albeit not by the Glc7-Reg1/2 phosphatase, which performs this function on yeast AMPK/SNF1. AMPK could take over SNF1 function in glucose derepression. While indirectly acting anti-diabetic drugs had no effect on AMPK in yeast, compound 991 stimulated α1-subunit phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate a remarkable functional conservation of AMPK and that glucose regulation of AMPK may not be mediated by regulatory features of a specific phosphatase.

  4. A genome-wide immunodetection screen in S. cerevisiae uncovers novel genes involved in lysosomal vacuole function and morphology.

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    Florante Ricarte

    Full Text Available Vacuoles of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are functionally analogous to mammalian lysosomes. Both are cellular organelles responsible for macromolecular degradation, ion/pH homeostasis, and stress survival. We hypothesized that undefined gene functions remain at post-endosomal stage of vacuolar events and performed a genome-wide screen directed at such functions at the late endosome and vacuole interface - ENV genes. The immunodetection screen was designed to identify mutants that internally accumulate precursor form of the vacuolar hydrolase carboxypeptidase Y (CPY. Here, we report the uncovering and initial characterizations of twelve ENV genes. The small size of the collection and the lack of genes previously identified with vacuolar events are suggestive of the intended exclusive functional interface of the screen. Most notably, the collection includes four novel genes ENV7, ENV9, ENV10, and ENV11, and three genes previously linked to mitochondrial processes - MAM3, PCP1, PPE1. In all env mutants, vesicular trafficking stages were undisturbed in live cells as assessed by invertase and active α-factor secretion, as well as by localization of the endocytic fluorescent marker FM4-64 to the vacuole. Several mutants exhibit defects in stress survival functions associated with vacuoles. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed the collection to be significantly enriched in vacuolar morphologies suggestive of fusion and fission defects. These include the unique phenotype of lumenal vesicles within vacuoles in the novel env9Δ mutant and severely fragmented vacuoles upon deletion of GET4, a gene recently implicated in tail anchored membrane protein insertion. Thus, our results establish new gene functions in vacuolar function and morphology, and suggest a link between vacuolar and mitochondrial events.

  5. Improvement of ethanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by high-efficient disruption of the ADH2 gene using a novel recombinant TALEN vector

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Ye; Weimin Zhang; Taomei Liu; Guohui Tan; Haohua Li; Zilei Huang

    2016-01-01

    Bioethanol is becoming increasingly important in energy supply and economic development. However, the low yield of bioethanol and the insufficiency of high-efficient genetic manipulation approaches limit its application. In this study, a novel transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) vector containing the left and right arms of TALEN was electroporated into Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain As2.4 to sequence the alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH2 and the hygromycin-resistant gene hyg...

  6. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transcriptional response of ADH-genes to glucose stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-Garda José

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The large sensitivity, high reproducibility and essentially unlimited dynamic range of real-time PCR to measure gene expression in complex samples provides the opportunity for powerful multivariate and multiway studies of biological phenomena. In multiway studies samples are characterized by their expression profiles to monitor changes over time, effect of treatment, drug dosage etc. Here we perform a multiway study of the temporal response of four yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different glucose uptake rates upon altered metabolic conditions. Results We measured the expression of 18 genes as function of time after addition of glucose to four strains of yeast grown in ethanol. The data are analyzed by matrix-augmented PCA, which is a generalization of PCA for 3-way data, and the results are confirmed by hierarchical clustering and clustering by Kohonen self-organizing map. Our approach identifies gene groups that respond similarly to the change of nutrient, and genes that behave differently in mutant strains. Of particular interest is our finding that ADH4 and ADH6 show a behavior typical of glucose-induced genes, while ADH3 and ADH5 are repressed after glucose addition. Conclusion Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling is a powerful technique which can be utilized to characterize functions of new genes by, for example, comparing their temporal response after perturbation in different genetic variants of the studied subject. The technique also identifies genes that show perturbed expression in specific strains.

  7. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transcriptional response of ADH-genes to glucose stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Elbing, Karin; Andrade-Garda, José Manuel; Sjögreen, Björn; Forootan, Amin; Kubista, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Background The large sensitivity, high reproducibility and essentially unlimited dynamic range of real-time PCR to measure gene expression in complex samples provides the opportunity for powerful multivariate and multiway studies of biological phenomena. In multiway studies samples are characterized by their expression profiles to monitor changes over time, effect of treatment, drug dosage etc. Here we perform a multiway study of the temporal response of four yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different glucose uptake rates upon altered metabolic conditions. Results We measured the expression of 18 genes as function of time after addition of glucose to four strains of yeast grown in ethanol. The data are analyzed by matrix-augmented PCA, which is a generalization of PCA for 3-way data, and the results are confirmed by hierarchical clustering and clustering by Kohonen self-organizing map. Our approach identifies gene groups that respond similarly to the change of nutrient, and genes that behave differently in mutant strains. Of particular interest is our finding that ADH4 and ADH6 show a behavior typical of glucose-induced genes, while ADH3 and ADH5 are repressed after glucose addition. Conclusion Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling is a powerful technique which can be utilized to characterize functions of new genes by, for example, comparing their temporal response after perturbation in different genetic variants of the studied subject. The technique also identifies genes that show perturbed expression in specific strains. PMID:18412983

  8. Improvement of acetic acid tolerance and fermentation performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by disruption of the FPS1 aquaglyceroporin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Guo; Liu, Xiu-Ying; He, Xiu-Ping; Guo, Xue-Na; Lu, Ying; Zhang, Bo-Run

    2011-02-01

    The FPS1 gene coding for the Fps1p aquaglyceroporin protein of an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was disrupted by inserting CUP1 gene. Wild-type strain, CE25, could only grow on YPD medium containing less than 0.45% (v/v) acetic acid, while recombinant strain T12 with FPS1 disruption could grow on YPD medium with 0.6% (v/v) acetic acid. Under 0.4% (v/v) acetic acid stress (pH 4.26), ethanol production and cell growth rates of T12 were 1.7 ± 0.1 and 0.061 ± 0.003 g/l h, while those of CE25 were 1.2 ± 0.1 and 0.048 ± 0.003 g/l h, respectively. FPS1 gene disruption in an industrial ethanologenic yeast thus increases cell growth and ethanol yield under acetic acid stress, which suggests the potential utility of FPS1 gene disruption for bioethanol production from renewable resources such as lignocelluloses.

  9. The gene ICS3 from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in copper homeostasis dependent on extracellular pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alesso, C A; Discola, K F; Monteiro, G

    2015-09-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many genes are involved in the uptake, transport, storage and detoxification of copper. Large scale studies have noted that deletion of the gene ICS3 increases sensitivity to copper, Sortin 2 and acid exposure. Here, we report a study on the Δics3 strain, in which ICS3 is related to copper homeostasis, affecting the intracellular accumulation of this metal. This strain is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and copper exposure, but not to other tested transition metals. At pH 6.0, the Δics3 strain accumulates a larger amount of intracellular copper than the wild-type strain, explaining the sensitivity to oxidants in this condition. Unexpectedly, sensitivity to copper exposure only occurs in acidic conditions. This can be explained by the fact that the exposure of Δics3 cells to high copper concentrations at pH 4.0 results in over-accumulation of copper and iron. Moreover, the expression of ICS3 increases in acidic pH, and this is correlated with CCC2 gene expression, since both genes are regulated by Rim101 from the pH regulon. CCC2 is also upregulated in Δics3 in acidic pH. Together, these data indicate that ICS3 is involved in copper homeostasis and is dependent on extracellular pH.

  10. Comparative study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains to identify potential marker genes correlated to desiccation stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Angela; Votta, Sonia; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zambuto, Marianna; Romaniello, Rossana; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-05-01

    The most diffused formulation of starter for winemaking is active dry yeast (ADY). ADYs production process is essentially characterized by air-drying stress, a combination of several stresses, including thermal, hyperosmotic and oxidative and cell capacity to counteract such multiple stresses will determine its survival. The molecular mechanisms underlying cell stress response to desiccation have been mostly studied in laboratory and commercial yeast strains, but a growing interest is currently developing for indigenous yeast strains which represent a valuable and alternative source of genetic and molecular biodiversity to be exploited. In this work, a comparative study of different Saccharomyces cerevisiae indigenous wine strains, previously selected for their technological traits, has been carried out to identify potentially relevant genes involved in desiccation stress tolerance. Cell viability was evaluated along desiccation treatment and gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR before and during the stress. Our data show that the observed differences in individual strain sensitivity to desiccation stress could be associated to specific gene expression over time. In particular, either the basal or the stress-induced mRNA levels of certain genes, such as HSP12, SSA3, TPS1, TPS2, CTT1 and SOD1, result tightly correlated to the strain survival advantage. This study provides a reliable and sensitive method to predict desiccation stress tolerance of indigenous wine yeast strains which could be preliminary to biotechnological applications.

  11. Overexpression of ADH1 and HXT1 genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves the fermentative efficiency during tequila elaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Lomelí, Melesio; Torres-Guzmán, Juan Carlos; González-Hernández, Gloria Angélica; Cira-Chávez, Luis Alberto; Pelayo-Ortiz, Carlos; Ramírez-Córdova, Jose de Jesús

    2008-05-01

    This work assessed the effect of the overexpression of ADH1 and HXT1 genes in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae AR5 strain during fermentation of Agave tequilana Weber blue variety must. Both genes were cloned individually and simultaneously into a yeast centromere plasmid. Two transformant strains overexpressing ADH1 and HXT1 individually and one strain overexpressing both genes were randomly selected and named A1, A3 and A5 respectively. Overexpression effect on growth and ethanol production of the A1, A3 and A5 strains was evaluated in fermentative conditions in A. tequilana Weber blue variety must and YPD medium. During growth in YPD and Agave media, all the recombinant strains showed lower cell mass formation than the wild type AR5 strain. Adh enzymatic activity in the recombinant strains A1 and A5 cultivated in A. tequilana and YPD medium was higher than in the wild type. The overexpression of both genes individually and simultaneously had no significant effect on ethanol formation; however, the fermentative efficiency of the A5 strain increased from 80.33% to 84.57% and 89.40% to 94.29% in YPD and Agave medium respectively.

  12. The AFT1 transcriptional factor is differentially required for expression of high-affinity iron uptake genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, C; Aldea, M; Espinet, C; Gallego, C; Gil, R; Herrero, E

    1997-06-15

    High-affinity iron uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves the extracytoplasmic reduction of ferric ions by FRE1 and FRE2 reductases. Ferrous ions are then transported across the plasma membrane through the FET3 oxidase-FTR1 permease complex. Expression of the high-affinity iron uptake genes is induced upon iron deprivation. We demonstrate that AFT1 is differentially involved in such regulation. Aft1 protein is required for maintaining detectable non-induced level of FET3 expression and for induction of FRE2 in iron starvation conditions. On the contrary, FRE1 mRNA induction is normal in the absence of Aft1, although the existence of AFT1 point mutations causing constitutive expression of FRE1 (Yamaguchi-Iwai et al., EMBO J. 14: 1231-1239, 1995) indicates that Aft1 may also participate in FRE1 expression in a dispensable way. The alterations in the basal levels of expression of the high-affinity iron uptake genes may explain why the AFT1 mutant is unable to grow on respirable carbon sources. Overexpression of AFT1 leads to growth arrest of the G1 stage of the cell cycle. Aft1 is a transcriptional activator that would be part of the different transcriptional complexes interacting with the promoter of the high-affinity iron uptake genes. Aft1 displays phosphorylation modifications depending on the growth stage of the cells, and it might link induction of genes for iron uptake to other metabolically dominant requirement for cell growth.

  13. Identification of the essential EPE1 gene involved in retention of secreted proteins on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexieva, K I; Klis, F; Wedler, H; Wambutt, R; Venkov, P

    1999-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells secrete extracellularly low amounts of a few proteins. The reasons for retardation of secreted proteins on the cell surface remain obscure. We describe here a mutant able to export enhanced amount of proteins. Classical genetic methods, nucleic acids manipulations and cloning procedures were used to isolate and characterize the mutant and to clone and sequence the corresponding wild type gene. The isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant MW11, is temperature sensitive and exports on average twenty-fold more proteins at 37 degrees C than parental wild type strain (80 micrograms of proteins/1 x 10(8) mutant cells, SEM +/- 5, n22; versus 3 micrograms of proteins/1 x 10(8) parental cells, SEM +/- 1, n22). Protein overexport in the mutant requires a functional SEC1 pathway and is independent of cell lysis. Cloning and sequencing of the corresponding wild type gene identified an open reading frame of 786 bp coding for a hydrophilic protein with predicted molecular mass of 30 kDa and cytosolic localization. The newly identified gene, designated EPE1, is an essential gene. Its DNA and amino acids sequence showed no homology with other yeast genes and proteins. It is concluded that the function of unknown yet genes, such as EPE1 is needed for retention of secreted proteins on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

  14. Screening of genes involved in isooctane tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using mRNA differential display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, S; Zou, W; Ueda, M; Tanaka, A

    2000-11-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, KK-211, isolated by the long-term bioprocess of stereoselective reduction in isooctane, showed extremely high tolerance to the solvent, which is toxic to yeast cells, but, in comparison with its wild-type parent, DY-1, showed low tolerance to hydrophilic organic solvents, such as dimethyl sulfoxide and ethanol. In order to detect the isooctane tolerance-associated genes, mRNA differential display (DD) was employed using mRNAs isolated from strains DY-1 and KK-211 cultivated without isooctane, and from strain KK-211 cultivated with isooctane. Thirty genes were identified as being differentially expressed in these three types of cells and were classified into three groups according to their expression patterns. These patterns were further confirmed and quantified by Northern blot analysis. On the DD fingerprints, the expression of 14 genes, including MUQ1, PRY2, HAC1, AGT1, GAC1, and ICT1 (YLR099c) was induced, while the expression of the remaining 16 genes, including JEN1, PRY1, PRY3, and KRE1, was decreased, in strain KK-211 cultivated with isooctane. The genes represented by HAC1, PRY1, and ICT1 have been reported to be associated with cell stress, and AGT1 and GAC1 have been reported to be involved in the uptake of trehalose and the production of glycogen, respectively. MUQ1 and KRE1, encoding proteins associated with cell surface maintenance, were also detected. Based on these results, we concluded that alteration of expression levels of multiple genes, not of a single gene, might be the critical determinant for isooctane tolerance in strain KK-211.

  15. The roles of whole-genome and small-scale duplications in the functional specialization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes.

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    Mario A Fares

    Full Text Available Researchers have long been enthralled with the idea that gene duplication can generate novel functions, crediting this process with great evolutionary importance. Empirical data shows that whole-genome duplications (WGDs are more likely to be retained than small-scale duplications (SSDs, though their relative contribution to the functional fate of duplicates remains unexplored. Using the map of genetic interactions and the re-sequencing of 27 Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes evolving for 2,200 generations we show that SSD-duplicates lead to neo-functionalization while WGD-duplicates partition ancestral functions. This conclusion is supported by: (a SSD-duplicates establish more genetic interactions than singletons and WGD-duplicates; (b SSD-duplicates copies share more interaction-partners than WGD-duplicates copies; (c WGD-duplicates interaction partners are more functionally related than SSD-duplicates partners; (d SSD-duplicates gene copies are more functionally divergent from one another, while keeping more overlapping functions, and diverge in their sub-cellular locations more than WGD-duplicates copies; and (e SSD-duplicates complement their functions to a greater extent than WGD-duplicates. We propose a novel model that uncovers the complexity of evolution after gene duplication.

  16. The Roles of Whole-Genome and Small-Scale Duplications in the Functional Specialization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Mario A.; Keane, Orla M.; Toft, Christina; Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Jones, Gary W.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have long been enthralled with the idea that gene duplication can generate novel functions, crediting this process with great evolutionary importance. Empirical data shows that whole-genome duplications (WGDs) are more likely to be retained than small-scale duplications (SSDs), though their relative contribution to the functional fate of duplicates remains unexplored. Using the map of genetic interactions and the re-sequencing of 27 Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes evolving for 2,200 generations we show that SSD-duplicates lead to neo-functionalization while WGD-duplicates partition ancestral functions. This conclusion is supported by: (a) SSD-duplicates establish more genetic interactions than singletons and WGD-duplicates; (b) SSD-duplicates copies share more interaction-partners than WGD-duplicates copies; (c) WGD-duplicates interaction partners are more functionally related than SSD-duplicates partners; (d) SSD-duplicates gene copies are more functionally divergent from one another, while keeping more overlapping functions, and diverge in their sub-cellular locations more than WGD-duplicates copies; and (e) SSD-duplicates complement their functions to a greater extent than WGD–duplicates. We propose a novel model that uncovers the complexity of evolution after gene duplication. PMID:23300483

  17. [Expression of the Drosophila melanogaster limk1 gene 3'-UTRs mRNA in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, A M; Zakharov, G A; Zhuravlev, A V; Padkina, M V; Savvateeva-Popova, E V; Sambuk, E V

    2014-06-01

    The stability of mRNA and its translation efficacy in higher eukaryotes are influenced by the interaction of 3'-untranscribed regions (3'-UTRs) with microRNAs and RNA-binding proteins. Since Saccharomyces cerevisiae lack microRNAs, it is possible to evaluate the contribution of only 3'-UTRs' and RNA-binding proteins' interaction in post-transcriptional regulation. For this, the post-transcriptional regulation of Drosophila limk1 gene encoding for the key enzyme of actin remodeling was studied in yeast. Analysis of limkl mRNA 3'-UTRs revealed the potential sites of yeast transcriptional termination. Computer remodeling demonstrated the possibility of secondary structure formation in limkl mRNA 3'-UTRs. For an evaluation of the functional activity of Drosophila 3'-UTRs in yeast, the reporter gene PHO5 encoding for yeast acid phosphatase (AP) fused to different variants of Drosophila limk1 mRNA 3'-UTRs (513, 1075, 1554 bp) was used. Assessments of AP activity and RT-PCR demonstrated that Drosophila limkl gene 3'-UTRs were functionally active and recognized in yeast. Therefore, yeast might be used as an appropriate model system for studies of 3'-UTR's role in post-transcriptional regulation.

  18. Polyphosphates and Polyphosphatase Activity in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Overexpression of the DDP1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilisenko, L V; Andreeva, N A; Eldarov, M A; Dumina, M V; Kulakovskaya, T V

    2015-10-01

    The effects of overexpression of yeast diphosphoinositol polyphosphate phosphohydrolase (DDP1) having endopolyphosphatase activity on inorganic polyphosphate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. The endopolyphosphatase activity in the transformed strain significantly increased compared to the parent strain. This activity was observed with polyphosphates of different chain length, being suppressed by 2 mM tripolyphosphate or ATP. The content of acid-soluble and acid-insoluble polyphosphates under DDP1 overexpression decreased by 9 and 28%, respectively. The average chain length of salt-soluble and alkali-soluble fractions did not change in the overexpressing strain, and that of acid-soluble polyphosphate increased under phosphate excess. At the initial stage of polyphosphate recovery after phosphorus starvation, the chain length of the acid-soluble fraction in transformed cells was lower compared to the recipient strain. This observation suggests the complex nature of DDP1 involvement in the regulation of polyphosphate content and chain length in yeasts.

  19. Identification of auxotrophic mutants of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus by non-homologous end joining-mediated integrative transformation with genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarimizu, Tohru; Nonklang, Sanom; Nakamura, Junpei; Tokuda, Shuya; Nakagawa, Takaaki; Lorreungsil, Sasithorn; Sutthikhumpha, Surasit; Pukahuta, Charida; Kitagawa, Takao; Nakamura, Mikiko; Cha-Aim, Kamonchai; Limtong, Savitree; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji

    2013-12-01

    The isolation and application of auxotrophic mutants for gene manipulations, such as genetic transformation, mating selection and tetrad analysis, form the basis of yeast genetics. For the development of these genetic methods in the thermotolerant fermentative yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, we isolated a series of auxotrophic mutants with defects in amino acid or nucleic acid metabolism. To identify the mutated genes, linear DNA fragments of nutrient biosynthetic pathway genes were amplified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomal DNA and used to directly transform the K. marxianus auxotrophic mutants by random integration into chromosomes through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The appearance of transformant colonies indicated that the specific S. cerevisiae gene complemented the K. marxianus mutant. Using this interspecific complementation approach with linear PCR-amplified DNA, we identified auxotrophic mutations of ADE2, ADE5,7, ADE6, HIS2, HIS3, HIS4, HIS5, HIS6, HIS7, LYS1, LYS2, LYS4, LYS9, LEU1, LEU2, MET2, MET6, MET17, TRP3, TRP4 and TRP5 without the labour-intensive requirement of plasmid construction. Mating, sporulation and tetrad analysis techniques for K. marxianus were also established. With the identified auxotrophic mutant strains and S. cerevisiae genes as selective markers, NHEJ-mediated integrative transformation with PCR-amplified DNA is an attractive system for facilitating genetic analyses in the yeast K. marxianus.

  20. MKT1, a nonessential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene with a temperature-dependent effect on replication of M2 double-stranded RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Wickner, R B

    1987-01-01

    The MKT1 gene was defined by recessive alleles present in many laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that result in loss of M2 double-stranded RNA at temperatures above 30 degrees C if L-A-HN double-stranded RNA is present but not if L-A-H is present. I mapped MKT1 near TOP2 and isolated the gene by chromosome walking from TOP2. The gene location was defined by deletions, and a 2.8-kilobase transcript corresponding to the gene was detected. The recessive natural-variant mutations are...

  1. Improvement of ethanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by high-efficient disruption of the ADH2 gene using a novel recombinant TALEN vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ye

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol is becoming increasingly important in energy supply and economic development. However, the low yield of bioethanol and the insufficiency of high-efficient genetic manipulation approaches limit its application. In this study, a novel transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN vector containing the left and right arms of TALEN was electroporated into Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain As2.4 to sequence the alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH2 and the hygromycin-resistant gene hyg. Western blot analysis using anti-FLAG monoclonal antibody proved the successful expression of TALE proteins in As2.4 strains. qPCR and sequencing demonstrated the accurate knockout of the 17 bp target gene with 80% efficiency. The TALEN vector and ADH2 PCR product were electroporated into △ADH2 to complement the ADH2 gene (ADH2+ As2.4. LC–MS and GC were employed to detect ethanol yields in the native As2.4, △ADH2 As2.4, and ADH2+ As2.4 strains. Results showed that ethanol production was improved by 52.4% ± 5.3% through the disruption of ADH2 in As2.4. The bioethanol yield of ADH2+ As2.4 was nearly the same as that of native As2.4. This study is the first to report on the disruption of a target gene in S. cerevisiae by employing Fast TALEN technology to improve bioethanol yield. This work provides a novel approach for the disruption of a target gene in S. cerevisiae with high efficiency and specificity, thereby promoting the improvement of bioethanol production in S. cerevisiae by metabolic engineering.

  2. Effects of deletion of different PP2C protein phosphatase genes on stress responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin, Dilruba; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2014-10-01

    A key mechanism of signal transduction in eukaryotes is reversible protein phosphorylation, mediated through protein kinases and protein phosphatases (PPases). Modulation of signal transduction by this means regulates many biological processes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has 40 PPases, including seven protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C PPase) genes (PTC1-PTC7). However, their precise functions remain poorly understood. To elucidate their cellular functions and to identify those that are redundant, we constructed 127 strains with deletions of all possible combinations of the seven PP2C PPase genes. All 127 disruptants were viable under nutrient-rich conditions, demonstrating that none of the combinations induced synthetic lethality under these conditions. However, several combinations exhibited novel phenotypes, e.g. the Δptc5Δptc7 double disruptant and the Δptc2Δptc3Δptc5Δptc7 quadruple disruptant exhibited low (13°C) and high (37°C) temperature-sensitive growth, respectively. Interestingly, the septuple disruptant Δptc1Δptc2Δptc3Δptc4Δptc5Δptc6Δptc7 showed an essentially normal growth phenotype at 37°C. The Δptc2Δptc3Δptc5Δptc7 quadruple disruptant was sensitive to LiCl (0.4 m). Two double disruptants, Δptc1Δptc2 and Δptc1Δptc4, displayed slow growth and Δptc1Δptc2Δptc4 could not grow on medium containing 1.5 m NaCl. The Δptc1Δptc6 double disruptant showed increased sensitivity to caffeine, congo red and calcofluor white compared to each single deletion. Our observations indicate that S. cerevisiae PP2C PPases have a shared and important role in responses to environmental stresses. These disruptants also provide a means for exploring the molecular mechanisms of redundant PTC gene functions under defined conditions.

  3. Genes for directing vacuolar morphogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. I. Isolation and characterization of two classes of vam mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y; Ohsumi, Y; Anraku, Y

    1992-09-15

    We identified nine VAM genes (for vacuolar morphology) by genetic analyses on mutants with defective vacuolar morphologies and assembly in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The nine VAM genes were classified into two classes according to the mutant phenotypes. The class I vam mutants (vam1, vam5, vam8, and vam9) show a few small vesicles that are stained with histochemical markers for the vacuolar compartment. They also have defects in the maturation of vacuolar marker proteins, and their growth is hypersensitive to high concentrations of CaCl2 or a temperature of 37 degrees C. There are apparent genetic overlaps among the class I vam mutations and other mutations including cls, end, pep, and vps, which have been shown to be involved in the expression of the vacuolar functions. The class II vam mutants (vam2, vam3, vam4, vam6, and vam7) contain numerous small vesicles stained with the vacuolar histochemical markers and mature forms of the vacuolar proteins and do not show any apparent growth defects in the presence of CaCl2 or at 37 degrees C.

  4. Involvement of oxidative stress response genes in redox homeostasis, the level of reactive oxygen species, and ageing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakulic, Tamara; Temple, Mark D; Guido, Ron; Jarolim, Stefanie; Breitenbach, Michael; Attfield, Paul V; Dawes, Ian W

    2005-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants lacking oxidative stress response genes were used to investigate which genes are required under normal aerobic conditions to maintain cellular redox homeostasis, using intracellular glutathione redox potential (glutathione E(h)) to indicate the redox environment of the cells. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potentials (MMP) were also assessed by FACS using dihydroethidium and rhodamine 123 as fluorescent probes. Cells became more oxidised as strains shifted from exponential growth to stationary phase. During both phases the presence of reduced thioredoxin and the activity of glutathione reductase were important for redox homeostasis. Thioredoxin reductase contributed less during exponential phase when there was a strong requirement for active Yap1p transcription factor, but was critical during stationary phase. The absence of ROS detoxification systems, such as catalases or superoxide dismutases, had a lesser effect on glutathione E(h), but a more pronounced effect on ROS levels and MMP. These results reflect the major shift in ROS generation as cells switch from fermentative to respiratory metabolism and also showed that there was not a strong correlation between ROS production, MMP and cellular redox environment. Heterogeneity was detected in populations of strains with compromised anti-oxidant defences, and as cells aged they shifted from one cell type with low ROS content to another with much higher intracellular ROS.

  5. The late-annotated small ORF LSO1 is a target gene of the iron regulon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xiuxiang; Zhang, Caiguo; Sclafani, Robert A; Seligman, Paul; Huang, Mingxia

    2015-12-01

    We have identified a new downstream target gene of the Aft1/2-regulated iron regulon in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the late-annotated small open reading frame LSO1. LSO1 transcript is among the most highly induced from a transcriptome analysis of a fet3-1 mutant grown in the presence of the iron chelator bathophenanthrolinedisulfonic acid. LSO1 has a paralog, LSO2, which is constitutively expressed and not affected by iron availability. In contrast, we find that the LSO1 promoter region contains three consensus binding sites for the Aft1/2 transcription factors and that an LSO1-lacZ reporter is highly induced under low-iron conditions in a Aft1-dependent manner. The expression patterns of the Lso1 and Lso2 proteins mirror those of their mRNAs. Both proteins are localized to the nucleus and cytoplasm, but become more cytoplasmic upon iron deprivation consistent with a role in iron transport. LSO1 and LSO2 appear to play overlapping roles in the cellular response to iron starvation since single lso1 and lso2 mutants are sensitive to iron deprivation and this sensitivity is exacerbated when both genes are deleted.

  6. A set of vectors with a tetracycline-regulatable promoter system for modulated gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garí, E; Piedrafita, L; Aldea, M; Herrero, E

    1997-07-01

    A set of Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression vectors has been developed in which transcription is driven by a hybrid tetO-CYC1 promoter through the action of a tetR-VP16 (tTA) activator. Expression from the promoter is regulated by tetracycline or derivatives. Various modalities of promoter and activator are used in order to achieve different levels of maximal expression. In the presence of antibiotic in the growth medium at concentrations that do not affect cell growth, expression from the tetO promoter is negligible, and upon antibiotic removal induction ratios of up to 1000-fold are observed with a lacZ reporter system. With the strongest system, overexpression levels comparable with those observed with GAL1-driven promoters are reached. For each particular promoter/tTA combination, expression can be modulated by changing the tetracycline concentration in the growth medium. These vectors may be useful for the study of the function of essential genes in yeast, as well as for phenotypic analysis of genes in overexpression conditions, without restrictions imposed by growth medium composition.

  7. Isolation of new genes in distal Xq28: transcriptional map and identification of a human homologue of the ARD1 N-acetyl transferase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribioli, C; Mancini, M; Plassart, E; Bione, S; Rivella, S; Sala, C; Torri, G; Toniolo, D

    1994-07-01

    In this paper, we describe the physical and transcriptional organization of a region of 140 kb in Xq28, 5' to the L1CAM gene. By isolation and mapping of CpG islands to the physical map of the region, isolation of cDNAs, determination of partial nucleotide sequences and study of the pattern of expression and of the orientation of the transcripts identified we have established a transcriptional map of this region. In this map, previously identified genes (L1CAM, V2R, HCF1 and RnBP) have been positioned as well as 3 new genes. All genes in the region are rather small, ranging in size from 2 to 30 kb, and very close to one another. With the exception of the V2R gene, they are housekeeping, have a CpG island at their 5' end and the same orientation of transcription. This kind of organization is consistent with the one previously described for the more distal portion of Xq28, between the Color Vision (CV) and the G6PD genes and indicates that genes with housekeeping and tissue specific pattern of expression are interspersed in the genome but they are probably found in different 'transcriptional domains'. Among the new genes, TE2 demonstrated 40% identity with the protein N-acetyl transferase ARD1 of S. cerevisiae: TE2 may be the human homologue of the S. cerevisiae gene.

  8. Gene engineering in yeast for biodegradation: Immunological cross-reactivity among cytochrome p-450 system proteins of saccharomyces cerevisiae and candida tropicalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loper, J.C.; Chen, C.; Dey, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    Yeasts are eukaryotic microorganisms whose cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase systems may be amenable to genetic engineering for the hydroxylation and detoxication of polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. The molecular genetic properties of strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and an n-alkane utilizing yeast, Candida tropicalis ATCC750 are examined. Standard methods were used to purify cytochrome P-450 and NADPH-cytochrome c (P-450) reductase proteins from cells cultured by semi-anaerobic glucose fermentation (S. cerevisiae, C. tropicalis) and by growth on tetradecane (C. tropicalis). Polyvalent antisera prepared in rabbits to some of these proteins were used in tests of immunological relatedness among the purified proteins using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and nitrocellulose filter immunoblots. The results provide evidence for gene relationships which should prove useful in gene isolation and subsequent engineering of P-450 enzyme systems in yeast.

  9. Testing of chemicals for genetic activity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a report of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Gene-Tox Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, F.K.; von Borstel, R.C.; von Halle, E.S.; Parry, J.M.; Siebert, D.; Zetterberg, G.; Barale, R.; Loprieno, N.

    1984-01-01

    This review article with over 200 references summarizes the results of mutation screening tests with 492 chemicals using saccharomyces cerevisiae as the test organism. In addition, an extensive description of S. cerevisiae as a test organism is given. Yeast can be used to study genetic effects both in mitotic and in meiotic cells because it can be cultured as a stable haploid or a stable diploid. The most commonly used genetic endpoint has been mitotic recombination either as mitotic crossing-over or mitotic gene conversion. Data were available on tests with 492 chemicals, of which 249 were positive, as reported in 173 articles or reports. The genetic test/carcinogenicity accuracy was 0.74, based on the carcinogen listing established in the gene-tox program. The yeast tests supplement the bacterial tests for detecting agents that act via radical formation, antibacterial drugs, and other chemicals interfering with chromosome segregation and recombination processes.

  10. Heme regulates the expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of chimaeric genes containing 5'-flanking soybean leghemoglobin sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E O; Marcker, K A; Villadsen, IS

    1986-01-01

    The TM1 yeast mutant was transformed with a 2 micron-derived plasmid (YEp24) which carries a chimaeric gene containing the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene fused to the 5'- and 3'-flanking regions of the soybean leghemoglobin (Lb) c3 gene. Expression of the chimaeric...

  11. Analysis of gene expression profiles of Lactobacillus paracasei induced by direct contact with Saccharomyces cerevisiae through recognition of yeast mannan

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAMASAKI-YASHIKI, Shino; SAWADA, Hiroshi; KINO-OKA, Masahiro; KATAKURA, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Co-culture of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeast induces specific responses that are not observed in pure culture. Gene expression profiles of Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC 334 co-cultured with Saccharomyces cerevisiae IFO 0216 were analyzed by DNA microarray, and the responses induced by direct contact with the yeast cells were investigated. Coating the LAB cells with recombinant DnaK, which acts as an adhesive protein between LAB and yeast cells, enhanced the ratio of adhesion of the LAB cells to the yeast cells. The signals induced by direct contact were clarified by removal of the LAB cells unbound to the yeast cells. The genes induced by direct contact with heat-inactivated yeast cells were very similar to both those induced by the intact yeast cells and those induced by a soluble mannan. The top 20 genes upregulated by direct contact with the heat-inactivated yeast cells mainly encoded proteins related to exopolysaccharide synthesis, modification of surface proteins, and transport systems. In the case of the most upregulated gene, LSEI_0669, encoding a protein that has a region homologous to polyprenyl glycosylphosphotransferase, the expression level was upregulated 7.6-, 11.0-, and 8.8-fold by the heat-inactivated yeast cells, the intact yeast cells, and the soluble mannan, respectively, whereas it was only upregulated 1.8-fold when the non-adherent LAB cells were not removed before RNA extraction. Our results indicated that the LAB responded to direct contact with the yeast cells through recognition of mannan on the surface of the yeast.

  12. VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Non; Miyoshi, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Takanori; Nakazono, Toshimitsu; Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2015-12-15

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is synthesized through decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine (PS), catalysed by PS decarboxylase 1 (Psd1p) and 2 (Psd2p) and the cytidine 5'-diphosphate (CDP)-ethanolamine (CDP-Etn) pathway. PSD1 null (psd1Δ) and PSD2 null (psd2Δ) mutants are viable in a synthetic minimal medium, but a psd1Δ psd2Δ double mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy, which is incorporated into PE through the CDP-Etn pathway. We have previously shown that psd1Δ is synthetic lethal with deletion of VID22 (vid22Δ) [Kuroda et al. (2011) Mol. Microbiol. 80: , 248-265]. In the present study, we found that vid22Δ mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy under PSD1-depressed conditions. Deletion of VID22 in wild-type and PSD1-depressed cells caused partial defects in PE formation through decarboxylation of PS. The enzyme activity of PS decarboxylase in an extract of vid22Δ cells was ∼70% of that in wild-type cells and similar to that in psd2Δ cells and the PS decarboxylase activity remaining in the PSD1-depressed cells became almost negligible with deletion of VID22. Thus, the vid22Δ mutation was suggested to cause a defect in the Psd2p activity. Furthermore, vid22Δ cells were shown to be defective in expression of the PSD2 gene tagged with 6×HA, the defect being ameliorated by replacement of the native promoter of the PSD2 gene with a CYC1 promoter. In addition, an α-galactosidase reporter assay revealed that the activity of the promoter of the PSD2 gene in vid22Δ cells was ∼5% of that in wild-type cells. These results showed that VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene.

  13. Enhancement of gene targeting in human cells by intranuclear permeation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52 protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvala, Arjun; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Di Primio, Cristina; Liverani, Vania; Falaschi, Arturo; Galli, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of exogenous DNA in human somatic cells results in a frequency of random integration at least 100-fold higher than gene targeting (GT), posing a seemingly insurmountable limitation for gene therapy applications. We previously reported that, in human cells, the stable over-expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52 gene (yRAD52), which plays the major role in yeast homologous recombination (HR), caused an up to 37-fold increase in the frequency of GT, indicating that yRAD52 interacts with the double-strand break repair pathway(s) of human cells favoring homologous integration. In the present study, we tested the effect of the yRad52 protein by delivering it directly to the human cells. To this purpose, we fused the yRAD52 cDNA to the arginine-rich domain of the TAT protein of HIV (tat11) that is known to permeate the cell membranes. We observed that a recombinant yRad52tat11 fusion protein produced in Escherichia coli, which maintains its ability to bind single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), enters the cells and the nuclei, where it is able to increase both intrachromosomal recombination and GT up to 63- and 50-fold, respectively. Moreover, the non-homologous plasmid DNA integration decreased by 4-fold. yRAD52tat11 proteins carrying point mutations in the ssDNA binding domain caused a lower or nil increase in recombination proficiency. Thus, the yRad52tat11 could be instrumental to increase GT in human cells and a ‘protein delivery approach’ offers a new tool for developing novel strategies for genome modification and gene therapy applications. PMID:20519199

  14. Nuclear localization domains of GATA activator Gln3 are required for transcription of target genes through dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numamoto, Minori; Tagami, Shota; Ueda, Yusuke; Imabeppu, Yusuke; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Maekawa, Hiromi; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    The GATA transcription activator Gln3 in the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) activates transcription of nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-sensitive genes. In cells grown in the presence of preferred nitrogen sources, Gln3 is phosphorylated in a TOR-dependent manner and localizes in the cytoplasm. In cells grown in non-preferred nitrogen medium or treated with rapamycin, Gln3 is dephosphorylated and is transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, thereby activating the transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. Caffeine treatment also induces dephosphorylation of Gln3 and its translocation to the nucleus and transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. However, the details of the mechanism by which phosphorylation controls Gln3 localization and transcriptional activity are unknown. Here, we focused on two regions of Gln3 with nuclear localization signal properties (NLS-K, and NLS-C) and one with nuclear export signal (NES). We constructed various mutants for our analyses: gln3 containing point mutations in all potential phosphoacceptor sites (Thr-339, Ser-344, Ser-347, Ser-355, Ser-391) in the NLS and NES regions to produce non-phosphorylatable (alanine) or mimic-phosphorylatable (aspartic acid) residues; and deletion mutants. We found that phosphorylation of Gln3 was impaired in all of these mutations and that the aspartic acid substitution mutants showed drastic reduction of Gln3-mediated transcriptional activity despite the fact that the mutations had no effect on nuclear localization of Gln3. Our observations suggest that these regions are required for transcription of target genes presumably through dephosphorylation.

  15. Differential control of Zap1-regulated genes in response to zinc deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Chang-Yi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Zap1 transcription factor is a central player in the response of yeast to changes in zinc status. We previously used transcriptome profiling with DNA microarrays to identify 46 potential Zap1 target genes in the yeast genome. In this new study, we used complementary methods to identify additional Zap1 target genes. Results With alternative growth conditions for the microarray experiments and a more sensitive motif identification algorithm, we identified 31 new potential targets of Zap1 activation. Moreover, an analysis of the response of Zap1 target genes to a range of zinc concentrations and to zinc withdrawal over time demonstrated that these genes respond differently to zinc deficiency. Some genes are induced under mild zinc deficiency and act as a first line of defense against this stress. First-line defense genes serve to maintain zinc homeostasis by increasing zinc uptake, and by mobilizing and conserving intracellular zinc pools. Other genes respond only to severe zinc limitation and act as a second line of defense. These second-line defense genes allow cells to adapt to conditions of zinc deficiency and include genes involved in maintaining secretory pathway and cell wall function, and stress responses. Conclusion We have identified several new targets of Zap1-mediated regulation. Furthermore, our results indicate that through the differential regulation of its target genes, Zap1 prioritizes mechanisms of zinc homeostasis and adaptive responses to zinc deficiency.

  16. Overexpression of ACC gene from oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi enhanced the lipid accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with increased levels of glycerol 3-phosphate substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiancai; Xu, Ronghua; Wang, Ruling; Haque, Mohammad Enamul; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-06-01

    The conversion of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA by acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is the rate-limiting step in fatty acid biosynthesis. In this study, a gene coding for ACC was isolated and characterized from an oleaginous yeast, Lipomyces starkeyi. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of L. starkeyi acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene (LsACC1) showed that the expression levels were upregulated with the fast accumulation of lipids. The LsACC1 was co-overexpressed with the glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GPD1), which regulates lipids biosynthesis by supplying another substrates glycerol 3-phosphate for storage lipid assembly, in the non-oleaginous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Further, the S. cerevisiae acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ScACC1) was transferred with GPD1 and its function was analyzed in comparison with LsACC1. The results showed that overexpressed LsACC1 and GPD1 resulted in a 63% increase in S. cerevisiae. This study gives new data in understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of fatty acids and lipid biosynthesis in yeasts.

  17. Gene expression profiling and phenotype analyses of S. cerevisiae in response to changing copper reveals six genes with new roles in copper and iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bakel, Harm; Strengman, Eric; Wijmenga, Cisca; Holstege, Frank C P

    2005-08-11

    Exhaustive microarray time course analyses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during copper starvation and copper excess reveal new aspects of metal-induced gene regulation. Aside from identifying targets of established copper- and iron-responsive transcription factors, we find that genes encoding mitochondrial proteins are downregulated and that copper-independent iron transport genes are preferentially upregulated, both during prolonged copper deprivation. The experiments also suggest the presence of a small regulatory iron pool that links copper and iron responses. One hundred twenty-eight genes with putative roles in metal metabolism were further investigated by several systematic phenotype screens. Of the novel phenotypes uncovered, hsp12-Delta and arn1-Delta display increased sensitivity to copper, cyc1-Delta and crr1-Delta show resistance to high copper, vma13-Delta exhibits increased sensitivity to iron deprivation, and pep12-Delta results in reduced growth in high copper and low iron. Besides revealing new components of eukaryotic metal trafficking pathways, the results underscore the previously determined intimate links between iron and copper metabolism and mitochondrial and vacuolar function in metal trafficking. The analyses further suggest that copper starvation can specifically lead to downregulation of respiratory function to preserve iron and copper for other cellular processes.

  18. Engineering of Promoter Replacement Cassettes for Fine-Tuning of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The strong overexpression or complete deletion of a gene gives only limited information about its control over a certain phenotype or pathway. Gene function studies based on these methods are therefore incomplete. To effect facile manipulation of gene expression across a full continuum of possible expression levels, we recently created a library of mutant promoters. Here, we provide the detailed characterization of our yeast promoter collection comprising 11 mutants of the strong constitutive...

  19. Expression of a chimeric human/salmon calcitonin gene integrated into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome using rDNA sequences as recombination sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hengyi; Zang, Xiaonan; Liu, Yuantao; Cao, Xiaofei; Wu, Fei; Huang, Xiaoyun; Jiang, Minjie; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2015-12-01

    Calcitonin participates in controlling homeostasis of calcium and phosphorus and plays an important role in bone metabolism. The aim of this study was to endow an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the ability to express chimeric human/salmon calcitonin (hsCT) without the use of antibiotics. To do so, a homologous recombination plasmid pUC18-rDNA2-ura3-P pgk -5hsCT-rDNA1 was constructed, which contains two segments of ribosomal DNA of 1.1 kb (rDNA1) and 1.4 kb (rDNA2), to integrate the heterologous gene into host rDNA. A DNA fragment containing five copies of a chimeric human/salmon calcitonin gene (5hsCT) under the control of the promoter for phosphoglycerate kinase (P pgk ) was constructed to express 5hsCT in S. cerevisiae using ura3 as a selectable auxotrophic marker gene. After digestion by restriction endonuclease HpaI, a linear fragment, rDNA2-ura3-P pgk -5hsCT-rDNA1, was obtained and transformed into the △ura3 mutant of S. cerevisiae by the lithium acetate method. The ura3-P pgk -5hsCT sequence was introduced into the genome at rDNA sites by homologous recombination, and the recombinant strain YS-5hsCT was obtained. Southern blot analysis revealed that the 5hsCT had been integrated successfully into the genome of S. cerevisiae. The results of Western blot and ELISA confirmed that the 5hsCT protein had been expressed in the recombinant strain YS-5hsCT. The expression level reached 2.04 % of total proteins. S. cerevisiae YS-5hsCT decreased serum calcium in mice by oral administration and even 0.01 g lyophilized S. cerevisiae YS-5hsCT/kg decreased serum calcium by 0.498 mM. This work has produced a commercial yeast strain potentially useful for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  20. Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus K; Andersen, Kaj Scherz; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biofilms can be defined as multi-cellular aggregates adhering to a surface and embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM). The nonpathogenic yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, follows the common traits of microbial biofilms with cell-cell and cell-surface adhesion. S. cerevisiae is shown...... pathways including the protein kinase A and a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Advanced genetic tools and resources have been developed for S. cerevisiae including a deletion mutant-strain collection in a biofilm-forming strain background and GFP-fusion protein collections. Furthermore, S....... cerevisiae biofilm is well applied for confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorophore tagging of proteins, DNA and RNA. These techniques can be used to uncover the molecular mechanisms for biofilm development, drug resistance and for the study of molecular interactions, cell response to environmental...

  1. Regulation of expression of GLT1, the gene encoding glutamate synthase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, L; Ballario, P; Aranda, C; Filetici, P; González, A

    1998-07-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate synthase (GOGAT) is an oligomeric enzyme composed of three 199-kDa identical subunits encoded by GLT1. In this work, we analyzed GLT1 transcriptional regulation. GLT1-lacZ fusions were prepared and GLT1 expression was determined in a GDH1 wild-type strain and in a gdh1 mutant derivative grown in the presence of various nitrogen sources. Null mutants impaired in GCN4, GLN3, GAT1/NIL1, or UGA43/DAL80 were transformed with a GLT1-lacZ fusion to determine whether the above-mentioned transcriptional factors had a role in GLT1 expression. A collection of increasingly larger 5' deletion derivatives of the GLT1 promoter was constructed to identify DNA sequences that could be involved in GLT1 transcriptional regulation. The effect of the lack of GCN4, GLN3, or GAT1/NIL1 was also tested in the pertinent 5' deletion derivatives. Our results indicate that (i) GLT1 expression is negatively modulated by glutamate-mediated repression and positively regulated by Gln3p- and Gcn4p-dependent transcriptional activation; (ii) two cis-acting elements, a CGGN15CCG palindrome and an imperfect poly(dA-dT), are present and could play a role in GLT1 transcriptional activation; and (iii) GLT1 expression is moderately regulated by GCN4 under amino acid deprivation. Our results suggest that in a wild-type strain grown on ammonium, GOGAT constitutes an ancillary pathway for glutamate biosynthesis.

  2. Programmed cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is hampered by the deletion of GUP1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulha Joana

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past years, yeast has been successfully established as a model to study mechanisms of programmed cell death regulation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae commits to cell death showing typical hallmarks of metazoan apoptosis, in response to different stimuli. Gup1p, an O-acyltransferase, is required for several cellular processes that are related to apoptosis development, such as rafts integrity and stability, lipid metabolism including GPI anchor correct remodeling, proper mitochondrial and vacuole function, bud site selection and actin dynamics. Therefore, we hypothesize that apoptotic process would be affected by GUP1 deletion. Results In the present work we used two known apoptosis inducing conditions, chronological aging and acetic acid, to assess several apoptotic markers in gup1∆ mutant strain. We found that this mutant presents a significantly reduced chronological lifespan as compared to Wt and it is also highly sensitive to acetic acid treatment. In addition, it presents extremely high levels of ROS. There were notorious differences on apoptotic markers between Wt and gup1∆ mutant strains, namely on the maintenance of plasma membrane integrity, on the phosphatidylserine externalization, on the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane and on the chromatin condensation. Those suggested that the mutant, under either condition, probably dies of necrosis and not from apoptosis. Conclusions To Gup1p has been assigned an important function on lipid rafts assembly/integrity, lipid metabolism and GPI anchor remodeling. Our results provide, for the first time, the connection of the integrity of yeast lipid rafts and apoptosis induction and/or signaling, giving new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying this process in yeast.

  3. Steady-state and dynamic gene expression programs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to variation in environmental nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airoldi, Edoardo M; Miller, Darach; Athanasiadou, Rodoniki; Brandt, Nathan; Abdul-Rahman, Farah; Neymotin, Benjamin; Hashimoto, Tatsu; Bahmani, Tayebeh; Gresham, David

    2016-04-15

    Cell growth rate is regulated in response to the abundance and molecular form of essential nutrients. InSaccharomyces cerevisiae(budding yeast), the molecular form of environmental nitrogen is a major determinant of cell growth rate, supporting growth rates that vary at least threefold. Transcriptional control of nitrogen use is mediated in large part by nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR), which results in the repression of specific transcripts in the presence of a preferred nitrogen source that supports a fast growth rate, such as glutamine, that are otherwise expressed in the presence of a nonpreferred nitrogen source, such as proline, which supports a slower growth rate. Differential expression of the NCR regulon and additional nitrogen-responsive genes results in >500 transcripts that are differentially expressed in cells growing in the presence of different nitrogen sources in batch cultures. Here we find that in growth rate-controlled cultures using nitrogen-limited chemostats, gene expression programs are strikingly similar regardless of nitrogen source. NCR expression is derepressed in all nitrogen-limiting chemostat conditions regardless of nitrogen source, and in these conditions, only 34 transcripts exhibit nitrogen source-specific differential gene expression. Addition of either the preferred nitrogen source, glutamine, or the nonpreferred nitrogen source, proline, to cells growing in nitrogen-limited chemostats results in rapid, dose-dependent repression of the NCR regulon. Using a novel means of computational normalization to compare global gene expression programs in steady-state and dynamic conditions, we find evidence that the addition of nitrogen to nitrogen-limited cells results in the transient overproduction of transcripts required for protein translation. Simultaneously, we find that that accelerated mRNA degradation underlies the rapid clearing of a subset of transcripts, which is most pronounced for the highly expressed NCR

  4. Characterization of fatty acid delta-6 desaturase gene in Nile tilapia and heterogenous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanomman, Supamas; Ketudat-Cairns, Mariena; Jangprai, Araya; Boonanuntanasarn, Surintorn

    2013-10-01

    Fatty acid delta-6 desaturase (fads2)-like gene from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) was characterized and designated as oni-fads2. The Oni-FADS2 showed the typical structure of microsomal FADS2. The presence of oni-fads2 transcripts in unfertilized eggs demonstrated the maternal role of Nile tilapia in providing the oni-fads2 transcript in their eggs. In addition, the expression of oni-fads2 was detectable in embryos throughout the hatching stage. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR revealed that oni-fads2 was expressed at a high level in all the brain regions, liver, and testis. Recombinant yeast (RY) was generated by transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the plasmid containing oni-fads2 driven by the Gal1 promoter (pYoni-fads2). The conspicuous expression of RY was detectable by RT-PCR after induction with galactose for 24h. When RY was induced with galactose, it exhibited 39% and 7% of delta-6 desaturase (∆6) activity toward C18:2n6 and C18:3n3, respectively. Additionally, it displayed 4% of delta-5 desaturase (∆5) activity toward C20:3n6, indicating that Oni-FADS2 had ∆5 and ∆6 bifunction.

  5. Expression of the hepatitis B surface antigen gene containing the preS2 region in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida,Iwao

    1991-02-01

    Full Text Available We constructed a plasmid, pBH103-ME5, in which the region encoding the 10 preS2 amino acid residues and the S domain of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg were regulated by the promoter of the yeast repressible acid phosphatase gene. Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying pBH103-ME5 produced the HBs antigen (yHBsAg, when it was cultured in a medium containing a low concentration of phosphate. The antigen was purified to homogeneity. Its molecular weight was determined by Western blotting to be 24,000, and its amino acid composition agreed well with that deduced from the nucleotide sequence. The C-terminal amino acid sequence of yHBsAg was exactly the same as that predicted from the nucleotide sequence, while the N-terminal amino acid acetylserine, which was followed by 8 amino acid residues coded by the preS2 region. These results indicate that the recombinant yeast produced a single polypeptide consisting of the preS2 region and the subsequent S domain after being processed at the N-terminus

  6. Control of dinucleoside polyphosphates by the FHIT-homologous HNT2 gene, adenine biosynthesis and heat shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieganowski Pawel

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The FHIT gene is lost early in the development of many tumors. Fhit possesses intrinsic ApppA hydrolase activity though ApppA cleavage is not required for tumor suppression. Because a mutant form of Fhit that is functional in tumor suppression and defective in catalysis binds ApppA well, it was hypothesized that Fhit-substrate complexes are the active, signaling form of Fhit. Which substrates are most important for Fhit signaling remain unknown. Results Here we demonstrate that dinucleoside polyphosphate levels increase 500-fold to hundreds of micromolar in strains devoid of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of Fhit, Hnt2. Accumulation of dinucleoside polyphosphates is reversed by re-expression of Hnt2 and is active site-dependent. Dinucleoside polyphosphate levels depend on an intact adenine biosynthetic pathway and time in liquid culture, and are induced by heat shock to greater than 0.1 millimolar even in Hnt2+ cells. Conclusions The data indicate that Hnt2 hydrolyzes both ApppN and AppppN in vivo and that, in heat-shocked, adenine prototrophic yeast strains, dinucleoside polyphosphates accumulate to levels in which they may saturate Hnt2.

  7. Selection and validation of reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR studies during Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcoholic fermentation in the presence of sulfite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadai, Chiara; Campanaro, Stefano; Giacomini, Alessio; Corich, Viviana

    2015-12-23

    Sulfur dioxide is extensively used during industrial fermentations and contributes to determine the harsh conditions of winemaking together with low pH, high sugar content and increasing ethanol concentration. Therefore the presence of sulfite has to be considered in yeast gene expression studies to properly understand yeast behavior in technological environments such as winemaking. A reliable expression pattern can be obtained only using an appropriate reference gene set that is constitutively expressed regardless of perturbations linked to the experimental conditions. In this work we tested 15 candidate reference genes suitable for analysis of gene expression during must fermentation in the presence of sulfite. New reference genes were selected from a genome-wide expression experiment, obtained by RNA sequencing of four Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains grown in enological conditions. Their performance was compared to that of the most common genes used in previous studies. The most popular software based on different statistical approaches (geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper) were chosen to evaluate expression stability of the candidate reference genes. Validation was obtained using other wine strains by comparing normalized gene expression data with transcriptome quantification both in the presence and absence of sulfite. Among 15 reference genes tested ALG9, FBA1, UBC6 and PFK1 appeared to be the most reliable while ENO1, PMA1, DED1 and FAS2 were the worst. The most popular reference gene ACT1, widely used for S. cerevisiae gene expression studies, showed a stability level markedly lower than those of our selected reference genes. Finally, as the expression of the new reference gene set remained constant over the entire fermentation process, irrespective of the perturbation due to sulfite addition, our results can be considered also when no sulfite is added to the must.

  8. Overexpressing enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway and deleting genes of the competing pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for increasing 2-phenylethanol production from glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Nishimura, Yuya; Matsuda, Fumio; Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-07-01

    2-Phenylethanol (2-PE) is a higher aromatic alcohol that is used in the cosmetics and food industries. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is considered to be a suitable host for the industrial production of higher alcohols, including 2-PE. To produce 2-PE from glucose in S. cerevisiae, we searched for suitable 2-keto acid decarboxylase (KDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway for overexpression in strain YPH499, and found that overexpression of the ARO10 and/or ADH1 genes increased 2-PE production from glucose. Further, we screened ten BY4741 single-deletion mutants of genes involved in the competing pathways for 2-PE production, and found that strains aro8Δ and aat2Δ displayed increased 2-PE production. Based on these results, we engineered a BY4741 strain that overexpressed ARO10 and contained an aro8Δ deletion, and demonstrated that the strain produced 96 mg/L 2-PE from glucose as the sole carbon source. As this engineered S. cerevisiae strain showed a significant increase in 2-PE production from glucose without the addition of an intermediate carbon substrate, it is a promising candidate for the large-scale production of 2-PE.

  9. EasyClone: method for iterative chromosomal integration of multiple genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Bjerg; Strucko, Tomas; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin

    2014-01-01

    of multiple genes with an option of recycling selection markers. The vectors combine the advantage of efficient uracil excision reaction-based cloning and Cre-LoxP-mediated marker recycling system. The episomal and integrative vector sets were tested by inserting genes encoding cyan, yellow, and red...... fluorescent proteins into separate vectors and analyzing for co-expression of proteins by flow cytometry. Cells expressing genes encoding for the three fluorescent proteins from three integrations exhibited a much higher level of simultaneous expression than cells producing fluorescent proteins encoded...... on episomal plasmids, where correspondingly 95% and 6% of the cells were within a fluorescence interval of Log10 mean ± 15% for all three colors. We demonstrate that selective markers can be simultaneously removed using Cre-mediated recombination and all the integrated heterologous genes remain...

  10. In silicio search for genes encoding peroxisomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kal, A J; Hettema, E H; van den Berg, M; Koerkamp, M G; van Ijlst, L; Distel, B; Tabak, H F

    2000-01-01

    The biogenesis of peroxisomes involves the synthesis of new proteins that after, completion of translation, are targeted to the organelle by virtue of peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS). Two types of PTSs have been well characterized for import of matrix proteins (PTS1 and PTS2). Induction of the genes encoding these matrix proteins takes place in oleate-containing medium and is mediated via an oleate response element (ORE) present in the region preceding these genes. The authors have searched the yeast genome for OREs preceding open reading frames (ORFs), and for ORFs that contain either a PTS1 or PTS2. Of the ORFs containing an ORE, as well as either a PTS1 or a PTS2, many were known to encode bona fide peroxisomal matrix proteins. In addition, candidate genes were identified as encoding putative new peroxisomal proteins. For one case, subcellular location studies validated the in silicio prediction. This gene encodes a new peroxisomal thioesterase.

  11. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Leu3 protein activates expression of GDH1, a key gene in nitrogen assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y; Cooper, T G; Kohlhaw, G B

    1995-01-01

    The Leu3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown to be a transcriptional regulator of genes encoding enzymes of the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic pathways. Leu3 binds to upstream activating sequences (UASLEU) found in the promoters of LEU1, LEU2, LEU4, ILV2, and ILV5. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that activation by Leu3 requires the presence of alpha-isopropylmalate. In at least one case (LEU2), Leu3 actually represses basal-level transcription when alpha-isopropylmalate is absent. Following identification of a UASLEU-homologous sequence in the promoter of GDH1, the gene encoding NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase, we demonstrate that Leu3 specifically interacts with this UASLEU element. We then show that Leu3 is required for full activation of the GDH1 gene. First, the expression of a GDH1-lacZ fusion gene is three- to sixfold lower in a strain lacking the LEU3 gene than in an isogenic LEU3+ strain. Expression is restored to near-normal levels when the leu3 deletion cells are transformed with a LEU3-bearing plasmid. Second, a significant decrease in GDH1-lacZ expression is also seen when the UASLEU of the GDH1-lacZ construct is made nonfunctional by mutation. Third, the steady-state level of GDH1 mRNA decreases about threefold in leu3 null cells. The decrease in GDH1 expression in leu3 null cells is reflected in a diminished specific activity of NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. We also demonstrate that the level of GDH1-lacZ expression correlates with the cells' ability to generate alpha-isopropylmalate and is lowest in cells unable to produce alpha-isopropylmalate. We conclude that GDH1, which plays an important role in the assimilation of ammonia in yeast cells, is, in part, activated by a Leu3-alpha-isopropylmalate complex. This conclusion suggests that Leu3 participates in transcriptional regulation beyond the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic pathways.

  12. The efflux pump MlcE from the Penicillium solitum compactin biosynthetic gene cluster increases Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistance to natural statins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ley, Ana; Frandsen, Rasmus John Normand

    The use of statins as cholesterol-lowering drugs is based on their ability to inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), the key enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, which is responsible for the production of ergosterol in fungi and cholesterol in human. Industrial scale...... integrated a putative efflux pump-encoding gene mlcE from the P. solitum compactin biosynthetic gene cluster into S. cerevisiae genome. The resulting strain was tested for susceptibility to statins by growing the strain on media containing statins. The constructed strain showed an increased resistance...

  13. Role of the complex upstream region of the GDH2 gene in nitrogen regulation of the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, S. M; Magasanik, B

    1991-01-01

    We analyzed the upstream region of the GDH2 gene, which encodes the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for elements important for the regulation of the gene by the nitrogen source. The levels of this enzyme are high in cells grown with glutamate as the sole source of nitrogen and low in cells grown with glutamine or ammonium. We found that this regulation occurs at the level of transcription and that a total of six sites are required to cause a CYC1-lacZ fusion to...

  14. Improvement of acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a zinc-finger-based artificial transcription factor and identification of novel genes involved in acetic acid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cui; Wei, Xiaowen; Sun, Cuihuan; Zhang, Fei; Xu, Jianren; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2015-03-01

    Acetic acid is present in cellulosic hydrolysate as a potent inhibitor, and the superior acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ensures good cell viability and efficient ethanol production when cellulosic raw materials are used as substrates. In this study, a mutant strain of S. cerevisiae ATCC4126 (Sc4126-M01) with improved acetic acid tolerance was obtained through screening strains transformed with an artificial zinc finger protein transcription factor (ZFP-TF) library. Further analysis indicated that improved acetic acid tolerance was associated with improved catalase (CAT) activity. The ZFP coding sequence associated with the improved phenotype was identified, and real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that three of the possible genes involved in the enhanced acetic acid tolerance regulated by this ZFP-TF, namely YFL040W, QDR3, and IKS1, showed decreased transcription levels in Sc4126-M01 in the presence of acetic acid, compared to those in the control strain. Sc4126-M01 mutants having QDR3 and IKS1 deletion (ΔQDR3 and ΔIKS1) exhibited higher acetic acid tolerance than the wild-type strain under acetic acid treatment. Glucose consumption rate and ethanol productivity in the presence of 5 g/L acetic acid were improved in the ΔQDR3 mutant compared to the wild-type strain. Our studies demonstrated that the synthetic ZFP-TF library can be used to improve acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae and that the employment of an artificial transcription factor can facilitate the exploration of novel functional genes involved in stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae.

  15. Heterooligomeric phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    2004-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains five phosphoribosyl diphosphate (PRPP) synthase-homologous genes (PRS1-5), which specify PRPP synthase subunits 1-5. Expression of the five S. cerevisiae PRS genes individually in an Escherichia coli PRPP-less strain (Deltaprs) showed that a single PRS...

  16. Co-expression of a Saccharomyces diastaticus glucoamylase-encoding gene and a Bacillus amyloliquefaciens alpha-amylase-encoding gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, A J; Pretorius, I S

    1991-04-01

    A glucoamylase-encoding gene (STA2) from Saccharomyces diastaticus and an alpha-amylase-encoding gene (AMY) from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens were cloned separately into a yeast-integrating shuttle vector (YIp5), generating recombinant plasmids pSP1 and pSP2, respectively. The STA2 and AMY genes were jointly cloned into YIp5, generating plasmid pSP3. Subsequently, the dominant selectable marker APH1, encoding resistance to Geneticin G418 (GtR), was cloned into pSP3, resulting in pSP4. For enhanced expression of GtR, the APH1 gene was fused to the GAL10 promoter and terminated by the URA3 terminator, resulting in pSP5. Plasmid pSP5 was converted to a circular minichromosome (pSP6) by the addition of the ARS1 and CEN4 sequences. Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae transformed with plasmids pSP1 through pSP6, stably produced and secreted glucoamylase and/or alpha-amylase. Brewers' and distillers' yeast transformed with pSP6 were also capable of secreting amylolytic enzymes. Yeast transformants containing pSP1, pSP2 and pSP3 assimilated soluble starch with an efficiency of 69%, 84% and 93%, respectively. The major starch hydrolysis products produced by crude amylolytic enzymes found in the culture broths of the pSP1-, pSP2- and pSP3-containing transformants, were glucose, glucose and maltose (1:1), and glucose and maltose (3:1), respectively. These results confirmed that co-expression of the STA2 and AMY genes synergistically enhanced starch degradation.

  17. Requirements for chromatin reassembly during transcriptional downregulation of a heat shock gene in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Moesgaard; Christensen, Marianne Skovgaard; Bonven, Bjarne Juul

    2008-01-01

    Heat shock genes respond to moderate heat stress by a wave of transcription. The induction phase is accompanied by massive eviction of histones, which later reassemble with DNA during the ensuing phase of transcription downregulation. Here, we identify determinants of this reassembly throughout...

  18. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YPR184w gene encodes the glycogen debranching enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teste, M A; Enjalbert, B; Parrou, J L; François, J M

    2000-12-01

    The YPR184w gene encodes a 1536-amino acid protein that is 34-39% identical to the mammal, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans glycogen debranching enzyme. The N-terminal part of the protein possesses the four conserved sequences of the alpha-amylase superfamily, while the C-terminal part displays 50% similarity with the C-terminal of other eukaryotic glycogen debranching enzymes. Reliable measurement of alpha-1,4-glucanotransferase and alpha-1, 6-glucosidase activity of the yeast debranching enzyme was determined in strains overexpressing YPR184w. The alpha-1, 4-glucanotransferase activity of a partially purified preparation of debranching enzyme preferentially transferred maltosyl units than maltotriosyl. Deletion of YPR184w prevents glycogen degradation, whereas overexpression had no effect on the rate of glycogen breakdown. In response to stress and growth conditions, the transcriptional control of YPR184w gene, renamed GDB1 (for Glycogen DeBranching gene), is strictly identical to that of other genes involved in glycogen metabolism.

  19. Expression of the SOD gene from Trichoderma harzianum in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Liming; Yang Qian; Liu Pigang; Li Sen

    2008-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases are metalloproteins which play a major role in defense against oxygen radical mediated toxicity in aerobic organisms.Such proteins are important endogeneity cytoprotection factor in volving defence.A 751-bp full-length cDNA sequence of an SOD gene was isolated from the Trichoderma harzianum.The full-length cDNA of the SOD gene consists of one 465-bp open reading frame nucleotide, which encodes a 15.7-kDa polypeptide consisting of 154 amino acid residues.Sequence analysis revealed that SOD gene has more than 72%-86% amino acid sequence homology with those of other fungi.The SOD gene was integrated into the genomic DNA of pYES2 by insertion into a single site for recombination, yielding the recombinant pYES2-SOD.SOD expressed by pYES2-SOD was induced by galactose.We test whether SOD could offer abiotic stress resistance when it was introduced into yeast cells.A transgenic yeast harboring T.harzianum SOD was generated under the control of a constitutively expressed GAL promoter.The results indicated that SOD yeast transfonnants had significantly higher resistance to salt and drought stress.

  20. CHL12, a gene essential for the fidelity of chromosome transmission in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouprina, N; Kroll, E; Kirillov, A; Bannikov, V; Zakharyev, V; Larionov, V

    1994-12-01

    We have analyzed the CHL12 gene, earlier identified in a screen for yeast mutants with increased rates of mitotic loss of chromosome III and circular centromeric plasmids. A genomic clone of CHL12 was isolated and used to map its physical position on the right arm of chromosome XIII near the ADH3 locus. Nucleotide sequence analysis of CHL12 revealed a 2.2-kb open reading frame with a 84-kD predicted protein sequence. Analysis of the sequence upstream of the CHL12 open reading frame revealed the presence of two imperfect copies of MluI motif, ACGCGT, a sequence associated with many DNA metabolism genes in yeast. Analysis of the amino acid sequence revealed that the protein contains a NTP-binding domain and shares a low degree of homology with subunits of replication factor C (RF-C). A strain containing a null allele of CHL12 was viable under standard growth conditions, and as well as original mutants exhibited an increase in the level of spontaneous mitotic recombination, slow growth and cold-sensitive phenotypes. Most of cells carrying the null chl12 mutation arrested as large budded cells with the nucleus in the neck at nonpermissive temperature that typical for cell division cycle (cdc) mutants that arrest in the cell cycle at a point either immediately preceding M phase or during S phase. Cell cycle arrest of the chl12 mutant requires the RAD9 gene. We conclude that the CHL12 gene product has critical role in DNA metabolism.

  1. Cloning of a yeast gene coding for the glutamate synthase small subunit (GUS2) by complementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli glutamate auxotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A; Membrillo-Hernández, J; Olivera, H; Aranda, C; Macino, G; Ballario, P

    1992-02-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate auxotroph, lacking NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activities, was complemented with a yeast genomic library. Clones were obtained which still lacked NADP-GDH but showed GOGAT activity. Northern analysis revealed that the DNA fragment present in the complementing plasmids coded for a 1.5kb mRNA. Since the only GOGAT enzyme so far purified from S. cerevisiae is made up of a small and a large subunit, the size of the mRNA suggested that the cloned DNA fragment could code for the GOGAT small subunit. Plasmids were purified and used to transform Escherichia coli glutamate auxotrophs. Transformants were only recovered when the recipient strain was an E. coli GDH-less mutant lacking the small GOGAT subunit. These data show that we have cloned the structural gene coding for the yeast small subunit (GUS2). Evidence is also presented indicating that the GOGAT enzyme which is synthesized in the E. coli transformants is a hybrid comprising the large E. coli subunit and the small S. cerevisiae subunit.

  2. Improved ethanol production from xylose in the presence of acetic acid by the overexpression of the HAA1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakihama, Yuri; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-03-01

    The hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass liberates sugars, primarily glucose and xylose, which are subsequently converted to ethanol by microbial fermentation. The rapid and efficient fermentation of xylose by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains is limited by weak acids generated during biomass pretreatment processes. In particular, acetic acid negatively affects cell growth, xylose fermentation rate, and ethanol production. The ability of S. cerevisiae to efficiently utilize xylose in the presence of acetic acid is an essential requirement for the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Here, an acetic acid-responsive transcriptional activator, HAA1, was overexpressed in a recombinant xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain to yield BY4741X/HAA1. This strain exhibited improved cell growth and ethanol production from xylose under aerobic and oxygen limited conditions, respectively, in the presence of acetic acid. The HAA1p regulon enhanced transcript levels in BY4741X/HAA1. The disruption of PHO13, a p-nitrophenylphosphatase gene, in BY4741X/HAA1 led to further improvement in both yeast growth and the ability to ferment xylose, indicating that HAA1 overexpression and PHO13 deletion act by different mechanisms to enhance ethanol production.

  3. Efficient screening of environmental isolates for Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that are suitable for brewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Hidehiko; Hino, Mika; Takashita, Hideharu; Kajiwara, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Keiko; Furukawa, Kensuke

    2014-01-01

    We developed an efficient screening method for Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from environmental isolates. MultiPlex PCR was performed targeting four brewing S. cerevisiae genes (SSU1, AWA1, BIO6, and FLO1). At least three genes among the four were amplified from all S. cerevisiae strains. The use of this method allowed us to successfully obtain S. cerevisiae strains.

  4. Inducible removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from transcriptionally active and inactive genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, R; Zhang, R; Jones, N J

    1993-05-01

    The prior UV irradiation of alpha haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a UV dose of 25 J/m2 substantially increases the repairability of damage subsequently induced by a UV dose of 70 J/m2 given 1 h after the first irradiation. This enhancement of repair is seen at both the MAT alpha and HML alpha loci, which are, respectively, transcriptionally active and inactive in alpha haploid cells. The presence in the medium of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide in the period between the two irradiations eliminated this effect. Enhanced repair still occurred if cycloheximide was present only after the final UV irradiation. This indicated that the first result is not due to cycloheximide merely blocking the synthesis of repair enzymes associated with a hypothetical rapid turnover of such molecules. The enhanced repairability is not the result of changes in chromatin accessibility without protein synthesis, merely caused by the repair of the damage induced by the prior irradiation. The data clearly show that a UV-inducible removal of pyrimidine dimers has occurred which involves the synthesis of new proteins. The genes known to possess inducible promoters, and which are involved in excision are RAD2, RAD7, RAD16 and RAD23. Studies with the rad7 and rad16 mutants which are defective in the ability to repair HML alpha and proficient in the repair of MAT alpha showed that in rad7, preirradiation enhanced the repair at MAT alpha, whereas in rad16 this increased repair of MAT alpha was absent. The preirradiation did not modify the inability to repair HML alpha in either strain. Thus RAD16 has a role in this inducible repair.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Compositions and methods for modeling Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The invention provides an in silica model for determining a S. cerevisiae physiological function. The model includes a data structure relating a plurality of S. cerevisiae reactants to a plurality of S. cerevisiae reactions, a constraint set for the plurality of S. cerevisiae reactions......, and commands for determining a distribution of flux through the reactions that is predictive of a S. cerevisiae physiological function. A model of the invention can further include a gene database containing information characterizing the associated gene or genes. The invention further provides methods...... for making an in silica S. cerevisiae model and methods for determining a S. cerevisiae physiological function using a model of the invention. The invention provides an in silica model for determining a S. cerevisiae physiological function. The model includes a data structure relating a plurality of S...

  6. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masser, Anna E.; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon‐optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half‐lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano‐Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in bioluminescent signal and mRNA levels during both induction and decay. We demonstrated that the bioluminescence of yNluc fused to the C‐terminus of a temperature‐sensitive protein reports on its protein levels. In conclusion, yNluc and yNlucPEST are valuable new reporter proteins suitable for experiments with yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26860732

  7. Heterologous expression of a new manganese-dependent peroxidase gene from Peniophora incarnata KUC8836 and its ability to remove anthracene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Aslan Hwanhwi; Kang, Chang-Min; Lee, Young Min; Lee, Hanbyul; Yun, Cheol-Won; Kim, Gyu-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2016-12-01

    The white rot fungus Peniophora incarnata KUC8836 has received an attention as the greatest degrader of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are hazardous xenobiotics and recalcitrant pollutants. To characterize the mechanisms through which MnP degrades PAHs, heterologous expression of manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) gene pimp1 was performed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 via the pGEM-T Easy vector, resulting in the recombinant plasmid pESC-URA/pimp1 containing the MnP signal peptide. MnP was significantly secreted into the culture medium with galactose as an active protein with higher efficiency (3.58 U mL(-1)) by transformants than by the wild-type S. cerevisiae. The recombinant MnP protein was shown to have a molecular weight of 44 kDa by western blotting analysis. With regard to enhancing the bioremediation of PAHs in the environment, anthracene was effectively degraded by the MnP encoded by pimp1, with a degradation rate of 6.5% when Tween 80 was added. In addition, the MnP activity of the transformant exhibited the highest efficiency (2.49 U mL(-1)) during the degradation. These results show that pimp1 might be useful for biodegradation and gene expression technologies at a transcriptional level, and genetic approaches can be improved by incorporating the highly ligninolytic gene pimp1 and the fungus P. incarnata KUC8836.

  8. Identification and characterization of four new GCD genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederberger, P; Aebi, M; Hütter, R

    1986-01-01

    Mutant strains, resistant against the amino acid analogues 5-methyltryptophan, 5-fluorotryptophan and canavanine were isolated, starting with a trp2 leaky auxotrophic strain. Of 10 such strains, only four turned out to be of the "general control derepressed" (gcd) mutant type. Three other isolates were shown to be defective in the general amino acid permease system, while the remaining three strains displayed low spore viability and were not further investigated. Complementation tests amongst the four new gcd-mutant strains, including strain RH558 gcd2-1 isolated earlier, yielded five complementation groups: GCD2, GCD3, GCD4, GCD5, and GCD6. All mutant strains showed a dual phenotype, which was not separable by wild type backcrosses: "constitutive derepression" and "slow growth". Epistasis of all gcd mutations over gcn1-1, gcn2-1 and gcn3-1 was found with respect to both phenotypes, except for gcd5-1, which was lethal in these combinations. On the other hand gcn4-101 was found to be epistatic over all gcd mutations, but only with respect to the "constitutive derepression" phenotype, and not to "slow growth"; again the combination with gcd5-1 was lethal. Mutation gcd2-1 was mapped on chromosome VII, 50 cM from leu1 and 22 cM from ade6. A new model is discussed, in which GCD-genes are involved in the amino acid uptake into the vacuoles.

  9. Role of Double-Strand Break End-Tethering during Gene Conversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Jain

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Correct repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is critical for maintaining genome stability. Whereas gene conversion (GC-mediated repair is mostly error-free, repair by break-induced replication (BIR is associated with non-reciprocal translocations and loss of heterozygosity. We have previously shown that a Recombination Execution Checkpoint (REC mediates this competition by preventing the BIR pathway from acting on DSBs that can be repaired by GC. Here, we asked if the REC can also determine whether the ends that are engaged in a GC-compatible configuration belong to the same break, since repair involving ends from different breaks will produce potentially deleterious translocations. We report that the kinetics of repair are markedly delayed when the two DSB ends that participate in GC belong to different DSBs (termed Trans compared to the case when both DSB ends come from the same break (Cis. However, repair in Trans still occurs by GC rather than BIR, and the overall efficiency of repair is comparable. Hence, the REC is not sensitive to the "origin" of the DSB ends. When the homologous ends for GC are in Trans, the delay in repair appears to reflect their tethering to sequences on the other side of the DSB that themselves recombine with other genomic locations with which they share sequence homology. These data support previous observations that the two ends of a DSB are usually tethered to each other and that this tethering facilitates both ends encountering the same donor sequence. We also found that the presence of homeologous/repetitive sequences in the vicinity of a DSB can distract the DSB end from finding its bona fide homologous donor, and that inhibition of GC by such homeologous sequences is markedly increased upon deleting Sgs1 but not Msh6.

  10. MIP1, a new yeast gene homologous to the rat mitochondrial intermediate peptidase gene, is required for oxidative metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaya, G; Miklos, D; Rollins, R A

    1994-08-01

    Cleavage of amino-terminal octapeptides, F/L/IXXS/T/GXXXX, by mitochondrial intermediate peptidase (MIP) is typical of many mitochondrial precursor proteins imported to the matrix and the inner membrane. We previously described the molecular characterization of rat liver MIP (RMIP) and indicated a putative homolog in the sequence predicted from gene YCL57w of yeast chromosome III. A new yeast gene, MIP1, has now been isolated by screening a Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic library with an RMIP cDNA probe. MIP1 predicts a protein of 772 amino acids (YMIP), which is 54% similar and 31% identical to RMIP and includes a putative 37-residue mitochondrial leader peptide. RMIP and YMIP contain the sequence LFHEMGHAM HSMLGRT, which includes a zinc-binding motif, HEXXH, while the predicted YCL57w protein contains a comparable sequence with a lower degree of homology. No obvious biochemical phenotype was observed in a chromosomally disrupted ycl57w mutant. In contrast, a mip1 mutant was unable to grow on nonfermentable substrates, while a mip1 ycl57w double disruption did not result in a more severe phenotype. The mip1 mutant exhibited defects of complexes III and IV of the respiratory chain, caused by failure to carry out the second MIP-catalyzed cleavage of the nuclear-encoded precursors for cytochrome oxidase subunit IV (CoxIV) and the iron-sulfur protein (Fe-S) of the bc1 complex to mature proteins. In vivo, intermediate-size CoxIV was accumulated in the mitochondrial matrix, while intermediate-size Fe-S was targeted to the inner membrane. Moreover, mip1 mitochondrial fractions failed to carry out maturation of the human ornithine transcarbamylase intermediate (iOTC), specifically cleaved by RMIP. A CEN plasmid-encoded YMIP protein restored normal MIP activity along with respiratory competence. Thus, YMIP is a functional homolog of RMIP and represents a new component of the yeast mitochondrial import machinery.

  11. [Improvement of acetic acid tolerance and fermentation performance of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of flocculent gene FLO1 and FLO1c].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhaoli; Cheng, Yanfei; Zhu, Hui; He, Xiuping; Zhang, Borun

    2015-02-01

    Flocculent gene FLO1 and its truncated form FLO1c with complete deletion of repeat unit C were expressed in a non-flocculent industrial strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae CE6 to generate recombinant flocculent strains 6-AF1 and 6-AF1c respectively. Both strains of 6-AF1 and 6-AF1c displayed strong flocculation and better cell growth than the control strain CE6-V carrying the empty vector under acetic acid stress. Moreover, the flocculent strains converted glucose to ethanol at much higher rates than the control strain CE6-V under acetic acid stress. In the presence of 0.6% (V/V) acetic acid, the average ethanol production rates of 6-AF1 and 6-AF1c were 1.56 and 1.62 times of that of strain CE6-V, while the ethanol production rates of 6-AF1 and 6-AF1c were 1.21 and 1.78 times of that of strain CE6-V under 1.0% acetic acid stress. Results in this study indicate that acetic acid tolerance and fermentation performance of industrial S. cerevisiae under acetic acid stress can be improved largely by flocculation endowed by expression of flocculent genes, especially FLO1c.

  12. Studies on Saccharomyces cerevisiae under carbon-limiting growth transformed with plasmid pCYG4 that carries the gene for NADP-GDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Filho, J L; Ledingham, W M

    1990-02-01

    The gene (GDH1) coding for the NADP-linked glutamate dehydrogenase system (NADP-GDH) has been cloned from Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. Cells being transformed by the NADP-GDH gene on a 2 micron bared vector (pCYG4) plasmid confering 11-fold higher level on expressed GDH activity over the wild-type cells. The behavior of these cells was investigated under chemostatic growth with a carbon rate-limiting nutrient. Specific growth rates of cells carrying plasmid pCYG4 were found to be slightly slower than wild type cells. Furthermore, the NADP-GDH activity increases proportionally with the dilution rate. In addition, oscillations in the NADP-GDH activity, especially at a dilution rate up to 0.15/h, are probably consequential on the appearance of a changing mixed population (cells with and without plasmids).

  13. Transcript levels of the Saccharomyes cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD23 increase in response to UV light and in meiosis but remain constant in the mitotic cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, K; Prakash, S

    1990-08-25

    The RAD23 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for excision-repair of UV damaged DNA. In this paper, we determine the location of the RAD23 gene in a cloned DNA fragment, identify the 1.6 kb RAD23 transcript, and examine RAD23 transcript levels in UV damaged cells, during the mitotic cell cycle, and in meiosis. The RAD23 mRNA levels are elevated 5-fold between 30 to 60 min after 37 J/m2 of UV light. RAD23 mRNA levels rise over 6-fold during meiosis at a stage coincident with high levels of genetic recombination. This response is specific to sporulation competent MATa/MAT alpha diploid cells, and is not observed in asporogenous MATa/MATa diploids. RAD23 mRNA levels, however, remain constant during the mitotic cell cycle.

  14. Steady-state and dynamic gene expression programs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to variation in environmental nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Airoldi, Edoardo M.; Miller, Darach; Athanasiadou, Rodoniki; Brandt, Nathan; Abdul-Rahman, Farah; Neymotin, Benjamin; Hashimoto, Tatsu; Bahmani, Tayebeh; Gresham, David

    2016-01-01

    Cell growth rate is regulated in response to the abundance and molecular form of essential nutrients. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast), the molecular form of environmental nitrogen is a major determinant of cell growth rate, supporting growth rates that vary at least threefold. Transcriptional control of nitrogen use is mediated in large part by nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR), which results in the repression of specific transcripts in the presence of a preferred nitrogen sour...

  15. Comparative studies of genome-wide maps of nucleosomes between deletion mutants of elp3 and hos2 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Matsumoto

    Full Text Available In order to elucidate the influence of histone acetylation upon nucleosomal DNA length and nucleosome position, we compared nucleosome maps of the following three yeast strains; strain BY4741 (control, the elp3 (one of histone acetyltransferase genes deletion mutant, and the hos2 (one of histone deactylase genes deletion mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We sequenced mononucleosomal DNA fragments after treatment with micrococcal nuclease. After mapping the DNA fragments to the genome, we identified the nucleosome positions. We showed that the distributions of the nucleosomal DNA lengths of the control and the hos2 disruptant were similar. On the other hand, the distribution of the nucleosomal DNA lengths of the elp3 disruptant shifted toward shorter than that of the control. It strongly suggests that inhibition of Elp3-induced histone acetylation causes the nucleosomal DNA length reduction. Next, we compared the profiles of nucleosome mapping numbers in gene promoter regions between the control and the disruptant. We detected 24 genes with low conservation level of nucleosome positions in promoters between the control and the elp3 disruptant as well as between the control and the hos2 disruptant. It indicates that both Elp3-induced acetylation and Hos2-induced deacetylation influence the nucleosome positions in the promoters of those 24 genes. Interestingly, in 19 of the 24 genes, the profiles of nucleosome mapping numbers were similar between the two disruptants.

  16. Regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of the DAN/TIR mannoprotein genes during anaerobic remodeling of the cell wall in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramova, N E; Cohen, B D; Sertil, O; Kapoor, R; Davies, K J; Lowry, C V

    2001-03-01

    The DAN/TIR genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encode homologous mannoproteins, some of which are essential for anaerobic growth. Expression of these genes is induced during anaerobiosis and in some cases during cold shock. We show that several heme-responsive mechanisms combine to regulate DAN/TIR gene expression. The first mechanism employs two repression factors, Mox1 and Mox2, and an activation factor, Mox4 (for mannoprotein regulation by oxygen). The genes encoding these proteins were identified by selecting for recessive mutants with altered regulation of a dan1::ura3 fusion. MOX4 is identical to UPC2, encoding a binucleate zinc cluster protein controlling expression of an anaerobic sterol transport system. Mox4/Upc2 is required for expression of all the DAN/TIR genes. It appears to act through a consensus sequence termed the AR1 site, as does Mox2. The noninducible mox4Delta allele was epistatic to the constitutive mox1 and mox2 mutations, suggesting that Mox1 and Mox2 modulate activation by Mox4 in a heme-dependent fashion. Mutations in a putative repression domain in Mox4 caused constitutive expression of the DAN/TIR genes, indicating a role for this domain in heme repression. MOX4 expression is induced both in anaerobic and cold-shocked cells, so heme may also regulate DAN/TIR expression through inhibition of expression of MOX4. Indeed, ectopic expression of MOX4 in aerobic cells resulted in partially constitutive expression of DAN1. Heme also regulates expression of some of the DAN/TIR genes through the Rox7 repressor, which also controls expression of the hypoxic gene ANB1. In addition Rox1, another heme-responsive repressor, and the global repressors Tup1 and Ssn6 are also required for full aerobic repression of these genes.

  17. RSC1 and RSC2 Are Required for Expression of Mid-Late Sporulation-Specific Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Bungard, David; Reed, Michelle; Winter, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Rsc1 and Rsc2 are alternative bromodomain-containing subunits of the ATP-dependent RSC chromatin remodeling complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Smk1 is a sporulation-specific mitogen-activated protein kinase homolog that is required for the postmeiotic events of spore formation. In this study we show that RSC1 and RSC2 are haploinsufficient for spore formation in a smk1 hypomorph. Moreover, diploids lacking Rsc1 or Rsc2 show a subset of smk1-like phenotypes. High-copy-number RSC1 plasmids do...

  18. The pol3-t Hyperrecombination Phenotype and DNA Damage-Induced Recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is RAD50 Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Galli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The DNA polymerase δ (POL3/CDC2 allele pol3-t of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has previously been shown to be sensitive to methylmethanesulfonate (MMS and has been proposed to be involved in base excision repair. Our results, however, show that the pol3-t mutation is synergistic for MMS sensitivity with MAG1, a known base excision repair gene, but it is epistatic with rad50Δ, suggesting that POL3 may be involved not only in base excision repair but also in a RAD50 dependent function. We further studied the interaction of pol3-t with rad50Δ by examining their effect on spontaneous, MMS-, UV-, and ionizing radiation-induced intrachromosomal recombination. We found that rad50Δ completely abolishes the elevated spontaneous frequency of intrachromosomal recombination in the pol3-t mutant and significantly decreases UV- and MMS-induced recombination in both POL3 and pol3-t strains. Interestingly, rad50Δ had no effect on γ-ray-induced recombination in both backgrounds between 0 and 50 Gy. Finally, the deletion of RAD50 had no effect on the elevated frequency of homologous integration conferred by the pol3-t mutation. RAD50 is possibly involved in resolution of replication forks that are stalled by mutagen-induced external DNA damage, or internal DNA damage produced by growing the pol3-t mutant at the restrictive temperature.

  19. Enhanced expression of genes involved in initial xylose metabolism and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway in the improved xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae through evolutionary engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Jian; Shen, Minghua; Hu, Menglong; Song, Hao; Yuan, Yingjin

    2014-01-01

    Fermentation of xylose in lignocellulosic hydrolysates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been achieved through heterologous expression of the xylose reductase (XR)-xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) pathway. However, the fermentation efficiency is far from the requirement for industrial application due to high yield of the byproduct xylitol, low ethanol yield, and low xylose consumption rate. Through evolutionary engineering, an improved xylose-utilizing strain SyBE005 was obtained with 78.3 % lower xylitol production and a 2.6-fold higher specific ethanol production rate than those of the parent strain SyBE004, which expressed an engineered NADP(+)-preferring XDH. The transcriptional differences between SyBE005 and SyBE004 were investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. Genes including XYL1, XYL2, and XKS1 in the initial xylose metabolic pathway showed the highest up-regulation in SyBE005. The increased expression of XYL1 and XYL2 correlated with enhanced enzymatic activities of XR and XDH. In addition, the expression level of ZWF1 in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway increased significantly in SyBE005, indicating an elevated demand for NADPH from XR. Genes involved in the TCA cycle (LAT1, CIT1, CIT2, KGD1, KGD, SDH2) and gluconeogenesis (ICL1, PYC1) were also up-regulated in SyBE005. Genomic analysis revealed that point mutations in transcriptional regulators CYC8 and PHD1 might be responsible for the altered expression. In addition, a mutation (Y89S) in ZWF1 was identified which might improve NADPH production in SyBE005. Our results suggest that increasing the expression of XYL1, XYL2, XKS1, and enhancing NADPH supply are promising strategies to improve xylose fermentation in recombinant S. cerevisiae.

  20. Improvement of cloned [alpha]-amylase gene expression in fed-batch culture of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae by regulating both glucose and ethanol concentrations using a fuzzy controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, Sumihisa; Nishida, Yoshio; Park, Y.S.; Iijima, Shinji; Kobayashi, Takeshi (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Biotechnology)

    1994-11-05

    The effect of ethanol concentration on cloned gene expression in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 20B-12 containing one of two plasmids, pNA3 and pNA7, was investigated in batch cultures. Plasmids pNA3 and pNA7 contain the [alpha]-amylase gene under the control of the SUC2 or PGK promoter, respectively. When the ethanol concentration was controlled at 2 to 5 g/L, the gene expressions were two times higher than those at 20 g/L ethanol. To increase the gene expression by maintaining both the ethanol and glucose concentrations at low levels, a fuzzy controller was developed. The concentrations of glucose and ethanol were controlled simultaneously at 0.15 and 2 g/L, respectively, in the production phase using the fuzzy controller in fed-batch culture. The synthesis of [alpha]-amylase was induced by the low glucose concentration and maintained at a high level of activity by regulating the ethanol concentration at 2 g/L. The secretory [alpha]-amylase activities of cells harboring plasmids pNA3 and pNA7 in fed-batch culture were 175 and 392 U/mL, and their maximal specific activities 7.7 and 12.4 U/mg dry cells, respectively. These values are two to three times higher in activity and three to four times higher in specific activity than those obtained when glucose only was controlled.

  1. Ptc6 is required for proper rapamycin-induced down-regulation of the genes coding for ribosomal and rRNA processing proteins in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asier González

    Full Text Available Ptc6 is one of the seven components (Ptc1-Ptc7 of the protein phosphatase 2C family in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to other type 2C phosphatases, the cellular role of this isoform is poorly understood. We present here a comprehensive characterization of this gene product. Cells lacking Ptc6 are sensitive to zinc ions, and somewhat tolerant to cell-wall damaging agents and to Li(+. Ptc6 mutants are sensitive to rapamycin, albeit to lesser extent than ptc1 cells. This phenotype is not rescued by overexpression of PTC1 and mutation of ptc6 does not reproduce the characteristic genetic interactions of the ptc1 mutation with components of the TOR pathway, thus suggesting different cellular roles for both isoforms. We show here that the rapamycin-sensitive phenotype of ptc6 cells is unrelated to the reported role of Pt6 in controlling pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. Lack of Ptc6 results in substantial attenuation of the transcriptional response to rapamycin, particularly in the subset of repressed genes encoding ribosomal proteins or involved in rRNA processing. In contrast, repressed genes involved in translation are Ptc6-independent. These effects cannot be attributed to the regulation of the Sch9 kinase, but they could involve modulation of the binding of the Ifh1 co-activator to specific gene promoters.

  2. Global transcription regulation by DNA topoisomerase I in exponentially growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells: activation of telomere-proximal genes by TOP1 deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotito, Luca; Russo, Alessandra; Chillemi, Giovanni; Bueno, Susana; Cavalieri, Duccio; Capranico, Giovanni

    2008-03-21

    To establish the cellular functions of DNA topoisomerase I-B (Top1p) at a global level, we have determined the expression profiles and histone modification patterns affected by TOP1 gene deletion (DeltaTOP1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In exponentially growing cells, DeltaTOP1 specifically increases transcription of telomere-proximal genes and decreases glucose utilization and energy production pathways. Immunoprecipitation data demonstrate that Top1p can bind to and is catalytically active at telomeric DNA repeats, and that both DeltaTOP1 and an inactive Y727F Top1p mutant increase H4 histone acetylation at telomere-proximal regions. Interestingly, while the Y727F mutation has no influence on enzyme recruitment to chromatin sites, it has a marked effect on H4 K16 acetylation at subtelomeric regions. The Top1p mutation also increases H3 histone K4 dimethylation, which has been associated with gene transcription, at 3' termini of subtelomeric genes. No major effect of DeltaTOP1 or mutation was detected on Sir3p recruitment; however, DeltaTOP1 has an effect on transcript levels of genes known to regulate telomeric silencing. Thus, the findings indicate that Top1p activity can favor both a repressed chromatin organization and a reduced gene expression level at telomere-proximal regions in yeast. As telomere-proximal regions are known to be enriched for stress-activated genes, our findings show that Top1p can optimize transcript levels for cell growth in exponentially growing cells under a synthetic medium with glucose.

  3. Mechanistic study on the nuclear modifier gene MSS1 mutation suppressing neomycin sensitivity of the mitochondrial 15S rRNA C1477G mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiyin; Wang, Wei; He, Xiangyu; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Shen, Yaoyao; Yu, Zhe; Wang, Xuexiang; Qi, Xuchen; Zhang, Xuan; Fan, Mingjie; Dai, Yu; Yang, Shuxu; Yan, Qingfeng

    2014-01-01

    The phenotypic manifestation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations can be modulated by nuclear genes and environmental factors. However, neither the interaction among these factors nor their underlying mechanisms are well understood. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mtDNA 15S rRNA C1477G mutation (PR) corresponds to the human 12S rRNA A1555G mutation. Here we report that a nuclear modifier gene mss1 mutation suppresses the neomycin-sensitivity phenotype of a yeast C1477G mutant in fermentable YPD medium. Functional assays show that the mitochondrial function of the yeast C1477G mutant was impaired severely in YPD medium with neomycin. Moreover, the mss1 mutation led to a significant increase in the steady-state level of HAP5 (heme activated protein), which greatly up-regulated the expression of glycolytic transcription factors RAP1, GCR1, and GCR2 and thus stimulated glycolysis. Furthermore, the high expression of the key glycolytic enzyme genes HXK2, PFK1 and PYK1 indicated that enhanced glycolysis not only compensated for the ATP reduction from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in mitochondria, but also ensured the growth of the mss1(PR) mutant in YPD medium with neomycin. This study advances our understanding of the phenotypic manifestation of mtDNA mutations.

  4. RAD1 and RAD10, but not other excision repair genes, are required for double-strand break-induced recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, E L; Haber, J E

    1995-04-01

    HO endonuclease-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be repaired by the process of gap repair or, alternatively, by single-strand annealing if the site of the break is flanked by directly repeated homologous sequences. We have shown previously (J. Fishman-Lobell and J. E. Haber, Science 258:480-484, 1992) that during the repair of an HO-induced DSB, the excision repair gene RAD1 is needed to remove regions of nonhomology from the DSB ends. In this report, we present evidence that among nine genes involved in nucleotide excision repair, only RAD1 and RAD10 are required for removal of nonhomologous sequences from the DSB ends. rad1 delta and rad10 delta mutants displayed a 20-fold reduction in the ability to execute both gap repair and single-strand annealing pathways of HO-induced recombination. Mutations in RAD2, RAD3, and RAD14 reduced HO-induced recombination by about twofold. We also show that RAD7 and RAD16, which are required to remove UV photodamage from the silent HML, locus, are not required for MAT switching with HML or HMR as a donor. Our results provide a molecular basis for understanding the role of yeast nucleotide excision repair gene and their human homologs in DSB-induced recombination and repair.

  5. Heterologous carotenoid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae induces the pleiotropic drug resistance stress response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwaal, R.; Jiang, Y.; Wang, J.; Daran, J.M.; Sandmann, G.; Berg, van den J.A.; Ooyen, van A.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    To obtain insight into the genome-wide transcriptional response of heterologous carotenoid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcriptome of two different S. cerevisiae strains overexpressing carotenogenic genes from the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous grown in carbon-limited chemosta

  6. Tailor-made zinc-finger transcription factors activate FLO11 gene expression with phenotypic consequences in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Jia-Ching; Cheng, Yu-Che; Su, Mao-Chang; Moore, Michael; Choo, Yen; Klug, Aaron

    2007-08-15

    Cys2His2 zinc fingers are eukaryotic DNA-binding motifs, capable of distinguishing different DNA sequences, and are suitable for engineering artificial transcription factors. In this work, we used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study the ability of tailor-made zinc finger proteins to activate the expression of the FLO11 gene, with phenotypic consequences. Two three-finger peptides were identified, recognizing sites from the 5' UTR of the FLO11 gene with nanomolar DNA-binding affinity. The three-finger domains and their combined six-finger motif, recognizing an 18-bp site, were fused to the activation domain of VP16 or VP64. These transcription factor constructs retained their DNA-binding ability, with the six-finger ones being the highest in affinity. However, when expressed in haploid yeast cells, only one three-finger recombinant transcription factor was able to activate the expression of FLO11 efficiently. Unlike in the wild-type, cells with such transcriptional activation displayed invasive growth and biofilm formation, without any requirement for glucose depletion. The VP16 and VP64 domains appeared to act equally well in the activation of FLO11 expression, with comparable effects in phenotypic alteration. We conclude that the functional activity of tailor-made transcription factors in cells is not easily predicted by the in vitro DNA-binding activity.

  7. Use of expression-enhancing terminators in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to increase mRNA half-life and improve gene expression control for metabolic engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Kathleen A; Karim, Ashty S; Gupta, Akash; Alper, Hal S

    2013-09-01

    Control of gene and protein expression of both endogenous and heterologous genes is a key component of metabolic engineering. While a large amount of work has been published characterizing promoters for this purpose, less effort has been exerted to elucidate the role of terminators in yeast. In this study, we characterize over 30 terminators for use in metabolic engineering applications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and determine mRNA half-life changes to be the major cause of the varied protein and transcript expression level. We demonstrate that the difference in transcript level can be over 6.5-fold even for high strength promoters. The influence of terminator selection is magnified when coupled with a low-expression promoter, with a maximum difference in protein expression of 11-fold between an expression-enhancing terminator and the parent plasmid terminator and over 35-fold difference when compared with a no-terminator baseline. This is the first time that terminators have been investigated in the context of multiple promoters spanning orders of magnitude in activity. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of terminator selection for metabolic engineering by using a mutant xylose isomerase gene as a proof-of-concept. Through pairing an expression-enhancing terminator with a low-expression promoter, we were able to achieve the same phenotypic result as with a promoter considerably higher in strength. Moreover, we can further boost the phenotype of the high-strength promoter by pairing it with an expression-enhancing terminator. This work highlights how terminator elements can be used to control metabolic pathways in the same way that promoters are traditionally used in yeast. Together, this work demonstrates that terminators will be an important part of heterologous gene expression and metabolic engineering for yeast in the future.

  8. Genome-wide screening of the genes required for tolerance to vanillin, which is a potential inhibitor of bioethanol fermentation, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokuyasu Ken

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lignocellulosic materials are abundant and among the most important potential sources for bioethanol production. Although the pretreatment of lignocellulose is necessary for efficient saccharification and fermentation, numerous by-products, including furan derivatives, weak acids, and phenolic compounds, are generated in the pretreatment step. Many of these components inhibit the growth and fermentation of yeast. In particular, vanillin is one of the most effective inhibitors in lignocellulose hydrolysates because it inhibits fermentation at very low concentrations. To identify the genes required for tolerance to vanillin, we screened a set of diploid yeast deletion mutants, which are powerful tools for clarifying the function of particular genes. Results Seventy-six deletion mutants were identified as vanillin-sensitive mutants. The numerous deleted genes in the vanillin-sensitive mutants were classified under the functional categories for 'chromatin remodeling' and 'vesicle transport', suggesting that these functions are important for vanillin tolerance. The cross-sensitivity of the vanillin-sensitive mutants to furan derivatives, weak acids, and phenolic compounds was also examined. Genes for ergosterol biosynthesis were required for tolerance to all inhibitory compounds tested, suggesting that ergosterol is a key component of tolerance to various inhibitors. Conclusion Our analysis predicts that vanillin tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is affected by various complicated processes that take place on both the molecular and the cellular level. In addition, the ergosterol biosynthetic process is important for achieving a tolerance to various inhibitors. Our findings provide a biotechnological basis for the molecular engineering as well as for screening of more robust yeast strains that may potentially be useful in bioethanol fermentation.

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NADH alternative dehydrogenase Ndi1p, as a tool to identify new genes involved in complex I related diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raynald eCossard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Isolated complex I deficiencies are one of the most commonly observed biochemical features in patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders. In the majority of these clinical cases the molecular bases of the diseases remain unknown suggesting the involvement of unidentified factors that are critical for complex I function.The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NDI1 gene, encoding the mitochondrial internal NADH dehydrogenase was previously shown to complement a complex I deficient strain in Caenorhabitis elegans with notable improvements in reproduction, whole organism respiration. These features indicate that Ndi1p can functionally integrate the respiratory chain, allowing complex I deficiency complementation. Taking into account the Ndi1p ability to bypass complex I, we evaluate the possibility to extend the range of defects/mutations causing complex I deficiencies that can be alleviated by NDI1 expression.We report here that NDI1 expressing animals unexpectedly exhibit a slightly shortened lifespan, a reduction in the progeny and a depletion of the mitochondrial genome. However, Ndi1p is expressed and targeted to the mitochondria as a functional protein that confers rotenone resistance to those animals and without affecting their respiration rate and ATP content.We show that the severe embryonic lethality level caused by the RNAi knockdowns of complex I structural subunit encoding genes (e.g. NDUFV1, NDUFS1, NDUFS6, NDUFS8 or GRIM-19 human orthologs in wild type animals is significantly reduced in the Ndi1p expressing worm.All together these results open up the perspective to identify new genes involved in complex I function, assembly or regulation by screening an RNAi library of genes leading to embryonic lethality that should be rescued by NDI1 expression.

  10. Genome-scale reconstruction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Förster, Jochen; Famili, I.; Fu, P.;

    2003-01-01

    The metabolic network in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was reconstructed using currently available genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. The metabolic reactions were compartmentalized between the cytosol and the mitochondria, and transport steps between the compartments...... containing 1175 metabolic reactions and 584 metabolites. The number of gene functions included in the reconstructed network corresponds to similar to16% of all characterized ORFs in S. cerevisiae. Using the reconstructed network, the metabolic capabilities of S. cerevisiae were calculated and compared...

  11. Identification of a novel C22-∆4-producing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) specific polyunsaturated fatty acid desaturase gene from Isochrysis galbana and its expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Tonglei; Yu, Aiqun; Li, Ming; Ou, Xiuyuan; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2012-12-01

    Isochrysis galbana, produces long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3). A novel gene (IgFAD4-2), encoding a C22-∆4 polyunsaturated fatty acid specific desaturase, has been isolated and characterized from I. galbana. A full-length cDNA of 1,302 bp was cloned by LA-PCR technique. The IgFAD4-2 encoded a protein of 433 amino acids that shares 78 % identity with a previously reported ∆4-desaturase (IgFAD4-1) from I. galbana. The function of IgFAD4-2 was deduced by its heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which then desaturated docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5n-3) to DHA. The conversion ratio of DPA to DHA was 34 %, which is higher than other ∆4-desaturases cloned from algae. However, IgFAD4-2 did not catalyze the desaturation or elongation reactions with other fatty acids. These results confirm that IgFAD4-2 has C22-∆4-PUFAs-specific desaturase activity.

  12. Genealogy-based methods for inference of historical recombination and gene flow and their application in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Paul A; Song, Yun S; Brem, Rachel B

    2012-01-01

    Genetic exchange between isolated populations, or introgression between species, serves as a key source of novel genetic material on which natural selection can act. While detecting historical gene flow from DNA sequence data is of much interest, many existing methods can be limited by requirements for deep population genomic sampling. In this paper, we develop a scalable genealogy-based method to detect candidate signatures of gene flow into a given population when the source of the alleles is unknown. Our method does not require sequenced samples from the source population, provided that the alleles have not reached fixation in the sampled recipient population. The method utilizes recent advances in algorithms for the efficient reconstruction of ancestral recombination graphs, which encode genealogical histories of DNA sequence data at each site, and is capable of detecting the signatures of gene flow whose footprints are of length up to single genes. Further, we employ a theoretical framework based on coalescent theory to test for statistical significance of certain recombination patterns consistent with gene flow from divergent sources. Implementing these methods for application to whole-genome sequences of environmental yeast isolates, we illustrate the power of our approach to highlight loci with unusual recombination histories. By developing innovative theory and methods to analyze signatures of gene flow from population sequence data, our work establishes a foundation for the continued study of introgression and its evolutionary relevance.

  13. Expression of the rgMT gene, encoding for a rice metallothionein-like protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shumei Jin; Dan Sun; Ji Wang; Ying Li; Xinwang Wang; Shenkui Liu

    2014-12-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are cysteine-rich proteins of low molecular weight with many attributed functions, such as providing protection against metal toxicity, being involved in regulation of metal ions uptake that can impact plant physiology and providing protection against oxidative stress. However, the precise function of the metallothionein-like proteins such as the one coded for rgMT gene isolated from rice (Oryza sativa L.) is not completely understood. The whole genome analysis of rice (O. sativa) showed that the rgMT gene is homologue to the Os11g47809 on chromosome 11 of O. sativa sp. japonica genome. This study used the rgMT coding sequence to create transgenic lines to investigate the subcellular localization of the protein, as well as the impact of gene expression in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Arabidopsis thaliana under heavy metal ion, salt and oxidative stresses. The results indicate that the rgMT gene was expressed in the cytoplasm of transgenic cells. Yeast cells transgenic for rgMT showed vigorous growth compared to the nontransgenic controls when exposed to 7mM CuCl2, 10 mM FeCl2, 1 M NaCl, 24 mM NaHCO3 and 3.2 mM H2O2, but there was no significant difference for other stresses tested. Similarly, Arabidopsis transgenic for rgMT displayed significantly improved seed germination rates over that of the control when the seeds were stressed with 100 M CuCl2 or 1 mM H2O2. Increased biomass was observed in the presence of 100 M CuCl2, 220 M FeCl2, 3 mM Na2CO3, 5 mM NaHCO3 or 1 mM H2O2. These results indicate that the expression of the rice rgMT gene in transgenic yeast and Arabidopsis is implicated in improving their tolerance for certain salt and peroxide stressors.

  14. Signature gene expressions of cell wall integrity pathway concur with tolerance response of industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae against biomass pretreatment inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditional industrial ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a robust performance under various environmental conditions and can be served as a candidate for the next-generation biocatalyst development for advanced biofuels production using lignocellulose mateials. Overcoming toxic compou...

  15. PRS5, the Fifth Member of the Phosphoribosyl Pyrophosphate Synthetase Gene Family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Is Essential for Cell Viability in the Absence of either PRS1 or PRS3

    OpenAIRE

    Hernando, Yolanda; Parr, Adrian; Schweizer, Michael

    1998-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an open reading frame, YOL061w, encodes a polypeptide with sequence similarity to the four known 5-phosphoribosyl-1(α)-pyrophosphate synthetase (PRS) genes since it contains a divalent cation binding site and a phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate binding site. We regard YOL061w as the fifth member of the PRS gene family, PRS5. Loss of Prs5p has a significant impact on PRS enzyme activity, causing it to be reduced by 84%. On the other hand, Δprs5 strains are not affected ...

  16. The sequence of an 11.1 kb fragment on the left arm of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome VII reveals six open reading frames including NSP49, KEM1 and four putative new genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, I; Coglievina, M; Zaccaria, P; Klima, R; Bruschi, C V

    1995-09-30

    We report the sequence of an 11.1 kb fragment located on the left arm of chromosome VII of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By sequence analysis we have detected six open reading frames (ORFs) longer that 300 bp, which cover 87% of the entire sequence. ORF G1645 is 100% identical to the KEM1 gene, also identified as DST2, XRN1, SEP1 and RAR5, while G1648 is 100% identical to the NSP49 or NUP49 gene. ORF G1642 shares some identity with a hypothetical protein of Caenorhabditis elegans, while the other four ORFs show no significant homology to known proteins.

  17. Use of the meganuclease I-SceI of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to select for gene deletions in actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Martínez, Lorena T; Bibb, Mervyn J

    2014-11-18

    The search for new natural products is leading to the isolation of novel actinomycete species, many of which will ultimately require genetic analysis. Some of these isolates will likely exhibit low intrinsic frequencies of homologous recombination and fail to sporulate under laboratory conditions, exacerbating the construction of targeted gene deletions and replacements in genetically uncharacterised strains. To facilitate the genetic manipulation of such species, we have developed an efficient method to generate gene or gene cluster deletions in actinomycetes by homologous recombination that does not introduce any other changes to the targeted organism's genome. We have synthesised a codon optimised I-SceI gene for expression in actinomycetes that results in the production of the yeast I-SceI homing endonuclease which produces double strand breaks at a unique introduced 18 base pair recognition sequence. Only those genomes that undergo homologous recombination survive, providing a powerful selection for recombinants, approximately half of which possess the desired mutant genotype. To demonstrate the efficacy and efficiency of the system, we deleted part of the gene cluster for the red-pigmented undecylprodiginine complex of compounds in Streptomyces coelicolor M1141. We believe that the system we have developed will be broadly applicable across a wide range of actinomycetes.

  18. The DNA sequence of a 7941 bp fragment of the left arm of chromosome VII of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains four open reading frames including the multicopy suppressor gene of the pop2 mutation and a putative serine/threonine protein kinase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coglievina, M; Bertani, I; Klima, R; Zaccaria, P; Bruschi, C V

    1995-06-30

    We report the sequence of a 7941 bp DNA fragment from the left arm of chromosome VII of Saccharomyces cerevisiae which contains four open reading frames (ORFs) of greater than 100 amino acid residues. ORF biC834 shows 100% bp identity with the recently identified multicopy suppressor gene of the pop2 mutation (MPT5); its deduced protein product carries an eight-repeat domain region, homologous to that found in the hypothetical regulatory YGL023 protein of S. cerevisiae and the Pumilio protein of Drosophila. ORF biE560 protein exhibits patterns typical of serine/threonine protein kinases, with which it shares high degrees of homology.

  19. Efficient construction of homozygous diploid strains identifies genes required for the hyper-filamentous phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Furukawa

    Full Text Available Yeast cells undergo diploid-specific developments such as spore formation via meiosis and pseudohyphal development under certain nutrient-limited conditions. Studies on these aspects require homozygous diploid mutants, which are generally constructed by crossing strains of opposite mating-type with the same genetic mutation. So far, there has been no direct way to generate and select diploids from haploid cells. Here, we developed a method for efficient construction of homozygous diploids using a PGAL1-HO gene (galactose-inducible mating-type switch and a PSTE18-URA3 gene (counter selection marker for diploids. Diploids are generated by transient induction of the HO endonuclease, which is followed by mating of part of the haploid population. Since the STE18 promoter is repressed in diploids, diploids carrying PSTE18-URA3 can be selected on 5-fluoroorotic acid (5-FOA plates where the uracil prototrophic haploids cannot grow. To demonstrate that this method is useful for genetic studies, we screened suppressor mutations of the complex colony morphology, strong agar invasion and/or hyper-filamentous growth caused by lack of the Hog1 MAPK in the diploid Σ1278b strain background. Following this approach, we identified 49 suppressor mutations. Those include well-known positive regulator genes for filamentous growth signaling pathways, genes involved in mitochondrial function, DNA damage checkpoint, chromatin remodeling, and cell cycle, and also previously uncharacterized genes. Our results indicate that combinatorial use of the PGAL1-HO and PSTE18-URA3 genes is suitable to efficiently construct and select diploids and that this approach is useful for genetic studies especially when combined with large-scale screening.

  20. Exploring the potential of the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 2 (GPD2) promoter for recombinant gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jan Dines; Johanson, Ted; Eliasson Lantz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    by placing it in strains with different ability to reoxidise NADH, and applying different environmental conditions. Flow cytometric analysis of reporter strains expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the GPD2 promoter was used to determine the promoter activity at the single...... mapping revealed conditions where the GPD2 promoter was either completely inactive or hyperactive, which has implications for its implementation in future biotechnological applications such as for process control of heterologous gene expression....

  1. Verification of the resistance of a LEA gene from Tamarix expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to abiotic stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bing-feng; WANG Yu-cheng; ZHANG Da-wei; LI Hong-yan; YANG Chuan-ping

    2008-01-01

    The role of late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins in stress tolerance was examined by using a yeast expression system. LEA protein tolerance to the abotic stresses in plants involved in salt, drought and freezing stresses and additional tolerance to heat, NaHCO3 (salt-alkali) and ultraviolet radiation was also investigated. The transgenic yeast harboring the Tamarix LEA gene (DQ663481) was generated under the control of inducible GAL promoter (pYES2 vector), yeast cells transformed with pYES2 empty vector were also generated as a control. Stress tolerance tests showed that LEA yeast transformants exhibited a higher survival rates than the control transformants under high temperature, NaHCO3, ultraviolet radiation, salt (NaCl), drought and freezing, indicating that the LEA gene is tolerant to these abiotic stresses. These results suggest that the LEA gene is resistant to a wider repertoire of stresses and may play a common role in plant acclimation to the examined stress conditions.

  2. Overexpression of a novel gene, Cms1, can rescue the growth arrest of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mcm10 suppressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    MCM10 protein is an essential replication factor involved in the initiation of DNA replication. A mcm10 mutant (mcm10-1) of budding yeast shows a growth arrest at 37℃. In the present work, we have isolated a mcm10-1 suppressor strain, which grows at 37℃. Interestingly, this mcm10-1 suppressor undergoes cell cycle arrest at 14℃. A novel gene, YLR003c, is identified by high-copy complementation of this suppressor. We called it as Cmsl (Complementation of Mcm 10 Suppressor). Furthermore, the experiments of transformation show that cells of mcm10-1 suppressor with high-copy plasmid but not low-copy plasmid grow at 14℃, indicating that overexpression of Cmsl can rescue the growth arrest of this mcm10 suppressor at non-permissive temperature. These results suggest that CMS1 protein may functionally interact with MCM10 protein and play a role in the regulation of DNA replication and cell cycle control.

  3. Detection of overlapping protein complexes in gene expression, phenotype and pathways of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using Prorank based Fuzzy algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, P; Ramyachitra, D; Banupriya, D

    2016-04-15

    Proteins show their functional activity by interacting with other proteins and forms protein complexes since it is playing an important role in cellular organization and function. To understand the higher order protein organization, overlapping is an important step towards unveiling functional and evolutionary mechanisms behind biological networks. Most of the clustering algorithms do not consider the weighted as well as overlapping complexes. In this research, Prorank based Fuzzy algorithm has been proposed to find the overlapping protein complexes. The Fuzzy detection algorithm is incorporated in the Prorank algorithm after ranking step to find the overlapping community. The proposed algorithm executes in an iterative manner to compute the probability of robust clusters. The proposed and the existing algorithms were tested on different datasets such as PPI-D1, PPI-D2, Collins, DIP, Krogan Core and Krogan-Extended, gene expression such as GSE7645, GSE22269, GSE26923, pathways such as Meiosis, MAPK, Cell Cycle, phenotypes such as Yeast Heterogeneous and Yeast Homogeneous datasets. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm predicts protein complexes with better accuracy compared to other state of art algorithms.

  4. Impaired Uptake and/or Utilization of Leucine by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Suppressed by the SPT15-300 Allele of the TATA-Binding Protein Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baerends, RJ; Qiu, Jin-Long; Rasmussen, Simon;

    2009-01-01

    us to examine the effect of expression of the SPT15-300 allele in various yeast species of industrial importance. Expression of SPT15-300 in leucine-prototrophic strains of S. cerevisiae, Saccharomyces bayanus, or Saccharomyces pastorianus (lager brewing yeast), however, did not improve tolerance...

  5. Transfer RNA pseudouridine synthases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, T; Olsson, M

    1990-05-25

    A transfer RNA lacking modified nucleosides was produced by transcription in vitro of a cloned gene that encodes a Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycine tRNA. At least three different uridines (in nucleotide positions 13, 32, and 55) of this transcript tRNA are modified to pseudouridine by an extract of S. cerevisiae. Variants of the RNA substrate were also constructed that each had only one of these sites, thus allowing specific monitoring of pseudouridylation at different nucleotide positions. Using such RNAs to assay pseudouridine synthesis, enzymes producing this nucleoside were purified from an extract of S. cerevisiae. The activities corresponding to positions 13, 32, and 55 in the tRNA substrate could all be separated chromatographically, indicating that there is a separate enzyme for each of these sites. The enzyme specific for position 55 (denoted pseudouridine synthase 55) was purified approximately 4000-fold using a combination of DEAE-Sepharose, heparin-Sepharose, and hydroxylapatite.

  6. 酿酒酵母减数分裂的事件和特异性基因%Meiosis Events and Specific Genes Involved in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽

    2006-01-01

    Meiosis is the most important reproduce and favoured by organisms. The key events of meiosis identified are pairing, synapsis, genetic recombination, segregation. In this article, the specific genes of meiosis and pathways are described in these events in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two pathways have been identified in homolog pairing and Dmc1,Hop2, Rad51 and Mnd1 have function in pairing. In synapsis Red1, Hop1 and Zip1 are the components of synaptonemal complex. Hop2 is required for synapsis. Genetic recombination is the most important event of meiosis and provides genetic diversity for organisms to adapt the environment change. The meiosis specific genes involved in gene recombination are Spo11, Rad52 epistasis group, Dmc1, Mnd1, Msh4, Msh5, Mek1, Red1, and Hop1. Rec8,Spo13 and Sgo1 are involved in segregation.%减数分裂是生物体重要的有性生殖方式,它提供来自母本和父本的基因信息,产生具有生物多样性的子代,使其能够适应环境的变化而不断进化.本文简述了现已阐明的酿酒酵母减数分裂的重要事件如同源染色体配对、联会、基因重组、染色体分裂和特异性基因.在同源染色体配对的过程中现已发现了2条途径,一条由Rad51独立完成,另一条有Dmc1、Hop2、Rad51和Mnd1参与,同时Rad51也可能参与.Red1、Hop1和Zip1是联会复合体的组成成分,而联会也要求其他减数分裂的特异性基因如Hop2的参与.基因重组是减数分裂中最重要的事件,它为子代提供了新的遗传信息,是生物多样性的基础之一.Spo11、Rad52组、Dmc1、Mnd1、Msh4、Msh5、Mek1、Red1和Hop1参与了基因重组.Spo11是发现和研究得最早的启动基因重组的基因之一;Rec8、Spo13和Sgo1参与了染色体分裂的过程.

  7. Grr1p is required for transcriptional induction of amino acid permease genes and proper transcriptional regulation of genes in carbon metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Regenberg, Birgitte; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    and a grr1 Delta strain and adding citrulline in the exponential phase. Whole-genome transcription analyses were performed on samples from each cultivation, both immediately before and 30 min after citrulline addition. Transcriptional induction of the AAP genes AGP1, BAP2, BAP3, DIP5, GNP1 and TAT1 is fully...

  8. Redox engineering by ectopic expression of glutamate dehydrogenase genes links NADPH availability and NADH oxidation with cold growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Ballester Tomás, Laura; Rández Gil, Francisca; Pérez Torrado, Roberto; Prieto Alamán, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Cold stress reduces microbial growth and metabolism being relevant in industrial processes like wine making and brewing. Knowledge on the cold transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests the need of a proper redox balance. Nevertheless, there are no direct evidence of the links between NAD(P) levels and cold growth and how engineering of enzymatic reactions requiring NAD(P) may be used to modify the performance of industrial strains at low temperature. Results Rec...

  9. Mdp1, a Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Gene Involved in Mitochondrial/Cytoplasmic Protein Distribution, Is Identical to the Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Gene Rsp5

    OpenAIRE

    Zoladek, T; Tobiasz, A.; Vaduva, G.; Boguta, M.; Martin, N C; Hopper, A K

    1997-01-01

    Alteration of the subcellular distribution of Mod5p-I, a tRNA modification enzyme, member of the sorting isozyme family, affects tRNA-mediated nonsense suppression. Altered suppression efficiency was used to identify MDP genes, which, when mutant, change the mitochondrial/cytosolic distribution of Mod5p-I,KR6. MDP2 is the previously identified VRP1, which encodes verprolin, required for proper organization of the actin cytoskeleton. MDP3 is identical to PAN1, which encodes a protein involved ...

  10. Effects of deletion of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutamate dehydrogenase genes on glycerol and ethanol metabolism in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Chin, Young-Wook; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Bioethanol is currently used as an alternative fuel for gasoline worldwide. For economic production of bioethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, formation of a main by-product, glycerol, should be prevented or minimized in order to reduce a separation cost of ethanol from fermentation broth. In this study, S. cerevisiae was engineered to investigate the effects of the sole and double disruption of NADH-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1) and NADPH-requiring glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) on the production of glycerol and ethanol from glucose. Even though sole deletion of GPD1 or GDH1 reduced glycerol production, double deletion of GPD1 and GDH1 resulted in the lowest glycerol concentration of 2.31 g/L, which was 46.4% lower than the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the recombinant S. cerevisiae ∆GPD1∆GDH1 strain showed a slight improvement in ethanol yield (0.414 g/g) compared with the wild-type strain (0.406 g/g). Genetic engineering of the glycerol and glutamate metabolic pathways modified NAD(P)H-requiring metabolic pathways and exerted a positive effect on glycerol reduction without affecting ethanol production.

  11. 酵母海藻糖磷酸合成酶基因的PCR扩增及其产物克隆%Gene Cloning of Trehalose-6-phosphotate Synthase from Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈红漫; 董志扬

    2000-01-01

    Based on template of Saccharomyces cerevisiae eDNA and reported gene sequence, a pair of primers was designed to am plify a 1.5kb DNA fragment by using PCR. The PCR product was pmified on 1% LMP agarose gel, and cloned into plasmid pBluscript, followed by transformation of R.coli DH- 5α. The Cloned PCR product was confirmed to be TPS1 by restriction endonu clease.%以海藻糖高产菌株啤酒酵母Saccharomyces cerevisiae S2.1416的cDNA克隆为模板,根据国外报道的序列,设计适当的 引物,利用PCR技术,克隆出大约1.5kb的片段。PCR产物经低溶点胶纯化,与PBluscript载体连接并转化大肠杆菌DH-5α, 阳性重组子经酶切鉴定,表明已获得海藻糖磷酸酶基因PCR产物及其克隆。

  12. Induction of sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to the formation of N6-methyladenosine in mRNA: a potential mechanism for the activity of the IME4 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Mary J; Shambaugh, Mary Eileen; Timpte, Candace S; Bokar, Joseph A

    2002-10-15

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is present at internal sites in mRNA isolated from all higher eukaryotes, but has not previously been detected in the mRNA of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This nucleoside modification occurs only in a sequence- specific context that appears to be conserved across diverse species. The function of this modification is not fully established, but there is some indirect evidence that m6A may play a role in the efficiency of mRNA splicing, transport or translation. The S.cerevisiae gene IME4, which is important for induction of sporulation, is very similar to the human gene MT-A70, which has been shown to be a critical subunit of the human mRNA [N6-adenosine]-methyltransferase. This observation led to the hypothesis that yeast sporulation may be dependent upon methylation of yeast mRNA, mediated by Ime4p. In this study we show that induction of sporulation leads to the appearance of low levels of m6A in yeast mRNA and that this modification requires IME4. Moreover, single amino acid substitutions in the putative catalytic residues of Ime4p lead to severe sporulation defects in a strain whose sporulation ability is completely dependent on this protein. Collectively, these data suggest very strongly that the activation of sporulation by Ime4p is the result of its proposed methyltransferase activity and provide the most direct evidence to date of a physiologic role of m6A in a gene regulatory pathway.

  13. Dynamic control of gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered for the production of plant sesquitepene α-santalene in a fed-batch mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scalcinati, Gionata; Knuf, Christoph; Partow, Siavash;

    2012-01-01

    Microbial cells engineered for efficient production of plant sesquiterpenes may allow for sustainable and scalable production of these compounds that can be used as e.g. perfumes and pharmaceuticals. Here, for the first time a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain capable of producing high levels of α......-santalene, the precursor of a commercially interesting compound, was constructed through a rationally designed metabolic engineering approach. Optimal sesquiterpene production was obtained by modulating the expression of one of the key metabolic steps of the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, squalene synthase (Erg9). To couple...

  14. Atypical yeasts identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae by MALDI-TOF MS and gene sequencing are the main responsible of fermentation of chicha, a traditional beverage from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Juan Andrés; Miranda, Patricia; Flores-Félix, José David; Sánchez-Juanes, Fernando; Ageitos, José M; González-Buitrago, José Manuel; Velázquez, Encarna; Villa, Tomás G

    2013-12-01

    Chicha is a drink prepared in several Andean countries from Inca's times by maize fermentation. Currently this fermentation is carried out in familiar artesanal "chicherías" that make one of the most known types of chicha, the "chicha de jora". In this study we isolate and identify the yeasts mainly responsible of the fermentation process in this type of chicha in 10 traditional "chicherías" in Cusco region in Peru. We applied by first time MALDI-TOF MS analysis for the identification of yeast of non-clinic origin and the results showed that all of yeast strains isolated belong to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These results agree with those obtained after the analysis of the D1/D2 and 5.8S-ITS regions. However the chicha strains have a phenotypic profile that differed in more than 40% as compared to that of current S. cerevisiae strains. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report concerning the yeasts involved in chicha fermentation.

  15. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system...

  16. Cloning of Xylose Reductase Gene and Site-Specific Integrating it into Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genome%木糖还原酶基因的克隆及其在酿酒酵母中的定向整合

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高岚; 夏黎明

    2013-01-01

      酿酒酵母(Saccharomyces cerevisiae)是重要的乙醇生产菌株,但因缺少戊糖代谢途径而不能利用木糖,为了改良工业酿酒酵母利用半纤维素发酵生产乙醇的性能,利用分子生物学技术构建能够利用木糖的基因工程酵母。选取酿酒酵母染色体的rDNA重复序列作为外源基因整合位点,依此构建多拷贝染色体整合型载体pUG-LR。采用融合表达策略扩增得到含有酿酒酵母乙醇脱氢酶启动子PADH和树干毕赤酵母木糖还原酶基因xyl1的融合序列,并将其插入pUG-LR载体中,构建成含遗传霉素G418抗性标记的同源重组质粒pUG-LR-XYL1。以工业酿酒酵母ZU-01为宿主,通过优化后的电穿孔法将重组质粒导入经缓冲液处理的酵母细胞,30℃培养。通过提高YEPX复筛培养基G418浓度,得到10株生长较快的优良性状转化子。在不含G418的YEPX培养基上传代8次以上,以转化子基因组DNA为模板,进行PCR检测,均可获得目的基因片段。研究结果表明:木糖还原酶基因xyl1已定向整合于ZU-01染色体DNA上并稳定遗传,为后续构建工业酿酒酵母的木糖代谢通路、利用木糖产酒精的重组菌株奠定了基础。%  Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important ethanol producing fungus, but it cannot be used in large-scale bioethanol production from hemicelluloses due to its lack of the metabolism pathway of pentose, and therefore the xylose can not be utilized. In order to improve its ability of utilizing hemicelluloses to produce ethand, molecular biology technology was adopted to obtain recombinant strain with ability of xylose-using in this study. The repeat region of rDNA in the S. cerevisiae chromosome was chosen as the insert site of foreign genes. Plasmid pUG6, with KanMX resistance marker, was connected with rDNA fragments to construct site-specific integration vector pUG-LR. Then a Pichia stipitis xylose reductase gene xyl1 was cloned

  17. Swi/SNF-GCN5-dependent chromatin remodelling determines induced expression of GDH3, one of the paralogous genes responsible for ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño, Amaranta; Riego, Lina; DeLuna, Alexander; Aranda, Cristina; Romero, Guillermo; Ishida, Cecilia; Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; Rodarte, Beatriz; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Valenzuela, Lourdes; Zonszein, Sergio; González, Alicia

    2005-07-01

    It is accepted that Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome arose from complete duplication of eight ancestral chromosomes; functionally normal ploidy was recovered because of the massive loss of 90% of duplicated genes. There is evidence that indicates that part of this selective conservation of gene pairs is compelling to yeast facultative metabolism. As an example, the duplicated NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase pathway has been maintained because of the differential expression of the paralogous GDH1 and GDH3 genes, and the biochemical specialization of the enzymes they encode. The present work has been aimed to the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that modulate GDH3 transcriptional activation. Our results show that GDH3 expression is repressed in glucose-grown cultures, as opposed to what has been observed for GDH1, and induced under respiratory conditions, or under stationary phase. Although GDH3 pertains to the nitrogen metabolic network, and its expression is Gln3p-regulated, complete derepression is ultimately determined by the carbon source through the action of the SAGA and SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complexes. GDH3 carbon-mediated regulation is over-imposed to that exerted by the nitrogen source, highlighting the fact that operation of facultative metabolism requires strict control of enzymes, like Gdh3p, involved in biosynthetic pathways that use tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates.

  18. An apoptotic cell cycle mutant in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Ingrid

    1996-01-01

    The simple eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be a useful organism for elucidating the mechanisms that govern cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells. The excellent in vivo system permits a cell cycle study using temperature sensitive mutants. In addition, it is possible to study...... many genes and gene products from higher eukaryotes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because many genes and biological processes are homologous or similar in lower and in higher eukaryotes. The highly developed methods of genetics and molecular biology greatly facilitates studies of higher eukaryotic...... processes.Programmmed cell death with apoptosis plays a major role in development and homeostatis in most, if not all, animal cells. Apoptosis is a morphologically distinct form of death, that requires the activation of a highly regulated suicide program. Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides a new system...

  19. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD7 and RAD16 genes are required for inducible excision of endonuclease III sensitive-sites, yet are not needed for the repair of these lesions following a single UV dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A D; Waters, R

    1997-01-31

    The RAD7 and RAD16 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have roles in the repair of UV induced CPDs in nontranscribed genes [1], and in the repair of CPDs in the nontranscribed strand of transcribed genes [2]. Previously, we identified an inducible component to nucleotide excision repair (NER), which is absent in a rad16 delta strain [3]. We have examined the repair of UV induced endonuclease III sensitive-sites (EIIISS), and have shown repair of these lesions to proceed by NER but their removal from nontranscribed regions is independent of RAD7 and RAD16. Furthermore, EIIISS are repaired with equal efficiency from both transcribed and nontranscribed genes [4]. In order to dissect the roles of RAD7 and RAD16 in the above processes we examined the repair of EIIISS in the MAT alpha and HML alpha loci, which are, respectively, transcriptionally active and inactive in alpha haploid cells. These loci have elevated levels of these lesions after UV (in genomic DNA EIIISS constitute about 10% of total lesions, whereas CPDs are about 70% of total lesions). We have shown that excision of UV induced EIIISS is enhanced following a prior UV irradiation. No enhancement of repair was detected in either the rad7 delta or the rad16 delta mutant. The fact that RAD7 and RAD16 are not required for the repair of EIIISS per se yet are required for the enhanced excision of these lesions from MAT alpha and HML alpha suggests two possibilities. These genes have two roles in NER, namely in the repair of CPDs from nontranscribed sequences, and in enhancing NER itself regardless of whether these genes' products are required for the excision of the specific lesion being repaired. In the latter case, the induction of RAD7 and RAD16 may increase the turnover of complexes stalled in nontranscribed DNA so as to increase the availability of NER proteins for the repair of CPDs and EIIISS in all regions of the genome.

  20. Physiological impact and context dependency of transcriptional responses: a chemostat study in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tai, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is a compilation of a four-year PhD project on bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Since the entire S. cerevisiae genome sequence became available in 1996, DNA-microarray analysis has become a popular high-information-density tool for analyzing gene expression in this important ind

  1. Ethanol production from acid- and alkali-pretreated corncob by endoglucanase and β-glucosidase co-expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae subject to the expression of heterologous genes and nutrition added.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunying; Zou, Shaolan; Liu, Cheng; Yang, Huajun; Zhang, Kun; Ma, Yuanyuan; Hong, Jiefang; Zhang, Minhua

    2016-05-01

    Low-cost technologies to overcome the recalcitrance of cellulose are the key to widespread utilization of lignocellulosic biomass for ethanol production. Efficient enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose requires the synergism of various cellulases, and the ratios of each cellulase are required to be regulated to achieve the maximum hydrolysis. On the other hand, engineering of cellulolytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains is a promising strategy for lignocellulosic ethanol production. The expression of cellulase-encoding genes in yeast would affect the synergism of cellulases and thus the fermentation ability of strains with exogenous enzyme addition. However, such researches are rarely reported. In this study, ten endoglucanase and β-glucosidase co-expressing S. cerevisiae strains were constructed and evaluated by enzyme assay and fermentation performance measurement. The results showed that: (1) maximum ethanol titers of recombinant strains exhibited high variability in YPSC medium (20 g/l peptone, 10 g/l yeast extract, 100 g/l acid- and alkali-pretreated corncob) within 10 days. However, they had relatively little difference in USC medium (100 g/l acid- and alkali-pretreated corncob, 0.33 g/l urea, pH 5.0). (2) Strains 17# and 19#, with ratio (CMCase to β-glucosidase) of 7.04 ± 0.61 and 7.40 ± 0.71 respectively, had the highest fermentation performance in YPSC. However, strains 11# and 3# with the highest titers in USC medium had a higher ratio of CMCase to β-glucosidase, and CMCase activities. These results indicated that nutrition, enzyme activities and the ratio of heterologous enzymes had notable influence on the fermentation ability of cellulase-expressing yeast.

  2. Isolation of a novel C18-Δ9 polyunsaturated fatty acid specific elongase gene from DHA-producing Isochrysis galbana H29 and its use for the reconstitution of the alternative Δ8 pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Ou, Xiuyuan; Yang, Xiangdong; Guo, Dongquan; Qian, Xueyan; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2011-09-01

    A novel gene (IgASE2) encoding a C18-Δ9 polyunsaturated fatty acids specific (C18-Δ9-PUFAs-specific) elongase was isolated and characterized from DHA-rich microalga, Isochrysis galbana H29. The IgASE2 gene was 1,653 bp in length, contained a 786 bp ORF encoding a protein of 261 amino acids that shared 87% identity with Δ9 elongase, IgASE1, and possessed a 44 bp 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) and a 823 bp 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR). IgASE2, by its heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, elongated linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6) and α-linolenic (ALA, 18:3n-3) to eicosadienoic acid (EDA, 20:2n-6) and eicosatrienoic acid (ETrA, 20:3n-3), respectively. The conversions of LA to EDA and ALA to ETrA were 57.6 and 56.1%, respectively. Co-expression of this elongase with Δ8 desaturase required for the synthesis of C20-polyunsaturated fatty acids resulted in the accumulation of dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (20:3n-6) from LA and eicosatetraenoic acid (20:4n-6) from ALA. These results demonstrated that IgASE2 exhibited C18-Δ9-PUFAs-specific elongase activity and the alternative Δ8 pathway was reconstituted.

  3. Preliminary Study on Silent ofSaccharomyces cerevisiae Alcohol Dehydrogenase II Gene%酿酒酵母ADH2基因沉默菌株构建的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林燕环

    2015-01-01

    本实验通过构建酿酒酵母ADH2基因沉默表达载体,电转化法转化酿酒酵母工程菌Y01,获得酿酒酵母ADH2基因沉默突变株S01。发酵实验结果表明沉默突变株乙醇产量相对较低。说明沉默突变株体内乙醇合成途径受到干扰。%The main purpose of this research is to construct a ADH2 gene silencing strain S01 by the method of constructing ADH2 gene silencing expression vector than transformed intoSaccharomyces cerevisiae Y01. The results showed that the ethanol production of the mutant strain was relatively low. The alcohol metabolic pathway in this transformant si interfered.

  4. Expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD6 that encodes a ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, increases in response to DNA damage and in meiosis but remains constant during the mitotic cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, K; Prakash, S; Prakash, L

    1990-02-25

    The RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) enzyme and is required for the repair of damaged DNA, mutagenesis, and sporulation. Here, we report our studies on the regulation of RAD6 gene expression after UV damage, during the mitotic cell cycle, in meiosis, and following heat shock and starvation. RAD6 mRNA levels became elevated in cells exposed to UV light, and at all UV doses the increase in mRNA levels was rapid and occurred within 30 min after exposure to UV. RAD6 mRNA levels also increased in sporulating MATa/MAT alpha cells, and the period of maximal accumulation of RAD6 mRNA during meiosis is coincident with the time during which recombination occurs. However, RAD6 mRNA levels showed no periodic fluctuation in the mitotic cell cycle, were not elevated upon heat shock, and fell in cells in the stationary phase of growth. These observations suggest that RAD6 activity is required throughout the cell cycle rather than being restricted to a specific stage, and that during meiosis, high levels of RAD6 activity may be needed at a stage coincident with genetic recombination. The observation that RAD6 transcription is not induced by heat and starvation, treatments that activate stress responses, suggests that the primary role of RAD6 is in the repair of damaged DNA rather than in adapting cells to stress situations.

  5. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for lactose/whey fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Lucília; Guimarães, Pedro M R; Oliveira, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Lactose is an interesting carbon source for the production of several bio-products by fermentation, primarily because it is the major component of cheese whey, the main by-product of dairy activities. However, the microorganism more widely used in industrial fermentation processes, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, does not have a lactose metabolization system. Therefore, several metabolic engineering approaches have been used to construct lactose-consuming S. cerevisiae strains, particularly involving the expression of the lactose genes of the phylogenetically related yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also the lactose genes from Escherichia coli and Aspergillus niger, as reviewed here. Due to the existing large amounts of whey, the production of bio-ethanol from lactose by engineered S. cerevisiae has been considered as a possible route for whey surplus. Emphasis is given in the present review on strain improvement for lactose-to-ethanol bioprocesses, namely flocculent yeast strains for continuous high-cell-density systems with enhanced ethanol productivity.

  6. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Fossati

    Full Text Available Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S-reticuline starting from (R,S-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS, salutaridine reductase (PsSAR and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes.

  7. LEU2基因敲除对工业啤酒酵母高级醇生成量的影响%Effect of LEU2 gene knockout on higher alcohols production in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佐一含; 朱旭东; 陈叶福; 吕鸿雁; 肖冬光

    2011-01-01

    Effect of β-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase gene (LEU2) on production of higher alcohols, especially isoamyl alcohol, in industrial brewing yeast was studied with the method of gene knockout. The recombinant cassette Po3-KanMX-Po4 with LEU2 gene homology region at both ends and with KanMX gene in the middle was amplified by PCR. The obtained Po3-KanMX-Po4 fragment was transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae using lithium acetate method. The mutant with LEU2 knocked out was selected out by the resistance to geneticin (G418) and further confirmed by PCR. Fermentation performance and production of higher alcohols by the mutant was compared with parental strain S6 in different fermentation medium. Mutant S6-1 with at least one copy of LEU2 gene knockout was obtained. The fermentation test results showed that the production of higher alcohols from this mutant was reduced by 9.97%, of which the content of isoamyl alcohol was reduced by 11 .82% when using a low branched-chain amino acids containing medium, while alcohol content, fermentation rate and other fermentation performance did not change significantly. Production of higher alcohols, especially isoamyl alcohol in the industrial S. cerevisiae S6 with LEU2 gene knockout was decreased when the branched-chain amino acids in the medium were insufficient.%通过敲除啤酒酵母中β-丙基苹果酸脱氢酶基因(LEU2),研究该基因对工业啤酒酵母高级醇特别是异戊醇生成量的影响.通过醋酸锂一步转化法,将一段两端具有LEU2摹因序列同源区,中间为遗传霉素(G418)抗性基因的DNA片段转入酵母细胞中,与LEU2基因的ORF(open reading flames)进行同源重组,利用遗传霉素抗性进行筛选.将突变株与出发菌株进行发酵实验,测定其发酵性能和高级醇的生成量.筛选获得了LEU2摹因突变的工业啤酒酵母.在支链氨基酸含量较低的培养基中进行发酵测定,突变株发酵液中高级醇含量比出发菌株降低了9.97%,

  8. A comprehensive comparison of RNA-Seq-based transcriptome analysis from reads to differential gene expression and cross-comparison with microarrays: a case study in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nookaew, Intawat; Papini, Marta; Pornputtapong, Natapol;

    2012-01-01

    of genetic variation on the estimation of gene expression level using three different aligners for read-mapping (Gsnap, Stampy and TopHat) on S288c genome, the capabilities of five different statistical methods to detect differential gene expression (baySeq, Cuffdiff, DESeq, edgeR and NOISeq) and we explored...... gene expression identification derived from the different statistical methods, as well as their integrated analysis results based on gene ontology annotation are in good agreement. Overall, our study provides a useful and comprehensive comparison between the two platforms (RNA-seq and microrrays...

  9. Regulatory circuit for responses of nitrogen catabolic gene expression to the GLN3 and DAL80 proteins and nitrogen catabolite repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Daugherty, J R; Rai, R; el Berry, H M; Cooper, T. G.

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrate that expression of the UGA1, CAN1, GAP1, PUT1, PUT2, PUT4, and DAL4 genes is sensitive to nitrogen catabolite repression. The expression of all these genes, with the exception of UGA1 and PUT2, also required a functional GLN3 protein. In addition, GLN3 protein was required for expression of the DAL1, DAL2, DAL7, GDH1, and GDH2 genes. The UGA1, CAN1, GAP1, and DAL4 genes markedly increased their expression when the DAL80 locus, encoding a negative regulatory element, was disrupt...

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae modulates immune gene expressions and inhibits ETEC-mediated ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galliano Zanello

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC infections result in large economic losses in the swine industry worldwide. ETEC infections cause pro-inflammatory responses in intestinal epithelial cells and subsequent diarrhea in pigs, leading to reduced growth rate and mortality. Administration of probiotics as feed additives displayed health benefits against intestinal infections. Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc is non-commensal and non-pathogenic yeast used as probiotic in gastrointestinal diseases. However, the immuno-modulatory effects of Sc in differentiated porcine intestinal epithelial cells exposed to ETEC were not investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We reported that the yeast Sc (strain CNCM I-3856 modulates transcript and protein expressions involved in inflammation, recruitment and activation of immune cells in differentiated porcine intestinal epithelial IPEC-1 cells. We demonstrated that viable Sc inhibits the ETEC-induced expression of pro-inflammatory transcripts (IL-6, IL-8, CCL20, CXCL2, CXCL10 and proteins (IL-6, IL-8. This inhibition was associated to a decrease of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, an agglutination of ETEC by Sc and an increase of the anti-inflammatory PPAR-γ nuclear receptor mRNA level. In addition, Sc up-regulates the mRNA levels of both IL-12p35 and CCL25. However, measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance displayed that Sc failed to maintain the barrier integrity in monolayer exposed to ETEC suggesting that Sc does not inhibit ETEC enterotoxin activity. CONCLUSIONS: Sc (strain CNCM I-3856 displays multiple immuno-modulatory effects at the molecular level in IPEC-1 cells suggesting that Sc may influence intestinal inflammatory reaction.

  11. Overexpression of Sbe2p, a Golgi Protein, Results in Resistance to Caspofungin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Osherov, Nir; May, Gregory S.; Albert, Nathaniel D.; Kontoyiannis, D. P.

    2002-01-01

    Caspofungin inhibits the synthesis of 1, 3-β-d-glucan, an essential cell wall target in fungi. Genetic studies in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that mutations in FKS1 and FKS2 genes result in caspofungin resistance. However, direct demonstration of the role of gene overexpression in caspofungin resistance has been lacking. We transformed wild-type S. cerevisiae with an S. cerevisiae URA3-based GAL1 cDNA library and selected transformants in glucose synthetic complete pla...

  12. Regulatory circuit for responses of nitrogen catabolic gene expression to the GLN3 and DAL80 proteins and nitrogen catabolite repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, J R; Rai, R; el Berry, H M; Cooper, T G

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrate that expression of the UGA1, CAN1, GAP1, PUT1, PUT2, PUT4, and DAL4 genes is sensitive to nitrogen catabolite repression. The expression of all these genes, with the exception of UGA1 and PUT2, also required a functional GLN3 protein. In addition, GLN3 protein was required for expression of the DAL1, DAL2, DAL7, GDH1, and GDH2 genes. The UGA1, CAN1, GAP1, and DAL4 genes markedly increased their expression when the DAL80 locus, encoding a negative regulatory element, was disrupted. Expression of the GDH1, PUT1, PUT2, and PUT4 genes also responded to DAL80 disruption, but much more modestly. Expression of GLN1 and GDH2 exhibited parallel responses to the provision of asparagine and glutamine as nitrogen sources but did not follow the regulatory responses noted above for the nitrogen catabolic genes such as DAL5. Steady-state mRNA levels of both genes did not significantly decrease when glutamine was provided as nitrogen source but were lowered by the provision of asparagine. They also did not respond to disruption of DAL80.

  13. Expression and secretion of Aspergillus niger glucoamylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文清; 何鸣; 罗进贤

    1995-01-01

    Aspergillus niger glucoamylase GA 1 cDNA was inserted in between the yeast PGK promoter and terminator on plasmid pMA91. The resultant plasmid pMAG69 was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae GRF18 by protoplast transformation. The A niger GA I cDNA was expressed efficiently under the contiol of PGK promoter and 99% of the gene products were secreted into the culture medium using its own signal sequence The recombmant yeast can digest 87% of starch in 2 d in the medium containing 10% starch. The recombinant plasmid pMAG69 can exist stably in 5. cerevisiae.

  14. Genetic mapping of Ty elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, H L; Petes, T. D.

    1984-01-01

    We used transformation to insert a selectable marker at various sites in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome occupied by the transposable element Ty. The vector CV9 contains the LEU2+ gene and a portion of the repeated element Ty1-17. Transformation with this plasmid resulted in integration of the vector via a reciprocal exchange using homology at the LEU2 locus or at the various Ty elements that are dispersed throughout the S. cerevisiae genome. These transformants were used to map genetical...

  15. Genetic mapping of quantitative phenotypic traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Steve; Thevelein, Johan M; Nevoigt, Elke

    2012-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become a favorite production organism in industrial biotechnology presenting new challenges to yeast engineers in terms of introducing advantageous traits such as stress tolerances. Exploring subspecies diversity of S. cerevisiae has identified strains that bear industrially relevant phenotypic traits. Provided that the genetic basis of such phenotypic traits can be identified inverse engineering allows the targeted modification of production strains. Most phenotypic traits of interest in S. cerevisiae strains are quantitative, meaning that they are controlled by multiple genetic loci referred to as quantitative trait loci (QTL). A straightforward approach to identify the genetic basis of quantitative traits is QTL mapping which aims at the allocation of the genetic determinants to regions in the genome. The application of high-density oligonucleotide arrays and whole-genome re-sequencing to detect genetic variations between strains has facilitated the detection of large numbers of molecular markers thus allowing high-resolution QTL mapping over the entire genome. This review focuses on the basic principle and state of the art of QTL mapping in S. cerevisiae. Furthermore we discuss several approaches developed during the last decade that allow down-scaling of the regions identified by QTL mapping to the gene level. We also emphasize the particular challenges of QTL mapping in nonlaboratory strains of S. cerevisiae.

  16. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to improve succinic acid production based on metabolic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuma; Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    We performed metabolic engineering on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhanced production of succinic acid. Aerobic succinic acid production in S. cerevisiae was achieved by disrupting the SDH1 and SDH2 genes, which encode the catalytic subunits of succinic acid dehydrogenase. Increased succinic acid production was achieved by eliminating the ethanol biosynthesis pathways. Metabolic profiling analysis revealed that succinic acid accumulated intracellularly following disruption of the SDH1 and SDH2 genes, which suggests that enhancing the export of intracellular succinic acid outside of cells increases succinic acid production in S. cerevisiae. The mae1 gene encoding the Schizosaccharomyces pombe malic acid transporter was introduced into S. cerevisiae, and as a result, succinic acid production was successfully improved. Metabolic profiling analysis is useful in producing chemicals for metabolic engineering of microorganisms.

  17. Expression of human poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Effect on survival, homologous recombination and identification of genes involved in intracellular localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Ferla, Marco; Mercatanti, Alberto; Rocchi, Giulia; Lodovichi, Samuele; Cervelli, Tiziana; Pignata, Luca [Yeast Genetics and Genomics, Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Council of Research (CNR), via Moruzzi 1, 56122 Pisa (Italy); Caligo, Maria Adelaide [Section of Genetic Oncology, University Hospital and University of Pisa, via Roma 57, 56125 Pisa (Italy); Galli, Alvaro, E-mail: alvaro.galli@ifc.cnr.it [Yeast Genetics and Genomics, Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Council of Research (CNR), via Moruzzi 1, 56122 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The human poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) gene affects growth and UV-induced homologous recombination in yeast. • PARP-1 chemical inhibition impacts yeast growth and UV-induced recombination. • A genome-wide screen identifies 99 yeast genes that suppress the growth defect inferred by PARP-1. • Bioinformatics analysis identifies 41 human orthologues that may have a role in PARP-1 intracellular localization. • The findings suggest that PARP-1 nuclear localization may affect the response to PARP inhibitors in cancer therapy. - Abstract: The poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) actively participates in a series of functions within the cell that include: mitosis, intracellular signaling, cell cycle regulation, transcription and DNA damage repair. Therefore, inhibition of PARP1 has a great potential for use in cancer therapy. As resistance to PARP inhibitors is starting to be observed in patients, thus the function of PARP-1 needs to be studied in depth in order to find new therapeutic targets. To gain more information on the PARP-1 activity, we expressed PARP-1 in yeast and investigated its effect on cell growth and UV induced homologous recombination. To identify candidate genes affecting PARP-1 activity and cellular localization, we also developed a yeast genome wide genetic screen. We found that PARP-1 strongly inhibited yeast growth, but when yeast was exposed to the PARP-1 inhibitor 6(5-H) phenantridinone (PHE), it recovered from the growth suppression. Moreover, we showed that PARP-1 produced PAR products in yeast and we demonstrated that PARP-1 reduced UV-induced homologous recombination. By genome wide screening, we identified 99 mutants that suppressed PARP-1 growth inhibition. Orthologues of human genes were found for 41 of these yeast genes. We determined whether the PARP-1 protein level was altered in strains which are deleted for the transcription regulator GAL3, the histone H1 gene HHO1, the HUL4 gene, the

  18. Enhancement of malate-production and increase in sensitivity to dimethyl succinate by mutation of the VID24 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negoro, Hiroaki; Kotaka, Atsushi; Matsumura, Kengo; Tsutsumi, Hiroko; Hata, Yoji

    2016-06-01

    Malate in sake (a Japanese alcoholic beverage) is an important component for taste that is produced by yeasts during alcoholic fermentation. To date, many researchers have developed methods for breeding high-malate-producing yeasts; however, genes responsible for the high-acidity phenotype are not known. We determined the mutated gene involved in high malate production in yeast, isolated as a sensitive mutant to dimethyl succinate. In the comparative whole genome analysis between high-malate-producing strain and its parent strain, one of the non-synonymous substitutions was identified in the VID24 gene. The mutation of VID24 resulted in enhancement of malate-productivity and sensitivity to dimethyl succinate. The mutation appeared to lead to a deficiency in Vid24p function. Furthermore, disruption of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase (Mdh2p) gene in the VID24 mutant inhibited the high-malate-producing phenotype. Vid24p is known as a component of the multisubunit ubiquitin ligase and participates in the degradation of gluconeogenic enzymes such as Mdh2p. We suggest that the enhancement of malate-productivity results from an accumulation of Mdh2p due to the loss of Vid24p function. These findings propose a novel mechanism for the regulation of organic acid production in yeast cells by the component of ubiquitin ligase, Vid24p.

  19. Functional profiling of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaever, Guri; Chu, Angela M; Ni, Li; Connelly, Carla; Riles, Linda; Véronneau, Steeve; Dow, Sally; Lucau-Danila, Ankuta; Anderson, Keith; André, Bruno; Arkin, Adam P; Astromoff, Anna; El-Bakkoury, Mohamed; Bangham, Rhonda; Benito, Rocio; Brachat, Sophie; Campanaro, Stefano; Curtiss, Matt; Davis, Karen; Deutschbauer, Adam; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Flaherty, Patrick; Foury, Francoise; Garfinkel, David J; Gerstein, Mark; Gotte, Deanna; Güldener, Ulrich; Hegemann, Johannes H; Hempel, Svenja; Herman, Zelek; Jaramillo, Daniel F; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L; Kötter, Peter; LaBonte, Darlene; Lamb, David C; Lan, Ning; Liang, Hong; Liao, Hong; Liu, Lucy; Luo, Chuanyun; Lussier, Marc; Mao, Rong; Menard, Patrice; Ooi, Siew Loon; Revuelta, Jose L; Roberts, Christopher J; Rose, Matthias; Ross-Macdonald, Petra; Scherens, Bart; Schimmack, Greg; Shafer, Brenda; Shoemaker, Daniel D; Sookhai-Mahadeo, Sharon; Storms, Reginald K; Strathern, Jeffrey N; Valle, Giorgio; Voet, Marleen; Volckaert, Guido; Wang, Ching-yun; Ward, Teresa R; Wilhelmy, Julie; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Yang, Yonghong; Yen, Grace; Youngman, Elaine; Yu, Kexin; Bussey, Howard; Boeke, Jef D; Snyder, Michael; Philippsen, Peter; Davis, Ronald W; Johnston, Mark

    2002-07-25

    Determining the effect of gene deletion is a fundamental approach to understanding gene function. Conventional genetic screens exhibit biases, and genes contributing to a phenotype are often missed. We systematically constructed a nearly complete collection of gene-deletion mutants (96% of annotated open reading frames, or ORFs) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA sequences dubbed 'molecular bar codes' uniquely identify each strain, enabling their growth to be analysed in parallel and the fitness contribution of each gene to be quantitatively assessed by hybridization to high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We show that previously known and new genes are necessary for optimal growth under six well-studied conditions: high salt, sorbitol, galactose, pH 8, minimal medium and nystatin treatment. Less than 7% of genes that exhibit a significant increase in messenger RNA expression are also required for optimal growth in four of the tested conditions. Our results validate the yeast gene-deletion collection as a valuable resource for functional genomics.

  20. Expression of human poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Effect on survival, homologous recombination and identification of genes involved in intracellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ferla, Marco; Mercatanti, Alberto; Rocchi, Giulia; Lodovichi, Samuele; Cervelli, Tiziana; Pignata, Luca; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Galli, Alvaro

    2015-04-01

    The poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) actively participates in a series of functions within the cell that include: mitosis, intracellular signaling, cell cycle regulation, transcription and DNA damage repair. Therefore, inhibition of PARP1 has a great potential for use in cancer therapy. As resistance to PARP inhibitors is starting to be observed in patients, thus the function of PARP-1 needs to be studied in depth in order to find new therapeutic targets. To gain more information on the PARP-1 activity, we expressed PARP-1 in yeast and investigated its effect on cell growth and UV induced homologous recombination. To identify candidate genes affecting PARP-1 activity and cellular localization, we also developed a yeast genome wide genetic screen. We found that PARP-1 strongly inhibited yeast growth, but when yeast was exposed to the PARP-1 inhibitor 6(5-H) phenantridinone (PHE), it recovered from the growth suppression. Moreover, we showed that PARP-1 produced PAR products in yeast and we demonstrated that PARP-1 reduced UV-induced homologous recombination. By genome wide screening, we identified 99 mutants that suppressed PARP-1 growth inhibition. Orthologues of human genes were found for 41 of these yeast genes. We determined whether the PARP-1 protein level was altered in strains which are deleted for the transcription regulator GAL3, the histone H1 gene HHO1, the HUL4 gene, the deubiquitination enzyme gene OTU1, the nuclear pore protein POM152 and the SNT1 that encodes for the Set3C subunit of the histone deacetylase complex. In these strains the PARP-1 level was roughly the same as in the wild type. PARP-1 localized in the nucleus more in the snt1Δ than in the wild type strain; after UV radiation, PARP-1 localized in the nucleus more in hho1 and pom152 deletion strains than in the wild type indicating that these functions may have a role on regulating PARP-1 level and activity in the nucleus.

  1. Modification of the spectral properties of cytochrome b in mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistant to 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. Mapping at two distinct genetic loci of the split mitochondrial gene of cytochrome b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briquet, M; Goffeau, A

    1981-07-01

    The effects of five inhibitors of the cytochrome bc1 complex: 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (diuron), 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HpHOQnO), antimycin A, funiculosin and mucidin were measured in submitochondrial particles of strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae belonging to two classes of diuron-resistant mutants Diu 1 and Diu 2 which are modified in different exons of the split mitochondrial gene of cytochrome b. 1. The oxidation of NADH and of cytochrome b-561 exhibits a similar resistance to diuron and HpHOQnO in Diu 1 and Diu 2 mutants. 2. No extra reduction of cytochrome b-561 and cytochrome b-565 is observed in the presence of diuron and HpHOQnO. 3. Both Diu 1 and Diu 2 mutants exhibit the red shift of cytochrome b-561 induced by concentrations of HpHOQno 2 -- 3-times higher than those required in the parental strains. 4. The spectral and respiratory effects of antimycin A, funiculosin and mucidin and generally similar in the diuron-resistant mutants and in their parental strains. However a cross-resistance between diuron and antimycin A is indicated in one Diu 2 mutant. 5. From the combined genetic and biochemical data it is concluded that the interaction of diuron and HpHOQnO with cytochrome b is mediated by at least two specific amino acids located apart in the central region of the apocytochrome b peptide coded by mitochondrial DNA. These two amino acids control tightly the extra reduction of cytochromes b-565 and b-561 as well as the flow of electrons through the bc1 complex. However the binding of HpHOQnO required for the expression of the red shift of cytochrome b-561 is only slightly affected by the diu-1 and diu-2 mutations.

  2. Enhanced lysosomal activity by overexpressed aminopeptidase Y in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jihee; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains vacuoles corresponding to lysosomes in higher eukaryotes. Lysosomes are dynamic (not silent) organelles in which enzymes can be easily integrated or released when exposed to stressful conditions. Changes in lysosomal enzymes have been observed due to oxidative stress, resulting in an increased function of lysosomes. The protein profiles from H2O2- and NH4Cl-treated lysosomes showed different expression patterns, observed with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The aminopeptidase Y protein (APE3) that conspicuously enhanced antimicrobial activity than other proteins was selected for further studies. The S. cerevisiae APE3 gene was isolated and inserted into pYES2.0 expression vector. The GFP gene was inserted downstream to the APE3 gene for confirmation of APE3 targeting to lysosomes, and S. cerevisiae was transformed to pYES2::APE3::GFP. The APE3 did not enter in lysosomes and formed an inclusion body at 30 °C, but it inserted to lysosomes as shown by the merger of GFP with lysosomes at 28 °C. Antimicrobial activity of the cloned S. cerevisiae increased about 5 to 10 % against eight strains, compared to normal cells, and galactose induction is increased more two folds than that of normal cells. Therefore, S. cerevisiae was transformed to pYES2::APE3::GFP, accumulating a large amount of APE3, resulting in increased lysosomal activity. Increase in endogenous levels of lysosomes and their activity following genetic modification can lead to its use in applications such as antimicrobial agents and apoptosis-inducing materials for cancer cells, and consequently, it may also be possible to use the organelles for improving in vitro functions.

  3. Molecular Basis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kaj Scherz

    of translation of FLO11. In conclusion, I have conducted the first global study of the genetic program for yeast biofilm formation on polystyrene. This work provide several target genes as good basis for further research of biofilm, that I believe can contribute to fields such as cell biology, genetics, system......In this study, I sought to identify genes regulating the global molecular program for development of sessile multicellular communities, also known as biofilm, of the eukaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). Yeast biofilm has a clinical interest, as biofilms can cause chronic......, but only a small subset is previously described as regulators of FLO11. These results reveal that the regulation of biofilm formation and FLO11 is even more complex than what has previously been described. I find that the molecular program for biofilm formation shares many essential components with two...

  4. DNA Topoisomerases Maintain Promoters in a State Competent for Transcriptional Activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager;

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of DNA topoisomerases in transcription, we have studied global gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient for topoisomerases I and II and performed single-gene analyses to support our findings. The genome-wide studies show a general transcriptional down-re...... transcriptional activation of genes with a repressible/inducible mode of regulation....

  5. Candida albicans AGE3, the ortholog of the S. cerevisiae ARF-GAP-encoding gene GCS1, is required for hyphal growth and drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lettner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyphal growth and multidrug resistance of C. albicans are important features for virulence and antifungal therapy of this pathogenic fungus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show by phenotypic complementation analysis that the C. albicans gene AGE3 is the functional ortholog of the yeast ARF-GAP-encoding gene GCS1. The finding that the gene is required for efficient endocytosis points to an important functional role of Age3p in endosomal compartments. Most C. albicans age3Delta mutant cells which grew as cell clusters under yeast growth conditions showed defects in filamentation under different hyphal growth conditions and were almost completely disabled for invasive filamentous growth. Under hyphal growth conditions only a fraction of age3Delta cells shows a wild-type-like polarization pattern of the actin cytoskeleton and lipid rafts. Moreover, age3Delta cells were highly susceptible to several unrelated toxic compounds including antifungal azole drugs. Irrespective of the AGE3 genotype, C-terminal fusions of GFP to the drug efflux pumps Cdr1p and Mdr1p were predominantly localized in the plasma membrane. Moreover, the plasma membranes of wild-type and age3Delta mutant cells contained similar amounts of Cdr1p, Cdr2p and Mdr1p. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate that the defect in sustaining filament elongation is probably caused by the failure of age3Delta cells to polarize the actin cytoskeleton and possibly of inefficient endocytosis. The high susceptibility of age3Delta cells to azoles is not caused by inefficient transport of efflux pumps to the cell membrane. A possible role of a vacuolar defect of age3Delta cells in drug susceptibility is proposed and discussed. In conclusion, our study shows that the ARF-GAP Age3p is required for hyphal growth which is an important virulence factor of C. albicans and essential for detoxification of azole drugs which are routinely used for antifungal therapy. Thus, it

  6. Mating type and ploidy effect on the β-glucosidase activity and ethanol-producing performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with multiple δ-integrated bgl1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Ma, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Huajun; Liu, Cheng; Zou, Shaolan; Hong, Jiefang; Zhang, Minhua

    2016-08-10

    In order to investigate the effect of mating type and ploidy on enzymatic activity and fermentation performance in yeast with multiple δ-integrated foreign genes, eight ploidy series strains were constructed. The initial haploid strain BGL-a was shown to contain about 19 copies of the bgl1 gene. In rich media containing 2% (w/v) sugar the specific activities of BGL-aα were lower than those of BGL-aa or BGL-αα, which indicates the existence of mating type effects. While the maximum OD660 decreased with rising ploidy, the biomass yield showed no significant difference between the eight strains and the specific activities (expressed as U/mL or U/mg DCW) showed little to no variation. When cellobiose was used as the carbon source and β-glucosidase substrate, β-glucosidase was expressed more quickly and at higher levels than in glucose-containing media. The maximum specific activitiy values obtained were 19.07U/mL and 19.39U/mL for BGL-αα and BGL-aa, repsectively. The anaerobic biomass and ethanol-producing performance in rich media containing 10% cellobiose showed no significant difference among the eight strains. Their maximal ethanol concentrations and corresponding yields ranged from 40.27 to 43.46g/L and 77.56 to 83.71%, respectively. When the acid- and alkali-pretreated corncob (10% solids content) was used, the diploid BGL-aα fermented the best. When urea was used as the only supplemented nutrient, the ethanol titer and yield were 35.65g/L and 83.69%, respectively, while a control experiment using industrial Angel yeast with exogenous β-glucosidase addition gave values of 37.93g/L and 89.04%. The combined effects of δ-integration of bgl1, ploidy and mating type result in BGL-aa or BGL-αα being the optimal choice for enzyme production and BGL-aα being more suitable for cellulosic ethanol fermentation. These results provide valuable information for future yeast breeding and utilization efforts.

  7. Population structure and comparative genome hybridization of European flor yeast reveal a unique group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with few gene duplications in their genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Erny, Claude; Charpentier, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Wine biological aging is a wine making process used to produce specific beverages in several countries in Europe, including Spain, Italy, France, and Hungary. This process involves the formation of a velum at the surface of the wine. Here, we present the first large scale comparison of all European flor strains involved in this process. We inferred the population structure of these European flor strains from their microsatellite genotype diversity and analyzed their ploidy. We show that almost all of these flor strains belong to the same cluster and are diploid, except for a few Spanish strains. Comparison of the array hybridization profile of six flor strains originating from these four countries, with that of three wine strains did not reveal any large segmental amplification. Nonetheless, some genes, including YKL221W/MCH2 and YKL222C, were amplified in the genome of four out of six flor strains. Finally, we correlated ICR1 ncRNA and FLO11 polymorphisms with flor yeast population structure, and associate the presence of wild type ICR1 and a long Flo11p with thin velum formation in a cluster of Jura strains. These results provide new insight into the diversity of flor yeast and show that combinations of different adaptive changes can lead to an increase of hydrophobicity and affect velum formation.

  8. Population structure and comparative genome hybridization of European flor yeast reveal a unique group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with few gene duplications in their genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Legras

    Full Text Available Wine biological aging is a wine making process used to produce specific beverages in several countries in Europe, including Spain, Italy, France, and Hungary. This process involves the formation of a velum at the surface of the wine. Here, we present the first large scale comparison of all European flor strains involved in this process. We inferred the population structure of these European flor strains from their microsatellite genotype diversity and analyzed their ploidy. We show that almost all of these flor strains belong to the same cluster and are diploid, except for a few Spanish strains. Comparison of the array hybridization profile of six flor strains originating from these four countries, with that of three wine strains did not reveal any large segmental amplification. Nonetheless, some genes, including YKL221W/MCH2 and YKL222C, were amplified in the genome of four out of six flor strains. Finally, we correlated ICR1 ncRNA and FLO11 polymorphisms with flor yeast population structure, and associate the presence of wild type ICR1 and a long Flo11p with thin velum formation in a cluster of Jura strains. These results provide new insight into the diversity of flor yeast and show that combinations of different adaptive changes can lead to an increase of hydrophobicity and affect velum formation.

  9. Horizontal and vertical growth of S. cerevisiae metabolic network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tramontano Anna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growth and development of a biological organism is reflected by its metabolic network, the evolution of which relies on the essential gene duplication mechanism. There are two current views about the evolution of metabolic networks. The retrograde model hypothesizes that a pathway evolves by recruiting novel enzymes in a direction opposite to the metabolic flow. The patchwork model is instead based on the assumption that the evolution is based on the exploitation of broad-specificity enzymes capable of catalysing a variety of metabolic reactions. Results We analysed a well-studied unicellular eukaryotic organism, S. cerevisiae, and studied the effect of the removal of paralogous gene products on its metabolic network. Our results, obtained using different paralog and network definitions, show that, after an initial period when gene duplication was indeed instrumental in expanding the metabolic space, the latter reached an equilibrium and subsequent gene duplications were used as a source of more specialized enzymes rather than as a source of novel reactions. We also show that the switch between the two evolutionary strategies in S. cerevisiae can be dated to about 350 million years ago. Conclusions Our data, obtained through a novel analysis methodology, strongly supports the hypothesis that the patchwork model better explains the more recent evolution of the S. cerevisiae metabolic network. Interestingly, the effects of a patchwork strategy acting before the Euascomycete-Hemiascomycete divergence are still detectable today.

  10. Horizontal and vertical growth of S. cerevisiae metabolic network.

    KAUST Repository

    Grassi, Luigi

    2011-10-14

    BACKGROUND: The growth and development of a biological organism is reflected by its metabolic network, the evolution of which relies on the essential gene duplication mechanism. There are two current views about the evolution of metabolic networks. The retrograde model hypothesizes that a pathway evolves by recruiting novel enzymes in a direction opposite to the metabolic flow. The patchwork model is instead based on the assumption that the evolution is based on the exploitation of broad-specificity enzymes capable of catalysing a variety of metabolic reactions. RESULTS: We analysed a well-studied unicellular eukaryotic organism, S. cerevisiae, and studied the effect of the removal of paralogous gene products on its metabolic network. Our results, obtained using different paralog and network definitions, show that, after an initial period when gene duplication was indeed instrumental in expanding the metabolic space, the latter reached an equilibrium and subsequent gene duplications were used as a source of more specialized enzymes rather than as a source of novel reactions. We also show that the switch between the two evolutionary strategies in S. cerevisiae can be dated to about 350 million years ago. CONCLUSIONS: Our data, obtained through a novel analysis methodology, strongly supports the hypothesis that the patchwork model better explains the more recent evolution of the S. cerevisiae metabolic network. Interestingly, the effects of a patchwork strategy acting before the Euascomycete-Hemiascomycete divergence are still detectable today.

  11. Regulation of Lactobacillus plantarum contamination on the carbohydrate and energy related metabolisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during bioethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shi-Jun; Lin, Xiang-Hua; Li, Hao

    2015-11-01

    During the industrial bioethanol fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells are often stressed by bacterial contaminants, especially lactic acid bacteria. Generally, lactic acid bacteria contamination can inhibit S. cerevisiae cell growth through secreting lactic acid and competing with yeast cells for micronutrients and living space. However, whether are there still any other influences of lactic acid bacteria on yeast or not? In this study, Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014 was co-cultivated with S. cerevisiae S288c to mimic the L. plantarum contamination in industrial bioethanol fermentation. The contaminative L. plantarum-associated expression changes of genes involved in carbohydrate and energy related metabolisms in S. cerevisiae cells were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to evaluate the influence of L. plantarum on carbon source utilization and energy related metabolism in yeast cells during bioethanol fermentation. Contaminative L. plantarum influenced the expression of most of genes which are responsible for encoding key enzymes involved in glucose related metabolisms in S. cerevisiae. Specific for, contaminated L. plantarum inhibited EMP pathway but promoted TCA cycle, glyoxylate cycle, HMP, glycerol synthesis pathway, and redox pathway in S. cerevisiae cells. In the presence of L. plantarum, the carbon flux in S. cerevisiae cells was redistributed from fermentation to respiratory and more reducing power was produced to deal with the excess NADH. Moreover, L. plantarum contamination might confer higher ethanol tolerance to yeast cells through promoting accumulation of glycerol. These results also highlighted our knowledge about relationship between contaminative lactic acid bacteria and S. cerevisiae during bioethanol fermentation.

  12. Heat shock response improves heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Österlund, Tobias; Liu, Zihe

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used platform for the production of heterologous proteins of medical or industrial interest. However, heterologous protein productivity is often low due to limitations of the host strain. Heat shock response (HSR) is an inducible, global, cellular...... stress response, which facilitates the cell recovery from many forms of stress, e.g., heat stress. In S. cerevisiae, HSR is regulated mainly by the transcription factor heat shock factor (Hsf1p) and many of its targets are genes coding for molecular chaperones that promote protein folding and prevent...... the accumulation of mis-folded or aggregated proteins. In this work, we over-expressed a mutant HSF1 gene HSF1-R206S which can constitutively activate HSR, so the heat shock response was induced at different levels, and we studied the impact of HSR on heterologous protein secretion. We found that moderate and high...

  13. Engineering of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain with multiple chromosome-integrated genes of human alpha-fetoprotein and its high-yield secretory production, purification, structural and functional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudich, Elena; Dudich, Igor; Semenkova, Lidia; Benevolensky, Sergey; Morozkina, Elena; Marchenko, Aleksey; Zatcepin, Sergey; Dudich, Dmitry; Soboleva, Galina; Khromikh, Luidmila; Roslovtceva, Olga; Tatulov, Eduard

    2012-07-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a biological drug candidate of high medicinal potential in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, cancer, and regenerative medicine. Large-scale production of recombinant human alpha-fetoprotein (rhAFP) is desirable for structural and functional studies and applied research. In this study we cloned and expressed in the secreted form wild-type glycosylated human rhAFP and non-glycosylated mutant rhAFP(0) (N233S) in the yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae with multiple chromosome-integrated synthetic human AFP genes. RhAFP and rhAFP(0) were successfully produced and purified from the culture liquids active naturally folded proteins. Elimination of the glycosylation by mutation reduced rhAFP(0) secretion about threefold as compared to the wild-type protein showing critical role of the N-linked glycan for heterologous protein folding and secretion. Structural similarity of rhAFP and rhAFP(0) with natural embryonic eAFP was confirmed by circular dichroism technique. Functional tests demonstrated similar type of tumor suppressive and immunosuppressive activity for both recombinant species rhAFP and rhAFP(0) as compared to natural eAFP. It was documented that both types of biological activities attributed to rhAFP and rhAFP(0) are due to the fast induction of apoptosis in tumor cells and mitogen-activated lymphocytes. Despite the fact that rhAFP and rhAFP(0) demonstrated slightly less effective tumor suppressive activity as compared to eAFP but rhAFP(0) had produced statistically notable increase in its ability to induce inhibition of in vitro lymphocyte proliferation as compared to the glycosylated rhAFP and eAFP. We conclude that N-linked glycosylation of rhAFP is required for efficient folding and secretion. However the presence of N-linked sugar moiety was shown to be unimportant for tumor suppressive activity but was critically important for its immunoregulative activity which demonstrates that different molecular mechanisms are involved

  14. levadura Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Aguilar Uscanga

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La pared celular de levaduras representa entre 20 a 30 % de la célula en peso seco. Está compuesta de polisacáridos complejos de β-glucanos, manoproteínas y quitina. Se estudió la composición de los polisacáridos contenidos en la pared celular de la Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK 113 y se observó el efecto de la variación de la fuente carbono (glucosa, sacarosa, galactosa, maltosa, manosa, etanol y pH (3, 4, 5, 6 en un medio mineral “cell factory”. Las células fueron recolectadas en fase exponencial y se extrajo la pared celular. Los extractos de pared se hidrolizaron con H2SO4 al 72% y las muestras fueron analizadas por cromatografía HPLC. Se realizó una prueba de resistencia al rompimiento celular con una β(1,3-glucanasa, y las células cultivadas a diferentes fuentes carbono y pH. Los resultados del análisis por HPLC, mostraron que la composición de los polisacáridos en la pared celular, varía considerablemente con las modificaciones del medio de cultivo. Se observó que las levaduras cultivadas en sacarosa tienen mayor porcentaje de pared celular (25% y mayor cantidad de glucanos (115µg/mg peso seco y mananos (131µg/mg peso seco, que aquellas levaduras cultivadas en etanol (13% en peso seco. Las levaduras cultivadas a pH 5 presentaron 19% de pared celular en peso seco, mientras que a pH 6 el porcentaje fue menor (14%. El análisis de resistencia al rompimiento celular, mostró que las células cultivadas en etanol y galactosa fueron resistentes al rompimiento enzimático. Se comparó este resultado con el contenido de polisacáridos en la pared celular y concluimos que la resistencia de la célula al rompimiento, no está ligada con la cantidad de β-glucanos contenidos en la pared celular, sino que va a depender del número de enlaces β(1,3 y β(1,6-glucanos, los cuales juegan un rol importante durante el ensamblaje de la pared

  15. Proteomics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Organelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiederhold, Elena; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Poolman, Bert; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the subcellular localization of proteins is indispensable to understand their physiological roles. In the past decade, 18 studies have been performed to analyze the protein content of isolated organelles from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we integrate the data sets and compare them wi

  16. Systems Biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Physiology and its DNA Damage Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazio, Alessandro

    damage response (Chapter 5). When DNA damage is repaired, cells restart the cell cycle and resume growth. This process is called damage recovery. In S. cerevisiae, the molecular mechanism of recovery relies on dephosphorylation of Rad53 by protein phosphatases (PPs), that, in case of recovery from MMS......The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model organism in biology, being widely used in fundamental research, the first eukaryotic organism to be fully sequenced and the platform for the development of many genomics techniques. Therefore, it is not surprising that S. cerevisiae has also been widely...... used in the field of systems biology during the last decade. This thesis investigates S. cerevisiae growth physiology and DNA damage response by using a systems biology approach. Elucidation of the relationship between growth rate and gene expression is important to understand the mechanisms regulating...

  17. Heterologous production of non-ribosomal peptide LLD-ACV in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siewers, Verena; Chen, Xiao; Huang, Le

    2009-01-01

    -(l-α-aminoadipyl)–l-cysteinyl–d-valine (ACV) as a model NRP. The Penicillium chrysogenum gene pcbAB encoding ACV synthetase was expressed in S. cerevisiae from a high-copy plasmid together with phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase) encoding genes from Aspergillus nidulans, P. chrysogenum and Bacillus subtilis, and in all the three cases...

  18. Early manifestations of replicative aging in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim I. Sorokin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is successfully used as a model organism to find genes responsible for lifespan control of higher organisms. As functional decline of higher eukaryotes can start as early as one quarter of the average lifespan, we asked whether S. cerevisiae can be used to model this manifestation of aging. While the average replicative lifespan of S. cerevisiae mother cells ranges between 15 and 30 division cycles, we found that resistances to certain stresses start to decrease much earlier. Looking into the mechanism, we found that knockouts of genes responsible for mitochondriato-nucleus (retrograde signaling, RTG1 or RTG3, significantly decrease the resistance of cells that generated more than four daughters, but not of the younger ones. We also found that even young mother cells frequently contain mitochondria with heterogeneous transmembrane potential and that the percentage of such cells correlates with replicative age. Together, these facts suggest that retrograde signaling starts to malfunction in relatively young cells, leading to accumulation of heterogeneous mitochondria within one cell. The latter may further contribute to a decline in stress resistances.

  19. Fungal genomics beyond Saccharomyces cerevisiae?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, Gerald; Mcintyre, Mhairi; Nielsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Fungi are used extensively in both fundamental research and industrial applications. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been the model organism for fungal research for many years, particularly in functional genomics. However, considering the diversity within the fungal kingdom, it is obvious that the a......Fungi are used extensively in both fundamental research and industrial applications. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been the model organism for fungal research for many years, particularly in functional genomics. However, considering the diversity within the fungal kingdom, it is obvious...... that the application of the existing methods of genome, transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analysis to other fungi has enormous potential, especially for the production of food and food ingredients. The developments in the past year demonstrate that we have only just started to exploit this potential....

  20. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kayikci, Omur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluc......Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration...... and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression...

  1. Redox balancing in recombinant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderlund, M.

    1998-09-01

    In metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing Pichia stipitis XYL1 and XYL2 genes, encoding xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), respectively, xylitol is excreted as the major product during anaerobic xylose fermentation and only low yields of ethanol are produced. This has been interpreted as a result of the dual cofactor dependence of XR and the exclusive use of NAD{sup +} by XDH. The excretion of xylitol was completely stopped and the formation of glycerol and acetic acid were reduced in xylose utilising S. cerevisiae strains cultivated in oxygen-limited conditions by expressing lower levels of XR than of XDH. The expression level of XYL1 and XYL2 were controlled by changing the promoters and transcription directions of the genes. A new functional metabolic pathway was established when Thermus thermophilus xylA gene was expressed in S. cerevisiae. The recombinant strain was able to ferment xylose to ethanol when cultivated on a minimal medium containing xylose as only carbon source. In order to create a channeled metabolic transfer in the two first steps of the xylose metabolism, XYL1 and XYL2 were fused in-frame and expressed in S. cerevisiae. When the fusion protein, containing a linker of three amino acids, was co expressed together with native XR and XDH monomers, enzyme complexes consisting of chimeric and native subunits were formed. The total activity of these complexes exhibited 10 and 9 times higher XR and XDH activity, respectively, than the original conjugates, consisting of only chimeric subunits. This strain produced less xylitol and the xylitol yield was lower than with strains only expressing native XR and XDH monomers. In addition, more ethanol and less acetic acid were formed. A new gene encoding the cytoplasmic transhydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii was cloned. The enzyme showed high similarity to the family of pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductase. To analyse the physiological effect of

  2. Bioconversion of lactose/whey to fructose diphosphate with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compagno, C.; Tura, A.; Ranzi, B.M.; Martegani, E. (Univ. di Milano (Italy))

    1993-07-01

    Genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that express Escherichia coli [beta]-galactosidase gene are able to bioconvert lactose or whey into fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FDP). High FDP yields from whey were obtained with an appropriate ratio between cell concentration and inorganic phosphate. The biomass of transformed cells can be obtained from different carbon sources, according to the expression vector bearing the lacZ gene. The authors showed that whey can be used as the carbon source for S. cerevisiae growth and as the substrate for bioconversion to fructose diphosphate.

  3. Mixing of vineyard and oak-tree ecotypes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in North American vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyma, Katie E; Fay, Justin C

    2013-06-01

    Humans have had a significant impact on the distribution and abundance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through its widespread use in beer, bread and wine production. Yet, similar to other Saccharomyces species, S. cerevisiae has also been isolated from habitats unrelated to fermentations. Strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from grapes, wine must and vineyards worldwide are genetically differentiated from strains isolated from oak-tree bark, exudate and associated soil in North America. However, the causes and consequences of this differentiation have not yet been resolved. Historical differentiation of these two groups may have been influenced by geographic, ecological or human-associated barriers to gene flow. Here, we make use of the relatively recent establishment of vineyards across North America to identify and characterize any active barriers to gene flow between these two groups. We examined S. cerevisiae strains isolated from grapes and oak trees within three North American vineyards and compared them to those isolated from oak trees outside of vineyards. Within vineyards, we found evidence of migration between grapes and oak trees and potential gene flow between the divergent oak-tree and vineyard groups. Yet, we found no vineyard genotypes on oak trees outside of vineyards. In contrast, Saccharomyces paradoxus isolated from the same sources showed population structure characterized by isolation by distance. The apparent absence of ecological or genetic barriers between sympatric vineyard and oak-tree populations of S. cerevisiae implies that vineyards play an important role in the mixing between these two groups.

  4. Toxicity and nutrient analysis ofSaccharomyces. cerevisiae powder with ChIFN-γgene%ChIFN-γ酿酒酵母工程菌粉的毒性与营养分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宗; 宋莉; 赵德刚

    2015-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae powder with a ChIFN-γgene, which endowed the recombinant yeast with an antiviral activity, was prepared by inducible expression and freeze-dry method, and further analysed for the toxicity and nutrient, based on the sensory properties, microorganisms, heavy metals and nutritious value according to the national standard method. Results indicated that the recombinant yeast power had a good sensory, security and quality evaluation for low water content, high cell viability, low bacteria, mold, lead and total arsenic, which were in line with limited demand of national standard. The crude ash, total sug-ar, phosphorus, calcium contents, total essential amino acids and total non-essential amino acids of yeast products were higher than that of wild-type ( WT) . However, its crude protein and crude fiber were contra-ry to WT. The first limiting amino acid was phenylalanine and tyrosine ( Phe+Tyr) , the second limiting ami-no acid was valine (Val). The recombinant yeast maybe unsuitable for using as protein feed for its protein contents and quality.%从感官特性、微生物和重金属含量及营养成分等方面,对具有抗禽病毒活性的ChIFN-γ酿酒酵母工程菌粉进行毒性和营养品质分析。结果表明,ChIFN-γ酿酒酵母工程菌粉具有酵母的正常特性,含水量低,复水后活细胞率高;其细菌、霉菌、铅和总砷含量均符合国标卫生学要求。工程菌粉的灰分、总糖、总磷和总钙含量高于野生型菌粉,粗脂肪含量与野生型菌粉接近,但粗蛋白质和粗纤维含量显著低于野生型菌粉;工程菌粉的总必需氨基酸和总非必需氨基酸含量较高,赖氨酸、甲硫氨酸和亮氨酸3种必需氨基酸的含量高于野生型菌粉;第一限制性氨基酸为苯丙氨酸+酪氨酸,第二限制性氨基酸为缬氨酸。工程菌粉的蛋白模式不符合蛋白质饲料要求。

  5. Non-coding RNA prediction and verification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Kavanaugh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNA (ncRNA play an important and varied role in cellular function. A significant amount of research has been devoted to computational prediction of these genes from genomic sequence, but the ability to do so has remained elusive due to a lack of apparent genomic features. In this work, thermodynamic stability of ncRNA structural elements, as summarized in a Z-score, is used to predict ncRNA in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This analysis was coupled with comparative genomics to search for ncRNA genes on chromosome six of S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Sets of positive and negative control genes were evaluated to determine the efficacy of thermodynamic stability for discriminating ncRNA from background sequence. The effect of window sizes and step sizes on the sensitivity of ncRNA identification was also explored. Non-coding RNA gene candidates, common to both S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus, were verified using northern blot analysis, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE, and publicly available cDNA library data. Four ncRNA transcripts are well supported by experimental data (RUF10, RUF11, RUF12, RUF13, while one additional putative ncRNA transcript is well supported but the data are not entirely conclusive. Six candidates appear to be structural elements in 5' or 3' untranslated regions of annotated protein-coding genes. This work shows that thermodynamic stability, coupled with comparative genomics, can be used to predict ncRNA with significant structural elements.

  6. Progress in Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Nevoigt, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The traditional use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation has, over time, resulted in substantial accumulated knowledge concerning genetics, physiology, and biochemistry as well as genetic engineering and fermentation technologies. S. cerevisiae has become a platform organism for developing metabolic engineering strategies, methods, and tools. The current review discusses the relevance of several engineering strategies, such as rational and inverse metabolic...

  7. Fatal Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Aortic Graft Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Smith, Davey; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast commonly used in baking and a frequent colonizer of human mucosal surfaces. It is considered relatively nonpathogenic in immunocompetent adults. We present a case of S. cerevisiae fungemia and aortic graft infection in an immunocompetent adult. This is the first reported case of S. cerevisiue fungemia where the identity of the pathogen was confirmed by rRNA sequencing.

  8. Membrane Trafficking in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Feyder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM, or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC, and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway. Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway. Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes.

  9. Overproduction of fatty acids in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Guo, Daoyi; Cheng, Yongbo; Zhu, Fayin; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Tiangang

    2014-09-01

    The long hydrocarbon fatty acyl chain is energy rich, making it an ideal precursor for liquid transportation fuels and high-value oleo chemicals. As Saccharomyces cerevisiae has many advantages for industrial production compared to Escherichia coli. Here, we attempted to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae for overproduction of fatty acids. First, disruption of the beta-oxidation pathway, elimination of the acyl-CoA synthetases, overexpression of different thioesterases and acetyl-CoA carboxylase ACC1, and engineering the supply of precursor acetyl-CoA. The engineered strain XL122 produced more than 120 mg/L of fatty acids. In parallel, we inactivated ADH1, the dominant gene for ethanol production, to redirect the metabolic flux to fatty acids synthesis. The engineered strain DG005 produced about 140 mg/L fatty acids. Additionally, Acetyl-CoA carboxylase was identified as a critical bottleneck of fatty acids synthesis in S. cerevisiae with a cell-free system. However, overexpression of ACC1 has little effect on fatty acids biosynthesis. As it has been reported that phosphorylation of ACC1 may influent its activity, so phosphorylation sites of ACC1 were further identified. Although the regulatory mechanisms remain unclear, our results provide rationale for future studies to target this critical step. All these efforts, particularly the discovery of the limiting step are critical for developing a "cell factory" for the overproduction of fatty acids by using type I fatty acids synthase in yeast or other fungi.

  10. Combinatorial metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for terminal alkene production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Binbin; Lee, Dong-Yup; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2015-09-01

    Biological production of terminal alkenes has garnered a significant interest due to their industrial applications such as lubricants, detergents and fuels. Here, we engineered the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce terminal alkenes via a one-step fatty acid decarboxylation pathway and improved the alkene production using combinatorial engineering strategies. In brief, we first characterized eight fatty acid decarboxylases to enable and enhance alkene production. We then increased the production titer 7-fold by improving the availability of the precursor fatty acids. We additionally increased the titer about 5-fold through genetic cofactor engineering and gene expression tuning in rich medium. Lastly, we further improved the titer 1.8-fold to 3.7 mg/L by optimizing the culturing conditions in bioreactors. This study represents the first report of terminal alkene biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae, and the abovementioned combinatorial engineering approaches collectively increased the titer 67.4-fold. We envision that these approaches could provide insights into devising engineering strategies to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biochemicals in S. cerevisiae.

  11. Membrane trafficking in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyder, Serge; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bär, Séverine; Bertazzi, Dimitri L; Friant, Sylvie

    2015-01-09

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM), or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC), and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway) or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway). Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END) and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway). Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes.

  12. Detoxification of Aflatoxin B1 by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mutants of Anti-Oxidative Relating Genes%酿酒酵母抗氧化相关基因突变体对黄曲霉毒素B1的清除作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史锋; 黄宇啸; 李永富

    2012-01-01

    黄曲霉毒素(AF)是粮食作物和饲料原料中容易污染的一种强毒性和强致癌性物质,酿酒酵母具有毒素清除功能.利用HPLC分析了酿酒酵母野生菌BY4742及三株关键的抗氧化相关基因缺失茵zwf1△、sod2△、glr1△对黄曲霉毒素B1的清除能力.结果表明,在PBS缓冲液中存活和死亡的细胞对AFB1的清除率分别为74%~76%和71%~73%,说明酵母细胞对AFB1的清除以生物吸附作用为主.在培养基中,3种突变菌活细胞对AFB1的清除率发生不同程度的降低,其中glr1△的AFB1清除能力下降最明显,其次是sod2△,而zwf1△下降最少,说明这些关键的抗氧化基因的缺失会影响细胞在生长状态下对AFB1的清除作用.%Aflatoxins are a group of mycotoxins with strong mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. Various commodities including crop and feed materials are easy to be contaminated with aflatoxin. Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported to bind or degrade aflatoxin. Here, detoxification of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 ) by wild-type strain of S. cerevisiae (BY4742) and three mutants of anti-oxidative relating genes (zw/l△, sod2△and girl △) were determined by HPLC. In PBS buffer, AFBi binding abilities of viable and dead cells were 74% -76% and 71% — 73%, respectively, indicating AFB1 was removed by yeast cells mainly through cell adsorption. In YPD medium, clearance of AFB1 by three mutant viable cells reduced, while that by wild-type BY4742 remaining high. AFB1 binding ability of g/rlA decreased most seriously, then was that of sod2△ and zwfl△. Thus, the deletion of critical anti-oxidative relating genes would decrease the AFB1 binding ability of S. cerevisiae growing cells.

  13. An improved method of xylose utilization by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tien-Yang; Lin, Ting-Hsiang; Hsu, Teng-Chieh; Huang, Chiung-Fang; Guo, Gia-Luen; Hwang, Wen-Song

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method to optimize expression levels of xylose-metabolizing enzymes to improve xylose utilization capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A xylose-utilizing recombinant S. cerevisiae strain YY2KL, able to express nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced (NADPH)-dependent xylose reductase (XR), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), and xylulokinase (XK), showed a low ethanol yield and sugar consumption rate. To optimize xylose utilization by YY2KL, a recombinant expression plasmid containing the XR gene was transformed and integrated into the aur1 site of YY2KL. Two recombinant expression plasmids containing an nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+))-dependent XDH mutant and XK genes were dually transformed and integrated into the 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sites of YY2KL. This procedure allowed systematic construction of an S. cerevisiae library with different ratios of genes for xylose-metabolizing enzymes, and well-grown colonies with different xylose fermentation capacities could be further selected in yeast protein extract (YPX) medium (1 % yeast extract, 2 % peptone, and 2 % xylose). We successfully isolated a recombinant strain with a superior xylose fermentation capacity and designated it as strain YY5A. The xylose consumption rate for strain YY5A was estimated to be 2.32 g/gDCW/h (g xylose/g dry cell weight/h), which was 2.34 times higher than that for the parent strain YY2KL (0.99 g/gDCW/h). The ethanol yield was also enhanced 1.83 times by this novel method. Optimal ratio and expression levels of xylose-metabolizing enzymes are important for efficient conversion of xylose to ethanol. This study provides a novel method that allows rapid and effective selection of ratio-optimized xylose-utilizing yeast strains. This method may be applicable to other multienzyme systems in yeast.

  14. amdSYM, a new dominant recyclable marker cassette for Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solis-Escalante, D.; Kuijpers, N.G.A.; Bongaerts, N.; Bolat, I.; Bosman, L.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran, J.M.; Daran-Lapujade, P.A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the large collection of selectable marker genes available for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, marker availability can still present a hurdle when dozens of genetic manipulations are required. Recyclable markers, counterselectable cassettes that can be removed from the targeted genome after use, ar

  15. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the overproduction of short branched-chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ai-Qun; Juwono, Nina Kurniasih Pratomo; Foo, Jee Loon; Leong, Susanna Su Jan; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2016-03-01

    Short branched-chain fatty acids (SBCFAs, C4-6) are versatile platform intermediates for the production of value-added products in the chemical industry. Currently, SBCFAs are mainly synthesized chemically, which can be costly and may cause environmental pollution. In order to develop an economical and environmentally friendly route for SBCFA production, we engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model eukaryotic microorganism of industrial significance, for the overproduction of SBCFAs. In particular, we employed a combinatorial metabolic engineering approach to optimize the native Ehrlich pathway in S. cerevisiae. First, chromosome-based combinatorial gene overexpression led to a 28.7-fold increase in the titer of SBCFAs. Second, deletion of key genes in competing pathways improved the production of SBCFAs to 387.4 mg/L, a 31.2-fold increase compared to the wild-type. Third, overexpression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter PDR12 increased the secretion of SBCFAs. Taken together, we demonstrated that the combinatorial metabolic engineering approach used in this study effectively improved SBCFA biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae through the incorporation of a chromosome-based combinatorial gene overexpression strategy, elimination of genes in competitive pathways and overexpression of a native transporter. We envision that this strategy could also be applied to the production of other chemicals in S. cerevisiae and may be extended to other microbes for strain improvement.

  16. The origin recognition complex links replication, sister chromatid cohesion and transcriptional silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suter, Bernhard; Tong, Amy; Chang, Michael; Yu, Lisa; Brown, Grant W; Boone, Charles; Rine, Jasper

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding the origin recognition complex (ORC) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affect initiation of DNA replication and transcriptional repression at the silent mating-type loci. To explore the function of ORC in more detail, a screen for genetic interactions was undertaken using large

  17. Conditions With High Intracellular Glucose Inhibit Sensing Through Glucose Sensor Snf3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karhumaa, Kaisa; Wu, B.Q.; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression in micro-organisms is regulated according to extracellular conditions and nutrient concentrations. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, non-transporting sensors with high sequence similarity to transporters, that is, transporter-like sensors, have been identified for sugars as well...

  18. One-hybrid screens at the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HMR locus identify novel transcriptional silencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulis, Erik D; Zappulla, David C; Alexieva-Botcheva, Krassimira; Evangelista, Carlos; Sternglanz, Rolf

    2004-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, genes located at the telomeres and the HM loci are subject to transcriptional silencing. Here, we report results of screening a Gal4 DNA-binding domain hybrid library for proteins that cause silencing when targeted to a silencer-defective HMR locus. PMID:15020450

  19. Substrate Specificity of Thiamine Pyrophosphate-Dependent 2-Oxo-Acid Decarboxylases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romagnoli, G.; Luttik, M.A.H.; Kötter, P.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Fusel alcohols are precursors and contributors to flavor and aroma compounds in fermented beverages, and some are under investigation as biofuels. The decarboxylation of 2-oxo acids is a key step in the Ehrlich pathway for fusel alcohol production. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, five genes share seque

  20. A repressor activator protein1 homologue from an oleaginous strain of Candida tropicalis increases storage lipid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Atrayee; Dey, Prabuddha; Barik, Amita; Bahadur, Ranjit P; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2015-06-01

    The repressor activator protein1 (Rap1) has been studied over the years as a multifunctional regulator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, its role in storage lipid accumulation has not been investigated. This report documents the identification and isolation of a putative transcription factor CtRap1 gene from an oleaginous strain of Candida tropicalis, and establishes the direct effect of its expression on the storage lipid accumulation in S. cerevisiae, usually a non-oleaginous yeast. In silico analysis revealed that the CtRap1 polypeptide binds relatively more strongly to the promoter of fatty acid synthase1 (FAS1) gene of S. cerevisiae than ScRap1. The expression level of CtRap1 transcript in vivo was found to correlate directly with the amount of lipid produced in oleaginous native host C. tropicalis. Heterologous expression of the CtRap1 gene resulted in ∼ 4-fold enhancement of storage lipid content (57.3%) in S. cerevisiae. We also showed that the functionally active CtRap1 upregulates the endogenous ScFAS1 and ScDGAT genes of S. cerevisiae, and this, in turn, might be responsible for the increased lipid production in the transformed yeast. Our findings pave the way for the possible utility of the CtRap1 gene in suitable microorganisms to increase their storage lipid content through transcription factor engineering.

  1. Origin of Endogenous DNA Abasic Sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites are among the most frequent endogenous lesions in DNA and present a strong block to replication. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an apn1 apn2 rad1 triple mutant is inviable because of its incapacity to repair AP sites and related 3′-blocked single-strand breaks (M. Guillet and S. Boiteux, EMBO J. 21:2833, 2002). Here, we investigated the origin of endogenous AP sites in yeast. Our results show that the deletion of the UNG1 gene encoding the uracil DNA glycosylase suppresses the...

  2. Two distinct DNA ligase activities in mitotic extracts of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, W; Tappe, N; Talamantez, J; Friedberg, E C; Tomkinson, A E

    1997-01-01

    Four biochemically distinct DNA ligases have been identified in mammalian cells. One of these enzymes, DNA ligase I, is functionally homologous to the DNA ligase encoded by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC9 gene. Cdc9 DNA ligase has been assumed to be the only species of DNA ligase in this organism. In the present study we have identified a second DNA ligase activity in mitotic extracts of S. cerevisiae with chromatographic properties different from Cdc9 DNA ligase, which is the major DNA joi...

  3. A putative helicase, the SUA5, PMR1, tRNALys1 genes and four open reading frames have been detected in the DNA sequence of an 8.8 kb fragment of the left arm of chromosome VII of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, R; Coglievina, M; Zaccaria, P; Bertani, I; Bruschi, C V

    1996-09-01

    We report the sequence of an 8.8 kb segment of DNA from the left arm of chromosome VII of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The sequence reveals seven open reading frames (ORFs) G1651, G1654, G1660, G1663, G1666, G1667 and G1669 greater than 100 amino acids in length and the tRNALys1 gene. ORF G1651 shows 100% identity with the ROK1 protein which is a putative RNA helicase of the 'DEAD box' protein family. ORF G1654 exhibits a motif highly conserved in ATP/GTP binding proteins generally referred to as 'P-loop'. From FastA analysis, G1660 and G1666 were found to be previously sequenced genes, respectively SUA5 and PMR1. The three other ORFs identified are partially (G1663) or completely (G1667 and G1669) overlapping with the PMR1 sequence on the complementary strand. This feature, together with their low codon adaptation indexes and the absence of significant homology with known proteins suggest that they do not correspond to real genes.

  4. Expression of the E.coli pntA and pntB genes encoding nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its effect on product formation during anaerobic glucose fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderlund, M.; Nissen, Torben Lauesgaard; Nielsen, Jens Bredal;

    1999-01-01

    in reoxidation of NADH to NAD(+) in S. cerevisiae and thereby reduce glycerol formation during anaerobic fermentation. Membranes isolated from the recombinant strains exhibited reduction of 3-acetylpyridine-NAD(+) by NADPH and by NADH in the presence of NADP(+), which demonstrated that an active enzyme...... was present. Unlike the situation in E. coli, however, most of the transhydrogenase activity was not present in the yeast plasma membrane; rather, the enzyme appeared to remain localized in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum. During anaerobic glucose fermentation we observed an increase...... in the formation of 2-oxoglutarate, glycerol, and acetic acid in a strain expressing a high level of transhydrogenase, which indicated that increased NADPH consumption and NADH production occurred. The intracellular concentrations of NADH, NAD(+) NADPH, and NADP(+) were measured in cells expressing...

  5. Sequence analysis of a 14.2 kb fragment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XIV that includes the ypt53, tRNALeu and gsr m2 genes and four new open reading frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cantalejo, J M; Boskovic, J; Jimenez, A

    1996-05-01

    As part of the EU yeast genome program, a fragment of 14,262 bp from the left arm of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XIV has been sequenced. This fragment corresponds to cosmid 14-14b and is located roughly 130 kb from the centromere. It contains four new open reading frames which encode potential proteins of more than 99 amino acids, as well as the ypt53, tRNALeu and gsr moffenes. The putative protein N2212 is similar to the ribosomal protein S7 from humans. N2215 contains several predicted transmembrane elements. N2231 contains regions which are rich in acidic, as well as basic, residues which could from alpha-helical structures. Similar regions are found in a variety of proteins including glutamic acid rich protein, trichohyalin, caldesmon, Tb-29 and several cytoskeleton-interacting proteins.

  6. Functional expression of a heterologous nickel-dependent, ATP-independent urease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, N; Luttik, M A H; Cueto Rojas, H F; Wahl, A; van Maris, A J A; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2015-07-01

    In microbial processes for production of proteins, biomass and nitrogen-containing commodity chemicals, ATP requirements for nitrogen assimilation affect product yields on the energy producing substrate. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a current host for heterologous protein production and potential platform for production of nitrogen-containing chemicals, uptake and assimilation of ammonium requires 1 ATP per incorporated NH3. Urea assimilation by this yeast is more energy efficient but still requires 0.5 ATP per NH3 produced. To decrease ATP costs for nitrogen assimilation, the S. cerevisiae gene encoding ATP-dependent urease (DUR1,2) was replaced by a Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene encoding ATP-independent urease (ure2), along with its accessory genes ureD, ureF and ureG. Since S. pombe ure2 is a Ni(2+)-dependent enzyme and Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not express native Ni(2+)-dependent enzymes, the S. pombe high-affinity nickel-transporter gene (nic1) was also expressed. Expression of the S. pombe genes into dur1,2Δ S. cerevisiae yielded an in vitro ATP-independent urease activity of 0.44±0.01 µmol min(-1) mg protein(-1) and restored growth on urea as sole nitrogen source. Functional expression of the Nic1 transporter was essential for growth on urea at low Ni(2+) concentrations. The maximum specific growth rates of the engineered strain on urea and ammonium were lower than those of a DUR1,2 reference strain. In glucose-limited chemostat cultures with urea as nitrogen source, the engineered strain exhibited an increased release of ammonia and reduced nitrogen content of the biomass. Our results indicate a new strategy for improving yeast-based production of nitrogen-containing chemicals and demonstrate that Ni(2+)-dependent enzymes can be functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae.

  7. 不同非氧化磷酸戊糖途径基因的过表达对酿酒酵母木糖发酵性能的影响%Xylose Fermentation Performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with Different Combination of the Overexpressed Non-Oxidative Pentose Phosphate Pathway Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙锦云; 高文萱; 丁文涛; 刘文; 陈洵

    2015-01-01

    以双拷贝过表达木糖代谢上游途径关键酶(木糖还原酶XR、木糖醇脱氢酶XDH和木酮糖激酶XKS)的酿酒酵母菌株为背景,在过表达非氧化磷酸戊糖(PP)途径中转醛酶基因TAL1的基础上,对途径中其他基因TKL1(转酮酶)、RPE1(核酮糖-5-磷酸差向异构酶)和RKI1(核酮糖-5-磷酸异构酶)进行了不同程度的过表达,以研究PP途径基因过表达对酿酒酵母木糖代谢的影响.在不同培养基条件下对重组菌株木糖代谢进行研究,结果显示,在过表达TAL1的基础上不同组合过表达PP途径其他基因不同程度改善了酿酒酵母木糖发酵性能,重组菌株能在36 ~ 48 h耗完质量分数(下同)为5%的木糖.其中,过表达PP途径全部基因比其他过表达基因组合表现出明显的优势,在8%木糖发酵条件下其乙醇产量达到了每1 g木糖0.337 g,较对照菌株提高了7.86%.这说明同步过表达PP途径基因更有利于酿酒酵母木糖发酵.%To study the influence of non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) on xylose utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae,different combinations of PPP genes TKL1,RPE1 and RKI1 were overexpressed in the TAL1-enhanced yeast strain,which also had the double-copy integration of upstream pathway genes XYL1,XYL2 and XKS1.Performance of recombinant yeasts was investigated at both 5 % and 8 % xylose as well as glucose and xylose mixture,results showed that overproduction of PPP genes stimulated cell growth and xylose conversion at both xylose concentrations,concomitant with higher ethanol yield at the expense of xylitol and glycerol formation,and all recombinant strains can use up 5 % xylose within 36 to 48 h.Yeast strains of S.cerevisiae with four PPP genes co-overexpressed showed more advantages,and under the g % xylose concentration,ethanol yield was about 0.337 g/g xylose,7.86 % higher than parent strain.It indicated that co-overproduction of all PPP genes may be the top priority for

  8. Switching the mode of sucrose utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miletti Luiz C

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overflow metabolism is an undesirable characteristic of aerobic cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during biomass-directed processes. It results from elevated sugar consumption rates that cause a high substrate conversion to ethanol and other bi-products, severely affecting cell physiology, bioprocess performance, and biomass yields. Fed-batch culture, where sucrose consumption rates are controlled by the external addition of sugar aiming at its low concentrations in the fermentor, is the classical bioprocessing alternative to prevent sugar fermentation by yeasts. However, fed-batch fermentations present drawbacks that could be overcome by simpler batch cultures at relatively high (e.g. 20 g/L initial sugar concentrations. In this study, a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase activity was engineered to transport sucrose into the cells through a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity, and the growth kinetics and biomass yields on sucrose analyzed using simple batch cultures. Results We have deleted from the genome of a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase the high-affinity sucrose-H+ symporter encoded by the AGT1 gene. This strain could still grow efficiently on sucrose due to a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity mediated by the MALx1 maltose permeases, and its further intracellular hydrolysis by cytoplasmic maltases. Although sucrose consumption by this engineered yeast strain was slower than with the parental yeast strain, the cells grew efficiently on sucrose due to an increased respiration of the carbon source. Consequently, this engineered yeast strain produced less ethanol and 1.5 to 2 times more biomass when cultivated in simple batch mode using 20 g/L sucrose as the carbon source. Conclusion Higher cell densities during batch cultures on 20 g/L sucrose were achieved by using a S. cerevisiae strain engineered in the sucrose uptake system. Such result was accomplished by

  9. Elucidation of the role of Grr1p in glucose sensing by Saccharomyces cerevisiae through genome-wide transcription analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Steen Lund; Bro, Christoffer; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2004-01-01

    The role of Grr1p in glucose sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was elucidated through genome-wide transcription analysis. From triplicate analysis of a strain with deletion of the GRR1-gene from the genome and an isogenic reference strain, 68 genes were identified to have significantly altered...

  10. The concentration of ammonia regulates nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1995-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was grown in a continuous culture at a single dilution rate with input ammonia concentrations whose effects ranged from nitrogen limitation to nitrogen excess and glucose limitation. The rate of ammonia assimilation (in millimoles per gram of cells per hour) was approximately constant. Increased extracellular ammonia concentrations are correlated with increased intracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations, increases in levels of NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity and its mRNA (gene GDH2), and decreases in levels of NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity and its mRNA (gene GDH1), as well as decreases in the levels of mRNA for the amino acid permease-encoding genes GAP1 and PUT4. The governing factor of nitrogen metabolism might be the concentration of ammonia rather than its flux.

  11. Identification of novel knockout targets for improving terpenoids biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiqiang; Meng, Hailin; Li, Jing; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Qian; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Yansheng

    2014-01-01

    Many terpenoids have important pharmacological activity and commercial value; however, application of these terpenoids is often limited by problems associated with the production of sufficient amounts of these molecules. The use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) for the production of heterologous terpenoids has achieved some success. The objective of this study was to identify S. cerevisiae knockout targets for improving the synthesis of heterologous terpeniods. On the basis of computational analysis of the S. cerevisiae metabolic network, we identified the knockout sites with the potential to promote terpenoid production and the corresponding single mutant was constructed by molecular manipulations. The growth rates of these strains were measured and the results indicated that the gene deletion had no adverse effects. Using the expression of amorphadiene biosynthesis as a testing model, the gene deletion was assessed for its effect on the production of exogenous terpenoids. The results showed that the dysfunction of most genes led to increased production of amorphadiene. The yield of amorphadiene produced by most single mutants was 8-10-fold greater compared to the wild type, indicating that the knockout sites can be engineered to promote the synthesis of exogenous terpenoids.

  12. Production of 1,2-propanediol from glycerol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Joon-Young; Yun, Hyun Shik; Lee, Jinwon; Oh, Min-Kyu

    2011-08-01

    Glycerol has become an attractive carbon source in the biotechnology industry owing to its low price and reduced state. However, glycerol is rarely used as a carbon source in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because of its low utilization rate. In this study, we used glycerol as a main carbon source in S. cerevisiae to produce 1,2-propanediol. Metabolically engineered S. cerevisiae strains with overexpression of glycerol dissimilation pathway genes, including glycerol kinase (GUT1), glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GUT2), glycerol dehydrogenase (gdh), and a glycerol transporter gene (GUP1), showed increased glycerol utilization and growth rate. More significant improvement of glycerol utilization and growth rate was accomplished by introducing 1,2-propanediol pathway genes, mgs (methylglyoxal synthase) and gldA (glycerol dehydrogenase) from Escherichia coli. By engineering both glycerol dissimilation and 1,2-propanediol pathways, the glycerol utilization and growth rate were improved 141% and 77%, respectively, and a 2.19 g 1,2- propanediol/l titer was achieved in 1% (v/v) glycerolcontaining YEPD medium in engineered S. cerevisiae.

  13. High level secretion of cellobiohydrolases by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlgren Simon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main technological impediment to widespread utilization of lignocellulose for the production of fuels and chemicals is the lack of low-cost technologies to overcome its recalcitrance. Organisms that hydrolyze lignocellulose and produce a valuable product such as ethanol at a high rate and titer could significantly reduce the costs of biomass conversion technologies, and will allow separate conversion steps to be combined in a consolidated bioprocess (CBP. Development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for CBP requires the high level secretion of cellulases, particularly cellobiohydrolases. Results We expressed various cellobiohydrolases to identify enzymes that were efficiently secreted by S. cerevisiae. For enhanced cellulose hydrolysis, we engineered bimodular derivatives of a well secreted enzyme that naturally lacks the carbohydrate-binding module, and constructed strains expressing combinations of cbh1 and cbh2 genes. Though there was significant variability in the enzyme levels produced, up to approximately 0.3 g/L CBH1 and approximately 1 g/L CBH2 could be produced in high cell density fermentations. Furthermore, we could show activation of the unfolded protein response as a result of cellobiohydrolase production. Finally, we report fermentation of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel™ to ethanol by CBH-producing S. cerevisiae strains with the addition of beta-glucosidase. Conclusions Gene or protein specific features and compatibility with the host are important for efficient cellobiohydrolase secretion in yeast. The present work demonstrated that production of both CBH1 and CBH2 could be improved to levels where the barrier to CBH sufficiency in the hydrolysis of cellulose was overcome.

  14. Acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinert, Brian Tate; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Moustafa, Tarek;

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification; however, little is known about the origin and regulation of most sites. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that acetylation...

  15. Effects of proteinase A on cultivation and viability characteristics of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae WZ65

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-bo ZHANG; Hai-feng ZHANG; Qi-he CHEN; Hui RUAN; Ming-liang FU; Guo-qing HE

    2009-01-01

    Proteinase A (PrA), encoded by PEP4 gene, is a key enzyme in the vacuoles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We characterized the effects of PrA on cell growth and glucose metabolism in the industrial S. cerevisiae WZ65. It was observed that the lag phase of cell growth of partial PEP4 gene deletion mutant (36 h) and PrA-negative mutant (48 h) was significantly ex-tended, compared with the wild type strain (24 h) (P<0.05), but PrA had no effect on glucose metabolism either under shaking or steady state cultivations. The logistic model was chosen to evaluate the effect of PrA on S. cerevisiae cell growth, and PrA was found to promote cell growth against insufficient oxygen condition in steady state cultivation, but had no effect in shaking culti-vation. The effects of glucose starvation on cell growth of partial PEP4 gene deletion strain and PrA-negative mutant were also evaluated. The results show that PrA partial deficiency increased the adaption ofS. cerevisiae to unfavorable nutrient environment, but had no effect on glucose metabolism under the stress of low glucose. During heat shock test, at 60 ℃ the reduced cell viability rate (RCVR) was 10% for the wild type S. cerevisiae and 90% for both mutant strains (P<0.01), suggesting that PrA was a negative factor for S. cerevisiae cells to survive under heat shock. As temperatures rose from 60 ℃ to 70 ℃, the wild type S. cerevisiae had significantly lower relative glucose consumption rate (RGCR) (61.0% and 80.0%) than the partial mutant (78.0% and 98.5%) and the complete mutant (80.0% and 98.0%) (P<0.05), suggesting that, in coping with heat shock, cells of the PrA mutants increased their glucose consumption to survive. The present study may provide meaningful information for brewing industry; however, the role of PrA in industrial S. cerevisiae physiology is complex and needs to be further investigated.

  16. Effects of pentamidine isethionate on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Ludewig, G.; Williams, J M; Li, Y.; Staben, C

    1994-01-01

    We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system in which to examine the mechanism of action of the anti-Pneumocystis drug pentamidine. Pentamidine at low concentrations inhibited S. cerevisiae growth on nonfermentable carbon sources (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 1.25 micrograms/ml in glycerol). Pentamidine inhibited growth on fermentable energy sources only at much higher concentrations (IC50 of 250 micrograms/ml in glucose). Inhibition at low pentamidine concentrations in glycer...

  17. Production of recombinant Agaricus bisporus tyrosinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezzi, Chiara; Bleve, Gianluca; Spagnolo, Stefano; Perrotta, Carla; Grieco, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that Agaricus bisporus tyrosinase is able to oxidize various phenolic compounds, thus being an enzyme of great importance for a number of biotechnological applications. The tyrosinase-coding PPO2 gene was isolated by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using total RNA extracted from the mushroom fruit bodies as template. The gene was sequenced and cloned into pYES2 plasmid, and the resulting pY-PPO2 recombinant vector was then used to transform Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by enzymatic activity staining with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) indicated that the recombinant tyrosinase is biologically active. The recombinant enzyme was overexpressed and biochemically characterized, showing that the catalytic constants of the recombinant tyrosinase were higher than those obtained when a commercial tyrosinase was used, for all the tested substrates. The present study describes the recombinant production of A. bisporus tyrosinase in active form. The produced enzyme has similar properties to the one produced in the native A. bisporus host, and its expression in S. cerevisiae provides good potential for protein engineering and functional studies of this important enzyme.

  18. Metabolomic approach for improving ethanol stress tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Erika; Nakayama, Yasumune; Mukai, Yukio; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2016-04-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used for brewing and ethanol production. The ethanol sensitivity of yeast cells is still a serious problem during ethanol fermentation, and a variety of genetic approaches (e.g., random mutant screening under selective pressure of ethanol) have been developed to improve ethanol tolerance. In this study, we developed a strategy for improving ethanol tolerance of yeast cells based on metabolomics as a high-resolution quantitative phenotypic analysis. We performed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis to identify and quantify 36 compounds on 14 mutant strains including knockout strains for transcription factor and metabolic enzyme genes. A strong relation between metabolome of these mutants and their ethanol tolerance was observed. Data mining of the metabolomic analysis showed that several compounds (such as trehalose, valine, inositol and proline) contributed highly to ethanol tolerance. Our approach successfully detected well-known ethanol stress related metabolites such as trehalose and proline thus, to further prove our strategy, we focused on valine and inositol as the most promising target metabolites in our study. Our results show that simultaneous deletion of LEU4 and LEU9 (leading to accumulation of valine) or INM1 and INM2 (leading to reduction of inositol) significantly enhanced ethanol tolerance. This study shows the potential of the metabolomic approach to identify target genes for strain improvement of S. cerevisiae with higher ethanol tolerance.

  19. Starmerella bombicola influences the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase level during mixed wine fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanovic Vesna

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of a multistarter fermentation process with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts has been proposed to simulate natural must fermentation and to confer greater complexity and specificity to wine. In this context, the combined use of S. cerevisiae and immobilized Starmerella bombicola cells (formerly Candida stellata was assayed to enhance glycerol concentration, reduce ethanol content and to improve the analytical composition of wine. In order to investigate yeast metabolic interaction during controlled mixed fermentation and to evaluate the influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae, the gene expression and enzymatic activity of two key enzymes of the alcoholic fermentation pathway such as pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc1 and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1 were studied. Results The presence of S. bombicola immobilized cells in a mixed fermentation trial confirmed an increase in fermentation rate, a combined consumption of glucose and fructose, an increase in glycerol and a reduction in the production of ethanol as well as a modification in the fermentation of by products. The alcoholic fermentation of S. cerevisiae was also influenced by S. bombicola immobilized cells. Indeed, Pdc1 activity in mixed fermentation was lower than that exhibited in pure culture while Adh1 activity showed an opposite behavior. The expression of both PDC1 and ADH1 genes was highly induced at the initial phase of fermentation. The expression level of PDC1 at the end of fermentation was much higher in pure culture while ADH1 level was similar in both pure and mixed fermentations. Conclusion In mixed fermentation, S. bombicola immobilized cells greatly affected the fermentation behavior of S. cerevisiae and the analytical composition of wine. The influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae was not limited to a simple additive contribution. Indeed, its presence caused metabolic modifications during S. cerevisiae fermentation

  20. Starmerella bombicola influences the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase level during mixed wine fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of a multistarter fermentation process with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts has been proposed to simulate natural must fermentation and to confer greater complexity and specificity to wine. In this context, the combined use of S. cerevisiae and immobilized Starmerella bombicola cells (formerly Candida stellata) was assayed to enhance glycerol concentration, reduce ethanol content and to improve the analytical composition of wine. In order to investigate yeast metabolic interaction during controlled mixed fermentation and to evaluate the influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae, the gene expression and enzymatic activity of two key enzymes of the alcoholic fermentation pathway such as pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc1) and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1) were studied. Results The presence of S. bombicola immobilized cells in a mixed fermentation trial confirmed an increase in fermentation rate, a combined consumption of glucose and fructose, an increase in glycerol and a reduction in the production of ethanol as well as a modification in the fermentation of by products. The alcoholic fermentation of S. cerevisiae was also influenced by S. bombicola immobilized cells. Indeed, Pdc1 activity in mixed fermentation was lower than that exhibited in pure culture while Adh1 activity showed an opposite behavior. The expression of both PDC1 and ADH1 genes was highly induced at the initial phase of fermentation. The expression level of PDC1 at the end of fermentation was much higher in pure culture while ADH1 level was similar in both pure and mixed fermentations. Conclusion In mixed fermentation, S. bombicola immobilized cells greatly affected the fermentation behavior of S. cerevisiae and the analytical composition of wine. The influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae was not limited to a simple additive contribution. Indeed, its presence caused metabolic modifications during S. cerevisiae fermentation causing variation in the gene

  1. Bioprospecting and evolving alternative xylose and arabinose pathway enzymes for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Jellison, Taylor; Alper, Hal S

    2016-03-01

    Bioprospecting is an effective way to find novel enzymes from strains with desirable phenotypes. Such bioprospecting has enabled organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize nonnative pentose sugars. Yet, the efficiency of this pentose catabolism (especially for the case of arabinose) remains suboptimal. Thus, further pathway optimization or identification of novel, optimal pathways is needed. Previously, we identified a novel set of xylan catabolic pathway enzymes from a superior pentose-utilizing strain of Ustilago bevomyces. These enzymes were used to successfully engineer a xylan-utilizing S. cerevisiae through a blended approach of bioprospecting and evolutionary engineering. Here, we expanded this approach to xylose and arabinose catabolic pathway engineering and demonstrated that bioprospected xylose and arabinose catabolic pathways from U. bevomyces offer alternative choices for enabling efficient pentose catabolism in S. cerevisiae. By introducing a novel set of xylose catabolic genes from U. bevomyces, growth rates were improved up to 85 % over a set of traditional Scheffersomyces stipitis pathway genes. In addition, we suggested an alternative arabinose catabolic pathway which, after directed evolution and pathway engineering, enabled S. cerevisiae to grow on arabinose as a sole carbon source in minimal medium with growth rates upwards of 0.05 h(-1). This pathway represents the most efficient growth of yeast on pure arabinose minimal medium. These pathways provide great starting points for further strain development and demonstrate the utility of bioprospecting from U. bevomyces.

  2. Plasma membrane electron transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on the presence of mitochondrial respiratory subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herst, Patries M; Perrone, Gabriel G; Dawes, Ian W; Bircham, Peter W; Berridge, Michael V

    2008-09-01

    Most investigations into plasma membrane electron transport (PMET) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have focused on the inducible ferric reductase responsible for iron uptake under iron/copper-limiting conditions. In this paper, we describe a PMET system, distinct from ferric reductase, which reduces the cell-impermeable water-soluble tetrazolium dye, 2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium monosodium salt (WST-1), under normal iron/copper conditions. WST-1/1-methoxy-phenazine methosulphate reduction was unaffected by anoxia and relatively insensitive to diphenyleneiodonium. Dye reduction was increased when intracellular NADH levels were high, which, in S. cerevisiae, required deletion of numerous genes associated with NADH recycling. Genome-wide screening of all viable nuclear gene-deletion mutants of S. cerevisiae revealed that, although mitochondrial electron transport per se was not required, the presence of several nuclear and mitochondrially encoded subunits of respiratory complexes III and IV was mandatory for PMET. This suggests some form of interaction between components of mitochondrial and plasma membrane electron transport. In support of this, mitochondrial tubular networks in S. cerevisiae were shown to be located in close proximity to the plasma membrane using confocal microscopy.

  3. Z curve theory-based analysis of the dynamic nature of nucleosome positioning in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xueting; Liu, Hui; Liu, Hongbo; Su, Jianzhong; Lv, Jie; Cui, Ying; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Nucleosome is the elementary structural unit of eukaryotic chromatin. Instability of nucleosome positioning plays critical roles in chromatin remodeling in differentiation and disease. In this study, we investigated nucleosome dynamics in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome using a geometric model based on Z curve theory. We identified 52,941 stable nucleosomes and 7607 dynamic nucleosomes, compiling them into a genome-wide nucleosome dynamic positioning map and constructing a user-friendly visualization platform (http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/nucleosome). Our approach achieved a sensitivity of 90.31% and a specificity of 87.76% for S. cerevisiae. Analysis revealed transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) were enriched in linkers. And among the sparse nucleosomes around TFBSs, dynamic nucleosomes were slightly preferred. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis indicated that stable and dynamic nucleosomes were enriched on genes involved in different biological processes and functions. This study provides an approach for comprehending chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation of genes.

  4. Engineering cellular redox balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for improved production of L-lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Young; Kang, Chang Duk; Lee, Seung Hyun; Park, Young Kyoung; Cho, Kwang Myung

    2015-04-01

    Owing to the growing market for the biodegradable and renewable polymer, polylactic acid, world demand for lactic acid is rapidly increasing. However, the very high concentrations desired for industrial production of the free lactic acid create toxicity and low pH concerns for manufacturers. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most well characterized eukaryote, a preferred microbial cell factory for the largest industrial biotechnology product (bioethanol), and a robust, commercially compatible workhorse to be exploited for the production of diverse chemicals. S. cerevisiae has also been explored as a host for lactic acid production because of its high acid tolerance. Here, we constructed an L-lactic acid-overproducing S. cerevisiae by redirecting cellular metabolic fluxes to the production of L-lactic acid. To this end, we deleted the S. cerevisiae genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase 1 (PDC1), L-lactate cytochrome-c oxidoreductase (CYB2), and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1), replacing them with a heterologous L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) gene. Two new target genes encoding isoenzymes of the external NADH dehydrogenase (NDE1 and NDE2), were also deleted from the genome to re-engineer the intracellular redox balance. The resulting strain was found to produce L-lactic acid more efficiently (32.6% increase in final L-lactic acid titer). When tested in a bioreactor in fed-batch mode, this engineered strain produced 117 g/L of L-lactic acid under low pH conditions. This result demonstrates that the redox balance engineering should be coupled with the metabolic engineering in the construction of L-lactic acid-overproducing S. cerevisiae.

  5. Genetic dissection of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Peng; Xiao, Yin; Hu, Yun; Sun, Haiye; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Gui-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Dissection of the hereditary architecture underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for ethanol fermentation. In this work, a genomics approach was used to dissect hereditary variations in acetic acid tolerance between two phenotypically different strains. A total of 160 segregants derived from these two strains were obtained. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the acetic acid tolerance displayed a normal distribution in these segregants, and suggested that the acetic acid tolerant traits were controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Thus, 220 SSR markers covering the whole genome were used to detect QTLs of acetic acid tolerant traits. As a result, three QTLs were located on chromosomes 9, 12, and 16, respectively, which explained 38.8-65.9 % of the range of phenotypic variation. Furthermore, twelve genes of the candidates fell into the three QTL regions by integrating the QTL analysis with candidates of acetic acid tolerant genes. These results provided a novel avenue to obtain more robust strains.

  6. Changes and roles of membrane compositions in the adaptation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfeng; Zhang, Shuxian; Liu, Huaqing; Zhang, Lei; Yi, Chenfeng; Li, Hao

    2015-12-01

    Bioethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often stressed by the accumulation of ethanol. Cell membrane is the first assaulting target of ethanol. Ethanol-adapted S. cerevisiae strains provide opportunity to shed light on membrane functions in the ethanol tolerance. This study aimed at clarifying the roles of cell membrane in the ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae through comparing membrane components between S. cerevisiae parental strain and ethanol-adapted strains. A directed evolutionary engineering was performed to obtain the ethanol-adapted S. cerevisiae strains. The parental, ethanol-adapted M5 and M10 strains were selected to be compared the percentage of viable cells after exposing to ethanol stress and cell membrane compositions (i.e., ergosterol, trehalose, and fatty acids). Compared with the parental strain, M5 or M10 strain had higher survival rate in the presence of 10% v/v ethanol. Compared with that in the parental strain, contents of trehalose, ergosterol, and fatty acids increased about 15.7, 12.1, and 29.3%, respectively, in M5 strain, and about 47.5, 107.8, and 61.5%, respectively, in M10 strain. Moreover, expression differences of genes involved in fatty acids metabolisms among the parental, M5 and M10 strains were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and results demonstrated that M5 or M10 strain had higher expression of ACC1 and OLE1 than the parental strain. These results indicated that although being exposed to step-wise increased ethanol, S. cerevisiae cells might remodel membrane components or structure to adapt to the ethanol stress.

  7. Genetic analysis and enzyme activity suggest the existence of more than one minimal functional unit capable of synthesizing phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernando, Yolanda; Carter, Andrew T.; Parr, Adrian;

    1999-01-01

    The PRS gene family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae consists of five genes each capable of encoding a 5-phosphoribosyl-1(α)-pyrophosphate synthetase polypeptide. To gain insight into the functional organization of this gene family we have constructed a collection of strains containing all possible co...

  8. [Advances in functional genomics studies underlying acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinqing; Zhang, Mingming; Xu, Guihong; Xu, Jianren; Bai, Fengwu

    2014-03-01

    Industrial microorganisms are subject to various stress conditions, including products and substrates inhibitions. Therefore, improvement of stress tolerance is of great importance for industrial microbial production. Acetic acid is one of the major inhibitors in the cellulosic hydrolysates, which affects seriously on cell growth and metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptive response and tolerance of acetic acid of S. cerevisiae benefit breeding of robust strains of industrial yeast for more efficient production. In recent years, more insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying acetic acid tolerance have been revealed through analysis of global gene expression and metabolomics analysis, as well as phenomics analysis by single gene deletion libraries. Novel genes related to response to acetic acid and improvement of acetic acid tolerance have been identified, and novel strains with improved acetic acid tolerance were constructed by modifying key genes. Metal ions including potassium and zinc play important roles in acetic acid tolerance in S. cerevisiae, and the effect of zinc was first discovered in our previous studies on flocculating yeast. Genes involved in cell wall remodeling, membrane transport, energy metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis and transport, as well as global transcription regulation were discussed. Exploration and modification of the molecular mechanisms of yeast acetic acid tolerance will be done further on levels such as post-translational modifications and synthetic biology and engineering; and the knowledge obtained will pave the way for breeding robust strains for more efficient bioconversion of cellulosic materials to produce biofuels and bio-based chemicals.

  9. Regulation of xylose metabolism in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penttilä Merja

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerable interest in the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol has led to metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for fermentation of xylose. In the present study, the transcriptome and proteome of recombinant, xylose-utilising S. cerevisiae grown in aerobic batch cultures on xylose were compared with those of glucose-grown cells both in glucose repressed and derepressed states. The aim was to study at the genome-wide level how signalling and carbon catabolite repression differ in cells grown on either glucose or xylose. The more detailed knowledge whether xylose is sensed as a fermentable carbon source, capable of catabolite repression like glucose, or is rather recognised as a non-fermentable carbon source is important for further engineering this yeast for more efficient anaerobic fermentation of xylose. Results Genes encoding respiratory proteins, proteins of the tricarboxylic acid and glyoxylate cycles, and gluconeogenesis were only partially repressed by xylose, similar to the genes encoding their transcriptional regulators HAP4, CAT8 and SIP1-2 and 4. Several genes that are repressed via the Snf1p/Mig1p-pathway during growth on glucose had higher expression in the cells grown on xylose than in the glucose repressed cells but lower than in the glucose derepressed cells. The observed expression profiles of the transcription repressor RGT1 and its target genes HXT2-3, encoding hexose transporters suggested that extracellular xylose was sensed by the glucose sensors Rgt2p and Snf3p. Proteome analyses revealed distinct patterns in phosphorylation of hexokinase 2, glucokinase and enolase isoenzymes in the xylose- and glucose-grown cells. Conclusion The results indicate that the metabolism of yeast growing on xylose corresponds neither to that of fully glucose repressed cells nor that of derepressed cells. This may be one of the major reasons for the suboptimal fermentation of xylose by

  10. Rationally designed, heterologous S. cerevisiae transcripts expose novel expression determinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yehezkel, Tuval; Atar, Shimshi; Zur, Hadas; Diament, Alon; Goz, Eli; Marx, Tzipy; Cohen, Rafael; Dana, Alexandra; Feldman, Anna; Shapiro, Ehud; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    Deducing generic causal relations between RNA transcript features and protein expression profiles from endogenous gene expression data remains a major unsolved problem in biology. The analysis of gene expression from heterologous genes contributes significantly to solving this problem, but has been heavily biased toward the study of the effect of 5′ transcript regions and to prokaryotes. Here, we employ a synthetic biology driven approach that systematically differentiates the effect of different regions of the transcript on gene expression up to 240 nucleotides into the ORF. This enabled us to discover new causal effects between features in previously unexplored regions of transcripts, and gene expression in natural regimes. We rationally designed, constructed, and analyzed 383 gene variants of the viral HRSVgp04 gene ORF, with multiple synonymous mutations at key positions along the transcript in the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. Our results show that a few silent mutations at the 5′UTR can have a dramatic effect of up to 15 fold change on protein levels, and that even synonymous mutations in positions more than 120 nucleotides downstream from the ORF 5′end can modulate protein levels up to 160%–300%. We demonstrate that the correlation between protein levels and folding energy increases with the significance of the level of selection of the latter in endogenous genes, reinforcing the notion that selection for folding strength in different parts of the ORF is related to translation regulation. Our measured protein abundance correlates notably(correlation up to r = 0.62 (p=0.0013)) with mean relative codon decoding times, based on ribosomal densities (Ribo-Seq) in endogenous genes, supporting the conjecture that translation elongation and adaptation to the tRNA pool can modify protein levels in a causal/direct manner. This report provides an improved understanding of transcript evolution, design principles of gene expression regulation, and suggests simple

  11. Improved production of fatty acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae through screening a cDNA library from the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Shuobo; Ji, Haichuan; Siewers, Verena;

    2016-01-01

    for screening a cDNA library from the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica for identification of genes/enzymes that were able to enhance free FA accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several novel enzymes resulting in increasing FA accumulation were discovered. These targets include a GPI anchor protein...... method for high-throughput evaluation of the content of free FAs, but also give new insight into how enzymes from Y. lipolytica may increase the production of fatty acids in S. cerevisiae....

  12. Chromosome VIII disomy influences the nonsense suppression efficiency and transition metal tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadorsky, S P; Sopova, Y V; Andreichuk, D Y; Startsev, V A; Medvedeva, V P; Inge-Vechtomov, S G

    2015-06-01

    The SUP35 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the translation termination factor eRF3. Mutations in this gene lead to the suppression of nonsense mutations and a number of other pleiotropic phenotypes, one of which is impaired chromosome segregation during cell division. Similar effects result from replacing the S. cerevisiae SUP35 gene with its orthologues. A number of genetic and epigenetic changes that occur in the sup35 background result in partial compensation for this suppressor effect. In this study we showed that in S. cerevisiae strains in which the SUP35 orthologue from the yeast Pichia methanolica replaces the S. cerevisiae SUP35 gene, chromosome VIII disomy results in decreased efficiency of nonsense suppression. This antisuppressor effect is not associated with decreased stop codon read-through. We identified SBP1, a gene that localizes to chromosome VIII, as a dosage-dependent antisuppressor that strongly contributes to the overall antisuppressor effect of chromosome VIII disomy. Disomy of chromosome VIII also leads to a change in the yeast strains' tolerance of a number of transition metal salts.

  13. Comparative genomics among Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces kudriavzevii natural hybrid strains isolated from wine and beer reveals different origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peris David

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interspecific hybrids between S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii have frequently been detected in wine and beer fermentations. Significant physiological differences among parental and hybrid strains under different stress conditions have been evidenced. In this study, we used comparative genome hybridization analysis to evaluate the genome composition of different S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii natural hybrids isolated from wine and beer fermentations to infer their evolutionary origins and to figure out the potential role of common S. kudriavzevii gene fraction present in these hybrids. Results Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and ploidy analyses carried out in this study confirmed the presence of individual and differential chromosomal composition patterns for most S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids from beer and wine. All hybrids share a common set of depleted S. cerevisiae genes, which also are depleted or absent in the wine strains studied so far, and the presence a common set of S. kudriavzevii genes, which may be associated with their capability to grow at low temperatures. Finally, a maximum parsimony analysis of chromosomal rearrangement events, occurred in the hybrid genomes, indicated the presence of two main groups of wine hybrids and different divergent lineages of brewing strains. Conclusion Our data suggest that wine and beer S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids have been originated by different rare-mating events involving a diploid wine S. cerevisiae and a haploid or diploid European S. kudriavzevii strains. Hybrids maintain several S. kudriavzevii genes involved in cold adaptation as well as those related to S. kudriavzevii mitochondrial functions.

  14. Optimizing promoters and secretory signal sequences for producing ethanol from inulin by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying Kluyveromyces marxianus inulinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soo-Jeong; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Jin-Woo; Lee, Dae-Hee; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-02-01

    Inulin is a polyfructan that is abundant in plants such as Jerusalem artichoke, chicory and dahlia. Inulinase can easily hydrolyze inulin to fructose, which is consumed by microorganisms. Generally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an industrial workhorse strain for bioethanol production, is known for not having inulinase activity. The inulinase gene from Kluyveromyces marxianus (KmINU), with the ability of converting inulin to fructose, was introduced into S. cerevisiae D452-2. The inulinase gene was fused to three different types of promoter (GPD, PGK1, truncated HXT7) and secretory signal sequence (KmINU, MFα1, SUC2) to generate nine expression cassettes. The inulin fermentation performance of the nine transformants containing different promoter and signal sequence combinations for inulinase production were compared to select an optimized expression system for efficient inulin fermentation. Among the nine inulinase-producing transformants, the S. cerevisiae carrying the PGK1 promoter and MFα1 signal sequence (S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM) showed not only the highest specific KmINU activity, but also the best inulin fermentation capability. Finally, a batch fermentation of the selected S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM in a bioreactor with 188.2 g/L inulin was performed to produce 80.2 g/L ethanol with 0.43 g ethanol/g inulin of ethanol yield and 1.22 g/L h of ethanol productivity.

  15. Lactose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting cellobiose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Oh, Eun Joong; Pathanibul, Panchalee; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-09-20

    Lactose is an inevitable byproduct of the dairy industry. In addition to cheese manufacturing, the growing Greek yogurt industry generates excess acid whey, which contains lactose. Therefore, rapid and efficient conversion of lactose to fuels and chemicals would be useful for recycling the otherwise harmful acid whey. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a popular metabolic engineering host, cannot natively utilize lactose. However, we discovered that an engineered S. cerevisiae strain (EJ2) capable of fermenting cellobiose can also ferment lactose. This finding suggests that a cellobiose transporter (CDT-1) can transport lactose and a β-glucosidase (GH1-1) can hydrolyze lactose by acting as a β-galactosidase. While the lactose fermentation by the EJ2 strain was much slower than the cellobiose fermentation, a faster lactose-fermenting strain (EJ2e8) was obtained through serial subcultures on lactose. The EJ2e8 strain fermented lactose with a consumption rate of 2.16g/Lh. The improved lactose fermentation by the EJ2e8 strain was due to the increased copy number of cdt-1 and gh1-1 genes. Looking ahead, the EJ2e8 strain could be exploited for the production of other non-ethanol fuels and chemicals from lactose through further metabolic engineering.

  16. Integral Membrane Protein Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell-Casteel, Rebba C; Johnson, Jennifer M; Stroud, Robert M; Hays, Franklin A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic integral membrane proteins are challenging targets for crystallography or functional characterization in a purified state. Since expression is often a limiting factor when studying this difficult class of biological macromolecules, the intent of this chapter is to focus on the expression of eukaryotic integral membrane proteins (IMPs) using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae is a prime candidate for the expression of eukaryotic IMPs because it offers the convenience of using episomal expression plasmids, selection of positive transformants, posttranslational modifications, and it can properly fold and target IMPs. Here we present a generalized protocol and insights based on our collective knowledge as an aid to overcoming the challenges faced when expressing eukaryotic IMPs in S. cerevisiae.

  17. Characteristics of sterol uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenz, R T; Rodriguez, R J; Lewis, T A; Parks, L W

    1986-01-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae sterol auxotroph, FY3 (alpha hem1 erg7 ura), was used to probe the characteristics of sterol uptake in S. cerevisiae. The steady-state cellular concentration of free sterol at the late exponential phase of growth could be adjusted within a 10-fold range by varying the concentration of exogenously supplied sterol. When cultured on 1 microgram of sterol ml-1, the cells contained a minimal cellular free-cholesterol concentration of 0.85 nmol/mg (dry weight) and were te...

  18. Xylan catabolism is improved by blending bioprospecting and metabolic pathway engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Jellison, Taylor; Alper, Hal S

    2015-04-01

    Complete utilization of all available carbon sources in lignocellulosic biomass still remains a challenge in engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Even with efficient heterologous xylose catabolic pathways, S. cerevisiae is unable to utilize xylose in lignocellulosic biomass unless xylan is depolymerized to xylose. Here we demonstrate that a blended bioprospecting approach along with pathway engineering and evolutionary engineering can be used to improve xylan catabolism in S. cerevisiae. Specifically, we perform whole genome sequencing-based bioprospecting of a strain with remarkable pentose catabolic potential that we isolated and named Ustilago bevomyces. The heterologous expression of xylan catabolic genes enabled S. cerevisiae to grow on xylan as a single carbon source in minimal medium. A combination of bioprospecting and metabolic pathway evolution demonstrated that the xylan catabolic pathway could be further improved. Ultimately, engineering efforts were able to achieve xylan conversion into ethanol of up to 0.22 g/L on minimal medium compositions with xylan. This pathway provides a novel starting point for improving lignocellulosic conversion by yeast.

  19. Production of pyruvate from mannitol by mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shiori; Tanaka, Hideki; Hirayama, Makoto; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Mannitol is contained in brown macroalgae up to 33% (w/w, dry weight), and thus is a promising carbon source for white biotechnology. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a key cell factory, is generally regarded to be unable to assimilate mannitol for growth. We have recently succeeded in producing S. cerevisiae that can assimilate mannitol through spontaneous mutations of Tup1-Cyc8, each of which constitutes a general corepressor complex. In this study, we demonstrate production of pyruvate from mannitol using this mannitol-assimilating S. cerevisiae through deletions of all 3 pyruvate decarboxylase genes. The resultant mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative strain produced 0.86 g/L pyruvate without use of acetate after cultivation for 4 days, with an overall yield of 0.77 g of pyruvate per g of mannitol (the theoretical yield was 79%). Although acetate was not needed for growth of this strain in mannitol-containing medium, addition of acetate had a significant beneficial effect on production of pyruvate. This is the first report of production of a valuable compound (other than ethanol) from mannitol using S. cerevisiae, and is an initial platform from which the productivity of pyruvate from mannitol can be improved.

  20. Increased copper bioremediation ability of new transgenic and adapted Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geva, Polina; Kahta, Rotem; Nakonechny, Faina; Aronov, Stella; Nisnevitch, Marina

    2016-10-01

    Environmental pollution with heavy metals is a very serious ecological problem, which can be solved by bioremediation of metal ions by microorganisms. Yeast cells, especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are known to exhibit a good natural ability to remove heavy metal ions from an aqueous phase. In the present work, an attempt was made to increase the copper-binding properties of S. cerevisiae. For this purpose, new strains of S. cerevisiae were produced by construction and integration of recombinant human MT2 and GFP-hMT2 genes into yeast cells. The ySA4001 strain expressed GFP-hMT2p under the constitutive pADH1 promoter and the ySA4002 and ySA4003 strains expressed hMT2 and GFP-hMT2 under the inducible pCUP1 promoter. An additional yMNWTA01 strain was obtained by adaptation of the BY4743 wild type S. cerevisiae strain to high copper concentrations. The yMNWTA01, ySA4002, and ySA4003 strains exhibited an enhanced ability for copper ion bioremediation.

  1. Evidence of Natural Hybridization in Brazilian Wild Lineages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Raquel; Almeida, Pedro; Safar, Silvana V B; Santos, Renata Oliveira; Morais, Paula B; Nielly-Thibault, Lou; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Landry, Christian R; Gonçalves, Paula; Rosa, Carlos A; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2016-01-18

    The natural biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the best known unicellular model eukaryote, remains poorly documented and understood although recent progress has started to change this situation. Studies carried out recently in the Northern Hemisphere revealed the existence of wild populations associated with oak trees in North America, Asia, and in the Mediterranean region. However, in spite of these advances, the global distribution of natural populations of S. cerevisiae, especially in regions were oaks and other members of the Fagaceae are absent, is not well understood. Here we investigate the occurrence of S. cerevisiae in Brazil, a tropical region where oaks and other Fagaceae are absent. We report a candidate natural habitat of S. cerevisiae in South America and, using whole-genome data, we uncover new lineages that appear to have as closest relatives the wild populations found in North America and Japan. A population structure analysis revealed the penetration of the wine genotype into the wild Brazilian population, a first observation of the impact of domesticated microbe lineages on the genetic structure of wild populations. Unexpectedly, the Brazilian population shows conspicuous evidence of hybridization with an American population of Saccharomyces paradoxus. Introgressions from S. paradoxus were significantly enriched in genes encoding secondary active transmembrane transporters. We hypothesize that hybridization in tropical wild lineages may have facilitated the habitat transition accompanying the colonization of the tropical ecosystem.

  2. Computational Analysis of Signal Peptide-Dependent Secreted Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Computer based software such as the SignalP v3.0, TargetP vl.01, big-PI predictor and TMHMM v2.0 were combined to predict the signal peptides, and the signal peptide-dependent secreted proteins among the 6 700 ORFs in genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results showed that 163 proteins were the secreted ones containing signal peptides, and they were secreted via Sec pathway. Among the 163 predicted secreted proteins, the signal peptides of 47 secreted proteins included only the H-domain and C-domain, without N-domain, but the signal peptides of other 116 secreted proteins included all the three domains. There were differences in the constitution of signal peptides between the secreted proteins of S. cerevisiae and of Candida albicans, but the length and amino acids types of their signal peptides were similar in general. Few of the same signal peptides occurred in the secreted proteins of S. cerevisiae genome, and the homology could be compared among the secreted proteins with the same signal peptides. The BLAST 2 SEQUENECES and CLUSTAL W were used to align the two protein sequences and multi-protein sequences, respectively. The alignment result indicated that homology of these sequences with the same signal peptide was very highly conservative in amino acid of complete gene. The effect of the signal peptides in S. cerevisia on expression of foreign eukaryotic secreted proteins is discussed in this paper.

  3. Dual utilization of NADPH and NADH cofactors enhances xylitol production in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jung-Hyun; Oh, Sun-Young; Lee, Hyeun-Soo; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    Xylitol, a natural sweetener, can be produced by hydrogenation of xylose in hemicelluloses. In microbial processes, utilization of only NADPH cofactor limited commercialization of xylitol biosynthesis. To overcome this drawback, Saccharomyces cerevisiae D452-2 was engineered to express two types of xylose reductase (XR) with either NADPH-dependence or NADH-preference. Engineered S. cerevisiae DWM expressing both the XRs exhibited higher xylitol productivity than the yeast strain expressing NADPH-dependent XR only (DWW) in both batch and glucose-limited fed-batch cultures. Furthermore, the coexpression of S. cerevisiae ZWF1 and ACS1 genes in the DWM strain increased intracellular concentrations of NADPH and NADH and improved maximum xylitol productivity by 17%, relative to that for the DWM strain. Finally, the optimized fed-batch fermentation of S. cerevisiae DWM-ZWF1-ACS1 resulted in 196.2 g/L xylitol concentration, 4.27 g/L h productivity and almost the theoretical yield. Expression of the two types of XR utilizing both NADPH and NADH is a promising strategy to meet the industrial demands for microbial xylitol production.

  4. NCW2, a Gene Involved in the Tolerance to Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB), May Help in the Organisation of β-1,3-Glucan Structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsztein, Carolina; de Lima, Rita de Cássia Pereira; de Barros Pita, Will; de Morais, Marcos Antonio

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, we provide biological evidences supporting the participation of NCW2 gene in the mechanism responsible for cell tolerance to polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), an antifungal agent. The growth rate of yeast cells exposed to this agent was significantly reduced in ∆ncw2 strain and the mRNA levels of NCW2 gene in the presence of PHMB showed a 7-fold up-regulation. Moreover, lack of NCW2 gene turns yeast cell more resistant to zymolyase treatment, indicating that alterations in the β-glucan network do occur when Ncw2p is absent. Computational analysis of the translated protein indicated neither catalytic nor transmembrane sites and reinforced the hypothesis of secretion and anchoring to cell surface. Altogether, these results indicated that NCW2 gene codes for a protein which participates in the cell wall biogenesis in yeasts and that Ncw2p might play a role in the organisation of the β-glucan assembly.

  5. Ecological and Genetic Barriers Differentiate Natural Populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clowers, Katie J; Heilberger, Justin; Piotrowski, Jeff S; Will, Jessica L; Gasch, Audrey P

    2015-09-01

    How populations that inhabit the same geographical area become genetically differentiated is not clear. To investigate this, we characterized phenotypic and genetic differences between two populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that in some cases inhabit the same environment but show relatively little gene flow. We profiled stress sensitivity in a group of vineyard isolates and a group of oak-soil strains and found several niche-related phenotypes that distinguish the populations. We performed bulk-segregant mapping on two of the distinguishing traits: The vineyard-specific ability to grow in grape juice and oak-specific tolerance to the cell wall damaging drug Congo red. To implicate causal genes, we also performed a chemical genomic screen in the lab-strain deletion collection and identified many important genes that fell under quantitative trait loci peaks. One gene important for growth in grape juice and identified by both the mapping and the screen was SSU1, a sulfite-nitrite pump implicated in wine fermentations. The beneficial allele is generated by a known translocation that we reasoned may also serve as a genetic barrier. We found that the translocation is prevalent in vineyard strains, but absent in oak strains, and presents a postzygotic barrier to spore viability. Furthermore, the translocation was associated with a fitness cost to the rapid growth rate seen in oak-soil strains. Our results reveal the translocation as a dual-function locus that enforces ecological differentiation while producing a genetic barrier to gene flow in these sympatric populations.

  6. Microarray analysis of p-anisaldehyde-induced transcriptome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lu; Guo, Na; Yang, Yi; Wu, Xiuping; Meng, Rizeng; Fan, Junwen; Ge, Fa; Wang, Xuelin; Liu, Jingbo; Deng, Xuming

    2010-03-01

    p-Anisaldehyde (4-methoxybenzaldehyde), an extract from Pimpinella anisum L. seeds, is a potential novel preservative. To reveal the possible action mechanism of p-anisaldehyde against microorganisms, yeast-based commercial oligonucleotide microarrays were used to analyze the genome-wide transcriptional changes in response to p-anisaldehyde. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was performed for selected genes to verify the microarray results. We interpreted our microarray data with the clustering tool, T-profiler. Analysis of microarray data revealed that p-anisaldehyde induced the expression of genes related to sulphur assimilation, aromatic aldehydes metabolism, and secondary metabolism, which demonstrated that the addition of p-anisaldehyde may influence the normal metabolism of aromatic aldehydes. This genome-wide transcriptomics approach revealed first insights into the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) to p-anisaldehyde challenge.

  7. Cloning and functional characterization of the SUR2/SYR2 gene encoding sphinganine hydroxylase in Pichia ciferrii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jung-Hoon; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Park, Chang-Seo; Rhee, Joon-Shick; Choi, Eui-Sung

    2004-04-15

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae sphinganine C4-hydroxylase encoded by the SUR2 gene catalyses the conversion of sphinganine to phytosphingosine. We isolated the SUR2 gene from Pichia ciferrii using nucleotide sequence homology to S. cerevisiae SUR2 to study hydroxylation of sphinganine in the sphingoid base overproducing yeast P. ciferrii. A positive clone was confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. A syringomycin-E resistance phenotype of a S. cerevisiae sur2-null mutant was complemented by expression of the cloned P. ciferrii SUR2 gene. Restoration of phytosphingosine production in the complemented strain was also confirmed, indicating that the cloned gene is a functional homologue of S. cerevisiae SUR2. .

  8. Biodiversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from a survey of pito production sites in various parts of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Richard L K; Abaidoo, Robert C; Jakobsen, Mogens; Jespersen, Lene

    2005-10-01

    Biodiversity among Saccharomyces cerevisiae predominating the spontaneous fermentation of Dagarti pito in Ghana was assessed. Two hundred and forty-nine isolates obtained from samples of dried yeast taken from commercial pito production sites in eight geographical regions of Ghana were characterized phenotypically by colony and cell morphology as well as carbohydrate assimilation profiling. Yeast populations ranged between 10(6) and 10(8) cfug(-1). Ninety-nine percent of the isolates (247) investigated showed macro-and micro morphological characteristics typical of S. cerevisiae. Of these, 72% (179) had assimilation profiles similar to S. cerevisiae while 28% (68) had assimilation profiles atypical of S. cerevisiae or any other member of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex. Amplification of the region spanning the two intergenic transcribed spacers (ITS) and the 5.8S ribosomal gene (ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2), followed by restriction analysis, as well as determination of chromosome length polymorphism by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of 25 representative isolates strongly indicated that all belonged to S. cerevisiae, notwithstanding the phenotypic differences. Sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome-c oxidase II gene (COX 2) and the actin-encoding gene (ACT1) of four isolates, confirmed their close relatedness to S. cerevisiae, particularly to the type strain CBS1171 (98.7%), as well as other members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex. Twenty isolates selected from eight geographical regions of Ghana and investigated for their technological properties, showed different patterns of growth and flocculation but otherwise similar technological characteristica. Most of the isolates produced pito having sensory attributes, which compared favourably with commercially produced pito.

  9. Production of β-galactosidase from recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on lactose

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Improved productivity and costs reduction in fermentation processes may be attained by using flocculating cell cultures. The production of extracellular heterologous β-galactosidase by recombinant flocculating Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, expressing the lacA gene (coding for β-galactosidase) of Aspergillus niger under the ADHI promotor and terminator in a bioreactor was studied. The effects of lactose concentration and yeast extract concentration on β-galactosidase production i...

  10. Flocculation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae tup1 mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying a mutation in the TUP1 locus exhibited calcium-dependent flocculation. The flocculation had none of the characteristics of sexual agglutination. The flocculation differed from that exhibited by a FLO1 strain in the effect of pH on cation dependence and sensitivity to chemical inactivation.

  11. Tangential Ultrafiltration of Aqueous "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae" Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carlos M.; Neves, Patricia S.; Da Silva, Francisco A.; Xavier, Ana M. R. B.; Eusebio, M. F. J.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental work on ultrafiltration is presented to illustrate the practical and theoretical principles of this separation technique. The laboratory exercise comprises experiments with pure water and with aqueous "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" (from commercial Baker's yeast) suspensions. With this work students detect the characteristic phenomena…

  12. Nitrogen Catabolite Repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the expression of all known nitrogen catabolite pathways are regulated by four regulators known as Gln3, Gat1, Da180, and Deh1. This is known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). They bind to motifs in the promoter region to the consensus sequence S' GATAA 3'. Gln3...

  13. Molecular characterization of propolis-induced cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Savoldi, Marcela; Bonatto, Diego; Barros, Mário Henrique; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Berretta, Andresa A; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2011-03-01

    Propolis, a natural product of plant resins, is used by the bees to seal holes in their honeycombs and protect the hive entrance. However, propolis has also been used in folk medicine for centuries. Here, we apply the power of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism for studies of genetics, cell biology, and genomics to determine how propolis affects fungi at the cellular level. Propolis is able to induce an apoptosis cell death response. However, increased exposure to propolis provides a corresponding increase in the necrosis response. We showed that cytochrome c but not endonuclease G (Nuc1p) is involved in propolis-mediated cell death in S. cerevisiae. We also observed that the metacaspase YCA1 gene is important for propolis-mediated cell death. To elucidate the gene functions that may be required for propolis sensitivity in eukaryotes, the full collection of about 4,800 haploid S. cerevisiae deletion strains was screened for propolis sensitivity. We were able to identify 138 deletion strains that have different degrees of propolis sensitivity compared to the corresponding wild-type strains. Systems biology revealed enrichment for genes involved in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, vacuolar acidification, negative regulation of transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter, regulation of macroautophagy associated with protein targeting to vacuoles, and cellular response to starvation. Validation studies indicated that propolis sensitivity is dependent on the mitochondrial function and that vacuolar acidification and autophagy are important for yeast cell death caused by propolis.

  14. De novo production of the flavonoid naringenin in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koopman Frank

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flavonoids comprise a large family of secondary plant metabolic intermediates that exhibit a wide variety of antioxidant and human health-related properties. Plant production of flavonoids is limited by the low productivity and the complexity of the recovered flavonoids. Thus to overcome these limitations, metabolic engineering of specific pathway in microbial systems have been envisaged to produce high quantity of a single molecules. Result Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered to produce the key intermediate flavonoid, naringenin, solely from glucose. For this, specific naringenin biosynthesis genes from Arabidopsis thaliana were selected by comparative expression profiling and introduced in S. cerevisiae. The sole expression of these A. thaliana genes yielded low extracellular naringenin concentrations ( Conclusion The results reported in this study demonstrate that S. cerevisiae is capable of de novo production of naringenin by coexpressing the naringenin production genes from A. thaliana and optimization of the flux towards the naringenin pathway. The engineered yeast naringenin production host provides a metabolic chassis for production of a wide range of flavonoids and exploration of their biological functions.

  15. Increased ethanol production by deletion of HAP4 in recombinant xylose-assimilating Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2015-12-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAP4 gene encodes a transcription activator that plays a key role in controlling the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial respiration and reductive pathways. This work examines the effect of knockout of the HAP4 gene on aerobic ethanol production in a xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae strain. A hap4-deleted recombinant yeast strain (B42-DHAP4) showed increased maximum concentration, production rate, and yield of ethanol compared with the reference strain MA-B42, irrespective of cultivation medium (glucose, xylose, or glucose/xylose mixtures). Notably, B42-DHAP4 was capable of producing ethanol from xylose as the sole carbon source under aerobic conditions, whereas no ethanol was produced by MA-B42. Moreover, the rate of ethanol production and ethanol yield (0.44 g/g) from the detoxified hydrolysate of wood chips was markedly improved in B42-DHAP4 compared to MA-B42. Thus, the results of this study support the view that deleting HAP4 in xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae strains represents a useful strategy in ethanol production processes.

  16. Gains and Losses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefke, Bernhard; Wang, Tzi-Yuan; Wang, Chuen-Yi; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2015-07-27

    Gene expression evolution occurs through changes in cis- or trans-regulatory elements or both. Interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites (TFBSs) constitute one of the most important points where these two regulatory components intersect. In this study, we investigated the evolution of TFBSs in the promoter regions of different Saccharomyces strains and species. We divided the promoter of a gene into the proximal region and the distal region, which are defined, respectively, as the 200-bp region upstream of the transcription starting site and as the 200-bp region upstream of the proximal region. We found that the predicted TFBSs in the proximal promoter regions tend to be evolutionarily more conserved than those in the distal promoter regions. Additionally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used in the fermentation of alcoholic drinks have experienced more TFBS losses than gains compared with strains from other environments (wild strains, laboratory strains, and clinical strains). We also showed that differences in TFBSs correlate with the cis component of gene expression evolution between species (comparing S. cerevisiae and its sister species Saccharomyces paradoxus) and within species (comparing two closely related S. cerevisiae strains).

  17. Deletion of host histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases strongly affects Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Jalal; van Heusden, Gerard Paul H; Hooykaas, Paul J J

    2009-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a plant pathogen that genetically transforms plant cells by transferring a part of its Ti-plasmid, the T-strand, to the host cell. Under laboratory conditions, it can also transform cells from many different nonplant organisms, including the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Collections of S. cerevisiae strains have been developed with systematic deletion of all coding sequences. Here, we used these collections to identify genes involved in the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) of S. cerevisiae. We found that deletion of genes (GCN5, NGG1, YAF9 and EAF7) encoding subunits of the SAGA, SLIK, ADA and NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complexes highly increased the efficiency of AMT, while deletion of genes (HDA2, HDA3 and HST4) encoding subunits of histone deacetylase complexes decreased AMT. These effects are specific for AMT as the efficiency of chemical (lithium acetate) transformation was not or only slightly affected by these deletions. Our data are consistent with a positive role of host histone deacetylation in AMT.

  18. Flavour formation in fungi: characterisation of KlAtf, the Kluyveromyces lactis orthologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol acetyltransferases Atf1 and Atf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laere, Stijn D M; Saerens, Sofie M G; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Van Dijck, Patrick; Thevelein, Johan M; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2008-04-01

    Volatile aroma-active esters are responsible for the fruity character of fermented alcoholic beverages, such as beer and wine. In the brewers' yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the major part of these esters is formed by two alcohol acetyltransferases, Atf1 and Atf2. In this paper, the existence of orthologues of these S. cerevisiae alcohol acetyltransferases in several ascomycetous fungi was investigated. Bioinformatic analysis of sequenced fungal genomes revealed the presence of multiple orthologues. The Saccharomyces sensu stricto yeasts all have two genes coding for orthologues. More distantly related fungi like Saccharomyces castelii, Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces waltii and Kluyveromyces lactis have only one orthologue in their genome. The homology between the identified proteins and the S. cerevisiae alcohol acetyltransferases suggests a role for these orthologues in the aroma-active ester formation. To verify this, the K. lactis orthologue KlAtf was cloned and expressed in S. cerevisiae. Gas chromatographic analysis of small-scale fermentations with the transformant strains showed that, while S. cerevisiae ATF1 overexpression resulted in a substantial increase in acetate ester levels, S. cerevisiae ATF2 and K. lactis ATF overexpression only caused a moderate increase in acetate esters. This study is the first report of the presence of an ester synthesis gene in K. lactis.

  19. Rapid Identification of Chemical Genetic Interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, David; Nelson, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the mode of action of bioactive chemicals is of interest to a broad range of academic, pharmaceutical, and industrial scientists. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or budding yeast, is a model eukaryote for which a complete collection of ~6,000 gene deletion mutants and hypomorphic essential gene mutants are commercially available. These collections of mutants can be used to systematically detect chemical-gene interactions, i.e. genes necessary to tolerate a chemical. This information, in turn, reports on the likely mode of action of the compound. Here we describe a protocol for the rapid identification of chemical-genetic interactions in budding yeast. We demonstrate the method using the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has a well-defined mechanism of action. Our results show that the nuclear TRAMP RNA exosome and DNA repair enzymes are needed for proliferation in the presence of 5-FU, which is consistent with previous microarray based bar-coding chemical genetic approaches and the knowledge that 5-FU adversely affects both RNA and DNA metabolism. The required validation protocols of these high-throughput screens are also described. PMID:25867090

  20. Recombination-stable multimeric green fluorescent protein for characterization of weak promoter outputs inSaccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Knuf, Christoph; Förster, Jochen;

    2015-01-01

    functions well in translational fusions, the use of tandem GFPs to amplify fluorescence signals is currently avoided in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and many other microorganisms due to the risk of loop-out by direct-repeat recombination. We increased GFP fluorescence by translationally fusing three different...... GFP variants, yeast-enhanced GFP, GFP+ and superfolder GFP to yield a sequence-diverged triple GFP molecule 3vGFP with 74–84% internal repeat identity. Unlike a single GFP, the brightness of 3vGFP allowed characterization of a weak promoter in S. cerevisiae. Utilizing 3vGFP, we further engineered...... a less leaky Cu2+-inducible promoter based on CUP1. The basal expression level of the new promoter was approx. 61% below the wild-type CUP1 promoter, thus expanding the absolute range of Cu2+-based gene control. The stability of 3vGFP towards direct-repeat recombination was assayed in S. cerevisiae...

  1. Involvement of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and signaling regulatory pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae biofilms during fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenjian eLi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Compared to free (free-living cells, biofilm cells show increased resistance and stability to high-pressure fermentation conditions, although the reasons underlying these phenomena remain unclear. Here, we investigated biofilm formation with immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells grown on fiber surfaces during the process of ethanol fermentation. The development of biofilm colonies was visualized by fluorescent labeling and confocal microscopy. RNA from yeast cells at 3 different biofilm development periods was extracted and sequenced by high-throughput sequencing. We quantitated gene expression differences between biofilm cells and free cells and found that 2098, 1556, and 927 genes were significantly differentially expressed respectively. We also validated the expression of previously reported genes and identified novel genes and pathways under the control of this system. Statistical analysis revealed that biofilm genes show significant gene expression changes principally in the initial period of biofilm formation compared to later periods. Carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism, signal transduction, and oxidoreductase activity were needed for biofilm formation. In contrast to previous findings, we observed some differential expression performances of FLO family genes, indicating that cell aggregation in our immobilized fermentation system was possibly independent of flocculation. Cyclic AMP-protein kinase A and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways regulated signal transduction pathways during yeast biofilm formation. We found that carbohydrate metabolism, especially glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, played a key role in the development of S. cerevisiae biofilms. This work provides an important dataset for future studies aimed at gaining insight into the regulatory mechanisms of immobilized cells in biofilms, as well as for optimizing bioprocessing applications with S. cerevisiae.

  2. AGAPE (Automated Genome Analysis PipelinE for pan-genome analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giltae Song

    Full Text Available The characterization and public release of genome sequences from thousands of organisms is expanding the scope for genetic variation studies. However, understanding the phenotypic consequences of genetic variation remains a challenge in eukaryotes due to the complexity of the genotype-phenotype map. One approach to this is the intensive study of model systems for which diverse sources of information can be accumulated and integrated. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an extensively studied model organism, with well-known protein functions and thoroughly curated phenotype data. To develop and expand the available resources linking genomic variation with function in yeast, we aim to model the pan-genome of S. cerevisiae. To initiate the yeast pan-genome, we newly sequenced or re-sequenced the genomes of 25 strains that are commonly used in the yeast research community using advanced sequencing technology at high quality. We also developed a pipeline for automated pan-genome analysis, which integrates the steps of assembly, annotation, and variation calling. To assign strain-specific functional annotations, we identified genes that were not present in the reference genome. We classified these according to their presence or absence across strains and characterized each group of genes with known functional and phenotypic features. The functional roles of novel genes not found in the reference genome and associated with strains or groups of strains appear to be consistent with anticipated adaptations in specific lineages. As more S. cerevisiae strain genomes are released, our analysis can be used to collate genome data and relate it to lineage-specific patterns of genome evolution. Our new tool set will enhance our understanding of genomic and functional evolution in S. cerevisiae, and will be available to the yeast genetics and molecular biology community.

  3. AGAPE (Automated Genome Analysis PipelinE) for pan-genome analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Giltae; Dickins, Benjamin J A; Demeter, Janos; Engel, Stacia; Gallagher, Jennifer; Choe, Kisurb; Dunn, Barbara; Snyder, Michael; Cherry, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    The characterization and public release of genome sequences from thousands of organisms is expanding the scope for genetic variation studies. However, understanding the phenotypic consequences of genetic variation remains a challenge in eukaryotes due to the complexity of the genotype-phenotype map. One approach to this is the intensive study of model systems for which diverse sources of information can be accumulated and integrated. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an extensively studied model organism, with well-known protein functions and thoroughly curated phenotype data. To develop and expand the available resources linking genomic variation with function in yeast, we aim to model the pan-genome of S. cerevisiae. To initiate the yeast pan-genome, we newly sequenced or re-sequenced the genomes of 25 strains that are commonly used in the yeast research community using advanced sequencing technology at high quality. We also developed a pipeline for automated pan-genome analysis, which integrates the steps of assembly, annotation, and variation calling. To assign strain-specific functional annotations, we identified genes that were not present in the reference genome. We classified these according to their presence or absence across strains and characterized each group of genes with known functional and phenotypic features. The functional roles of novel genes not found in the reference genome and associated with strains or groups of strains appear to be consistent with anticipated adaptations in specific lineages. As more S. cerevisiae strain genomes are released, our analysis can be used to collate genome data and relate it to lineage-specific patterns of genome evolution. Our new tool set will enhance our understanding of genomic and functional evolution in S. cerevisiae, and will be available to the yeast genetics and molecular biology community.

  4. Improving monoterpene geraniol production through geranyl diphosphate synthesis regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianzhi; Bao, Xiaoming; Li, Chen; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin

    2016-05-01

    Monoterpenes have wide applications in the food, cosmetics, and medicine industries and have recently received increased attention as advanced biofuels. However, compared with sesquiterpenes, monoterpene production is still lagging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, geraniol, a valuable acyclic monoterpene alcohol, was synthesized in S. cerevisiae. We evaluated three geraniol synthases in S. cerevisiae, and the geraniol synthase Valeriana officinalis (tVoGES), which lacked a plastid-targeting peptide, yielded the highest geraniol production. To improve geraniol production, synthesis of the precursor geranyl diphosphate (GPP) was regulated by comparing three specific GPP synthase genes derived from different plants and the endogenous farnesyl diphosphate synthase gene variants ERG20 (G) (ERG20 (K197G) ) and ERG20 (WW) (ERG20 (F96W-N127W) ), and controlling endogenous ERG20 expression, coupled with increasing the expression of the mevalonate pathway by co-overexpressing IDI1, tHMG1, and UPC2-1. The results showed that overexpressing ERG20 (WW) and strengthening the mevalonate pathway significantly improved geraniol production, while expressing heterologous GPP synthase genes or down-regulating endogenous ERG20 expression did not show positive effect. In addition, we constructed an Erg20p(F96W-N127W)-tVoGES fusion protein, and geraniol production reached 66.2 mg/L after optimizing the amino acid linker and the order of the proteins. The best strain yielded 293 mg/L geraniol in a fed-batch cultivation, a sevenfold improvement over the highest titer previously reported in an engineered S. cerevisiae strain. Finally, we showed that the toxicity of geraniol limited its production. The platform developed here can be readily used to synthesize other monoterpenes.

  5. Kluyveromyces marxianus Fps1p-like protein (FPS1) gene, complete cds

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Sequência nucleotídica, e respectiva tradução, do ortólogo de Kluyveromyces marxianus do gene FPS1 de Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nucleotidic sequence, and its translation, of the Kluyveromyces marxianus ortholgue of FPS1 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  6. Balance of Activities of Alcohol Acetyltransferase and Esterase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Important for Production of Isoamyl Acetate

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Nagi; Kiyokawa, Yoshifumi; Yanagiuchi, Toshiyasu; Wakai, Yoshinori; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Inoue, Yoshiharu; Kimura, Akira

    1998-01-01

    Isoamyl acetate is synthesized from isoamyl alcohol and acetyl coenzyme A by alcohol acetyltransferase (AATFase) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is hydrolyzed by esterases at the same time. We hypothesized that the balance of both enzyme activities was important for optimum production of isoamyl acetate in sake brewing. To test this hypothesis, we constructed yeast strains with different numbers of copies of the AATFase gene (ATF1) and the isoamyl acetate-hydrolyzing esterase gene (IAH1) and ...

  7. Ecological interactions among Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: insight into the dominance phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Perrone, Benedeta; Navarro-Tapia, Elisabeth; Querol, Amparo; Cocolin, Luca

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the behaviour of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, in order to obtain insight into the intraspecies competition taking place in mixed populations of this species. Two strains of S. cerevisiae, one dominant and one non-dominant, were labelled and mixed, and individual fermentations were set up to study the transcriptomes of the strains by means of RNA-seq. The results obtained suggest that cell-to-cell contact and aggregation, which are driven by the expression of genes that are associated with the cell surface, are indispensable conditions for the achievement of dominance. Observations on mixed aggregates, made up of cells of both strains, which were detected by means of flow cytometry, have confirmed the transcriptomic data. Furthermore, overexpression of the SSU1 gene, which encodes for a transporter that confers resistance to sulphites, provides an ecological advantage to the dominant strain. A mechanistic model is proposed that sheds light on the dominance phenomenon between different strains of the S. cerevisiae species. The collected data suggest that cell-to-cell contact, together with differential sulphite production and resistance is important in determining the dominance of one strain over another. PMID:28266552

  8. Cellular memory of acquired stress resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Qiaoning; Haroon, Suraiya; Bravo, Diego González; Will, Jessica L; Gasch, Audrey P

    2012-10-01

    Cellular memory of past experiences has been observed in several organisms and across a variety of experiences, including bacteria "remembering" prior nutritional status and amoeba "learning" to anticipate future environmental conditions. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae maintains a multifaceted memory of prior stress exposure. We previously demonstrated that yeast cells exposed to a mild dose of salt acquire subsequent tolerance to severe doses of H(2)O(2). We set out to characterize the retention of acquired tolerance and in the process uncovered two distinct aspects of cellular memory. First, we found that H(2)O(2) resistance persisted for four to five generations after cells were removed from the prior salt treatment and was transmitted to daughter cells that never directly experienced the pretreatment. Maintenance of this memory did not require nascent protein synthesis after the initial salt pretreatment, but rather required long-lived cytosolic catalase Ctt1p that was synthesized during salt exposure and then distributed to daughter cells during subsequent cell divisions. In addition to and separable from the memory of H(2)O(2) resistance, these cells also displayed a faster gene-expression response to subsequent stress at >1000 genes, representing transcriptional memory. The faster gene-expression response requires the nuclear pore component Nup42p and serves an important function by facilitating faster reacquisition of H(2)O(2) tolerance after a second cycle of salt exposure. Memory of prior stress exposure likely provides a significant advantage to microbial populations living in ever-changing environments.

  9. MAP kinase pathways in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, M. C.; Albertyn, J.; Alexander, M.; Davenport, K.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A cascade of three protein kinases known as a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is commonly found as part of the signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells. Almost two decades of genetic and biochemical experimentation plus the recently completed DNA sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome have revealed just five functionally distinct MAPK cascades in this yeast. Sexual conjugation, cell growth, and adaptation to stress, for example, all require MAPK-mediated cellular responses. A primary function of these cascades appears to be the regulation of gene expression in response to extracellular signals or as part of specific developmental processes. In addition, the MAPK cascades often appear to regulate the cell cycle and vice versa. Despite the success of the gene hunter era in revealing these pathways, there are still many significant gaps in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms for activation of these cascades and how the cascades regulate cell function. For example, comparison of different yeast signaling pathways reveals a surprising variety of different types of upstream signaling proteins that function to activate a MAPK cascade, yet how the upstream proteins actually activate the cascade remains unclear. We also know that the yeast MAPK pathways regulate each other and interact with other signaling pathways to produce a coordinated pattern of gene expression, but the molecular mechanisms of this cross talk are poorly understood. This review is therefore an attempt to present the current knowledge of MAPK pathways in yeast and some directions for future research in this area.

  10. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of ginsenosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhubo; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Xianan; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Beibei; Wang, Dong; Huang, Luqi; Zhang, Xueli

    2013-11-01

    Ginsenosides are the primary bioactive components of ginseng, which is a popular medicinal herb and exhibits diverse pharmacological activities. Protopanaxadiol is the aglycon of several dammarane-type ginsenosides, which also has anticancer activity. For microbial production of protopanaxadiol, dammarenediol-II synthase and protopanaxadiol synthase genes of Panax ginseng, together with a NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase gene of Arabidopsis thaliana, were introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in production of 0.05 mg/g DCW protopanaxadiol. Increasing squalene and 2,3-oxidosqualene supplies through overexpressing truncated 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, squalene synthase and 2,3-oxidosqualene synthase genes, together with increasing protopanaxadiol synthase activity through codon optimization, led to 262-fold increase of protopanaxadiol production. Finally, using two-phase extractive fermentation resulted in production of 8.40 mg/g DCW protopanaxadiol (1189 mg/L), together with 10.94 mg/g DCW dammarenediol-II (1548 mg/L). The yeast strains engineered in this work can serve as the basis for creating an alternative way for production of ginsenosides in place of extraction from plant sources.

  11. Enhancing sesquiterpene production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through in silico driven metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahi, Mohammad A; Maury, Jérôme; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Schalk, Michel; Clark, Anthony; Nielsen, Jens

    2009-11-01

    A genome-scale metabolic model was used to identify new target genes for enhanced biosynthesis of sesquiterpenes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The effect of gene deletions on the flux distributions in the metabolic model of S. cerevisiae was assessed using OptGene as the modeling framework and minimization of metabolic adjustments (MOMA) as objective function. Deletion of NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase encoded by GDH1 was identified as the best target gene for the improvement of sesquiterpene biosynthesis in yeast. Deletion of this gene enhances the available NADPH in the cytosol for other NADPH requiring enzymes, including HMG-CoA reductase. However, since disruption of GDH1 impairs the ammonia utilization, simultaneous over-expression of the NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase encoded by GDH2 was also considered in this study. Deletion of GDH1 led to an approximately 85% increase in the final cubebol titer. However, deletion of this gene also caused a significant decrease in the maximum specific growth rate. Over-expression of GDH2 did not show a further effect on the final cubebol titer but this alteration significantly improved the growth rate compared to the GDH1 deleted strain.

  12. Elucidating TOR Signaling and Rapamycin Action: Lessons from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo, José L; Hall, Michael N.

    2002-01-01

    TOR (target of rapamycin) is a phosphatidylinositol kinase-related protein kinase that controls cell growth in response to nutrients. Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive and anticancer drug that acts by inhibiting TOR. The modes of action of TOR and rapamycin are remarkably conserved from S. cerevisiae to humans. The current understanding of TOR and rapamycin is derived largely from studies with S. cerevisiae. In this review, we discuss the contributions made by S. cerevisiae to understanding r...

  13. The Bioconversion of Red Ginseng Ethanol Extract into Compound K by Saccharomyces cerevisiae HJ-014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hak Joo; Kim, Eun A; Kim, Dong Hee; Shin, Kwang-Soo

    2014-09-01

    A β-glucosidase producing yeast strain was isolated from Korean traditional rice wine. Based on the sequence of the YCL008c gene and analysis of the fatty acid composition, the isolate was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain HJ-014. S. cerevisiae HJ-014 produced ginsenoside Rd, F2, and compound K from the ethanol extract of red ginseng. The production was increased by shaking culture, where the bioconversion efficiency was increased 2-fold compared to standing culture. The production of ginsenoside F2 and compound K was time-dependent and thought to proceed by the transformation pathway of: red ginseng extract→Rd→F2→compound K. The optimum incubation time and concentration of red ginseng extract for the production of compound K was 96 hr and 4.5% (w/v), respectively.

  14. Improved xylose and arabinose utilization by an industrial recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain using evolutionary engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, R.G.; Karhumaa, Kaisa; Fonseca, C.;

    2010-01-01

    to improve the simultaneous conversion of xylose and arabinose to ethanol in a recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain carrying the heterologous genes for xylose and arabinose utilization pathways integrated in the genome. The evolved strain TMB3130 displayed an increased consumption rate......Background: Cost-effective fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysate to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires efficient mixed sugar utilization. Notably, the rate and yield of xylose and arabinose co-fermentation to ethanol must be enhanced. Results: Evolutionary engineering was used...... of xylose and arabinose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Improved anaerobic ethanol production was achieved at the expense of xylitol and glycerol but arabinose was almost stoichiometrically converted to arabitol. Further characterization of the strain indicated that the selection pressure during...

  15. Recombination-stable multimeric green fluorescent protein for characterization of weak promoter outputs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Knuf, Christoph; Förster, Jochen;

    2015-01-01

    GFP variants, yeast-enhanced GFP, GFP+ and superfolder GFP to yield a sequence-diverged triple GFP molecule 3vGFP with 74–84% internal repeat identity. Unlike a single GFP, the brightness of 3vGFP allowed characterization of a weak promoter in S. cerevisiae. Utilizing 3vGFP, we further engineered...... a less leaky Cu2+-inducible promoter based on CUP1. The basal expression level of the new promoter was approx. 61% below the wild-type CUP1 promoter, thus expanding the absolute range of Cu2+-based gene control. The stability of 3vGFP towards direct-repeat recombination was assayed in S. cerevisiae...

  16. Fed-batch bioreactor process with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing on cheese whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rech

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain W303 was transformed with two yeast integrative plasmids containing Kluyveromyces lactis LAC4 and LAC12 genes that codify beta-galactosidase and lactose permease respectively. The BLR030 recombinant strain was selected due to its growth and beta-galactosidase production capacity. Different culture media based on deproteinized cheese whey (DCW were tested and the best composition (containing DCW, supplemented with yeast extract 1 %, and peptone 3 % (w/v was chosen for bioreactor experiments. Batch, and fed-batch cultures with linear ascending feeding for 25 (FB25, 35 (FB35, and 50 (FB50 hours, were performed. FB35 and FB50 produced the highest beta-galactosidase specific activities (around 1,800 U/g cells, and also the best productivities (180 U/L.h. Results show the potential use of fed-batch cultures of recombinant S. cerevisiae on industrial applications using supplemented whey as substrate.

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism in ecological context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhten, Paula; Ponomarova, Olga; Gonzalez, Ramon; Patil, Kiran R.

    2016-01-01

    The architecture and regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network are among the best studied owing to its widespread use in both basic research and industry. Yet, several recent studies have revealed notable limitations in explaining genotype–metabolic phenotype relations in this yeast, especially when concerning multiple genetic/environmental perturbations. Apparently unexpected genotype–phenotype relations may originate in the evolutionarily shaped cellular operating principles being hidden in common laboratory conditions. Predecessors of laboratory S. cerevisiae strains, the wild and the domesticated yeasts, have been evolutionarily shaped by highly variable environments, very distinct from laboratory conditions, and most interestingly by social life within microbial communities. Here we present a brief review of the genotypic and phenotypic peculiarities of S. cerevisiae in the context of its social lifestyle beyond laboratory environments. Accounting for this ecological context and the origin of the laboratory strains in experimental design and data analysis would be essential in improving the understanding of genotype–environment–phenotype relationships. PMID:27634775

  18. [Construction of high sulphite-producing industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Na; He, Xiu-ping; Guo, Xue-na; Liu, Nan; Zhang, Bo-run

    2006-02-01

    In the process of beer storage and transportation, off-flavor can be produced for oxidation of beer. Sulphite is important for stabilizing the beer flavor because of its antioxidant activity. However, the low level of sulphite synthesized by the brewing yeast is not enough to stabilize beer flavor. Three enzymes involve sulphite biosynthesis in yeast. One of them, APS kinase (encoded by MET14) plays important role in the process of sulphite formation. In order to construct high sulphite-producing brewing yeast strain for beer production, MET14 gene was cloned and overexpressed in industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Primer 1 (5'-TGTGAATTCCTGTACACCAATGGCTACT-3', EcoR I) and primer 2 (5'-TATAAGCTTGATGA GGTGGATGAAGACG-3', HindIII) were designed according to the MET14 sequence in GenBank. A 1.1kb DNA fragment containing the open reading frame and terminator of MET14 gene was amplified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae YSF-5 by PCR, and inserted into YEp352 to generate recombinant plasmid pMET14. To express MET14 gene properly in S. cerevisiae, the recombinant expression plasmids pPM with URA3 gene as the selection marker and pCPM with URA3 gene and copper resistance gene as the selection marker for yeast transformation were constructed. In plasmid pPM, the PGK1 promoter from plasmid pVC727 was fused with the MET14 gene from pMET14, and the expression cassette was inserted into the plasmid YEp352. The dominant selection marker, copper-resistance gene expression cassette CUP1-MTI was inserted in plasmid pPM to result in pCPM. Restriction enzyme analysis showed that plasmids pPM and pCPM were constructed correctly. The laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae YS58 with ura3, trp1, leu2, his4 auxotroph was transformed with plasmid pPM. Yeast transformants were screened on synthetic minimal medium (SD) containing leucine, histidine and tryptophan. The sulphite production of the transformants carrying pPM was 2 fold of that in the control strain YS58, which showed that the

  19. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Strain Inhibits Growth and Decreases Ochratoxin A Biosynthesis by Aspergillus carbonarius and Aspergillus ochraceus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena Budroni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to select wine yeast strains as biocontrol agents against fungal contaminants responsible for the accumulation of ochratoxin A (OTA in grape and wine and to dissect the mechanism of OTA detoxification by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain (DISAABA1182, which had previously been reported to reduce OTA in a synthetic must. All of the yeast strains tested displayed an ability to inhibit the growth of Aspergillus carbonarius both in vivo and in vitro and addition of culture filtrates from the tested isolates led to complete inhibition of OTA production. S. cerevisiae DISAABA1182 was selected and further tested for its capacity to inhibit OTA production and pks (polyketide synthase transcription in A. carbonarius and Aspergillus ochraceus in vitro. In order to dissect the mechanism of OTA detoxification, each of these two fungi was co-cultured with living yeast cells exposed to yeast crude or to autoclaved supernatant: S. cerevisiae DISAABA1182 was found to inhibit mycelial growth and OTA production in both Aspergilli when co-cultured in the OTA-inducing YES medium. Moreover, a decrease in pks transcription was observed in the presence of living cells of S. cerevisiae DISAABA1182 or its supernatant, while no effects were observed on transcription of either of the constitutively expressed calmodulin and β-tubulin genes. This suggests that transcriptional regulation of OTA biosynthetic genes takes place during the interaction between DISAABA1182 and OTA-producing Aspergilli.

  20. Producing human ceramide-NS by metabolic engineering using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Suguru; Shimamoto, Toshi; Nagano, Hideaki; Tsuruno, Masahiro; Okuhara, Hiroaki; Hatanaka, Haruyo; Tojo, Hiromasa; Kodama, Yukiko; Funato, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Ceramide is one of the most important intercellular components responsible for the barrier and moisture retention functions of the skin. Because of the risks involved with using products of animal origin and the low productivity of plants, the availability of ceramides is currently limited. In this study, we successfully developed a system that produces sphingosine-containing human ceramide-NS in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by eliminating the genes for yeast sphingolipid hydroxylases (encoded by SUR2 and SCS7) and introducing the gene for a human sphingolipid desaturase (encoded by DES1). The inactivation of the ceramidase gene YDC1, overexpression of the inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C gene ISC1, and endoplasmic reticulum localization of the DES1 gene product resulted in enhanced production of ceramide-NS. The engineered yeast strains can serve as hosts not only for providing a sustainable source of ceramide-NS but also for developing further systems to produce sphingosine-containing sphingolipids.

  1. Functional analysis of 150 deletion mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a systematic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entian, K D; Schuster, T; Hegemann, J H; Becher, D; Feldmann, H; Güldener, U; Götz, R; Hansen, M; Hollenberg, C P; Jansen, G; Kramer, W; Klein, S; Kötter, P; Kricke, J; Launhardt, H; Mannhaupt, G; Maierl, A; Meyer, P; Mewes, W; Munder, T; Niedenthal, R K; Ramezani Rad, M; Röhmer, A; Römer, A; Hinnen, A

    1999-12-01

    In a systematic approach to the study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes of unknown function, 150 deletion mutants were constructed (1 double, 149 single mutants) and phenotypically analysed. Twenty percent of all genes examined were essential. The viable deletion mutants were subjected to 20 different test systems, ranging from high throughput to highly specific test systems. Phenotypes were obtained for two-thirds of the mutants tested. During the course of this investigation, mutants for 26 of the genes were described by others. For 18 of these the reported data were in accordance with our results. Surprisingly, for seven genes, additional, unexpected phenotypes were found in our tests. This suggests that the type of analysis presented here provides a more complete description of gene function.

  2. 缺刻缘绿藻ω3脂肪酸去饱和酶基因(ω3FAD)在酿酒酵母中的低温诱导表达%Low-temperature-induced Expression of a ω3 Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene (ω3FAD)from Myrmecia incisa in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李慧; 欧阳珑玲; 周志刚

    2012-01-01

    ω3脂肪酸去饱和酶(fatty acid desaturase,FAD)能使藻类细胞产生一系列具有高附加值的ω3脂肪酸.在已克隆到缺刻缘绿藻(Myrmecia incisa Reisigl)的ω3FAD基因基础上,为进一步了解其功能,本研究首先利用反转录PCR(RT-PCR)技术,克隆其开放阅读框(open reading frame,ORF)片段,然后亚克隆到穿梭表达载体pYES2中,以构建重组酵母表达载体pY-ω3FAD;通过电穿孔法将该重组载体转入酿酒酵母(Saccharomyces cerevisiae)INVSc1菌株中,经筛选与序列验证得到含有pY-ω3FAD重组质粒的酵母转化株.在5℃,添加底物亚麻酸及半乳糖诱导表达,连续培养72 h,经脂肪酸甲酯的气相色谱分析及气相色谱-质谱联用证明,转目的基因的酵母能将外源添加的亚油酸在15位脱氢生成α-亚麻酸,表明ω3FAD具有△15脂肪酸去饱和作用的功能.在不同温度条件下诱导培养时,气相色谱结果显示,在30℃培养的转基因酵母中没有检测到α-亚麻酸;但在不高于25℃培养的转基因酵母中,发现ω3FAD能将外源添加的底物去饱和为α-亚麻酸,且随着温度的降低,其去饱和能力增强,5℃时的底物转化效率达到29.73%.将转目的基因酵母在5℃温度下诱导培养不同时间,结果显示,随着培养时间的增加,LA(linoleic acid,亚油酸)转化为α-亚麻酸的效率也提高,培养4d时其转化效率达到38.86%.该研究结果提示,缺刻缘绿藻ω3FAD基因编码的酶蛋白为一个低温诱导酶.缺刻缘绿藻ω3FAD基因之所以能在酵母细胞中被低温诱导表达,可能因为后者存在一个低温诱导的脂肪酸去饱和系统.%Omega 3 fatty acid desaturase (FAD) enables algae to produce a series species of ω3 fatty acids of high-valued quality. Based on the sequence of a ω3FAD gene cloned from Myrmecia incisa Reisigl., its open reading frame (ORF) was amplified by RT-PCR and sub-cloned into the shuttle vector pYES2 to generate the recombinant vector

  3. Common features and interesting differences in transcriptional responses to secretion stress in the fungi Trichoderma reesei and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suortti Tapani

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secretion stress is caused by compromised folding, modification or transport of proteins in the secretory pathway. In fungi, induction of genes in response to secretion stress is mediated mainly by the unfolded protein response (UPR pathway. This study aims at uncovering transcriptional responses occurring in the filamentous fungi Trichoderma reesei exposed to secretion stress and comparing these to those found in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results Chemostat cultures of T. reesei expressing human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA and batch bioreactor cultures treated with dithiothreitol (DTT to prevent correct protein folding were analysed with cDNA subtraction and cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP experiments. ESTs corresponding to 457 unique genes putatively induced under secretion stress were isolated and the expression pattern of 60 genes was confirmed by Northern analysis. Expression of these genes was also studied in a strain over-expressing inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IREI protein, a sensor for the UPR pathway. To compare the data with that of S. cerevisiae, published transcriptome profiling data on various stress responses in S. cerevisiae was reanalysed. The genes up-regulated in response to secretion stress included a large number of secretion related genes in both organisms. In addition, analysis of T. reesei revealed up regulation of the cpc1 transcription factor gene and nucleosomal genes. The induction of the cpcA and histone gene H4 were shown to be induced also in cultures of Aspergillus nidulans treated with DTT. Conclusion Analysis of the genes induced under secretion stress has revealed novel features in the stress response in T. reesei and in filamentous fungi. We have demonstrated that in addition to the previously rather well characterised induction of genes for many ER proteins or secretion related proteins also other types of responses exist.

  4. YPA: an integrated repository of promoter features in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Darby Tien-Hao; Huang, Cheng-Yi; Wu, Chi-Yeh; Wu, Wei-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the Yeast Promoter Atlas (YPA, http://ypa.ee.ncku.edu.tw/ or http://ypa.csbb.ntu.edu.tw/) database, which aims to collect comprehensive promoter features in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. YPA integrates nine kinds of promoter features including promoter sequences, genes' transcription boundaries-transcription start sites (TSSs), five prime untranslated regions (5'-UTRs) and three prime untranslated regions (3'UTRs), TATA boxes, transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), nucleosome occupancy, DNA bendability, transcription factor (TF) binding, TF knockout expression and TF-TF physical interaction. YPA is designed to present data in a unified manner as many important observations are revealed only when these promoter features are considered altogether. For example, DNA rigidity can prevent nucleosome packaging, thereby making TFBSs in the rigid DNA regions more accessible to TFs. Integrating nucleosome occupancy, DNA bendability, TF binding, TF knockout expression and TFBS data helps to identify which TFBS is actually functional. In YPA, various promoter features can be accessed in a centralized and organized platform. Researchers can easily view if the TFBSs in an interested promoter are occupied by nucleosomes or located in a rigid DNA segment and know if the expression of the downstream gene responds to the knockout of the corresponding TFs. Compared to other established yeast promoter databases, YPA collects not only TFBSs but also many other promoter features to help biologists study transcriptional regulation.

  5. Sulfate assimilation mediates tellurite reduction and toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosson, Lars-Göran; Logg, Katarina; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Sunnerhagen, Per; Käll, Mikael; Blomberg, Anders; Warringer, Jonas

    2010-10-01

    Despite a century of research and increasing environmental and human health concerns, the mechanistic basis of the toxicity of derivatives of the metalloid tellurium, Te, in particular the oxyanion tellurite, Te(IV), remains unsolved. Here, we provide an unbiased view of the mechanisms of tellurium metabolism in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring deviations in Te-related traits of a complete collection of gene knockout mutants. Reduction of Te(IV) and intracellular accumulation as metallic tellurium strongly correlated with loss of cellular fitness, suggesting that Te(IV) reduction and toxicity are causally linked. The sulfate assimilation pathway upstream of Met17, in particular, the sulfite reductase and its cofactor siroheme, was shown to be central to tellurite toxicity and its reduction to elemental tellurium. Gene knockout mutants with altered Te(IV) tolerance also showed a similar deviation in tolerance to both selenite and, interestingly, selenomethionine, suggesting that the toxicity of these agents stems from a common mechanism. We also show that Te(IV) reduction and toxicity in yeast is partially mediated via a mitochondrial respiratory mechanism that does not encompass the generation of substantial oxidative stress. The results reported here represent a robust base from which to attack the mechanistic details of Te(IV) toxicity and reduction in a eukaryotic organism.

  6. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuza Nogueira Moysés

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review.

  7. Investigation of autonomous cell cycle oscillation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Skov

    2007-01-01

    Autonome Oscillationer i kontinuert kultivering af Saccharomyces cerevisiae Udgangspunktet for dette Ph.d. projekt var at søge at forstå, hvad der gør det muligt at opnå multiple statiske tilstande ved kontinuert kultivering af Saccharomyces cerevisiae med glukose som begrænsende substrat...

  8. Potential immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae as heavy metal removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffar, Nur Izzati Abdul; Rahman, Nadhratul Nur Ain Abdul; Alrozi, Rasyidah; Senusi, Faraziehan; Chang, Siu Hua

    2015-05-01

    Biosorption of copper ion using treated and untreated immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae from aqueous solution was investigate in this study. S.cerevisiae has been choosing as biosorbent due to low cost, easy and continuously available from various industries. In this study, the ability of treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae in removing copper ion influence by the effect of pH solution, and initial concentration of copper ion with contact time. Besides, adsorption isotherm and kinetic model also studied. The result indicated that the copper ion uptake on treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae was increased with increasing of contact time and initial concentration of copper ion. The optimum pH for copper ion uptake on untreated and treated immobilized S.cerevisiae at 4 and 6. From the data obtained of copper ion uptake, the adsorption isotherm was fitted well by Freundlich model for treated immobilized S.cerevisiae and Langmuir model for untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae according to high correlation coefficient. Meanwhile, the pseudo second order was described as suitable model present according to high correlation coefficient. Since the application of biosorption process has been received more attention from numerous researchers as a potential process to be applied in the industry, future study will be conducted to investigate the potential of immobilized S.cerevisiae in continuous process.

  9. Functional expression of rat VPAC1 receptor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.K.; Tams, J.W.; Fahrenkrug, Jan;

    1999-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor; heterologous expression; membrane protein; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide; yeast mating factor-pre-pro *Ga-leader peptide......G protein-coupled receptor; heterologous expression; membrane protein; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide; yeast mating factor-pre-pro *Ga-leader peptide...

  10. Industrial PE-2 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: from alcoholic fermentation to the production of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Costa, Andrea; Nakayama, Darlan Gonçalves; Andrade, Letícia de Freitas; Catelli, Lucas Ferioli; Bassi, Ana Paula Guarnieri; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina; Henrique-Silva, Flavio

    2014-01-25

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most important microorganism used in the ethanol fermentation process. The PE-2 strain of this yeast is widely used to produce alcohol in Brazil due to its high fermentation capacity. The aim of the present study was to develop an expression system for recombinant proteins using the industrial PE-2 strain of S. cerevisiae during the alcoholic fermentation process. The protein chosen as a model for this system was CaneCPI-1, a cysteine peptidase inhibitor. A plasmid containing the CaneCPI-1 gene was constructed and yeast cells were transformed with the pYADE4_CaneCPI-1 construct. To evaluate the effect on fermentation ability, the transformed strain was used in the fermentation process with cell recycling. During the nine-hour fermentative cycles the transformed strain did not have its viability and fermentation ability affected. In the last cycle, when the fermentation lasted longer, the protein was expressed probably at the expense of ethanol once the sugars were exhausted. The recombinant protein was expressed in yeast cells, purified and submitted to assays of activity that demonstrated its functionality. Thus, the industrial PE-2 strain of S. cerevisiae can be used as a viable system for protein expression and to produce alcohol simultaneously. The findings of the present study demonstrate the possibility of producing recombinant proteins with biotechnological applications during the ethanol fermentation process.

  11. [Regulation of isoprenoid pathway for enhanced production of linalool in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingxue; Liu, Jidong; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2013-06-01

    Linalool is an important monoterpene, and widely used in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry. The low concentration in plants and the difficulties in extraction restrict its large scale production. Saccharomyces cerevisiae can provide the monoterpene precursor, geranyl diphosphate (GPP) through its endogenous isoprenoid pathway. Therefore, it could be used as the host for monoterpene production. However, the weak metabolic flux through the isoprenoid pathway leads to the insufficient supply of GPP, and results in low monoterpene productivity. In order to increase the metabolic flux, we constructed the integrated expression plasmid pRS305-tHMG1 and free expression plasmid pYLIS-IDI1 to enhance the expression levels of isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI1) and a truncated 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase gene (tHMG1). The two plasmids were separately transformed into S. cerevisiae CEN.PK2-1C, resulting in strains LS01 and LS02. The plasmid pYLIS-IDI1 was further transformed into strain LS01, resulting in strain LS03. GC-MS analysis showed that the linalool concentration was increased by 1.3 times and reached (127.71 +/- 7.68) microg/L. In conclusion, enhancement of the supply of GPP precursors through the regulation of isoprenoid pathway could increase the linalool production in S. cerevisiae.

  12. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of fatty acid-derived biofuels and chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runguphan, Weerawat; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-01-01

    As the serious effects of global climate change become apparent and access to fossil fuels becomes more limited, metabolic engineers and synthetic biologists are looking towards greener sources for transportation fuels. In recent years, microbial production of high-energy fuels by economically efficient bioprocesses has emerged as an attractive alternative to the traditional production of transportation fuels. Here, we engineered the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce fatty acid-derived biofuels and chemicals from simple sugars. Specifically, we overexpressed all three fatty acid biosynthesis genes, namely acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1), fatty acid synthase 1 (FAS1) and fatty acid synthase 2 (FAS2), in S. cerevisiae. When coupled to triacylglycerol (TAG) production, the engineered strain accumulated lipid to more than 17% of its dry cell weight, a four-fold improvement over the control strain. Understanding that TAG cannot be used directly as fuels, we also engineered S. cerevisiae to produce drop-in fuels and chemicals. Altering the terminal "converting enzyme" in the engineered strain led to the production of free fatty acids at a titer of approximately 400 mg/L, fatty alcohols at approximately 100mg/L and fatty acid ethyl esters (biodiesel) at approximately 5 mg/L directly from simple sugars. We envision that our approach will provide a scalable, controllable and economic route to this important class of chemicals.

  13. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of n-butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, EricJ.; Chan, Rossana; Prasad, Nilu; Myers, Samuel; Petzold, Christopher; Redding, Alyssa; Ouellet, Mario; Keasling, JayD.

    2008-11-25

    BackgroundIncreasing energy costs and environmental concerns have motivated engineering microbes for the production of ?second generation? biofuels that have better properties than ethanol.Results& ConclusionsSaccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered with an n-butanol biosynthetic pathway, in which isozymes from a number of different organisms (S. cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Ralstonia eutropha) were substituted for the Clostridial enzymes and their effect on n-butanol production was compared. By choosing the appropriate isozymes, we were able to improve production of n-butanol ten-fold to 2.5 mg/L. The most productive strains harbored the C. beijerinckii 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which uses NADH as a co-factor, rather than the R. eutropha isozyme, which uses NADPH, and the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase from S. cerevisiae or E. coli rather than that from R. eutropha. Surprisingly, expression of the genes encoding the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase from C. beijerinckii (bcd and etfAB) did not improve butanol production significantly as previously reported in E. coli. Using metabolite analysis, we were able to determine which steps in the n-butanol biosynthetic pathway were the most problematic and ripe for future improvement.

  14. Comparative proteomics analysis of engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced biofuel precursor production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Tang

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was metabolically modified for enhanced biofuel precursor production by knocking out genes encoding mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase and over-expression of a heterologous ATP-citrate lyase. A comparative iTRAQ-coupled 2D LC-MS/MS analysis was performed to obtain a global overview of ubiquitous protein expression changes in S. cerevisiae engineered strains. More than 300 proteins were identified. Among these proteins, 37 were found differentially expressed in engineered strains and they were classified into specific categories based on their enzyme functions. Most of the proteins involved in glycolytic and pyruvate branch-point pathways were found to be up-regulated and the proteins involved in respiration and glyoxylate pathway were however found to be down-regulated in engineered strains. Moreover, the metabolic modification of S. cerevisiae cells resulted in a number of up-regulated proteins involved in stress response and differentially expressed proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and protein biosynthesis pathways. These LC-MS/MS based proteomics analysis results not only offered extensive information in identifying potential protein-protein interactions, signal pathways and ubiquitous cellular changes elicited by the engineered pathways, but also provided a meaningful biological information platform serving further modification of yeast cells for enhanced biofuel production.

  15. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of n-butanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Samuel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing energy costs and environmental concerns have motivated engineering microbes for the production of "second generation" biofuels that have better properties than ethanol. Results and conclusion Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered with an n-butanol biosynthetic pathway, in which isozymes from a number of different organisms (S. cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Ralstonia eutropha were substituted for the Clostridial enzymes and their effect on n-butanol production was compared. By choosing the appropriate isozymes, we were able to improve production of n-butanol ten-fold to 2.5 mg/L. The most productive strains harbored the C. beijerinckii 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which uses NADH as a co-factor, rather than the R. eutropha isozyme, which uses NADPH, and the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase from S. cerevisiae or E. coli rather than that from R. eutropha. Surprisingly, expression of the genes encoding the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase from C. beijerinckii (bcd and etfAB did not improve butanol production significantly as previously reported in E. coli. Using metabolite analysis, we were able to determine which steps in the n-butanol biosynthetic pathway were the most problematic and ripe for future improvement.

  16. L-histidine inhibits biofilm formation and FLO11-associated phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Zeidan, Marc; Zara, Giacomo; Viti, Carlo; Decorosi, Francesca; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Budroni, Marilena; Giovannetti, Luciana; Zara, Severino

    2014-01-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an innate diversity of Flo11p which codes for a highly hydrophobic and anionic cell-wall glycoprotein with a fundamental role in biofilm formation. In this study, 380 nitrogen compounds were administered to three S. cerevisiae flor strains handling Flo11p alleles with different expression levels. S. cerevisiae strain S288c was used as the reference strain as it cannot produce Flo11p. The flor strains generally metabolized amino acids and dipeptides as the sole nitrogen source, although with some exceptions regarding L-histidine and histidine containing dipeptides. L-histidine completely inhibited growth and its effect on viability was inversely related to Flo11p expression. Accordingly, L-histidine did not affect the viability of the Δflo11 and S288c strains. Also, L-histidine dramatically decreased air-liquid biofilm formation and adhesion to polystyrene of the flor yeasts with no effect on the transcription level of the Flo11p gene. Moreover, L-histidine modified the chitin and glycans content on the cell-wall of flor yeasts. These findings reveal a novel biological activity of L-histidine in controlling the multicellular behavior of yeasts [corrected].

  17. Molecular characterization of new natural hybrids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii in brewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Sara S; Barrio, Eladio; Querol, Amparo

    2008-04-01

    We analyzed 24 beer strains from different origins by using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of different gene regions, and six new Saccharomyces cerevisiae x Saccharomyces kudriavzevii hybrid strains were found. This is the first time that the presence in brewing of this new type of hybrid has been demonstrated. From the comparative molecular analysis of these natural hybrids with respect to those described in wines, it can be concluded that these originated from at least two hybridization events and that some brewing hybrids share a common origin with wine hybrids. Finally, a reduction of the S. kudriavzevii fraction of the hybrid genomes was observed, but this reduction was found to vary among hybrids regardless of the source of isolation. The fact that 25% of the strains analyzed were discovered to be S. cerevisiae x S. kudriavzevii hybrids suggests that an important fraction of brewing strains classified as S. cerevisiae may correspond to hybrids, contributing to the complexity of Saccharomyces diversity in brewing environments. The present study raises new questions about the prevalence of these new hybrids in brewing as well as their contribution to the properties of the final product.

  18. Recombination-stable multimeric green fluorescent protein for characterization of weak promoter outputs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Knuf, Christoph; Förster, Jochen; Sommer, Morten O A

    2015-12-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) are widely used for visualization of proteins to track localization and expression dynamics. However, phenotypically important processes can operate at too low expression levels for routine detection, i.e. be overshadowed by autofluorescence noise. While GFP functions well in translational fusions, the use of tandem GFPs to amplify fluorescence signals is currently avoided in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and many other microorganisms due to the risk of loop-out by direct-repeat recombination. We increased GFP fluorescence by translationally fusing three different GFP variants, yeast-enhanced GFP, GFP+ and superfolder GFP to yield a sequence-diverged triple GFP molecule 3vGFP with 74-84% internal repeat identity. Unlike a single GFP, the brightness of 3vGFP allowed characterization of a weak promoter in S. cerevisiae. Utilizing 3vGFP, we further engineered a less leaky Cu(2+)-inducible promoter based on CUP1. The basal expression level of the new promoter was approximately 61% below the wild-type CUP1 promoter, thus expanding the absolute range of Cu(2+)-based gene control. The stability of 3vGFP towards direct-repeat recombination was assayed in S. cerevisiae cultured for 25 generations under strong and slightly toxic expression after which only limited reduction in fluorescence was detectable. Such non-recombinogenic GFPs can help quantify intracellular responses operating a low copy number in recombination-prone organisms.

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts isolated from fermentations of traditional beverages unveils different adaptive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Clara; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Chiva, Rosana; Guillamón, José Manuel; Barrio, Eladio; Querol, Amparo

    2014-02-03

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are the main responsible of most traditional alcohol fermentation processes performed around the world. The characteristics of the diverse traditional fermentations are very different according to their sugar composition, temperature, pH or nitrogen sources. During the adaptation of yeasts to these new environments provided by human activity, their different compositions likely imposed selective pressures that shaped the S. cerevisiae genome. In the present work we performed a comparative genomic hybridization analysis to explore the genome constitution of six S. cerevisiae strains isolated from different traditional fermentations (masato, mescal, cachaça, sake, wine, and sherry wine) and one natural strain. Our results indicate that gene copy numbers (GCN) are very variable among strains, and most of them were observed in subtelomeric and intrachromosomal gene families involved in metabolic functions related to cellular homeostasis, cell-to-cell interactions, and transport of solutes such as ions, sugars and metals. In many cases, these genes are not essential but they can play an important role in the adaptation to new environmental conditions. However, the most interesting result is the association observed between GCN changes in genes involved in the nitrogen metabolism and the availability of nitrogen sources in the different traditional fermentation processes. This is clearly illustrated by the differences in copy numbers not only in gene PUT1, the main player in the assimilation of proline as a nitrogen source, but also in CAR2, involved in arginine catabolism. Strains isolated from fermentations where proline is more abundant contain a higher number of PUT1 copies and are more efficient in assimilating this amino acid as a nitrogen source. A strain isolated from sugarcane juice fermentations, in which arginine is a rare amino acid, contains less copies of CAR2 and showed low efficiency in arginine assimilation. These

  20. Efficiency Analysis and Mechanism Insight of that Whole-Cell Biocatalytic Production of Melibiose from Raffinose with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yingbiao; Zhu, Yueming; Dai, Longhai; Men, Yan; Wu, Jinhai; Zhang, Juankun; Sun, Yuanxia

    2017-01-01

    Melibiose is widely used as a functional carbohydrate. Whole-cell biocatalytic production of melibiose from raffinose could reduce its cost. However, characteristics of strains for whole-cell biocatalysis and mechanism of such process are unclear. We compared three different Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (liquor, wine, and baker's yeasts) in terms of concentration variations of substrate (raffinose), target product (melibiose), and by-products (fructose and galactose) in whole-cell biocatalysis process. Distinct difference was observed in whole-cell catalytic efficiency among three strains. Furthermore, activities of key enzymes (invertase, α-galactosidase, and fructose transporter) involved in process and expression levels of their coding genes (suc2, mel1, and fsy1) were investigated. Conservation of key genes in S. cerevisiae strains was also evaluated. Results show that whole-cell catalytic efficiency of S. cerevisiae in the raffinose substrate was closely related to activity of key enzymes and expression of their coding genes. Finally, we summarized characteristics of producing strain that offered advantages, as well as contributions of key genes to excellent strains. Furthermore, we presented a dynamic mechanism model to achieve some mechanism insight for this whole-cell biocatalytic process. This pioneering study should contribute to improvement of whole-cell biocatalytic production of melibiose from raffinose.

  1. Inhibition effect of expression of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase from rice on synthesis of Glutathione in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Yu-zhuo; DU Ye-jie; ZU Yuan-gang; AN Zhi-gang

    2008-01-01

    The expression of a rice Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulated by GAPDH promoter, involved in the inhibition of endogenous Glutathione (GSH) synthesis, and the competitive expression was detected by constructing the expression vector transferred Cu/Zn-SOD gene into wild-type S. Cerevisiae. Transcription and expression of the Cu/Zn-SOD gene in S. Cerevisiawere were confirmed by northern blot and SDS-PAGE, respectively, and activity of the Cu/Zn-SOD from crude extracts was enzymatically detected based on the effect of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) after running a native polyacrylamide gel. The GSH synthesis was also tested by DTNB (5, 5′-Dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid)) method. Results showed that GSH synthesis was evidently suppressed by the expression of Cu/Zn-SOD gene in both control and heat shock strains. It implied that the expression of the Cu/Zn-SOD gene in S. Cerevisiae has more potential facility in response to oxidative exposure than that of endogenous GSH, although Cu/Zn-SOD and GSH were both contributed to the function of oxygen radical oxidoreduction.

  2. In vitro screening of probiotic properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii and food-borne Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Aa Kuhle, Alis; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Jespersen, Lene

    2005-01-01

    strain when the cells were pre- and coincubated with S. cerevisiae var. boulardii even though this yeast strain was low adhesive (5.4%), suggesting that adhesion is not a mandatory prerequisite for such a probiotic effect. A strain of S. cerevisiae isolated from West African sorghum beer exerted similar...

  3. Correlation between Low Temperature Adaptation and Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estéfani García-Rios

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many factors, such as must composition, juice clarification, fermentation temperature or inoculated yeast strain, strongly affect the alcoholic fermentation and aromatic profile of wine. As fermentation temperature is effectively controlled by the wine industry, low-temperature fermentation (10-15 ºC is becoming more prevalent in order to produce white and rosé wines with more pronounced aromatic profiles. Elucidating the response to cold in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is of paramount importance for the selection or genetic improvement of wine strains. Previous research has shown the strong implication of oxidative stress response in adaptation to low temperature during the fermentation process. Here we aimed first to quantify the correlation between recovery after shock with different oxidants and cold, and then to detect the key genes involved in cold adaptation that belong to sulfur assimilation, peroxiredoxins, glutathione-glutaredoxins and thioredoxins pathways. To do so, we analyzed the growth of knockouts from the EUROSCARF collection S. cerevisiae BY4743 strain at low and optimal temperatures. The growth rate of these knockouts, compared with the control, enabled us to identify the genes involved, which were also deleted and validated as key genes in the background of two commercial wine strains with a divergent phenotype in their low-temperature growth. We identified three genes, AHP1, MUP1 and URM1, whose deletion strongly impaired low-temperature growth.

  4. Correlation between Low Temperature Adaptation and Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ríos, Estéfani; Ramos-Alonso, Lucía; Guillamón, José M

    2016-01-01

    Many factors, such as must composition, juice clarification, fermentation temperature, or inoculated yeast strain, strongly affect the alcoholic fermentation and aromatic profile of wine. As fermentation temperature is effectively controlled by the wine industry, low-temperature fermentation (10-15°C) is becoming more prevalent in order to produce white and "rosé" wines with more pronounced aromatic profiles. Elucidating the response to cold in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is of paramount importance for the selection or genetic improvement of wine strains. Previous research has shown the strong implication of oxidative stress response in adaptation to low temperature during the fermentation process. Here we aimed first to quantify the correlation between recovery after shock with different oxidants and cold, and then to detect the key genes involved in cold adaptation that belong to sulfur assimilation, peroxiredoxins, glutathione-glutaredoxins, and thioredoxins pathways. To do so, we analyzed the growth of knockouts from the EUROSCARF collection S. cerevisiae BY4743 strain at low and optimal temperatures. The growth rate of these knockouts, compared with the control, enabled us to identify the genes involved, which were also deleted and validated as key genes in the background of two commercial wine strains with a divergent phenotype in their low-temperature growth. We identified three genes, AHP1, MUP1, and URM1, whose deletion strongly impaired low-temperature growth.

  5. Heterologous production of non-ribosomal peptide LLD-ACV in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewers, Verena; Chen, Xiao; Huang, Le; Zhang, Jie; Nielsen, Jens

    2009-11-01

    Non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) are a diverse family of secondary metabolites with a broad range of biological activities. We started to develop an eukaryotic microbial platform based on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for heterologous production of NRPs using delta-(l-alpha-aminoadipyl)-l-cysteinyl-d-valine (ACV) as a model NRP. The Penicillium chrysogenum gene pcbAB encoding ACV synthetase was expressed in S. cerevisiae from a high-copy plasmid together with phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase) encoding genes from Aspergillus nidulans, P. chrysogenum and Bacillus subtilis, and in all the three cases production of ACV was observed. To improve ACV synthesis, several factors were investigated. Codon optimization of the 5' end of pcbAB did not significantly increase ACV production. However, a 30-fold enhancement was achieved by lowering the cultivation temperature from 30 to 20 degrees C. When ACVS and PPTase encoding genes were integrated into the yeast genome, a 6-fold decrease in ACV production was observed indicating that gene copy number was one of the rate-limiting factors for ACV production in yeast.

  6. The genetic basis of natural variation in oenological traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Salinas

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main microorganism responsible for wine alcoholic fermentation. The oenological phenotypes resulting from fermentation, such as the production of acetic acid, glycerol, and residual sugar concentration are regulated by multiple genes and vary quantitatively between different strain backgrounds. With the aim of identifying the quantitative trait loci (QTLs that regulate oenological phenotypes, we performed linkage analysis using three crosses between highly diverged S. cerevisiae strains. Segregants from each cross were used as starter cultures for 20-day fermentations, in synthetic wine must, to simulate actual winemaking conditions. Linkage analysis on phenotypes of primary industrial importance resulted in the mapping of 18 QTLs. We tested 18 candidate genes, by reciprocal hemizygosity, for their contribution to the observed phenotypic variation, and validated five genes and the chromosome II right subtelomeric region. We observed that genes involved in mitochondrial metabolism, sugar transport, nitrogen metabolism, and the uncharacterized ORF YJR030W explained most of the phenotypic variation in oenological traits. Furthermore, we experimentally validated an exceptionally strong epistatic interaction resulting in high level of succinic acid between the Sake FLX1 allele and the Wine/European MDH2 allele. Overall, our work demonstrates the complex genetic basis underlying wine traits, including natural allelic variation, antagonistic linked QTLs and complex epistatic interactions between alleles from strains with different evolutionary histories.

  7. Isocitrate lyase localisation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, R S; Herrero, P; Ordiz, I; Angeles del Brio, M; Moreno, F

    1997-10-01

    The isocitrate lyase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was only located in the cell cytoplasm. This protein was found not to be associated with cell organelles, even under growth conditions that induce peroxisome proliferation. This conclusion is supported by experiments carried out by damaging the protoplast plasma membrane with DEAE-dextran, by differential centrifugation of osmotically lysed protoplast and by using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of Aequorea victoria as a reporter fusion tag to localise the subcellular compartment to which isocitrate lyase is targeted.

  8. A genome-wide deletion mutant screen identifies pathways affected by nickel sulfate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Wei

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The understanding of the biological function, regulation, and cellular interactions of the yeast genome and proteome, along with the high conservation in gene function found between yeast genes and their human homologues, has allowed for Saccharomyces cerevisiae to be used as a model organism to deduce biological processes in human cells. Here, we have completed a systematic screen of the entire set of 4,733 haploid S. cerevisiae gene deletion strains (the entire set of nonessential genes for this organism to identify gene products that modulate cellular toxicity to nickel sulfate (NiSO4. Results We have identified 149 genes whose gene deletion causes sensitivity to NiSO4 and 119 genes whose gene deletion confers resistance. Pathways analysis with proteins whose absence renders cells sensitive and resistant to nickel identified a wide range of cellular processes engaged in the toxicity of S. cerevisiae to NiSO4. Functional categories overrepresented with proteins whose absence renders cells sensitive to NiSO4 include homeostasis of protons, cation transport, transport ATPases, endocytosis, siderophore-iron transport, homeostasis of metal ions, and the diphthamide biosynthesis pathway. Functional categories overrepresented with proteins whose absence renders cells resistant to nickel include functioning and transport of the vacuole and lysosome, protein targeting, sorting, and translocation, intra-Golgi transport, regulation of C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism, transcriptional repression, and chromosome segregation/division. Interactome analysis mapped seven nickel toxicity modulating and ten nickel-resistance networks. Additionally, we studied the degree of sensitivity or resistance of the 111 nickel-sensitive and 72 -resistant strains whose gene deletion product has a similar protein in human cells. Conclusion We have undertaken a whole genome approach in order to further understand the mechanism(s regulating the cell

  9. Transcriptional responses to glucose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains lacking a functional protein kinase A

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    Livas Daniela

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pattern of gene transcripts in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is strongly affected by the presence of glucose. An increased activity of protein kinase A (PKA, triggered by a rise in the intracellular concentration of cAMP, can account for many of the effects of glucose on transcription. In S. cerevisiae three genes, TPK1, TPK2, and TPK3, encode catalytic subunits of PKA. The lack of viability of tpk1 tpk2 tpk3 triple mutants may be suppressed by mutations such as yak1 or msn2/msn4. To investigate the requirement for PKA in glucose control of gene expression, we have compared the effects of glucose on global transcription in a wild-type strain and in two strains devoid of PKA activity, tpk1 tpk2 tpk3 yak1 and tpk1 tpk2 tpk3 msn2 msn4. Results We have identified different classes of genes that can be induced -or repressed- by glucose in the absence of PKA. Representative examples are genes required for glucose utilization and genes involved in the metabolism of other carbon sources, respectively. Among the genes responding to glucose in strains devoid of PKA some are also controlled by a redundant signalling pathway involving PKA activation, while others are not affected when PKA is activated through an increase in cAMP concentration. On the other hand, among genes that do not respond to glucose in the absence of PKA, some give a full response to increased cAMP levels, even in the absence of glucose, while others appear to require the cooperation of different signalling pathways. We show also that, for a number of genes controlled by glucose through a PKA-dependent pathway, the changes in mRNA levels are transient. We found that, in cells grown in gluconeogenic conditions, expression of a small number of genes, mainly connected with the response to stress, is reduced in the strains lacking PKA. Conclusions In S. cerevisiae, the transcriptional responses to glucose are triggered by a variety of pathways, alone or in

  10. Ixr1p and the control of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae hypoxic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizoso-Vázquez, Angel; Lamas-Maceiras, Mónica; Becerra, Manuel; González-Siso, M Isabel; Rodríguez-Belmonte, Esther; Cerdán, M Esperanza

    2012-04-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adaptation to hypoxia/anaerobiosis requires the transcriptional induction or derepression of multiple genes organized in regulons controlled by specific transcriptional regulators. Ixr1p is a transcriptional regulatory factor that causes aerobic repression of several hypoxic genes (COX5B, TIR1, and HEM13) and also the activation of HEM13 during hypoxic growth. Analysis of the transcriptome of the wild-type strain BY4741 and its isogenic derivative Δixr1, grown in aerobic and hypoxic conditions, reveals differential regulation of genes related not only to the hypoxic and oxidative stress responses but also to the re-adaptation of catabolic and anabolic fluxes in response to oxygen limitation. The function of Ixr1p in the transcriptional regulation of genes from the sulfate assimilation pathway and other pathways producing α-keto acids is of biotechnological importance for industries based on yeast-derived fermentation products.

  11. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  12. DNA Topoisomerases maintain promoters in a state competent for transcriptional activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Jakob Madsen Pedersen

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of DNA topoisomerases in transcription, we have studied global gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient for topoisomerases I and II and performed single-gene analyses to support our findings. The genome-wide studies show a general transcriptional down-regulation upon lack of the enzymes, which correlates with gene activity but not gene length. Furthermore, our data reveal a distinct subclass of genes with a strong requirement for topoisomerases. These genes are characterized by high transcriptional plasticity, chromatin regulation, TATA box presence, and enrichment of a nucleosome at a critical position in the promoter region, in line with a repressible/inducible mode of regulation. Single-gene studies with a range of genes belonging to this group demonstrate that topoisomerases play an important role during activation of these genes. Subsequent in-depth analysis of the inducible PHO5 gene reveals that topoisomerases are essential for binding of the Pho4p transcription factor to the PHO5 promoter, which is required for promoter nucleosome removal during activation. In contrast, topoisomerases are dispensable for constitutive transcription initiation and elongation of PHO5, as well as the nuclear entrance of Pho4p. Finally, we provide evidence that topoisomerases are required to maintain the PHO5 promoter in a superhelical state, which is competent for proper activation. In conclusion, our results reveal a hitherto unknown function of topoisomerases during transcriptional activation of genes with a repressible/inducible mode of regulation.

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces yeasts in grape varieties of the São Francisco Valley

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    Camila M.P.B.S. de Ponzzes-Gomes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this work was to characterise indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in the naturally fermented juice of grape varieties Cabernet Sauvignon, Grenache, Tempranillo, Sauvignon Blanc and Verdejo used in the São Francisco River Valley, northeastern Brazil. In this study, 155 S. cerevisiae and 60 non-Saccharomyces yeasts were isolated and identified using physiological tests and sequencing of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene. Among the non-Saccharomyces species, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was the most common species, followed by Pichia kudriavzevii, Candida parapsilosis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Kloeckera apis, P. manshurica, C. orthopsilosis and C. zemplinina. The population counts of these yeasts ranged among 1.0 to 19 x 10(5 cfu/mL. A total of 155 isolates of S. cerevisiae were compared by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis, and five molecular mitochondrial DNA restriction profiles were detected. Indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from grapes of the São Francisco Valley can be further tested as potential starters for wine production.

  14. A dual approach for improving homogeneity of a human-type N-glycan structure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piirainen, Mari A; Boer, Harry; de Ruijter, Jorg C; Frey, Alexander D

    2016-04-01

    N-glycosylation is an important feature of therapeutic and other industrially relevant proteins, and engineering of the N-glycosylation pathway provides opportunities for developing alternative, non-mammalian glycoprotein expression systems. Among yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most established host organism used in therapeutic protein production and therefore an interesting host for glycoengineering. In this work, we present further improvements in the humanization of the N-glycans in a recently developed S. cerevisiae strain. In this strain, a tailored trimannosyl lipid-linked oligosaccharide is formed and transferred to the protein, followed by complex-type glycan formation by Golgi apparatus-targeted human N-acetylglucosamine transferases. We improved the glycan pattern of the glycoengineered strain both in terms of glycoform homogeneity and the efficiency of complex-type glycosylation. Most of the interfering structures present in the glycoengineered strain were eliminated by deletion of the MNN1 gene. The relative abundance of the complex-type target glycan was increased by the expression of a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine transporter from Kluyveromyces lactis, indicating that the import of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine into the Golgi apparatus is a limiting factor for efficient complex-type N-glycosylation in S. cerevisiae. By a combination of the MNN1 deletion and the expression of a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine transporter, a strain forming complex-type glycans with a significantly improved homogeneity was obtained. Our results represent a further step towards obtaining humanized glycoproteins with a high homogeneity in S. cerevisiae.

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces yeasts in grape varieties of the São Francisco Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ponzzes-Gomes, Camila M.P.B.S.; de Mélo, Dângelly L.F.M.; Santana, Caroline A.; Pereira, Giuliano E.; Mendonça, Michelle O.C.; Gomes, Fátima C.O.; Oliveira, Evelyn S.; Barbosa, Antonio M.; Trindade, Rita C.; Rosa, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this work was to characterise indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in the naturally fermented juice of grape varieties Cabernet Sauvignon, Grenache, Tempranillo, Sauvignon Blanc and Verdejo used in the São Francisco River Valley, northeastern Brazil. In this study, 155 S. cerevisiae and 60 non-Saccharomyces yeasts were isolated and identified using physiological tests and sequencing of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene. Among the non-Saccharomyces species, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was the most common species, followed by Pichia kudriavzevii, Candida parapsilosis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Kloeckera apis, P. manshurica, C. orthopsilosis and C. zemplinina. The population counts of these yeasts ranged among 1.0 to 19 × 105 cfu/mL. A total of 155 isolates of S. cerevisiae were compared by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis, and five molecular mitochondrial DNA restriction profiles were detected. Indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from grapes of the São Francisco Valley can be further tested as potential starters for wine production. PMID:25242923

  16. The impact of respiration and oxidative stress response on recombinant α-amylase production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez, José L.; Meza, Eugenio; Petranovic, Dina

    2016-01-01

    to purify a secreted product. However, recombinant production at high rates represents a significant metabolic burden for the yeast cells, which results in oxidative stress and ultimately affects the protein production capacity. Here we describe a method to reduce the overall oxidative stress......Studying protein production is important for fundamental research on cell biology and applied research for biotechnology. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive workhorse for production of recombinant proteins as it does not secrete many endogenous proteins and it is therefore easy...... by overexpressing the endogenous HAP1 gene in a S. cerevisiae strain overproducing recombinant α-amylase. We demonstrate how Hap1p can activate a set of oxidative stress response genes and meanwhile contribute to increase the metabolic rate of the yeast strains, therefore mitigating the negative effect of the ROS...

  17. Carnitine uptake by AGP2 in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is dependent on Hog1 MAP kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyoung; Lee, Boyoung; Shin, Dongjin; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Bahk, Jeong Dong; Lim, Chae Oh; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2002-06-30

    The AGP2 gene encodes a plasma membrane carnitine transporter in S. cerevisiae. Here, we report the identification of AGP2 as an osmotic stress response gene. AGP2 was isolated from mTn3 tagged mutants that contained in-frame fusions with lacZ. The expression of AGP2 was down-regulated by osmotic stresses, including NaCl, sorbitol, and KCI. We also found that carnitine uptake was inhibited by NaCl. In the ssk1delta stelldelta double-mutant strain, the expression of AGP2 and the uptake of carnitine were greatly reduced compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, carnitine uptake was inhibited by the constitutive expression of PBS2, which encodes a MAPKK that activates Hog1. We concluded, therefore, that the HOG pathway plays an important role in the regulation of carnitine uptake in S. cerevisiae.

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae decreases inflammatory responses induced by F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Galliano; Meurens, François; Berri, Mustapha; Chevaleyre, Claire; Melo, Sandrine; Auclair, Eric; Salmon, Henri

    2011-05-15

    Probiotic yeasts may provide protection against intestinal inflammation induced by enteric pathogens. In piglets, infection with F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) leads to inflammation, diarrhea and intestinal damage. In this study, we investigated whether the yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc, strain CNCM I-3856) and S. cerevisiae variety boulardii (Sb, strain CNCM I-3799) decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in intestinal epithelial IPI-2I cells cultured with F4+ ETEC. Results showed that viable Sc inhibited the ETEC-induced TNF-α gene expression whereas Sb did not. In contrast, killed Sc failed to inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. This inhibition was dependent on secreted soluble factors. Sc culture supernatant decreased the TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, CXCL2 and CCL20 ETEC-induced mRNA. Furthermore, Sc culture supernatant filtrated fraction yeast strains onto inflammation.

  19. Production of 2,3-butanediol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by in silico aided metabolic engineering

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    Ng Chiam Yu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 2,3-Butanediol is a chemical compound of increasing interest due to its wide applications. It can be synthesized via mixed acid fermentation of pathogenic bacteria such as Enterobacter aerogenes and Klebsiella oxytoca. The non-pathogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae possesses three different 2,3-butanediol biosynthetic pathways, but produces minute amount of 2,3-butanediol. Hence, we attempted to engineer S. cerevisiae strain to enhance 2,3-butanediol production. Results We first identified gene deletion strategy by performing in silico genome-scale metabolic analysis. Based on the best in silico strategy, in which disruption of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH pathway is required, we then constructed gene deletion mutant strains and performed batch cultivation of the strains. Deletion of three ADH genes, ADH1, ADH3 and ADH5, increased 2,3-butanediol production by 55-fold under microaerobic condition. However, overproduction of glycerol was observed in this triple deletion strain. Additional rational design to reduce glycerol production by GPD2 deletion altered the carbon fluxes back to ethanol and significantly reduced 2,3-butanediol production. Deletion of ALD6 reduced acetate production in strains lacking major ADH isozymes, but it did not favor 2,3-butanediol production. Finally, we introduced 2,3-butanediol biosynthetic pathway from Bacillus subtilis and E. aerogenes to the engineered strain and successfully increased titer and yield. Highest 2,3-butanediol titer (2.29 g·l-1 and yield (0.113 g·g-1 were achieved by Δadh1 Δadh3 Δadh5 strain under anaerobic condition. Conclusions With the aid of in silico metabolic engineering, we have successfully designed and constructed S. cerevisiae strains with improved 2,3-butanediol production.

  20. Construction of lycopene-overproducing Saccharomyces cerevisiae by combining directed evolution and metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wenping; Lv, Xiaomei; Ye, Lidan; Zhou, Pingping; Yu, Hongwei

    2015-07-01

    Improved supply of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) is often considered as a typical strategy for engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae towards efficient terpenoid production. However, in the engineered strains with enhanced precursor supply, the production of the target metabolite is often impeded by insufficient capacity of the heterologous terpenoid pathways, which limits further conversion of FPP. Here, we tried to assemble an unimpeded biosynthesis pathway by combining directed evolution and metabolic engineering in S. cerevisiae for lycopene-overproduction. First, the catalytic ability of phytoene syntheses from different sources was investigated based on lycopene accumulation. Particularly, the lycopene cyclase function of the bifunctional enzyme CrtYB from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous was inactivated by deletion of functional domain and directed evolution to obtain mutants with solely phytoene synthase function. Coexpression of the resulting CrtYB11M mutant along with the CrtE and CrtI genes from X. dendrorhous, and the tHMG1 gene from S. cerevisiae led to production of 4.47 mg/g DCW (Dry cell weight) of lycopene and 25.66 mg/g DCW of the by-product squalene. To further increase the FPP competitiveness of the lycopene synthesis pathway, we tried to enhance the catalytic performance of CrtE by directed evolution and created a series of pathway variants by varying the copy number of Crt genes. Finally, fed-batch fermentation was conducted for the diploid strain YXWPD-14 resulting in accumulation of 1.61 g/L (24.41 mg/g DCW) of lycopene, meanwhile, the by-production of squalene was reduced to below 1 mg/g DCW.

  1. Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to cadmium stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Luciana Mara Costa; Ribeiro, Frederico Haddad; Neves, Maria Jose [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: luamatu@uol.com.br; Porto, Barbara Abranches Araujo; Amaral, Angela M.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Ativacao Neutronica], e-mail: menezes@cdtn.br; Rosa, Carlos Augusto [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia], e-mail: carlrosa@icb.ufmg

    2009-07-01

    The intensification of industrial activity has been greatly contributing with the increase of heavy metals in the environment. Among these heavy metals, cadmium becomes a serious pervasive environmental pollutant. The cadmium is a heavy metal with no biological function, very toxic and carcinogenic at low concentrations. The toxicity of cadmium and several other metals can be mainly attributed to the multiplicity of coordination complexes and clusters that they can form. Some aspects of the cellular response to cadmium were extensively investigated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The primary site of interaction between many toxic metals and microbial cells is the plasma membrane. Plasma-membrane permeabilisation has been reported in a variety of microorganisms following cadmium exposure, and is considered one mechanism of cadmium toxicity in the yeast. In this work, using the yeast strain S. cerevisiae W303-WT, we have investigated the relationships between Cd uptake and release of cellular metal ions (K{sup +} and Na{sup +}) using neutron activation technique. The neutron activation was an easy, rapid and suitable technique for doing these metal determinations on yeast cells; was observed the change in morphology of the strains during the process of Cd accumulation, these alterations were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) during incorporation of cadmium. (author)

  2. Interactions between Drosophila and its natural yeast symbionts—Is Saccharomyces cerevisiae a good model for studying the fly-yeast relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Hoang

    2015-08-01

    preference of D. melanogaster when given the choice between a naturally associated yeast and S. cerevisiae. We do not find a correlation between preferred yeasts and those that persist in the intestine. Notably, in no instances is S. cerevisiae preferred over the naturally associated strains. Overall, our results show that D. melanogaster-yeast interactions are more complex than might be revealed in experiments that use only S. cerevisiae. We propose that future research utilize other yeasts, and especially those that are naturally associated with Drosophila, to more fully understand the role of yeasts in Drosophila biology. Since the genetic basis of host–microbe interactions is shared across taxa and since many of these genes are initially discovered in D. melanogaster, a more realistic fly-yeast model system will benefit our understanding of host–microbe interactions throughout the animal kingdom.

  3. Interactions between Drosophila and its natural yeast symbionts-Is Saccharomyces cerevisiae a good model for studying the fly-yeast relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Don; Kopp, Artyom; Chandler, James Angus

    2015-01-01

    . melanogaster when given the choice between a naturally associated yeast and S. cerevisiae. We do not find a correlation between preferred yeasts and those that persist in the intestine. Notably, in no instances is S. cerevisiae preferred over the naturally associated strains. Overall, our results show that D. melanogaster-yeast interactions are more complex than might be revealed in experiments that use only S. cerevisiae. We propose that future research utilize other yeasts, and especially those that are naturally associated with Drosophila, to more fully understand the role of yeasts in Drosophila biology. Since the genetic basis of host-microbe interactions is shared across taxa and since many of these genes are initially discovered in D. melanogaster, a more realistic fly-yeast model system will benefit our understanding of host-microbe interactions throughout the animal kingdom.

  4. Biochemical analysis of essential components involved in mitochondrial and cytosolic iron-sulfur protein biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Urzica, Eugen

    2007-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe/S) clusters are inorganic cofactors of many proteins found in nearly all prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Fe/S proteins play important roles in different cellular processes, such as electron transport, enzyme catalysis or gene regulation. Eukaryotes contain Fe/S proteins in mitochondria, chloroplasts, cytosol and nucleus. In S. cerevisiae 3 different machineries cooperate to synthesise Fe/S proteins. ...

  5. Physiological and genetic analysis of the carbon regulation of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Coschigano, P W; Miller, S. M; Magasanik, B

    1991-01-01

    We found that cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an elevated level of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH; encoded by the GDH2 gene) when grown with a nonfermentable carbon source or with limiting amounts of glucose, even in the presence of the repressing nitrogen source glutamine. This regulation was found to be transcriptional, and an upstream activation site (GDH2 UASc) sufficient for activation of transcription during respiratory growth conditions was identified. This U...

  6. A delay in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle that is induced by a dicentric chromosome and dependent upon mitotic checkpoints.

    OpenAIRE

    Neff, M. W.; Burke, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Dicentric chromosomes are genetically unstable and depress the rate of cell division in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have characterized the effects of a conditionally dicentric chromosome on the cell division cycle by using microscopy, flow cytometry, and an assay for histone H1 kinase activity. Activating the dicentric chromosome induced a delay in the cell cycle after DNA replication and before anaphase. The delay occurred in the absence of RAD9, a gene required to arrest cell division in r...

  7. Integration of Transcriptional and Posttranslational Regulation in a Glucose Signal Transduction Pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong-Ho; Brachet, Valérie; Moriya, Hisao; Johnston, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Expression of the HXT genes encoding glucose transporters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by two interconnected glucose-signaling pathways: the Snf3/Rgt2-Rgt1 glucose induction pathway and the Snf1-Mig1 glucose repression pathway. The Snf3 and Rgt2 glucose sensors in the membrane generate a signal in the presence of glucose that inhibits the functions of Std1 and Mth1, paralogous proteins that regulate the function of the Rgt1 transcription factor, which binds to th...

  8. Cloning and Characterization of a Sulfonate/α-Ketoglutarate Dioxygenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan, Deborah A; Auchtung, Thomas A.; Hausinger, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae open reading frame YLL057c is predicted to encode a gene product with 31.5% amino acid sequence identity to Escherichia coli taurine/α-ketoglutarate dioxygenase and 27% identity to Ralstonia eutropha TfdA, a herbicide-degrading enzyme. Purified recombinant yeast protein is shown to be an Fe(II)-dependent sulfonate/α-ketoglutarate dioxygenase. Although taurine is a poor substrate, a variety of other sulfonates are utilized, with the best natural substrates being is...

  9. Characterization of transcription site-associated mRNP retention in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Heick

    In a variety of S. cerevisiae mutants with defective mRNP maturation and/or export, heat shock (hs) mRNPs are retained at or near their sites of transcription. For example, mutants of the THO complex display an intense hs-mRNA FISH signal, which co-localizes with the hs-gene after transcriptional...... underrepresented in recovered fractions from mutant cells. This bias is abolished when a THO mutation is combined with a second site mutation alleviating the mRNA export block. Thus, the bias parallels transcription-site retention of the mRNP and suggests the existence of a complex specifically formed at the 3...

  10. Evaluation of Brachypodium distachyon L-Tyrosine Decarboxylase Using L-Tyrosine Over-Producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Noda

    Full Text Available To demonstrate that herbaceous biomass is a versatile gene resource, we focused on the model plant Brachypodium distachyon, and screened the B. distachyon for homologs of tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC, which is involved in the modification of aromatic compounds. A total of 5 candidate genes were identified in cDNA libraries of B. distachyon and were introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae to evaluate TDC expression and tyramine production. It is suggested that two TDCs encoded in the transcripts Bradi2g51120.1 and Bradi2g51170.1 have L-tyrosine decarboxylation activity. Bradi2g51170.1 was introduced into the L-tyrosine over-producing strain of S. cerevisiae that was constructed by the introduction of mutant genes that promote deregulated feedback inhibition. The amount of tyramine produced by the resulting transformant was 6.6-fold higher (approximately 200 mg/L than the control strain, indicating that B. distachyon TDC effectively converts L-tyrosine to tyramine. Our results suggest that B. distachyon possesses enzymes that are capable of modifying aromatic residues, and that S. cerevisiae is a suitable host for the production of L-tyrosine derivatives.

  11. The genetic basis of variation in clean lineages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to stresses encountered during bioethanol fermentations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Greetham

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the micro-organism of choice for the conversion of monomeric sugars into bioethanol. Industrial bioethanol fermentations are intrinsically stressful environments for yeast and the adaptive protective response varies between strain backgrounds. With the aim of identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL's that regulate phenotypic variation, linkage analysis on six F1 crosses from four highly divergent clean lineages of S. cerevisiae was performed. Segregants from each cross were assessed for tolerance to a range of stresses encountered during industrial bioethanol fermentations. Tolerance levels within populations of F1 segregants to stress conditions differed and displayed transgressive variation. Linkage analysis resulted in the identification of QTL's for tolerance to weak acid and osmotic stress. We tested candidate genes within loci identified by QTL using reciprocal hemizygosity analysis to ascertain their contribution to the observed phenotypic variation; this approach validated a gene (COX20 for weak acid stress and a gene (RCK2 for osmotic stress. Hemizygous transformants with a sensitive phenotype carried a COX20 allele from a weak acid sensitive parent with an alteration in its protein coding compared with other S. cerevisiae strains. RCK2 alleles reveal peptide differences between parental strains and the importance of these changes is currently being ascertained.

  12. Highly efficient biosynthesis of astaxanthin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by integration and tuning of algal crtZ and bkt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pingping; Ye, Lidan; Xie, Wenping; Lv, Xiaomei; Yu, Hongwei

    2015-10-01

    Astaxanthin is a highly valued carotenoid with strong antioxidant activity and has wide applications in aquaculture, food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. The market demand for natural astaxanthin promotes research in metabolic engineering of heterologous hosts for astaxanthin production. In this study, an astaxanthin-producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain was created by successively introducing the Haematococcus pluvialis β-carotenoid hydroxylase (crtZ) and ketolase (bkt) genes into a previously constructed β-carotene hyperproducer. Further integration of strategies including codon optimization, gene copy number adjustment, and iron cofactor supplementation led to significant increase in the astaxanthin production, reaching up to 4.7 mg/g DCW in the shake-flask cultures which is the highest astaxanthin content in S. cerevisiae reported to date. Besides, the substrate specificity of H. pluvialis CrtZ and BKT and the probable formation route of astaxanthin from β-carotene in S. cerevisiae were figured out by expressing the genes separately and in combination. The yeast strains engineered in this work provide a basis for further improving biotechnological production of astaxanthin and might offer a useful general approach to the construction of heterologous biosynthetic pathways for other natural products.

  13. Metabolic engineering and adaptive evolution for efficient production of D-lactic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-Ho; Kwon, Eunice Y; Kim, Yong Hwan; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2016-03-01

    There is an increasing demand for microbial production of lactic acid (LA) as a monomer of biodegradable poly lactic acid (PLA). Both optical isomers, D-LA and L-LA, are required to produce stereocomplex PLA with improved properties. In this study, we developed Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for efficient production of D-LA. D-LA production was achieved by expressing highly stereospecific D-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhA, LEUM_1756) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 in S. cerevisiae lacking natural LA production activity. D-LA consumption after glucose depletion was inhibited by deleting DLD1 encoding D-lactate dehydrogenase and JEN1 encoding monocarboxylate transporter. In addition, ethanol production was reduced by deleting PDC1 and ADH1 genes encoding major pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively, and glycerol production was eliminated by deleting GPD1 and GPD2 genes encoding glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. LA tolerance of the engineered D-LA-producing strain was enhanced by adaptive evolution and overexpression of HAA1 encoding a transcriptional activator involved in weak acid stress response, resulting in effective D-LA production up to 48.9 g/L without neutralization. In a flask fed-batch fermentation under neutralizing condition, our evolved strain produced 112.0 g/L D-LA with a yield of 0.80 g/g glucose and a productivity of 2.2 g/(L · h).

  14. Engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae for improvement in ethanol tolerance by accumulation of trehalose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divate, Nileema R; Chen, Gen-Hung; Wang, Pei-Ming; Ou, Bor-Rung; Chung, Yun-Chin

    2016-11-01

    A genetic recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starter with high ethanol tolerance capacities was constructed. In this study, the gene of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (encoded by tps1), which catalyzes the first step in trehalose synthesis, was cloned and overexpressed in S. cerevisiae. Moreover, the gene of neutral trehalase (encoded by nth1, trehalose degrading enzyme) was deleted by using a disruption cassette, which contained long flanking homology regions of nth1 gene (the upstream 0.26 kb and downstream 0.4 kb). The engineered strain increased its tolerance against ethanol and glucose stress. The growth of the wild strain was inhibited when the medium contained 6 % or more ethanol, whereas growth of the engineered strain was affected when the medium contained 10 % or more ethanol. There was no significant difference in the ethanol yield between the wild strain and the engineered strain when the fermentation broth contained 10 % glucose (p > 0.05). The engineered strain showed greater ethanol yield than the wild type strain when the medium contained more than 15 % glucose (p < 0.05). Higher intracellular trehalose accumulation by overexpression of tps1 and deletion of nth1 might provide the ability for yeast to protect against environmental stress.

  15. A set of haploid strains available for genetic studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coi, Anna Lisa; Legras, Jean-Luc; Zara, Giacomo; Dequin, Sylvie; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-09-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been extensively studied for biofilm formation, however the lack of specific haploid model strains has limited the application of genetic approaches such as gene knockout, allelic replacement and Quantitative Trait Locus mapping for the deciphering of the molecular basis of velum formation under biological ageing. The aim of this work was to construct a set of flor isogenic haploid strains easy to manipulate genetically. The analysis of the allelic variations at 12 minisatellite loci of 174 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains allowed identifying three flor parental strains with different phylogenic positions. These strains were characterized for sporulation efficiency, growth on galactose, adherence to polystyrene, agar invasion, growth on wine and ability to develop a biofilm. Interestingly, the inability to grow on galactose was found associated with a frameshift in GAL4 gene that seems peculiar of flor strains. From these wild flor strains, isogenic haploid strains were constructed by deleting HO gene with a loxP-KanMX-loxP cassette followed by the removal of the kanamycin cassette. Haploid strains obtained were characterized for their phenotypic and genetic properties and compared with the parental strains. Preliminary results showed that the haploid strains represent new tools for genetic studies and breeding programs on biofilm formation.

  16. Increasing NADH oxidation reduces overflow metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vemuri, Goutham; Eiteman, M.A; McEwen, J.E;

    2007-01-01

    Crabtree effect.’’ The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has served as an important model organism for studying the Crabtree effect. When subjected to increasing glycolytic fluxes under aerobic conditions, there is a threshold value of the glucose uptake rate at which the metabolism shifts from purely...... effect is due to limited respiratory capacity or is caused by glucose-mediated repression of respiration. When respiration in S. cerevisiae was increased by introducing a heterologous alternative oxidase, we observed reduced aerobic ethanol formation. In contrast, increasing nonrespiratory NADH oxidation...... NADH dehydrogenases in S. cerevisiae. These results indicate that NADH oxidase localizes in the cytosol, whereas alternative oxidase is directed to the mitochondria....

  17. Protein disorder reduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive heat shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Gasik, Zofia; Dong, Yu-An; Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments established that a culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker’s yeast) survives sudden high temperatures by specifically duplicating the entire chromosome III and two chromosomal fragments (from IV and XII). Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are not significantly over-abundant in the duplication. In contrast, we suggest a simple algorithm to “ postdict ” the experimental results: Find a small enough chromosome with minimal protein disorder and duplicate this region. This algorithm largely explains all observed duplications. In particular, all regions duplicated in the experiment reduced the overall content of protein disorder. The differential analysis of the functional makeup of the duplication remained inconclusive. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment suggested over-representation in processes related to reproduction and nutrient uptake. Analyzing the protein-protein interaction network (PPI) revealed that few network-central proteins were duplicated. The predictive hypothesis hinges upon the concept of reducing proteins with long regions of disorder in order to become less sensitive to heat shock attack. PMID:26673203

  18. An overview of membrane transport proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, B

    1995-12-01

    All eukaryotic cells contain a wide variety of proteins embedded in the plasma and internal membranes, which ensure transmembrane solute transport. It is now established that a large proportion of these transport proteins can be grouped into families apparently conserved throughout organisms. This article presents the data of an in silicio analysis aimed at establishing a preliminary classification of membrane transport proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This analysis was conducted at a time when about 65% of all yeast genes were available in public databases. In addition to approximately 60 transport proteins whose function was at least partially known, approximately 100 deduced protein sequences of unknown function display significant sequence similarity to membrane transport proteins characterized in yeast and/or other organisms. While some protein families have been well characterized by classical genetic experimental approaches, others have largely if not totally escaped characterization. The proteins revealed by this in silicio analysis also include a putative K+ channel, proteins similar to aquaporins of plant and animal origin, proteins similar to Na+-solute symporters, a protein very similar to electroneural cation-chloride cotransporters, and a putative Na+-H+ antiporter. A new research area is anticipated: the functional analysis of many transport proteins whose existence was revealed by genome sequencing.

  19. Single-nucleosome mapping of histone modifications in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih Long Liu

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Covalent modification of histone proteins plays a role in virtually every process on eukaryotic DNA, from transcription to DNA repair. Many different residues can be covalently modified, and it has been suggested that these modifications occur in a great number of independent, meaningful combinations. Published low-resolution microarray studies on the combinatorial complexity of histone modification patterns suffer from confounding effects caused by the averaging of modification levels over multiple nucleosomes. To overcome this problem, we used a high-resolution tiled microarray with single-nucleosome resolution to investigate the occurrence of combinations of 12 histone modifications on thousands of nucleosomes in actively growing S. cerevisiae. We found that histone modifications do not occur independently; there are roughly two groups of co-occurring modifications. One group of lysine acetylations shows a sharply defined domain of two hypo-acetylated nucleosomes, adjacent to the transcriptional start site, whose occurrence does not correlate with transcription levels. The other group consists of modifications occurring in gradients through the coding regions of genes in a pattern associated with transcription. We found no evidence for a deterministic code of many discrete states, but instead we saw blended, continuous patterns that distinguish nucleosomes at one location (e.g., promoter nucleosomes from those at another location (e.g., over the 3' ends of coding regions. These results are consistent with the idea of a simple, redundant histone code, in which multiple modifications share the same role.

  20. Metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae for branched-chain ester productions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jifeng; Mishra, Pranjul; Ching, Chi Bun

    2016-12-10

    Medium branched-chain esters can be used not only as a biofuel but are also useful chemicals with various industrial applications. The development of economically feasible and environment friendly bio-based fuels requires efficient cell factories capable of producing desired products in high yield. Herein, we sought to use a number of strategies to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae for high-level production of branched-chain esters. Mitochondrion-based expression of ATF1 gene in a base strain with an overexpressed valine biosynthetic pathway together with expression of mitochondrion-relocalized α-ketoacid decarboxylase (encoded by ARO10) and alcohol dehydrogenase (encoded by ADH7) not only produced isobutyl acetate, but also 3-methyl-1-butyl acetate and 2-methyl-1-butyl acetate. Further segmentation of the downstream esterification step into the cytosol to utilize the cytosolic acetyl-CoA pool for acetyltransferase (ATF)-mediated condensation enabled an additional fold improvement of ester productions. The best titre attained in the present study is 260.2mg/L isobutyl acetate, 296.1mg/L 3-methyl-1-butyl acetate and 289.6mg/L 2-methyl-1-butyl acetate.

  1. Genetic Basis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm in Liquid Medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kaj Scherz; Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth; Gro Rejkjær Sørensen, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm-forming microorganisms switch between two forms: free-living planktonic and sessile multicellular. Sessile communities of yeast biofilms in liquid medium provide a primitive example of multicellularity and are clinically important because biofilms tend to have other growth characteristics...... than free-living cells. We investigated the genetic basis for yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, biofilm on solid surfaces in liquid medium by screening a comprehensive deletion mutant collection in the S1278b background and found 71 genes that were essential for biofilm development. Quantitative...... northern blots further revealed that AIM1, ASG1, AVT1, DRN1, ELP4, FLO8, FMP10, HMT1, KAR5, MIT1, MRPL32, MSS11, NCP1, NPR1, PEP5, PEX25, RIM8, RIM101, RGT1, SNF8, SPC2, STB6, STP22, TEC1, VID24, VPS20, VTC3, YBL029W, YBL029C-A, YFL054C, YGR161W-C, YIL014C-A, YIR024C, YKL151C, YNL200C, YOR034C-A, and YOR...

  2. Alleviation of glucose repression of maltose metabolism by MIG1 disruption in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Christopher; Olsson, Lisbeth; Rønnow, B.

    1996-01-01

    The MIG1 gene was disrupted in a haploid laboratory strain (B224) and in an industrial polyploid strain (DGI 342) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The alleviation of glucose repression of the expression of MAL genes and alleviation of glucose control of maltose metabolism were investigated in batch...... cultivations on glucose-maltose mixtures. In the MIG1-disrupted haploid strain, glucose repression was partly alleviated; i.e., maltose metabolism was initiated at higher glucose concentrations than in the corresponding wild-type strain. In contrast, the polyploid Delta mig1 strain exhibited an even more...... of glucose repression of the SUC genes. The disruption of MIG1 was shown to bring about pleiotropic effects, manifested in changes in the pattern of secreted metabolites and in the specific growth rate....

  3. Base excision of oxidative purine and pyrimidine DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a DNA glycosylase with sequence similarity to endonuclease III from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, L; Bjørås, M; Pirovano, M; Alseth, I; Berdal, K G; Seeberg, E

    1996-10-01

    One gene locus on chromosome I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein (YAB5_YEAST; accession no. P31378) with local sequence similarity to the DNA repair glycosylase endonuclease III from Escherichia coli. We have analyzed the function of this gene, now assigned NTG1 (endonuclease three-like glycosylase 1), by cloning, mutant analysis, and gene expression in E. coli. Targeted gene disruption of NTG1 produces a mutant that is sensitive to H2O2 and menadione, indicating that NTG1 is required for repair of oxidative DNA damage in vivo. Northern blot analysis and expression studies of a NTG1-lacZ gene fusion showed that NTG1 is induced by cell exposure to different DNA damaging agents, particularly menadione, and hence belongs to the DNA damage-inducible regulon in S. cerevisiae. When expressed in E. coli, the NTG1 gene product cleaves plasmid DNA damaged by osmium tetroxide, thus, indicating specificity for thymine glycols in DNA similarly as is the case for EndoIII. However, NTG1 also releases formamidopyrimidines from DNA with high efficiency and, hence, represents a glycosylase with a novel range of substrate recognition. Sequences similar to NTG1 from other eukaryotes, including Caenorhabditis elegans, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and mammals, have recently been entered in the GenBank suggesting the universal presence of NTG1-like genes in higher organisms. S. cerevisiae NTG1 does not have the [4Fe-4S] cluster DNA binding domain characteristic of the other members of this family.

  4. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bat1 and Bat2 aminotransferases have functionally diverged from the ancestral-like Kluyveromyces lactis orthologous enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritrini Colón

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene duplication is a key evolutionary mechanism providing material for the generation of genes with new or modified functions. The fate of duplicated gene copies has been amply discussed and several models have been put forward to account for duplicate conservation. The specialization model considers that duplication of a bifunctional ancestral gene could result in the preservation of both copies through subfunctionalization, resulting in the distribution of the two ancestral functions between the gene duplicates. Here we investigate whether the presumed bifunctional character displayed by the single branched chain amino acid aminotransferase present in K. lactis has been distributed in the two paralogous genes present in S. cerevisiae, and whether this conservation has impacted S. cerevisiae metabolism. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results show that the KlBat1 orthologous BCAT is a bifunctional enzyme, which participates in the biosynthesis and catabolism of branched chain aminoacids (BCAAs. This dual role has been distributed in S. cerevisiae Bat1 and Bat2 paralogous proteins, supporting the specialization model posed to explain the evolution of gene duplications. BAT1 is highly expressed under biosynthetic conditions, while BAT2 expression is highest under catabolic conditions. Bat1 and Bat2 differential relocalization has favored their physiological function, since biosynthetic precursors are generated in the mitochondria (Bat1, while catabolic substrates are accumulated in the cytosol (Bat2. Under respiratory conditions, in the presence of ammonium and BCAAs the bat1Δ bat2Δ double mutant shows impaired growth, indicating that Bat1 and Bat2 could play redundant roles. In K. lactis wild type growth is independent of BCAA degradation, since a Klbat1Δ mutant grows under this condition. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that BAT1 and BAT2 differential expression and subcellular relocalization has resulted in the distribution of the

  5. Homology-integrated CRISPR-Cas (HI-CRISPR) system for one-step multigene disruption in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zehua; Xiao, Han; Liang, Jing; Zhang, Lu; Xiong, Xiong; Sun, Ning; Si, Tong; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-05-15

    One-step multiple gene disruption in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a highly useful tool for both basic and applied research, but it remains a challenge. Here, we report a rapid, efficient, and potentially scalable strategy based on the type II Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR associated proteins (Cas) system to generate multiple gene disruptions simultaneously in S. cerevisiae. A 100 bp dsDNA mutagenizing homologous recombination donor is inserted between two direct repeats for each target gene in a CRISPR array consisting of multiple donor and guide sequence pairs. An ultrahigh copy number plasmid carrying iCas9, a variant of wild-type Cas9, trans-encoded RNA (tracrRNA), and a homology-integrated crRNA cassette is designed to greatly increase the gene disruption efficiency. As proof of concept, three genes, CAN1, ADE2, and LYP1, were simultaneously disrupted in 4 days with an efficiency ranging from 27 to 87%. Another three genes involved in an artificial hydrocortisone biosynthetic pathway, ATF2, GCY1, and YPR1, were simultaneously disrupted in 6 days with 100% efficiency. This homology-integrated CRISPR (HI-CRISPR) strategy represents a powerful tool for creating yeast strains with multiple gene knockouts.

  6. Synchronization of the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltman, Magdalena; Molist, Iago; Sanchez-Diaz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    A number of model organisms have provided the basis for our understanding of the eukaryotic cell cycle. These model organisms are generally much easier to manipulate than mammalian cells and as such provide amenable tools for extensive genetic and biochemical analysis. One of the most common model organisms used to study the cell cycle is the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This model provides the ability to synchronise cells efficiently at different stages of the cell cycle, which in turn opens up the possibility for extensive and detailed study of mechanisms regulating the eukaryotic cell cycle. Here, we describe methods in which budding yeast cells are arrested at a particular phase of the cell cycle and then released from the block, permitting the study of molecular mechanisms that drive the progression through the cell cycle.

  7. Viruses and prions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickner, Reed B; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Esteban, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a key experimental organism for the study of infectious diseases, including dsRNA viruses, ssRNA viruses, and prions. Studies of the mechanisms of virus and prion replication, virus structure, and structure of the amyloid filaments that are the basis of yeast prions have been at the forefront of such studies in these classes of infectious entities. Yeast has been particularly useful in defining the interactions of the infectious elements with cellular components: chromosomally encoded proteins necessary for blocking the propagation of the viruses and prions, and proteins involved in the expression of viral components. Here, we emphasize the L-A dsRNA virus and its killer-toxin-encoding satellites, the 20S and 23S ssRNA naked viruses, and the several infectious proteins (prions) of yeast.

  8. Evolutionary engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient aerobic xylose consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scalcinati, Gionata; Otero, José Manuel; Van Vleet, Jennifer R. H.;

    2012-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology aims to develop robust microbial cell factories, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to produce an array of added value chemicals presently dominated by petrochemical processes. Xylose is the second most abundant monosaccharide after glucose and the most prevalent pentose...... sugar found in lignocelluloses. Significant research efforts have focused on the metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for fast and efficient xylose utilization. This study aims to metabolically engineer S. cerevisiae, such that it can consume xylose as the exclusive substrate while maximizing carbon......-metabolizing yeast Pichia stipitis, was constructed, followed by a directed evolution strategy to improve xylose utilization rates. The resulting S. cerevisiae strain was capable of rapid growth and fast xylose consumption producing only biomass and negligible amount of byproducts. Transcriptional profiling...

  9. Adaption of Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing a heterologous protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Astrid Mørkeberg; Beck, Vibe; Højlund Christensen, Lars;

    2008-01-01

    Production of the heterologous protein, bovine aprotinin, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was shown to affect the metabolism of the host cell to various extent depending on the strain genotype. Strains with different genotypes, industrial and laboroatory, respectively, were investigated. The maximal...

  10. Glucose- and nitrogen sensing and regulatory mechanisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødkaer, Steven V; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2014-01-01

    steps and by numerous different regulators. As numerous of these regulating proteins, biochemical mechanisms, and cellular pathways are evolutionary conserved, complex biochemical information relevant to humans can be obtained by studying simple organisms. Thus, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has...... been recognized as a powerful model system to study fundamental biochemical processes. In the present review, we highlight central signaling pathways and molecular circuits conferring nitrogen- and glucose sensing in S. cerevisiae....

  11. Prioritized Expression of BDH2 under Bulk Translational Repression and Its Contribution to Tolerance to Severe Vanillin Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Yoko; Nguyen, Trinh T. M.; Kitajima, Sakihito; Izawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Vanillin is a potent fermentation inhibitor derived from the lignocellulosic biomass in biofuel production, and high concentrations of vanillin result in the pronounced repression of bulk translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies on genes that are efficiently translated even in the presence of high concentrations of vanillin will be useful for improving yeast vanillin tolerance and fermentation efficiency. The BDH1 and BDH2 genes encode putative medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reduc...

  12. Isolation, identification and characterization of regional indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šuranská, Hana; Vránová, Dana; Omelková, Jiřina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we isolated and identified various indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and screened them for the selected oenological properties. These S. cerevisiae strains were isolated from berries and spontaneously fermented musts. The grape berries (Sauvignon blanc and Pinot noir) were grown under the integrated and organic mode of farming in the South Moravia (Czech Republic) wine region. Modern genotyping techniques such as PCR-fingerprinting and interdelta PCR typing were employed to differentiate among indigenous S. cerevisiae strains. This combination of the methods provides a rapid and relatively simple approach for identification of yeast of S. cerevisiae at strain level. In total, 120 isolates were identified and grouped by molecular approaches and 45 of the representative strains were tested for selected important oenological properties including ethanol, sulfur dioxide and osmotic stress tolerance, intensity of flocculation and desirable enzymatic activities. Their ability to produce and utilize acetic/malic acid was examined as well; in addition, H2S production as an undesirable property was screened. The oenological characteristics of indigenous isolates were compared to a commercially available S. cerevisiae BS6 strain, which is commonly used as the starter culture. Finally, some indigenous strains coming from organically treated grape berries were chosen for their promising oenological properties and these strains will be used as the starter culture, because application of a selected indigenous S. cerevisiae strain can enhance the regional character of the wines. PMID:26887243

  13. Zinc, magnesium, and calcium ion supplementation confers tolerance to acetic acid stress in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizing xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ku Syahidah Ku; Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a potential substrate for ethanol production. However, pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials produces inhibitory compounds such as acetic acid, which negatively affect ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Supplementation of the medium with three metal ions (Zn(2+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) ) increased the tolerance of S. cerevisiae toward acetic acid compared to the absence of the ions. Ethanol production from xylose was most improved (by 34%) when the medium was supplemented with 2 mM Ca(2+) , followed by supplementation with 3.5 mM Mg(2+) (29% improvement), and 180 μM Zn(2+) (26% improvement). Higher ethanol production was linked to high cell viability in the presence of metal ions. Comparative transcriptomics between the supplemented cultures and the control suggested that improved cell viability resulted from the induction of genes controlling the cell wall and membrane. Only one gene, FIT2, was found to be up-regulated in common between the three metal ions. Also up-regulation of HXT1 and TKL1 might enhance xylose consumption in the presence of acetic acid. Thus, the addition of ionic nutrients is a simple and cost-effective method to improve the acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae.

  14. Primers-4-Yeast: a comprehensive web tool for planning primers for Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yofe, Ido; Schuldiner, Maya

    2014-02-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a key model organism of functional genomics, due to its ease and speed of genetic manipulations. In fact, in this yeast, the requirement for homologous sequences for recombination purposes is so small that 40 base pairs (bp) are sufficient. Hence, an enormous variety of genetic manipulations can be performed by simply planning primers with the correct homology, using a defined set of transformation plasmids. Although designing primers for yeast transformations and for the verification of their correct insertion is a common task in all yeast laboratories, primer planning is usually done manually and a tool that would enable easy, automated primer planning for the yeast research community is still lacking. Here we introduce Primers-4-Yeast, a web tool that allows primers to be designed in batches for S. cerevisiae gene-targeting transformations, and for the validation of correct insertions. This novel tool enables fast, automated, accurate primer planning for large sets of genes, introduces consistency in primer planning and is therefore suggested to serve as a standard in yeast research. Primers-4-Yeast is available at: http://www.weizmann.ac.il/Primers-4-Yeast

  15. Fermentation of xylose to produce ethanol by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain containing XYLA and XKS1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaolin; JIANG Ning; HE Peng; LU Dajun; SHEN An

    2005-01-01

    Fermentation of the pentose sugar xylose to produce ethanol using lignocellulosic biomass would make bioethanol production economically more competitive. Saccharomyce cerevisise, an efficient ethanol producer, cannot utilize xylose because it lacks the ability to convert xylose to its isomer xylulose. In this study, XYLA gene encoding xylose isomerase (XI) from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4T and XKS1 gene encoding xylulokinase (XK) from Pichia stipitis were cloned and functionally coexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae EF-326 to construct a recombinant xylose-utilizing strain. The resulting strain S. cerevisiae EF 1014 not only grew on xylose as sole carbon source, but also produced ethanol under anaerobic conditions. Fermentations performed with different xylose concentrations at different temperatures demonstrated that the highest ethanol productivity was 0.11 g/g xylose when xylose concentration was provided at 50 g/L. Under this condition, 28.4% of xylose was consumed and 1.54 g/L xylitol was formed. An increasing fermentation temperature from 30℃ to 37℃ did not improve ethanol yield.

  16. Properties of natural double-strand-break sites at a recombination hotspot in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring, Stuart J; Halley, George R; Jones, Alex J; Malone, Robert E

    2003-01-01

    This study addresses three questions about the properties of recombination hotspots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: How much DNA is required for double-strand-break (DSB) site recognition? Do naturally occurring DSB sites compete with each other in meiotic recombination? What role does the sequence located at the sites of DSBs play? In S. cerevisiae, the HIS2 meiotic recombination hotspot displays a high level of gene conversion, a 3'-to-5' conversion gradient, and two DSB sites located approximately 550 bp apart. Previous studies of hotspots, including HIS2, suggest that global chromosome structure plays a significant role in recombination activity, raising the question of how much DNA is sufficient for hotspot activity. We find that 11.5 kbp of the HIS2 region is sufficient to partially restore gene conversion and both DSBs when moved to another yeast chromosome. Using a variety of different constructs, studies of hotspots have indicated that DSB sites compete with one another for DSB formation. The two naturally occurring DSBs at HIS2 afforded us the opportunity to examine whether or not competition occurs between these native DSB sites. Small deletions of DNA at each DSB site affect only that site; analyses of these deletions show no competition occurring in cis or in trans, indicating that DSB formation at each site at HIS2 is independent. These small deletions significantly affect the frequency of DSB formation at the sites, indicating that the DNA sequence located at a DSB site can play an important role in recombination initiation. PMID:14504220

  17. Secretory expression and characterization of a novel peroxiredoxin for zearalenone detoxification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuqian; Xiao, Junmei; Chen, Yi; Yu, Yigang; Xiao, Xinglong; Yu, Yuanshan; Wu, Hui

    2013-01-15

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a Fusarium mycotoxin, which is considered to be an oestrogenic endocrine disruptor found to cause severe morphological and functional disorders of reproductive organs in livestock. Increasing attention has been paid to the development of an effective strategy for ZEN decontamination. ZEN is oxidized into smaller estrogenic metabolites by a novel peroxiredoxin (Prx) isolated from Acinetobacter sp. SM04. The Prx coding gene was cloned in a secretory vector pYES2-alpha (pYα) with an alpha (α) signal peptide gene inserted into the multiple cloning site of pYES2. The recombinant Prx was secreted from Saccharomyces cerevisiae INVSc1 after inducing with 2% (w/v) galactose for 72 h, and was found to be nearly 20 kDa through 12% SDS-PAGE. The expressed amount of recombinant Prx was 0.24 mg/mL in the extracellular supernatant. Recombinant Prx showed a gradient increase at the beginning of ZEN degradation. The final ZEN degradation amount was 0.43 μg by one unit recombinant Prx after 12 h. Furthermore, the temperature, H(2)O(2) concentration, and pH for highest peroxidase activity of recombinant Prx were 80°C, 20 mM and 9.0, respectively. When compared with other peroxidases, the thermal stability and alkali resistance of recombinant Prx were much better. The results suggest that recombinant Prx is successfully expressed in S. cerevisiae.

  18. Construction of robust dynamic genome-scale metabolic model structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through iterative re-parameterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Benjamín J; Pérez-Correa, José R; Agosin, Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Dynamic flux balance analysis (dFBA) has been widely employed in metabolic engineering to predict the effect of genetic modifications and environmental conditions in the cell׳s metabolism during dynamic cultures. However, the importance of the model parameters used in these methodologies has not been properly addressed. Here, we present a novel and simple procedure to identify dFBA parameters that are relevant for model calibration. The procedure uses metaheuristic optimization and pre/post-regression diagnostics, fixing iteratively the model parameters that do not have a significant role. We evaluated this protocol in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae dFBA framework calibrated for aerobic fed-batch and anaerobic batch cultivations. The model structures achieved have only significant, sensitive and uncorrelated parameters and are able to calibrate different experimental data. We show that consumption, suboptimal growth and production rates are more useful for calibrating dynamic S. cerevisiae metabolic models than Boolean gene expression rules, biomass requirements and ATP maintenance.

  19. Comparison of different PCR methods for the detection of Neospora caninum target gene%犬新孢子虫不同靶基因PCR检测方法的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭焕平; 贾立军; 焦石; 张守发

    2012-01-01

    To find a PCR method which is more specific and sensitive to Neospora caninum,MAG1 gene,SAG1 gene and Nc5 gene of N.caninum were used as target genes and the sensitivity,specificity and detection rate of PCR of clinical samples were compared.The results showed that PCR method based on the Nc5 gene had the highest sensitivity,with minimum detectable amount as 17.8 fg/μL.While the MAG1 gene had the lowest sensitivity,with the minimum detectable amount of MAG1 gene as 17.8 pg/μL.The genomic DNA of Toxoplasma gondii,Theileria sergenti and Eperythrozoon suis could not be amplified by the three PCR methods,which indicated they had good specificity.Test on 28 tissue samples of BALB/c mouse that had been challenged by N.caninum standard strain showed that,75.0%(21/28) was identified by PCR based on the Nc5 gene,which was significantly higher than that of PCR based on the SAG1 gene 67.9%(19/28) and the MAG1 gene 53.6%(15/28).This study provided a more sensitive and specific detection approach for neosporosis and epidemiological investigation.%为筛选出检测犬新孢子虫更为特异、敏感的PCR方法,分别以MAG1、SAG1和Nc5为靶基因进行PCR检测,并从敏感性、特异性和临床样本检出率等方面进行了比较。结果显示,以Nc5为靶基因的PCR方法敏感性最高,最小检测DNA量为17.8fg/μL;以MAG1为靶基因的PCR方法敏感性最低,最小检测DNA量为17.8pg/μL;而以SAG1为靶基因的PCR方法的最低检测量为178fg/μL;3种靶基因引物均扩增不出刚地弓形虫、牛瑟氏泰勒虫、猪附红细胞体等基因片段,具有较好的特异性;对28份已攻犬新孢子虫标准株的BALB/c小鼠组织样本的检测结果表明,以Nc5基因设计的引物检出率最高,为75.0%(21/28),明显高于SAG1基因的67.9%(19/28)和MAG1基因的53.6%(15/28)。本试验为新孢子虫病的诊断及流行病学调查提供了更为敏感、特异的检测技术。

  20. Industrial systems biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae enables novel succinic acid cell factory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Otero

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most well characterized eukaryote, the preferred microbial cell factory for the largest industrial biotechnology product (bioethanol, and a robust commerically compatible scaffold to be exploitted for diverse chemical production. Succinic acid is a highly sought after added-value chemical for which there is no native pre-disposition for production and accmulation in S. cerevisiae. The genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction of S. cerevisiae enabled in silico gene deletion predictions using an evolutionary programming method to couple biomass and succinate production. Glycine and serine, both essential amino acids required for biomass formation, are formed from both glycolytic and TCA cycle intermediates. Succinate formation results from the isocitrate lyase catalyzed conversion of isocitrate, and from the α-keto-glutarate dehydrogenase catalyzed conversion of α-keto-glutarate. Succinate is subsequently depleted by the succinate dehydrogenase complex. The metabolic engineering strategy identified included deletion of the primary succinate consuming reaction, Sdh3p, and interruption of glycolysis derived serine by deletion of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, Ser3p/Ser33p. Pursuing these targets, a multi-gene deletion strain was constructed, and directed evolution with selection used to identify a succinate producing mutant. Physiological characterization coupled with integrated data analysis of transcriptome data in the metabolically engineered strain were used to identify 2(nd-round metabolic engineering targets. The resulting strain represents a 30-fold improvement in succinate titer, and a 43-fold improvement in succinate yield on biomass, with only a 2.8-fold decrease in the specific growth rate compared to the reference strain. Intuitive genetic targets for either over-expression or interruption of succinate producing or consuming pathways, respectively, do not lead to increased succinate. Rather, we

  1. Expression of a codon-optimized β-glucosidase from Cellulomonas flavigena PR-22 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for bioethanol production from cellobiose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Fránquez, Francisco Javier; González-Bautista, Enrique; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana Carmela; Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor Mario; García-Mena, Jaime; Martinez, Alfredo

    2017-01-30

    Bioethanol is one of the main biofuels produced from the fermentation of saccharified agricultural waste; however, this technology needs to be optimized for profitability. Because the commonly used ethanologenic yeast strains are unable to assimilate cellobiose, several efforts have been made to express cellulose hydrolytic enzymes in these yeasts to produce ethanol from lignocellulose. The C. flavigenabglA gene encoding β-glucosidase catalytic subunit was optimized for preferential codon usage in S. cerevisiae. The optimized gene, cloned into the episomal vector pRGP-1, was expressed, which led to the secretion of an active β-glucosidase in transformants of the S. cerevisiae diploid strain 2-24D. The volumetric and specific extracellular enzymatic activities using pNPG as substrate were 155 IU L(-1) and 222 IU g(-1), respectively, as detected in the supernatant of the cultures of the S. cerevisiae RP2-BGL transformant strain growing in cellobiose (20 g L(-1)) as the sole carbon source for 48 h. Ethanol production was 5 g L(-1) after 96 h of culture, which represented a yield of 0.41 g g(-1) of substrate consumed (12 g L(-1)), equivalent to 76% of the theoretical yield. The S. cerevisiae RP2-BGL strain expressed the β-glucosidase extracellularly and produced ethanol from cellobiose, which makes this microorganism suitable for application in ethanol production processes with saccharified lignocellulose.

  2. Genome-wide transcriptional response of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with an altered redox metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bro, Christoffer; Regenberg, Birgitte; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-02-05

    The genome-wide transcriptional response of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain deleted in GDH1 that encodes a NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase was compared to a wild-type strain under anaerobic steady-state conditions. The GDH1-deleted strain has a significantly reduced NADPH requirement, and therefore, an altered redox metabolism. Identification of genes with significantly changed expression using a t-test and a Bonferroni correction yielded only 16 transcripts when accepting two false-positives, and 7 of these were Open Reading Frames (ORFs) with unknown function. Among the 16 transcripts the only one with a direct link to redox metabolism was GND1, encoding phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. To extract additional information we analyzed the transcription data for a gene subset consisting of all known genes encoding metabolic enzymes that use NAD(+) or NADP(+). The subset was analyzed for genes with significantly changed expression again with a t-test and correction for multiple testing. This approach was found to enrich the analysis since GND1, ZWF1 and ALD6, encoding the most important enzymes for regeneration of NADPH under anaerobic conditions, were down-regulated together with eight other genes encoding NADP(H)-dependent enzymes. This indicates a possible common redox-dependent regulation of these genes. Furthermore, we showed that it might be necessary to analyze the expression of a subset of genes to extract all available information from global transcription analysis.

  3. Construction of a novel kind of expression plasmid by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xiangling

    2005-01-01

    [1]Brunelli, J. P., Pall, M. L., A series of yeast vectors for expression of cDNAs and other DNA sequences, Yeast, 1993, 9: 1299―1308.[2]Sikorski, R. S., Hieter, P., A system of shuttle vectors and yeast host strains designed for efficient manipulation of DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Genetics, 1989, 122: 19―27.[3]Bonneaud, N., Ozier-Kalogerogoulos, O., Li, G. et al., A family of low and high copy replicative, integrative and single-stranded S. cerevisiae /E. coli shuttle vector, Yeast, 1991, 7: 609―615.[4]Huo, K. K., Yu, L. L., Chen, X. J., Li, Y. Y., A stable vector for high-level expression and secretion of human interferon alpha A in yeast, Science in China, Ser. B, 1993, 36(5): 557―567.[5]Zhou, Z. X., Yuan, H. Y., He, W. et al., Expression of the modified HBsAg gene SA-28 directed by a constitutive promoter, Journal of Fudan university (Natural Science), 2000, 39(3): 264―268.[6]Paques, F., Haber, J. E., Multiple pathways of recombination induces by double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews, 1999, 63(2): 349―404.[7]Martin, K., Damage-induced recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mutation Research, 2000, 451: 91―105.[8]Alira, S., Tomoko, O., Homologous recombination and the roles of double-strand breaks, TIBS, 1995, 20: 387―391.[9]Patrick, S., Kelly, M. T., Stephen, V. K., Recombination factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mutation Research, 2000, 451: 257―275.[10]Manivasakam, P., Weber, S. C., McElver, J., Schiestl, R. H., Micro-homology mediated PCR targeting in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Nucleic Acids Res., 1995, 23(14): 2799―2800.[11]Baudin, A., Lacroute, F., Cullin, C., A simple and efficient method for direct gene deletion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Nucleic Acids Res., 1993, 21(14): 3329―3330.[12]Hua, S. B., Qiu, M., Chan, E., Zhu, L., Luo, Y., Minimum length of sequence homology required for in vivo cloning by homolo-gous recombination in yeast, Plasmid, 1997, 38

  4. DNA microarray analysis suggests that zinc pyrithione causes iron starvation to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasokawa, Daisuke; Murata, Satomi; Iwahashi, Yumiko; Kitagawa, Emiko; Kishi, Katsuyuki; Okumura, Yukihiro; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2010-05-01

    Zinc pyrithione has been used in anti-dandruff shampoos and in anti-fouling paint on ships. However, little is known of its mode of action. We characterized the effects of sub-lethal concentrations of zinc pyrithione (Zpt) on Saccharomyces cerevisiae using DNA microarrays. The majority of the strongly upregulated genes are related to iron transport, and many of the strongly downregulated genes are related to the biosynthesis of cytochrome (heme). These data suggest that Zpt induces severe iron starvation. To confirm the DNA microarray data, we supplemented cultures containing Zpt with iron, and the growth of the yeast was restored significantly. From these results, we propose that the principal toxicity of zinc pyrithione arises from iron starvation.

  5. Vanillin causes the activation of Yap1 and mitochondrial fragmentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trinh Thi My; Iwaki, Aya; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Izawa, Shingo

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin and furfural are derived from lignocellulosic biomass and inhibit yeast growth and fermentation as biomass conversion inhibitors. Furfural has been shown to induce oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Since there has been no report on the relationship between vanillin and oxidative stress, we investigated whether vanillin caused oxidative stress in yeast cells. We showed that vanillin caused the nuclear accumulation of Yap1, an oxidative stress responsive transcription factor, and subsequent transcriptional activation of Yap1-target genes. The growth of the null mutant of the YAP1 gene (yap1Δ) was delayed in the presence of vanillin, which indicated that Yap1 plays a role in the acquisition of tolerance to vanillin. We also demonstrated that vanillin facilitated the fragmentation of mitochondria. These findings suggest that the toxicity of vanillin involves damage induced by oxidative stress.

  6. Roles of Catalase and Trehalose in the Protection from Hydrogen Peroxide Toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Takuto; Watanabe, Takeru; Furuta, Masakazu; Kataoka, Michihiko; Kishida, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The roles of catalase and trehalose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae subject to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment were examined by measuring the catalase activity and intracellular trehalose levels in mutants lacking catalase or trehalose synthetase. Intracellular trehalose was elevated but the survival rate after H2O2 treatment remained low in mutants with deletion of the Catalase T gene. On the other hand, deletion of the trehalose synthetase gene increased the catalase activity in mutated yeast to levels higher than those in the wild-type strain, and these mutants exhibited some degree of tolerance to H2O2 treatment. These results suggest that Catalase T is critical in the yeast response to oxidative damage caused by H2O2 treatment, but trehalose also plays a role in protection against H2O2 treatment.

  7. Motifs, themes and thematic maps of an integrated Saccharomyces cerevisiae interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Brenda

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale studies have revealed networks of various biological interaction types, such as protein-protein interaction, genetic interaction, transcriptional regulation, sequence homology, and expression correlation. Recurring patterns of interconnection, or 'network motifs', have revealed biological insights for networks containing either one or two types of interaction. Results To study more complex relationships involving multiple biological interaction types, we assembled an integrated Saccharomyces cerevisiae network in which nodes represent genes (or their protein products and differently colored links represent the aforementioned five biological interaction types. We examined three- and four-node interconnection patterns containing multiple interaction types and found many enriched multi-color network motifs. Furthermore, we showed that most of the motifs form 'network themes' – classes of higher-order recurring interconnection patterns that encompass multiple occurrences of network motifs. Network themes can be tied to specific biological phenomena and may represent more fundamental network design principles. Examples of network themes include a pair of protein complexes with many inter-complex genetic interactions – the 'compensatory complexes' theme. Thematic maps – networks rendered in terms of such themes – can simplify an otherwise confusing tangle of biological relationships. We show this by mapping the S. cerevisiae network in terms of two specific network themes. Conclusion Significantly enriched motifs in an integrated S. cerevisiae interaction network are often signatures of network themes, higher-order network structures that correspond to biological phenomena. Representing networks in terms of network themes provides a useful simplification of complex biological relationships.

  8. Metabolic engineering of ammonium assimilation in xylose-fermenting Saccharomyes cerevisiae improves ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Nielsen, Jens; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    Cofactor imbalance impedes xylose assimilation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that has been metabolically engineered for xylose utilization. To improve cofactor use, we modified ammonia assimilation in recombinant S. cerevisiae by deleting GDH1, which encodes an NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase...

  9. Mathematical model of GAL regulon dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostu, Raluca; Mackey, Michael C

    2012-01-21

    Genetic switches are prevalent in nature and provide cells with a strategy to adapt to changing environments. The GAL switch is an intriguing example which is not understood in all detail. The GAL switch allows organisms to metabolize galactose, and controls whether the machinery responsible for the galactose metabolism is turned on or off. Currently, it is not known exactly how the galactose signal is sensed by the transcriptional machinery. Here we utilize quantitative tools to understand the S. cerevisiae cell response to galactose challenge, and to analyze the plausible molecular mechanisms underlying its operation. We work at a population level to develop a dynamic model based on the interplay of the key regulatory proteins Gal4p, Gal80p, and Gal3p. To our knowledge, the model presented here is the first to reproduce qualitatively the bistable network behavior found experimentally. Given the current understanding of the GAL circuit induction (Wightman et al., 2008; Jiang et al., 2009), we propose that the most likely in vivo mechanism leading to the transcriptional activation of the GAL genes is the physical interaction between galactose-activated Gal3p and Gal80p, with the complex Gal3p-Gal80p remaining bound at the GAL promoters. Our mathematical model is in agreement with the flow cytometry profiles of wild type, gal3Δ and gal80Δ mutant strains from Acar et al. (2005), and involves a fraction of actively transcribing cells with the same qualitative features as in the data set collected by Acar et al. (2010). Furthermore, the computational modeling provides an explanation for the contradictory results obtained by independent laboratories when tackling experimentally the issue of binary versus graded response to galactose induction.

  10. Arsenate and phosphate interaction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Chun-nu; ZHU Yong-guan

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, arsenate(As(Ⅴ)) and phosphate(P(Ⅴ)) interactions were investigated in growth, uptake and RNA content in yeast(Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Yeast grew slowly with As(Ⅴ) concentrations increasing in the medium. However, the maximal population density was almost the same among different As(Ⅴ) treatments. It was in the late log phase that yeast growth was augmented by low As(Ⅴ), which was maybe due to the fact that methionine metabolism was stressed by vitamin B6 deprivation, so As(Ⅴ)treatments did not affect maximal population density. However, with P (Ⅴ) concentrations increasing, the maximal population density increased. Therefore, the maximal population density was determined by P (Ⅴ) concentrations in the medium but not by As (Ⅴ)concentrations in the medium. Ycf1p(a tonoplast transpor) transports As(GS)3 into the vacuole, but arsenic(As) remaining in the thalli was 1.27% with As(Ⅴ) exposure for 60 h, from which it can be speculated that the percentage of As transported into vacuole should be lower than 1.27%. However, the percentage of As pumped out of cell was 71.49% with As (Ⅴ) exposure for 68 h. Although two pathways (extrusion and sequestration) were involved in As detoxification in yeast, the extrusion pathway played a major role in As detoxification. RNA content was the highest in the early-log phase and was reduced by As(Ⅴ).

  11. Acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, Brian T; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Moustafa, Tarek; Schölz, Christian; Wagner, Sebastian A; Magnes, Christoph; Zechner, Rudolf; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification; however, little is known about the origin and regulation of most sites. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that acetylation accumulated in growth-arrested cells in a manner that depended on acetyl-CoA generation in distinct subcellular compartments. Mitochondrial acetylation levels correlated with acetyl-CoA concentration in vivo and acetyl-CoA acetylated lysine residues nonenzymatically in vitro. We developed a method to estimate acetylation stoichiometry and found that the vast majority of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic acetylation had a very low stoichiometry. However, mitochondrial acetylation occurred at a significantly higher basal level than cytoplasmic acetylation, consistent with the distinct acetylation dynamics and higher acetyl-CoA concentration in mitochondria. High stoichiometry acetylation occurred mostly on histones, proteins present in histone acetyltransferase and deacetylase complexes, and on transcription factors. These data show that a majority of acetylation occurs at very low levels in exponentially growing yeast and is uniformly affected by exposure to acetyl-CoA.

  12. Low oxygen levels as a trigger for enhancement of respiratory metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebe Marilyn G

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The industrially important yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to grow both in the presence and absence of oxygen. However, the regulation of its metabolism in conditions of intermediate oxygen availability is not well characterised. We assessed the effect of oxygen provision on the transcriptome and proteome of S. cerevisiae in glucose-limited chemostat cultivations in anaerobic and aerobic conditions, and with three intermediate (0.5, 1.0 and 2.8% oxygen levels of oxygen in the feed gas. Results The main differences in the transcriptome were observed in the comparison of fully aerobic, intermediate oxygen and anaerobic conditions, while the transcriptome was generally unchanged in conditions receiving different intermediate levels (0.5, 1.0 or 2.8% O2 of oxygen in the feed gas. Comparison of the transcriptome and proteome data suggested post-transcriptional regulation was important, especially in 0.5% oxygen. In the conditions of intermediate oxygen, the genes encoding enzymes of the respiratory pathway were more highly expressed than in either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. A similar trend was also seen in the proteome and in enzyme activities of the TCA cycle. Further, genes encoding proteins of the mitochondrial translation machinery were present at higher levels in all oxygen-limited and anaerobic conditions, compared to fully aerobic conditions. Conclusion Global upregulation of genes encoding components of the respiratory pathway under conditions of intermediate oxygen suggested a regulatory mechanism to control these genes as a response to the need of more efficient energy production. Further, cells grown in three different intermediate oxygen levels were highly similar at the level of transcription, while they differed at the proteome level, suggesting post-transcriptional mechanisms leading to distinct physiological modes of respiro-fermentative metabolism.

  13. Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae serves as novel carrier for oral DNA vaccines in Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Nana; Xu, Kun; Li, Xinyi; Liu, Yuwan; Bai, Yichun; Zhang, Xiaohan; Han, Baoquan; Chen, Zhilong; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-12-01

    Oral delivery of DNA vaccines represents a promising vaccinating method for fish. Recombinant yeast has been proved to be a safe carrier for delivering antigen proteins and DNAs to some species in vivo. However, whether recombinant yeast can be used to deliver functional DNAs for vaccination to fish is still unknown. In this study, red crucian carp (Carassius auratus) was orally administrated with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae harboring CMV-EGFP expression cassette. On day 5 post the first vaccination, EGFP expression in the hindgut was detected under fluorescence microscope. To further study whether the delivered gene could induce specific immune responses, the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) was used as immunogen, and oral administrations were conducted with recombinant S. cerevisiae harboring pCMV-OVA mammalian gene expression cassette as gene delivery or pADH1-OVA yeast gene expression cassette as protein delivery. Each administration was performed with three different doses, and the OVA-specific serum antibody was detected in all the experimental groups by western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). ELISA assay also revealed that pCMV-OVA group with lower dose (pCMV-OVA-L) and pADH1-OVA group with moderate dose (pADH1-OVA-M) triggered relatively stronger antibody response than the other two doses. Moreover, the antibody level induced by pCMV-OVA-L group was significantly higher than pADH1-OVA-M group at the same serum dilutions. All the results suggested that recombinant yeast can be used as a potential carrier for oral DNA vaccines and would help to develop more practical strategies to control infectious diseases in aquaculture.

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Permissive for Replication of Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Kong-Nan; Frazer, Ian H

    2002-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Saccharomyces cerevisiae protoplasts can take up bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) virions and that viral episomal DNA is replicated after uptake. Here we demonstrate that BPV virus-like particles are assembled in infected S. cerevisiae cultures from newly synthesized capsid proteins and also package newly synthesized DNA, including full-length and truncated viral DNA and S. cerevisiae-derived DNA. Virus particles prepared in S. cerevisiae are able to convey pa...

  15. Ultrastructural changes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to ethanol stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Manli; Han, Pei; Zhang, Ruimin; Li, Hao

    2013-09-01

    In the fermentative process using Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce bioethanol, the performance of cells is often compromised by the accumulation of ethanol. However, the mechanism of how S. cerevisiae responds against ethanol stress remains elusive. In the current study, S. cerevisiae cells were cultured in YPD (yeast extract - peptone - dextrose) medium containing various concentrations of ethanol (0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 15% (v/v)). Compared with the control group without ethanol, the mean cell volume of S. cerevisiae decreased significantly in the presence of 7.5% and 10% ethanol after incubation for 16 h (P < 0.05), and in the presence of 15% ethanol at all 3 sampling time points (1, 8, and 16 h) (P < 0.05). The exposure of S. cerevisiae cells to ethanol also led to an increase in malonyldialdehyde content (P < 0.05) and a decrease in sulfhydryl group content (P < 0.05). Moreover, the observations through transmission electron microscopy enabled us to relate ultrastructural changes elicited by ethanol with the cellular stress physiology. Under ethanol stress, the integrity of the cell membrane was compromised. The swelling or distortion of mitochondria together with the occurrence of a single and large vacuole was correlated with the addition of ethanol. These results suggested that the cell membrane is one of the targets of ethanol, and the degeneration of mitochondria promoted the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species.

  16. Removing cadmium from electroplating wastewater by waste saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Shu-juan; WEI De-zhou; ZHOU Dong-qin; JIA Chun-yun; WANG Yu-juan; LIU Wen-gang

    2008-01-01

    The appropriate condition and scheme of removing cadmium from electroplating wastewater were investigated by adsorption-precipitation method using waste saccharomyces cerevisiae(WSC) as sorbent. Effect factors on biosorption of cadmium in cadmium-containing electroplating wastewater by waste saccharomyces cerevisiae and precipitation process of waste saccharomyces cerevisiae after adsorbing cadmium were studied. The results show that removal rate of cadmium is over 88% after 30 min adsorbing under the condition of cadmium concentration 26 mg/L, the dosage of waste saccharomyces cerevisiae 16.25 g/L, temperature 18 ℃, pH 6.0 and precipitation time 4 h. Biosorption-precipitation method is effective to remove cadmium in cadmium-containing electroplating wastewater by waste saccharomyces cerevisiae. The SEM, infrared spectroscopy and Zeta-potential of the cells show that chemical chelating is the main adsorption form; electrostatic attraction, hydrogen bonding and van der Waals force all function in adsorption process; and ―NH2―,―C=O―,―C=O―NH―,―CH3, ―OH are the main adsorption groups.

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a starter culture in Mycella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, T K; Tempel, T V; Cantor, M D; Jakobsen, M

    2001-09-19

    The potential use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae FB7 as an additional starter culture for the production of Mycella, a Danish Gorgonzola type cheese, was investigated. Two dairy productions of Mycella, each containing batches of experimental cheeses with S. cerevisiae added and reference cheeses without yeast added were carried out. For both experimental and reference cheeses, chemical analysis (pH, a(w), NaCl, water and fat content) were carried out during the ripening period, but no significant differences were found. The evolution of lactic acid bacteria was almost identical in both the experimental and reference cheeses and similar results were found for the number of yeast. S. cerevisiae FB7 was found to be predominant in the core of the experimental cheeses throughout the ripening period, while Debaryomyces hansenii dominated in the reference cheese and on the surface of the experimental cheeses. In the cheeses with S. cerevisiae FB7, an earlier sporulation and an improved growth of Penicillium roqueforti was observed compared to the reference cheeses. Furthermore, in the experimental cheese, synergistic interactions were also found in the aroma analysis, the degradation of casein and by the sensory analysis. The observed differences indicate a positive contribution to the overall quality of Mycella by S. cerevisiae FB7.

  18. Identification of the fifth subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication factor C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, S L; Burgers, M J

    1995-01-01

    Yeast replication factor C (RF-C) is a multipolypeptide complex required for chromosomal DNA replication. Previously this complex was known to consist of at least four subunits. We here report the identification of a fifth RF-C subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoded by the RFC5 (YBR0810) gene. This subunit exhibits highest homology to the 38 kDa subunit (38%) of human RF-C (activator 1). Like the other four RFC genes, the RFC5 gene is essential for yeast viability, indicating an essential function for each subunit. RFC5 mRNA is expressed at steady-state levels throughout the mitotic cell cycle. Upon overexpression in Escherichia coli Rfc5p has an apparent molecular mass of 41 kDa. Overproduction of RF-C activity in yeast is dependent on overexpression of the RFC5 gene together with overexpression of the RFC1-4 genes, indicating that the RFC5 gene product forms an integral subunit of this replication factor. Images PMID:8559655

  19. COMPARISON OF THE EXPRESSION IN Saccharomyces cerevisiae OF ENDOGLUCANASE II FROM Trichoderma reesei AND ENDOGLUCANASE I FROM Aspergillus aculeatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weina Zhang,

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Two distinct expression cassettes were synthesized by overlapping PCR for expressing the endoglucanase I gene (egl1 from Aspergillus aculeatus and the endoglucanase II gene (egl2 from Trichoderma reesei in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae host. One contained the anchored sequence from the S. cerevisiae cwp2 gene, while the other did not. The low and high copy number plasmids YCplac33 and YEplac195 were used. The enzymatic activities and viscosity changes in the YP-CMC medium varied between the eight recombinant yeast strains produced, and the greatest values were obtained with the YE-TrEII’ strain, which had an activity of 347.7 U/g dry cell weight (DCW and viscosity at 12 h of 4.7% of the initial control value, respectively; YE-TrEII’ was YEplac195-based and contained T. reesei egl2 and no Cwp2 sequence. Strains YC-AaEI and YC-TrEII showed the lowest enzyme activitiy (80.5 and 30.4 U/g DCW, respectively and viscosity changes at 12 h (20.5 and 26.2% of the initial control viscosity, respectively, which were YCplac33-based and contained the Cwp2 sequence. The results showed that gene copy number was the most significant factor to influence the expression of endoglucanases in S. cerevisiae, and the existence of Cwp2 sequence led to decreased enzymatic level and viscosity-reducing performance, while it was shown not to realize efficient surface display of these two endoglucanases.Keywords

  20. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases mediated metabolic engineering for enhanced fatty acids production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha

    2015-04-01

    Targeted engineering of microbial genomes holds much promise for diverse biotechnological applications. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 systems are capable of efficiently editing microbial genomes, including that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we demonstrate the use of TALENs to edit the genome of S.cerevisiae with the aim of inducing the overproduction of fatty acids. Heterodimeric TALENs were designed to simultaneously edit the FAA1 and FAA4 genes encoding acyl-CoA synthetases in S.cerevisiae. Functional yeast double knockouts generated using these TALENs over-produce large amounts of free fatty acids into the cell. This study demonstrates the use of TALENs for targeted engineering of yeast and demonstrates that this technology can be used to stimulate the enhanced production of free fatty acids, which are potential substrates for biofuel production. This proof-of-principle study extends the utility of TALENs as excellent genome editing tools and highlights their potential use for metabolic engineering of yeast and other organisms, such as microalgae and plants, for biofuel production. © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan.

  1. Implication of Ccr4-Not complex function in mRNA quality control in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assenholt, Jannie; Mouaikel, John; Saguez, Cyril

    2011-01-01

    Production of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) is subjected to quality control (QC). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the RNA exosome and its cofactors are part of the nuclear QC machinery that removes, or stalls, aberrant molecules, thereby ensuring that only correctly formed mRNPs are ......Production of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) is subjected to quality control (QC). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the RNA exosome and its cofactors are part of the nuclear QC machinery that removes, or stalls, aberrant molecules, thereby ensuring that only correctly formed m......RNPs are exported to the cytoplasm. The Ccr4-Not complex, which constitutes the major S. cerevisiae cytoplasmic deadenylase, has recently been implied in nuclear exosome–related processes. Consistent with a possible nuclear function of the complex, the deletion or mutation of Ccr4-Not factors also elicits...... transcription phenotypes. Here we use genetic depletion of the Mft1p protein of the THO transcription/mRNP packaging complex as a model system to link the Ccr4-Not complex to nuclear mRNP QC. We reveal strong genetic interactions between alleles of the Ccr4-Not complex with both the exosomal RRP6 and MFT1 genes...

  2. PHO13 deletion-induced transcriptional activation prevents sedoheptulose accumulation during xylose metabolism in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiqing; Kim, Sooah; Sorek, Hagit; Lee, Youngsuk; Jeong, Deokyeol; Kim, Jungyeon; Oh, Eun Joong; Yun, Eun Ju; Wemmer, David E; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-03-01

    The deletion of PHO13 (pho13Δ) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding a phosphatase enzyme of unknown specificity, results in the transcriptional activation of genes related to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) such as TAL1 encoding transaldolase. It has been also reported that the pho13Δ mutant of S. cerevisiae expressing a heterologous xylose pathway can metabolize xylose efficiently compared to its parental strain. However, the interaction between the pho13Δ-induced transcriptional changes and the phenotypes of xylose fermentation was not understood. Thus we investigated the global metabolic changes in response to pho13Δ when cells were exponentially growing on xylose. Among the 134 intracellular metabolites that we identified, the 98% reduction of sedoheptulose was found to be the most significant change in the pho13Δ mutant as compared to its parental strain. Because sedoheptulose-7-phosphate (S7P), a substrate of transaldolase, reduced significantly in the pho13Δ mutant as well, we hypothesized that limited transaldolase activity in the parental strain might cause dephosphorylation of S7P, leading to carbon loss and inefficient xylose metabolism. Mutants overexpressing TAL1 at different degrees were constructed, and their TAL1 expression levels and xylose consumption rates were positively correlated. Moreover, as TAL1 expression levels increased, intracellular sedoheptulose concentration dropped significantly. Therefore, we concluded that TAL1 upregulation, preventing the accumulation of sedoheptulose, is the most critical mechanism for the improved xylose metabolism by the pho13Δ mutant of engineered S. cerevisiae.

  3. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases mediated metabolic engineering for enhanced fatty acids production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouida, Mustapha; Li, Lixin; Mahjoub, Ali; Alshareef, Sahar; Ali, Zahir; Piatek, Agnieszka; Mahfouz, Magdy M

    2015-10-01

    Targeted engineering of microbial genomes holds much promise for diverse biotechnological applications. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 systems are capable of efficiently editing microbial genomes, including that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we demonstrate the use of TALENs to edit the genome of S. cerevisiae with the aim of inducing the overproduction of fatty acids. Heterodimeric TALENs were designed to simultaneously edit the FAA1 and FAA4 genes encoding acyl-CoA synthetases in S. cerevisiae. Functional yeast double knockouts generated using these TALENs over-produce large amounts of free fatty acids into the cell. This study demonstrates the use of TALENs for targeted engineering of yeast and demonstrates that this technology can be used to stimulate the enhanced production of free fatty acids, which are potential substrates for biofuel production. This proof-of-principle study extends the utility of TALENs as excellent genome editing tools and highlights their potential use for metabolic engineering of yeast and other organisms, such as microalgae and plants, for biofuel production.

  4. Real-time Monitoring of Non-specific Toxicity Using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Reporter System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Karp

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is the simplest and most well-known representative of eukaryotic cells and thus a convenient model organism for evaluating toxic effects in human cells and tissues. Yeast cell sensors are easy to maintain with short generation times, which makes the analytical method of assessing antifungal toxicity cheap and less-time consuming. In this work, the toxicity of test compounds was assessed in bioassays based on bioluminescence inhibition and on traditional growth inhibition on agar plates. The model organism in both tests was a modified S. cerevisiae sensor strain that produces light when provided with D-luciferin in an insect luciferase reporter gene activity assay. The bioluminescence assay showed toxic effects for yeast cell sensor of 5,6-benzo-flavone, rapamycin, nystatin and cycloheximide at concentrations of nM to µM. In addition, arsenic compounds, cadmium chloride, copper sulfate and lead acetate were shown to be potent non-specific inhibitors of the reporter organism described here. The results from a yeast agar diffusion assay correlated with the bioluminescence assay results.

  5. Consolidated bioprocessing of starchy substrates into ethanol by industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains secreting fungal amylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, Lorenzo; Viktor, Marko J; Rose, Shaunita H; Viljoen-Bloom, Marinda; van Zyl, Willem H; Basaglia, Marina; Cagnin, Lorenzo; Casella, Sergio