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Sample records for cerebrovascular risk factors

  1. Risk factors of cerebrovascular diseases and their intervention and management

    OpenAIRE

    En XU; Hai-xia WEN

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are important causes of clinical death and disability because of high prevalence and morbidity and easy to recurrence. A number of risk factors have involved in the progress of cerebrovascular diseases, which include uncontrolled and controlled risk factors. The former refers to old age, gender, low birth weight, race/ethnicity, genetic factors, etc. The latter includes hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation and other cardiac diseases, dyslipidemia...

  2. Risk factors of cerebrovascular diseases and their intervention and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En XU

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular diseases are important causes of clinical death and disability because of high prevalence and morbidity and easy to recurrence. A number of risk factors have involved in the progress of cerebrovascular diseases, which include uncontrolled and controlled risk factors. The former refers to old age, gender, low birth weight, race/ethnicity, genetic factors, etc. The latter includes hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation and other cardiac diseases, dyslipidemia, asymptomatic carotid stenosis, obesity, smoking, unhealthy lifestyle, alcoholism, metabolic syndrome, hyperhomocysteinemia, etc. Meanwhile, hypertension is the most important one in the above-mentioned risk factors. It would effectively reduce or postpone the onset of cerebrovascular diseases through proper intervention and management on those risk factors. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.01.006

  3. Association of Fibrin Monomer Polymerization Function, Cerebrovascular Risk Factors and Ischemic Cerebrovascular Disease in Old People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪梅; 魏文宁; 李红戈; 杨锐; 杨焰

    2003-01-01

    Summary: In order to investigate the association of fibrin monomer polymerization function (FMPF)with traditional cerebrovascular risk factors and ischemic cerebrovascular disease in old people, 1 : 1paired case-control comparative study was performed for FMPF and traditional cerebrovascular riskfactors on 110 cases of old ischemic cerebrovascular disease and 110 controls matched on age, sex andliving condition. The results showed that cerebrovascular risk factors were more prevalent in casegroup than in control group. In the case group, FMPF was significantly higher than in controlgroup. There was a significant positive correlation between hypertension and fibrin monomer poly-merization velocity (FMPV), hypertension and fibrinogen (Fbg), alcohol consumption and Fbg, butno significant correlation between diabetic mellitus, smoking and FMPF was found. Among the pa-rameters of blood lipids, there were significant positive correlations between total cholesterol (TC)and parameters of FMPF to varying degrees, triglycerides (TG) and FMPV, TG and Fbg. Our re-sults also showed there were significant linear trends between TC and FMPV (P<0. 001), TC andFbg (P=0. 0087), TG and FMPV/Amax (maximum absorbance)(P=0. 0143) respectively. Multi-ple logistic regression analysis revealed that FMPF in case group remained significantly higher thancontrol group after adjustment of all risk factors that were significant in univariate analysis. It wasconcluded that there is a possible pathophysiological link between FMPF and cerebrovascular risk fac-tors. An elevated FMPF is associated with ischemic cerebrovascular disease and an independent riskfactor of this disease. In old people, detection of FMPF might be a useful screening to identify indi-viduals at increased cerebrothrombotic risk.

  4. Cerebrovascular Risk Factors - In View of Stroke Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Schreiber, Angela K.; Haberl, Roman L.

    2001-01-01

    Stroke risk factors can be divided into those with evidence-based relationship and those with supposed relationship to ischemic stroke, and into potentially treatable risk factors and risk factors with no therapeutic options. Age, gender and race are risk factors with no therapeutic options, while among treatable stroke risk factors most important are high blood pressure, atrial fibrillation, patent foramen ovale, cardiac disorders, diabetes mellitus, hiperhomocysteinemia, hiperlipidemia, and...

  5. Cerebrovascular risk factors and brain microstructural abnormalities on diffusion tensor images in HIV-infected individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamoto, BK; Jahanshad, N.; McMurtray, A; Kallianpur, KJ; Chow, DC; Valcour, VG; Paul, RH; Marotz, L; Thompson, PM; Shikuma, CM

    2012-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder remains prevalent in HIV-infected individuals despite effective antire-troviral therapy. As these individuals age, comorbid cerebro-vascular disease will likely impact cognitive function. Effective tools to study this impact are needed. This study used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize brain microstructural changes in HIV-infected individuals with and without cerebrovascular risk factors. Diffusion-weighted MRIs were obtained in 22 HIV-infec...

  6. Cerebrovascular Diseases and Risk Factors: a Strategy of Primary Prevention Factores de riesgo y enfermedad cerebrovascular: una estrategia de prevención primaria

    OpenAIRE

    Rubén Bembibre Taboada; Miguel Angel Buergo Zuaznábar

    2007-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases constitute a health problem worldwide and have the tendency to grow up. Chronic diseases sometimes are considered transmissible diseases at a level of risk factors. The alimentary habits and the levels of physical activity at present are risk behaviors which are spread all over the world passing from one population to another as an infectious disease with incidence in the morbidity profiles worldwide. While age and sex as well as genetic vulnerability are no modifiabl...

  7. Brain MRI hyperintense lesions and cerebrovascular risk factors in the elderly

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    Iidaka, Tetsuya (Kanto Teishin Hospital, Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-04-01

    It is known that asymptomatic MRI lesions of the brain are found in elderly subjects, but the significance of the lesions has not been determined. In previous reports, the prevalence of MRI lesions varied from 11% to 59%, but many of the authors indicated a close relationship with cerebrovascular risk factors. We evaluated 76 elderly subjects (over 60 years old, average age [+-]SD was 66.7[+-]4.5) without a history of cerebrovascular disease and dementia, and determined the prevalence of periventricular (PVH), white matter (WMH) and pontine (PH) hyperintensity and risk factors. The severity of MRI lesion was evaluated in T2-weighted images by Fazekas' scoring method of MRI hyperintense lesions. PVH, WMH and PH were graded visually from 0 to 3 by the author and these points are added to the MRI score. In T1-weighted images, we also measured the diameter of the third ventricle, frontal horn and body of the lateral ventricle. Our results were that 62% of subjects had PVH, 64% had WMH and 8% had PH. In regard to risk factors, 38% of subjects had hypertension, 17% had diabetes mellitus, 8% had ischemic heart disease. The PVH (+) group was significantly older (p<0.01) and had larger lateral ventricles (p<0.05) than the PVH (-) group. The WMH (+) group was significantly older (p<0.05) and had higher risk of cerebrovascular disease (0.05) than the WMH (-) group. The MRI score was related, but not significantly, to a history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and ischemic heart disease. The MRI score and index of ventricular enlargement correlated with age (p<0.05). In conclusion, PVH was related to aging and cerebrovascular risk factors. Therefore, PVH and WMH were suspected to have different pathogenesis and WMH was more closely related to risk factors. Our scoring method permits evaluation and comparison of MRI lesions of different groups. (author).

  8. Brain MRI hyperintense lesions and cerebrovascular risk factors in the elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that asymptomatic MRI lesions of the brain are found in elderly subjects, but the significance of the lesions has not been determined. In previous reports, the prevalence of MRI lesions varied from 11% to 59%, but many of the authors indicated a close relationship with cerebrovascular risk factors. We evaluated 76 elderly subjects (over 60 years old, average age ±SD was 66.7±4.5) without a history of cerebrovascular disease and dementia, and determined the prevalence of periventricular (PVH), white matter (WMH) and pontine (PH) hyperintensity and risk factors. The severity of MRI lesion was evaluated in T2-weighted images by Fazekas' scoring method of MRI hyperintense lesions. PVH, WMH and PH were graded visually from 0 to 3 by the author and these points are added to the MRI score. In T1-weighted images, we also measured the diameter of the third ventricle, frontal horn and body of the lateral ventricle. Our results were that 62% of subjects had PVH, 64% had WMH and 8% had PH. In regard to risk factors, 38% of subjects had hypertension, 17% had diabetes mellitus, 8% had ischemic heart disease. The PVH (+) group was significantly older (p<0.01) and had larger lateral ventricles (p<0.05) than the PVH (-) group. The WMH (+) group was significantly older (p<0.05) and had higher risk of cerebrovascular disease (0.05) than the WMH (-) group. The MRI score was related, but not significantly, to a history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and ischemic heart disease. The MRI score and index of ventricular enlargement correlated with age (p<0.05). In conclusion, PVH was related to aging and cerebrovascular risk factors. Therefore, PVH and WMH were suspected to have different pathogenesis and WMH was more closely related to risk factors. Our scoring method permits evaluation and comparison of MRI lesions of different groups. (author)

  9. Aggregate effects of vascular risk factors on cerebrovascular changes in autopsy-confirmed Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bangen, Katherine J.; Nation, Daniel A.; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Weissberger, Gali H.; Hansen, Lawrence A.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Salmon, David P.; Bondi, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the relationships of ante-mortem vascular risk factors to post-mortem cerebrovascular and AD pathologies. Eighty-four AD patients underwent assessment of vascular risk (blood pressure, cholesterol, smoking, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, atrial fibrillation, transient ischemic attack [TIA] or stroke) and later underwent brain autopsy. Given our aim to examine mild cerebrovascular changes (CVC), individuals were excluded if autopsy revealed large stroke. The most common forms of...

  10. Risk factors for cerebrovascular disease mortality among the elderly in Beijing: a competing risk analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Tang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations of combined lifestyle factors and physical conditions with cerebrovascular diseases (CBVD mortality, after accounting for competing risk events, including death from cardiovascular diseases, cancers and other diseases. METHODS: Data on 2010 subjects aged over 55 years were finally analyzed using competing risk models. All the subjects were interviewed by the Beijing Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA, in China, between 1 January 1992 and 30 August 2009. RESULTS: Elderly females were at a lower risk of death from CBVD than elderly males (HR = 0.639, 95% CI = 0.457-0.895. Increasing age (HR = 1.543, 95% CI = 1.013-2.349, poor self-rated health (HR = 1.652, 95% CI = 1.198-2.277, hypertension (HR = 2.201, 95% CI = 1.524-3.178 and overweight (HR = 1.473, 95% CI = 1.013-2.142 or obesity (HR = 1.711, 95% CI = 1.1754-2.490 was associated with higher CBVD mortality risk. Normal cognition function (HR = 0.650, 95% CI = 0.434-0.973 and living in urban (HR = 0.456, 95% CI = 0.286-0.727 was associated with lower CBVD mortality risk. Gray's test also confirmed the cumulative incidence (CIF of CBVD was lower in the 'married' group than those without spouse, and the mortality was lowest in the 'nutrition sufficient' group among the 'frequent consumption of meat group' and the 'medial type group' (P value<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: CBVD mortality was associated with gender, age, blood pressure, residence, BMI, cognitive function, nutrition and the result of self-rated health assessment in the elderly in Beijing, China.

  11. Cerebral blood flow in asymptomatic individuals; Relationship with cerebrovascular risk factors and magnetic resonance imaging signal abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaka, Yoshinari; Iiji, Osamu; Ashida, Keiichi; Imaizumi, Masatoshi (National Osaka Hospital (Japan))

    1993-04-01

    We studied the relationship between cortical grey matter flow (CBF) and age, cerebrovascular risk factors and the severity of subcortical hypersignals (HS, hyperintensity score in MRI) in 47 asymptomatic subjects with cerebrovascular risk factors. Multiple regression analysis revealed that HS was most strongly related to CBF, and that hematocrit, age and evidence of ischemic change detected in the electrocardiogram also appeared to be independent determinants of CBF. Both the severity and location of hypersignals were correlated with CBF. The most significant negative correlation observed was that between CBF and HS in the basal ganglia-thalamic region, where the degree of signal abnormality was modest. Decreased CBF in asymptomatic subjects with cerebrovascular risk factors may be related to microcirculatory disturbance associated with elevated hematocrit and an increase in the number of risk factors, and functional suppression of cerebral cortex due to the neuronal disconnection associated with subcortical lesions. In addition, impaired cerebral circulation may be related to MRI signal abnormalities. (author).

  12. [Soft tissue calcifications in panoramic radiography. A risk factor for cerebrovascular accidents?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariayi, Ayesha Shekeba; Berndt, Dorothea; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Panoramic radiography is a basic diagnostic tool in the dental field where calcifications are seen occasionally in the lateral parts of the x-ray. The differential diagnosis are carotid artery atheromas, calcified submandibular lymphnodes and sialoliths of the submandibular gland. 4007 panoramic radiographs (100%) from patients >40 years were scanned retrospectively. Special emphasis was given to the carotid artery territory (CAT). 225 soft tissue calcifications were found (5.6%). 144 patients had calcifications in the CAT (3.6%), 73 showed calcified submandibular lymphnodes (1.8%), and 8 (0.2%) sialoliths. The female to male ratio was 54.7%:45.3%. Pneumatic diseases were beside hypertension and smoking a risk factor for CAT calcification. Carotid artery atheromas are the main risk for cerebrovascular insults. Dentists can help to detect patients at risk for stroke. Their patients can be referred for further diagnostics (ultrasound). PMID:19954131

  13. Congenital and genetic cerebrovascular anomalies as risk factors for stroke in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the role of and report congenital and genetic cerebrovascular anomalies as risk factors for stroke in a prospective and retrospective cohort of Saudi children. Children with stroke were evaluated at the Division of Pediatric Neurology (Dpn), or were seen as inpatients in the Pediatric Wards at King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH), Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the periods July 1992 to February 2001 (retrospective study) and February 2001 to March 2003 (prospective study). Stroke work-up for each suspected case included hemostatic assays, serological, biochemical and neurophysiological tests. Neuroimaging modalities included routine skill x-rays, CT, MRI, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and conventional cerebral angiography. Of 104 children with stroke, congenital and genetic cerebrovascular anomalies were the underlying risk factor in 7 (6.7%). The patients were evaluated at the DPN at a mean age of 66 months (range = 8 months to 11 years, median = 6 years); and they had stroke at a mean age of 48 months (range = 2 months to 10 years, median = 8 months). Four patients had stroke in association with neurocutaneous syndromes. Two had Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS), one had Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome associated with SWS, and the fourth had neurofibromatosis type 1. Two patients had intracranial hemorrhage secondary to ruptured aneurysm. A girl (aged 9 years and 4 months) had left posterior cerebral artery aneurysm. She was diagnosed to have autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease following renal ultrasonography. She died 5 months later despite surgical intervention (clipping of aneurysm). The second child was an 8-months-old boy who presented with subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) following ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm. He recovered with no residual symptoms following successful clipping of the aneurysm. Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) caused IVH in a 7-year-old boy who reported to hospital 5 hours

  14. Cerebrovascular Diseases and Risk Factors: a Strategy of Primary Prevention Factores de riesgo y enfermedad cerebrovascular: una estrategia de prevención primaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Bembibre Taboada

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular diseases constitute a health problem worldwide and have the tendency to grow up. Chronic diseases sometimes are considered transmissible diseases at a level of risk factors. The alimentary habits and the levels of physical activity at present are risk behaviors which are spread all over the world passing from one population to another as an infectious disease with incidence in the morbidity profiles worldwide. While age and sex as well as genetic vulnerability are no modifiable elements, great part of the risks associated to age and sex can be reduced. In such risks, behavior factors (alimentary habits, physical inactivity, smoking habit and alcoholism, biological factors (dyslipidemia, hypertension, overweight, and hyperinsulinemia and finally the social factors which cover a complex combination of socio-economic, cultural parameters, and other elements of the environment that interact among them. This work covers risk factors and the behavior to be followed for its modification.
    Las enfermedades cerebrovasculares constituyen un problema de salud mundial con tendencia creciente. A veces las enfermedades crónicas son consideradas transmisibles a nivel de los factores de riesgo. Los hábitos alimentarios y el nivel de actividad física modernos son comportamientos de riesgo que se difunden por los países y pasan de una población a otra como una enfermedad infecciosa, con incidencia en los perfiles de morbilidad a nivel mundial. Mientras que la edad, el sexo y la vulnerabilidad genética son elementos no modificables, gran parte de los riesgos asociados a la edad y el sexo pueden ser aminorados. Tales riesgos incluyen factores conductuales (régimen alimentario, inactividad física, consumo de tabaco y consumo de alcohol, factores biológicos (dislipidemia, hipertensión, sobrepeso e hiperinsulinemia y, por último, factores sociales, que abarcan una compleja combinación de parámetros socioecon

  15. Cerebrovascular diseases in a fixed population Hiroshima and Nagasaki with special reference to relationship between type and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases, their chronological trend, and relationship between the disease types and risk factors on 16,491 subjects of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who underwent medical examination at least once between 1958 - 74, and who were free of cerebrovascular disease at the initial examination. During the 16-year period, 1,162 cases of cerebrovascular disease developed in this study population with the diagnosis definite in 621, and the annual incidence was 3.2 per 1,000 population. By type, there were 108 cases of cerebral hemorrhage, 469 cases of cerebral infarction, 33 cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage, and 11 cases of other unclassifiable types, with cerebral infarction occurring more frequently than cerebral hemorrhage at the ratio of 4.5 : 1. The incidence of cerebrovascular diseases increased with age in both types, but the proportion of younger subjects in cerebral hemorrhage was greater than that in cerebral infarction. A secular trend of declining incidence was noted for both cerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction. As a risk factor of cerebral hemorrhage, elevation of systolic and diastolic blood pressure was the most closely related to onset, and left ventricular hypertrophy on electrocardiogram (ECG) and proteinuria were also related. However, a tendency was seen for the risk to be somewhat higher the lower the levels of serum cholesterol. In cerebral infarction, aging, like systolic blood pressure, was a most important risk factor. Left ventricular hypertrophy on ECG, proteinuria, and diabetes could also be risk factors. However, the relation to blood pressure, especially diastolic blood pressure, was not so great as in the case of cerebral hemorrhage. (author)

  16. Homocysteine in cerebrovascular disease: An independent risk factor for subcortical vascular encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Bertsch, Thomas; Mielke, Orell; Höly, Sabine; Zimmer, Wilma; Casarin, Wendy; Aufenanger, Johannes; Walter, Silke; Muehlhauser, Frank; Kuehl, Sandra; Ragoschke, Andreas; Fassbender, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for obstructive large-vessel disease. Here, we studied plasma concentrations of homocysteine and vitamins in patients suffering from subcortical vascular encephalopathy (SVE), a cerebral small-vessel disease leading to dementia. These results were compared to the homocysteine and vitamin plasma concentrations from patients with cerebral large vessel disease and healthy control subjects. Plasma concentrations of homocysteine, vascular risk factors and vita...

  17. Cerebrovascular disease in South Asia – Part II: Risk factors and prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Vibha, Deepti; Prasad, Kameshwar

    2012-01-01

    In South Asian countries, conventional vascular risk factors like hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cardiac disease, smoking, obesity, atrial fibrillation are the dominant ones, while other aetiologies like rheumatic heart disease, infective meningitis-related infarcts and postpartum cerebral venous thrombosis also constitute a big fraction. This review discusses the evidence of prevalence of various risk factors in South Asian countries and possible measures to combat the rising burden of cer...

  18. Factors influencing ischemic cerebrovascular disease complicated by hyperhomocysteinemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongping An; Yonghong Xing; Sha Jin

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperhomocysteinemia, as an important risk factor for ischemic cerebrovascular disease is receiving increasing attention.OBJECTIVE: To analyze whether differences of gender, age, cerebrovascular disease typing, and disease conditions exist when ischemic cerebrovascular disease occurs together with hyperhomocysteinemia. DESIGN: A controlled observation. SETTING: Department of Neurology, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 601 acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease inpatients, comprising 386 males and 215 females, aged 33-90 years old, were admitted to the Department of Stroke, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital between August 2005 and April 2007, and were recruited for this study. All included patients consisted of 342 aged patients (≥ 60 years old) and 92 middle-aged and young patients ( 0.05). No significant difference in incidence of hyperhomocysteinemia existed between mild, moderate, and severe cerebrovascular disease patients (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: There is a greater chance of ischemic cerebrovascular disease complicated by hyperhomocysteinemia in older, male patients.

  19. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Pneumoconiosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Ho, Shang-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pneumoconiosis is a parenchymal lung disease that develops through the inhalation of inorganic dust at work. Cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events are leading causes of mortality and adult disability worldwide. This retrospective cohort study investigated the association between pneumoconiosis, and cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events by using a nationwide population-based database in Taiwan. The data analyzed in this study was retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We selected 6940 patients with pneumoconiosis from the database as our study cohort. Another 27,760 patients without pneumoconiosis were selected and matched with those with pneumoconiosis according to age and sex as the comparison cohort. We used univariate and multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analyses to determine the association between pneumoconiosis and the risk of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events after adjusting for medical comorbidities. After adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities, the patients with pneumoconiosis exhibited a significantly higher incidence of ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–1.24) than did those without pneumoconiosis. The incidence of hemorrhagic stroke was higher, but not significant, in the pneumoconiosis patients (HR 1.20, 95% CI 0.99–1.46). No statistically significant differences were observed between the pneumoconiosis and nonpneumoconiosis groups in acute coronary syndrome (HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.95–1.26). The findings of this study reveal an association between pneumoconiosis and a higher risk of cerebrovascular events after adjustment for comorbidities. Healthcare providers should control the related risk factors for primary prevention of stroke in pneumoconiosis patients. PMID:26945404

  20. Genetic risk factors for cerebrovascular disease in children with sickle cell disease: design of a case-control association study and genomewide screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brambilla Donald

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phenotypic heterogeneity of sickle cell disease is likely the result of multiple genetic factors and their interaction with the sickle mutation. High transcranial doppler (TCD velocities define a subgroup of children with sickle cell disease who are at increased risk for developing ischemic stroke. The genetic factors leading to the development of a high TCD velocity (i.e. cerebrovascular disease and ultimately to stroke are not well characterized. Methods We have designed a case-control association study to elucidate the role of genetic polymorphisms as risk factors for cerebrovascular disease as measured by a high TCD velocity in children with sickle cell disease. The study will consist of two parts: a candidate gene study and a genomewide screen and will be performed in 230 cases and 400 controls. Cases will include 130 patients (TCD ≥ 200 cm/s randomized in the Stroke Prevention Trial in Sickle Cell Anemia (STOP study as well as 100 other patients found to have high TCD in STOP II screening. Four hundred sickle cell disease patients with a normal TCD velocity (TCD Discussion It is expected that this study will yield important information on genetic risk factors for the cerebrovascular disease phenotype in sickle cell disease by clarifying the role of candidate genes in the development of high TCD. The genomewide screen for a large number of SNPs may uncover the association of novel polymorphisms with cerebrovascular disease and stroke in sickle cell disease.

  1. Evaluation of arterial diseases by intravenous digital angiography (IVSDA) and risk factors in patients with cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intravenous digital angiography (IVSDA) has been performed in 1,031 consecutive patients during the previous 4 years. Complications of IVSDA, such as coughing, dermal reaction, nausea and vomiting, occurred in 77 patients (7.5%). Among them, 234 patients with a definite diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease were entered onto this study. On the basis of findings of IVSDA, the patients were largely classified into six groups: internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion, ICA stenosis, middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, MCA stenosis, marked arterial elongation, and normal findings. A group of the patients with ICA occlusion was characterized by having sudden onset with less complicated hypertension. In this group, etiological factors seemed to be embolism, intra-atheromatic hemorrhage, and dissecting aneurysm, as well as atherosclerosis. Major risk factors were hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease for lesions of the main trunk; and severe hypertension, high hematocrit levels and elevated platelet aggregability for lesions of perforating and small cortical arteries and arterioles. In the case of arterial elongation, platelet aggregability elicited by ADP was not suppressed by antiplatelet agents. These patients need to receive intensive treatment to prevent relapse of the disease. (Namekawa, K)

  2. Evaluation of arterial diseases by intravenous digital angiography (IVSDA) and risk factors in patients with cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Toshiya (Kakeyu Hospital, Nagano (Japan))

    1989-04-01

    Intravenous digital angiography (IVSDA) has been performed in 1,031 consecutive patients during the previous 4 years. Complications of IVSDA, such as coughing, dermal reaction, nausea and vomiting, occurred in 77 patients (7.5%). Among them, 234 patients with a definite diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease were entered onto this study. On the basis of findings of IVSDA, the patients were largely classified into six groups: internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion, ICA stenosis, middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, MCA stenosis, marked arterial elongation, and normal findings. A group of the patients with ICA occlusion was characterized by having sudden onset with less complicated hypertension. In this group, etiological factors seemed to be embolism, intra-atheromatic hemorrhage, and dissecting aneurysm, as well as atherosclerosis. Major risk factors were hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease for lesions of the main trunk; and severe hypertension, high hematocrit levels and elevated platelet aggregability for lesions of perforating and small cortical arteries and arterioles. In the case of arterial elongation, platelet aggregability elicited by ADP was not suppressed by antiplatelet agents. These patients need to receive intensive treatment to prevent relapse of the disease. (Namekawa, K).

  3. The identification of multiple thrombophilic risk factors in an infant with cerebrovascular accident

    OpenAIRE

    Neves, Joana; Costa, Elísio; Branca, Rosa; Carrilho, Inês; Barbot, José; Barbot, Clara

    2005-01-01

    La frecuencia del accidente vascular cerebral (AVC) neonatal ha aumentado de manera significativa en los últimos años. Ello puede deberse no tanto a un aumento real del número de casos, como a una mayor certeza en su diagnóstico. Actualmente, su incidencia se ha calculado en un caso por cada 4.000 nacimientos. Caso clínico. Lactante con AVC en el área de la arteria cerebral media izquierda, del cual se disponía de información documentada sobre factores de riesgo (FR) tromboembólicos hereditar...

  4. Meta-analysis of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphism as a risk factor for ischemic cerebrovascular disease in a Chinese Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Bai

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism(-genotype or T allele) is a risk factor for ischemic cerebrovascular disease (ICVD).DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE and PubMed databases from September 1997 to December 2009 were searched for case-control studies that examined MTHFR genotype in human ICVD using "MTHFR, gene, polymorphism, and ischemic cerebrovascular disease" as search kev words.J I UU T JCLCU I 1Urv: cigmeen associatea stuaies were identified.1 he methods used to collect relevant information factors were similar between case and control groups, and diagnosis of ischemic cerebrovascular disease was in accordance with Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria classification, with some referring to European Stroke Diagnostic Criteria.Quality of all included studies was evaluated, and meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan4.2 software (Cochrane Collaboration, http://www.cochrane-handbook.orq) following strict screenina.MAIN UU r UUMt MLAJUrrts: I ne correlation Detween M 1 Hi-H gene I I genotype or T allele and ICVD was determined.RESULTS: Eighteen studies involving 4 295 patients with ICVD and 6 169 control subjects were included for this meta-analysis.There was a significant difference in MTHFR gene TT aenotvoe or T auele frequency(X2=15.31, 9.156, P U.U5) in the Uhinese Han population.CONCLUSION: Results from the present meta-analysis suggested that the MTHFR gene TT genotype or T allele is a risk factor for ICVD.However, the-genotype or T allele is not a risk factor for ICVD in the Chinese Han population.

  5. The death risk factors analysis of severe cerebrovascular disease%重症脑血管病死亡危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the death risk factors of severe cerebrovascular disease.Methods The clinical data of 226 patients with severe cerebrovascular disease were analyzed retrospectively.All of the death risk factors were divided into three types.Type Ⅰ was the uncontrollable factors,including age,gender and family genetic history.Type Ⅱ was morbid risk factors,including hypertension,hyperlipemia,diabetes,valvular heart disease,cardiovascular diseases and history of stroke.Type Ⅲ was life style risk factors,including smoking,drinking,obesity,high salt diet,high protein diet and less movement.The risk factors were evaluated with single factor and multiple factors analysis.Results Single factor analysis showed that age,hypertension,diabetes,history of stroke,smoking,drinking,high salt diet and less movement were the high risk factors (P < 0.01 or < 0.05).Multiple factors analysis showed that age (OR =1.242,P =0.001),history of stroke (OR =2.325,P =0.000),less movement (OR =-1.172,P =0.010) were correlated with the death.Conclusions Severe cerebrovascular disease is associated with multiple factors.Early intervention to the risk factors in patients with severe cerebrovascular disease can effectively decrease the risk of death and reduce the mortality.%目的 分析影响重症脑血管病患者死亡的危险因素.方法 回顾性分析226例重症脑血管病患者的临床资料.将死亡危险因素分为三类进行分析:Ⅰ类为不可干预因素,包括性别、年龄以及家族遗传史.Ⅱ类为疾病危险因素,包括高血压、高血脂、糖尿病、心血管疾病(冠心病、心脏瓣膜病、心房颤动)、脑血管病发作史.Ⅲ类为生活方式因素,包括吸烟、饮酒、肥胖、高盐饮食、高蛋白饮食、缺乏运动.采用单因素和多因素Logistic回归方法进行分析.结果 单因素分析结果显示年龄、高血压、糖尿病、心脏瓣膜病、脑血管病发作史、吸烟、饮酒、高盐饮食以及

  6. The role of social psychological factors in the primary prevention of cerebrovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are the second leading cause of death worldwide. In recent years, a growing body of evidence has shown that rather than the traditional cardio-cerebrovascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, hyperlipemia and obesity, the social psychological factors including psychosocial stress, anxiety and depressive disorders play an important role in the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases. Therefore, this review will mainly di...

  7. Chronic Pancreatitis Correlates With Increased Risk of Cerebrovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tuck-Siu; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Chi-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lai, Shih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to explore whether there is a relationship between chronic pancreatitis and cerebrovascular disease in Taiwan. Using the claims data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, we identified 16,672 subjects aged 20 to 84 years with a new diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis from 2000 to 2010 as the chronic pancreatitis group. We randomly selected 65,877 subjects aged 20 to 84 years without chronic pancreatitis as the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Both groups were matched by sex, age, comorbidities, and the index year of diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of cerebrovascular disease at the end of 2011 was measured. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for cerebrovascular disease risk associated with chronic pancreatitis and other comorbidities. The overall incidence of cerebrovascular disease was 1.24-fold greater in the chronic pancreatitis group than that in the nonchronic pancreatitis group (14.2 vs. 11.5 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI = 1.19–1.30). After controlling for confounding factors, the adjusted HR of cerebrovascular disease was 1.27 (95% CI = 1.19–1.36) for the chronic pancreatitis group as compared with the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Woman (adjusted HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.31–1.51), age (every 1 year, HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.04–1.05), atrial fibrillation (adjusted HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.02–1.48), chronic kidney disease (adjusted HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.31–1.67), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (adjusted HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.16–1.40), diabetes mellitus (adjusted HR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.72–1.92), hypertension (adjusted HR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.56–1.76), and peripheral atherosclerosis (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.06–1.51) were other factors significantly associated with cerebrovascular disease. Chronic pancreatitis is

  8. Factores de riesgo relacionados con mortalidad por enfermedad cerebro vascular. armenia 2008 = Risk factors associated with cerebrovascular disease mortality, Armenia, Colombia, 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez Aristizábal, Luis Carlos; Londoño Franco, Ángela Liliana; Pérez Carreño, Juan Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Introducción: La Enfermedad cerebro vascular (ECV) se encuentra entre las primeras causas de morbimortalidad en adultos en todo el mundo. Comparte con la enfermedad cardiovascular factores de riesgo modificables y no modificables; constituye una prioridad para la salud pública realizar todos los esfuerzos necesarios en la prevención primaria a través del tratamiento farmacológico y no farmacológico adecuados.Objetivo: Determinar la prevalencia y la mortalidad del accidente cerebrovascular y l...

  9. A cohort study on the relationship between cerebrovascular hemodynamic changing and risk of strok

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭吉平

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the role of cerebrovascular hemodynamic indexes(CVHI)changing in stroke and to provide reference for stroke prevention and risk factor study.Methods From 2003 to 2004,participants aged 40 years

  10. Promotor polymorphisms in leukotriene C4 synthase and risk of ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiberg, J.J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Sillesen, H.; Jensen, Gorm Boje; Nordestgaard, Børge; Freiberg, Jacob J; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Sillesen, Henrik; Jensen, Gorm B; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cysteinyl leukotrienes are involved in inflammation and possibly in early carotid atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that the -444 A/C and -1072 G/A polymorphisms of the leukotriene C(4) synthase associate with risk of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: We...... atherosclerosis, or with levels of platelets and coagulation factors. CONCLUSIONS: Leukotriene C(4) synthase -1072 AA genotype predict increased risk, whereas -444 CC genotype predict decreased risk of ischemic cerebrovascular disease....

  11. Risk of cerebrovascular events in persons with and without HIV: a Danish nationwide population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line D; Engsig, Frederik N; Christensen, Hanne;

    2011-01-01

    To assess the risk of cerebrovascular events (CVEs) in HIV-infected individuals and evaluate the impact of proven risk factors, injection drug abuse (IDU), immunodeficiency, HAART and family-related risk factors.......To assess the risk of cerebrovascular events (CVEs) in HIV-infected individuals and evaluate the impact of proven risk factors, injection drug abuse (IDU), immunodeficiency, HAART and family-related risk factors....

  12. Risk factors for cervical carotid and intracranial cerebrovascular lesions in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Preoperative evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging and angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, Masahiro [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan). Research Inst. for Neurological Diseases and Geriatrics

    2001-12-01

    lesions were significantly older (p=0.002) and had a significantly higher prevalence of smoking habit (p=0.005) than those without carotid lesions, and subjects with intracranial arterial stenosis showed significantly higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (p=0.004). Patients with brain infarction verified by MRI were significantly older (p=0.018), and had a significantly higher incidence of prior stroke (p=0.005), and showed a significantly higher prevalence of abnormal neurological findings (p=0.001), and had significantly lower scores on MMSE (p=0.027). Patients with severe cerebral deep white matter lesions were older (p=0.003), and had significantly lower scores on MMSE (p=0.027). Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that smoking habits (odds ratio [OR] 7.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.92-29.49) and older age (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.05-1.22) was significant and independent predictors of cervical carotid arterial stenosis, and that diabetes mellitus (OR 3.57, 95% CI 1.31-9.73), female sex (OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.08-0.90), smoking habits (OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.03-11.06) and hypertension (OR 3.39, 95% CI 1.01-11.35) were significant and independent risk factors for intracranial arterial stenosis. There was a high frequency of cervical carotid arterial stenosis in Japanese patients waiting for CABG, and the prevalence of intracranial arterial stenosis was even higher. Brain infarctions were detected on MRI in more than half of the subjects scheduled for CABG. Both MRI and MRA were useful for identifying these patients. Appropriate surgical strategies to avoid cerebrovascular events are recommended based on accurate evaluations of cerebrovascular lesions, especially in patients with the risk factors described above. (author)

  13. Risk factors for cervical carotid and intracranial cerebrovascular lesions in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Preoperative evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging and angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    significantly older (p=0.002) and had a significantly higher prevalence of smoking habit (p=0.005) than those without carotid lesions, and subjects with intracranial arterial stenosis showed significantly higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (p=0.004). Patients with brain infarction verified by MRI were significantly older (p=0.018), and had a significantly higher incidence of prior stroke (p=0.005), and showed a significantly higher prevalence of abnormal neurological findings (p=0.001), and had significantly lower scores on MMSE (p=0.027). Patients with severe cerebral deep white matter lesions were older (p=0.003), and had significantly lower scores on MMSE (p=0.027). Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that smoking habits (odds ratio [OR] 7.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.92-29.49) and older age (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.05-1.22) was significant and independent predictors of cervical carotid arterial stenosis, and that diabetes mellitus (OR 3.57, 95% CI 1.31-9.73), female sex (OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.08-0.90), smoking habits (OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.03-11.06) and hypertension (OR 3.39, 95% CI 1.01-11.35) were significant and independent risk factors for intracranial arterial stenosis. There was a high frequency of cervical carotid arterial stenosis in Japanese patients waiting for CABG, and the prevalence of intracranial arterial stenosis was even higher. Brain infarctions were detected on MRI in more than half of the subjects scheduled for CABG. Both MRI and MRA were useful for identifying these patients. Appropriate surgical strategies to avoid cerebrovascular events are recommended based on accurate evaluations of cerebrovascular lesions, especially in patients with the risk factors described above. (author)

  14. Asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis and cerebrovascular risk stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaides, Andrew N; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kyriacou, Efthyvoulos;

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cerebrovascular risk stratification potential of baseline degree of stenosis, clinical features, and ultrasonic plaque characteristics in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis....

  15. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Pneumoconiosis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Ho, Shang-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pneumoconiosis is a parenchymal lung disease that develops through the inhalation of inorganic dust at work. Cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events are leading causes of mortality and adult disability worldwide. This retrospective cohort study investigated the association between pneumoconiosis, and cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events by using a nationwide population-based database in Taiwan. The data analyzed in this study was retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insur...

  16. The effect of medicamentous and non-medicamentous therapy on lowering risk factors for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular episodes in an interventional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lapčević Mirjana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In a chain of cardiovascular episodes, risk factors (RF and bad habits represent the first link. Objective The purpose of the study was to determine, during six months, on four examinations (the first, and three follow-ups after the second, fourth and sixth month, the following: physical activity (PA alteration and the number of cigarettes smoked; the effect of antihypertensive betablockers and ACE inhibitors on systolic and diastolic arterial tension; the effect of metmorfin therapy on BMI, glycaemia, total cholesterol level (TCL and triglycerides in diabetics compared to healthy individuals; the effect of hypolipidaemics on blood TCL and triglycerides in patients with angina pectoris (AP; the effect of betablocker therapy on TCL. Method This was a multicentric interventional study. Secondary prevention of coronary disease and cerebrovascular conditions was applied in the first half of 2005. There were 185 general practitioners from 38 health centers in Serbia, and patients of both sexes were included with the verified diagnosis of coronary disease and/or cerebrovascular condition. They had demographic data verified as well as data of being genetically (nonpredisposed for AP, hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke and diabetes mellitus. Descriptive and differential statistical methods were used for study result analysis. Results Out of 1,189 patients, there were 51.4% of women and 48.6% of men. The average age was 59.45±9.77 years. The population was homogeneous by sex and the factor of being genetically (nonpredisposed for AP. There was a significant difference in examinations in four contacts in PA and cigarette smoking (p<0.0001. Systolic and diastolic pressure, TCL and triglycerides were significantly decreased by medicaments (p<0.05 and more significantly so associated with nonmedicamentous measures (p<0.001. Metmorfin significantly decreased the glycaemic level (p<0.001 both in diabetics and patients with a reduced

  17. Risks of cerebrovascular events related to open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attum, A A; Girardet, R; Barbie, R; Yared, S; Raleigh, D; Mathew, T; Hymes, W; Lansing, A

    1998-08-01

    Prevention of perioperative cerebrovascular injury in patients undergoing open heart surgery is a serious task for the surgeon, especially as age and severity of atherosclerotic disease increases. The most significant predisposing factors have been identified as existing carotid arterial disease or prior stroke, heavy calcification of the aorta, renal dysfunction, advanced age, and diabetes mellitus. We have studied a series of 600 open heart patients from 1992 to 1995 from the incidence of peri-operative stroke and mortality, evaluating 16 risk factors: heavy calcification of the ascending aorta, asymptomatic carotid disease, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, prior CVA, left ventricular function (ejection fraction of 20% or less), age greater than 70, renal dysfunction, transmural myocardial infarction, fluid balance index greater than 2500 ccs, smoking, type of procedure, emergency procedure, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, cardiopulmonary bypass time, gender, and hypertension Stroke occurred in 8 patients (1.3%), one of whom die postoperatively. Full or near-full recovery was experienced by 5 patients; 2 patients remained partially dysfunctional at the end of the study period. The operative mortality was 2.0% (12 patients); 10 deaths occurred in hospital and 2 following discharge within 30 days postoperatively. The risk of stroke was 15 times greater in patients over age 70; 16 times greater in older males (> or = 70 years); 5 times greater in patients with prior stroke or existing (asymptomatic) carotid artery disease; 8 times greater in patients with renal dysfunction; 4 times greater with a positive fluid balance index; and twice greater when cardiopulmonary bypass exceeded 110 minutes. Four of the stroke patients had diabetes mellitus. Two of 9 patients with heavy calcification of the aortic arch suffered cerebrovascular injury. Six or more of the risk factors studied were present in 81 patients; all 8 stroke patients (9.9%) came from this

  18. Factores de riesgo relacionados con mortalidad por enfermedad cerebro vascular. armenia 2008 = Risk factors associated with cerebrovascular disease mortality, Armenia, Colombia, 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez Aristizábal, Luis Carlos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La Enfermedad cerebro vascular (ECV se encuentra entre las primeras causas de morbimortalidad en adultos en todo el mundo. Comparte con la enfermedad cardiovascular factores de riesgo modificables y no modificables; constituye una prioridad para la salud pública realizar todos los esfuerzos necesarios en la prevención primaria a través del tratamiento farmacológico y no farmacológico adecuados.Objetivo: Determinar la prevalencia y la mortalidad del accidente cerebrovascular y la relación con factores de riesgo.Métodos: se realizó un estudio de cross sectional .Se revisaron 318 historias clínicas de pacientes con diagnóstico de ECV que ingresaron a IPS de tercer nivel en la ciudad de Armenia entre 2005 y 2007. Se analizó la frecuencia de los factores de riesgo y se relacionaron con la mortalidad y tipos de ECV.Resultados: La edad promedio fue 72 años; la mortalidad del 29.9%. Presentaron ECV isquémico 61.9% y hemorrágica 38.1%, con una mortalidad de 21.3% y 43.8% respectivamente. Los factores de riesgo más prevalentes fueron: hipertensión arterial (74.5%, tabaquismo (23.3%, ACV o cardiopatía isquémica previos (15.4%, y diabetes (15.1%. Se encontraron asociados a mortalidad: presión arterial media al ingreso a urgencias mayor a 105 (OR 1.6, presión arterial diastólica mayor a 100 (OR 3.1 y ECV hemorrágica (OR 2.9.Conclusiones: los eventos hemorrágicos son menos frecuentes pero ocasionan mayor mortalidad que los isquémicos; es necesario realizar programas de prevención secundaria para el adecuado control de factores como la hipertensión arterial; además impulsar la promoción para el cambio a estilos de vida saludables.

  19. 贵阳市社区居民脑血管病及危险因素问卷调查%Questionnaire Survey of Cerebrovascular Disease and Risk Factors In The GUIYANG City Community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    井绪西; 陈赞军; 付桂丽; 侯丽; 陈安强; 金建平; 刘康; 龙胜利; 梁忠明; 翁颖; 尤丛笑; 张曦

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate morbidity,risk factors and clinical symptom of cerebrovascular disease in the Guiyang community. Methods In the sixteen cornmunity,19715 people above 30 years-old were selected. The data of four groups(30 ~ 39,40 ~ 49,50 ~ 59, ≥60years-old) was comparatively analyzed. Results The morbidity of the cerebrovascular disease was 5.1% in last five years in the sixteen community. The incidence of smoking and drinking in 30 ~ 49 years-old two groups was the highest-level comparated other groups. The mor-bidity of the cerebrovascular disease,the hypertension, the diabetes mellitus, the coronary heart disease, and the hyperlipoidemia was raise as they continue into old age. The incidence of clinical symptom of cerebrovascular disease for instance dizzy, asthenia, Unilateral hypodynamia, unilateral neglect and simple eye blurred vision and so on was raise as they continue into old age. Conclusion In order to prevent and control the cerebrovascular disease of people in community, we should focus on its clinical features, take appropriate measures, such as quist smoking, controlling drinking and Primary Prevent in the under 49 years-old people. The above 49 years-old should take secondary and third prevention, such as pay close attention to their blood pressure, blood sugar, blood-fat and so on. We should guide their periodic physical examination, timing hospitalize, proper dose and ad-justing diet composition, strengthening physical exercise.%目的 探讨贵阳市社区居民脑血管病患病情况、危险因素、与脑血管病相关的临床症状的发生率.方法 采用采用分层整群随机方法对16个社区的30岁以上居民问卷调查,按年龄每10岁(60岁以上归入一组)一组分别统计.结果 各个年龄段5年累加的脑血管病患病率为5.1%;吸烟、饮酒率在30~49岁两个年龄段最高;脑血管病、高血压、糖尿病、冠心病、高血脂均随年龄增大而患病率增加;而与脑血管病

  20. Superficial temporal artery calcification in patients with end-stage renal disease: Association with vascular risk factors and ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Anwar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Extracranial superficial temporal artery (STA calcification is an unusual finding seen in patients with chronic kidney disease and has unknown ramifications with respect to intracranial ischemic disease. We sought to determine the association between the risk factors for vascular calcification and this rare phenomenon, in patients with chronic renal failure, and to assess the coexistence of cerebral ischemia. Materials and Methods: Medical records and laboratory data on risk factors for vascular calcification were retrospectively retrieved for 453 patients with a discharge diagnosis of end-stage renal disease (ESRD. CT head examinations were reviewed to identify and associate STA calcification with 1 risk factors for the vascular calcification, 2 intracranial artery calcification, and 3 cerebral ischemia (white matter and/or cortical ischemic changes. Results: STA calcification was present in 9.9% (45/453 of the studied cohort. The prevalence of cerebral ischemia was 24.4% (11/45 in patients with STA calcification and 9.3% (38/408 in patients without it. Diabetes mellitus (OR: 2.56, 95% CI: 1.059-6.208; P=0.037 was independently associated with the risk of STA calcification. The risk of cerebral ischemia, however, was not related to STA calcification (P=0.221. Conclusion: The presence of diabetes mellitus is important in describing the risk of STA calcification in patients with ESRD, whereas age, gender, hypertension, serum calcium, serum phosphate, or serum hemoglobin levels are not. The risk of cerebral ischemia is not related to STA calcification but has the strongest association with diabetes mellitus.

  1. DEPRESSION IN CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES

    OpenAIRE

    Voskresenskaya, Tatyana

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses the topical problem of depression in cerebrovascular diseases. It shows its possible causes, mechanisms of occurrence, clinical picture and negative impact on the course of cerebrovascular disease and recovery of neurological functions. There is a bilateral association between stroke and depression: on the one hand, stroke is a risk factor for the development of depression and, on the other, depression is a both direct and indirect risk factor for the development of stroke...

  2. DEPRESSION IN CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES

    OpenAIRE

    Tat'yana Gratsievna Voznesenskaya; Tatyana Gratsievna Voskresenskaya

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses the topical problem of depression in cerebrovascular diseases. It shows its possible causes, mechanisms of occurrence, clinical picture and negative impact on the course of cerebrovascular disease and recovery of neurological functions. There is a bilateral association between stroke and depression: on the one hand, stroke is a risk factor for the development of depression and, on the other, depression is a both direct and indirect risk factor for the development of str...

  3. Increasing severity of cardiovascular risk factors with increasing middle cerebral artery stenotic involvement in type 2 diabetic Chinese patients with asymptomatic cerebrovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, GN; Lin, JW; Lam, WWM; Tomlinson, B; Yeung, V; Chan, JCN; Liu, R; Wong, KS

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify determinants associated with increasing severity of middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis in asymptomatic Chinese type 2 diabetic patients with and without MCA stenosis determined using transcranial Doppler. Conventional risk factors contribute to the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, and differences in the pattern of these may explain the heterogeneity of disease presentation in different populations. In Chinese patients, MCA stenosis is the most commonly identified int...

  4. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Pneumoconiosis Patients: A Population-based Study, 1996-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Ho, Shang-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-03-01

    Pneumoconiosis is a parenchymal lung disease that develops through the inhalation of inorganic dust at work. Cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events are leading causes of mortality and adult disability worldwide. This retrospective cohort study investigated the association between pneumoconiosis, and cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events by using a nationwide population-based database in Taiwan. The data analyzed in this study was retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We selected 6940 patients with pneumoconiosis from the database as our study cohort. Another 27,760 patients without pneumoconiosis were selected and matched with those with pneumoconiosis according to age and sex as the comparison cohort. We used univariate and multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analyses to determine the association between pneumoconiosis and the risk of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events after adjusting for medical comorbidities. After adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities, the patients with pneumoconiosis exhibited a significantly higher incidence of ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.24) than did those without pneumoconiosis. The incidence of hemorrhagic stroke was higher, but not significant, in the pneumoconiosis patients (HR 1.20, 95% CI 0.99-1.46). No statistically significant differences were observed between the pneumoconiosis and nonpneumoconiosis groups in acute coronary syndrome (HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.95-1.26). The findings of this study reveal an association between pneumoconiosis and a higher risk of cerebrovascular events after adjustment for comorbidities. Healthcare providers should control the related risk factors for primary prevention of stroke in pneumoconiosis patients. PMID:26945404

  5. The coexistence of carotid and lower extremity atherosclerosis further increases cardio-cerebrovascular risk in type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Mei-Fang; Zhao, Cui-Chun; Li, Ting-ting; Tu, Yin-Fang; Lu, Jun-Xi; Zhang, Rong; Chen, Ming-Yun; Bao, Yu-Qian; Li, Lian-Xi; Jia, Wei-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Both carotid and lower limb atherosclerosis are associated with increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risks. However, it is still unclear whether the concomitant presence of carotid and lower extremity atherosclerosis further increases the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risks. Therefore, our aim is to investigate whether the coexistence of carotid and lower extremity atherosclerosis was associated with higher cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risks in patients with type...

  6. Analysis on related risk factors of nosocomial infections in patients with acute cerebrovascular diseases%急性脑血管病患者医院感染相关危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周华苏; 陈伟丽; 李美云

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the risk factors of nosocomial infections in the patients with acute cerebro‐vascular diseases and study the efficacy of intensive hand hygiene in controlling nosocomial infections ,so as to pro‐vide reference for reducing nosocomial infections .METHODS A retrospective analysis was conducted on clinical data of 1146 patients with acute cerebrovascular diseases from Jan .2011 to Dec .2013 in our hospital to investigate risk factors of nosocomial infections in these patients .The software SPSS 11 .0 was used for statistical analysis . RESULTS Totally 64 patients had infections with the infection rate of 5 .58% .A total of 85 pathogens were isola‐ted ,mainly including 49 strains of gram‐negative bacteria which accounted for 57 .65% .The analysis revealed that age ,hospital stay ,GCS scores ,insufficient enhancement of hand hygiene and invasive operations ,etc .,were main risk factors for nosocomial infections (P<0 .05) .CONCLUSION Many risk factors are related to nosocomial infections in patients with acute cerebrovascular diseases .Strengthening hand hygiene can effectively control this kind of infections .Clinicians and nurses should perform strict hand hygiene to reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections .%目的:调查急性脑血管疾病患者发生医院感染危险因素,探讨手卫生在控制医院感染中的作用,为降低医院感染的发生提供依据。方法回顾性分析2011年1月-2013年12月1146例急性脑血管疾病患者临床资料,调查分析急性脑血管病患者发生医院感染的危险因素,采用SPSS 11.0软件进行统计分析。结果发生感染64例患者,感染率5.58%;共分离出85株病原菌其中以革兰阴性菌为主,共49株占57.65%;对医院感染的患者进行分析,发现患者的年龄、住院时间、GCS评分、不注重强化手卫生、侵入性操作等是发生医院感染的主要危险因素(P<0.05)。结论急性脑血

  7. Estudo das freqüências dos principais fatores de risco para acidente vascular cerebral isquêmico em idosos Study of the main risk factors frequencies for ischemic cerebrovascular disease in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Luciano Pires

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados retrospectivamente 262 pacientes com diagnóstico clínico de acidente vascular cerebral isquêmico (AVCi permanente, com idade igual ou superior a 60 anos, selecionados dos 1015 registros da Liga de Aterosclerose da Clínica Neurológica da ISCMSP, de 1990 a 2002. O estudo focalizou as freqüências dos fatores de risco modificáveis para AVCi nesta população idosa, considerando-se sexo e faixa etária dos pacientes. Os resultados evidenciaram que a hipertenção arterial sistêmica é significativamente freqüente (87,8% entre pacientes idosos com AVCi, independentemente do sexo e da faixa etária. Tabagismo (46,9% e etilismo (35,1% revelaram-se fatores de riscos modificáveis freqüentes especialmente entre os homens. As cardiopatias (27,0%, o Diabete Melito (19,9% e as dislipidemias (15,6% também se revelaram fatores de risco modificáveis freqüentes em pacientes idosos com AVCi, em ambos os sexos e em ambas as faixas etárias estudadas (60 a 70 anos e mais que 71 anos. Foi relativamente baixa a freqüência de hiperuricemia nesta amostra.Two hundred and sixty two patients with clinical diagnosis of permanent ischemic stroke, all of them aged 60 or more were retrospectively studied from the 1015 cerebrovascular diseases (CVD records of the Atherosclerosis Ligue of the Neurology Clinics of the ISCMSP, from 1990 to 2002. The study emphasized modifiable risk factors frequencies for ischemic stroke in this population, considering gender and age of the patients. Results have evidenced that systemic arterial hypertension is a main risk factor significantly frequent in old people (87.8%, independently of gender and age. Smoking (46.9% and alcohol consumption (35.1% have revealed to be very frequent important modifiable risk factors especially among men. Lower frequencies have been presented for cardiac diseases (27.0%, Diabetes Melitus (19.9%, and dislipidemia (15.6% as risk factors for ischemic stroke in old people of both

  8. Neonatal Stroke : Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Neonatal stroke refers to cerebrovascular events between 28 weeks of gestational age and 28 days postnatal and includes thromboembolic cerebral infarction and all kinds of intracranial haemorrhage. Neonatal stroke may contribute to severe neurological deficit, such as cerebral palsy and even death. International reports suggest the incidence to be approximately 1/4000 live births per year (1). There are several etiological hypothesises regarding risk factors, such as maternal, obstetrical...

  9. Radioiodine therapy increases the risk of cerebrovascular events in hyperthyroid and euthyroid patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Jensen, Lars Thorbjoern; Vej-Hansen, Anders; Nygaard, Birte

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine have increased morbidity and mortality from cerebrovascular events. This risk has until now has been attributed to the hyperthyroidism. However, radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases exposes the carotid arteries to...... radiation and is capable of inducing atherosclerosis. The objective of the study was to elucidate whether ionizing radiation from radioiodine might contribute to cerebrovascular morbidity. METHODS: In a retrospective register cohort study, 4000 hyperthyroid and 1022 euthyroid goitre patients treated with...... cerebrovascular events among all treated patients, hazard ratio (HR) 1.18 (95% CI 1.09-1.29). The risk was increased among hyperthyroid (HR 1.17; 95% CI 1.07-1.28) as well as euthyroid patients (HR 1.21; 95% CI 1.02-1.44). CONCLUSIONS: We report an increased risk of cerebrovascular events in hyperthyroid as well...

  10. Prothrombotic Gene Polymorphisms in Young Patients with Cerebrovascular Accident

    OpenAIRE

    Kuyaþ Hekimler Öztürk

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Cerebrovascular diseases are complex multifactorial disorders showing an increased incidence with increasing age and affected by genetic and environmental factors. Although risk factors for cerebrovascular diseases include age, sex, lineage, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia; in young cerebrovascular patients below age 45, genetic factors may also contribute to the etiology. In this retrospective study, prothrombotic gene polymorphisms which are thought to be related ...

  11. Depression as a Risk Factor for the Initial Presentation of Twelve Cardiac, Cerebrovascular, and Peripheral Arterial Diseases: Data Linkage Study of 1.9 Million Women and Men

    OpenAIRE

    Daskalopoulou, M.; George, J.; Walters, K.; Osborn, D. P.; Batty, G D; Stogiannis, D.; Rapsomaniki, E.; Pujades-Rodriguez, M.; Denaxas, S.; Udumyan, R.; Kivimaki, M.; Hemingway, H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression is associated with coronary heart disease and stroke, but associations with a range of pathologically diverse cardiovascular diseases are not well understood. We examine the risk of 12 cardiovascular diseases according to depression status (history or new onset). METHODS: Cohort study of 1,937,360 adult men and women, free from cardiovascular disease at baseline, using linked UK electronic health records between 1997 and 2010. The exposures were new-onset depression (a ...

  12. 多发性硬化患者脑血管病危险因素研究%Research on Risk Factors of Cerebrovascular Disease in Patients with Multi-ple Sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘畅; 黄剑涛

    2016-01-01

    目的:分析研究多发性硬化患者脑血管病危险因素。方法选择2013年4月—2014年10月到该院就诊的120例多发性硬化患者,其中60例患者的病程在5年以内,60例患者的病程超过5年,同时选择60例健康人群做为对照组,检测各组脑血管病的相关传统危险因素,记录并进行对比。结果观察组中的多发性硬化患者HCY、LDL、VLDL、TC浓度明显要高于对照组中的健康人群,病程高于5年的多发性硬化患者HCY、LDL、VLDL、TC浓度明显要高于病程在5年以内的患者,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);对照组中患者斑块的检出率为7.2%,明显低于病程在五年以内患者的检出率(24.1%)以及病程高于5年的检出率(41.2%),差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论多发性硬化患者相比于健康人群,更容易得缺血性的脑血管疾病。%Objective To analyze and research the risk factors of cerebrovascular disease in patients with multiple sclerosis. Methods 120 cases of patients with multiple sclerosis diagnosed in our hospital from April 2013 to October 2014 were se-lected, the course of disease of 60 cases was within 5 years and of 60 cases was over 5 years, at the same time, 60 cases of healthy people were selected as the control group, and the relevant and traditional risk factors of the three groups were de-tected, recorded and compared. Results The HCY, LDL, VLDL, TC concentrations in the observation group were obviously higher than those in the control group, and the HCY, LDL, VLDL, TC concentrations of patients with multiple sclerosis whose course of disease was over 5 years was obviously higher than those of the patients with multiple sclerosis whose course of disease was within 5 years, and the differences had statistical significance (P<0.05), the plaque detection rate in the control group was obviously lower than that in patients whose course of disease was within 5 years and over 5 years, (7.2% vs 24.1%, 41.2%), and the

  13. Vascular Risk Factors: Imaging and Neuropathologic Correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Knopman, David S; Roberts, Rosebud

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease plays an important role in cognitive disorders in the elderly. Cerebrovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease interact on several levels, one important level being the overlap in risk factors. The major vascular risk factors such as diabetes and impaired glycemic control, hypertension, obesity and hyper- or dyslipidemia have been associated both with Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. The purpose of this review is to consider the context in which vascular deme...

  14. Caregiver awareness of cerebrovascular risk of patients with dementia due to Alzheimer's disease in São Paulo, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Fabricio Ferreira de Oliveira; Jose Roberto Wajman; Paulo Henrique Ferreira Bertolucci

    2014-01-01

    Background Proper control of cerebrovascular risk is essential to prevent cognitive change in dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Objective To investigate whether caregiver awareness to control cerebrovascular risk impacts the lifestyles of patients with AD. Methods Consecutive outpatients with AD were assessed for demographic features, Clinical Dementia Rating scores, cerebrovascular risk, pharmacotherapy, dietary therapy and practice of physical activities. Patients and caregiv...

  15. Clinical study on magnetic resonance imaging of lacunar infarcts and cerebrovascular high-risk group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hironaka, Masatoshi (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study was performed in 32 patients with recent lacunar stroke. T2-weighted images showed ischemic lesions more clearly than T1-weighted images. Sixty-six percent of 32 patients had periventricular lesions. Eighty-four percent had subcortical white matter lesions. Sixty-nine percent had lesions in basal ganglia. Twenty-eight percent had lesions in brainstem. Periventricular lesions were revealed symmetrically. On the other hand, lesions in other areas were not detected symmetrically. Severe periventricular lesions on MRI were similar to those of Binswanger's disease. Patients with severe periventricular lesions had often hypertension. Moreover, two of them had dementia. Twenty-three patients with transient ischemic attack had less remarkable lesions than patients with lacunar stroke. Thirty-seven patients with a history of cerebrovascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus) had severer lesions compared with normal controls. Sixty-one percent of controls, who had no cerebrovascular symptoms and signs, had MRI lesions. These results suggest that MRI is useful for detection of cerebral ischemic lesions with no associated clinical symptoms or signs. (author).

  16. Clinical study on magnetic resonance imaging of lacunar infarcts and cerebrovascular high-risk group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study was performed in 32 patients with recent lacunar stroke. T2-weighted images showed ischemic lesions more clearly than T1-weighted images. Sixty-six percent of 32 patients had periventricular lesions. Eighty-four percent had subcortical white matter lesions. Sixty-nine percent had lesions in basal ganglia. Twenty-eight percent had lesions in brainstem. Periventricular lesions were revealed symmetrically. On the other hand, lesions in other areas were not detected symmetrically. Severe periventricular lesions on MRI were similar to those of Binswanger's disease. Patients with severe periventricular lesions had often hypertension. Moreover, two of them had dementia. Twenty-three patients with transient ischemic attack had less remarkable lesions than patients with lacunar stroke. Thirty-seven patients with a history of cerebrovascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus) had severer lesions compared with normal controls. Sixty-one percent of controls, who had no cerebrovascular symptoms and signs, had MRI lesions. These results suggest that MRI is useful for detection of cerebral ischemic lesions with no associated clinical symptoms or signs. (author)

  17. C-reactive protein, genetically elevated levels and risk of ischemic heart and cerebrovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Jeppe; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2009-01-01

    We tested whether genetically elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) cause increased risk of ischemic heart disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Levels of CRP >3mg/L, compared with levels <1mg/L, associated with a 1.6- and 1.3-fold increased risk of ischemic heart disease and ischemic...

  18. [C-reactive protein and risk of ischaemic vascular and cerebrovascular disease--secondary publication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Jensen, J.S.; Grande, P.; Sillesen, H.; Nordestgaard, B.G.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated levels of C reactive protein (CRP) are associated with increased risk of ischaemic vascular disease. We tested whether this is a causal association. CRP > 3 vs < 1 mg/l were associated with an increased risk of ischaemic heart- and cerebrovascular disease of 1.6 and 1.3, respectively. Four...

  19. 缺血性脑血管病患者脑微出血的危险因素分析%Risk factors of cerebral microbleeds in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢俏丽; 李晨; 尹延英; 王欢; 徐梅松; 贾志荣

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨缺血性脑血管病患者脑微出血( CMB)发生的危险因素,为脑卒中的预防及治疗提供临床依据。方法收集缺血性脑血管病135例患者的年龄、性别、体质量、身高、血压、血糖、血脂、有无吸烟史、饮酒史、心脏病史等临床资料,以及磁共振磁敏感加权成像检测CMB、无症状腔隙性脑梗死、脑白质病变情况,比较有无CMB、不同部位CMB及不同严重程度CMB患者的临床特点,采用Logistic回归对CMB的危险因素进行分析。结果135例患者中,发生CMB 55例,无CMB 80例;CMB出现在深部幕下35例、脑叶20例,其严重程度分为1级25例、2级26例、3级4例。深部幕下CMB患者年龄、BMI、收缩压水平、脑白质病变评分以及出现高血压、既往卒中史、无症状腔隙性脑梗死比例高于非CMB患者(P均<0.05),BMI及出现高血压、无症状腔隙性脑梗死比例高于脑叶CMB患者(P均<0.05),脑叶CMB患者年龄、脑白质疏松评分明显高于非CMB患者(P均<0.05)。 CMB 2级、3级患者出现高血压、既往卒中史、无症状腔隙性脑梗死比例以及脑白质疏松评分明显高于CMB 1级患者( P均<0.05)。 Logistic多元回归分析显示高龄、高血压、既往卒中史、无症状腔隙性脑梗死及脑白质病变( OR分别为7.536、0.432、0.470、0.413、2.158,P均<0.05)是CMB发生的独立危险因素。结论高龄、高血压、有腔隙性脑梗死、脑白质病变以及既往有卒中史患者易发生CMB,应注意再发脑卒中的可能。%Objective To investigate the risk factors of cerebral microbleeds ( CMB) in patients with ischemic cere-brovascular disease, and to provide clinical basis for the prevention and treatment of stroke.Methods The clinical data of 135 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease, including the age, sex, body mass index ( BMI) , height, blood pres-sure, blood

  20. Caregiver awareness of cerebrovascular risk of patients with dementia due to Alzheimer's disease in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio Ferreira de Oliveira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Proper control of cerebrovascular risk is essential to prevent cognitive change in dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Objective To investigate whether caregiver awareness to control cerebrovascular risk impacts the lifestyles of patients with AD. Methods Consecutive outpatients with AD were assessed for demographic features, Clinical Dementia Rating scores, cerebrovascular risk, pharmacotherapy, dietary therapy and practice of physical activities. Patients and caregivers were inquired on awareness of the importance of measures to control cerebrovascular risk. Chi-square test was employed for statistics, significance at ρ < 0.05. Results A total of 217 patients were included; whereas 149 caregivers (68.7% were aware of the need to control cerebrovascular risk, only 11 patients (5.1% simultaneously practiced physical activities and received pharmacological treatment and dietary therapy. Patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus were more likely to receive dietary therapy (ρ = 0.007. Male patients were more engaged in physical activities (ρ = 0.018. Patients in earlier AD stages exercised (ρ = 0.0003 and received pharmacological treatment more often (ρ = 0.0072. Caregiver awareness of the need to control cerebrovascular risk was higher when patients had hypertension (ρ = 0.024 and/or hypercholesterolemia (ρ = 0.006, and influenced adherence to dietary therapy (ρ = 0.002 and to pharmacological treatment (ρ = 0.001. Discussion Caregiver awareness of the need to control cerebrovascular risk has positive impacts for patients with AD.

  1. Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Depression has been found to be a risk factor for development of heart disease. Depression occurs in up to 20% of people with ... and has been found to be a risk factor also for subsequent heart attack, the ... Fortunately, depression in patients with heart disease responds well to ...

  2. Risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article deals with the development of risk management in the gas sector business: why a risk factor legal mention must precede any published financial information? Do gas companies have to face new risks? Is there specific risks bound to gas activities? Why companies want to master their risks? Is it mandatory or just a new habit? Do they expect a real benefit in return? These are the risk management questions that are analyzed in this article which is based on the public communication of 15 gas companies randomly selected over the world. The information comes from their annual reports or from documents available on their web sites. The intention of this document is not to be exhaustive or to make statistics but only to shade light on the risk factors of the gas sector. (J.S.)

  3. Cerebrovascular Complications After Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejaldre, Aída; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Santos, Miguel Ángel; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Neurological complications in orthotopic heart transplantation represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality despite successful transplantation. The most frequent perioperative neurological complications are delirium or encephalopathy. In this period cerebrovascular complication ranges between 5-11%. After the perioperative period, the 5-year stroke risk after cardiac transplantation is 4.1%. In a retrospective study conducted with 314 patients who underwent cardiac transplantation, it was found that 20% of cerebrovascular complications occurred within the first two weeks after transplantation, while 80% occurred in the late postoperative phase. Of these, ischemic stroke is the most common subtype. In the perioperative periode, hemodynamic instability, cardiac arrest, extracorporeal circulation over 2 hours, prior history of stroke, and carotid stenosis greater than 50% have been reported to be risk factors for the occurrence of cerebrovascular complications. Perioperative cerebrovascular complications are associated with higher mortality and poor functional outcome at one year follow-up. After the perioperative period, the only factor that has been significantly associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular complications is a history of prior stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic. Other associated factors include unknown atrial fibrillation, septic emboli from endocarditis, cardiac catheterization and perioperative hemodynamic shock. According to the TOAST etiologic classification, the most prevalent etiologic subtype of ischemic stroke is undetermined cause. PMID:21804780

  4. Characterization and prognosis factors of cerebro-vascular disease in Cienfuegos province. Caracterización y factores pronósticos de la enfermedad cerebrovascular en la Provincia de Cienfuegos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Suárez Suri

    Full Text Available Fundaments: Cerebrovascular disease constitutes the third cause of death and the first cause of severe discapacity in adults in those countries that have a developed health system like ours. Objective: To characterise the patients with cerebrovascular disease and to determine the variables that influence upon their prognosis once it is established. Method: Prospective, descriptive, longitudinal study of a series of cases developed at the University Hospital ¨Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima¨. Questionnaires were applied to the patients that fitted the inclusion criteria (n 1318 Results: The mean age was 66,08 years with a predominance of white patients ( 75,26 %, mainly males ( 56,67%. The risk factor of highest frequency was hypertension ( 43,24 % The evolution for alive patients without discapacities was 14,71%, alive with discapacities ( 57,96% and death 27,31%. There was a predominance of ischemic cerebrovascular disease (46,13 % of aterothrombotic infarcts and 14,94 % cardioembolic disease. In regards to hemorrhagic disease 13,42 % were intracerebral hemorrhage and 4,55% subarachnoid hemorrhage. There was a prognostic correlation between the clinical variables: consciousness, sight, sensibility, language, tone, Babinski , osteotendious reflexes and muscular force. For the general variables cerebral edema, bacterial bronchopneumonia , displacement of the medial line, diagnosis is some values, CT scan diagnoses in some values for diabetes mellitus and convulsions.

    Fundamento: Las enfermedades cerebrovasculares constituyen la tercera causa de muerte y la primera de discapacidad grave del adulto en los países con sistemas de salud desarrollados similares al nuestro. Objetivo : Caracterizar a los pacientes con enfermedades cerebrovasculares y determinar las variables que influyen en su pron

  5. Effects of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 on ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongjie Luo; Xiaoping Wang; Hongbin Sun

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor I, a nuclear transcription factor, is induced by hypoxia. Hypoxia-inducible factor I, a heterodimeric DNA-binding protein, is composed of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 β subunits, which are family members of the basic helix-loop-helix-PER, ARNT, SIM (PAS) protein. O2 concentration regulates hypoxia-inducible factor 1 activity via this subunit. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α plays a major role in response to hypoxia and transcriptional activation, as well as in the target gene specificity of the DNA enhancer. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1β cannot be induced by hypoxia. This effect may be due to hypoxia-inducible factor 1 stability and activated conformation due to dimerization. Previous studies have shown that hypoxia-inducible factor 1 mRNA expression increases in the penumbra following ischemia/hypoxia. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 plays an important role in brain tissue injury alter ischemia by affecting a series of target genes, elevating tolerance to hypoxia, and ensuring survival of neural cells. This article summarizes the structure, function, expression, regulatory mechanisms, biological effects, and significance of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease. As a transcriptional activator, hypoxia- inducible factor 1 plays a key role in hypoxic responses by stabilizing the internal environment. It also has been shown to regulate the expression of several genes. The regulatory effects of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease have been described. The present review re-examined the concept of brain protection at the level of gene regulation.

  6. EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS IN ACUTE STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebrovascular disease is the third most common cause of death in the developed world after cancer and ischemic heart disease. In India, community surveys have shown a crude prevalence rate of 200 per 100000 population for hemiplegia. Aims and objectives: Identification of risk factors for c erebrovascular disease. Materials and Methods: Inclusion Criteria: Cases of acute stroke admitted in S.V.R.R.G.G.H, Tirupati were taken for the study. Exclusion Criteria: Head injury cases, neoplasm cases producing cerebrovascular disease were excluded. Re sults: Stroke was more common in male, 54% patients were male 46% were female. It was more common in 6 th and 7 th decade. More common risk factors were hypertension followed by smoking, diabetes mellitus. More common pathology was infarction. Conclusion: Com mon risk factors for acute stroke are hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, obesity, cardiac disease. Stroke was confirmed by CT scan of brain.

  7. Categorization of cerebrovascular intervention methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenxin Zhao; Gelin Xu; Xinfeng Liu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebrovascular intervention is a medical strategy to diagnose and treat cerebrovascular disease by intravascular intervention techniques. With the continual developments of computer technology, imageology, and angiography, cerebrovascular intervention techniques have developed rapidly.OBJECTIVE: To summarize and to evaluate vascular imaging diagnostic techniques, vascular intra-arterial thrombolysis, vascular intra-arterial angioplasty, and vascular embolization in clinical applications.RETRIEVAL STRATEGY: An online search was conducted in PubMed for English language reports, published from January 2002 to January 2008, containing the key words: intervention therapy, cerebral vascular disease, endovascular intervention and angioplasty. A total of 57 publications were identified. Inclusion criteria: articles about cerebrovascular intervention for cerebrovascular disease; articles published either in high impact factor journals or in recent years. Exclusion criteria: duplicated articles.LITERATURE EVALUATION: 30 articles were identified concerning intravascular intervention techniques and arterial angioplasty. Of those, 7 articles were reviews and 23 were clinical or basic studies.DATA SYNTHESIS: Carotid artery and basilar artery stenosis were important etiological factors for ischemic cerebrovascular disease. The mechanism of stenosis induction included atherosclerotic plaque exfoliation and stenosis could cause hemodynamic changes to induce cerebral infarction. Therefore, the treatment of carotid artery and basilar artery stenosis played a key role in preventing ischemic cerebral infarction. The international organization for subarachnoid hemorrhage aneurysm has conclusively shown that both relative and absolute risk factors of intravascular embolotherapy were reduced compared to those of surgical occlusion, demonstrating the important role of vascular embolization for the treatment of intracranial aneurysm. Endovascular stents were placed into the

  8. Investigation of community senile hypertension patients combined with other cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases%社区老年高血压患者合并其他心血管危险因素及心脑血管疾病的调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴昊

    2015-01-01

    目的:调查社区老年高血压患者合并其他心血管危险因素及心脑血管疾病状况,为社区高血压管理提供借鉴。方法:抽取社区老年高血压患者200例,收集患者临床资料,进行对比分析。结果:男性糖尿病率14.91%低于女性的20.93%,吸烟率48.25%、缺乏运动率37.72%高于女性的19.77%、30.23%,伴有≥2种危险因素人均脑卒中与心脏病发作住院次数高于伴有1种危险因素患者,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:脑卒中与心脏病发作住院次数与伴有心血管病危险因素件数呈正相关;应开展老年高血压疾病心血管病风险因素筛查,关注高危人群,积极转变后天因素,有助于降低心脑血管病发生风险,改善患者预后。%Objective:To investigate the condition of community senile hypertension patients combined with other cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases,to provide reference for the community hypertension management. Methods:200 cases of community senile hypertension patients were selected.Their clinical data were selected and contrastively analyzed.Results:The male diabetes rate 14.91% was lower than 20.93% of female;the smoking rate 48.25% and the lack of movement rate 37.72% were higher than 19.77% and 30.23% of female.The average stroke and heart attack hospitalization number of patients with 2 pieces or more were higher than that of patients with 1 piece or below,and the difference was statistically significant(P<0.05).Conclusion:The stroke and heart attack hospitalization number is positively correlated with the quantity of cardiovascular disease risk factors.It should develop the screening for senile hypertension disease cardiovascular disease risk factors,focus on high-risk groups,positive change acquired factors,help to reduce the risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease,and improve the prognosis of the patients.

  9. Risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Catherine J; Connors, K C; Sheehan, Timothy J; Vaughan, James S

    2005-06-01

    Minimize surprises on your financial statement by adopting a model for integrated risk management that: Examines interrelationships among operations, investments, and financing. Incorporates concepts of the capital asset pricing model to manage unexpected volatility PMID:17240669

  10. Increased Cerebral Oxygen Metabolism and Ischemic Stress in Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome-Associated Risk Factors: Preliminary Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Uchino, Ken; Lin, Ridwan; Zaidi, Syed F.; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Sashin, Donald; Bircher, Nicholas; Chang, Yue-Fang; Hammer, Maxim D.; Reddy, Vivek; Jovin, Tudor G.; Vora, Nirav; Jumaa, Mouhammad; Massaro, Lori; Billigen, Julia; Boada, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemia are risk factors that characterize metabolic syndrome (MetS), which increases the risk for stroke by 40%. In a preliminary study, our aim was to evaluate cerebrovascular reactivity and oxygen metabolism in subjects free of vascular disease but with one or more of these risk factors. Volunteers (n=15) 59±15 (mean±SD)years of age clear of cerebrovascular disease by magnetic resonance angiography but with one or more risk factors were studied by ...

  11. Cerebrovascular stroke at high altitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To asses the high altitude as a risk factor for cerebrovascular stroke in people residing at a height greater than 15,000 feet above sea level. Results: Ten patients suffered from stroke at high altitude while just one case had stroke in indexed age group at lower heights (p-value<0.05). Relative risk was 10 times greater at high altitude. Conclusion: High altitude is a risk factor for stroke in persons residing at altitudes of over 15, 000 ft. (author)

  12. Homocistinemia, factor de riesgo oculto en la enfermedad cerebrovascular isquémica: Presentación de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liván Rodríguez Mutuberría

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available La homocisteína y su metabolismo han sido objeto de estudios, desde la década de los 60, se ha considerado la relación existente entre ella y el desarrollo de aterosclerosis y enfermedades vasculares. Se presentó un paciente, que ingresó al Centro Internacional de Restauración Neurológica con diagnóstico de enfermedad cerebrovascular isquémica y cardiopatía isquémica, en ausencia de factores de riesgo. Entre los estudios realizados al enfermo, se detectó una elevación moderada de los niveles de homocisteína en plasma. Se reconoció la participación de la homocisteína en la génesis de la enfermedad del paciente, se realizó una breve reseña de los efectos de este aminoácido sobre los vasos sanguíneos. Considerando el tratamiento de este fenómeno, ha quedado demostrado, que la terapia con ácido fólico combinada con vitamina B6 y B12 produce disminuciones de la homocisteína en plasma. En el caso presentado se inició tratamiento con 5 mg de ácido fólico asociado a vitaminas del complejo B.Homocysteine and its metabolism have been studied since the 60´s. The relation existing between homocysteine, the development of atherosclerosis and vascular disease has also been considered. We present here a patient assisted at the International Center of Neurological Restoration with the diagnosis of ischemic cerebrovascular disease and ischemic cardiopathy in the absence of risk factors. A moderate elevation of the homocysteine levels in plasma was observed during the patient's study. The participation of homocysteine in the genesis of the vascular alterations affecting this patient was recognized. A brief review of the effects of amino-acids on blood vessels is included. Considering the treatment of this phenomenon, it has been suggested that folic acid combined with vitamines B6 and B12 produce a decrease of homocysteine in plasma. In the case presented here, treatment with 5 mg of folic acid associated with complex - B type

  13. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Elderly Patients After Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery for Early-Stage Glottic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Comprehensive neck radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to increase cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk in advanced-stage head-and-neck cancer. We assessed whether more limited neck RT used for early-stage (T1-T2 N0) glottic cancer is associated with increased CVD risk, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: We identified patients ≥66 years of age with early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer from SEER diagnosed from 1992 to 2007. Patients treated with combined surgery and RT were excluded. Medicare CPT codes for carotid interventions, Medicare ICD-9 codes for cerebrovascular events, and SEER data for stroke as the cause of death were collected. Similarly, Medicare CPT and ICD-9 codes for peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were assessed to serve as an internal control between treatment groups. Results: A total of 1413 assessable patients (RT, n=1055; surgery, n=358) were analyzed. The actuarial 10-year risk of CVD was 56.5% (95% confidence interval 51.5%-61.5%) for the RT cohort versus 48.7% (41.1%-56.3%) in the surgery cohort (P=.27). The actuarial 10-year risk of PVD did not differ between the RT (52.7% [48.1%-57.3%]) and surgery cohorts (52.6% [45.2%-60.0%]) (P=.89). Univariate analysis showed an increased association of CVD with more recent diagnosis (P=.001) and increasing age (P=.001). On multivariate Cox analysis, increasing age (P<.001) and recent diagnosis (P=.002) remained significantly associated with a higher CVD risk, whereas the association of RT and CVD remained not statistically significant (HR=1.11 [0.91-1.37,] P=.31). Conclusions: Elderly patients with early-stage laryngeal cancer have a high burden of cerebrovascular events after surgical management or RT. RT and surgery are associated with comparable risk for subsequent CVD development after treatment in elderly patients

  14. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Elderly Patients After Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery for Early-Stage Glottic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Julian C.; Kruser, Tim J. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Gondi, Vinai [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Central Dupage Hospital Cancer Center, Warrenville, Illinois (United States); Mohindra, Pranshu; Cannon, Donald M.; Harari, Paul M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bentzen, Søren M., E-mail: bentzen@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Comprehensive neck radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to increase cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk in advanced-stage head-and-neck cancer. We assessed whether more limited neck RT used for early-stage (T1-T2 N0) glottic cancer is associated with increased CVD risk, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: We identified patients ≥66 years of age with early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer from SEER diagnosed from 1992 to 2007. Patients treated with combined surgery and RT were excluded. Medicare CPT codes for carotid interventions, Medicare ICD-9 codes for cerebrovascular events, and SEER data for stroke as the cause of death were collected. Similarly, Medicare CPT and ICD-9 codes for peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were assessed to serve as an internal control between treatment groups. Results: A total of 1413 assessable patients (RT, n=1055; surgery, n=358) were analyzed. The actuarial 10-year risk of CVD was 56.5% (95% confidence interval 51.5%-61.5%) for the RT cohort versus 48.7% (41.1%-56.3%) in the surgery cohort (P=.27). The actuarial 10-year risk of PVD did not differ between the RT (52.7% [48.1%-57.3%]) and surgery cohorts (52.6% [45.2%-60.0%]) (P=.89). Univariate analysis showed an increased association of CVD with more recent diagnosis (P=.001) and increasing age (P=.001). On multivariate Cox analysis, increasing age (P<.001) and recent diagnosis (P=.002) remained significantly associated with a higher CVD risk, whereas the association of RT and CVD remained not statistically significant (HR=1.11 [0.91-1.37,] P=.31). Conclusions: Elderly patients with early-stage laryngeal cancer have a high burden of cerebrovascular events after surgical management or RT. RT and surgery are associated with comparable risk for subsequent CVD development after treatment in elderly patients.

  15. Endometrial Cancer Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer? Next Topic What causes endometrial cancer? Endometrial cancer risk factors A risk factor is anything that affects your ... to obesity, which is a well-known endometrial cancer risk factor. Many scientists think this is the main way ...

  16. Risk Factors and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Back to Patient Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Even people who look healthy and ... Blood Pressure , high cholesterol, diabetes, and thyroid disease. Risk Factors For Arrhythmias and Heart Disease The following ...

  17. Risk Factors for Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here: Home For Patients Risk Factors Risk Factors for Scleroderma The cause of scleroderma is ... what biological factors contribute to scleroderma pathogenesis. Genetic Risk Scleroderma does not tend to run in families ...

  18. Thickness of the Human Cerebral Cortex is Associated with Metrics of Cerebrovascular Health in a Normative Sample of Community Dwelling Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Leritz, Elizabeth C.; Salat, David H.; Williams, Victoria J.; Schnyer, David M.; Rudolph, James L.; Lipsitz, Lewis; Fischl, Bruce; McGlinchey, Regina E.; Milberg, William P.

    2010-01-01

    We examined how wide ranges in levels of risk factors for cerebrovascular disease are associated with thickness of the human cerebral cortex in 115 individuals ages 43–83 with no cerebrovascular or neurologic history. Cerebrovascular risk factors included blood pressure, cholesterol, body mass index, creatinine, and diabetes-related factors. Variables were submitted into a principal components analysis that confirmed four orthogonal factors (Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Cholesterol/Metabolic ...

  19. Clinical Significance of Cerebrovascular Biomarkers and White Matter Tract Integrity in Alzheimer Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ming-Kung; Lu, Yan-Ting; Huang, Chi-Wei; Lin, Pin-Hsuan; Chen, Nai-Ching; Lui, Chun-Chung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Lee, Chen-Chang; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Sz-Fan; Chang, Chiung-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cerebrovascular risk factors and white matter (WM) damage lead to worse cognitive performance in Alzheimer dementia (AD). This study investigated WM microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging in patients with mild to moderate AD and investigated specific fiber tract involvement with respect to predefined cerebrovascular risk factors and neurobehavioral data prediction cross-sectionally and after 18 months. To identify the primary pathoanatomic relationships of risk biomarkers to f...

  20. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000106.htm Heart disease - risk factors To use the sharing features on ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. Changing ...

  1. Cerebrovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008482 Risk factors for ischemic lacunar stroke associated headache. HU Wei(胡伟), et al. Dept Neurol, Nanjing General Hosp, Nanjing Milit Command, Nanjing 210002. Chin J Nerv Ment Dis 2008;34(5):262-265. Objective To analyze risk factors of stroke-associated headache (SH) and explore its underlying mechanisms. Methods First-ever lacunar infarction patients (n=371) were extracted from Nanjing Stroke Registration Program.

  2. Hypertension and cerebrovascular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veglio, Franco; Paglieri, Cristina; Rabbia, Franco; Bisbocci, Daniela; Bergui, Mauro; Cerrato, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    Hypertension is the most important modifiable factor for cerebrovascular disease. Stroke and dementia are growing health problems that have considerable social and economical consequences. Hypertension causes brain lesions by several mechanisms predisposing to lacunar infarctions, leucoaraiosis, and white matter changes as well as to intracerebral haemorrhages. These parenchymal damages determine evident or silent neurological alterations that often precede the onset of cognitive decline. It is important to recognize cerebrovascular disease and, above all, to correlate typical lesions to hypertension. Antihypertensive therapy has shown clinical benefits in primary and secondary prevention of stroke. These drugs represent important instruments against cerebrovascular disease but their effects on cognition are still matter of debate. Cerebral parenchymal and functional damages have to be considered together to make medical intervention more incisive. PMID:19100549

  3. Depression as the cause and consequence of cerebrovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabi-Žikić Tamara

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Inbtroduction: Recent epidemiological, clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathological studies have reported substantial evidence on the complex interactive relationships between depression and cerebrovascular diseases, especially in older populations, and plausible explanations of the etiopathogenetic mechanisms in both directions have been proposed. Poststroke depression Although there is no general consensus regarding its prevalence, it is widely accepted that major depression after stroke is common and that it should be recognized as a key factor in rehabilitation and outcome following stroke. Vascular depression The "vascular depression" hypothesis presupposes that late-onset depression may often result from vascular damage to frontal-subcortical circuits implicated in mood regulation. This concept has stimulated many researches and the obtained results support the proposed hypothesis. Depression as a stroke risk factor Recent large studies have emphasized the role of depression per se in the development of subsequent stroke. Mechanisms proposed to explain the increased risk of cerebrovascular diseases in depressed patients There are a number of plausible mechanisms that could explain why depression may increase the risk of subsequent cerebrovascular disease, the most important being sympathoadrenal hyperactivity, platelet activation, an increase in inflammatory cytokines and an increased risk of arrhythmias. Conclusion: Thorough clinical examinations determining the conventional stroke risk factors in the population with depression, as well as management of depression as part of the overall measures for the reduction of cerebrovascular risk factors are of utmost importance.

  4. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of cerebrovascular events in patients with osteoarthritis: a nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, Francesco; Piccinni, Carlo; Simonetti, Monica; Levi, Miriam; Lora Aprile, Pierangelo; Cricelli, Iacopo; Cricelli, Claudio; Fanelli, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies show that the risk of cardiovascular adverse events for certain traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is similar to that of rofecoxib. While these results are focused on ischemic cardiomyopathy, there is little evidence concerning the risk of ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack and hemorrhagic stroke. Additionally, there is no information on nimesulide and ketoprofen, the most frequently prescribed NSAIDs in Italy, along with diclofenac. This study aims to determine whether the use of NSAIDs is associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular events in Italy. We performed a case-control analysis nested in a cohort of patients with osteoarthritis between 2002 and 2011 who were newly treated with NSAIDs. The patients were followed until December 31, 2012. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) of cerebrovascular events (index date) associated with current (until 30 days before the index date), recent (31-365 days) and past (>365 days) use of NSAIDs. Within a cohort of 29,722 patients, 1566 cases (1546 matched with controls) were identified (incidence rate = 11.0/1000 person-years). The overall rate of cerebrovascular event was not elevated with current NSAIDs overall when compared with past use. Among individual NSAIDs, diclofenac and ketoprofen were the molecules significantly associated with an increased rate of cerebrovascular events (OR = 1.53; 95 % CI 1.04-2.24; OR = 1.62; 95 % CI 1.02-2.58, respectively). The most frequent event was hemorrhagic stroke following the use of ketoprofen (OR = 2.09; 95 % CI 1.05-4.15). Diclofenac and ketoprofen seemed to increase the risk of cerebrovascular events. These findings might influence the choice of NSAIDs according to patient characteristics. PMID:26271463

  5. [Helicobacter pylori: a new cardiovascular risk factor?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Torres, Alejandra; Martínez Gaensly, Miguel

    2002-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that certain microbial agents may have an etiopathogenic role in the development of atherothrombosis. Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that causes peptic ulcer disease, has been suggested as one of the microbes involved in the development of atherothrombosis. This hypothesis is based on the following observations: a) a higher prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, or cerebrovascular disease; b) the coincidence of Helicobacter pylori infection and cardiovascular risk factors, such as serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations and plasma fibrinogen; c) Helicobacter pylori seropositivity correlates with acute-phase proteins associated with higher risk of coronary disease, such as C-reactive protein, and d) controversial PCR studies indicating the presence of Helicobacter pylori in atheromas. Analysis of the scientific evidence suggests that Helicobacter pylori infection could indirectly contribute to the development and severity of atherothrombosis and cardiovascular disease. PMID:12113724

  6. MRI plaque imaging detects carotid plaques with a high risk for future cerebrovascular events in asymptomatic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Esposito-Bauer

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively whether MRI plaque imaging can identify patients with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis who have an increased risk for future cerebral events. MRI plaque imaging allows categorization of carotid stenosis into different lesion types (I-VIII. Within these lesion types, lesion types IV-V and VI are regarded as rupture-prone plaques, whereas the other lesion types represent stable ones. METHODS: Eighty-three consecutive patients (45 male (54.2%; age 54-88 years (mean 73.2 years presenting with an asymptomatic carotid stenosis of 50-99% according to ECST-criteria were recruited. Patients were imaged with a 1.5-T scanner. T1-, T2-, time-of-flight-, and proton-density weighted studies were performed. The carotid plaques were classified as lesion type I-VIII. Clinical endpoints were ischemic stroke, TIA or amaurosis fugax. Survival analysis and log rank test were used to ascertain statistical significance. RESULTS: Six out of 83 patients (7.2% were excluded: 4 patients had insufficient MR image quality; 1 patient was lost-to-follow-up; 1 patient died shortly after the baseline MRI plaque imaging. The following results were obtained by analyzing the remaining 77 patients. The mean time of follow-up was 41.1 months. During follow-up, n = 9 (11.7% ipsilateral ischemic cerebrovascular events occurred. Only patients presenting with the high-risk lesion types IV-V and VI developed an ipsilateral cerebrovascular event versus none of the patients presenting with the stable lesion types III, VII, and VIII (n = 9 (11.7% vs. n = 0 (0% during follow-up. Event-free survival was higher among patients with the MRI-defined stable lesion types (III, VII, and VIII than in patients with the high-risk lesion types (IV-V and VI (log rank test P<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: MRI plaque imaging has the potential to identify patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis who are particularly at risk of

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors can affect a person’s chance of getting cancer of the pancreas. Most of these are risk factors for exocrine ... Chronic pancreatitis, a long-term inflammation of the pancreas, is linked with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (especially in smokers), but most people with pancreatitis ...

  8. Relation between diagnosis of atheromatous plaque from orthopantomographs and cardiovascular risk factors. A study of cases and control subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Barona Dorado, Cristina; Gutiérrez Bonet, Carmen; Leco Berrocal, María Isabel; Fernández Cáliz, Fernando; Martínez González, José María

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years the use of orthopantomography has been proposed as a low-cost, reliable and non-invasive diagnostic medium for detecting atheromatous plaque. The purpose of this study was to correlate the presence of carotid calcifications (atheroma) in orthopantomographs with specific risk factors for cerebrovascular accidents (previous cerebrovascular accidents, arterial hypertension, and diabetes). Material and Methods The methods used in this observational study of cases and co...

  9. Risk factors for neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A broad survey is given of risk factors for neoplasms. The main carcinogenic substances (including also ionizing radiation and air pollution) are listed, and are correlated with the risk factors for various cancers most frequently explained and discussed in the literature. The study is intended to serve as a basis for a general assessment of the incidence of neoplasms in children, and of cancer mortality in the entire population of Bavaria in the years 1983-1989, or 1979-1988, respectively, with the principal idea of drawing up an environment-related health survey. The study therefore takes into account not only ionizing radiation as a main risk factor, but also other risk factors detectable within the ecologic context, as e.g. industrial installations and their effects, refuse incineration plants or waste dumps, or the social status. (orig./MG)

  10. Brain Tumor Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for example), unusual symptoms such as headaches or short-term memory loss can be investigated with your family history in mind. Click here to view our webinars on Causes and Risk Factors of Brain Tumors. Additional information ...

  11. Risk Factors of Cholangiocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tyson, Gia L.; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2011-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is the second most common primary hepatic malignancy after hepatocellular cancer. It accounts for approximately 10–25% of all hepatobiliary malignancies. There are considerable geographic and demographic variations in the incidence of cholangiocarcinoma. There are several established risk factors for CC including parasitic infections, primary sclerosing cholangitis, biliary-duct cysts, hepatolithiasis, and toxins. Other less-established, potential risk factors include infla...

  12. Thirty-Year Trends in Mortality from Cerebrovascular Diseases in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Won; Lee, Hye Sun; Suh, Il

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Cerebrovascular disease is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in Korea. Understanding of cerebrovascular disease mortality trends is important to reduce the health burden from cerebrovascular diseases. We examined the changing pattern of mortality related to cerebrovascular disease in Korea over 30 years from 1983 to 2012. Subjects and Methods Numbers of deaths from cerebrovascular disease, hemorrhagic stroke, and cerebral infarction were obtained from the national Cause of Death Statistics. Crude and age-adjusted mortality rates were calculated for men and women for each year. Penalized B-spline methods, which reduce bias and variability in curve fitting, were used to identify the trends of 30-year mortality and identify the year of highest mortality. Results During the 30 years, cerebrovascular disease mortality has markedly declined. The age-adjusted cerebrovascular disease mortality rate has decreased by 78% in men and by 68% in women. In the case of hemorrhagic stroke, crude mortality peaked in 2001 but age-adjusted mortality peaked in 1994. Between 1994 and 2012, age-adjusted mortality from hemorrhagic stroke has decreased by 68% in men and 59% in women. In the case of cerebral infarction, crude and age-adjusted mortality rates steeply increased until 2004 and 2003, respectively, and both rates decreased rapidly thereafter. Conclusion Cerebrovascular disease mortality rate has significantly decreased over the last 30 years in Korea, but remains a health burden. The prevalence of major cardiovascular risk factors are still highly prevalent in Korea. PMID:27482259

  13. Relationship of obesity and insulin resistance with the cerebrovascular reactivity: a case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Flores, Marcela; García-García, Eduardo; Cano-Nigenda, Claudia Vanessa; Cantú-Brito, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with increased risk for stroke. The breath-holding index (BHI) is a measure of vasomotor reactivity of the brain which can be measured with the transcranial Doppler (TCD). We aim to evaluate obesity as an independent factor for altered cerebrovascular reactivity. Methods Cerebrovascular hemodynamics (mean flow velocities MFV, pulsatility index, PI, resistance index, RI, and BHI) was determined in 85 non-obese (Body Mass Index, BMI ≤27 kg/m2) and 85 obese subje...

  14. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke Heart Disease Risk Factors Recommend ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke File Formats Help: How do ...

  15. SMAD3 rs17228212 gene polymorphism is associated with reduced risk to cerebrovascular accidents and subclinical atherosclerosis in anti-CCP negative Spanish rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes García-Bermúdez

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a complex polygenic inflammatory disease associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular (CV disease. Previous genome-wide association studies have described SMAD3 rs17228212 polymorphism as an important signal associated with CV events. The aim of the present study was to evaluate for the first time the relationship between this gene polymorphism and the susceptibility to CV manifestations and its potential association with the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis assessed by the evaluation of carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT in patients with RA.One thousand eight hundred and ninety-seven patients fulfilling classification criteria for RA were genotyped for SMAD3 rs17228212 gene polymorphism through TaqMan genotyping assay. Also, subclinical atherosclerosis determined by the assessment of cIMT was analyzed in a subgroup of these patients by carotid ultrasonography.No statistically significant differences were observed when allele frequencies of RA patients with or without CV events were compared. Nevertheless, when RA patients were stratified according to anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP status, we found that in RA patients who were negative for anti-CCP antibodies, the presence of C allele of SMAD3 rs17228212 polymorphism conferred a protective effect against the risk of cerebrovascular accident (CVA after adjustment for demographic and classic CV risk factors (HR [95%CI]=0.36 [0.14-0.94], p=0.038 in a Cox regression model. Additionally, correlation between the presence of C allele of SMAD3 rs17228212 polymorphism and lower values of cIMT was found after adjustment for demographic and classic CV risk factors (p-value=0.0094 in the anti-CCP negative RA patients.Our results revealed that SMAD3 rs17228212 gene variant is associated with lower risk of CVA and less severe subclinical atherosclerosis in RA patients negative for anti-CCP antibodies. These findings may have

  16. Clinical Survey of Cerebrovascular Disease in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ghofrani

    Full Text Available Objective: Stroke is defined as the sudden occlusion or rupture of cerebral arteries or veins resulting in focal cerebral damage and clinical neurologic deficits. The risk factors for stroke in children are numerous and differ from those in adults. Identification of these factors can prevent subsequent strokes. The aim of this study is to determine the etiology of stroke in children.Methods: In this descriptive prospective study, children who were referred to pediatric neurology clinic in Mofid Children's Hospital due to acute hemiparesis during 2 years period (Sep 2003-Sep 2005 were evaluated and their diagnosis was cerebrovascular disorders, in the view of physical examination and brain imaging.Findings: The study group consisted of 40 children in age groups between 3 months to 14 years old. The most common age group at presentation was 2 to 5 years old. Occurrence was predominant during autumn and winter (70%. The most common clinical presentations were acute hemiparesis (85% and seizures (40%. The other symptoms were as follow: 15% decreased level of consciousness, 12.5% fever, 7.5% VI nerve palsy, and 2.5% cerebellar signs. 20% of patients suffered from hemorrhagic and 80% had ischemic stroke. In 60% of the patients specific etiologic factors were identified and in the rest of the group, risk factors could be delineated. The most common etiologies were: 17.5% cardiac diseases or procedures and 10% hematologic disorders. Other etiologies included: 7.5% prothrombotic states, 7.5% CNS infection, 5% mitochondriopathy, 2.5% for each of the head trauma, migraine, serum lipid abnormality, hypertension and arteriovenus malformation. The most common risk factors consisted of 40% anemia and 20% infections.Conclusion: This study demonstrates that stroke in children is a multifactorial process. Identification of the underlying risk factors for cerebrovascular disorders is highly desirable because many of the risk factors can be prevented, resulting in

  17. Breast cancer risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, Marzena; Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  18. Breast cancer risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Kamińska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women’s ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual’s life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence.

  19. Breast cancer risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Marzena Kamińska; Tomasz Ciszewski; Karolina Łopacka-Szatan; Paweł Miotła; Elżbieta Starosławska

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neopla...

  20. Risk Factors for Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors review research on risk factors for eating disorders, restricting their focus to studies in which clear precedence of the hypothesized risk factor over onset of the disorder is established. They illustrate how studies of sociocultural risk factors and biological factors have progressed on parallel tracks and propose that major advances…

  1. Clinical validation of the nursing diagnosis Risk for Aspiration among patients who experienced a cerebrovascular accident Validación clínica del diagnóstico de enfermería riesgo de aspiración en pacientes con accidente cerebrovascular Validação clínica do diagnóstico de enfermagem "risco de aspiração" em pacientes com acidente cerebrovascular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahissa Frota Cavalcante

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: the study's objective was the clinical validation of the nursing diagnosis Risk for Aspiration among patients who experienced cerebrovascular accidents (CVA. METHOD: a prospective cohort study was conducted with 24 patients hospitalized due to a CVA. The instrument used to collect the data addressed the risk factors for respiratory aspiration, validated by concept analysis and by experts. RESULTS: the most frequent risk factors for respiratory aspiration were: dysphagia (54.2% and impaired physical mobility (41.7%. The prevalence of the nursing diagnosis Risk for Aspiration was 58.3% and the prevalence of respiratory aspiration over the span of 48 hours (monitoring period was 37.5%. Risk factors for dysphagia and impaired physical mobility were significantly associated with respiratory aspiration. CONCLUSION: the risk factors dysphagia and impaired physical mobility are good predictors of the nursing diagnosis Risk for Aspiration. This study contributed to improving the NANDA-I Taxonomy and the systematization of the nursing process.OBJETIVO: el estudio tiene como objetivo la validación clínica del diagnóstico de enfermería riesgo de aspiración en pacientes con accidente cerebrovascular. MÉTODO: un estudio de cohorte prospectivo desarrollado con 24 pacientes hospitalizados para el tratamiento del ictus agudo. El instrumento utilizado para la recolección de datos contiene los factores de riesgo de aspiración respiratoria, validado en el análisis conceptual y por expertos. RESULTADOS: los factores de riesgo para aspiración respiratoria más presentes en los pacientes fueron: disfagia (54,2% y disminución de la movilidad física (41,7%. La prevalencia del diagnóstico de enfermería riesgo de aspiración fue del 58,3% y la prevalencia en 48 horas (el tiempo del seguimiento de la aspiración respiratoria fue de 37,5%. Los factores de riesgo disfagia y la disminución de la movilidad física se asociaron significativamente con

  2. Risk Parity Portfolios with Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Roncalli, Thierry; Weisang, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    Portfolio construction and risk budgeting are the focus of many studies by academics and practitioners. In particular, diversification has spawn much interest and has been defined very differently. In this paper, we analyze a method to achieve portfolio diversification based on the decomposition of the portfolio's risk into risk factor contributions. First, we expose the relationship between risk factor and asset contributions. Secondly, we formulate the diversification problem in terms of ri...

  3. Prevalence of stroke/cardiovascular risk factors in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo, M.; Sipos, K.; Thuroczy, G.; Panczel, G.; Ilias, L.; Szonyi, P.; Bodo, M., Jr.; Nebella, T.; Banyasz, A.; Nagy, Z.

    2010-04-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Hungary using the Cerberus system which includes: 1) a questionnaire addressing the risk factors for stroke/cardiovascular disease; 2) amplifiers to record the pulse waves of cerebral arteries (rheoencephalography) and peripheral arteries, electrocardiogram and electroencephalogram. Additionally, subjects were measured for carotid stenosis by Doppler ultrasound and 12-lead electrocardiogram; subjects were also screened for blood cholesterol, glucose, and triglyceride levels. Prevalence of the following stroke risk factors was identified: overweight, 63.25%; sclerotic brain arteries (by rheoencephalogram), 54.29%; heart disease, 37.92%; pathologic carotid flow, 34.24%; smoking, 30.55%; high blood cholesterol, 28.70%; hypertension, 27.83%; high triglyceride, 24.35%; abnormality in electrocardiogram, 20%; high glucose, 15.95%; symptoms of transient ischemic attack, 16.07%; alcohol abuse, 6.74%; and diabetes, 4.53%. The study demonstrates a possible model for primary cardiovascular disease/stroke prevention. This method offers a standardizable, cost effective, practical technique for mass screenings by identifying the population at high risk for cardiovascular disturbances, especially cerebrovascular disease (primary prevention). In this model, the rheoencephalogram can detect cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis in the susceptibility/presymptomatic phase, earlier than the Doppler ultrasound technique. The method also provides a model for storing analog physiological signals in a computer-based medical record and is a first step in applying an expert system to stroke prevention.

  4. What Are the Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Stay Informed Cancer Home What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from your cell phone Research has found several risk factors that may increase your chances of getting lung ...

  5. Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB) focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of high-quality risk factor metrics, methods, tools, technologies, and resources for use across the cancer research continuum, and the assessment of cancer-related risk factors in the population.

  6. In-hospital cerebrovascular complications following orthotopic liver transplantation: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhijian

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebrovascular complications are severe events following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. This study aimed to observe the clinical and neuroimaging features and possible risk factors of in-hospital cerebrovascular complications in the patients who underwent OLT. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed 337 consecutive patients who underwent 358 OLTs. Cerebrovascular complications were determined by clinical and neuroimaging manifestations, and the possible risk factors were analyzed in the patients with intracranial hemorrhage. Results Ten of 337 (3.0% patients developed in-hospital cerebrovascular complications (8 cases experienced intracranial hemorrhage and 2 cases had cerebral infarction, and 6 of them died. The clinical presentations were similar to common stroke, but with rapid deterioration at early stage. The hematomas on brain CT scan were massive, irregular, multifocal and diffuse, and most of them were located at brain lobes and might enlarge or rebleed. Infarcts presented lacunar and multifocal lesions in basal gangliar but with possible hemorrhagic transformation. The patients with intracranial hemorrhage had older age and a more frequency of systemic infection than non-intracranial hemorrhage patients. (P = 0.011 and 0.029, respectively. Conclusion Posttransplant cerebrovascular complications have severe impact on outcome of the patients who received OLT. Older age and systemic infection may be the possible risk factors of in-hospital intracranial hemorrhage following OLT.

  7. Stroke - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risk of stroke goes up with age. Your gender. Men have a higher risk of getting heart disease than women, except in older adults. Your genes and race. If your parents had a stroke, you are at higher risk. ...

  8. Chronic mild cerebrovascular dysfunction as a cause for Alzheimer's disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Humpel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive chronic disorder and is characterized by β-amyloid plaques and angiopathy, tau pathology, neuronal cell death, and inflammatory responses. The reasons for this disease are not known. This review proposes the hypothesis that a chronic mild longlasting cerebrovascular dysfunction could initiate a cascade of events leading to AD. It is suggested that (vascular) risk factors (e.g. hypercholesterolemia, type 2 diabetes, hyperhomocysteinemia) causes either ...

  9. Perinatal risk factors for strabismus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Tobias; Boyd, Heather A; Poulsen, Gry; Haargaard, Birgitte; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Holmes, Jonathan M; Melbye, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the aetiological factors underlying strabismus. We undertook a large cohort study to investigate perinatal risk factors for strabismus, overall and by subtype.......Little is known about the aetiological factors underlying strabismus. We undertook a large cohort study to investigate perinatal risk factors for strabismus, overall and by subtype....

  10. Risks factoring business: accounting measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.V. Gutsaylyuk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper carried out the identification of risk factors for the development of possible accounting software management. Studied theoretical and methodological aspects of the risk classification of factoring operations in the part of the risk assessment factors. It is proposed to consider the risks factors as the risk that is acceptable controlled by accounting instruments and the risks that can not be taken into account in the accounting records. To minimize the risk factor, accounting-driven tools, a method of self-insurance, which is a factor in the creation of provision for factoring transactions designed to cover unexpected expenses and losses. Provision for factoring factor will establish more stable conditions of financial activity and avoid the fluctuations of profit factor in relation to the writing off of losses on factoring operatsіyam.Developed proposals allow for further research to improve the organizational and methodological basis of accounting and analysis of information as a basis for providing risk management factor, particularly in terms of improving the evaluation questions such risks and their qualitative and quantitative analysis.

  11. Epidemiology, classification, and modifiable risk factors of peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas W Shammas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas W ShammasMidwest Cardiovascular Research Foundation, Cardiovascular Medicine, PC, Davenport, IA, USAAbstract: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is part of a global vascular problem of diffuse atherosclerosis. PAD patients die mostly of cardiac and cerebrovascular-related events and much less frequently due to obstructive disease of the lower extremities. Aggressive risk factors modification is needed to reduce cardiac mortality in PAD patients. These include smoking cessation, reduction of blood pressure to current guidelines, aggressive low density lipoprotein lowering, losing weight, controlling diabetes and the use of oral antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin or clopidogrel. In addition to quitting smoking and exercise, cilostazol and statins have been shown to reduce claudication in patients with PAD. Patients with critical rest limb ischemia or severe progressive claudication need to be treated with revascularization to minimize the chance of limb loss, reduce symptoms, and improve quality of life.Keywords: peripheral arterial disease, epidemiology, risk factors, classification

  12. Cerebrovascular contributions to aging and Alzheimer's disease in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcock, Donna M; Schmitt, Frederick A; Head, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a common cause of intellectual disability and is also associated with early age of onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Due to an extra copy of chromosome 21, most adults over 40years old with DS have beta-amyloid plaques as a result of overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein. Cerebrovascular pathology may also be a significant contributor to neuropathology observed in the brains of adults with DS. This review describes the features of cardiovascular dysfunction and cerebrovascular pathology in DS that may be modifiable risk factors and thus targets for interventions. We will describe cerebrovascular pathology, the role of co-morbidities, imaging studies indicating vascular pathology and the possible consequences. It is clear that our understanding of aging and AD in people with DS will benefit from further studies to determine the role that cerebrovascular dysfunction contributes to cognitive health. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26593849

  13. Genetic Risk Factors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Ashkenazi Jewish descent, causes a greatly increased risk of breast cancer. Zora and her relatives who carry the gene also have an increased risk of ovarian cancer. Interviewer: When there was a ...

  14. Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Factors Request Permissions Print to PDF Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 08/ ... anything that increases a person’s chance of developing cancer. Although risk factors often influence the development of cancer, most do ...

  15. Uric acid levels and their relation to incapacities in acute cerebrovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio López Argüelles

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: cerebrovascular disease and ischemic cardiopathy can be considered as an epidemic and constitute the first cause of incapacities in developed countries. Multiple studies have shown the association between uric acid levels and cerebrovascular diseases. Objective: To correlate the levels of serum uric acid and incapacities in the acute phase of cerebrovascular disease. Methods: A correlational study was carried out with 217 patients with acute cerebrovascular disease. The patient’s incapacity level was measured by using the Barthel Index and those results were related with the serum uric acid levels and other variables. Results: Male patients have higher levels of uric acid (p=0, 04; r=0, 13. Age and Barthel index were p < 0,001; r = -0, 30 and uric acid levels and Barthel Index were p=0, 03; r=-0, 14. The principal predicting factors of incapacity in the acute phase of cerebrovascular disease were the high levels of uric acid, age and diabetes mellitus. Conclusions: It is shown that the highest is the level of uric acid at advanced age; the greatest is the risk of suffering from incapacity in acute phases of cerebrovascular diseases.

  16. Microalbuminuria: a Cardiovascular Risk Factor

    OpenAIRE

    ERCAN, Ertuğrul

    2010-01-01

    Albumin is a protein which is charged negatively. By correcting for the daily excretion of creatinine, the albumin creatinin ratio implicates the daily excretion of albumin in spot urine. Albuminuria is a cardiovascular risk factor in patients with diabetes, hypertension, and the general population. Urinary albumin excretion is independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events, even after adjustment for risk factors. Risk has been shown to increase continuously with inc...

  17. Risk Factors for Teenage Fatherhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberry, Terence P.; Smith, Carolyn A.; Howard, Gregory J.

    1997-01-01

    Uses data from the Rochester Youth Development Study of urban youth (N=615) to identify early risk factors for the likelihood of becoming a teen father. Results show that teen fatherhood is related to a variety of risk factors, such as social class, educational performance, precocious sexual activity, and drug use. (RJM)

  18. Genetic Risk Factors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... option for high-risk women is to take tamoxifen, a drug long used to treat cancer. Dr. ... Zora Brown's case, for example, if we had tamoxifen out -- would that have helped? She sure would ...

  19. Genetic Risk Factors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women who believe that having prophylactic mastectomy may prevent them from having breast cancer. I have a niece who's had prophylactic mastectomy. Announcer: Another preventative option for high-risk women is to take ...

  20. Environmental risk factors and pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter the physical risk factors (as radiation [air contamination, contamination of the environment components and food contamination], radon and its radioactive decay products, radioactive wastes, noise), chemical risk factors [chemical substances, xenobiotics in the food chain the ozone depletion], wastes (waste generation, waste management, municipal waste management, import, export and transit of waste) and natural an technological hazards (water quality deterioration as a result of various accidents and fire risk) in the Slovak Republic in 1997 are reviewed

  1. Searching of the peripheric arterial disease in which patient have cerebrovascular event

    OpenAIRE

    Kanar, Rayiha Görkem

    2012-01-01

    Arteriosclerotic disease a systemic disease. Arteriosclerotic disease may affect more than one region in vascular system. In the presence of risk factors of arteriosclerosis; clinical manifestations will emerge depending on organ involvement. The aim of our study is searching the association of peripheral artery disease and determining related risk factors in patients who had cerebrovascular event. This study was performed by Cardiovascular Surgery Department of Trakya Universty Faculty of Me...

  2. Genetic Risk Factors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... having prophylactic mastectomy may prevent them from having breast cancer. I have a niece who's had prophylactic mastectomy. Announcer: Another preventative option for high-risk women is to take tamoxifen, a drug long used to treat cancer. Dr. Dewitty: In ...

  3. Genetic Risk Factors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... them and their health so much. I do worry that they are at risk and I wish they weren't. Announcer: For women who have the BRCA I gene, the most radical option is a prophylactic mastectomy, where healthy breasts are removed. This is effective in preventing ...

  4. Cognitive impairments in cerebrovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Emelin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular diseases belong to a group of the major causes of cognitive impairments, in the elderly in particular. The paper presents current ideas on the etiology and pathogenesis of vascular cognitive impairments (VCI. The etiological factors of VCI may be divided into genetic, sociodemographic, and common risk factors for vascular and other diseases. The pathogenesis of VCI is multifactorial; cognitive function decrement results from brain damage due to cerebral circulatory disorders. Damage to the deep white matter portions and basal ganglions plays a leading role in the development of cognitive deficit in cerebral circulatory insufficiency, disrupting the connections between the frontal lobes and subcortical structures (a dissociation phenomenon. Regulatory functions are impaired; instability of volitional attention develops; the speed of thinking processes and the performance of professional and everyday skills are suffered, mnestic functions being impaired to a lesser extent. Impairments in other higher cortical functions, such as speech, gnosis, praxis, thinking, generally occur in the later stages of cognitive deficit. The comprehensive approach to examining patients with cognitive dysfunctions, which encompasses physical examination with a mandatory evaluation of neurological symptoms, neuropsychological testing, laboratory studies, instrumental diagnostic methods, and structural and functional neuroimaging techniques, are most justified now. VCI therapy is a challenging task requiring the specific features of different types of cognitive deficit to be analyzed, by providing a rationale for the choice of medications. Therapeutic effectiveness may be enhanced by rational combined multimodal therapy, by keeping in mind a variety of factors for the pathogenesis of VCI.

  5. Environmental risk factors for autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney R. Dietert

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a devastating childhood condition that has emerged as an increasing social concern just as it has increased in prevalence in recent decades. Autism and the broader category of autism spectrum disorders are among the increasingly seen examples in which there is a fetal basis for later disease or disorder. Environmental, genetic, and epigenetic factors all play a role in determining the risk of autism and some of these effects appear to be transgenerational. Identification of the most critical windows of developmental vulnerability is paramount to understanding when and under what circumstances a child is at elevated risk for autism. No single environmental factor explains the increased prevalence of autism. While a handful of environmental risk factors have been suggested based on data from human studies and animal research, it is clear that many more, and perhaps the most significant risk factors, remain to be identified. The most promising risk factors identified to date fall within the categories of drugs, environmental chemicals, infectious agents, dietary factors, and other physical/psychological stressors. However, the rate at which environmental risk factors for autism have been identified via research and safety testing has not kept pace with the emerging health threat posed by this condition. For the way forward, it seems clear that additional focused research is needed. But more importantly, successful risk reduction strategies for autism will require more extensive and relevant developmental safety testing of drugs and chemicals.

  6. OSA – a risk factor for stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan CM

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Clodagh M RyanCentre for Sleep Health and Research, University of Toronto/Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, CanadaAbstract: Obstructive sleep apnea is a sleep breathing disorder characterized by recurrent and intermittent hypoxia with continued respiratory effort against a closed glottis. The result of this is a cascade of acute and chronic systemic pathophysiological responses that cause endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and lead to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. This article focuses on the clinical evidence linking obstructive sleep apnea and stroke and on the specific mechanisms perpetuating stroke risk in this population.Keywords: stroke, obstructive sleep apnea, brain injury, atherosclerosis, continuous positive airway pressure, outcomes

  7. Doppler Sonography Confirmation in Patients Showing Calcified Carotid Artery Atheroma in Panoramic Radiography and Evaluation of Related Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims The purpose of this study was to identify patients at the risk of cerebrovascular attack (CVA) by detecting calcified carotid artery atheroma (CCAA) in panoramic radiography and evaluating their risk factors. Materials and methods A total of 960 panoramic radiographs of patients above 40 years old were evaluated. Doppler Sonography (DS) was performed for patients who showed calcified carotid artery atheroma (CCAA) in panoramic radiogra-phy in order to determine the presenc...

  8. Cerebrovascular disease in children with HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Charles K; Eley, Brian; Wieselthaler, Nicky; Ndondo, Alvin; Wilmshurst, Jo M

    2016-05-01

    An estimated 3.2 million children worldwide have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in prolonged survival, leading to an increase in complications previously recognized in adults. Children with HIV infection have increased risk of cerebrovascular disease from multiple aetiologies including HIV-associated vasculopathy, opportunistic vasculitis, cardioembolism or coagulopathy, all of which may be secondary to the infection. Prevalence of cerebrovascular disease in HIV-infected children is underestimated because of limited neuroimaging in low and middle income countries, silent events without overt motor manifestations, and mislabeling as HIV encephalopathy for non-motor manifestations such as behavioural and cognitive difficulties. No management guidelines for cerebrovascular disease in HIV-infected children exist but common practices target risk factors for stroke in low and middle income countries. Where capacity permits, screening for opportunistic infections, vasculitis, coagulopathy and cardioembolism is important. Optimising virological suppression, correction of anaemia, control of seizures and aspirin prophylaxis are management priorities. Neurosurgical interventions may have a role. PMID:26890389

  9. Hidden Risk Factors for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... high cholesterol. “Those are the most common risk factors,” according to Steven J. Kittner, M.D., director of the Maryland Stroke Center at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. “But ...

  10. Cardiac risk factors: environmental, sociodemographic, and behavioral cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, David; George, Paul; Eaton, Charles B

    2014-06-01

    Several environmental exposures are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Exposure to secondhand smoke may increase the risk by as much as 25% to 30%. Exposure to third hand smoke, residual components of tobacco smoke that remain in the environment after a cigarette is extinguished, also appears to increase risk. These residual components can remain in rooms and automobiles for up to 30 years and enter the body through the skin or via inhalation or ingestion. Exposure to particulate matter air pollution from automobile emissions, power plants, and other sources is yet another environmental risk factor for CHD, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths annually in the United States. Exposure to other environmental toxins, particularly bisphenol A and phthalates, also has been linked to CHD. There are sociodemographic risks for CHD, with numerous studies showing that lower socioeconomic status is associated with higher risk. Behavioral risk factors include poor diet, such as frequent consumption of fast food and processed meals; sleep disturbance; and psychological stress, particularly related to marital or work issues. Finally, although high alcohol consumption is associated with increased CHD risk, moderate alcohol consumption (ie, less than 1 to 2 drinks/day), particularly of wine and possibly beer, appears to reduce the risk. PMID:24936715

  11. Cardiovascular risk factors in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyllenborg, J; Rasmussen, S L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut;

    2001-01-01

    Males have higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than premenopausal females. Gonadal steroids are probably involved in the gender difference in CVD, but previous results have been conflicting. We investigated the associations between CVD risk factors and sex hormones in a cross...

  12. Risk factors for suicidal behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonova A.A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

     

    The article presents data on risk factors that contribute to the development of suicidal behavior. The development of suicidal behavior is infuenced by a number of factors. These include — gender, age, residence, occupation, marital status, health status, etc. A number of studies indicated the impact of economic and social factors on the level of suicidal activity of the population. Observed relationship between mental disorders, substance abuse (particularly alcohol and suicide. In this case, the presence of numerous investigations in the feld of Suicidology, a number of problems still remains unsolved. Further study of issues relating to risk factors that infuence the development of suicidal behavior. Of particular note is the importance of “regional” risk factors that most infuence on the formation of suicidal behavior in a particular region.

  13. PREVALENCE AND RISK FACTORS OF ASYMPTOMATIC CEREBRAL INFARCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Zhetishev

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute stroke manifesting as focal neurological deficit is a leading cause of death and disability. Of interest is the problem of asymptomatic cerebral infarctions (AСI, in which there is focal medullary involvement unaccompanied by the development of focal symptoms. The role of AСI as a marker for the progression of vascular dementia and for the further development of symptomatic stroke has not been adequately explored. There are current instrumental (neuroimaging criteria for diagnosing AСI. An update on the risk factors of AСI and their association with the further course of cerebrovascular involvement is analyzed. The results of a number of prospective studies conducted in the countries of Asia and Europe to investigate risk factors for AСI and their prognostic value are considered in detail. There is a relationship between hypertension, blood pressure instability, type 2 diabetes mellitus, some other factors, and a significantly increased risk for AСI. Based on the results of analyzing the data available in the literature, the authors demonstrate the association of prior AСI with the higher rates of progressive vascular cognitive impairments. A correlation is shown between prior AСI and an increased risk for further development of ischemic stroke accompanied by its clinical symptoms, which leads to disability. It is suggested that it is advisable to implement measures for secondary cardiovascular disease prevention, including the administration of antiaggregatory and antihypertensive agents, in patients with AСI. 

  14. The relationship between cerebrovascular disease and homocysteine, folate and vitamin B12 in serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the relationship between cerebrovascular disease and the serum levels of homocysteine(Hcy), folate and vitamin B12, the serum levels of Hcy, folate and vitamin B12 in 148 patients with cerebrovascular disease were measured by fluorescence polarization immuno- assay and chemiluminescence and were compared with those in healthy controls. The result showed that the serum Hcy levels in patients with cerebral infarction, cerebral hemorrhage and vertebrobasilar ischemiay were significantly higher than those in healthy controls (P12 levels were signifieantly lower (P0.05). No significantly higher ratio of increased Hcy levels was observed in patient with complications (P> 0.05). Our conclusion is that hyperhomocysteinemia may be a new and an independent risk factor for cerebrovascular disease. The serum Hcy level is correlated with decreased levels of folate and vitamin B12 but not obviously correlated with hypertension, diabetes and coronary heart disease. (authors)

  15. Human Leptospirosis and risk factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Yanelis Emilia Tabío Henry; Yailín Palmero Dones; Elizabeth Cruz Pérez

    2010-01-01

    The human leptospirosis is a zoonosis of world distribution, were risk factors exist that have favored the wild and domestic animal propagation and so man. A descpitive investigation was made with the objective of determining the behavior of risk factors in outpatients by human leptospirosis in “Camilo Cienfuegos“ University General Hospital from Sncti Spíritus In the comprised time period betwen december 1 st and 3 st , 2008.The sample of this study was conformed by 54 risk persons that kee...

  16. Migraine, cerebrovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Sinclair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is emerging that migraine is not solely a headache disorder. Observations that ischemic stroke could occur in the setting of a migraine attack, and that migraine headaches could be precipitated by cerebral ischemia, initially highlighted a possibly association between migraine and cerebrovascular disease. More recently, large population-based studies that have demonstrated that migraineurs are at increased risk of stroke outside the setting of a migraine attack have prompted the concept that migraine and cerebrovascular disease are comorbid conditions. Explanations for this association are numerous and widely debated, particularly as the comorbid association does not appear to be confined to the cerebral circulation as cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease also appear to be comorbid with migraine. A growing body of evidence has also suggested that migraineurs are more likely to be obese, hypertensive, hyperlipidemic and have impaired insulin sensitivity, all features of the metabolic syndrome. The comorbid association between migraine and cerebrovascular disease may consequently be explained by migraineurs having the metabolic syndrome and consequently being at increased risk of cerebrovascular disease. This review will summarise the salient evidence suggesting a comorbid association between migraine, cerebrovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome.

  17. The pulsatility volume index: an indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on fast magnetic resonance imaging of cardiac and respiratory pulsatility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Evans, Karleyton C; Bhat, Himanshu; Keil, Boris; Rosen, Bruce R; Boas, David A; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-05-13

    The influence of cardiac activity on the viscoelastic properties of intracranial tissue is one of the mechanisms through which brain-heart interactions take place, and is implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Cerebrovascular disease risk is not fully explained by current risk factors, including arterial compliance. Cerebrovascular compliance is currently estimated indirectly through Doppler sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of blood velocity changes. In order to meet the need for novel cerebrovascular disease risk factors, we aimed to design and validate an MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on direct endogenous measures of blood volume changes. We implemented a fast non-gated two-dimensional MRI pulse sequence based on echo-planar imaging (EPI) with ultra-short repetition time (approx. 30-50 ms), which stepped through slices every approximately 20 s. We constrained the solution of the Bloch equations for spins moving faster than a critical speed to produce an endogenous contrast primarily dependent on spin volume changes, and an approximately sixfold signal gain compared with Ernst angle acquisitions achieved by the use of a 90° flip angle. Using cardiac and respiratory peaks detected on physiological recordings, average cardiac and respiratory MRI pulse waveforms in several brain compartments were obtained at 7 Tesla, and used to derive a compliance indicator, the pulsatility volume index (pVI). The pVI, evaluated in larger cerebral arteries, displayed significant variation within and across vessels. Multi-echo EPI showed the presence of significant pulsatility effects in both S0 and [Formula: see text] signals, compatible with blood volume changes. Lastly, the pVI dynamically varied during breath-holding compared with normal breathing, as expected for a compliance indicator. In summary, we characterized and performed an initial validation of a novel MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance, which might prove useful

  18. Influence of cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis on cerebral oxygenation during exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although it is assumed that cerebral oxygenation during exercise is influenced by both cardiopulmonary function and cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis, the latter factor has not been fully clarified. In the present study the relationship between the degree of cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis and cerebral oxygenation during exercise was investigated. A total of 109 patients (69 patients with coronary artery disease, 40 patients with hypertensive heart disease) (61.7±9.7 years) performed a symptom-limited exercise test with respiratory gas measurements (CPX). From the respiratory gas analysis, peak O2 uptake (VO2), the slope of the increase in VO2 to the increase in work rate (ΔVO2/ΔWR), and the slope of the increase in ventilation to the increase in CO2 output (VE/VCO2 slope) were calculated. Oxyhemoglobin (O2Hb) at the forehead was monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy. The brain ischemic score was counted based upon fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images of magnetic resonance imaging and expressed from 0 to 4. When compared with patients with a lower ischemic score (2Hb during exercise (-1.08±2.7 vs 0.77±4.1 μmol/L, p=0.011). Of brain ischemic score, left ventricular ejection fraction, peak VO2, ΔVO2/ΔWR, and the VE/VCO2 slope, ΔVO2/ΔWR was found to be the sole independent index determining cerebral O2Hb during exercise. The CPX parameters were also significantly related to the degree of cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis. Although cerebral oxygenation during exercise is mainly related to cardiopulmonary function, the degree of cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis partly influences cerebral oxygenation in patients with risk factors for atherosclerosis. (author)

  19. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors? Coronary heart disease risk factors are ... high blood pressure, overweight and obesity, and others. Heart Disease Risk Factors 09/30/2011 This video—presented ...

  20. Risk of cerebrovascular events in persons with and without HIV: A Danish nationwide population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line D; Engsig, Frederik Neess; Christensen, Hanne;

    2011-01-01

    , stratifying the analyses on IDU. Impact of immunodeficiency, HAART, protease-inhibitors, indinavir, didanosin, tenofovir and abacavir on risk of CVE was analyzed using time-dependent Cox regression analyses. RESULTS:: HIV-infected individuals had an increased risk of CVE compared with the comparison cohorts...

  1. Risk factors related to systemic arterial hypertension in victims of cerebral vascular accident

    OpenAIRE

    Joselany Áfio Caetano; Verineida Lima; Enedina Soares; Zélia Maria de Sousa Araújo Santos

    2006-01-01

    The Cerebrovascular accident (AVC)is the third cause of death in the world.Apart systemic arterial hypertension (HAS),many other preventable factors are related to its appearance and evolution.This study aimed at identifying the risk factors for AVC in interned hypertensive patients.It was a descriptive study held at a philanthropic hospital in Sobral-Ceará,with fourteen patients taken ill with AVC.Among those,85.7%(n=12)were above 65 years old and the same quantitative were retired;71,4%(n=1...

  2. Risk factors for eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monterrosa-Castro Álvaro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: eating disorders (ED are characterized by the excessive worry aboutphysical appearance. They have high incidence in young population with more frequencyin women than in men.Objective: to identify the risk factors for ED.Methods: thematic review of publications in which are described and evaluated thedifferent risk factors to develop ED. It was done an electronic search since 1984 to2011, in english and spanish, in which were included all the methods of publications.There were reviewed the summaries to find the complete articles that treated about riskfactors associate with the development of the ED.Results: there were found 48203 about ED. 96 tried specifically about risk factors. 35(36.4% complete articles were obtained and the review was done with them.Conclusion: principal risk factors are: To be an adolescent, woman, to have distortedperception of the corporal image and the use of diet to lose weight. Rev.cienc.biomed.2012;3(2:300-305

  3. Detecting Risk Factor of Diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvárová, Jana

    1995-01-01

    Roč. 15, 1/2 (1995), s. 203-212. ISSN 0208-5216. [Seminar on Statistics and Clinical Practice. Warsaw, 20.06.1994-23.06.1994] Keywords : risk factors * genetics * association * epidemilogy * measures of association * screening * genetics

  4. Seasonality of cardiovascular risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marti-Soler, Helena; Gubelmann, Cédric; Aeschbacher, Stefanie;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the seasonality of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in a large set of population-based studies. METHODS: Cross-sectional data from 24 population-based studies from 15 countries, with a total sample size of 237 979 subjects. CVRFs included Body Mass Index (BMI) and waist...

  5. [Psoriasis and cardiovascular risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Roy; Pavlovsky, Lev; David, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease which may dramatically affect patients' lives. This chronic disease is characterized by a protracted course of alternating remissions and relapses. In recent years, the attention of researchers has focused on the association between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease risk factors. This review summarizes the literature on this topic with an emphasis on research conducted in Israel. PMID:23316664

  6. Current therapy for chronic cerebrovascular attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shmonin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic cerebrovascular attack (CCVA is a brain lesion caused by vascular factors. CCVA appears as cognitive impairments (CIs, affective (emotional disorders and focal syndromes. Treatment for CCVA requires a comprehensive approach. Effective combination therapy for CCVA involves secondary prevention of stroke and CIs; treatment of CIs; treatment of depression and other affective disorders; and neuroprotective therapy. Basic therapy for CCVA includes modification of risk factors, antihypertensive, hypolipidemic, and antithrombotic therapies. Central acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (galantamine, rivastigmine, donepezil and a reversible NMDA receptor blocker (memantine are symptomatically used at a stage of vascular and mixed dementia. There are no unique guidelines for the therapy of mild and moderate vascular nondementia-related CIs. Drug use, based on the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the development of vascular CIs, is substantiated. When choosing psychotropic agents, it is necessary to take into account the causes and clinical manifestations of neuromediator deficiency. Antidepressants are used as essential drugs. Neuroleptics and tranquilizers are additionally administered in complex-pattern syndromes, such as depression with marked anxiety. Prescription of neuroprotectors may be effective in treating both stroke and CCVA. These medicaments are most effective when a damaging factor acts, i.e. neuroprotectors should be given in a risk situation and to reduce damage. Citicoline is one of the most test drugs in a group of neuroprotectors. 

  7. CEREBRAL PALSY : ANTENATAL RISK FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cerebral palsy (CP is a group of permanent movement disorders that appear in early childhood. Cerebral palsy is caused by abnormal development or damage to the parts of the brain that control movement, balance, and posture. Most often the problems occur during pregnancy; however, they may also occur during childbirth, or shortly after birth. Often the cause is unknown. AIM: To study the different antenatal maternal risk factors associated with cerebral palsy in the study group. MATERIA LS AND METHODS: Retrospective study was done to assess possible associated antenatal risk factors for cerebral palsy. Mothers of 100 cerebral palsy children were selected who are treated in Rani Chandramani Devi Hospital, a Government hospital in Visakhapa tn am, Andhra Pradesh State, India , from 2012 to 2014 and 100 controls, mothers of normal children were studied. Detailed antenatal history was obtained from the mothers of the children in both affected and control group. RESULTS: From the data, we conclude that the association of maternal anaemia with cerebral palsy is 7.3 times higher; association of maternal hypertension with cerebral palsy is 6.6 time higher, association with Pre - eclampsia is 6 times higher; association with Eclampsia is 8.6 times higher ; with antepartum haemorrhage, the association is 8.6 times higher and association of multiple pregnancy with cerebral palsy is 4.8 times higher than with controls. CONCLUSION: From this study of the role of antenatal risk factors, in the occurrence of cer ebral palsy in children it is concluded that the most common risk factor associated with cerebral palsy is the maternal anaemia and the other important risk factors associated being hypertension, pre eclampsia, eclampsia, antepartum haemorrhage and multipl e births.

  8. Other Possible Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your risk Heart Health and Stroke Other possible heart disease risk factors Related information Depression fact sheet Stress ... Return to top More information on Other possible heart disease risk factors Read more from womenshealth.gov Heart ...

  9. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk factors. ...

  10. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease: Know your risk Heart Health and Stroke Heart disease risk factors you can control Did you know? ... overall health. Return to top More information on Heart disease risk factors you can control Read more from ...

  11. Risk factors for the syndrome of ventricular enlargement with gait apraxia (idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus): a case-control study.

    OpenAIRE

    Casmiro, M; D'Alessandro, R.(INFN Sezione di Firenze, Firenze, Italy); Cacciatore, F M; Daidone, R; Calbucci, F; Lugaresi, E

    1989-01-01

    A case-control study was performed to verify the association between the risk factors for cerebrovascular disease and the syndrome of ventricular enlargement with gait apraxia (VEGAS). This syndrome was defined on the basis of clinical and CT criteria alone; however, it may be representative of patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus in whom gait disturbance is the initial symptom. Seventeen patients were matched for age and sex with one hospitalised and two general population ...

  12. Paper de "Chlamydia pneumoniae" en la generació de respostes immunes implicades en la malaltia cerebrovascular

    OpenAIRE

    Luque Gómez, Ana

    2011-01-01

    [eng] ROLE OF CHLAMYDIA PNEUMONIAE IN THE GENERATION OF IMMUNE RESPONSES INVOLVED IN THE CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASE Carotid atherosclerosis is one of the main causes of ischemic brain stroke which is one of the most common causes of death and morbidity in developed countries. Nowadays atherosclerosis is considered a multi-factorial disease in which take part a genetic component and different classic risk factors such as hypertension, age, diabetes, etc. These classic risk factors are only ab...

  13. Environmental risk factors for autism

    OpenAIRE

    Dietert, Rodney R.; Janice M. Dietert; DeWitt, Jamie C.

    2011-01-01

    Autism is a devastating childhood condition that has emerged as an increasing social concern just as it has increased in prevalence in recent decades. Autism and the broader category of autism spectrum disorders are among the increasingly seen examples in which there is a fetal basis for later disease or disorder. Environmental, genetic, and epigenetic factors all play a role in determining the risk of autism and some of these effects appear to be transgenerational. Identification of the most...

  14. CEREBRAL PALSY : ANTENATAL RISK FACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasa Rao; Vidyullatha; Subbalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of permanent movement disorders that appear in early childhood. Cerebral palsy is caused by abnormal development or damage to the parts of the brain that control movement, balance, and posture. Most often the problems occur during pregnancy; however, they may also occur during childbirth, or shortly after birth. Often the cause is unknown. AIM: To study the different antenatal maternal risk factors associated with cere...

  15. Perinatal risk factors including malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study gives a survey of the factors most frequently mentioned in the literature as factors likely to adversely affect a pregnancy. One essential aspect is the discussion of those factors that can be counted among the causes of malformations, as among others, prenatal radiation exposure. The study prepared within the framework of the research project 'Radiobiological environmental monitoring in Bavaria' is intended to serve as a basis for a retrospective and prospective evaluation of infant mortality, perinatal conditions and occurrence of malformations in Bavaria, with the principal idea of drawing up an environment - related health survey. The study therefore, in addition to ionizing radiation also takes into account other detectable risks within the ecologic context, as e.g. industrial installations, refuse incineration plants or waste dumps, or urbanity. (orig./MG)

  16. ROLE OF SMOKING AND ALCOHOLISM IN CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Indira,

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Though previously stroke was considered an old man disease, it is increasing among the young and middle aged people are not likely to die of stroke as they are of heart attack, but they are likely to be disabled for rest of their lives. As the cases of stroke admitted to medical wards, formed nearly 1/10th to 1/8th of total bed strength at any time, and their prolonged stay at hospital attracted our attention. To study the etiological factors for the present study we have thoroughly evaluated 50 pts, with acute cerebrovascular disease and focused more attention in the revaluation of physiological variants of clinical importance by examining the blood for complete blood picture, which may help a long way in near future to predict the risk group in developing an acute cerebrovascular stroke and to avoid risk factors and to take measures to rectify the variations so as to minimize the mortality due to stroke.

  17. Risk Factors in Derivatives Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimonda Martinkutė-Kaulienė

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the article is to analyse and present the classification of risks actual to derivative securities. The analysis is based on classical and modern literature findings and analysis of newest statistical data. The analysis led to the conclusion, that the main risks typical for derivatives contracts and their traders are market risk, liquidity risk, credit and counterparty risk, legal risk and transactions risk. Pricing risk and systemic risk is also quite important. The analysis showed that market risk is the most important kind of risk that in many situations influences the level of remaining risks.

  18. Factors influencing accuracy of estimation of comprehension problems in patients following cerebrovascular accident, by doctors, nurses and relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenahan, R; Johnston, M; Densham, Y

    1992-01-01

    Previous work has shown that doctors, nurses and relatives are inaccurate at estimating the comprehension problem of stroke patients. Possible factors that influence the accuracy of these judgements were studied, including confidence of the respondents, the severity of the comprehension problems of the patients and factors specific to relatives (educational background and the length of the relative's relationship with the patient). Doctors, nurses and relatives involved with 30 recently aphasic stroke patients were asked to estimate how patients would perform on the comprehension sections of two tests (Western Aphasia Battery and Functional Communication Profile). Results show that although all respondents over-estimated patients' comprehension abilities, they were more accurate for patients who had mild problems. Doctors and nurses who were more confident about their predictions tended to be more accurate on some parts of the tests than those with less confidence, whereas relatives were equally inaccurate when giving high and low confidence judgements. Length of relationship and educational level did not predict relative's accuracy. PMID:1306387

  19. Risk factors of teenage pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Siettou; Maria Saridi

    2011-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy is a worldwide medical and social issue, associated with many physical, psychological and social consequences and can result in birth, miscarriage or abortion. Aim: The aim of the present study is to find those risk factors that contribute to teenage pregnancy. Results: In U.S.A., according to data from Unicef, the birth rate among teenagers touches the 52.1% and it is four times higher, than the corresponding rate recorded in the countries of Western Europe. The United King...

  20. Using risk factors to help in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with non-diagnostic electrocardiogram changes in emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Arhami Dolatabadi; Parvin Kashani; Hamidreza Hatamabadi; Hamid Kariman; Alireza Baratloo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to determine the association of cardiac risk factors and the risk of Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) in Emergency Department (ED) patients with non-diagnostic ECG changes. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the ED of Imam Hossein Hospital during a period of one year. In this study, patients with symptoms suggestive of AMI including chest pain, dyspnea, palpitation, syncope, cerebrovascular incidents, nausea, vomitting, dizziness and loss of c...

  1. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  2. Risk factors identified for certain lymphoma subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a large international collaborative analysis of risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scientists were able to quantify risk associated with medical history, lifestyle factors, family history of blood or lymph-borne cancers, and occupation for 11

  3. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Bo; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Grøn, Randi; Bretler, Ditte-Marie; Schmiegelow, Michelle Dalgas; Andersson, Charlotte; Azimi, Aziza; Gislason, Gunnar; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women are at an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Risk factors for VTE among pregnant women are not sufficiently investigated.......Pregnant women are at an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Risk factors for VTE among pregnant women are not sufficiently investigated....

  4. Risk factors for colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihajlović-Božić Vesna

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in human population. It causes significant morbidity and mortality in our country. The incidence of colorectal cancer increases in the fifth decade of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between colorectal cancer and potential risk factors. A case-control study of colorectal cancer was carried out between 1998 and 1999 in Clinical Center of Serbia, Center for Digestive Surgery. A total of 100 cases of newly diagnosed patients with colorectal cancer confirmed by histopathology and an equal number of controls, individually matched by gender and age (+/-5 years, were chosen from patients from the same hospital with no history of cancer at all. McNemar test and conditional logistic regression were used in the analysis. According to logistic regression analysis the following risk factors were independently related with the occurrence of colorectal cancer: cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and diet rich in red meat and fat promote the carcinogenic process; food rich in vegetables, fruits, grains, vitamin C, physical activity, and oral contraceptive use inhibit the same process. A family history of cancer and long standing inflammatory bowel diseases also have significant role. There is convincing evidence that nutrition affects colorectal carcinogenesis in a complex fashion.

  5. Cardiovascular risk factors among Chamorros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Phillis L

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known regarding the cardiovascular disease risk factors among Chamorros residing in the United States. Methods The Chamorro Directory International and the CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Questionnaire (BRFSS were used to assess the health related practices and needs of a random sample of 228 Chamorros. Results Inactivity, hypertension, elevated cholesterol and diabetes mellitus were more prevalent in this Chamorro sample compared to the US average. Participants who were 50-and-older or unemployed were more likely to report hypertension, diabetes and inactivity, but they were also more likely to consume more fruits and vegetables than their younger and employed counterparts. Women were more likely to report hypertension and diabetes, whereas men were more likely to have elevated BMI and to have never had their blood cholesterol checked. Conclusion The study provides data that will help healthcare providers, public health workers and community leaders identify where to focus their health improvement efforts for Chamorros and create culturally competent programs to promote health in this community.

  6. Neckties and cerebrovascular reactivity in young healthy males: a pilot randomised crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Mark; Quinn, Terence J; Dawson, Jesse; Walters, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Background. A necktie may elevate intracranial pressure through compression of venous return. We hypothesised that a tight necktie would deleteriously alter cerebrovascular reactivity. Materials and Methods. A necktie was simulated using bespoke apparatus comprising pneumatic inner-tube with aneroid pressure-gauge. Using a randomised crossover design, cerebrovascular reactivity was measured with the "pseudo-tie" worn inflated or deflated for 5 minutes (simulating tight/loose necktie resp.). Reactivity was calculated using breath hold index (BHI) and paired "t" testing used for comparative analysis. Results. We enrolled 40 healthy male volunteers. There was a reduction in cerebrovascular reactivity of 0.23 units with "tight" pseudotie (BHI loose 1.44 (SD 0.48); BHI tight 1.21 (SD 0.38) P < .001). Conclusion. Impairment in cerebrovascular reactivity was found with inflated pseudo-tie. However, mean BHI is still within a range of considered normal. The situation may differ in patients with vascular risk factors, and confirmatory work is recommended. PMID:21076611

  7. Neckties and Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Young Healthy Males: A Pilot Randomised Crossover Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Rafferty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A necktie may elevate intracranial pressure through compression of venous return. We hypothesised that a tight necktie would deleteriously alter cerebrovascular reactivity. Materials and Methods. A necktie was simulated using bespoke apparatus comprising pneumatic inner-tube with aneroid pressure-gauge. Using a randomised crossover design, cerebrovascular reactivity was measured with the “pseudo-tie” worn inflated or deflated for 5 minutes (simulating tight/loose necktie resp.. Reactivity was calculated using breath hold index (BHI and paired “t” testing used for comparative analysis. Results. We enrolled 40 healthy male volunteers. There was a reduction in cerebrovascular reactivity of 0.23 units with “tight” pseudotie (BHI loose 1.44 (SD 0.48; BHI tight 1.21 (SD 0.38 P<.001. Conclusion. Impairment in cerebrovascular reactivity was found with inflated pseudo-tie. However, mean BHI is still within a range of considered normal. The situation may differ in patients with vascular risk factors, and confirmatory work is recommended.

  8. Configurations of Common Childhood Psychosocial Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Background: Co-occurrence of psychosocial risk factors is commonplace, but little is known about psychiatrically-predictive configurations of psychosocial risk factors. Methods: Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied to 17 putative psychosocial risk factors in a representative population sample of 920 children ages 9 to 17. The resultant class…

  9. Impact of Cerebrovascular Disease Mortality on Life Expectancy in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guo Qi; LI Yan; ZHAO Dong; FAN Jie; LIU Jing; WANG Wei; WANG Miao; QI Yue; XIE Wu Xiang; LIU Jun; ZHAO Fan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of cerebrovascular disease mortality on life expectancy (LE) in China in 2010 compared with 2005, and to identify the high-risk population (age, sex, and region) where cerebrovascular disease mortality has had a major impact on LE. Methods LE and cause-eliminated LE were calculated by using standard life tables which used adjusted mortality data from the Death Surveillance Data Sets in 2005 and 2010 from the National Disease Surveillance System. Decomposition was used to quantitate the impact of cerebrovascular disease in different age groups. Results LE in China was 73.24 years in 2010, which was higher in women and urban residents compared with men and rural residents. The loss of LE caused by cerebrovascular disease mortality was 2.26 years, which was higher in men and rural residents compared with women and urban residents. More than 30%of the loss of LE were attributed to premature death from cerebrovascular disease in people aged Conclusion Cerebrovascular disease mortality had a major impact on LE in China, with a significant difference between urban and rural residents. LE is likely to be further increased by reducing cerebrovascular disease mortality, and special attention should be paid to reducing premature deaths in people aged<65 years.

  10. Cerebrovascular Complications of Diabetes: Focus on Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Ergul, Adviye; Kelly-Cobbs, Aisha; Abdalla, Maha; Fagan, Susan C

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrovascular complications make diabetic patients 2–6 times more susceptible to a stroke event and this risk is magnified in younger individuals and in patients with hypertension and complications in other vascular beds. In addition, when patients with diabetes and hyperglycemia experience an acute ischemic stroke they are more likely to die or be severely disabled and less likely to benefit from the one FDA-approved therapy, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. Experimental stroke mo...

  11. Clinical risk factors for age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Christopher

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in Western countries. Numerous risk factors have been reported but the evidence and strength of association is variable. We aimed to identify those risk factors with strong levels of evidence which could be easily assessed by physicians or ophthalmologists to implement preventive interventions or address current behaviours. Methods A systematic review identified 18 prospective and cross-sectional studies and 6 case control studies involving 113,780 persons with 17,236 cases of late AMD that included an estimate of the association between late AMD and at least one of 16 pre-selected risk factors. Fixed-effects meta-analyses were conducted for each factor to combine odds ratio (OR and/or relative risk (RR outcomes across studies by study design. Overall raw point estimates of each risk factor and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated. Results Increasing age, current cigarette smoking, previous cataract surgery, and a family history of AMD showed strong and consistent associations with late AMD. Risk factors with moderate and consistent associations were higher body mass index, history of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and higher plasma fibrinogen. Risk factors with weaker and inconsistent associations were gender, ethnicity, diabetes, iris colour, history of cerebrovascular disease, and serum total and HDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Conclusions Smoking, previous cataract surgery and a family history of AMD are consistent risk factors for AMD. Cardiovascular risk factors are also associated with AMD. Knowledge of these risk factors that may be easily assessed by physicians and general ophthalmologists may assist in identification and appropriate referral of persons at risk of AMD.

  12. Contributing Mechanisms of Aortic Atheroma in Ischemic Cerebrovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qi; Ma, Xin

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the correlation between aortic atheroma (AA) and the occurrence and recurrence of ischemic cerebrovascular disease (ICVD) has attracted much attention, but the contributory mechanisms remain controversial. This review analyzes related research on the roles of AA in ICVD, and demonstrates the correlation between the formation and development of AA and abnormal metabolism, inflammation, hemodynamic changes, and other contributory factors. The presence of complex aortic plaque (CAP) in the ascending aorta and aortic arch increases the risk of cerebral embolism and degree of injury, while the association between CAP in the descending aorta and cerebral embolism remains ambiguous. AA also functions as an indicator of atherosclerosis burden as well as hypercoagulability, which may further increase the risk of ICVD. Further study on the relationship of AA to ICVD will improve diagnosis and treatment in clinical practice. PMID:26522269

  13. DEPRESSION IN CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tat'yana Gratsievna Voznesenskaya

    2009-06-01

    both direct and indirect risk factor for the development of stroke. on the other. The vascular depression concept by G.S. Alexopoulos and its main points are discussed. The author gives her own data on the prevalence of depression in dyscirculatory encephalopathy with non-dementia cognitive disorders. She gives prove that a neurologist should diagnose and treat depression and to choose antidepressants for its treatment.

  14. Risk factors of thrombosis in abdominal veins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amit Kumar Durra; Ashok Chacko; Biju George; Joseph Anjilivelil Joseph; Sukesh Chandran Nair; Vikram Mathews

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of inherited and acquired thrombophilic risk factors in patients with abdominal venous thrombosis and to compare the risk factor profiles between Budd-Chiari syndromes (BCS) and splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT).METHODS: In this retrospective study, 36 patients with abdominal venous thrombosis were studied.The patients were divided into Budd-Chiari group (hepatic vein, IVC thrombosis) and splanchnic venous thrombosis group (portal, splenic, superior mesenteric veins) based on the veins involved. Hereditary and acquired thrombophilic risk factors were evaluated in all patients.RESULTS: Twenty patients had SVT, 14 had BCS,and 2 had mixed venous thrombosis. Ten patients (28%) had hereditary and 10 patients (28%) acquired thrombophilic risk factors. The acquired risk factors were significantly more common in the SVT group (SVT vs BCS:45% vs 7%,x2=5.7,P=0.02) while hereditary risk factors did not show significant differences between the two groups (SVT vs BCS: 25%vs 36%, x2=0.46,P=0.7). Multiple risk factors were present in one (7%) patient with BCS and in 3 patients (15%) with SVT. No risk factors were identified in 57% of patients with BCS and in 45% of patients with SVT.CONCLUSION: Hereditary and acquired risk factors play an important role in the etiopathogenesis of abdominal venous thrombosis. Acquired risk factors are significantly more common in SVT patients while hereditary factors are similar in both groups.

  15. Information Asymmetry as a Risk Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Viktor Ya. Tsvetkov

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores information asymmetry as the cause of risks in decision making. The author describes the types of information asymmetry as a risk factor; describes the types of risk arising under different information asymmetries; describes the methods for minimizing such risks; brings to light the principal-agent issue; analyzes the principles of minimizing risks in the event of this issue arising; illustrates the application of special information models for minimizing risks in this iss...

  16. Association of carotid artery intima-media thickness and cardiovascular risk factors in adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased intima-media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery is an early marker of atherosclerosis and a powerful predictor of coronary and cerebrovascular diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between carotid artery IMT and cardiovascular risk factors. Total 134 adult were performed with Ultrasonography to measure IMT at common carotid artery, the physical measurements and blood tests, the following results were obtained. As a result, IMT showed higher value in male IMT than female IMT. And, the IMT increased according to the age increased. Also, TC and AI have positive significant correlation with IMT. In Conclusion, cardiovascular risk factors with adult are associated with increased IMT of common carotid artery

  17. Association of carotid artery intima-media thickness and cardiovascular risk factors in adult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Young [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hwa Sun [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Ansan University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Shin Young [Dept. of Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Increased intima-media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery is an early marker of atherosclerosis and a powerful predictor of coronary and cerebrovascular diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between carotid artery IMT and cardiovascular risk factors. Total 134 adult were performed with Ultrasonography to measure IMT at common carotid artery, the physical measurements and blood tests, the following results were obtained. As a result, IMT showed higher value in male IMT than female IMT. And, the IMT increased according to the age increased. Also, TC and AI have positive significant correlation with IMT. In Conclusion, cardiovascular risk factors with adult are associated with increased IMT of common carotid artery.

  18. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure Anyone can develop high blood pressure; however, age, ... can increase your risk for developing high blood pressure. Age Blood pressure tends to rise with age. About 65 ...

  19. CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state-based system of health surveys that collects information on health risk behaviors, preventive...

  20. About Alzheimer's Disease: Risk Factors and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Risk Factors and Prevention We can’t control some risk factors for ... Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease: What Do We Know? Alzheimer's Disease: Unraveling the Mystery ... Factors and Prevention News Summit sets the path ahead for Alzheimer's ...

  1. [General practitioner burnout: risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagrada, H; Verbanck, P; Kornreich, C

    2011-09-01

    This paper aims to review current knowledge on risk factors leading to burn-out of general practitioners, who are particularly concerned by burn-out, as 50% of them are being more or less affected. This article is based on bibliographic research covering literature between 1975 and 2010, using PUB MED software, medical books and articles. 44 articles were selected as dealing well with the aspects of the burn-out reviewed here. It seems established that stress precedes burnout symptoms. Theories investigating relationships between stress and work are presented. Exogenic stress (load and organization of work, emotional interaction with the patient, constraints, lack of recognition, conflicts between private and professional life) interacts with endogenous stress (idealism, (too much) acute feeling of responsibility, mood disorder, difficulty in collaborating, character, personality). Burn-out symptoms would appear preferentially when these two stresses coexist. Despite the wealth of publications, there is still a lack of knowledge of the causes of burn-out, requiring therefore increased research efforts, in order to improve the implementation of preventive measures, beneficial to the doctors as well as to their patients. PMID:22034773

  2. Pharmacoepidemiological Study on Cerebrovascular Accident in Tertiary Care Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathyusha GR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States (US and a leading cause of serious, long-term disability. Incidence of ischemic stroke is higher than hemorrhagic stroke. The aim is to conduct pharmacoepidemiology study on cerebrovascular accident patient by evaluating the use and the effects of drugs, and quantification of adverse drug reactions, drug utilization studies to improve the quality and use of medicines. A prospective observational study was conducted in department of general medicine and ICU at Mallareddy hospital, data was collected from 130 patients and it was proposed to be conducted for 6 months. Among 130 patients 78(60% are males and 52(40% are females. Among all age groups major number of CVA patients was seen in 60-69 years (30%. Among them 92% of strokes are Ischemic majorly seen in both males and females and8% strokes are hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke (94.87% is majorly seen in 60-69 yr age group. Among various risk factors Hypertension (36.43% is the major risk factor found in males (60% and females (40%.Antiplatelet drugs (25.75% are the highest number of drugs given in patients 71.27% in males and 28.72% in females. Highest numbers of drugs are given in 50-59yrs age group and are antiplatelets. As a clinical pharmacist 16 adverse drug reactions and 25 drug interactions are reported. Proper patient counselling is needed to reduce hypertension and to reduce the risk for cerebrovascular accident. Among all antiplatelet drugs are majorly given in males and lipid lowering drugs in females.

  3. Relationship of acute cerebrovascular diseases and hypothyroidism%急性脑血管病与甲状腺功能减退

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨华; 马召玺; 毛慧慧; 王万华; 张炎

    2013-01-01

    急性脑血管病后可引起临床甲状腺功能低下及亚临床甲状腺功能退减,甲状腺功能低下及亚临床甲状腺功能退减可能为急性脑血管病的危险因素,本文将二者关系综述如下。%Acute cerebrovascular diseases may result in overt hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism, however, overt hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism may be risk factors of acute cerebrovascular diseases. The relationship between the two aspects is reviewed as follows.

  4. Atherosclerotic plaque volume and composition in symptomatic carotid arteries assessed with multidetector CT angiography; relationship with severity of stenosis and cardiovascular risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Rozie, S.; de Weert, T. T.; de Monyé, C.; Homburg, P. J.; Tanghe, H L J; Dippel, D W J; van der Lugt, A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the volume and the composition of atherosclerotic plaque in symptomatic carotid arteries and to investigate the relationship between these plaque features and the severity of stenosis and the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. One hundred patients with cerebrovascular symptoms underwent CT angiography. We measured plaque volume (PV) and the relative contribution of plaque components (calcifications, fibrous tissue, and lipid) in the symptomatic a...

  5. What Are the Risk Factors for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... what causes gastrointestinal stromal tumors? What are the risk factors for gastrointestinal stromal tumors? A risk factor is ... disease like cancer. Different cancers have different risk factors. Some risk factors, like smoking, can be changed. Others, like ...

  6. Significance of ultrasound evaluation of carotid atherosclerotic plaque for diagnosing ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotid artery is the main source for craniocerebral blood supply. Its intimal plaque formation and arterial stenosis degree both are the risk factors for ischemic cerebrovascular disease.Therefore, the close relationship of carotid atherosclerotic plaque and ischemic cerebrovascular disease, and ultrasound evaluation of carotid atherosclerotic plaque have become the hot spot in studying ischemic cerebrovascular disease.OBJECTIVE: This study was to detect the degree of carotid atherosclerosis of ischemic cerebrovascular disease patients by ultrasonography, and to analyze the situation of carotid atherosclerosis and its relationship with clinic.DESIGN: Clinical randomized concurrent control experiment.SETTING: Lintong Convalescent Hospital of Lanzhou Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: Totally 60 outpatients and inpatients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease, 42 males and 18 females, admitted to Lintong Convalescent Hospital of Lanzhou Military Area Command of Chinese PLA between January 2006 and December 2006 were involved in the patient group. They met the diagnosis criteria of ischemic cerebrovascular disease constituted by the 4th Cerebrovascular Disease Conference in 1996, and were confirmed to suffer from ischemic cerebrovascular disease by skull CT and MRI. Another 20 subjects who received healthy examination concurrently in the same hospital, 12 males and 8 females, were involved in the control group. Informed consents of detected items were obtained from involved subjects.METHODS: The plaque thickness of mid portion, distal end and crotch of common carotid artery (CCA),internal carotid artery (ICA), external carotid artery (ECA) and vertebral artery (VA) of involved subjects,who received health examination was separately detected with color Doppler ultrasonograph (HDI-5000).Then, total integral of plaque was calculated. The intima-media thickness (IMT) was measured with two-dimensional ultrasonography. The inner diameter

  7. Progress on diabetic cerebrovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Houguang Zhou; Xiaoming Zhang; Jianfeng Lu

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic cerebrovascular diseases are defined as cerebral vascular diseases induced by diabetes with sugar, fat and a series of nutrient substance metabolic disorders, resulting in intracranial large and small vessel diseases. About 20%-40% patients with type 2 diabetes suffer from cerebral blood vessel diseases. Diabetic cerebrovascular diseases are the main causes of death in patients with diabetes mellitus. The major clinical manifestations are asymptomatic cerebral atherosclerosis, stroke...

  8. Developmental Risk Factors for Sexual Offending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph K. P.; Jackson, Henry J.; Pattison, Pip; Ward, Tony

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 64 Australian sex offenders and 33 non-sex offenders found childhood emotional abuse and family dysfunction, childhood behavior problems, and childhood sexual abuse were developmental risk factors for paraphilia. Emotional abuse and family dysfunction was found to be a risk factor for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, or multiple…

  9. Genetic polymorphisms and cerebrovascular disease in children with sickle cell anemia from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Isaac Lima da Silva; Leite, Ana Claudia Celestino Bezerra; Moura, Patrícia Gomes; Ribeiro, Georgina Severo; Cavalcante, Andréa Cony; Azevedo, Flávia Carolina Marques de; Andrada-Serpa, Maria José de

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to examine possible genetic risk factors related to the occurrence of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) in Brazilian population, the frequency of β(S)-globin gene haplotypes and co-inheritance with α-thalassemia (-α(3.7kb)) and single nucleotide polymorphism of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR-C677T), Factor V Leiden (FV-G1691A) and prothrombin (PT-G20210A) genes in children from Rio de Janeiro. Ninety four children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) were included, 24 patients with cerebrovascular involvement and 70 patients without CVD as control group. The mean age of children at the time of the cerebrovascular event was similar to the control group. The frequency of -α(3.7kb) thalassemia was similar in both groups (p=0.751). Children with Bantu/Atypical β(S)-globin gene haplotype presented 15 times more chance (OR=15.4 CI 95% 2.9-81.6) of CVD than the other β(S)-globin gene haplotypes. The C677T polymorphism of MTHFR gene was similar in both groups (p=0.085). No mutation in the FV Leiden or PT genes was found. A large study seems necessary to establish the role of these genetic polymorphisms in Brazilian miscegenated population. PMID:21755116

  10. Genetic polymorphisms and cerebrovascular disease in children with sickle cell anemia from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Lima da Silva Filho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to examine possible genetic risk factors related to the occurrence of cerebrovascular disease (CVD in Brazilian population, the frequency of βS-globin gene haplotypes and co-inheritance with α-thalassemia (-α3.7kb and single nucleotide polymorphism of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR-C677T, Factor V Leiden (FV-G1691A and prothrombin (PT-G20210A genes in children from Rio de Janeiro. Ninety four children with sickle cell anemia (SCA were included, 24 patients with cerebrovascular involvement and 70 patients without CVD as control group. The mean age of children at the time of the cerebrovascular event was similar to the control group. The frequency of -α3.7kb thalassemia was similar in both groups (p=0.751. Children with Bantu/Atypical βS-globin gene haplotype presented 15 times more chance (OR=15.4 CI 95% 2.9-81.6 of CVD than the other βS-globin gene haplotypes. The C677T polymorphism of MTHFR gene was similar in both groups (p=0.085. No mutation in the FV Leiden or PT genes was found. A large study seems necessary to establish the role of these genetic polymorphisms in Brazilian miscegenated population.

  11. Seismic Risk Perception compared with seismic Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Pessina, Vera; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Peruzza, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The communication of natural hazards and their consequences is one of the more relevant ethical issues faced by scientists. In the last years, social studies have provided evidence that risk communication is strongly influenced by the risk perception of people. In order to develop effective information and risk communication strategies, the perception of risks and the influencing factors should be known. A theory that offers an integrative approach to understanding and explaining risk perception is still missing. To explain risk perception, it is necessary to consider several perspectives: social, psychological and cultural perspectives and their interactions. This paper presents the results of the CATI survey on seismic risk perception in Italy, conducted by INGV researchers on funding by the DPC. We built a questionnaire to assess seismic risk perception, with a particular attention to compare hazard, vulnerability and exposure perception with the real data of the same factors. The Seismic Risk Perception Questionnaire (SRP-Q) is designed by semantic differential method, using opposite terms on a Likert scale to seven points. The questionnaire allows to obtain the scores of five risk indicators: Hazard, Exposure, Vulnerability, People and Community, Earthquake Phenomenon. The questionnaire was administered by telephone interview (C.A.T.I.) on a statistical sample at national level of over 4,000 people, in the period January -February 2015. Results show that risk perception seems be underestimated for all indicators considered. In particular scores of seismic Vulnerability factor are extremely low compared with house information data of the respondents. Other data collected by the questionnaire regard Earthquake information level, Sources of information, Earthquake occurrence with respect to other natural hazards, participation at risk reduction activities and level of involvement. Research on risk perception aims to aid risk analysis and policy-making by

  12. Mortalidad intrahospitalaria por accidente cerebrovascular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Rodríguez Lucci

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available La mortalidad global por accidente cerebrovascular (ACV ha disminuido en las últimas tres décadas, probablemente debido a un mejor control de los factores de riesgo vascular. La mortalidad hospitalaria por ACV ha sido tradicionalmente estimada entre 6 y 14% en la mayoría de las series comunicadas. Sin embargo, los datos de ensayos clínicos recientes sugieren que esta cifra sería sustancialmente menor. Se revisaron datos de pacientes internados con diagnóstico de ACV del Banco de Datos de Stroke de FLENI y los registros institucionales de mortalidad entre los años 2000 y 2010. Los subtipos de ACV isquémicos se clasificaron según criterios TOAST y los ACV hemorrágicos en hematomas intrapanquimatosos, hemorragias subaracnoideas aneurismáticas, malformaciones arteriovenosas y otros hematomas intraparenquimatosos. Se analizaron 1514 pacientes, 1079 (71% con ACV isquémico (grandes vasos 39%, cardioembólicos 27%, lacunares 9%, etiología indeterminada 14%, otras etiologías 11% y 435 (29% con ACV hemorrágico (intraparenquimatosos 27%, hemorragia subaracnoidea 30%, malformaciones arteriovenosas 25% y otros hematomas espontáneos 18%. Se registraron 38 muertes intrahospitalarias (17 ACV isquémicos y 21 ACV hemorrágicos, representando una mortalidad global del 2.5% (1.7% en ACV isquémicos y 4.8% en ACV hemorrágicos. No se registraron muertes asociadas al uso de fibrinolíticos endovenosos. La mortalidad intrahospitalaria en pacientes con ACV isquémico y hemorrágico en nuestro centro fue baja. El manejo en un centro dedicado a las enfermedades neurológicas y el enfoque multidisciplinario por personal médico y no médico entrenado en el cuidado de la enfermedad cerebrovascular podrían explicar, al menos en parte, estos resultados.

  13. Ultra-sensitive molecular MRI of cerebrovascular cell activation enables early detection of chronic central nervous system disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since endothelial cells can be targeted by large contrast-carrying particles, molecular imaging of cerebrovascular cell activation is highly promising to evaluate the underlying inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cerebrovascular cell activation can reveal CNS disorders in the absence of visible lesions and symptoms. To this aim, we optimized contrast carrying particles targeting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and MRI protocols through both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although, pre-contrast MRI images failed to reveal the ongoing pathology, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed hypoperfusion-triggered CNS injury in vascular dementia, unmasked amyloid-induced cerebrovascular activation in Alzheimer's disease and allowed monitoring of disease activity during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Moreover, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed the cerebrovascular cell activation associated with known risk factors of CNS disorders such as peripheral inflammation, ethanol consumption, hyperglycemia and aging. By providing a dramatically higher sensitivity than previously reported methods and molecular contrast agents, the technology described in the present study opens new avenues of investigation in the field of neuro-inflammation. (authors)

  14. Cerebrovascular accidents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S V Kakorin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular accident (CA is a nowadays widely spread, highly incapacitating and often lethal event that poses a prominent clini- cal problem. Cardiovascular disease (CVD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM – an “epidemic” of the century, – are known to be its primary risk factors. Hyperglycemia promotes CA risks by induction of protein glycosylation, elevation of blood plasma atherogenic potential, activation of coagulation system with higher risk for thrombosis and disturbance of microcirculation on tissue and organ lev- els. Influence of hyperglycemia on severity and extent of neurologic damage is still under evaluation. Development of macroangiopathy is thought to be associated with media calcification, distal polyneuropathy and renal disorders, all of which are cardiovascular risk factors. Application of so-called metabolic drugs resulted in certain disillusionment, as these agents failed to prove their efficacy during clinical trials. Incidence of pulmonary edema in patients with ischemic CA and T2DM is important as it dictates the necessity for use of loop diuretics. Incidence and severity of heart failure and its correlation with degree of glycemic disorders, incidence of pulmonary em- bolism, as well as tactics of management and prognosis in patients with ischemic CA and T2DM, remains a relevant research problem.

  15. Subjective and objective knowledge and decisional role preferences in cerebrovascular patients compared to controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechel, Christina; Alegiani, Anna Christina; Köpke, Sascha; Kasper, Jürgen; Rosenkranz, Michael; Thomalla, Götz; Heesen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk knowledge and active role preferences are important for patient involvement in treatment decision-making and adherence. Although knowledge about stroke warning signs and risk factors has received considerable attention, objective knowledge on secondary prevention and further self-esteem subjective knowledge have rarely been studied. The aim of our study was to investigate knowledge and treatment decisional role preferences in cerebrovascular patients compared to controls. Methods We performed a survey on subjective and objective stroke risk knowledge and autonomy preferences in cerebrovascular patients from our stroke outpatient clinic (n=262) and from pedestrians on the street taken as controls during a “World Stroke Day” (n=274). The questionnaire includes measures for knowledge and decisional role preferences from previously published questionnaires and newly developed measures, for example, subjective knowledge, revealed on a visual analog scale. Results The overall stroke knowledge was low to moderate, with no differences between patients and controls. Knowledge about secondary prevention was particularly low. Only 10%–15% of participants correctly estimated the stroke absolute risk reduction potential of aspirin. The medical data interpretation competence was moderate in both groups. Age and basic mathematical and statistical understanding (numeracy) were the only independent predictors of objective stroke knowledge, whereas previous stroke had no impact on stroke knowledge. However, patients were thought to be better informed than controls. Approximately 60% of both patients and controls claimed to prefer a shared decision-making approach in treatment decisions. Conclusion The level of stroke risk knowledge in patients with cerebrovascular diseases was as low as in randomly selected pedestrians, although patients felt better informed. Both groups preferred involvement in treatment decision-making. We conclude that educational concepts

  16. Ectasia risk factors in refractive surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhiago MR

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Marcony R Santhiago,1 Natalia T Giacomin,1 David Smadja,2 Samir J Bechara1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil, 2Ophthalmology Department, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel Abstract: This review outlines risk factors of post-laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK ectasia that can be detected preoperatively and presents a new metric to be considered in the detection of ectasia risk. Relevant factors in refractive surgery screening include the analysis of intrinsic biomechanical properties (information obtained from corneal topography/tomography and patient’s age, as well as the analysis of alterable biomechanical properties (information obtained from the amount of tissue altered by surgery and the remaining load-bearing tissue. Corneal topo­graphy patterns of placido disk seem to play a pivotal role as a surrogate of corneal strength, and abnormal corneal topography remains to be the most important identifiable risk factor for ectasia. Information derived from tomography, such as pachymetric and epithelial maps as well as computational strategies, to help in the detection of keratoconus is additional and relevant. High percentage of tissue altered (PTA is the most robust risk factor for ectasia after LASIK in patients with normal preoperative corneal topography. Compared to specific residual stromal bed (RSB or central corneal thickness values, percentage of tissue altered likely provides a more individualized measure of biomechanical alteration because it considers the relationship between thickness, tissue altered through ablation and flap creation, and ultimate RSB thickness. Other recognized risk factors include low RSB, thin cornea, and high myopia. Age is also a very important risk factor and still remains as one of the most overlooked ones. A comprehensive screening approach with the Ectasia Risk Score System, which evaluates multiple risk factors simultaneously, is also a

  17. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  18. Uncertainty factors in ectotoxicological risk : uncertainty factors in ectotoxicological risk management.

    OpenAIRE

    Craig, P.

    2006-01-01

    Uncertainty factors (also known as extrapolation or safety factors) are widely used in lower tier ecotoxicological risk management in order to allow for sources of variability and uncertainty for which there is only limited information. From the point of view of probabilistic risk assessment, the rationale underlying both the use of uncertainty factors and the specific values chosen is often unclear. On the other hand, uncertainty factors are a convenient approach to lower tier risk assessme...

  19. Risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter ruptures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jangö, Hanna; Langhoff-Roos, J; Rosthøj, Steen;

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Jangö H, Langhoff-Roos J, Rosthøj S, Sakse A. Risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter ruptures: a population-based cohort study. BJOG 2012;00:000-000 DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2012.03486.x. Objective  To determine the incidence and risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter...... rupture (ASR). Design  Population-based retrospective cohort study. Setting  Data were taken from the National Medical Birth Registry, Denmark. Population  Patients with a first and a second vaginal delivery in the time period 1997-2010. Methods  Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression...... were used to determine risk factors of recurrent ASR. Main outcome measures  The incidence of recurrent ASR and odds ratios for possible risk factors of recurrent ASR: age, body mass index, grade of ASR, birthweight, head circumference, gestational age, presentation, induction of labour, oxytocin...

  20. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Espanol Image Library Campaign Materials The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease ... on how to choose and cook low-fat foods, get more physical activity, and achieve a healthy ...

  1. Risk Factors Associated with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Shannon; Wong, C K

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the studies reviewed here is to consider the risk factors associated with gestational diabetes mellitus. In order to abstract general features meta-analysis is utilized as the review tool.

  2. Awareness of risk factors for cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerlund, Magdalena; Hvidberg, Line; Hajdarevic, Senada;

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sweden and Denmark are neighbouring countries with similarities in culture, healthcare, and economics, yet notable differences in cancer statistics. A crucial component of primary prevention is high awareness of risk factors in the general public. We aimed to determine and compare...... awareness of risk factors for cancer between a Danish and a Swedish population sample, and to examine whether there are differences in awareness across age groups. Methods: Data derive from Module 2 of the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership. Telephone interviews were conducted with 3000 adults in...... Denmark and 3070 in Sweden using the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer measure. Data reported here relate to awareness of 13 prompted risk factors for cancer. Prevalence ratios with 95 % confidence intervals were calculated to examine associations between country, age, and awareness of risk factors...

  3. Risk factors across the eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hilbert, Anja; Pike, Kathleen; Goldschmidt, Andrea; Wilfley, Denise; Fairburn, Christopher; Dohm, Faith-Anne; Walsh, Timothy; Weissman, Ruth Striegel

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to examine risk and onset patterns in anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). Women with AN (n=71), BN (n=66), BED (n=160) and non-psychiatric controls (n=323) were compared retrospectively on risk factors, symptom onset, and diagnostic migration. Eating disorder groups reported greater risk exposure than non-psychiatric controls. AN and BED differed on premorbid personality/behavioral problems, childhood obesity, and family overeating. ...

  4. Risk factors in prevention of drug dependences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orosova, Ol'ga; Gajdosova, Beata; Madarasova-Geckova, Andrea; Van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2007-01-01

    The study presents the state-of-art of knowledge of risk factors of drug use as a form of risk behaviour in adolescents in individual, interpersonal, and environmental domain (family, school, society). The attention is paid to general deviation syndrome and to the construct of general tendency to dr

  5. Psychosocial risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs)

    OpenAIRE

    Heuvel, S. van den

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for some time that risk factors in the workplace can have a negative effect on health. Ramazzini was one of the first scientists to identify occupational health hazards. He wrote about diseases of the musculoskeletal system caused by sudden and irregular movements and the adoption of awkward postures. Another category of work-related risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) includes psychosocial work characteristics, such as work demands, job control and social supp...

  6. Atherogenic Risk Factors and Hearing Thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas Winther; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Stokholm, Zara Ann;

    2014-01-01

    children's day care units, financial services and 10 manufacturing trades. Associations between atherogenic risk factors (blood lipids, glycosylated hemoglobin, smoking habits, body mass index (BMI), and ambulatory blood pressure) and hearing thresholds were analyzed using multiple linear regression models...... associated with increased low-frequency hearing thresholds, but only at a borderline level of statistical significance. Associations were generally strongest with hearing levels of the worst hearing ear. We found no statistically significant associations between atherogenic risk factors and high...

  7. Endocrine Risk Factors for Cognitive Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer's disease and other kinds of dementia, is a major health problem in older adults worldwide. Although numerous investigators have attempted to develop effective treatment modalities or drugs, there is no reasonably efficacious strategy for preventing or recovering from cognitive impairment. Therefore, modifiable risk factors for cognitive impairment have received attention, and the growing literature of metabolic risk factors for cognitive impairment h...

  8. Adolescent Risk Factors for Child Maltreatment

    OpenAIRE

    Thornberry, Terence P.; Matsuda, Mauri; Greenman, Sarah J.; Augustyn, Megan Bears; Henry, Kimberly L.; Smith, Carolyn A.; Ireland, Timothy O.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate adolescent risk factors, measured at both early and late adolescence, for involvement in child maltreatment during adulthood. Comprehensive assessments of risk factors for maltreatment that use representative samples with longitudinal data are scarce and can inform multilevel prevention. We use data from the Rochester Youth Development Study, a longitudinal study begun in 1988 with a sample of 1,000 seventh and eighth graders. Participants have been interviewed 14 times and, at...

  9. RISK FACTORS FOR INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Ceren Atakay

    2014-01-01

    Intimate partner violence has kept being one of the major societal issues in our country over the past year. It is absolutely necessary to intervene in this substantially psychological issue multi-directionally. In order to intervene in the problem from psychological aspect, it is important to estimate and interpret the risk factors for intimate partner violence. Therefore in the current study, ‘I-cube theory’ which is about the risk factors for intimate partner violence has been explained fi...

  10. Epidemiological & Risk Factors In Childhood Bronchial Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Harmesh; Soni R.K; Gill P J S

    1998-01-01

    Research question: What are the epidemiological and risk factors associated with asthma in children. Objective: To determine epidemiological and risk factors in childhood bronchial asthma. Study design: Cross-sectional. Setting Hospital based. Participants: Children suffering from bronchial asthma and their parents/ attendants. Sample size: 235 children. Study variables: Age, sex place of residence, socio-economic status, age of onset of asthma, no of siblings, fuel used for cooking, smoking,...

  11. Childhood asthma and risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Ljuština-Pribić Radmila; Petrović Slobodanka; Tomić Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. This article summarizes the contribution of epidemiology to the understanding of childhood asthma. The first task in epidemiology is to determine prevalence and incidence of any disease. Prevalence. Epidemiological investigations are aimed at evaluating hypotheses about causes of disease by defining demographic characteristics of a certain population as well as by determining possible effects of environmental factors. In spite of some limitations, data obtained by epidemio...

  12. Risk factors predisposing to congenital heart defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with multiple risk factors, consanguinity may be one such significant factor. The role of consanguinity in the etiology of CHD is supported by inbreeding studies, which demonstrate an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance of some congenital heart defects. This study was done to find out the risk factors for CHD. A case-control study was done on pediatric patients at a tertiary care hospital, Aga Khan University Hospital, located in Karachi, Pakistan. A total of 500 patients, 250 cases and 250 controls were included in the study. Amongst the 250 cases (i.e. those diagnosed with CHD), 122 patients (48.8%) were born of consanguineous marriages while in the controls (i.e. non-CHD) only 72 patients (28.9%) showed a consanguinity amongst parents. On multivariate analysis, consanguinity emerged as an independent risk factor for CHD; adjusted odds ratio 2.59 (95% C. I. 1.73 - 3.87). Other risk factors included low birth weight, maternal co-morbidities, family history of CHD and first born child. On the other hand, medications used by the mother during the index pregnancy, maternal age and gender of the child did not significantly increase the risk of developing CHD. Analyses of our results show that parental consanguinity, family history of CHD, maternal co-morbidities, first born child and low birth weight are independent risk factors for CHD

  13. Risk factors predisposing to congenital heart defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul Haq, Faheem; Jalil, Fatima; Hashmi, Saman; Jumani, Maliha Iqbal; Imdad, Aamer; Jabeen, Mehnaz; Hashmi, Javad Tauseef; Irfan, Furqan Bin; Imran, Muhammad; Atiq, Mehnaz

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with multiple risk factors, consanguinity may be one such significant factor. The role of consanguinity in the etiology of CHD is supported by inbreeding studies, which demonstrate an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance of some congenital heart defects. This study was done to find out the risk factors for CHD. Methods: A case-control study was done on pediatric patients at a tertiary care hospital, Aga Khan University Hospital, located in Karachi, Pakistan. A total of 500 patients, 250 cases and 250 controls were included in the study. Results: Amongst the 250 cases (i.e. those diagnosed with CHD), 122 patients (48.8%) were born of consanguineous marriages while in the controls (i.e. non-CHD) only 72 patients (28.9%) showed a consanguinity amongst parents. On multivariate analysis, consanguinity emerged as an independent risk factor for CHD; adjusted odds ratio 2.59 (95% C. I. 1.73 - 3.87). Other risk factors included low birth weight, maternal co-morbidities, family history of CHD and first born child. On the other hand, medications used by the mother during the index pregnancy, maternal age and gender of the child did not significantly increase the risk of developing CHD. Conclusions: Analyses of our results show that parental consanguinity, family history of CHD, maternal co-morbidities, first born child and low birth weight are independent risk factors for CHD. PMID:21976868

  14. Ectasia risk factors in refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhiago, Marcony R; Giacomin, Natalia T; Smadja, David; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    This review outlines risk factors of post-laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) ectasia that can be detected preoperatively and presents a new metric to be considered in the detection of ectasia risk. Relevant factors in refractive surgery screening include the analysis of intrinsic biomechanical properties (information obtained from corneal topography/tomography and patient's age), as well as the analysis of alterable biomechanical properties (information obtained from the amount of tissue altered by surgery and the remaining load-bearing tissue). Corneal topography patterns of placido disk seem to play a pivotal role as a surrogate of corneal strength, and abnormal corneal topography remains to be the most important identifiable risk factor for ectasia. Information derived from tomography, such as pachymetric and epithelial maps as well as computational strategies, to help in the detection of keratoconus is additional and relevant. High percentage of tissue altered (PTA) is the most robust risk factor for ectasia after LASIK in patients with normal preoperative corneal topography. Compared to specific residual stromal bed (RSB) or central corneal thickness values, percentage of tissue altered likely provides a more individualized measure of biomechanical alteration because it considers the relationship between thickness, tissue altered through ablation and flap creation, and ultimate RSB thickness. Other recognized risk factors include low RSB, thin cornea, and high myopia. Age is also a very important risk factor and still remains as one of the most overlooked ones. A comprehensive screening approach with the Ectasia Risk Score System, which evaluates multiple risk factors simultaneously, is also a helpful tool in the screening strategy. PMID:27143849

  15. New assessment for the risk of ischemic stroke or carotid artery stenosis. Prognostic factor analysis in hypercholesterolemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concise and non-invasive methods to detect the risk of cerebrovascular disease in high risk patients are considered useful. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the contribution to ischemic cerebrovascular risk of the Revised Atherosclerotic Index (RAI) which is calculated from the Atherogenic Index (AI), patient's age and number of risk factors of atherosclerotic disease. I studied retrospectively the serum lipid levels, carotid stenosis measured by ultrasonography and cerebral infarction diagnosed from the symptoms and CT in 56 hypercholesterolemic outpatients. I assessed the relation between the RAI and carotid stenoic findings, history of cerebral infarction, and type of cerebral infarction. I also assessed the relation between the RAI and changes in LDL-cholesterol level before and after atorvastatin administration. The RAI was significantly increased in patients with carotid lesions and cerebral infarction, but the AI was not. While the odds ratio of the AI for carotid lesions was high but not significantly so, that of the RAI increased with statistical significance. The odds ratio for cerebral infarction was high for the RAI but not for the AI. Furthermore, the RAI was significantly high in patients with aortic thrombotic cerebral infarction as compared to that in patients without any infarction. The serum lipids were well controlled under administration of atorvastatin and the mean RAI was also significantly decreased; however, more comprehensive control of risk factors might be necessary. The AI adjusted for patient's age and number of risk factors might be useful for assessing the risk of carotid lesion atherosclerosis and aortic thrombotic cerebral infarction. (author)

  16. Mediterranean Diet and Cardiovascular Risk: Beyond Traditional Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Lista, Javier; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Perez-Caballero, Ana I; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco; Lopez-Miranda, Jose

    2016-04-01

    A strict adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) has repeatedly been linked to a low risk of cardiovascular disease in several situations. Initially, the mechanisms considered as possible causes of this were based on the effects of this dietary pattern on the so-called traditional risk factors (especially lipids and blood pressure). However, the high relative reduction in the prevalence of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were not proportional to the limited findings about regulation of those traditional risk factors. In addition to several studies confirming the above effects, current research on the MedDiet is being focused on defining its effects on non-traditional risk factors, such as endothelial function, inflammation, oxidative stress, or on controlling the conditions which predispose people to cardiovascular events, such as obesity, metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus. In the current article, after briefly reviewing the known effects of the MedDiet on the traditional risk factors, we will mainly focus on reviewing the current evidence about the effects that this dietary pattern exerts on alternative factors, including postprandial lipemia or coagulation, among others, as well as providing a short review on future directions. PMID:25118147

  17. Warfarin therapy and incidence of cerebrovascular complications in left-sided native valve endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snygg-Martin, U; Rasmussen, Rasmus Vedby; Hassager, C;

    2011-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy has been anticipated to increase the risk of cerebrovascular complications (CVC) in native valve endocarditis (NVE). This study investigates the relationship between ongoing oral anticoagulant therapy and the incidence of symptomatic CVC in left-sided NVE. In a prospective...... factors for CVC, while warfarin on admission (aOR 0.26, 95% CI 0.07-0.94), history of congestive heart failure (adjusted OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.1-0.52) and previous endocarditis (aOR 0.1, 95% CI 0.01-0.79) correlated with lower CVC frequency....

  18. Anxiety and depressive disorders in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and cerebrovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Inessa Ivanovna Dubinina; Vladimir Alekseevich Zhadnov; Svetlana Vital'evna Yankina; Aleksandra Viktorovna Solov'eva

    2012-01-01

    Aims. Current study was aimed to identify symptoms and risk factors for depression and anxiety and to estimate quality of life (QoL) in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD).Materials and methods. We examined 73 patients with T2DM. 1st group included 49 patients with T2DM and CVD, 2nd group - 24 patients with T2DM and no cardiovascular pathology. The groups were not significantly different in terms of age, BMI, level of HbAlc, fasting and postprandial...

  19. BREAST CANCER: IS OBESITY A RISK FACTOR?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Most epidemiological studies established obesity as an important risk factor for breast cancer. It is one of the few risk factors that women can modify. Now-a-days breast cancer is considered to be a life-style disease. The relation of obesity to breast cancer is complex one. Obesity is found to be associated with increased risk of cancer in post-menopausal women, but relation is reverse in pre-menopausal women. In these patients, obesity increases risk due to enhanced oestrogenic activity in obese females. Apart from it, other factors like Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF-1, Leptin has also been involved. Due to big breasts in obese females there is delay in seeking medical attention, delay in diagnosis, poor response to surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and associated complication during treatment. We study the effect of obesity (Weight, BMI, WHR as a risk factor in occurrence of breast cancer in local population of Southern part of Rajasthan in India. We found no significant association between obesity and increased risk of breast cancer in local population of this region where women are multiparous, physically active and usually do not use exogenous hormones.

  20. Predictive risk factors for persistent postherniotomy pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske K; Gmaehle, Eliza; Hansen, Jeanette B;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persistent postherniotomy pain (PPP) affects everyday activities in 5-10% of patients. Identification of predisposing factors may help to identify the risk groups and guide anesthetic or surgical procedures in reducing risk for PPP. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted in 464...... patients undergoing open or laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal elective groin hernia repair. Primary outcome was identification of risk factors for substantial pain-related functional impairment at 6 months postoperatively assessed by the validated Activity Assessment Scale (AAS). Data on potential...... risk factors for PPP were collected preoperatively (pain from the groin hernia, preoperative AAS score, pain from other body regions, and psychometric assessment). Pain scores were collected on days 7 and 30 postoperatively. Sensory functions including pain response to tonic heat stimulation were...

  1. Cannabis use motives and personality risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecimovic, Karen; Barrett, Sean P; Darredeau, Christine; Stewart, Sherry H

    2014-03-01

    According to the model of substance abuse of Conrod, Pihl, Stewart, and Dongier (2000), four personality factors (i.e., anxiety sensitivity [AS], introversion/hopelessness [I/H], sensation seeking [SS], and impulsivity [IMP]) are associated with elevated risk for substance use/misuse, with each personality factor being related to preference for particular drugs of abuse (e.g., AS with anxiolytics). However, cannabis use has not been consistently linked to any one of these personality factors. This may be due to the heterogeneity in cannabis use motives. The present study explored the association between these four personality risk factors and different cannabis use motives. Cannabis users completed an interview about their motives for cannabis use as well as the self-report Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS; Woicik, Conrod, Stewart, & Pihl, 2009), which measures the four personality risk factors. Results showed that AS was associated with conformity motives and I/H was associated with coping motives for cannabis use. SS was positively associated with expansion motives and IMP was associated with drug availability motives. Thus, personality risk factors in the model of Conrod et al. (2000) are associated with distinct cannabis use motives in a pattern consistent with theory. PMID:24368004

  2. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors of Cerebral Infarction in 439 Patients Undergoing Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaoka, Yuji; Ohki, Takao; Maeda, Koji; Baba, Takeshi; Fujita, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to identify the potential risk factors of cerebral infarction associated with thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR). TEVAR was developed as a less invasive surgical alternative to conventional open repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm treatment. However, outcomes following TEVAR of aortic and distal arch aneurysms remain suboptimal. Cerebral infarction is a major concern during the perioperative period. We included 439 patients who underwent TEVAR of aortic aneurysms at a high-volume teaching hospital between July 2006 and June 2013. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify perioperative cerebral infarction risk factors. Four patients (0.9%) died within 30 days of TEVAR; 17 (3.9%) developed cerebral infarction. In univariate analysis, history of ischemic heart disease and cerebral infarction and concomitant cerebrovascular disease were significantly associated with cerebral infarction. “Shaggy aorta” presence, left subclavian artery coverage, carotid artery debranching, and pull-through wire use were identified as independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. In multivariate analysis, history of ischemic heart disease (odds ratio [OR] 6.49, P = 0.046) and cerebral infarction (OR 43.74, P = 0.031), “shaggy aorta” (OR 30.32, P < 0.001), pull-through wire use during surgery (OR 7.196, P = 0.014), and intraoperative blood loss ≥800 mL (OR 24.31, P = 0.017) were found to be independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. This study identified patient- and procedure-related risk factors of cerebral infarction following TEVAR. These results indicate that patient outcomes could be improved through the identification and management of procedure-related risk factors. PMID:27082585

  3. Risk factors for progressive ischemic stroke A retrospective analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progressive ischemic stroke has higher fatality rate and disability rate than common cerebral infarction, thus it is very significant to investigate the early predicting factors related to the occurrence of progressive ischemic stroke, thc potential pathological mechanism and the risk factors of early intervention for preventing the occurrence of progressive ischemic stroke and ameliorating its outcome.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the possible related risk factors in patients with progressive ishcemic stroke, so as to provide reference for the prevention and treatment of progressive ishcemic stroke.DESIGN: A retrospective analysis.SETTING: Department of Neurology, General Hospital of Beijing Coal Mining Group.PARTICIPANTS: Totally 280 patients with progressive ischemic stroke were selected from the Department of Neurology, General Hospital of Beijing Coal Mining Group from March 2002 to June 2006, including 192 males and 88 females, with a mean age of (62±7) years old. They were all accorded with the diagnostic standards for cerebral infarction set by the Fourth National Academic Meeting for Cerebrovascular Disease in 1995, and confired by CT or MRI, admitted within 24 hours after attack, and the neurological defect progressed gradually or aggravated in gradients within 72 hours after attack, and the aggravation of neurological defect was defined as the neurological deficit score decreased by more than 2 points. Meanwhile,200 inpatients with non-progressive ischemic stroke (135 males and 65 females) were selected as the control group.METHODS: After admission, a univariate analysis of variance was conducted using the factors of blood pressure, history of diabetes mellitus, fever, leukocytosis, levels of blood lipids, fibrinogen, blood glucose and plasma homocysteine, cerebral arterial stenosis, and CT symptoms of early infarction, and the significant factors were involved in the multivariate non-conditional Logistic regression analysis.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

  4. OCULAR HYPERTENSION - RISK FACTORS AND THERAPY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janicijevic Katarina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Aim: The goal of our study was to analyze the epidemiological`s characteristics of ocular hypertension, as well as the influence of chronic risk factors on glaucoma development (conversion in glaucoma. We tried to make some entries for solving this complex ophthalmological problem. Material /Methods: From 2009 to 2015, a retrospective control study was performed on 121 patient with diagnoses of bilateral ocular hypertension and without disease progression/conversion of glaucoma (by standard protocols of diagnosis and basic procedures on tertiary level at Clinic of Ophthalmology, Clinical Centre of Kragujevac, Serbia.. The authors analyzed epidemiological characteristics: sex, age groups, positive/negative family history and personal history with chronic risk factors (one and/or two of ocular hypertension. The data obtained from this study were statistically analyzed in SPSS program, version 20.00. Results: As for the patients, 69 of them (57.02% were male and 52 female (42.98%. Dominant age group was between 40-49 (42.15% and then group between 50-59 (40.50% years of age. Anamnesis data indicated the absence of family anamnesis 71 (58.68%. Risk factors for ocular hypertension were presented in 103 (85.13% patients, 18 of them (14.87% did not respond. One risk factor - cardiovascular disease was noted in 83 (68.59%, with two risk factors - cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus in 20 patients (16.53% and with PEX syndroma at other respondents. Conclusion: Ocular hypertension is not a common disease, but with risk factors, such as older age, positive family history, and chronic risk factors syndicated, represents a serious clinical and social problem, so the question remains for ophthalmologists - pro or against therapy? Those in favor of therapy would state the safety and protection from conversion/progression of glaucoma; but those against therapy would only mention adequate monitoring of patients.

  5. Cervical artery dissection: emerging risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, S; Paciaroni, M; Corea, F; Agnelli, G; Zampolini, M; Caso, V

    2010-01-01

    Cervical artery dissection (CAD) represents an increasingly recognized cause of stroke and the most common cause of ischemic stroke in young adults. Many factors have been identified in association with CAD such as primary disease of arterial wall (fibrodysplasia) and other non-specific diseases related to CAD like Ehlers Danlos-syndrome IV, Marfan's syndrome, vessel tortuosity. Moreover, an underlying arteriopathy which could be in part genetically determined, has been suspected. The rule of emerging risk factors for CAD such as recent respiratory tract infection, migraine and hyperhomocysteinemia are still a matter of research. Other known risks factors for CAD are major head/neck trauma like chiropractic maneuver, coughing or hyperextension injury associated to car. We examined emerging risks factors for CAD detected in the last years, as CAD pathogenesis is still not completely understood and needs further investigations. PMID:21270941

  6. Portfolio Credit Risk Modelling With Heavy-Tailed Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Kostadinov, Krassimir

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade, the dependencies between financial assets have increased due to globalization effects and relaxed market regulation. The standard industrial methodologies like RiskMetrics and CreditMetrics model the dependence structure in the derivatives or in the credit portfolio by assuming multivariate normality of the underlying risk factors. It has been well recognized that many financial assets exhibit a number of features which contradict the normality assumption - namely asym...

  7. Determinants of Risk Factors for Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Busse, William W.

    1999-01-01

    There are a number of risk factors for the development of asthma, including genetic and environmental components. Moreover, there is mounting evidence that a variety of genes are associated with the features of asthma, such as persistent wheezing, airway responsiveness and chronic bronchial inflammation. However, for expression of these features, other factors must also come into play. This paper focuses on the importance of environmental factors in the development of asthma, including allerg...

  8. The main factors affecting the long-term outcomes in patients after acute cerebrovascular disorder: results of the LIS-2 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Martsevich

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the long-term prognosis of life in patients after cerebral stroke (MI and to identify the main factors influencing it.Material and methods. All patients (n=960 who had MI or transient ischemic attack in the period from 01.01.2009 to 31.12.2011, admitted to Lyubertsy district hospital №2, were included into the register of LIS-2. The primary endpoint was total mortality of patients.Results. The average age of patients was 72±9 years, 2/3 were women. 207 patients (21.7% died in the hospital, 753 were discharged from the hospital. Median follow-up was 2.8 (2.1, 3.5 years. 31.5% of the patients died during this period. The main cause of death (36% was re-MI, and 22.4% of patients died from the heart failure. The relative risk (RR of death was significantly increased with the age of patients (RR=1.1. The probability of death increased in the presence of diabetes mellitus (RR=1.4, alcohol abuse (RR=2.3, any signs of consciousness disorders in the acute phase of MI (RR=1.6, heart failure (RR=1.6, atrial fibrillation (RR=1.4. Patients who were treated with calcium channel blockers before admission to the hospital, had a lower risk of death than those who did not receive these drugs (RR=0.4. Prescription of ACE inhibitors at discharge from the hospital reduced significantly the risk of death in the long-term period (RR=0.7.Conclusion. High rate of long-term mortality in the LIS-2 register can be largely explained by the poor quality of primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events.

  9. What Are the Risk Factors for Bladder Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer Next Topic What causes bladder cancer? Bladder cancer risk factors A risk factor is anything that changes your ... make a person more likely to develop bladder cancer. Risk factors you can change Smoking Smoking is the most ...

  10. Heart Disease Risk Factors | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk factors. Risk factors also increase the chance that existing CHD ... CHD, talk with your doctor or healthcare provider. Risk Factors You Can Control Smoking —Smoking is the most ...

  11. Endocrine Risk Factors for Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jae Hoon

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer's disease and other kinds of dementia, is a major health problem in older adults worldwide. Although numerous investigators have attempted to develop effective treatment modalities or drugs, there is no reasonably efficacious strategy for preventing or recovering from cognitive impairment. Therefore, modifiable risk factors for cognitive impairment have received attention, and the growing literature of metabolic risk factors for cognitive impairment has expanded from epidemiology to molecular pathogenesis and therapeutic management. This review focuses on the epidemiological evidence for the association between cognitive impairment and several endocrine risk factors, including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, thyroid dysfunction, vitamin D deficiency, and subclinical atherosclerosis. Researches suggesting possible mechanisms for this association are reviewed. The research investigating modifiable endocrine risk factors for cognitive impairment provides clues for understanding the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment and developing novel treatment modalities. However, so far, interventional studies investigating the beneficial effect of the "modification" of these "modifiable risk factors" on cognitive impairment have reported variable results. Therefore, well-designed, randomized prospective interventional studies are needed. PMID:27118278

  12. Risk factors for hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijailović Željko D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hepatitis C viral infection represents a major health problem in the world. The estimated global incidence is about 3%, whereas the number of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV carriers worldwide is estimated to be between 150-300 million people. Material and methods This retrospective analysis included 82 patients whose diagnosis of viral hepatitis C infection was based upon the following criteria: case history, physical examination, laboratory and abdominal ultrasound examination, histological examination of the liver, radiological examination, serological analysis and viral analysis. Descriptive statistics were used to describe general data on patients of the study group, risk factor analysis and follow-up results. Results The most prominent risk factor in our study group was intravenous use of drugs in 37 patients (37%, and blood transfusion in 13 patients (13%. Less important risk factors of viral hepatitis C infection included: promiscuity (8%, sexual contact with hepatitis C carriers (5%, surgical intervention (5%, haemodialysis (3%, intranasal use of cocaine (2%. Discussion Hepatitis C viral infection has become the illness of young and middle-aged population. This is due to the epidemic profile of this illness, due to intravenous use of drugs as the most prominent risk factor. Conclusion Due to the number of infected, numerous risk factors and complications of viral hepatitis C, hepatitis C virus has become the most prominent hepatotrophic virus.

  13. 18F-fluoroethylcholine uptake in arterial vessel walls and cardiovascular risk factors. Correlation in a PET-CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorine-labelled choline derivatives were recently suggested as agents for visualizing vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. We therefore aimed to evaluate the association between 18F-fluorethylcholine (FEC) uptake in the wall of large arteries, where calcification was also measured, with the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and occurrence of prior cardiovascular events. Detailed clinical information, including common cardiovascular risk factors, was obtained retrospectively in 60 prostate cancer patients examined with whole-body FEC PET-CT. In each patient, we calculated the mean blood pool-corrected SUV, as well as the mean target-to-background ratio (TBR), in addition to the sum of calcified plaques (CPsum) from six major vessels: ascending and descending aorta, aortic arch, abdominal aorta, and both iliac arteries. As reported previously, the CPsum correlated significantly with cardiovascular risk factors, in contrast to mean SUV or TBR scores, which did not show any significance with the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. There was no correlation between CPsum, mean TBR or SUV, nor was there any significant association of CPsum, mean TBR or SUV with the prior occurrence of cardio- or cerebrovascular events. Contrary to a recent report, we found in our rather large cohort of elderly prostate cancer patients no significant association between FEC uptake in large vessels and atherosclerotic plaque burden, or the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. In line with prior reports on structural changes in vessels, increased calcified atherosclerotic plaque burden was strongly associated with the occurrence of common cardiovascular risk factors. (orig.)

  14. Environmental risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molodecky, Natalie A; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2010-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune response. Although many IBD susceptibility genes have been discovered, similar advances in defining environmental risk factors have lagged. A number of environmental risk factors have been explored, including smoking, appendectomy, oral contraceptives, diet, breastfeeding, infections/ vaccinations, antibiotics, and childhood hygiene. However, most of these factors have demonstrated inconsistent findings, thus making additional studies necessary to better understand the etiology of IBD. PMID:20567592

  15. Risk factors of cardiac allograft vasculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Wioletta; Gąsior, Mariusz; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in prevention and treatment of heart transplant rejection, development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) remains the leading factor limiting long-term survival of the graft. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy etiopathogenesis is not fully understood, but a significant role is attributed to endothelial cell damage, caused by immunological and non-immunological mechanisms. Immunological factors include the differences between the recipient's and the donor's HLA systems, the presence of alloreactive antibodies and episodes of acute rejection. Among the non-immunological factors the most important are the age of the donor, ischemia-reperfusion injury and cytomegalovirus infection. The classical cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, obesity and hyperlipidemia) are also important. This study presents an up-to-date overview of current knowledge on the vasculopathy etiopathogenesis and the role played by endothelium and inflammatory processes in CAV, and it also investigates the factors which may serve as risk markers of cardiac allograft vasculopathy. PMID:26855649

  16. Safety Factors in Pesticide Risk Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmegaard, N.; Jagers op Akkerhuis, G. A. J. M.

    to secure that the methodology is adequate. As new knowledge surfaces the risk assessment procedures develops. The present report is a contribution to the development of safety factors used to account for the uncertainty when · extrapolating from the results of test with a single species in the......Foreword It has become common practice to protect the environment from hazardous chemicals by use of risk assessment to establish environmental concentration at which only limited damage to the ecosystem can be expected. The methods and tools applied in the risk assessment need constant evaluation...... safety factors used in pesticide risk assessment: the variability in species sensitivities, and the relationship between acute LC50's and chronic NOEC's....

  17. Psychosocial risk factors and heart failure hospitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Andersen, Ingelise; Prescott, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Prospective studies on the role of psychosocial factors in heart failure development are virtually nonexistent. The authors aimed to address the effect of psychosocial factors on the risk of heart failure hospitalization in men and women free of cardiovascular disease. In 1991-1993, the 8...... population reported some degree of vital exhaustion. The vital exhaustion score was associated with a higher risk of heart failure in a dose-response manner (P <0.002), with high vital exhaustion being associated with a 2-fold higher risk of heart failure in both men (hazard ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence...... population, even a modestly higher risk of heart failure associated with vital exhaustion may be of importance in the planning of future preventive strategies for heart failure....

  18. Clinical Risk Factors for Gastroduodenal Ulcer in Romanian Low-Dose Aspirin Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negovan, Anca; Iancu, Mihaela; Moldovan, Valeriu; Voidazan, Septimiu; Bataga, Simona; Pantea, Monica; Sarkany, Kinga; Tatar, Cristina; Mocan, Simona; Banescu, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aspirin use for cardiovascular or cancer prevention is limited due to its gastrointestinal side effects. Objective. Our prospective, observational case-control study aims to identify the predictive factors for ulcers in low-dose aspirin consumers (75-325 mg/day). Methods. The study included patients who underwent an upper digestive endoscopy and took low-dose aspirin treatment. Results. We recruited 51 patients with ulcer (ulcer group) and 108 patients with no mucosal lesions (control group). In univariate analysis, factors significantly associated with ulcers were male gender (p = 0.001), anticoagulants (p = 0.029), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (p = 0.013), heart failure (p = 0.007), liver (p = 0.011) or cerebrovascular disease (p = 0.004), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.043), ulcer history (p = 0.044), and alcohol consumption (p = 0.018), but not Helicobacter pylori infection (p = 0.2). According to our multivariate regression analysis results, history of peptic ulcer (OR 3.07, 95% CI 1.06-8.86), cotreatment with NSAIDs (OR 8, 95% CI 2.09-30.58) or anticoagulants (OR 4.85, 95% CI 1.33-17.68), male gender (OR 5.2, 95% CI 1.77-15.34), and stroke (OR 7.27, 95% CI 1.40-37.74) remained predictors for ulcer on endoscopy. Conclusions. Concomitant use of NSAIDs or anticoagulants, comorbidities (cerebrovascular disease), and male gender are the most important independent risk factors for ulcer on endoscopy in low-dose aspirin consumers, in a population with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. PMID:27579036

  19. Cerebrovascular endothelial dysfunction induced by mercury exposure at low concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra; Furieri, Lorena Barros; Briones, Ana María; Avendaño, María Soledad; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Salaices, Mercedes; Alonso, María Jesús

    2016-03-01

    Mercury (Hg) has many harmful vascular effects by increasing oxidative stress, inflammation and vascular/endothelial dysfunction, all of which may contribute to cerebrovascular diseases development. We aimed to explore the effects of chronic low-mercury concentration on vascular function in cerebral arteries and the mechanisms involved. Basilar arteries from control (vehicle-saline solution, im) and mercury chloride (HgCl2)-treated rats for 30 days (first dose 4.6μg/kg, subsequent dose 0.07μg/kg/day, im, to cover daily loss) were used. Vascular reactivity, protein expression, nitric oxide (NO) levels and superoxide anion (O2(-)) production were analyzed. HgCl2 exposure increased serotonin contraction and reduced the endothelium-dependent vasodilatation to bradykinin. After NO synthase inhibition, serotonin responses were enhanced more in control than in mercury-treated rats while bradykinin-induced relaxation was abolished. NO levels were greater in control than Hg-treated rats. Tiron and indomethacin reduced vasoconstriction and increased the bradykinin-induced relaxation only in HgCl2-treated rats. Vascular O2(-) production was greater in mercury-treated when compared to control rats. Protein expressions of endothelial NO synthase, copper/zinc (Cu/Zn), Manganese (Mn) and extracellular-superoxide dismutases were similar in cerebral arteries from both groups. Results suggest that Hg treatment increases cerebrovascular reactivity by reducing endothelial negative modulation and NO bioavailability; this effect seems to be dependent on increased reactive oxygen species and prostanoids generation. These findings show, for the first time, that brain vasculature are also affected by chronic mercury exposure and offer further evidence that even at small concentration, HgCl2 is hazardous and might be an environmental risk factor accounting for cerebral vasospasm development. PMID:26945730

  20. Cardiovascular risk factors and risk of venous thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Brækkan, Sigrid Kufaas

    2010-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a common disease, with serious short- and long-term complications and a potential fatal outcome. Despite the knowledge of several inherited and acquired risk factors for VTE, still 30-50 % of the VTE events occur in the absence of obvious predisposing factors. Traditionally, arterial and venous thrombosis has been considered as separate disease entities with different pathology, epidemiology and treatments...

  1. What Are the Risk Factors for Ovarian Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer? What are the risk factors for ovarian cancer? A risk factor is anything that changes your chance of getting ... is a risk factor for a number of cancers. But risk factors don't tell us everything. Having a risk ...

  2. Evento cerebrovascular isquémico en el adulto joven

    OpenAIRE

    Verónica Leandro-Sandí; Miguel Barboza-Elizondo; Gustavo Vindas-Angulo

    2013-01-01

    El evento cerebrovascular isquémico es un desorden multifactorial, en el que contribuyen factores genéticos y ambientales. A pesar de que se reconoce un aumento del riesgo de eventos cerebrovasculares cuando existe una historia familiar positiva (de hasta un 75% en ciertos estudios), no se conoce la contribución exacta que tiene la genética en el desarrollo de eventos cerebrales isquémicos en el paciente joven. El papel que desempeña la predisposición genética sobre la ocurrencia de estos eve...

  3. Nutritional risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Sakshi Singh; Ray, T K; Ranjan Das; Abha Singh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been observed to be associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality. GDM is becoming a public health concern globally as well as in India with fast increasing trend. It affects approximately 14% of all pregnancies. Studies on the association of food items having high glycaemic index with GDM risk are sparse. Most of the literature has focused on typical risk factors like advanced maternal age, family history of diabetes mellitus,...

  4. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are immediately disabling and are associated with long-term consequences, such as posttraumatic osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 2 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unkn...

  5. Psychological Factors Linked to Risk Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaş, I.; Creãu, R. Z.; Stǎnciugelu, I.

    2012-04-01

    Risks are mental models, which allow people to cope with dangerous phenomena (Renn, 2008; Jasanoff, 1998). The term "risk" refers to the likelihood of an adverse effect resulting from an event. The aim of the present study is to identify the psychological factors that are most predictive of risk perception in relation with age, gender, educational level and socio-economical status. Earthquake hazard was considered, because it is an emerging danger for Bucharest. 80% of the laypeople sample are waiting for this event to happen in the next three years. By integrating all the research data, it was attempted to build a risk profile of the investigated population, which could be used by institutions responsible for earthquake risk mitigation situations in Bucharest. This research appealed to the social learning Rotter (1966), auto-effectiveness Bandura (1977; 1983), and anxiety and stress theories. We used psychological variables that measured stress, personal effectiveness and the belief in personal control. The multi-modal risk perception questionnaire was structured on a 49 items sequence. The sample was composed of 1.376 participants recruited on a voluntary basis. The characteristics of risk (like probability and magnitude, time scales) are perceived differently according to psychological factors that play a role also in biases in people's ability to draw inferences from probabilistic information (like cognitive dissonance). Since the 1970's, it has been argued that those who perceive life's events as being beyond their locus of control (external locus of control) are significantly more anxious and less adapted. In this research, strongest associations and significant differences were obtained between sex, age and income categories with Stress vulnerability factor and the External Locus of Control factor. The profile of the low risk perceiver is that of a young, more educated, male individual with a higher self- efficacy level and an internal locus of control.

  6. Lung cancer risk factors among women

    OpenAIRE

    Papadopoulos, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of female lung cancer in developed countries has been increasing since 1950 and particularly in France where the cigarettes consumption has also increased. Since 1980, a growing number of epidemiological surveys have pinpointed the risk of female lung cancer related to smoking. Consecutively, a debate on gender differences in lung cancer risk has appeared, but still in progress nowadays. The reproductive factors could explain these differences. In order to have recent and reliab...

  7. Stroke Prevention: Managing Modifiable Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Di Legge; Giacomo Koch; Marina Diomedi; Paolo Stanzione; Fabrizio Sallustio

    2012-01-01

    Prevention plays a crucial role in counteracting morbidity and mortality related to ischemic stroke. It has been estimated that 50% of stroke are preventable through control of modifiable risk factors and lifestyle changes. Antihypertensive treatment is recommended for both prevention of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. The use of antiplatelets and statins has been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI...

  8. RISK FACTORS OF MORTALITY IN NEONATAL ILLNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyanthi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Infant Mortality Rate (IMR is high in India. Identification of risk factors of mortality in neonatal illness is essential to reduce Neonatal Mortality Rate (NMR and ultimately the IMR. AIM To identify the risk factors of mortality in neonatal illness. SETTING AND DESIGN It was a nested case control study done at the sick neonatal unit of urban tertiary referral centre. METHODS AND MATERIALS After obtaining ethical committee approval, retrospective analysis of 150 out born neonatal case records of babies admitted during the period from October 2015 to December 2015 was done. Data such as demographic features, maternal details, referral details, perinatal events, clinical features, laboratory reports and outcome were recorded. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS These risk factors were subjected to univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis and P value calculated for the same to find out significant risk factors of mortality in neonatal illness. RESULTS Neonatal mortality rate was 22%. Male-to-female ratio was 2:1, death occurred more commonly in female neonates (23.1%. Home deliveries carried more risk of mortality. Birth order 4 and above had 25% mortality. Neonates of mother who had primary education and below had higher mortality. Perinatal asphyxia and sepsis were the most common causes of neonatal mortality. By univariate analysis, preterms had 4.9 times increased risk of mortality than term babies. Apnoeic spells, chest retractions and shock had 8 times, 3 times and 3.6 times increased risk of mortality respectively. By multivariate analysis, birth weight below 2 kilograms (kg carried 11.8 times more risk of mortality with a p value 0.00 (95% C.I 3.2, 30.4 and poor maternal intake of iron and folic acid tablets was 3.9 times more risk p value 0.003 (95% C.I 1.6, 9.6, apnoeic spells were 5.8 times more risk of mortality with p value 0.02 (95% C.I 1.3, 26.2. CONCLUSION Birth weight below 2 kg, poor maternal intake of iron and folic

  9. Risk Factors for Wound Complications Following Abdominoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir K. Jabaiti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Abdominoplasty has become an increasingly popular procedure. Risk factors affecting wound complications of abdominoplasty are not adequately defined in literature. Identification of these risk factors is crucial for better patient’s selection and counseling. The objectives of this study were to determine wound complication rate following abdominoplasty and to examine the relationship of a set of possible risk factors with the incidence of complications. Approach: We studied 116 patients (107 women and 9 men who underwent abdominoplasty at Jordan University Hospital, between June 1997 and June 2007. Data were collected from patients’ medical records and analyzed to determine types and rates of surgical wound complications. Fourteen possible risk factors were investigated using logistic regression analysis to evaluate their relationship with the occurrence of wound complications. Risk factors examined were: age, sex, body mass index, parity number, smoking history, history of diabetes mellitus, previous gastroplasty for morbid obesity, previous abdominal surgical scars, type of abdominoplasty, plication of recti, hernia repair, operative time and operative blood loss. Results: A total of 29 patients (two males and 27 females (25% had wound complications. The most common complication was seroma. It was encountered in 15 cases (12.9%. Six patients (5.2% had wound infection. Partial skin necrosis was encountered in four cases (3.4 %. Two patients (1.7% developed wound dehiscence and two patients (1.7% had hematoma. The only factors significantly increased the complication rate were: increased body mass index (p = 0.002 and history of smoking (p = 0.004. Conclusions and Recommendations: This study confirms the adverse effect of overweight and cigarette smoking on the incidence of wound complication rate following abdominoplasty. We recommend that overweight patients and smokers undergoing abdominoplasty should be adequately

  10. Risk factors for male breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    D'Avanzo, B.; La Vecchia, C

    1995-01-01

    Risk factors for male breast cancer were investigated in a case-control study of 21 cases and 82 controls admitted to hospital for acute, non-neoplastic, non-hormone-related diseases in the Greater Milan area between 1988 and 1994. More educated men tended to be at higher risk of breast cancer, with a multivariate odds ratio (OR) of 2.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-9.4]. The OR was 3.2 (95% CI 1.1-9.6) for those in the higher social class. Men with no offspring were at higher risk than f...

  11. Lung cancer incidence and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of developing lung cancer (lc) as a consequence of inhaling hot particles from the Chernobyl accident is discussed. The risk from various factors is reviewed in order to assess the rate of contribution for any of them to carcinogenic process. The conclusions are based on data reported by National Centre of Oncology, Sofia (BG). A total of 2873 new cases have been recorded in 1990. The data for the period 1970-1990 show a crude increase for males and tend to stabilization for females. The similar pattern is obtained in other countries and geographic areas with steady rise of lc cases with about 0.5% per year. The contribution of particular risk factor and its interaction with other factors is assessed on the basis of large number of epidemiologic and experimental studies. The risk of cigarette smoking, as the principal cause for lc, is discussed in various aspects - age, duration, possible dropping the habit. The assessment of another risk factor - exposure to relatively high doses of natural radon daughter products - is more complicated. As an occupational hazard in uranium mines radon and its progeny reveals an increase in excess lc incidence. Regarding radon and its daughters as an environmental risk factor in dwellings, no clear positive relationship between exposure and lc incidence has been observed. In this case the assessment for population living in areas with higher concentration of radon products have to rely on data from uranium mines. Non radiation factors as asbestos, ethers, chromates, metallic iron, nickel, beryllium and arsenic, are also considered. The combined effect of all these factors, as well as of pathological cell processes, viruses, malfunctions of immune system, is mentioned as well. The possibility of interpreting the findings from epidemiological studies within the framework of theoretical multistage models of carcinogenic process is pointed out. (author)

  12. Evento cerebrovascular isquémico en el adulto joven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Leandro-Sandí

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available El evento cerebrovascular isquémico es un desorden multifactorial, en el que contribuyen factores genéticos y ambientales. A pesar de que se reconoce un aumento del riesgo de eventos cerebrovasculares cuando existe una historia familiar positiva (de hasta un 75% en ciertos estudios, no se conoce la contribución exacta que tiene la genética en el desarrollo de eventos cerebrales isquémicos en el paciente joven. El papel que desempeña la predisposición genética sobre la ocurrencia de estos eventos, difiere según la edad y el tipo de evento. Los factores genéticos se conjugan con los factores de riesgo convencionales, como hipertensión arterial, diabetes y niveles de homocisteína, que a su vez interactúan con el ambiente en el desarrollo de aterosclerosis. La homocisteína por sí sola, ha sido considerada un factor aterogénico en enfermedades cardiovasculares y cerebrovasculares. Se refiere el caso de un paciente de 49 años conocido sano, quien presenta un evento cerebrovascular isquémico de la circulación cerebral anterior, con un valor en la escala para derrame del Instituto Nacional de Salud de 7 puntos al ingreso y una mutación heterocigota del gen de la metiltetrahidrofolato reductasa (región de mutación C677T.

  13. Dementia risk factors for Australian baby boomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K. Panegyres

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Baby boomers are individuals born in the years 1946 to 1965. The objective of this paper was to define the risk factors for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD and their relevance to Australian baby boomers, with the aim of providing evidence-based guidelines for dementia prevention. A series of PubMed searches (1994-2010 were conducted with relevant key words. Data was included from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS in relation to baby boomers in Australia. Article titles and abstracts were assessed by two reviewers for inclusion. Searches through ABS revealed no specific study on baby boomers at a national level; information was only available for Western Australia, South Australia and Queensland. A number of genetic and non-genetic risk factors for dementia were identified most of which remain controversial and require further study. We did not identify significant differences in the prevalence and incidence of dementia in those under 65 years in Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia. There were no correlations of risk factors and dementia between the Australian states. Modification of risk factors has not been proven to reduce the incidence and prevalence of dementia and AD in baby boomers. Nevertheless, on available evidence, we recommend: i active management of cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension; ii the encouragement of a healthy lifestyle (eg, weight reduction, exercise as offering the best pathways to reduce the emerging dementia risk for baby boomers. The implications are that activities promoting a healthy heart might lead to a healthy brain and help to prevent dementia.

  14. Gastric cancer: prevention, risk factors and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Zali, Hakimeh; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Azodi, Mona

    2011-01-01

    Cancer starts with a change in one single cell. This change may be initiated by external agents and genetic factors. Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and accounts for 7.6 million deaths (around 13% of all deaths) in 2008. Lung, stomach, liver, colon and breast cancer cause the most cancer deaths each year. In this review, different aspects of gastric cancer; including clinical, pathological characteristic of gastric cancer, etiology, incidence, risk factors, prevention and treatme...

  15. Epidemiology and risk factors for drug allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Thong, Bernard Y-H; Tan, Teck-Choon

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review was to describe the current evidence-based knowledge of the epidemiology, prevalence, incidence, risk factors and genetic associations of drug allergy. Articles published between 1966 and 2010 were identified in MEDLINE using the key words adult, adverse drug reaction reporting systems, age factors, anaphylactoid, anaphylaxis, anaesthetics, antibiotics, child, drug allergy, drug eruptions, ethnic groups, hypersensitivity, neuromuscular depolarizing agents, neuromuscular...

  16. Exploring Risk Factors for Follicular Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Ambinder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Follicular lymphoma (FL is an indolent malignancy of germinal center B cells with varied incidence across racial groups and geographic regions. Improvements in the classification of non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes provide an opportunity to explore associations between environmental exposures and FL incidence. Our paper found that aspects of Western lifestyle including sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and diets high in meat and milk are associated with an increased risk of FL. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamin D, and certain antioxidants are inversely associated with FL risk. A medical history of Sjogren's syndrome, influenza vaccination, and heart disease may be associated with FL incidence. Associations between FL and exposure to pesticides, industrial solvents, hair dyes, and alcohol/tobacco were inconsistent. Genetic risk factors include variants at the 6p21.32 region of the MHC II locus, polymorphisms of the DNA repair gene XRCC3, and UV exposure in individuals with certain polymorphisms of the vitamin D receptor. Increasing our understanding of risk factors for FL must involve integrating epidemiological studies of genetics and exposures to allow for the examination of risk factors and interactions between genes and environment.

  17. Risk factors and effective management of preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    English FA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fred A English,1 Louise C Kenny,1 Fergus P McCarthy1,2 1Irish Centre for Fetal and Neonatal Translational Research (INFANT, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland; 2Women’s Health Academic Centre, King's Health Partners, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Preeclampsia, a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy is estimated to complicate 2%–8% of pregnancies and remains a principal cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Preeclampsia may present at any gestation but is more commonly encountered in the third trimester. Multiple risk factors have been documented, including: family history, nulliparity, egg donation, diabetes, and obesity. Significant progress has been made in developing tests to predict risk of preeclampsia in pregnancy, but these remain confined to clinical trial settings and center around measuring angiogenic profiles, including placental growth factor or newer tests involving metabolomics. Less progress has been made in developing new treatments and therapeutic targets, and aspirin remains one of the few agents shown to consistently reduce the risk of developing preeclampsia. This review serves to discuss recent advances in risk factor identification, prediction techniques, and management of preeclampsia in antenatal, intrapartum, and postnatal patients. Keywords: pregnancy, treatment, risk reduction, prediction

  18. Analysis of risk factors for epilepsy after stroke%脑卒中后癫痫的危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈春富; 曹丙政; 郭涉树

    2002-01-01

    Objective To explore the risk factors for epilepsy induced by stroke. Methods There were 179 patients with epilepsy caused by stroke,and 1 447 patients with cerebrovascular disorders without epilepsy after stroke. Multivariate noncondition stepwise logistic model analysis was made after single variable analysis.Results The following four factors were associated with epilepsy, i.e., large size of cerebral hemorrhage or cerebral infarction,subarachnoid hemorrhage, electrolyte disturbances and cortical lesions.Conclusion Epilepsy induced by stroke is mainly associated with the size of brain tissue necrosis.

  19. Risk factors for goiter and thyroid nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, N.; Laurberg, P.; Perrild, H.;

    2002-01-01

    The occurrence of thyroid diseases is determined by interplay between genetic and environmental factors. The major environmental factor that determines goiter prevalence is iodine status, but other environmental factors influencing entire populations have been identified such as goitrogens in food...... and drinking water. Less focus has been on individual environmental factors and the interplay between factors. The goiter prevalence is higher in certain groups in the population. The variation in goiter prevalence between the genders is well known with a higher occurrence among women. The association with age...... is probably dependent on iodine status, because it seems that the zenith of goiter prevalence appears earlier in life the more severe iodine deficiency the population is exposed to. The association with individual risk factors has been investigated in some studies, especially the association with tobacco...

  20. Risk factors for goiter and thyroid nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, N.; Laurberg, P.; Perrild, H.; Bulow, I.; Ovesen, Lars; Jørgensen, T.

    2002-01-01

    with age is probably dependent on iodine status, because it seems that the zenith of goiter prevalence appears earlier in life the more severe iodine deficiency the population is exposed to. The association with individual risk factors has been investigated in some studies, especially the association......The occurrence of thyroid diseases is determined by interplay between genetic and environmental factors. The major environmental factor that determines goiter prevalence is iodine status, but other environmental factors influencing entire populations have been identified such as goitrogens in food...... and drinking water. Less focus has been on individual environmental factors and the interplay between factors. The goiter prevalence is higher in certain groups in the population. The variation in goiter prevalence between the genders is well known with a higher occurrence among women. The association...

  1. Risk Factors for Depression in Early Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhee, Angela R.; Andrews, Jac J. W.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify salient risk factors for depression in early adolescence from a group of common predictors. The following nine predictors were examined: (1) perceived quality of peer relationships, (2) perceived parental nurturance, (3) perceived parental rejection, (4) self-esteem, (5) body image, (6) pubertal status,…

  2. Risk Factors for Domestic Violence in Curacao

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, N. Ph. L.; de Bruijn, J. G. M.

    2012-01-01

    One out of three people (25% of men, 38% of women) in Curacao have experienced some form of domestic violence at some point in their adult lives. The most significant risk factors for domestic violence in Curacao are the female gender, a young age, low education, and experiencing domestic violence victimization in childhood. Divorce, single…

  3. Psychosocial risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, S. van den

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for some time that risk factors in the workplace can have a negative effect on health. Ramazzini was one of the first scientists to identify occupational health hazards. He wrote about diseases of the musculoskeletal system caused by sudden and irregular movements and the adoption

  4. Adolescent Suicide Risk: Four Psychosocial Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Philip A.; Behrendt, Andrew E.

    2004-01-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents. This study examined the suicidal ideation, behavior, and attempt history of 100 adolescents ages seventeen to nineteen. Four psychosocial factors were found to be important for overall suicide risk: hopelessness, hostility, negative self-concept, and isolation. It is suggested that focusing on…

  5. Risk Factors for Herpes Zoster Among Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Mona; Harpaz, Rafael; Zhang, John; Wollan, Peter C; Bialek, Stephanie R; Yawn, Barbara P

    2016-09-01

    Background.  The causes of varicella-zoster virus reactivation and herpes zoster (HZ) are largely unknown. We assessed potential risk factors for HZ, the data for which cannot be obtained from the medical sector. Methods.  We conducted a matched case-control study. We established active surveillance in Olmsted County, Minnesota to identify HZ occurring among persons age ≥50 years during 2010-2011. Cases were confirmed by medical record review. Herpes zoster-free controls were age- and sex-matched to cases. Risk factor data were obtained by telephone interview. Results.  We enrolled 389 HZ case patients and 511 matched controls; the median age was 65 and 66 years, respectively. Herpes zoster was associated with family history of HZ (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.65); association was highest with first-degree or multiple relatives (aOR = 1.87 and 3.08, respectively). Herpes zoster was also associated with prior HZ episodes (aOR = 1.82), sleep disturbance (aOR = 2.52), depression (aOR = 3.81), and recent weight loss (aOR = 1.95). Stress was a risk factor for HZ (aOR = 2.80), whereas a dose-response relationship was not noted. All associations indicated were statistically significant (P .1). Conclusions.  We identified several important risk factors for HZ; however, the key attributable causes of HZ remain unknown. PMID:27382600

  6. Lifestyle factors and risk of cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoevenaar-Blom, M.P.

    2013-01-01

     Background Evidence is accumulating that lifestyle factors influence the incidence of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular diseases (CVD). A healthy diet, being physically active, moderate alcohol consumption and not smoking are associated with a lower CVD risk. In addition to

  7. Risk Factors for Smoking Behaviors among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sung Suk; Joung, Kyoung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Many students in Korea begin to use tobacco and develop a regular smoking habit before they reach adulthood. Yet, little is known about various signs contributing to the transition of the student smoking behaviors. This study used a national sample to explore and compare risk factors for smoking behaviors. Three types of smoking behaviors were…

  8. Risk factors for domestic violence in Curacao

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van N.Ph.L.; Bruijn, de J.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    One out of three people (25% of men, 38% of women) in Curacao have experienced some form of domestic violence at some point in their adult lives. The most significant risk factors for domestic violence in Curacao are the female gender, a young age, low education, and experiencing domestic violence v

  9. Risk Factors and Prodromal Eating Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Ng, Janet; Shaw, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Prospective studies have identified factors that increase risk for eating pathology onset, including perceived pressure for thinness, thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint, and negative affect. Research also suggests that body dissatisfaction and dietary restraint may constitute prodromal stages of the development of…

  10. Guide to Atherosclerosis Risk Factors Data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomečková, Marie; Rauch, J.; Berka, P.

    Caen: University of Caen, 2004 - (Berka, P.; Cremilleux, B.), s. 1-7 [ECML/PKDD 2004 Discovery Challenge. Pisa (IT), 20.09.2004-24.09.2004] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00B107 Keywords : data mining * epidemiological study * risk factors of the atherosclerosis Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  11. Risk factors for feline diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slingerland, L.I.

    2008-01-01

    The chapters of Part I of the thesis describe the development of techniques that can be used in the assessment of risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus (DM) in cats. The hyperglycemic glucose clamp (HGC) was developed for use in conscious cats, equipped with arterial catheters for pl

  12. Smoldering multiple myeloma risk factors for progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørrig, Rasmus; Klausen, Tobias W; Salomo, Morten;

    2016-01-01

    Several risk scores for disease progression in Smoldering Multiple Myeloma (SMM) patients have been proposed, however, all have been developed using single center registries. To examine risk factors for time to progression (TTP) to Multiple Myeloma (MM) for SMM we analyzed a nationwide population......-based cohort of 321 newly diagnosed SMM patients registered within the Danish Multiple Myeloma Registry between 2005 and 2014. Significant univariable risk factors for TTP were selected for multivariable Cox regression analyses. We found that both an M-protein ≥ 30g/l and immunoparesis significantly influenced...... TTP (HR 2.7, 95%CI(1.5;4.7), p=0.001, and HR 3.3, 95%CI(1.4;7.8), p=0.002 respectively). High free light chain (FLC) ratio did not significantly influence TTP in our cohort. Therefore, our data do not support the recent IMWG proposal of identifying patients with FLC ratio above 100 as having ultra...

  13. Roles of Vascular and Metabolic Components in Cognitive Dysfunction of Alzheimer disease: Short- and Long-term Modification by Non-genetic Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki eSato

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that a specific set of genetic and non-genetic risk factors contributes to the onset of Alzheimer disease (AD. Non-genetic risk factors include diabetes, hypertension in mid-life, and probably dyslipidemia in mid-life. This review focuses on the vascular and metabolic components of non-genetic risk factors. The mechanisms whereby non-genetic risk factors modify cognitive dysfunction are divided into four components, short- and long-term effects of vascular and metabolic factors. These consist of 1 compromised vascular reactivity, 2 vascular lesions, 3 hypo/hyperglycemia, and 4 exacerbated AD histopathological features, respectively. Vascular factors compromise cerebrovascular reactivity in response to neuronal activity and also cause irreversible vascular lesions. On the other hand, representative short-term effects of metabolic factors on cognitive dysfunction occur due to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Non-genetic risk factors also modify the pathological manifestations of AD in the long-term. Therefore, vascular and metabolic factors contribute to aggravation of cognitive dysfunction in AD through short-term and long-term effects. Beta-amyloid could be involved in both vascular and metabolic components. It might be beneficial to support treatment in AD patients by appropriate therapeutic management of non-genetic risk factors, considering the contributions of these four elements to the manifestation of cognitive dysfunction in individual patients, though all components are not always present. It should be clarified how these four components interact with each other. To answer this question, a clinical prospective study that follows up clinical features with respect to these four components: 1 functional MRI or SPECT for cerebrovascular reactivity, 2 MRI for ischemic lesions and atrophy, 3 clinical episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, 4 amyloid-PET and tau-PET for pathological features of AD, would be required.

  14. Cardiovascular Risk Factors of Taxi Drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshatarat, Rami Azmi; Burgel, Barbara J

    2016-06-01

    In the United States (U.S.), cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major leading cause of death. Despite the high mortality rate related to CVD, little is known about CVD risk factors among urban taxi drivers in the U.S. A cross-sectional design was used to identify the predictors of high cardiovascular risk factors among taxi drivers. Convenience sampling method was used to recruit 130 taxi drivers. A structured questionnaire was used to obtain the data. The sample was male (94 %), age mean (45 ± 10.75) years, married (54 %), born outside of the USA (55 %), had some college or below (61.5 %), night drivers (50.8 %), and driving on average 9.7 years and 41 h/week. About 79 % of them were eligible for CVD prevention, and 35.4 % had high CVD risk factors (4-9 risk factors). A CVD high-risk profile had a significant relationship with the subjects who were ≥55 years old; had hypertension, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia; were drinking alcohol ≥2 times/week; and had insufficient physical activity. Subjects who worked as a taxi driver for more than 10 years (OR 4.37; 95 % CI 1.82, 10.50) and had mental exertion from cab driving >5 out of 10 (OR 2.63; 95 % CI 1.05, 6.57) were more likely to have a CVD high-risk profile. As a conclusion, system-level or worksite interventions include offering healthy food at taxi dispatching locations, creating a work culture of frequent walking breaks, and interventions focusing on smoking, physical activity, and weight management. Improving health insurance coverage for this group of workers is recommended. PMID:27151321

  15. Risk factors associated with lambing traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, N; Berry, D P; Pabiou, T

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the risk factors associated with both lambing difficulty and lamb mortality in the Irish sheep multibreed population. A total of 135 470 lambing events from 42 675 ewes in 839 Irish crossbred and purebred flocks were available. Risk factors associated with producer-scored ewe lambing difficulty score (scale of one (no difficulty) to four (severe difficulty)) were determined using linear mixed models. Risk factors associated with the logit of the probability of lamb mortality at birth (i.e. binary trait) were determined using generalised estimating equations. For each dependent variable, a series of simple regression models were developed as well as a multiple regression model. In the simple regression models, greater lambing difficulty was associated with quadruplet bearing, younger ewes, of terminal breed origin, lambing in February; for example, first parity ewes experienced greater (P7.0 kg) birth weights, quadruplet born lambs and lambs that experienced a more difficult lambing (predicted probability of death for lambs that required severe and veterinary assistance of 0.15 and 0.32, respectively); lambs from dual-purpose breeds and born to younger ewes were also at greater risk of mortality. In the multiple regression model, the association between ewe parity, age at first lambing, year of lambing and lamb mortality no longer persisted. The trend in solutions of the levels of each fixed effect that remained associated with lamb mortality in the multiple regression model, did not differ from the trends observed in the simple regression models although the differential in relative risk between the different lambing difficulty scores was greater in the multiple regression model. Results from this study show that many common flock- and animal-level factors are associated with both lambing difficulty and lamb mortality and management of different risk category groups (e.g. scanned litter sizes, ewe age groups) can be used

  16. Risk factors and their identification. First Part: What is a risk factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkau, B; Eschwege, E

    1995-02-01

    This series of three articles reviews the designs of studies which can be used to identify risk factors of a disease, here: diabetes or complications of diabetes. In the present issue of Diabete & Metabolisme, the first article of the series, we give the definition of a risk factor, along with measures of its force--relative risk and odds ratio, followed by the epidemiological definitions of the diseases: diabetes, coronary heart disease and hypertension. Risk factors are further discussed and we complete the discussion by some observations on the bias which can arise from a study or from its analysis, which can lead the researcher to the wrong conclusion. The three types of epidemiological studies which are used to determine whether factors are associated with a disease: observational or cross-sectional studies, cohort studies and case-cohort studies will be described in the second of the series in the next issue of the journal. Examples will be provided of each of these study types; their advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In a third issue, the final paper will provide some examples of the study types and the identification of risk factors. The first examples involve diabetes and pancreatic cancer, the second birth weight and non-insulin dependent diabetes. Having found an association between a risk factor and diabetes, then we will discuss whether it can be considered to be a risk factor and if so and whether it is likely to be a cause of the disease. PMID:7781849

  17. Risk factors and their identification second part: study designs for identification of risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkau, B; Eschwege, E

    1995-06-01

    This is the second a series of three articles which reviews the identification of risk factors of a disease, here: diabetes or complications of diabetes. In the first of the series [1], we gave the definition of a risk factor, along with measures of its force-relative risk and odds ratio, followed by the epidemiological definitions of the diseases: diabetes, coronary heart disease and hypertension. Risk factors were further discussed and we completed the discussion by some observations on the bias which can arise from a study or from its analysis, which can lead the researcher to the wrong conclusion. In this second article we define the three types of epidemiological studies which are used to determine whether factors are associated with a disease: observational or cross-sectional studies, cohort studies and casecohort studies. Examples are provided of each of these study types; their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The final paper will provide some examples of the identification of risk factors from the literature. The first example involves diabetes and pancreatic cancer, the second birth weight and non-insulin dependent diabetes. Having found an association between a risk factor and diabetes, we will discuss whether it can be considered to be a risk factor, and if so whether it is likely to be a cause of the disease. PMID:7556816

  18. Pre-Transplant Cardiovascular Risk Factors Affect Kidney Allograft Survival: A Multi-Center Study in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Pyo; Bae, Eunjin; Kang, Eunjeong; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Yong-Jin; Oh, Yun Kyu; Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Young Hoon; Lim, Chun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-transplant cardiovascular (CV) risk factors affect the development of CV events even after successful kidney transplantation (KT). However, the impact of pre-transplant CV risk factors on allograft failure (GF) has not been reported. Methods and Findings We analyzed the graft outcomes of 2,902 KT recipients who were enrolled in a multi-center cohort from 1997 to 2012. We calculated the pre-transplant CV risk scores based on the Framingham risk model using age, gender, total cholesterol level, smoking status, and history of hypertension. Vascular disease (a composite of ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease) was noted in 6.5% of the patients. During the median follow-up of 6.4 years, 286 (9.9%) patients had developed GF. In the multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard model, pre-transplant vascular disease was associated with an increased risk of GF (HR 2.51; 95% CI 1.66–3.80). The HR for GF (comparing the highest with the lowest tertile regarding the pre-transplant CV risk scores) was 1.65 (95% CI 1.22–2.23). In the competing risk model, both pre-transplant vascular disease and CV risk score were independent risk factors for GF. Moreover, the addition of the CV risk score, the pre-transplant vascular disease, or both had a better predictability for GF compared to the traditional GF risk factors. Conclusions In conclusion, both vascular disease and pre-transplant CV risk score were independently associated with GF in this multi-center study. Pre-transplant CV risk assessments could be useful in predicting GF in KT recipients. PMID:27501048

  19. What Are the Risk Factors for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carcinoid tumors? A risk factor is anything that affects your chance of getting a disease such as cancer. For example, exposure to strong sunlight is a risk factor for skin cancer, while smoking is a risk factor for cancer of the lung and several other cancers. But risk factors don’ ...

  20. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: High Blood Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease High Blood Cholesterol High blood cholesterol is another major risk factor for heart disease ... can do something about. The higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk for developing heart ...

  1. Psychosocial risk factors, weight changes and risk of obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Louise Bagger; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Prescott, Eva;

    2012-01-01

    patterns in the associations between social network, economic hardship and weight gain or obesity. The number of psychosocial risk factors, as an indicator for clustering, was not associated with weight gain or obesity. In conclusion, major life events and vital exhaustion seem to play a role for weight...... participants were asked comprehensive questions on major life events, work stress, vital exhaustion, social network, economic hardship, and intake of sleep medication. Weight and height were measured by health professionals. Weight changes and incident obesity was used as outcome measures. The participants on......The aim of the study was to establish the effects of a range of psychosocial factors on weight changes and risk of obesity. The study population consisted of the 4,753 participants in the third (1991-1994) and fourth wave (2001-2003) of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, Denmark. At baseline the...

  2. Risk factors for age-related maculopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connell, Paul P

    2012-02-01

    Age-related maculopathy (ARM) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715\\/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  3. Chronic migraine: risk factors, mechanisms and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Arne; Schulte, Laura H

    2016-08-01

    Chronic migraine has a great detrimental influence on a patient's life, with a severe impact on socioeconomic functioning and quality of life. Chronic migraine affects 1-2% of the general population, and about 8% of patients with migraine; it usually develops from episodic migraine at an annual conversion rate of about 3%. The chronification is reversible: about 26% of patients with chronic migraine go into remission within 2 years of chronification. The most important modifiable risk factors for chronic migraine include overuse of acute migraine medication, ineffective acute treatment, obesity, depression and stressful life events. Moreover, age, female sex and low educational status increase the risk of chronic migraine. The pathophysiology of migraine chronification can be understood as a threshold problem: certain predisposing factors, combined with frequent headache pain, lower the threshold of migraine attacks, thereby increasing the risk of chronic migraine. Treatment options include oral medications, nerve blockade with local anaesthetics or corticoids, and neuromodulation. Well-defined diagnostic criteria are crucial for the identification of chronic migraine. The International Headache Society classification of chronic migraine was recently updated, and now allows co-diagnosis of chronic migraine and medication overuse headache. This Review provides an up-to-date overview of the classification of chronic migraine, basic mechanisms and risk factors of migraine chronification, and the currently established treatment options. PMID:27389092

  4. Physical inactivity : A cardiovascular risk factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence regarding health benefits of physical activity is overwhelming and plays a critical role in both the primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD. Epidemiological investigations show approximately half the incidence of CAD in active compared to sedentary persons. A sedentary lifestyle is considered by various national and international organizations to be one of the most important modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Fortunately, a moderate level of occupational or recreational activity appears to confer a significant protective effect. Once coronary artery disease has become manifest, exercise training can clearly improve the functional capacity of patients and reduce overall mortality by decreasing the risk of sudden death. Well-designed clinical investigations, supported by basic animal studies, have demonstrated that the beneficial effects of exercise are related to direct and indirect protective mechanisms. These benefits may result from an improvement in cardiovascular risk factors, enhanced fibrinolysis, improved endothelial function, decreased sympathetic tone, and other as-yet-undetermined factors. Hence physical fitness, more than the absence of ponderosity or other factors, is the major determinant of cardiovascular and metabolic risk and long-term disease-free survival, in effect linking health span to life span. It is obviously in every individual′s interest to assume the responsibility for his or her own health and embrace this extremely effective, safe, and inexpensive treatment modality. The need for a comprehensive review of this particular topic has arisen in view of the high prevalence of physical inactivity and overwhelming evidence regarding CVD risk reduction with regular physical activity.

  5. Finding Genetic Risk Factors of Gestational Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Soo Heon; Jang, Hak C.; Park, Kyong Soo

    2012-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a complex metabolic disorder of pregnancy that is suspected to have a strong genetic predisposition. It is associated with poor perinatal outcome, and both GDM women and their offspring are at increased risk of future development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). During the past several years, there has been progress in finding the genetic risk factors of GDM in relation to T2DM. Some of the genetic variants that were proven to be significantly associa...

  6. Perinatal Risk Factors for Childhood Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Naumburg, Estelle

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to assess the association between certain perinatal factors and the risk of childhood lymphatic and myeloid leukemia and infant leukemia. The five studies presented were all conducted in Sweden as population-based case-control studies. All cases were born and diagnosed between 1973-89 with leukemia up to the age of 16 years. A control was individually matched to each case. As Down’s syndrome entails a major risk for childhood leukemia, chil...

  7. Analysis of relative factors of tumble among senile cerebrovascular diseases patients%老年脑血管病患者跌倒的相关因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祁爱英; 赵艳霞; 杨丽娟; 康杰; 刘云

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究老年脑血管病患者跌倒的相关因素,从而有效的预防跌倒的发生.方法 对12个月内有跌倒史的老年脑血管病患者102例进行调查.结果 男性患者跌倒发生率为42.16%,女性患者为6.86%;独居患者跌倒发生率为37.25%,同住患者为16.67%;平衡能力正常的患者跌倒发生率为22.55%,异常患者为38.24%,差异均有统计学意义(x2分别为4.95,8.45,5.13;P <0.05或P<0.01);不同年龄、是否服药、不同夜尿情况、视力、智力及伴有不同慢性病患者跌倒发生率比较差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05或P<0.01).结论 老年脑血管病患者跌倒是多种因素共同作用的结果,护理重在预防,正确评估老年脑血管病患者的身体状况,制定有效的预防措施,从而减少跌倒的发生.%Objective To study the related factors of tumble among senile cerebrovascular diseases patients,so as to effectively prevent it happening.Methods A total of 102 senile cerebrovascular diseases patients with the history of tumble within 12 months were investigated with self-designed questionnaire.Results The incidence of tumble among male patients was 42.16%,while female patients was6.86% ;living alone patients was 37.25%,while cohabit patients was 16.67% ;balance ability abnormal patients was 38.24%,while that normal patients was 22.55%.There was significantly difference between them(x2 =4.95,8.45,5.13 ;P <0.05 or P < 0.01).The tumble incidence among patients with different ages,medicine or not,nocturnal enuresis condition,eyesight,intelligence and different chronic diseases was significantly difference(P <0.05 or P <0.01).Conclusions The incidence of tumble among senile cerebrovascular diseases patients are related to many factors,so it is important to assessment their health condition and establish effective preventive measures to reduce the ratio of tumble.

  8. Risk factors for suicidal behavior in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkcaldy, B D; Siefen, G R; Urkin, J; Merrick, J

    2006-10-01

    Adolescent suicide is today a public health problem among the leading cause of mortality among adolescents and young adults. There seems to be many reasons for this increase (which has different trends in different populations), but associations have been found with increased substance abuse, television and video violence, socio-economic status and easy access to firearms. Gender differences have also been observed with crime, suicide and substance abuse higher among males, while eating disorder, depression and suicidal behavior more prevalent among females. This paper will review prevalence and incidence of adolescent suicidal behavior, socio-demographic and psychological risk factors, associated cognitive factors and socio-economic factors. Risk factors include previous suicide attempts, a history of others in the family who have been suicidal, mental illness, alcohol and drug use, and other self-destructive behaviors as well as consideration being given to hopelessness, hostility, negative self-concept and isolation. At the individual difference level, factors such as trait depression, anger and hostility, perfectionism and social sensitivity would seem critical variables, as would age, gender and intellectual functioning. Sociological and family-related factors may also be implicated including dysfunctional family organizations, a history of physical or psychological abuse (sexual abuse) and limited extent of social support networks. A frequently reported precipitating event of suicidal behavior is family adversity including rejection, separation and interpersonal conflict. At a socio-economic level it would seem essential to provide comprehensive document about the social and economic conditions from which the adolescent comes. PMID:17008855

  9. Breast cancer epidemiology and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the Western society. Over the past decades it has become apparent that breast cancer incidence rates are increasing steadily, whereas the mortality rates for breast cancer have remained relatively constant. Information through the media on this rising number of cases has increased breast health awareness but has also introduced anxiety in the female population. This combination of factors has made the need for prevention of breast cancer an urgent matter. Breast cancer does not seem to be a single disease entity. A specific etiologic factor may therefore have more influence on one form may therefore have more influence on one form of breast cancer than another. So far though, as shown in their summary of current knowledge on established and dubious risk factors, no risk factors have been identified that can explain a major part of the incidence. Efforts to identify other ways for primary prevention have also been discouraging, even though breast cancer is one of the most investigated tumours world-wide. Thus, at this point i time, the most important strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality is early detection through individual counselling and organised breast screening programs. The recent isolation of breast cancer susceptibility genes may introduce new ways to reduce the risk of breast cancer in a small subset of women

  10. Risk Factors for Vertebral Artery Injuries in Cervical Spine Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabke, Harshad V.

    2014-01-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (i.e. involvement of carotid and vertebral arteries) are increasingly being recognized in setting of cervical spine trauma/fractures and are associated with high incidence of stroke/morbidity and mortality. The incidence of vertebral artery injuries (VAI) is more common than previously thought and regular screening is seldom performed. However there exists no screening criteria and conflicting reports exists between spine and trauma literature. Many clinicians do not routinely screen/evaluate patients presenting with cervical spine trauma for potential VAI. This article provides a brief summary of existing evidence regarding the incidence of VAI in the background of cervical trauma/fractures. The type and fracture pattern that is associated with a high risk of VAI warranting mandatory screening/further work-up is discussed. A brief overview of diagnostic modalities and their respective sensitivity/specificity along with available treatment options is also summarized. PMID:25317310

  11. Risk factors for vertebral artery injuries in cervical spine trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanjundappa S. Harshavardhana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (i.e. involvement of carotid and vertebral arteries are increasingly being recognized in setting of cervical spine trauma/fractures and are associated with high incidence of stroke/morbidity and mortality. The incidence of vertebral artery injuries (VAI is more common than previously thought and regular screening is seldom performed. However there exists no screening criteria and conflicting reports exists between spine and trauma literature. Many clinicians do not routinely screen/evaluate patients presenting with cervical spine trauma for potential VAI. This article provides a brief summary of existing evidence regarding the incidence of VAI in the background of cervical trauma/fractures. The type and fracture pattern that is associated with a high risk of VAI warranting mandatory screening/further work-up is discussed. A brief overview of diagnostic modalities and their respective sensitivity/specificity along with available treatment options is also summarized.

  12. Risk factors for suicide in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E N; Koch-Henriksen, N; Stenager, E

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of the present study was to identify risk factors for suicide in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: The study is based on available information about MS patients identified in the Danish MS Registry (DMSR) with onset in the period 1950-1985. We compared the MS...... suicides with the 1950-1985 onset cohort patients in the DSMR as to distribution of age at onset, presenting symptoms, and time from onset to diagnosis. We reviewed sociodemographic data, age of onset, the course of the disease, recent deterioration, type of deterioration, Kurtzke Disability Status Scale...... (DSS) score, previous mental disorder, type of mental disorder, previous suicide attempts, expression of suicidal intentions, circumstances at suicide, and suicide method for all MS patients who had committed suicide. In order to characterize MS suicides with respect to risk factors, comparisons were...

  13. Skin carcinoma and occupational risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify the relative contribution of different occupational risk factors associated with the occurrence of skin cancer in the provinces of Havana City and Havana, Cuba , in 2006-2007. It was designed a case-control study of hospital base that included 112 cases of non-melanoma skin cancer and 448 witnesses, following the inclusion-exclusion criteria preset. We considered the totality of patients diagnosed with basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell histological study of skin biopsy or surgical excision. Risk factors with possible association with the disease were studied, such as sun exposure, ionizing and non-ionizing radiations and a wide range of chemical and biological substances potentially carcinogenic

  14. Risk Factors for Giant Retinal Tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mehdizadeh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the risk factors associated with giant retinal tears. Methods: This retrospective study was performed on medical records of 150 patients who had undergone retinal detachment surgery. Age, sex, history of trauma, lens status (phakic, pseudophakic, or aphakic, and high myopia were evaluated in association with giant retinal tears. Results: Of 150 patients with retinal detachments, 99 subjects (66% were older than 30 years while 51 (34% were 30 years of age or younger. Overall, 26 (17.3% patients had giant retinal tears. Controlling for all variables, only age had a significant correlation with giant retinal tears. Each year of advancing age was associated with a 6% decrease in the incidence of giant retinal tears. Conclusion: Young age is a significant risk factor for development of giant retinal tears.

  15. RISK FACTORS FOR INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceren Atakay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Intimate partner violence has kept being one of the major societal issues in our country over the past year. It is absolutely necessary to intervene in this substantially psychological issue multi-directionally. In order to intervene in the problem from psychological aspect, it is important to estimate and interpret the risk factors for intimate partner violence. Therefore in the current study, ‘I-cube theory’ which is about the risk factors for intimate partner violence has been explained first. Afterwards, the findings of content analysis which was obtained from newspaper reports about femicide in 2013 have been shown and these findings have been discussed within the context of I-cube theory, respectively. Finally, solutions to prevent this violence has been suggested.

  16. Cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus;

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological data have established an association between cardiovascular disease and psoriasis. Only one general population study has so far compared prevalences of cardiovascular risk factors among subjects with psoriasis and control subjects. We aimed to determine the prevalence of...... cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with and without psoriasis in the general population. Methods During 2006-2008, a cross-sectional study was performed in the general population in Copenhagen, Denmark. A total of 3471 subjects participated in a general health examination that included assessment of current...... smoking status, weight, height, waist and hip circumferences, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, resting heart rate, and plasma lipids, hemoglobin A1c, fasting glucose, and insulin levels. Results Physician-diagnosed psoriasis was reported by 238 (7.1%) of 3374 participants. There were no differences...

  17. [Hyponatremia as a risk factor of death in patients with community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcia, Ricardo E; Castiglia, Nora I; Villaverde, Marcelo E; Lanosa, Gustavo A; Ujeda Mantello, Carlos J; Aguirre, Marina; Borello, Gustavo J; Caisson, Alejandro M

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether hyponatremia is a risk factor of death in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and estimated the relative risk of death by CAP of other risk factors. The design was prospective multicentre cohort study. In 5 centers in Buenos Aires, Argentina, we studied adults hospitalized with CAP between March 21, 2000 and December 21, 2000. Using stepwise logistic regression, we analyzed risk factors that showed a univariate association with mortality; alpha significance level was 0.05. During a 9-month period, 238 patients were admitted with CAP: 150 (63%) male and 88 (36%) female, mean age 52.99 (+/-20.35) and 55.06 (+/-20.94), respectively. Mortality was 10.5% (25/238). By multivariate analysis, the following variables were statistically associated with evolution: cerebrovascular disease (CD) (B: 2.614, p < 0.001, RRE: 13.6, IC 95%: 3.7-49.6); hyponatremia at admission or during hospitalization (B: 1.994, p<0.001, RRE: 7.3, IC 95%: 2.5-20.8); and elevated blood urea (B: 0.016, p= 0.003, RRE: 1.016, IC 95%: 1.005-1.02). We developed a formula to predict mortality by CAP: P (death) = 1/1 + exp - (-4.03 + 2.61 x l + 1.99 x 2 + 0.016x3), where: x1=CD (yes = 1/ no=0); x2= hyponatremia (yes = 1/ no=0); x3 = blood urea (mg/dl). The predictability was 91.1%. The mortality risk by CAP was statistically higher in patients with CD, hyponatremia and elevated blood urea. PMID:17240620

  18. Enfermedad cerebro-vascular y depresión Cerebrovascular Disorders and Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Augusto Franco López

    2007-01-01

    Introducción: la enfermedad cerebro-vascular (ECV) y la depresión son dos entidades que presentan una relación bidireccional, es decir, existen numerosos hallazgos que muestran que las personas que presentan ECV tienen mayor incidencia y prevalencia de depresión, comparadas con población sin ECV; a su vez, una buena cantidad de estudios muestran que la depresión es un factor de riesgo independiente para la presencia de enfermedad cardiovascular y ECV. Objetivo: revisar las dos caras de la mon...

  19. Risk Factors for Sudden Cardiac Death : Risk Factors for Sudden Cardiac Death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Niemeijer (Maartje)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractSCD is a common cause of death, with around four to five million cases annually worldwide. Determining which persons are at high risk for SCD remains difficult, due to lack of knowledge on individual risk factors and because in the majority of cases, SCD is the first manifestation of

  20. Psychological Risk Factors in Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouva M.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Several theoretical models have been occasionally proposed to account for the involvement of psychological factors in cancer genesis. Family environment and relations as well as certain personality traits were correlated to cancer onset. However, little is known in the case of acute leukemia. The present study examined family environment, state-trait anxiety, hostility and the direction of hostility as well as alexithymia in 41 acute leukemia patients and their first degree relatives (70. In accordance with previous findings, the present results showed that family cohesion, conflict and organization as well as guilt, state anxiety and alexithymia were significant risk factors for the development of the disease.

  1. Risk factors for hypospadias in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LingFan Xu; ChaoZhao Liang; Julia Lipianskaya; XianGuo Chen; Song Fan; Li Zhang; Jun Zhou; Sheng Tai; ChangQin Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This case‑controlled study was designed to evaluate the association between various baseline parental factors and the risk of hypospadias in China. Patients were selected from tertiary referral hospitals in Anhui, a province in mid‑eastern China. Aquestionnaire was given to the parents of each patient. The ifnal database included 193cases and 835 controls. The incidence of additional coexistent anomalies was 13.0%, primarily cryptorchidism(9.8%). Ten patients(5.1%) were from families with genital anomaly, including ifve families(2.6%) with hypospadias. The risks of hypospadias was higher for children of mothers>35 (odds ratio[OR] =1.47) and<18(OR=2.95) years of age, and in mothers who had consumed alcohol(OR=2.67), used drugs(OR=1.53) and had an infection(OR=1.87) during pregnancy. The risk of hypospadias was also higher when mothers(OR=1.68) and fathers(OR=1.74) were engaged in agriculture. Other factors assessed were not associated with the risk of hypospadias.

  2. Risk factors of depression occurrence in Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Miloseva, Lence

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this lecture is focus on different aspects of occurerence of depression in Adolescence, especially with focus on risk factors. I introduced epidemiology of depression : causes, treatment, and prevention (Abela & Hankin,2008). The special part of the lecture was focus on etiology of depression. Adolescence is characterized by positive gains in cognitive maturity, better interpersonal skills, new experiences, increased autonomy, and hormonal changes (Feldman & Elliot, 1990). Alt...

  3. OCULAR HYPERTENSION - RISK FACTORS AND THERAPY?

    OpenAIRE

    Janicijevic Katarina; Kocic Sanja; Todorovic Dusan; Sarenac Vulovic Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction/Aim: The goal of our study was to analyze the epidemiological`s characteristics of ocular hypertension, as well as the influence of chronic risk factors on glaucoma development (conversion in glaucoma). We tried to make some entries for solving this complex ophthalmological problem. Material /Methods: From 2009 to 2015, a retrospective control study was performed on 121 patient with diagnoses of bilateral ocular hypertension and without disease progression/conversion of glauc...

  4. Risk Factors for Jumper’s Knee

    OpenAIRE

    Visnes, Håvard

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of jumper’s knee is high in sports characterized by high demands on leg extensor speed and power, such as volleyball, basketball, football and athletics. A prevalence up to 50% has been reported among male, elite volleyball players. The complex process from a healthy tendon to jumper’s knee is not fully understood. Jumper’s knee is usually described as an overuse injury, although previous studies on risk factors are not conclusive. Previous cross-...

  5. Risk Factors for Giant Retinal Tears

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Mehdizadeh; Mehrdad Afarid; Mohammad Shabanpour Haqiqi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk factors associated with giant retinal tears. Methods: This retrospective study was performed on medical records of 150 patients who had undergone retinal detachment surgery. Age, sex, history of trauma, lens status (phakic, pseudophakic, or aphakic), and high myopia were evaluated in association with giant retinal tears. Results: Of 150 patients with retinal detachments, 99 subjects (66%) were older than 30 years while 51 (34%) were 30 years of age or you...

  6. Risk Factors for Giant Retinal Tears

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdizadeh, Morteza; Afarid, Mehrdad; Haqiqi, Mohammad Shabanpour

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the risk factors associated with giant retinal tears. Methods This retrospective study was performed on medical records of 150 patients who had undergone retinal detachment surgery. Age, sex, history of trauma, lens status (phakic, pseudophakic, or aphakic), and high myopia were evaluated in association with giant retinal tears. Results Of 150 patients with retinal detachments, 99 subjects (66%) were older than 30 years while 51 (34%) were 30 years of age or younger. Overa...

  7. Risk factor profile in retinal detachment

    OpenAIRE

    Azad Raj; Nayak B; Sharma Y; Tiwari Hem; Khosla P

    1988-01-01

    150 cases of retinal detachment comprising 50 patients each of bilateral retinal detachment, unilateral retinal detachment without any retinal lesions in the fellow eve and unilateral retinal detachment with retinal lesions in the fellow eye were studied and the various associated risk factors were statistically analysed. The findings are discussed in relation to their aetiological and prognostic significance in the different types of retinal detachment. Based on these observations certain gu...

  8. Allergy: A Risk Factor for Suicide?

    OpenAIRE

    Teodor T. Postolache; Komarow, Hirsh; Tonelli, Leonardo H.

    2008-01-01

    The rates of depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance (suicide risk factors) are greater in patients with allergic rhinitis than in the general population. The rate of allergy is also greater in patients with depression. Preliminary data suggest that patients with a history of allergy may have an increased rate of suicide. Clinicians should actively inquire to diagnose allergy in patients with depression and depression in patients with allergy.

  9. Maternal Risk Factors for Congenital Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Streja, Elani

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Cerebral Palsy (CP) is the most common physical disability in children. In spite of major advances in medical technology, the etiology of CP is still not well understood. There is growing evidence that brain damage leading to CP development occurs during pregnancy and that maternal phenotype contributes to this intrauterine environment. We hypothesized that maternal factors such as infections, smoking, comorbidities and genetics can increase the risk of CP in children. Additionally...

  10. CLIMATE AS A RISK FACTOR FOR TOURISM

    OpenAIRE

    ÁKOS NÉMETH; JÁNOS MIKA

    2009-01-01

    Weather and climate risk factors for tourism are surveyed and illustrated with regard to the expected climate changes in Hungary. These changes are not at all advantageous and which affect the business in question both directly and indirectly. These are the summer resort tourism (characterised by bioclimatic indices). Green tourism is the next one to characterise, including skiing, mountain climbing and eco-tourism, as well. Here both day-to-day weather extremes and long-lasting effects on th...

  11. Domestic violence. Risk factors, diagnostic & psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Degtyaryov A.V.

    2012-01-01

    In this article theme of domestic violence & sexual abuse against children is being considered from the cultural-historical, social-economic & psychological paradigms. Foreign authors approaches specialized on the work with children’s abuse & their practical results are presented herein. The risk factors of impact of cruel treatment & different forms of child’s mental development abuse are analyzed. The examples of prevention & psychotherapy work with the abused children are given. The articl...

  12. Studying risk factors associated with Human Leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra Kamath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leptospirosis is one of the most under diagnosed and underreported disease in both developed and developing countries including India. It is established that environmental conditions and occupational habit of the individuals put them at risk of acquiring disease, which varies from community to community. Various seroprevalence studies across the world have documented emerging situation of this neglected tropical disease, but limited have probed to identify the risk factors, especially in India. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the environmental and occupational risk factors associated with the disease in Udupi District. Materials and Methods: This population-based case-control study was carried out in Udupi, a District in Southern India from April 2012 until August 2012. Udupi is considered to be endemic for Leptospirosis and reported 116 confirmed cases in the year 2011. Seventy of 116 laboratory confirmed cases and 140 sex matched neighborhood healthy controls participated in the study. A predesigned, semi-structured and validated questionnaire was used for data collection through house to house visit and observations were noted about environmental conditions. Univariate analysis followed by multivariate analysis (back ward conditional logistic regression was performed by using STATA version 9.2 (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA to identify potential risk factors. Results: Occupational factors such as outdoor activities (matched odds ratio [OR] of 3.95, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-13.0, presence of cut or wound at body parts during work (matched OR: 4.88, CI: 1.83-13.02 and environmental factors such as contact with rodents through using the food materials ate by rat (matched OR: 4.29, CI: 1.45-12.73 and contact with soil or water contaminated with urine of rat (matched OR: 4.58, CI: 1.43-14.67 were the risk factors identified to be associated with disease. Conclusion: Leptospirosis is still

  13. Risk factors for developing diabetic foot

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    Julia Estela Willrich Boell

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study is to identify the risk factors for developing diabetic foot. A cross-sectional study, with a convenience sample, developed with 70 individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM, registered in three basic health units in the municipality of Florianópolis/SC, Brazil, in the period from November 2010 to May 2011. Biometric data was collected regarding their sociodemographic, health and illness conditions. An assessment of the feet was also carried out. The average participant age was 66.17 years and time with diagnosed disease was under ten years (61.42%. The following risk factors were identified: advanced age; time of DM diagnosis; few years of schooling; overweight/obesity; inadequate diet; physical inactivity; inadequate metabolic control; lack of proper and specific foot care; and arterial hypertension. We conclude that the majority of the population presented one or more risk factors that favor the appearance of foot-related complications. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i2.20460.

  14. Risk factors and management of diabetic nephropathy

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    Mohamed Akheel Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the risk factors for nephropathy in diabetic patients and to study the management of diabetic nephropathy (DN, we conducted a hospital-based prospective study in the Internal Medicine department of our hospital on 60 patients with DN and 60 diabetic patients without DN. An odds ratio (OR disclosed the following risk factors: Hypertension (OR = 2.06, family history of diabetes (OR = 1.23, family history of DN (OR = 2.86, uncontrolled hyperglycemia (OR = 11.80, obesity (OR = 1.07, duration of diabetes between 11 and 20 years (OR = 4.69, smoking (OR = 2.79, alcohol consumption (OR = 3.75, other complications (OR = 2.03, lack of physical activity (OR = 1.51 and anemia (OR = 2.29. According to these risk factors, we suggest that improving patient′s knowledge on diabetes and its treatment, life style modifications and aggressive management of the disease may delay the progression of disease to advanced stages.

  15. Risk factors for psychopathology among Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Kurita, H; Sun, Z; Wang, F

    1999-08-01

    The present study was designed to examine the family environment and child characteristics associated with psychopathology among Chinese children. A large epidemiological sample of 1695 children aged 6-11 was drawn from 12 elementary schools in Linyi Prefecture of China. Parents completed the Child Behaviour Checklist, the Family Environment Scale, and a self-administered questionnaire including a number of items with regard to family, parental, and child characteristics. Results indicated that the overall prevalence of child psychopathology was 17.2%. Logistic regression analyses showed that a number of family and parental, as well as prenatal, perinatal and postnatal risk factors had significant association with child psychopathology. The most notable risks were derived from poor parental rearing with regard to the child's misbehaviour, low birthweight, and poor marital relations of the parents after controlling for other factors. These findings are consistent with previously reported risk factors for child psychopathology, highlighting the importance of family and early childhood intervention as a measure to prevent child psychopathology in China. PMID:10498232

  16. Risk Factor and Comorbidity of Migraine

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    Woro Riyadina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine is a chronic daily headache which interfere a quality of life. The purpose of this research is to obtain the prevalence, risk factors, and comorbidity of migraine. Methods: A cross sectional study involving 4771 subjects in 5 villages in the district of Central Bogor, Bogor City 2011–2012. Data collection was performed using WHO STEPS (interview, measurement, physical examination, and laboratory test. Results: In this study, the migraine prevalence was 22.43%, with significant risk factors were sex, age, and stress (p < 0.05. Comorbidity of migraine was coronary heart diseases (p < 0.05. There was no significant correlation between migraine with marital status, level of education, smoking, hypertension, obesity, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, trigliseride level, and diabetes mellitus (p > 0.05. Conclusions: Risk factors which have significant association with migraine are sex, age, and stress, whereas coronary heart disease existed as a comorbidity with migraine.

  17. Corneal Graft Rejection: Incidence and Risk Factors

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    Alireza Baradaran-Rafii

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To determine the incidence and risk factors of late corneal graft rejection after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP. METHODS: Records of all patients who had undergone PKP from 2002 to 2004 without immunosuppressive therapy other than systemic steroids and with at least one year of follow up were reviewed. The role of possible risk factors such as demographic factors, other host factors, donor factors, indications for PKP as well as type of rejection were evaluated. RESULTS: During the study period, 295 PKPs were performed on 286 patients (176 male, 110 female. Mean age at the time of keratoplasty was 38±20 (range, 40 days to 90 years and mean follow up period was 20±10 (range 12-43 months. Graft rejection occurred in 94 eyes (31.8% at an average of 7.3±6 months (range, 20 days to 39 months after PKP. The most common type of rejection was endothelial (20.7%. Corneal vascularization, regrafting, anterior synechiae, irritating sutures, active inflammation, additional anterior segment procedures, history of trauma, uncontrolled glaucoma, prior graft rejection, recurrence of herpetic infection and eccentric grafting increased the rate of rejection. Patient age, donor size and bilateral transplantation had no significant influence on graft rejection. CONCLUSION: Significant risk factors for corneal graft rejection include

  18. Prevalence and risk factors of carotid intima-media thickness in asymptomatic individual subjects in a tertiary care center in India

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    Subhash Kaul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT is increasingly identified as a marker of atherosclerosis and increased risk of cerebrovascular disease. Aim: We aimed to investigate the prevalence of carotid IMT in asymptomatic Indian individuals, more than 40 years of age, and correlate it with other risk factors for cerebrovascular ischemia. Materials and Methods: Individuals attending outpatient services of Nizam′s Institute of Medical Sciences, who were asymptomatic for cerebrovascular ischemia underwent detailed history and carotid Doppler examination. IMT on mid common carotid artery (CCA was measured. All subjects′ blood was taken for biochemical estimation of fasting blood sugar and total cholesterol levels. Results: Out of 1,392 subjects, 571 (41% had abnormal IMT and 821 (59% had normal IMT. On comparison of the two groups, the factors significantly associated with abnormal IMT were mean older age (59 vs 50.7 years; P < 0.0001 and higher prevalence of hypertension (257 (45% vs 236 (28.7%; P < 0.0001, diabetes (159 (27.8% vs 139 (16.9%; P < 0.0001, and hypercholesterolemia (124 (21.7% vs113 (13.7%; P = 0.0001. After adjustment with multiple logistic regression, significant predictors were age (odds 3.2; 95% confidence interval (CI 2.5-4.1, male gender (odds 1.5; 95% CI 1.1-1.9, hypercholesterolemia (odds 1.5; 95% CI 1.1-2.0, hypertension (odds 1.4; 95% CI 1.1-1.8, and diabetes (odds 1.3; 95% CI 1.0-1.7. Conclusion: We found age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia to be independent risk factor for abnormal IMT in asymptomatic subjects over 40 years of age.

  19. SMAD3 rs17228212 gene polymorphism is associated with reduced risk to cerebrovascular accidents and subclinical atherosclerosis in anti-CCP negative Spanish rheumatoid arthritis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mercedes García-Bermúdez; Raquel López-Mejías; Fernanda Genre; Santos Castañeda; Carlos González-Juanatey; Javier Llorca; Alfonso Corrales; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Javier Rueda-Gotor; Carmen Gómez-Vaquero; Luis Rodríguez-Rodríguez; Benjamín Fernández-Gutiérrez; Dora Pascual-Salcedo; Alejandro Balsa; Francisco J. López-Longo

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex polygenic inflammatory disease associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease. Previous genome-wide association studies have described SMAD3 rs17228212 polymorphism as an important signal associated with CV events. The aim of the present study was to evaluate for the first time the relationship between this gene polymorphism and the susceptibility to CV manifestations and its potential associatio...

  20. Risk Factors for Sudden Cardiac Death: Risk Factors for Sudden Cardiac Death

    OpenAIRE

    Niemeijer, Maartje

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractSCD is a common cause of death, with around four to five million cases annually worldwide. Determining which persons are at high risk for SCD remains difficult, due to lack of knowledge on individual risk factors and because in the majority of cases, SCD is the first manifestation of cardiac disease. Therefore, this thesis had three aims: (i) to study the current and past incidence of SCD, (ii) to identify new risk factors for SCD in the general population, and (iii) to study ...

  1. 多因素 Logistic分析对急性重症脑血管病患者死亡风险的预测%Analysis and precognition of death risk in hospital of acute severe cerebrovascular disease by multivariate Lo-gistic analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马国胜; 张东; 彭彩丽

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析急性重症脑血管病死亡的危险因素,预测死亡风险,以有效降低脑卒中患者的院内病死率。方法选择2008-10-2012-10于我院住院的急性重症脑血管病患者463例,采用回顾性分析方法,将研究对象的危险因素分为不可干预的Ⅰ类因素(性别、年龄、家族史)、可干预的Ⅱ类因素(高血压、脑卒中史、糖尿病、冠心病、慢性阻塞性肺病、高血脂、饮酒、吸烟)、Ⅲ类为并发症因素(上消化道出血、颅内再出血或梗死、肺部感染、心律失常、电解质紊乱、癫痫发作、多脏器功能障碍)和Ⅳ类为疾病特征因素(体温、脉搏、呼吸、收缩压、血糖、早期昏迷、Glasgow评分、溶栓、手术)共4个类别,逐项分类记录后采用多因素Logistic回归分析。结果年龄(>70岁)、体温(>38.5℃)、早期昏迷、高血压、脑卒中史、糖尿病、冠心病、慢性阻塞性肺病、上消化道出血、颅内再出血或梗死、肺部感染、电解质紊乱、癫痫发作、多脏器功能障碍和手术是独立危险因素,Glas-gow评分与死亡呈负相关。结论预测急性重症脑血管病死亡的关键因素,积极预防和治疗是降低重症脑血管病死亡风险的有效途径。%Objective To investigate and analyze the risk factors of mortality in patients with acute severe cerebrovascular disease ,in order to predict the death risk and reduce hospital mortality in acute cerebral apoplexy. Methods From July 2008 to July 2012 ,a total of 453 cases of patients with acute severe cerebrovascular disease in our hospital were selected ,and retrospec-tive method was performed. According to the characters of the different factors ,all of the risk factors were divided into four kinds. Type Ⅰ or the unchangeable factors were gender ,age ,family history ;type Ⅱ or the interfered factors included hyper-tension ,history of stroke ,diabetes ,coronary

  2. Whether chronic bronchitis is an independent risk factor for cerebral infarction in the elderly 1:1 case paired study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The inflammatory reaction already becomes an important risk factor of causing acute cerebral infarction; however, the correlation between chronic bronchitis and senile cerebral infarction is still unclear.OBJECTIVE: To study whether the chronic bronchitis is the risk factor for senile cerebral infarction.DESIGN: 1:1 pair, case contrast, and risk factor study.SETTINGS: Department of Respiratory Medicine, Third Hospital of Tangshan; Department of Neurology,Affiliated Hospital of North China Coal Medical College.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 147 patients with acute cerebral infarction who were regarded as case group were selected from Department of Neurology, the Third Hospital of Tangshan from January 2004 to December 2006. All patients met the diagnostic criteria of the Fourth National Cerebrovascular Diseases Meeting. There were 87 males and 60 females, and their ages ranged from 65 to 83 years. Based on 1∶1 pair study, another 147 subjects without cerebrovascular disease were regarded as control group. Except the diseases about infection, there were 73 males and 74 females, and their ages ranged from 62 to 81 years. All subjects provided the confirm consent and agreed with the coordinate experiment.METHODS: ① Questionnaire of risk factor of cerebral infarction was designed to measure the following items: chronic bronchitis, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipemia, coronary heart disease, primary cerebral infarction/transient ischemic attack and history of smoking. ② Cerebral infarction was regarded as the dependent variance, while chronic bronchitis, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperiipemia, primary cerebral infarction/transient ischemic attack, coronary heart disease and smoking were regarded as the independent variance for multiple regression analysis.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Risk factors of senile cerebral infarction.RESULTS: All 147 patients with acute cerebral infarction and 147 subjects without cerebrovascular diseases were involved in

  3. Incidence and risk factors of major cardiovascular events in a multicentre HIV cohort

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    L Carenzi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular (CV [1] and cerebrovascular [2] events threaten HIV+ subjects, affecting them earlier as compared to the general population and the current algorithms seem inadequate to estimate the CV risk, in particular concerning the weight of drugs, immunity and virus-related inflammation as risk factors. We analysed three Italian HIV cohorts from January 2005 to August 2011, extracting cases of acute myocardial infarction (AMI or stroke. We analysed at the time of the event the subjects’ age, the risk factors, the Framingham score, the antiviral regimen and the time spent on each drug, the CDC stage, the nadir CD4+ T cells and the outcome. Out of 4893 patients 92 experienced major CV events (76 AMI and 19 stroke, 2 subjects having both and 10 died, at a median age of 50 years (range 33–77. Classical risk factors were widely represented, mainly smoke (72.8% and dyslipidemia (53.3%. Three young subjects had no risk factors and dramatic coronary patterns, leading in one case to transplantation. No one ever had pathological bone fractures, and only 4/81 had GFR <60 mL/min (range 33.6–57.4. The median 10 years’ Framingham score was 10.5 (range 1–31. Abacavir had been taken by 19 subjects, equal to tenofovir and less than zidovudine (n=55, and lopinavir/ritonavir by 20, and no single drug emerged as risk. The median time spent on abacavir and/or on lopinavir/ritonavir was 48 weeks (range 1–552 and 106 weeks (range 8–256, respectively. One patient was antiretroviral–naïve. The CD4 nadir was 183/mm3 and 41.3% were CDC stage C. Although infrequent (1.8%, major CV events affect HIV people at younger age. Classical risk factors are common, while no drug effect emerged clearly. HIV infection was managed late in most of the patients. Early initiation of HAART [3] and reduction of risk factors seem the key points for preventing the occurrence of CV disease.

  4. Risk factors for asthma: is prevention possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Richard; Semprini, Alex; Mitchell, Edwin A

    2015-09-12

    Asthma is one of the most common diseases in the world, resulting in a substantial burden of disease. Although rates of deaths due to asthma worldwide have reduced greatly over the past 25 years, no available therapeutic regimens can cure asthma, and the burden of asthma will continue to be driven by increasing prevalence. The reasons for the increase in asthma prevalence have not been defined, which limits the opportunities to develop targeted primary prevention measures. Although associations are reported between a wide range of risk factors and childhood asthma, substantiation of causality is inherently difficult from observational studies, and few risk factors have been assessed in primary prevention studies. Furthermore, none of the primary prevention intervention strategies that have undergone scrutiny in randomised controlled trials has provided sufficient evidence to lead to widespread implementation in clinical practice. A better understanding of the factors that cause asthma is urgently needed, and this knowledge could be used to develop public health and pharmacological primary prevention measures that are effective in reducing the prevalence of asthma worldwide. To achieve this it will be necessary to think outside the box, not only in terms of risk factors for the causation of asthma, but also the types of novel primary prevention strategies that are developed, and the research methods used to provide the evidence base for their implementation. In the interim, public health efforts should remain focused on measures with the potential to improve lung and general health, such as: reducing tobacco smoking and environmental tobacco smoke exposure; reducing indoor and outdoor air pollution and occupational exposures; reducing childhood obesity and encouraging a diet high in vegetables and fruit; improving feto-maternal health; encouraging breastfeeding; promoting childhood vaccinations; and reducing social inequalities. PMID:26382999

  5. Risk and protection factors in fatal accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Emmanuelle; Martensen, Heike; Papadimitriou, Eleonora; Yannis, George

    2010-03-01

    This paper aims at addressing the interest and appropriateness of performing accident severity analyses that are limited to fatal accident data. Two methodological issues are specifically discussed, namely the accident-size factors (the number of vehicles in the accident and their level of occupancy) and the comparability of the baseline risk. It is argued that - although these two issues are generally at play in accident severity analyses - their effects on, e.g., the estimation of survival probability, are exacerbated if the analysis is limited to fatal accident data. As a solution, it is recommended to control for these effects by (1) including accident-size indicators in the model, (2) focusing on different sub-groups of road-users while specifying the type of opponent in the model, so as to ensure that comparable baseline risks are worked with. These recommendations are applied in order to investigate risk and protection factors of car occupants involved in fatal accidents using data from a recently set up European Fatal Accident Investigation database (Reed and Morris, 2009). The results confirm that the estimated survival probability is affected by accident-size factors and by type of opponent. The car occupants' survival chances are negatively associated with their own age and that of their vehicle. The survival chances are also lower when seatbelt is not used. Front damage, as compared to other damaged car areas, appears to be associated with increased survival probability, but mostly in the case in which the accident opponent was another car. The interest of further investigating accident-size factors and opponent effects in fatal accidents is discussed. PMID:20159090

  6. SYSTOLIC HYPERTENSION. IMPACT ON CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASE

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    Juan Eloy Cruz Quesada

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento: La aterosclerosis es un proceso multifactorial sobre el cual actúan varios factores de riesgo. Constituye la principal causa de muerte y de morbilidad en ingresados hospitalarios, y puede ocasionar una acentuada disminución del flujo sanguíneo hacia todos los órganos del cuerpo humano Objetivo: Determinar el impacto de la hipertensión arterial sistólica sobre la enfermedad cerebrovascular. Métodos: Se realizó un estudio transversal, observacional y analítico, en 59 fallecidos hipertensos. Se analizaron las arterias cerebrales y se cuantificó la lesión aterosclerótica y su variedad, aplicándose el sistema aterométrico, teniendo en cuenta los tipos de hipertensión arterial. Se emplearon procedimientos estadísticos (medidas de tendencia central y comparativos (prueba de comparación de media aritmética basadas en el test “t” de student. Resultados: Los infartos cerebrales recientes fueron más frecuentes en hipertensos sistodiastólicos. No hubo diferencia significativa en cuanto a la edad en el momento de aparición de las lesiones para ambos sexos, pero las mujeres con hipertensión sistólica, fueron significativamente más dañadas desde el punto de vista morfométrico. Se observó correlación significativa para ambos grupos de hipertensos entre tipo de accidente cerebrovascular y variables del sistema aterométrico. Conclusiones: La hipertensión arterial sistólica es un factor importante en la génesis de la enfermedad vasculocerebral y está asociada con la progresión de la placa de ateroma.

  7. Risk Factors and Comorbidities for Onychomycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    A number of comorbidities and risk factors complicate the successful management of onychomycosis. Underlying conditions and patient characteristics, such as tinea pedis, age, and obesity, contribute to risk, whereas comorbidities, such as diabetes and psoriasis, can increase susceptibility to the disease. There are limited data on treatment effectiveness in these patients. Here, the authors review post hoc analyses of efinaconazole topical solution, 10%, in mild-to-moderate onychomycosis and present new data in terms of age and obesity. The only post hoc analysis to report significant differences so far is gender, where female patients do much better; however, the reasons are unclear. The authors report significant differences in terms of efficacy in obese patients who do not respond as well as those with normal body mass index (P=0.05) and in patients who have their co-existing tinea pedis treated compared to those in whom co-existing tinea pedis was not treated (P=0.025). Although there is a trend to reduced efficacy in older patients and those with co-existing diabetes, differences were not significant. More research is needed in onychomycosis patients with these important risk factors and comorbidities to fully evaluate the treatment challengse and possible solutions. PMID:26705439

  8. Risk factors of γ-hydroxybutyrate overdosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korf, Dirk J; Nabben, Ton; Benschop, Annemieke; Ribbink, Kim; van Amsterdam, Jan G C

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify in recreational drug users the factors which increase the risk of overdosing (OD) with γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). A purposive sample of 45 experienced GHB users was interviewed, equally divided into three groups (never OD, occasional OD, and repeat OD). The repeat OD group scored highest on many risk factors regarding GHB use, the occasional OD group scored intermediate, and the never OD group scored lowest. Participants, whether or not they had overdosed on GHB, most often perceived GHB use (e.g. using more GHB than usual, using GHB doses too closely together) as the main reason for GHB OD, and many participants who had overdosed on GHB reported that they had taken more GHB than usual at their most recent occasion of GHB OD. No significant differences in co-use of GHB with other substances were found between the three groups. Our findings indicate that using GHB in the company of groups of friends probably reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of OD. PMID:24080792

  9. OCCUPATIONAL RISK FACTORS IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

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    Muralidhara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Osteoarthritis (OA, also often called “osteoarthrosis” or “degenerative joint disease” is the most common form of arthritis. MATERIALS AND METHODS Present retrospective statistical study was conducted at the Department of orthopaedics in a tertiary care hospital (Catering to a largely agricultural population over a period of 2 years from January 2012 to December 2014. RESULTS Prevalence of osteoarthritis common in farmers accounting to 70%. Other occupations at risk of OA of knee were, Teachers 12%, Housewives 08%, Athletes 04%, Policemen 04% and Drivers 02%. It is in conformity with most previous studies reviewed. CONCLUSION Osteoarthritis of Knee is a major health issue and important cause of disability in elderly population. Occupational risk factors are important in development of osteoarthritis.

  10. Assessing risk factors for periodontitis using regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo Pereira, J. A.; Ferreira, Maria Cristina; Oliveira, Teresa

    2013-10-01

    Multivariate statistical analysis is indispensable to assess the associations and interactions between different factors and the risk of periodontitis. Among others, regression analysis is a statistical technique widely used in healthcare to investigate and model the relationship between variables. In our work we study the impact of socio-demographic, medical and behavioral factors on periodontal health. Using regression, linear and logistic models, we can assess the relevance, as risk factors for periodontitis disease, of the following independent variables (IVs): Age, Gender, Diabetic Status, Education, Smoking status and Plaque Index. The multiple linear regression analysis model was built to evaluate the influence of IVs on mean Attachment Loss (AL). Thus, the regression coefficients along with respective p-values will be obtained as well as the respective p-values from the significance tests. The classification of a case (individual) adopted in the logistic model was the extent of the destruction of periodontal tissues defined by an Attachment Loss greater than or equal to 4 mm in 25% (AL≥4mm/≥25%) of sites surveyed. The association measures include the Odds Ratios together with the correspondent 95% confidence intervals.

  11. Age as a risk factor for suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocić Sanja S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. World Health Organization (WHO in its plan for health policy until the year 2010, has taken reduction of risk factors of suicide as its 12th aim. Because of the fact that the problem of suicide is also significant health problem in our society, the aim of this study was to examine the influence of life period as a risk factor for suicide in the area of the town of Kragujevac. Methods. In total 211 persons, both sexes, aged between 17 and 91 years, from the area of the town of Kragujevac, who had been committed a suicide during the period from 1996 to 2005, were included in a retrospective study. This study included the analysis of: conditions prior to suicide, locations of suicide, motives for suicide, the ways of committing suicide. For statistical analysis χ2 test and univariante regression model were used. Results. Average rate of suicide, in analyzed period, moved from 8.7 to 27 with a mean value of 14.6± 6.9. Suicide rates were the lowest in the age group from 15 to 24 years and the highest in the age group above 65 years (p < 0.05. Among the presuicidal conditions, within any age groups the presence of mental disease dominated as a factor for suicide, but within the oldest one in which organic diseases prevailed as a factor for suicide (p < 0.05. Statistically significant fact is that a house (flat was the main location for committing suicide in any age groups. Motives for suicide were significantly different within the groups and they were mostly unknown. Committing suicide by hanging was the most frequent way of suicide among any age groups. Univariant regression analysis failed to show any impact of age on the analyzed factors. Conclusion. Because of the fact that an average rate of suicide in elderly increases it is obligatory to primarily determine risk factors for suicide among people more than 65 years of age. Physicians should play the most important role in that.

  12. Risk factors for mortality in burn children

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    Maria Teresa Rosanova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies about risk factors for mortality in burn children are scarce. We conducted this study to evaluate the risk factors for mortality in pediatric burn patients. We included 110 patients. Mean age was 31.5 months (range: 1 to 204. The burn surface was between 1% and 95%(median 27% Type of burn was: A or superfitial in 39 patients (36%, AB or intermediate in 19 (17%, and B or full thickness in 52 (47%. Inhalatory injury was present in 52 patients (47%. Invasive procedures were: venous catheter, 90 patients (82%, arterial catheter, 83patients (75.5%, urinary catheter, 86 patients (78%, and mechanical ventilation, 75 patients (68%. In 84 patients, 128 infections were diagnosed. in 53 cases (48%. Multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acynetobacter baumannii were the most common organisms isolated. The median length of hospital stay was 33 days (r: 8-139 days. Seventeen patients (15% died and 14 of them of infection-related causes. Age 40% burn surface, presence of inhalatory syndrome, use of venous catheter, arterial catheter, urinary catheter and mechanical ventilation, positive blood cultures, colistin use in documented multiresistant infections, antifungal use and graft requirement, were identified as risks factors for mortality in the univariate analysis. By multivariate analysis: age <4 years, Garcés 4, colistin use in multiresistant infections, mechanical ventilation and graft requirement were independent variables related with mortality. CONCLUSIONS: In this series of burn children age < 4 years, Garces index score 4, colistin use in documented multiresistant infections, mechanical ventilation and graft requirement were identified as independent variables related with mortality.

  13. Risk factors of uveitis in ankylosing spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Wu, Rui; Xue, Qin; Wang, Feng; Lu, Peirong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Uveitis is the most common extra-articular manifestation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The prevalence and characteristics of uveitis in AS have been studied in previous literatures, whereas its associated risk factors have not been clarified. Therefore, this study analyzed the risk factors of uveitis in patients with AS. Methods: A total of 390 patients with AS who fulfilled the modified New York criteria were enrolled from January to December in 2015. The history of uveitis was accepted only if diagnosed by ophthalmologists. The medical records of the patients were retrospectively reviewed and associated information was collected, such as disease duration, HLA-B27, and the number of peripheral arthritis. Hip-joint lesion was identified by imaging examination. Meanwhile, biochemical examinations were performed to determine the patient's physical function. Results: Of 390 patients with AS (80.5% male, mean age 33.3 years), 38 (9.7%) had experienced 1 or more episodes of uveitis. The incidence rate for hip-joint lesion was obviously higher for patients with uveitis than the nonuveitis group (44.7% vs 22.2%; P arthritis was also larger for the uveitis group than nonuveitis group (2.18 ± 0.23 vs 0.55 ± 0.04; P HLA-B27, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) between the 2 groups. Binary logistic regression results showed that ASO (OR = 12.2, 95% CI:3.6–41.3, P arthritis (OR = 4.1, 95%CI:2.6–6.3, P arthritis, ASO, and CIC may be associated with higher rates of uveitis in AS. The results of this comprehensive analysis suggest that the possible occurrence of uveitis in AS should not be neglected if the patients have those concomitant risk factors. PMID:27428230

  14. Cholera risk factors, Papua New Guinea, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosewell Alexander

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholera is newly emergent in Papua New Guinea but may soon become endemic. Identifying the risk factors for cholera provides evidence for targeted prevention and control measures. Methods We conducted a hospital-based case–control study to identify cholera risk factors. Using stool culture as the standard, we evaluated a cholera point of care test in the field. Results 176 participants were recruited: 54 cases and 122 controls. Independent risk factors for cholera were: being over 20 years of age (aOR 2.5; 95%CI 1.1, 5.4, defecating in the open air (or river (aOR 4.5; 95% CI 1.4, 14.4 and knowing someone who travelled to a cholera affected area (aOR 4.1; 95%CI 1.6, 10.7; while the availability of soap for handwashing at home was protective (aOR 0.41; 95%CI 0.19, 0.87. Those reporting access to a piped water distribution system in the home were twice as likely to report the availability of soap for handwashing. The sensitivity and specificity of the rapid test were 72% (95% CI 47–90 and 71% (95%CI 44–90%. Conclusions Improving population access to the piped water distribution system and sanitation will likely reduce transmission by enabling enhanced hygiene and limiting the contamination of water sources. The One step V. cholerae O1/O139 Antigen Test is of limited utility for clinical decision making in a hospital setting with access to traditional laboratory methods. Settlement dwellers and mobile populations of all age groups should be targeted for interventions in Papua New Guinea.

  15. Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Risk Factors, Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafina Janevska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the most often primary cancer of the liver and is one if the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The incidence of HCC has geographic distribution with the highest levels in countries with developing economies. Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma have poor prognosis despite the achievements in surgery techniques and other therapeutic procedures and it is a reason why continuous attention should be paid to this issue. This article provides an overview of this disease based on an extensive review of relevant literature. The article summarizes the current risk factors, diagnosis, staging and the management of HCC.

  16. Risk factors associated with emergency peripartum hysterectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Rong; Guo Yuna; Chen Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of an emergency peripartum hysterectomy (EPH) as a lifesaving measure to manage intractable postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) appears to be increasing recently around the world,and the indications for EPH have changed.The object of this study is to identify risk factors associated with EPH.Methods We conducted a case-control study of 21 patients who underwent EPH because of intractable PPH between January 1,2005 and June 30,2013,at the International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital Shanghai Jiao Tong University,School of Medicine (IPMCH).The parametric t-test,chi-square tests and Logistic regression models were used for analysis to identify the risk factors.The results were considered statistically significant when P<0.05.Results There were 89 178 deliveries during the study period.Twenty-one women had an EPH,with an incidence of 24 per 100 000 deliveries.The loss of blood during postpartum hemorrhage of the EPH group was (5 060.7±3 032.6)ml,and that of the control group was (2 040.8±723.5) ml.There was a significant difference of PHH between the EHP group and the control group (P=0.001).Independent risk factors for EPH from a logistic regression model were:disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) (OR:9.9,95% CI 2.8-34,P=0.003),previous cesarean section (OR:5.27;95% CI:1.48-17.9,P=0.009),placenta previa (OR:6.9; 95% CI 1.6-2.9,P=0.008),the loss of PPH (OR:1.001; 95% CI 1.001-1.002,P=0.002),placenta accreta (OR:68; 95% CI 10-456,P=0.004),the use of tocolytic agents prenatally (OR:6.55,95%CI 1.34-32.1,P=0.049),and fetal macrosomia (OR:6.9,95% CI 1.25-38,P=0.049).Conclusion Significant risk factors of EPH are DIC,placenta previa,PPH,previous cesarean delivery,and placenta accrete,the use of tocolytic agents prenatally,and fetal macrosomia.

  17. [Patient's Risk Factors for Perioperative Aspiration Pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Teruhiko; Isono, Shiroh

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews patient's own risk factors for perioperative aspiration pneumonia. Maintaining the function of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), the airway protective reflex, and the oral hygiene are the most important to prevent the pneumonia. The LES is adversely affected by excessive stomach distention, some medication given in perioperative periods, and habitual smoking, as well as pathological status such as esophageal hiatus hernia and achalasia. Postapoplectic patients may have insufficient airway protective reflex including swallowing and laryngeal reflex. It is emphasized that the perioperative oral care is increasing in its importance for the prevention of aspiration pneumonia. PMID:27004381

  18. Subconjunctival hemorrhage: risk factors and potential indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarlan B

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bercin Tarlan,1 Hayyam Kiratli21Department of Ophthalmology, Kozluk State Hospital, Batman, Turkey; 2Ocular Oncology Service, Hacettepe University Schoolof Medicine, Ankara, TurkeyAbstract: Subconjunctival hemorrhage is a benign disorder that is a common cause of acute ocular redness. The major risk factors include trauma and contact lens usage in younger patients, whereas among the elderly, systemic vascular diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, and arteriosclerosis are more common. In patients in whom subconjunctival hemorrhage is recurrent or persistent, further evaluation, including workup for systemic hypertension, bleeding disorders, systemic and ocular malignancies, and drug side effects, is warranted.Keywords: subconjunctival hemorrhage, contact lens, hypertension, red eye

  19. Lifestyle Decreases Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Slavíček, Jaroslav; Kittnar, Otomar; Fraser, Gary E.; Medová, Eva; Konečná, Jana; Žižka, Robert; Dohnalová, Alena; Novák, Vladimír

    2008-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality of the cardiovascular diseases is high in the developed countries. The lifestyle changes are capable to decrease it by 50%. The aim of the present study was to measure the parameters of some risk factors before and after a one-week NEW START rehabilitative retreat. 1,349 volunteers, 320 men, 1,029 woman, mean age 51±14.5 (SD) years participated in 30 rehabilitative retreats from 1999–2006 in the Czech Republic, using a low-fat, low-energy, lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet...

  20. Prevalence of health risk factors among fishermen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frantzeskou, Elpida; Jensen, Olaf; Linos, Athena

    2014-01-01

    accompanied by moderate–high alcohol consumption. On many vessels, food was limited to coffee, sandwiches and occasionally fruit on board. 66% of the Greek fishing workers did not perform any kind of exercise outside work. Obesity (Body mass index > 30.0) was found for 33 % of the Greek fishermen. Of the...... review the available information on the prevalence of these preventable risk factors in order to strengthen the preventive strategies. Methods A search for the last decade was done via Medline, Google and Google Scholar with the keywords "diet, tobacco, alcohol, physical exercise, overweight AND...

  1. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Epidemiology, risk factors and pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the commonest primary malignant cancer of the liver in the world. Given that the burden of chronic liver disease is expected to rise owing to increasing rates of alcoholism, hepatitis B and C prevalence and obesity-related fatty liver disease, it is expected that the incidence of HCC will also increase in the foreseeable future. This article summarizes the international epidemiology, the risk factors and the pathogenesis of HCC, including the roles of viral hepatitis, toxins, such as alcohol and aflatoxin, and insulin resistance.

  2. Neurosonological examination: A non-invasive approach for the detection of cerebrovascular impairment in AD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora eUrbanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a growing interest in vascular impairment associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD. This interest was stimulated by the findings of higher incidence of vascular risk factors in AD. Signs of vascular impairment were investigated notably in the field of imaging methods. Our aim was to explore ultrasonographic studies of extra- and intracranial vessels in patients with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI and define implications for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the disease. The most frequently studied parameters with extracranial ultrasound are intima-media thickness in common carotid artery, carotid atherosclerosis, and total cerebral blood flow. The transcranial ultrasound concentrates mostly on flow velocities, pulsatility indices, cerebrovascular reserve capacity, cerebral microembolization. Studies suggest there is morphological and functional impairment of cerebral circulation in AD compared to healthy subjects. Ultrasound as a non-invasive method could be potentially useful in identifying individuals in a higher risk of progression of cognitive decline.

  3. Lipid profile in cerebrovascular accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Soodeh Razeghi; Patricia Khashaiar; Babak Ahmadi; Mohamad Reza Gheini; Mansoureh Togha

    2011-01-01

    Background: Changes in the lipid profile have been suggested as a risk factor for developing ischemic stroke. Their role in intra-cerebral hemorrhage, however, is not clear. The present study was designed to evaluate the lipid profile levels of patients who had experienced an acute stroke during the first 24-hour and to compare these levels in different patients suffering from the stroke, either hemorrhagic or ischemic, and healthy individuals.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 258 conse...

  4. Risk factors in stage III breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five-year follow-up data of 100 patients with stage III breast cancer treated by primary irradiation from 1977 to 1981 are presented. The 5-year overall survival rate for the entire group was 38% with a median survival time of 33 months. The data were analysed to determine factors associated with prognosis. Patients with shorter premedical history and premenopausal status had a modest survival advantage. Response to radiation therapy, primary tumor status, regional lymph node condition, postirradiation histologic findings in axillary lymph nodes proved to have a prognostic value. Disease which was not controlled by radiotherapy also tended to be resistant to chemotherapy and the 5-year survival in this group was zero. Risk factors have to be taken into consideration for the combined modality treatment for stage III breast cancer. However, further studies are needed to define the indication and appropriate sequence of systemic treatment in this stage of the disease. (orig.)

  5. A multidimensional risk factor model for suicide attempts in later life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan SMS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sau Man Sandra Chan,1 Fung Kum Helen Chiu,1 Chiu Wa Linda Lam,1 Sau Man Corine Wong,1 Yeates Conwell2 1Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA Background: Elderly suicide is a public health problem worldwide, and the risk factors are multidimensional. Chronic mental health problems, personality traits, stressful life events, comorbid medical conditions, social isolation, unemployment, and poverty are associated with higher risk for suicide in later life. There was a relative paucity of data on the neurobiological markers of elderly suicide. Objective: This study examines the conjoint roles of cerebrovascular risk factors (CVRFs and other established biopsychosocial risk factors in older adults who had made a recent suicide attempt.Design: A cross-sectional, case-controlled study.Setting: A tertiary care setting in a public sector and a community setting.Subjects and methods: Cases (N=77 were nondemented Chinese adults aged ≥65 years, enrolled in a regional psychogeriatric service following a suicide attempt; comparison subjects (N=99 were community-dwelling nondemented older adults with no lifetime history of suicide. Measures of sociodemographic profile, life events, suicidal behavior, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV Axis I psychopathology, personality traits, functional status, physical health, CVRFs, and executive cognitive functions were administered. Results: Weighted sum of CVRF score was significantly higher in older women who had made a recent suicide attempt (mean: 10.56; standard deviation [SD]: 5.46 than comparison subjects (mean: 7.24; SD: 4.04 (t=3.52, P=0.001; df=99. Logistic regression showed that CVRF score (Exp[B]: 1.289, P=0.033, DSM-IV depressive disorders (current (Exp[B]: 348, P<0.001, number of life events in the past 12 weeks (Exp[B]: 10.4; P

  6. Risk Factors in ERP Implementation Projects for Process Oriented

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Partyka

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper present review and analysis of risk factors, which could affect successful implementation of ERP system, for project performed in project oriented organizations. Presented risk breakdown structure and the list of common risk factors, are well-suited for ERP implementation projects. Considered risk categories allow for complex risk analysis. Additionally, mapping of risk importance for particular implementation phases is presented. Making presented model an important input for project risk management process, especially for the beginning phases which require identification of risk factors.

  7. Dependence structure of risk factors and diversification effects

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Zou

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the aggregated risk from dependent risk factors under the multivariate Extreme Value theory (EVT) framework. We consider the heavy-tailness of the risk factors as well a non-parametric tail dependence structure. This allows a large scope of models on the dependency. We assess the Value-at-Risk of a diversified portfolio constructed from dependent risk factors. Moreover, we examine the diversification effects under this setup.

  8. Risk factors of thyroid cancer in Babol, Northern Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Moazezi, Zoleika; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Yahyahpour, Yousef; Alaleh, AliReza

    2011-01-01

    Background : Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Several risk factors were found to play a role in thyroid cancer. The purpose of the study was to determine the risk factors for thyroid cancer, in Babol, north of Iran.

  9. Bicycling to school improves the cardiometabolic risk factor profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Børrestad, Line A B; Tarp, Jakob;

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether bicycling to school improves cardiometabolic risk factor profile and cardiorespiratory fitness among children.......To investigate whether bicycling to school improves cardiometabolic risk factor profile and cardiorespiratory fitness among children....

  10. Patient risk factors for pressure ulcer development: Systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coleman, S.; Gorecki, C.; Nelson, E.A.; Closs, S.J.; Defloor, T.; Halfens, R.; Farrin, A.; Brown, J.; Schoonhoven, L.; Nixon, J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors independently predictive of pressure ulcer development in adult patient populations? DESIGN: A systematic review of primary research was undertaken, based upon methods recommended for effectiveness questions but adapted to identify observational risk factor studie

  11. Risk Factors in ERP Implementation Projects for Process Oriented

    OpenAIRE

    Andrzej Partyka

    2009-01-01

    This paper present review and analysis of risk factors, which could affect successful implementation of ERP system, for project performed in project oriented organizations. Presented risk breakdown structure and the list of common risk factors, are well-suited for ERP implementation projects. Considered risk categories allow for complex risk analysis. Additionally, mapping of risk importance for particular implementation phases is presented. Making presented model an important input for proje...

  12. Epigenetic Risk Factors in PTSD and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Joachim Raabe

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown that children exposed to adverse experiences are at increased risk for the development of depression, anxiety disorders and PTSD. A history of child abuse and maltreatment increases the likelihood of being subsequently exposed to traumatic events or of developing PTSD as an adult. The brain is highly plastic during early life and encodes acquired information into lasting memories that normally subserve adaptation. Translational studies in rodents showed that enduring sensitization of neuronal and neuroendocrine circuits in response to early life adversity are likely risk factors of life time vulnerability to stress. Hereby, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis integrates cognitive, behavioural and emotional responses to early-life stress and can be epigenetically programmed during sensitive windows of development. Epigenetic mechanisms, comprising reciprocal regulation of chromatin structure and DNA methylation, are important to establish and maintain sustained, yet potentially reversible, changes in gene transcription. The relevance of these findings for the development of PTSD requires further studies in humans where experience-dependent epigenetic programming can additionally depend on genetic variation in the underlying substrates which may protect from or advance disease development. Overall, identification of early-life stress associated epigenetic risk markers informing on previous stress history can help to advance early diagnosis, personalized prevention and timely therapeutic interventions, thus reducing long-term social and health costs.

  13. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML. PMID:26113060

  14. Risk factors associated with childhood asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify the risk factors associated with childhood asthma, in children attending Isra University Hospital, Hyderabad. The study included 398 age-matched children (200 asthmatic and 198 non-asthmatic). Information was collected concerning their familial history of atopy, birth weight, environment, breastfeeding, disease and treatment history. Odds ratio was calculated for determining the risk. The children were aged between 12 months and 8 years and 60% were male. The asthmatic children were hospitalized more frequently than the non-asthmatic children (p < 0.0001). Most of the asthmatic children lived in the urban areas of Hyderabad (odd ratio (OR) 16.7, 95% CI = 3.1-14.6, p < 0.0001), had a parental history of asthma (OR 26.8, 95% CI = 10.8-68.2, p < 0.0001) or allergic rhinitis (OR 4, 95% CI 1.2-13.4, p= 0.01), 38.5% had at least one person who smoked, and were weaned earlier than the non-asthmatic children (OR =12.4, 95% CI 1.3-4.4, p < 0.01). Childhood asthma was strongly associated with a family history of asthma and allergic rhinitis, the urban place of residence, having smokers as parents and early weaning from maternal breast milk. The results highlight the need to educate the parents about the risk of smoking and early weaning in the development of asthma. (author)

  15. Risk factors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection among children in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søborg, Bolette; Andersen, Aase Bengaard; Melbye, Mads;

    2011-01-01

    To examine the risk factors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (MTI) among Greenlandic children for the purpose of identifying those at highest risk of infection.......To examine the risk factors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (MTI) among Greenlandic children for the purpose of identifying those at highest risk of infection....

  16. CLIMATE AS A RISK FACTOR FOR TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ÁKOS NÉMETH

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Weather and climate risk factors for tourism are surveyed and illustrated with regard to the expected climate changes in Hungary. These changes are not at all advantageous and which affect the business in question both directly and indirectly. These are the summer resort tourism (characterised by bioclimatic indices. Green tourism is the next one to characterise, including skiing, mountain climbing and eco-tourism, as well. Here both day-to-day weather extremes and long-lasting effects on the biota (e.g. drought, or inundation for plain-area eco-tourism. Last, but not least the urban (cultural- and shopping- tourism is presented, since the large towns exhibit their special climate and different risks. The paper intends to specify these meteorological factors and effects also in terms of the different types of touristic activities. The general statements on the effect of weather and climate on tourism are illustrated by a few individual parameters and also by the so called Physiologically Equivalent Temperature. Annual and diurnal course of this parameter are presented, together with various trends in this variable at different sites and in different (hot and cold extremities of the occurring values. Other examples, helping the tourism industry are presented in various climate conditions of the country. They include high precipitation and high relative humidity information. The paper also lists the possible adaptation measures to extreme events and also their likely changes in time.

  17. Post biopsy pneumothorax: Risk factors and course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The was to study the natural course of pneumothorax produced after aspiration biopsy in the attempt to differentiate those cases that will resolve spontaneously from those that will require drainage, and to assess the possible risk factors associated with the development of this entity. Eighty-nine CT-guided aspiration biopsies were performed in 80 patients. Control CT was done immediately after the procedure and 24 hours later. When pneumothorax persisted, CT was repeated at 48 h, 72 h, day 5 and day 7 or until a drainage tube was introduced. The cases of pneumothorax were classified as minimal, anterior or anterolateral. Seven variables were assessed as possible risk factors for its occurrence. Pneumothorax developed on 29 occasions (32.5%), requiring drainage in 12 cases (13.5%). In 20 patients (22%), pneumothorax occurred immediately, while in the remaining 9 (10%) it was detected in the 24 h CT scan. When studied according to type, drainage was required in 3 of the 19 cases of minimal or anterior pneumothorax (15%) and in 9 or the 10 cases of anterolateral location (90%) (p<0.0005). The mean thickness of the parenchyma punctured was 3.4 cm +- 2.2. cm when pneumothorax developed and 1.3 cm+- 2 cm when it did not (p<0.0001). There is a statistically significant association between the development of anterolateral pneumothorax and the need for chest drainage. The thickness of the punctured parenchyma is associated with the production of pneumothorax. 16 refs

  18. Peritoneal dialysis peritonitis: risk factors and effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alikari V.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peritonitis is the most frequent complication of peritoneal dialysis. It is the main cause of failure of the method and inclusion of patients in hemodialysis Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the risk factors of peritoneal dialysis peritonitis as well as the acute and long-term effects of peritonitis on peritoneal membrane function and success of the method. Methods: Literature review of relevant articles in the database Pubmed as well as the official website of the International Society of Peritoneal Dialysis (ISPD was carried out. The search included articles published during the period 1986 -2012.Results: Lack of patient compliance with the peritoneal changes protocol, lack of social support, systemic diseases and connection systems are risk factors of peritonitis. Peritonitis causes transient increase of peritoneum permeability, loss of the ability of the peritoneum for ultrafiltration and, consequently, overhydration. Long-term, recurrent episodes of peritonitis resulting in permanent loss of peritoneum capacity for ultrafiltration even fibrosis that leads to failure of the method. Finally, its effect on the reduction of the residual renal function seems to be remarkable. Conclusions: Peritonitis is the most common infectious complication of peritoneal dialysis and the main cause of morbidity associated with the method. Moreover, it is the major cause of failure of the method and patients accession in hemodialysis. Any attempt to prevent peritonitis passes through the careful patient selection and effective patient education on compliance with the rules of asepsis during peritoneal changes.

  19. Lifestyle decreases risk factors for cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavícek, Jaroslav; Kittnar, Otomar; Fraser, Gary E; Medová, Eva; Konecná, Jana; Zizka, Robert; Dohnalová, Alena; Novák, Vladimir

    2008-12-01

    The morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases is high in the developed countries. The lifestyle changes are capable to decrease it by 50%. The aim of the present study was to measure the parameters of some risk factors before and after a one-week NEW START rehabilitative retreat. 1349 volunteers, 320 men, 1029 woman, mean age 51 +/- 14.5 (SD) years participated in 30 rehabilitative retreats from 1999-2006 in the Czech Republic, using a low-fat, low-energy, lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet and exercise, in a stress-free environment. Body weight, height, BMI, blood pressure, heart rate, serum cholesterol and blood glucose were measured. Body weight decreased in 1223 measured persons from 71.2 +/- 14.38 (SD) to 70.6 +/- 14.02 kg (placto-ovo vegetarians and Seventh-day Adventists than in controls who never observed the diet and avail the lifestyle programs. The parameters were nonsignificantly changed one year after finishing the retreat in the sample of 68 persons showing the positive effect of retreats. Our results showed, that the intake of a low-fat, low-energy diet, over the course of one week in a stress-free environment, had positive impact on the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:19256282

  20. Adolescent fatherhood: Risk factor or resilience?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Benatuil

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of the adolescent pregnancy has been historically centered in the mother, the preponderant focus has been considers the maternity in this stage of the vital cycle as a factor of risk. Nowadays, have begun some studies that focus the problem of the adolescent pregnancy being centered in the father’s figure to appear and proposing a healthy focus, starting from the introduction of such concepts like Resilience. The present article, is a theoretical work, it is carried out to leave of secondary data. The objective is the compilation of studies and information on the subject of adolescent fatherhood from a less explored focus, considering the factors of risk and resilience. Different studies are raised with Latin American youths. Also are analyzed the access possibilities to the sanitary system from the youths, the knowledge of birth-control methods and the participation in programs of reproductive health. It outlines the importance of including the males in the whole process of procreation and the boy’s upbringing. 

  1. Stroke Prevention: Managing Modifiable Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Di Legge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention plays a crucial role in counteracting morbidity and mortality related to ischemic stroke. It has been estimated that 50% of stroke are preventable through control of modifiable risk factors and lifestyle changes. Antihypertensive treatment is recommended for both prevention of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. The use of antiplatelets and statins has been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs are indicated in stroke prevention because they also promote vascular health. Effective secondary-prevention strategies for selected patients include carotid revascularization for high-grade carotid stenosis and vitamin K antagonist treatment for atrial fibrillation. The results of recent clinical trials investigating new anticoagulants (factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors clearly indicate alternative strategies in stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation. This paper describes the current landscape and developments in stroke prevention with special reference to medical treatment in secondary prevention of ischemic stroke.

  2. [Perception of health risks: psychological and social factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzenhäuser, S; Epp, A

    2009-12-01

    This article reviews central findings and current developments of psychological and sociological research on the perception of health risks. Risk perception is influenced by numerous psychological, social, political, and cultural factors. These factors can be categorized into (a) risk characteristics, (b) characteristics of the risk perceiving person and his/her situation, and (c) characteristics of risk communication. Thus, besides individual cognitive and affective processing of risk information, social processes of risk amplification (e.g., media effects) are also involved in the construction of individual risk perceptions. We discuss the recommendations for health risk communication that follow from these findings with regard to different communication goals. PMID:19862487

  3. Risk Factors for Hyperglycaemia in Pregnancy in Tamil Nadu, India

    OpenAIRE

    Karoline Kragelund Nielsen; Peter Damm; Anil Kapur; Vijayam Balaji; Balaji, Madhuri S.; Veerasamy Seshiah; Bygbjerg, Ib C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hyperglycaemia in pregnancy (HIP), i.e. gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and diabetes in pregnancy (DIP), increases the risk of various short- and long-term adverse outcomes. However, much remains to be understood about the role of different risk factors in development of HIP. Objective The aims of this observational study were to examine the role of potential risk factors for HIP, and to investigate whether any single or accumulated risk factor(s) could be used to predict HIP...

  4. Gang Membership Risk Factors for Eighth-Grade Students

    OpenAIRE

    James Martinez; Jeremy Tost; Larry Hilgert; Tracy Woodard-Meyers

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the major risk factor domains for gang membership and the relationships of these risk factors to eighth grade students. The domains of risk factors include: individual characteristics, peer group influences, family conditions, school experiences and the community context, along with demographic information obtained from the Student Gang Survey items. Through logistic multiple regression, risk factors associated with school, peer, community-neighborhood...

  5. Risk factors of pancreatic leakage after pancreaticoduodenectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Mo Yang; Xiao-Dong Tian; Yan Zhuang; Wei-Min Wang; Yuan-Lian Wan; Yan-Ting Huang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the risk factors for pancreatic leakage after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and to evaluate whether duct-to-mucosa pancreaticojejunostomy could reduce the risk of pancreatic leakage.METHODS: Sixty-two patients who underwent PD at our hospital between January 2000 and November 2003 were reviewed retrospectively. The primary diseases of the patients included pancreas cancer, ampullary cancer, bile duct cancer, islet cell cancer, duodenal cancer, chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cystadenoma, and gastric cancer.Standard PD was performed for 25 cases, PD with extended lymphadenectomy for 27 cases, pylorus-preserving PD for 10 cases. A duct-to-mucosa pancreaticojejunostomy was performed for patients with a hard pancreas and a dilated pancreatic duct, and a traditional end-to-end invagination pancreaticojejunostomy for patients with a soft pancreas and a non-dilated duct. Patients were divided into two groups according to the incidence of postoperative pancreaticojejunal anastomotic leakage: 10 cases with leakage and 52 cases without leakage. Seven preoperative and six intraoperative risk factors with the potential to affect the incidence of pancreatic leakage were analyzed with SPSS10.0 software. Logistic regression was then used to determine the effect of multiple factors on pancreatic leakage.RESULTS: Of the 62 patients, 10 (16.13%) were identified as having pancreatic leakage after operation. Other major postoperative complications included delayed gastric emptying (eight patients), abdominal bleeding (four patients), abdominal abscess (three patients) and wound infection (two patients). The overall surgical morbidity was 43.5% (27/62). The hospital mortality in this series was 4.84% (3/62), and the mortality associated with pancreatic fistula was 10% (1/10). Sixteen cases underwent duct-to-mucosa pancreaticojejunostomy and 1 case (1/16, 6.25%) devel-oped postoperative pancreatic leakage, 46 cases underwent invagination pancreaticojejunostomy and 9

  6. Nutritional risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus

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    Sakshi Singh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM has been observed to be associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality. GDM is becoming a public health concern globally as well as in India with fast increasing trend. It affects approximately 14% of all pregnancies. Studies on the association of food items having high glycaemic index with GDM risk are sparse. Most of the literature has focused on typical risk factors like advanced maternal age, family history of diabetes mellitus, history of abortions, previous history of GDM. Objective: To assess the risk of developing GDM in pregnant women consuming food items with high glycemic index. Material and Methods: A hospital based case control study was conducted in Lady Hardinge Medical College and associated hospital with a sample size of 104 (52 cases & 52 controls. For dietary history a validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire was used. The usual pattern of eating during days, weeks and months were asked. The data was compiled and analysed in SPSS version 12. Results: Total 30.8% cases and 13.5% controls gave history of consuming food items having high glycaemic index more frequently (at least once daily. The odds ratio of developing GDM was 2.86(CI -1.06-7.70 among the cases who were taking high glycaemic foods more frequently in comparison to those who were taking occasionally. Conclusions: Risk of developing GDM in high glycemic foods consumers is high. Simple measures like changing dietary patterns, consuming food items with low glycaemic load can contribute significantly in prevention of GDM. 

  7. What Are the Risk Factors for Thymus Cancer?

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    ... cancer? What are the risk factors for thymus cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects your chance of getting ... Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Thymus Cancer? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating ...

  8. What Are the Risk Factors for Gallbladder Cancer?

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    ... cancer? What are the risk factors for gallbladder cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects your chance of getting ... Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Gallbladder Cancer? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating ...

  9. What Are the Risk Factors for Bile Duct Cancer?

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    ... What are the risk factors for bile duct cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects your chance of getting ... to top » Guide Topics What Is Bile Duct Cancer? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating ...

  10. Doppler Sonography Confirmation in Patients Showing Calcified Carotid Artery Atheroma in Panoramic Radiography and Evaluation of Related Risk Factors

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    Mahrokh Imanimoghaddam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The purpose of this study was to identify patients at the risk of cerebrovascular attack (CVA by detecting calcified carotid artery atheroma (CCAA in panoramic radiography and evaluating their risk factors. Materials and methods. A total of 960 panoramic radiographs of patients above 40 years old were evaluated. Doppler Sonography (DS was performed for patients who showed calcified carotid artery atheroma (CCAA in panoramic radiography in order to determine the presence of CCAA and the degree of stenosis. Cardiovascular risk factors in both groups of patients with CCAA (12 subjects and without CCAA (3 subjects were compared using a questionnaire filled out by the patients. Statistical analysis including Fisher and independent t-test applied for data analysis. Results. Fifteen patients (30 sides showed calcification in their panoramic radiographs, and underwent DS which revealed CCAA in 16 sides (12 patients. Two patients (13.33% showed stenosis greater than 70%. Among the risk factors, only age showed a significant association with the occurrence of carotid calcified atheroma (P=0.026. Conclusion. Considering the results, dentists should refer especially elderly patients with radiographically identified atheromas for further examinations, as asymptomatic CCAA might be associated with high degrees of stenosis.

  11. Doppler Sonography Confirmation in Patients Showing Calcified Carotid Artery Atheroma in Panoramic Radiography and Evaluation of Related Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanimoghaddam, Mahrokh; Rah Rooh, Mohammad; Mahmoudi Hashemi, Elahe; Javadzade Blouri, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims The purpose of this study was to identify patients at the risk of cerebrovascular attack (CVA) by detecting calcified carotid artery atheroma (CCAA) in panoramic radiography and evaluating their risk factors. Materials and methods A total of 960 panoramic radiographs of patients above 40 years old were evaluated. Doppler Sonography (DS) was performed for patients who showed calcified carotid artery atheroma (CCAA) in panoramic radiogra-phy in order to determine the presence of CCAA and the degree of stenosis. Cardiovascular risk factors in both groups of patients with CCAA (12 subjects) and without CCAA (3 subjects) were compared using a questionnaire filled out by the patients. Statistical analysis including Fisher and independent t-test applied for data analysis. Results Fifteen patients (30 sides) showed calcification in their panoramic radiographs, and underwent DS which revealed CCAA in 16 sides (12 patients). Two patients (13.33%) showed stenosis greater than 70%. Among the risk factors, only age showed a significant association with the occurrence of carotid calcified atheroma (P=0.026). Conclusion Considering the results, dentists should refer especially elderly patients with radiographically identified atheromas for further examinations, as asymptomatic CCAA might be associated with high degrees of stenosis. PMID:22991627

  12. Hepatotoxicity with antituberculosis drugs: the risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the severity and frequency of hepatotoxicity caused by different antituberculosis (ATT) drugs and to evaluate whether concurrence of risk factors influence the antituberculosis drug induced hepatotoxicity. This prospective cohort study was conducted in Medical Unit-V and OPD department of Civil Hospital Karachi from July 2004 to July 2005. A total of 339 patients diagnosed of active tuberculosis infection with normal pretreatment liver function were monitored clinically as well as biochemically. Their data were collected on proforma and patients were treated with Isoniazid, Rifampicin and Pyrazinamide. Duration after which derangement in function, if any, occurred and time taken for normalization was noted. Treatment was altered as needed, with exclusion of culprit drug. Finally data was analyzed by SPSS version 10.0. ATT induced hepatotoxicity was seen in 67 (19.76%) out of 339 patients. Females were more affected as compared to males (26.3% vs. 19.7%). BMI (kg/m2) of 91% of diseased group were less than 18.5 (p<0.01) most of them were anemic having low albumin level suggestive of lean body mass. Hepatotoxicity was more severe in AFB smear positive patients. Concomitant use of alcohol, paracetamol and low serum cholesterol were proved as predisposing factors. Isoniazid (37 patients (55.21%), p<0.01) was the main culprit followed by Rifampicin (23 patients, 34.21%) and Pyrazinamide (7 patients, 10.5%). Most of the patients (61%) developed the hepatotoxicity within two weeks of starting antituberculosis therapy with mild to moderate alteration in ALT and AST. ATT-induced hepatitis is significantly more frequent and more severe in patients with hepatotoxicity risk factors. (author)

  13. Cardiovascular risk assessment in Italy: the CUORE Project risk score and risk chart

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    Simona Giampaoli

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Aim: Risk charts and risk score, based on the global absolute risk, are key tools for CVD risk assessment. When applied to the population from which they derive, they provide the best estimate of CVD risk. That is why the CUORE Project has among its objectives the assessment of the Italian population’s cardiovascular risk, identifying the model for the prediction of coronary and cerebrovascular events in 10 years.

    Methods: Data fromdifferent cohorts enrolled in the North, Centre and South of Italy between the 1980s and the 1990s were used. From the 7,056 men and 12,574 women aged 35-69 years, free of cardiovascular disease at base-line and followed up for a mean time of 10 years for total and cause-specific mortality and non fatal cerebrovascular and coronary events, 894 major cardiovascular events (596 coronary and 298 cerebrovascular were identified and validated. To assess 10-year cardiovascular risk, the risk score and risk chart were developed for men and women separately, considering the first major coronary or cerebrovascular event as the endpoint.

    Results: The risk score is applied tomen andwomen aged 35-69 years and includes age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, smoking habit, diabetes and hypertension treatment using continuous values when possible. The risk chart is applied to persons aged 40-69 years and includes the same risk factors as risk score, except for HDL-cholesterol and hypertension treatment, and uses categorical values for all variables.

    Conclusions: The risk score and risk chart are easy-to-use tools which enable general practitioners and specialists to achieve an objective evaluation of the absolute global cardiovascular risk of middle-aged persons in primary prevention.

  14. Environmental risk factors of systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Isabelle; Gehanno, Jean-François

    2015-09-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) has a complex pathogenesis. Although, there is a growing evidence that environmental factors have an impact on alterations and modulation of epigenetic determinants, resulting in SSc onset and progression. A marked correlation has thus been found between SSc onset and occupational exposure to crystalline silica and the following organic solvents: white spirit, aromatic solvents, chlorinated solvents, trichloroethylene, and ketones; the risk associated with high cumulative exposure to silica and organic solvents further appears to be strongly increased in SSc. Altogether, occupational exposure should be systematically checked in all SSc patients at diagnosis, as (1) exposed patients seem to develop more severe forms of SSc and (2) the identification of the occupational agents will allow its interruption, which may lead to potential improvement of SSc outcome. By contrast, based on current published data, there is insufficient evidence that exposure to other chemical agents (including notably pesticides as well as personal care such as silicone and hair dye), physical agents (ionizing radiation, ultraviolet radiation, electric and magnetic fields), and biological agents (infections and diet, foods, and dietary contaminants) is a causative factor of SSc. Further investigations are still warranted to identify other environmental factors that may be associated with SSc onset and progression. PMID:26141606

  15. Risk factors for gout: Gender differences

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    Maxim Sergeyevich Eliseyev

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to comparatively assess risk factors for gout in male and female patients with this condition. Subjects and methods. The study enrolled 340 gouty patients (289 men and 51 women examined in the period 2002 to 2009. The diagno sis corresponded to the criteria developed by S.L. Wallace. The mean age was 52.3±11.4 years for the women and 52.3±10.4 years for the men. The study group included female patients with gout and a comparison group comprised male patients with this condition. All the patients were interviewed using a questionnaire to identify risk factors for gout: the regular use of diuretics or alcoholic beverages before the onset of this disease, the presence of arterial hypertension (AH, and menopause in women. Results. The intake of diuretics before gout was reported by 57% of the women and 19.7% of the men (p < 0.00001. The drugs were given to all the men according to medical indications; 10 of 29 women took diuretics to lose weight. Alcohol was consumed more than twice week ly by 17.6% of the women and 33.6% of the men (p = 0.032. The median weekly alcohol consumption was 2 (range 1-4 conventional units (CU in the women and 4 (range 2-10 CU in the men (p = 0.002. AH occurring the onset of gout was found in 30 (59% women and 136 (47% men (p = 0.13. Menopause developing prior to the onset of gout was noted in 26 (51% women. Conclusion. Among possible causes of gout, the use of diuretics is more common in the women than in the men, moreover, the former take them unfairly in one third of cases. The women consume alcohol less frequently and in smaller quantities, but the rate of female intake of alcoholic beverages is associated with younger age at the onset of gout. In early menopause or amenorrhea, gout more frequently occurs at a young age. AH is a common risk factor for gout in both the women (59% and the men (47%.

  16. Hepatocellular carcinoma: epidemiology and risk factors

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    Kew MC

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Michael C Kew Department of Medicine, Groote Schuur Hospital and University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the major malignant tumors in the world today. The number of new cases of the tumor increases year by year, and hepatocellular carcinoma almost always runs a fulminant course and carries an especially grave prognosis. It has a low resectability rate and a high recurrence rate after surgical intervention, and responds poorly to anticancer drugs and radiotherapy. Hepatocellular carcinoma does not have a uniform geographical distribution: rather, very high incidences occur in Eastern and Southeastern Asia and in sub-Saharan Black Africans. In these regions and populations, the tumor shows a distinct shift in age distribution toward the younger ages, seen to greatest extent in sub-Saharan Black Africans. In all populations, males are more commonly affected. The most common risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma in resource-poor populations with a high incidence of the tumor are chronic hepatitis B virus infection and dietary exposure to the fungal hepatocarcinogen aflatoxin B1. These two causative agents act either singly or synergistically. Both the viral infection and exposure to the fungus occur from early childhood, and the tumor typically presents at an early age. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is an important cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in resource-rich countries with a low incidence of the tumor. The infection is acquired in adulthood and hepatocellular carcinoma occurs later than it does with hepatitis B virus-induced tumors. In recent years, obesity and the metabolic syndrome have increased markedly in incidence and importance as a cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in some resource-rich regions. Chronic alcohol abuse remains an important risk factor for malignant transformation of hepatocytes, frequently in association with alcohol-induced cirrhosis. Excessive iron

  17. Anesthetic issues and perioperative blood pressure management in patients who have cerebrovascular diseases undergoing surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellish, W Scott

    2006-11-01

    Patients who have cerebrovascular disease and vascular insufficiency routinely have neurosurgical and nonneurosurgical procedures. Anesthetic priorities must provide a still bloodless operative field while maintaining cardiovascular stability and renal function. Patients who have symptoms or a history of cerebrovascular disease are at increased risk for stroke, cerebral hypoperfusion, and cerebral anoxia. Type of surgery and cardiovascular status are key concerns when considering neuroprotective strategies. Optimization of current condition is important for a good outcome; risks must be weighed against perceived benefits in protecting neurons. Anesthetic use and physiologic manipulations can reduce neurologic injury and assure safe and effective surgical care when cerebral hypoperfusion is a real and significant risk. PMID:16935193

  18. Risk Factors of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and Risk Factors for Sleep Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2011-01-01

    Relationship between major risk factors of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and sleep disorders in the infants is the subject of review and discussion. Improper micro-environmental characteristics (especially poor environmental organisation and lack of developmental stimulation), pre-term delivery and/or infant low birth weight, prone sleep…

  19. Cardiovascular risk in lupus nephritis: Do renal disease-related and other traditional risk factors play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atukorala, Inoshi; Weeratunga, Praveen; Kalubowila, Janaka; Ranasinghe, Hasanthika; Gunawardena, Nalika; Lanerolle, Rushika; Rathnamalala, Nadeeka

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of thickened carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) in a Sri Lankan cohort of lupus nephritis (LN) patients and to identify associations between traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) and LN-related risk factors with increased CIMT. Consecutive patients with biopsy-proven LN were evaluated for conventional CVD risk factors, renal parameters and extent of organ involvement in this cross-sectional study. Current disease activity and damage were assessed by the British Isles Lupus Activity Group (BILAG) score and the Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR) damage index, respectively. CIMT was assessed by B Mode grey scale ultrasonography. Increased CIMT was defined as CIMT more than the 75th percentile based on cutoffs from the "Carotid Atherosclerosis Progression Study." Forty patients (98% female), with a mean age of 38 years (age range of 20-50) and of South Asian descent, were evaluated. The mean duration of disease of 6.15 years (SD = 4.66). The overall prevalence of cardiovascular events was low and included previous acute coronary syndromes in 7.5%, stable angina in 5%, cerebrovascular accidents in 7.5% and transient ischemic attacks in 2.5% of the patients; 72.5% had hypertension (HTN) [mean blood pressure (BP) 140/80 mm Hg]; 32.5% had dyslipidemias (mean serum cholesterol 5.9; SD = 5.6) and 25% had diabetes (mean blood sugar 103.7; SD = 15.6). Forty percent were obese and 20% were overweight (Asian cutoffs). Increased CIMT (57.5%) and atherosclerotic plaques (15.36%) indicated a high CVD risk in this cohort. Diabetes (P = 0.016), HTN (P = 0.002), dyslipidemia (P = 0.002) and obesity (P = 0.048) were associated with thickened CIMT. The only LN-related risk factor associated with thickened CIMT (P <0.05) was the SLICC/ACR damage index. The independent predictors of thickened CIMT determined by logistic regression analysis were HTN and dyslipidemia. PMID

  20. Cardiovascular risk in lupus nephritis: Do renal disease-related and other traditional risk factors play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoshi Atukorala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of thickened carotid intima media thickness (CIMT in a Sri Lankan cohort of lupus nephritis (LN patients and to identify associations between traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD and LN-related risk factors with increased CIMT. Consecutive patients with biopsy-proven LN were evaluated for conventional CVD risk factors, renal parameters and extent of organ involvement in this cross-sectional study. Current disease activity and damage were assessed by the British Isles Lupus Activity Group (BILAG score and the Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR damage index, respectively. CIMT was assessed by B Mode grey scale ultrasonography. Increased CIMT was defined as CIMT more than the 75th percentile based on cutoffs from the "Carotid Atherosclerosis Progression Study." Forty patients (98% female, with a mean age of 38 years (age range of 20-50 and of South Asian descent, were evaluated. The mean duration of disease of 6.15 years (SD = 4.66. The overall prevalence of cardiovascular events was low and included previous acute coronary syndromes in 7.5%, stable angina in 5%, cerebrovascular accidents in 7.5% and transient ischemic attacks in 2.5% of the patients; 72.5% had hypertension (HTN [mean blood pressure (BP 140/80 mm Hg]; 32.5% had dyslipidemias (mean serum cholesterol 5.9; SD = 5.6 and 25% had diabetes (mean blood sugar 103.7; SD = 15.6. Forty percent were obese and 20% were overweight (Asian cutoffs. Increased CIMT (57.5% and atherosclerotic plaques (15.36% indicated a high CVD risk in this cohort. Diabetes (P = 0.016, HTN (P = 0.002, dyslipidemia (P = 0.002 and obesity (P = 0.048 were associated with thickened CIMT. The only LN-related risk factor associated with thickened CIMT (P <0.05 was the SLICC/ACR damage index. The independent predictors of thickened CIMT determined by logistic regression analysis were HTN and dyslipidemia.

  1. Clinical presentation and risk factors of osteoradionecrosis

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    Chronopoulos, Aristeidis

    2015-03-26

    Introduction: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the jaws is defined as exposed irradiated bone that fails to heal over a period of 3 months without the evidence of a persisting or recurrent tumor. In the previous decades, numerous factors were associated with the risk of ORN development and severity. Aims: The purposes of this study were to present the data of the patients that were treated for ORN in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Munich (LMU), to detect factors that contributed to the onset of ORN, to identify risk factors associated with the severity of ORN and finally, to delineate and correlate these factors with the personal, health and treatment characteristics of the patients. Material and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted during the period from January 2003 until December 2012 that included all ORN cases having been treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Munich (LMU). The total sample was categorized in three groups according to stage and several variables were evaluated in an attempt to identify possible correlations between them and the necrosis severity. Results: One hundred and fifty three cases of ORN were documented. Among them, 23 (15.1%) cases were stage I, 31 (20.2%) were stage II and 99 (64.7%) were stage III and all localised in the mandible. There was a predominance of the disease in the posterior region when compared to the anterior region. The majority of cases was addicted to alcohol and tobacco abuse and was suffering from Diabetes Mellitus (DM). All cases were treated with RT and 80.4% of them with concomitant chemotherapy. The initial tumor was predominantly located in the floor of the mouth, the tongue and the pharynx. Approximately two thirds of the cases occured either after dental treatment or due to a local pathological condition. Logistic regression analysis identified Diabetes Mellitus (OR: 4.955, 95% Cl: 1.965-12.495), active smoking (OR: 13.542, 95% Cl: 2.085-87.947), excessive

  2. Clinical presentation and risk factors of osteoradionecrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the jaws is defined as exposed irradiated bone that fails to heal over a period of 3 months without the evidence of a persisting or recurrent tumor. In the previous decades, numerous factors were associated with the risk of ORN development and severity. Aims: The purposes of this study were to present the data of the patients that were treated for ORN in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Munich (LMU), to detect factors that contributed to the onset of ORN, to identify risk factors associated with the severity of ORN and finally, to delineate and correlate these factors with the personal, health and treatment characteristics of the patients. Material and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted during the period from January 2003 until December 2012 that included all ORN cases having been treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Munich (LMU). The total sample was categorized in three groups according to stage and several variables were evaluated in an attempt to identify possible correlations between them and the necrosis severity. Results: One hundred and fifty three cases of ORN were documented. Among them, 23 (15.1%) cases were stage I, 31 (20.2%) were stage II and 99 (64.7%) were stage III and all localised in the mandible. There was a predominance of the disease in the posterior region when compared to the anterior region. The majority of cases was addicted to alcohol and tobacco abuse and was suffering from Diabetes Mellitus (DM). All cases were treated with RT and 80.4% of them with concomitant chemotherapy. The initial tumor was predominantly located in the floor of the mouth, the tongue and the pharynx. Approximately two thirds of the cases occured either after dental treatment or due to a local pathological condition. Logistic regression analysis identified Diabetes Mellitus (OR: 4.955, 95% Cl: 1.965-12.495), active smoking (OR: 13.542, 95% Cl: 2.085-87.947), excessive

  3. Assessment and Imaging of the Cerebrovascular Glycocalyx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeren, Roel Hubert Louis; van de Ven, Steffi Elisabeth Maria; van Zandvoort, Marcus Anna Maria Jacobus; Vink, Hans; van Overbeeke, Jacobus Johannes; Hoogland, Govert; Rijkers, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The glycocalyx is a gel-like layer lining the luminal surface of the endothelium. The glycocalyx exerts an important barrier role because it prevents exposure of plasma components to the endothelial surface. Disruption of the glycocalyx by local inflammation or ischemia results in decreased glycocalyx thickness which is associated with a number of vascular diseases. The cerebrovascular glycocalyx has sparsely been studied, but is of great interest because of its potential role in cerebrovascular disease. In this review, we describe all existing techniques to visualize the glycocalyx and designate techniques that may be suitable for studying the cerebrovascular glycocalyx. A total of seven imaging techniques are discussed thoroughly, including transmission electron microscopy, intravital microscopy, micro-particle image velocimetry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, two-photon laser scanning microscopy, orthogonal polarization spectral imaging and sidestream dark field/oblique imaging. Measurement of serum concentrations of glycocalyx-specific constituents is another method for glycocalyx analysis. Also, we have reviewed the methods of glycocalyx analysis by using these imaging techniques. So far, the cerebrovascular glycocalyx has only been studied in vitro. However, other cerebral microcirculatory properties have been studied in vivo. This suggests that the cerebrovascular glycocalyx can be studied in vivo by using some of the described techniques, when specific software is subjoined to the analysis. In conclusion, we have summarized techniques available for glycocalyx assessment, and explained the significance and technical possibilities regarding cerebrovascular glycocalyx visualization. Cerebrovascular glycocalyx assessment would add valuable information to our understanding of the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular disease. Moreover, as a part of the blood-brain barrier, more knowledge on the cerebrovascular glycocalyx may lead to better understanding of

  4. Risk factors in childrenwith platelet refractoriness

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    Jonliberti Purba Sri Mulatsih Neti Nurani, Teguh Triyono

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Platelet transfusions are often performed in pediatric patients. Nevertheless, platelet transfusion has its own risk and it alsoincrease the cost of care. Therefore,its effectiveness needs to be evaluated. This study aimed to assess the clinical risk factors namely sepsis, splenomegaly, DIC, severe bleeding and the history of platelet transfusion in the incidence of refractory platelets. This was a case-control study conducted during the period of August 2010 to September 2011.From a total of 1403 cases of transfusion, there were 86 incidences of refractory and 86 of nonrefractory. From the bivariate analysis, it was obtained that sepsis [OR 5.91 (2.90-12.05], p = 0.000], splenomegaly [OR 2.82 (1.32-6.04.12, p = 0006] heavy bleeding [OR 8:41 (4.19-16.871, p = 0.000 ], DIC [OR 22.96 (6.73-78.35, p = 0.000] and the history of platelet transfusions [OR 5:33 (2.78-10.23, p = 0.000] increase the risk of refractory platelets. On multivariate analysis, sepsis (OR 2.96 [95% CI: 1:19 to 7:32], p = 0019, splenomegaly (OR 3.94 [95% CI: 2:21 to 16:00], p = 0.000, severe bleeding (OR 3:53 [95% CI : 1.40-8.89], p = 0.008, DIC (5:54 OR [95% CI: 1.29-22.75], p = 0021 and platelet transfusion the history (OR 2.84 [95% CI: 2.74-9.77], p = 0.001 were the independent risk factors for the occurrence of children refractory. In conclusion, sepsis, splenomegaly, severe bleeding, DIC, andthe history of platelet transfusion are the risk factors in pediatric patients refractory platelets. ABSTRAKTransfusitrombositseringdilakukanpadapasienanak.Transfusitrombositsendirimemilikirisikoterhadappasiendanmenambahbiayaperawatan, sehinggaperludievaluasiefektifitasnya.Menilaifaktorrisikoklinisyakni sepsis, splenomegali, DIC, pendarahanberatdanriwayattransfusitrombositterhadapkejadianrefraktertrombosit.Penelitianinimerupakanpenelitiankasuskontroluntukmenilaifaktorrisikoterjadinyarefraktertrombositseperti sepsis, DIC, splenomegali, pendarahanberat, riwayattransfusitrombosit

  5. Risk factor profile in retinal detachment

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    Azad Raj

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available 150 cases of retinal detachment comprising 50 patients each of bilateral retinal detachment, unilateral retinal detachment without any retinal lesions in the fellow eve and unilateral retinal detachment with retinal lesions in the fellow eye were studied and the various associated risk factors were statistically analysed. The findings are discussed in relation to their aetiological and prognostic significance in the different types of retinal detachment. Based on these observations certain guidelines are offered which may be of value in decision making, in prophylactic detachment surgery. Tractional breaks in the superior temporal quadrant especially when symptomatic. mandate prophylactic treatment. Urgency is enhanced it′ the patient is aphakic. Associated myopia adds to the urgency. The higher incidence of initial right e′ e involvement in all groups suggests a vascular original possibly ischaemic.

  6. Competing hazards with shared unmeasured risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D H; Axinn, W G; Thornton, A

    1993-01-01

    "The present paper develops a generalization of the standard discrete-time competing hazards model that allows for the types of stochastic dependencies resulting from shared unmeasured risk factors. An empirical example is provided using the process by which young women form their first conjugal residential union, with married and unmarried cohabitation representing the competing alternatives. The results suggest considerable and significant similarity of the alternatives in terms of the unmeasurables. It is also shown that, as a result, the independence assumption leads to substantially biased estimates of the net marriage and net cohabitation survival functions." The data concern a cohort of white children born in Detroit, Michigan, in 1961 and their mothers, followed up to 1985. PMID:12318164

  7. Risk factors of post renal transplant hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well recognized that patients with end stage renal diseases (ESRD) have hyper-plastic parathyroid glands. In most patients, a decrease in parathyroid hormone (PTH) occurs by about 1 year after renal transplantation. However, some renal transplant recipients continue to have elevated level of PTH. We prospectively evaluated 121 patients undergoing renal transplantation between August 2000 and 2002. The duration of dialysis, calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), albumin, creatinine and iPTH levels were recorded prior to transplantation and three months and one year after transplantation. These 121 patients were on dialysis for an average period of 17.4 months prior to transplantation. An increase in the serum Ca and a decrease in serum P and iPTH level was seen in the patients after transplantation (P< 0.001). Hyperparathyroidism was in 12 (9.9%) and 7 (5.7%) patients three months and one year after transplantation respectively. Elderly patients and patients with longer duration on dialysis had an increased risk of developing post transplant hyperparathyroidism and hypercalcemia in the first year post transplant (P< 0.05). In conclusion age and duration on dialysis before transplantation seems to be important risk factors for post transplant hyperparathyroidism. (author)

  8. Risk factors for caries - control and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melida Hasanagić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate a prevalence of caries, filled permanentand extracted permanent teeth, as well as caries risk factors inschool children aged 7, 9 and 11.Methods. The survey included 800 children (296 children aged7; 254 children aged 9 and 250 children aged 11 from the MostarMunicipality, 400 of them living in both rural and urban areas.A dental mirror and standard light of dental chair were used forexamination. The DMF index (Dental Caries, Missing Teeth andFilled Teeth was determined, as well as failure in keeping teethhygiene, sugar intake with food, and incidence of oral cavity infection.Results. The dental state of permanent teeth in children aged 7and 9 has shown significant difference between the children fromrural and urban areas (p < 0,001. Out of 2,698 and 2,790 permanentteeth in children aged 11 from rural and urban areas, 1,086(40,25 % and 884 (31.68 % had caries, respectively (p < 0.01.The difference between these groups of children has been foundin relation to the index of oral hygiene too (p < 0.05.Conclusion. An identification of risk groups for getting caries wasvery important and could help health and social structures to maintaintheir programs in order to improve oral health.

  9. Risk factors for ocular toxoplasmosis in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, A I C; De Mattos, C C Brandão; Frederico, F B; Meira, C S; Almeida, G C; Nakashima, F; Bernardo, C R; Pereira-Chioccola, V L; De Mattos, L C

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate risk factors for ocular toxoplasmosis (OT) in patients who received medical attention at a public health service. Three hundred and forty-nine consecutive patients, treated in the Outpatient Eye Clinic of Hospital de Base, São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo state, Brazil, were enrolled in this study. After an eye examination, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies. The results showed that 25.5% of the patients were seronegative and 74.5% were seropositive for IgG anti-T. gondii antibodies; of these 27.3% had OT and 72.7% had other ocular diseases (OOD). The presence of cats or dogs [odds ratio (OR) 2.22, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.24-3.98, P = 0.009] and consumption of raw or undercooked meat (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.05-2.98, P = 0.03) were associated with infection but not with the development of OT. Age (OT 48.2 ± 21.2 years vs. OOD: 69.5 ± 14.7 years, P dogs and cats as well as eating raw/undercooked meat increases the risk of infection, but is not associated with the development of OT. PMID:23507508

  10. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebrovascular Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Bembibre Taboada

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebrovascular Disease Treatment. Even when this term makes reference to the whole process affecting part of cerebral vessel system and cerebral tissue, this document focuses on the cerebrovascular or acute neurological event abruptly affecting the cerebral tissue and the neurological condition of the patient. This condition is usually cause by an abrupt vessel occlusion, of thrombotic or embolic origin, or by subarachnoid or intraventricular intraparenchymatous hemorrhage, of aneurism origin, related with hypertension or with a tumour or arteriovenous defects. The main concepts, classification and conduct are reviewed, stressing the cerebrovascular accident. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  11. Familial Recurrence of Cerebral Palsy with Multiple Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence P. Richer; Dower, Nancy A.; Norma Leonard; Chan, Alicia K. J.; Robertson, Charlene M. T.

    2012-01-01

    The recurrence of cerebral palsy in the same family is uncommon. We, however, report on two families with two or more affected siblings. In both families, numerous potential risk factors were identified including environmental, obstetric, and possible maternal effects. We hypothesize that multiple risk factors may lead to the increased risk of recurrence of cerebral palsy in families. Intrinsic and maternal risk factors should be investigated in all cases of cerebral palsy to properly counsel...

  12. Risk factors for small-vessel disease revealed by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Shinya; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Shigenobu [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Tanaka, Eiji

    1996-02-01

    In total, 133 patients with asymptomatic or symptomatic cerebral infarction were randomly selected for the study (64 males, 69 females). Among them 91 patients had a history of symptomatic cerebral infarction, 46 patients of hypertension, and 28 patients of diabetes mellitus. The MRI scans were reviewed for areas with increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The grade of periventricular lesions, and the number of small infarctions in the subcortical white matter, basal ganglia and brain stem increased significantly with advancing age. It was thus reconfirmed that age is an important risk for demonstrating small-vessel disease on brain MRI. In addition, the degree of small-vessel disease on brain MRI was more extensive in patients with symptomatic cerebral infarction than with asymptomatic cerebral infarction. The detailed results suggest that small-vessel disease on brain MRI in patients with asymptomatic cerebral infarction might represent preclinical lesions for symptomatic cerebral infarction. The numbers of small infarctions in both the subcortical white matter and basal ganglia associated with advancing age, and histories of cerebrovascular accident and hypertension, suggest that common underlying mechanisms may exist in small-vessel disease in both the medullary arteries, which arise from cortical arteries, and perforating arteries. In the subcortical white matter, the number of patchy lesions was more strongly correlated with histories of hypertension and diabetes mellitus than was the number of spotty lesions, suggesting that the risk factors differed depending on the size of the lesions. The present study revealed that the degree of small-vessel disease on brain MRI was not correlated with the serum concentration of total cholesterol, triglyceride or HDL-cholesterol. The data thus indicate that the risk factors for small-vessel disease are distinct from those for large-vessel disease. (J.P.N.)

  13. Risk factors for small-vessel disease revealed by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In total, 133 patients with asymptomatic or symptomatic cerebral infarction were randomly selected for the study (64 males, 69 females). Among them 91 patients had a history of symptomatic cerebral infarction, 46 patients of hypertension, and 28 patients of diabetes mellitus. The MRI scans were reviewed for areas with increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The grade of periventricular lesions, and the number of small infarctions in the subcortical white matter, basal ganglia and brain stem increased significantly with advancing age. It was thus reconfirmed that age is an important risk for demonstrating small-vessel disease on brain MRI. In addition, the degree of small-vessel disease on brain MRI was more extensive in patients with symptomatic cerebral infarction than with asymptomatic cerebral infarction. The detailed results suggest that small-vessel disease on brain MRI in patients with asymptomatic cerebral infarction might represent preclinical lesions for symptomatic cerebral infarction. The numbers of small infarctions in both the subcortical white matter and basal ganglia associated with advancing age, and histories of cerebrovascular accident and hypertension, suggest that common underlying mechanisms may exist in small-vessel disease in both the medullary arteries, which arise from cortical arteries, and perforating arteries. In the subcortical white matter, the number of patchy lesions was more strongly correlated with histories of hypertension and diabetes mellitus than was the number of spotty lesions, suggesting that the risk factors differed depending on the size of the lesions. The present study revealed that the degree of small-vessel disease on brain MRI was not correlated with the serum concentration of total cholesterol, triglyceride or HDL-cholesterol. The data thus indicate that the risk factors for small-vessel disease are distinct from those for large-vessel disease. (J.P.N.)

  14. Periodontitis as a Risk Factor of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirina Bartova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the amount of evidence corroborating an association between dental plaque bacteria and coronary diseases that develop as a result of atherosclerosis has increased. These findings have brought a new aspect to the etiology of the disease. There are several mechanisms by which dental plaque bacteria may initiate or worsen atherosclerotic processes: activation of innate immunity, bacteremia related to dental treatment, and direct involvement of mediators activated by dental plaque and involvement of cytokines and heat shock proteins from dental plaque bacteria. There are common predisposing factors which influence both periodontitis and atherosclerosis. Both diseases can be initiated in early childhood, although the first symptoms may not appear until adulthood. The formation of lipid stripes has been reported in 10-year-old children and the increased prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents is a risk factor contributing to lipid stripes development. Endothelium damage caused by the formation of lipid stripes in early childhood may lead to bacteria penetrating into blood circulation after oral cavity procedures for children as well as for patients with aggressive and chronic periodontitis.

  15. Cold - an underrated risk factor for health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are responsible for around 20% of all deaths worldwide (approximately 14 million) and are the principal cause of death in all developed countries, accounting for 50% of all deaths. Variations in the annual per capita death rates in different countries are well documented. Less well known are seasonal variations in death rates, with the highest levels occurring during the colder winter months, which have been described in many countries. This phenomenon is referred to as excess winter mortality. CVD-related deaths account for the majority of excess winter deaths (up to 70% in some countries), while about half of the remaining are due to increases in respiratory diseases. Paradoxically, CVD mortality increases to a greater extent with a given fall in temperature in regions with warm winters. While much of the indirect evidence points to the notion that cold is somehow involved in explaining excess winter deaths, the mechanism by which seemingly mild exposure to cold ambient conditions can increase the risk of death remains unclear. The strong indirect epidemiological evidence coupling cold climate to mortality may be related to indoor rather than outdoor climatic conditions (e.g., cold/damp houses versus arm/dry houses) coupled with a plethora of factors including health status, ageing-related deterioration in physiological and behavioral thermoregulation, toxicology, and socioeconomic factors

  16. [Epidemiology and risk factors of testicular tumours].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowski, Piotr; Starosławska, Elżbieta; Szumiło, Justyna; Jankiewicz, Małgorzata; Kozłowska, Magdalena; Burdan, Franciszek

    2016-04-01

    Testicular tumours are rare neoplasms, which most commonly affects men aged 25 to 35 years. Among young adult males it is the most common cause of testicular swelling. In recent decades, the number of cases of testicular tumours has greatly increased. The most significant predisposing factors are cryptorchidism and some endocrine disorders, especially increased levels of gonadotropins and female sex hormones. Testicular trauma, inguinal hernia, extreme values of body mass index (BMI), high-calorie diet rich in dairy products as well as high social status are also regarded as risk factors. Furthermore, some chromosomal abnormalities like increased number of chromosomes 7, 8. 12, 21 and X, loss of chromosomes 4, 5, 11, 13, 18, or Y, mutation in the gene Xq27; as well as multiplied copy of the gene i(12p) are associated with tumor development. It has been proven that high testosterone levels and regular physical activity may prevent testicular tumours. Since one of the first sign the lesion is often a lump or swelling of the testis and the appearance of abnormal structure in the scrotum routine testicular self-examination seems to be important in early detection. In all suspected cases an immediate ultrasound examination of both testicles is highly recommended. It is also advised to conduct a computerized tomography (CT) and a positron emission tomography (PET) scan for staging of the tumor to select the best mode of treatment. PMID:27137819

  17. Cerebral blood flow in sickle cell cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been studied by the xenon-133 (133Xe) inhalation method in 16 children with suspected sickle cell cerebrovascular disease. Abnormalities consisting of decreases in total, hemispheral, or regional CBF were found in 17 of 26 studies. Eleven studies performed immediately after stroke, transient ischemic attack, or depression of state of alertness showed abnormalities. In addition to confirming regional cerebrovascular insufficiency in children with stroke due to major cerebral artery occlusion, the method detected diffuse decrease in CBF in children with stupor, coma, and seizures who had normal angiographic findings. In contrast, six of seven studies obtained after exchange transfusion or during maintenance on hypertransfusion therapy showed normal findings. The difference between results in patients with acute neurologic disturbances and those receiving transfusion therapy was statistically significant (P less than .005). The data indicate that the 133Xe method reliably demonstrates cerebrovascular impairment in sickle cell disease. They also suggest that CBF changes in patients with sickle cell disease can be reversed by exchange transfusion and by hypertransfusion therapy. The 133Xe CBF method may be useful for following up children with sickle cell disease who are at high risk for recurrent stroke

  18. Intermittent hypoxia training protects cerebrovascular function in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukhina, Eugenia B; Downey, H Fred; Shi, Xiangrong; Mallet, Robert T

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of death and disability among older adults. Modifiable vascular risk factors for AD (VRF) include obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, and metabolic syndrome. Here, interactions between cerebrovascular function and development of AD are reviewed, as are interventions to improve cerebral blood flow and reduce VRF. Atherosclerosis and small vessel cerebral disease impair metabolic regulation of cerebral blood flow and, along with microvascular rarefaction and altered trans-capillary exchange, create conditions favoring AD development. Although currently there are no definitive therapies for treatment or prevention of AD, reduction of VRFs lowers the risk for cognitive decline. There is increasing evidence that brief repeated exposures to moderate hypoxia, i.e. intermittent hypoxic training (IHT), improve cerebral vascular function and reduce VRFs including systemic hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, and mental stress. In experimental AD, IHT nearly prevented endothelial dysfunction of both cerebral and extra-cerebral blood vessels, rarefaction of the brain vascular network, and the loss of neurons in the brain cortex. Associated with these vasoprotective effects, IHT improved memory and lessened AD pathology. IHT increases endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO), thereby increasing regional cerebral blood flow and augmenting the vaso- and neuroprotective effects of endothelial NO. On the other hand, in AD excessive production of NO in microglia, astrocytes, and cortical neurons generates neurotoxic peroxynitrite. IHT enhances storage of excessive NO in the form of S-nitrosothiols and dinitrosyl iron complexes. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD, and IHT reduces oxidative stress in a number of experimental pathologies. Beneficial effects of IHT in experimental neuropathologies other than AD, including dyscirculatory encephalopathy, ischemic stroke injury, audiogenic

  19. FastStats: Cerebrovascular Disease or Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit Button NCHS Home Cerebrovascular Disease or Stroke Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Morbidity Number of adults who ever had a stroke: 6.3 million Percent of adults who ever ...

  20. Pharmacological undertreatment of coronary risk factors in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, Ole; Skov, Lone; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Kristensen, Søren Lund; Iversen, Lars; Lasthein, Stine; Gniadecki, Robert; Dam, Tomas Norman; Torp-Pedersen, Christian Tobias; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2012-01-01

    Patients with psoriasis have increased prevalence of coronary risk factors and limited recent results have suggested that these risk factors are undertreated in patients with psoriasis. This may contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases observed in patients with psoriasis....

  1. Factors Associated with Sexual Risk-Taking Behaviors among Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luster, Tom; Small, Stephen A.

    1994-01-01

    Describes investigation examining factors that distinguish between sexually active adolescents who are at risk for pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases and those who are at lower risk for these outcomes. Suggests factors associated with sexual risk taking include low GPA, frequent alcohol consumption, and low levels of parental…

  2. Low-risk factor profile, estrogen levels, and breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Hansen, Ase Marie; Nielsen, Jens;

    2008-01-01

    Obesity, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity and postmenopausal hormone use are known modifiable risk factors for breast cancer. We aim to measure incidence rates of breast cancer for women with favorable levels on all 4 risk factors (BMI......Obesity, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity and postmenopausal hormone use are known modifiable risk factors for breast cancer. We aim to measure incidence rates of breast cancer for women with favorable levels on all 4 risk factors (BMI...

  3. Clinic Practical Guides for Cerebrovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Angel Buergo Zuaznábar; Otman Fernández Concepción; Jesús Pérez Nellar; Gloria Lara Fernández; Carlos Maya Entenza; Alejandro Pando Cabrera

    2007-01-01

    The clinic practical guides for cerebrovascular diseases are presented. They include different aspects as its concept, classification, and epidemiological data in Cuba as well as worldwide. They also offer its diagnosis, classification, complications and treatment. The frequency of assessment of its application including the tools to measure the quality of life in patients with cerebrovascular accident and the way to proceed with them are shown

  4. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebrovascular Disease Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Rubén Bembibre Taboada; Diosdania Alfonso Falcón; Julio Héctor Jova Dueñas; Tania Pérez Ramos

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebrovascular Disease Treatment. Even when this term makes reference to the whole process affecting part of cerebral vessel system and cerebral tissue, this document focuses on the cerebrovascular or acute neurological event abruptly affecting the cerebral tissue and the neurological condition of the patient. This condition is usually cause by an abrupt vessel occlusion, of thrombotic or embolic origin, or by subarachnoid or intraventricular intraparenchymat...

  5. Childhood risk factors for developing fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivieri P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Olivieri,1 Bruce Solitar,2,* Michel Dubois3,*1NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Rheumatology, 3Department of Pain Management, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Fibromyalgia is a disease process without an obvious etiology. While some evidence suggests that adverse experiences in childhood contribute to its development, specific evidence has been equivocal.Methods: A total of 36 patients with fibromyalgia from the greater New York area were recruited and surveyed using the Centers for Disease Control's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, and questions from the section on adverse childhood experiences were administered. The results were compared to those obtained from over 400,000 people surveyed by the Centers for Disease control each year, and were monitored for statistically significant differences.Results: A statistically significant difference was noted among the control group, suggesting that individuals reported growing up with someone who was depressed when the respondents were between the ages of 0 and 18 years old. Moreover, respondents reported that they were hit by their parents in some way, were insulted or cursed at by their parents, and had been forced to have sex with someone at least 5 years older than them or with an adult. No correlation was found with the following variables and the development of fibromyalgia: growing up with divorced or separated parents; growing up with someone sentenced to serve time in jail; or having parents that abused each other. Additionally, statistically significant differences were found for the following categories: lack of emotional support; life dissatisfaction; fair or poor health; physical, mental or emotional disability; and being divorced or not married.Discussion: Using this well-validated survey, it became clear that at least six specific adverse childhood

  6. Hipertensión arterial sistólica. Impacto sobre la enfermedad cerebrovascular.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María C. Valle Campo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento: La aterosclerosis es un proceso multifactorial sobre el cual actúan varios factores de riesgo. Constituye la principal causa de muerte y de morbilidad en ingresados hospitalarios, y puede ocasionar una acentuada disminución del flujo sanguíneo hacia todos los órganos del cuerpo humano
    Objetivo
    : Determinar el impacto de la hipertensión arterial sistólica sobre la enfermedad cerebrovascular.
    Métodos
    : Se realizó un estudio transversal, observacional y analítico, en 59 fallecidos hipertensos. Se analizaron las arterias cerebrales y se cuantificó la lesión aterosclerótica y su variedad, aplicándose el sistema aterométrico, teniendo en cuenta los tipos de hipertensión arterial. Se emplearon procedimientos estadísticos (medidas de tendencia central y comparativos (prueba de comparación de media aritmética basadas en el test “t” de student.
    Resultados: Los infartos cerebrales recientes fueron más frecuentes en hipertensos sistodiastólicos. No hubo diferencia significativa en cuanto a la edad en el momento de aparición de las lesiones para ambos sexos, pero las mujeres con hipertensión sistólica, fueron significativamente más dañadas desde el punto de vista morfométrico. Se observó correlación significativa para ambos grupos de hipertensos entre tipo de accidente cerebrovascular y variables del sistema aterométrico. Conclusiones: La hipertensión arterial sistólica es un factor importante en la génesis de la enfermedad vasculocerebral y está asociada con la progresión de la placa de ateroma.

    SYSTOLIC HYPERTENSION. IMPACT ON CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASE

    Background: Atherosclerosis is a multifactor process in which several risk factors are involved. It is the leading cause of death and morbidity in hospital admitted patients, and it may cause

  7. FEBRILE SEIZURE: RECURRENCE AND RISK FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. TALEBIAN

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:Febrile Convulsion is the most common convulsive disorder in children,occurring in 2 to 4% of the pediatric population and recurring in 30-50% of cases. Considering the varying recurrence rates reported, thisstudy was conducted at the pediatric ward of the Shaheed BeheshtiGeneral Hospital, between 2000-2001 to determine the frequencyof recurrence and related risk factors in children presenting with theirfirst episode of febrile convulsionMaterials & Methods:A two–year cohort study was performed on 50 children presentingwith the first attack of febrile convulsion. Patient demographic dataincluding age, sex, type and duration of seizure, family history offebrile seizure or epilepsy and the interval between fever onset andoccurrence of seizure were recorded in questionnaires. Those patients,for whom prophylactic medication was not administered, werefollowed at three–month intervals for up to one year. Findings werestatistically analyzed using Fisher’s exact testResults:Recurrence was observed in twelve children (24% out of the fifty,being most common in patients aged less than one year (54.4%.Recurrence rates among children with a positive family history offebrile convulsion, presence of complex febrile seizure and positivefamily history of epilepsy were 42.1%, 42.8% and 25% respectively.From among those children with a “less than one hour” intervalbetween fever onset and occurrence of seizure, recurrence occurredin 43-7% of cases, while in those with a “more than one hourinterval”, 14.7% experienced recurrence.Conclusion:Recurrence rates are increased by certain factors including age-belowone year-, positive family history of febrile convulsion, and a “lessthan one hour” interval between time of fever onset and seizureoccurrence.

  8. Carotid artery calcification at the initiation of hemodialysis is a risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with end-stage renal disease: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikeda Hirofumi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular calcification has been recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular (CV events in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. However, the association of carotid artery calcification (CAAC with CV events remains unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether CAAC is associated with composite CV events in ESRD patients. Methods One-hundred thirty-three patients who had been started on hemodialysis between 2004 and 2008 were included in this retrospective cohort study. These patients received multi-detector computed tomography to assess CAAC at the initiation of hemodialysis. Composite CV events, including ischemic heart disease, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, and CV deaths after the initiation of hemodialysis, were examined in each patient. Results CAAC was found in 94 patients (71%. At the end of follow-up, composite CV events were seen in 47 patients: ischemic heart disease in 20, heart failure in 8, cerebrovascular disease in 12, and CV deaths in 7. The incidence of CAAC was 87% in patients with CV events, which was significantly higher than the rate (62% in those without. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significant increase in composite CV events in patients with CAAC compared with those without CAAC (p = 0.001, log-rank test. Univariate analysis using a Cox hazards model showed that age, smoking, common carotid artery intima-media thickness and CAAC were risk factors for composite CV events. In multivariate analysis, only CAAC was a significant risk factor for composite CV events (hazard ratio, 2.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-8.00; p = 0.02. Conclusions CAAC is an independent risk factor for CV events in ESRD patients. The assessment of CAAC at the initiation of hemodialysis is useful for predicting the prognosis.

  9. Colorectal Cancer Epidemiology: Incidence, Mortality, Survival, and Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Haggar, Fatima A.; Boushey, Robin P.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the incidence, mortality, and survival rates for colorectal cancer are reviewed, with attention paid to regional variations and changes over time. A concise overview of known risk factors associated with colorectal cancer is provided, including familial and hereditary factors, as well as environmental lifestyle-related risk factors such as physical inactivity, obesity, smoking, and alcohol consumption.

  10. Risk Factors and Behaviors Associated with Adolescent Violence and Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valois, Robert F.; MacDonald, John M.; Bretous, Lena; Fischer, Megan A.; Drane, J. Wanzer

    2002-01-01

    Reviews relevant research to examine risk factors and behaviors associated with adolescent aggression and violence. Adolescent aggression and violence develop and manifest within a complex constellation of factors (individual, family, school/academic, peer-related, community and neighborhood, and situational). Different risk factors are more…

  11. Clinician Perceptions of Childhood Risk Factors for Future Antisocial Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koegl, Christopher J.; Farrington, David P.; Augimeri, Leena K.

    2009-01-01

    We asked 176 mental health clinicians to list factors that place a child at risk for engaging in future antisocial behavior. Participants were randomly assigned to do this in relationship to boys and girls. Listed factors were then coded into broad item categories using the Early Assessment Risk Lists (EARL). Of the 1,695 factors listed, 1,476…

  12. Risk factors for sepsis-associated encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Li; Ang Li; Yibing Weng; Shuwen Zhang; Meili Duan

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a diffuse and acute cerebral dysfunction caused by sepsis. Many sepsis patients exhibit acute deterioration in mental status during the early stage of disease, and central nervous system dysfunction has been shown to increase patient mortality. The present study selected 284 sepsis patients who were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, from January to December 2009. The patients were assigned to SAE and non-SAE patient groups according to SAE occurrence. SAE incidence was 37.68%, and mortality was significantly greater in SAE patients compared with non-SAE patients (41.12% vs. 17.51%, P < 0.01). Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated lower arterial partial pressure of oxygen and greater alanine aminotransferase and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores in the SAE group compared with the non-SAE group. Arterial partial pressure of oxygen, alanine aminotransferase, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores were determined to be potential risk factors for SAE.

  13. Open-Heart surgery and cerebrovascular accident: retrospective study at King Khalid University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroke after coronary by-pass grafting (CABG) is often disabling. The incidence of ischemic stroke may approach 3% to 5%. Several risk factors have been identified including previous history of stroke, prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass time, and postoperative atrial fibrillation. Objective was to determine the incidence and risk factors of neurological deficit after open heart surgery. Retrospective study was done during the period 1992-1995 at the King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. There were 350 patients who were subjected to (CABG), 10 patients (2.8%) found to suffer from cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) following open-heart surgery. In 8 patients, the complaint lasted more than 24 hours (stroke), while 2 patients developed transient ischemic attacks (TIA). Five factors were found to be associated with increased risk of post cardiac surgery CVA. These factors are postoperative atrial fibrillation, carotid bruit, past history of heart failure, past history of CVA and smoking. The authors concluded that it is necessary to start a prospective study to verify the area of improvement with regards to technique, selection of patients and mode of perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) Arabia. (author)

  14. Microbial translocation and cardiometabolic risk factors in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøseid, Marius; Manner, Ingjerd W; Pedersen, Karin K; Haissman, Judith M; Kvale, Dag; Nielsen, Susanne D

    2014-01-01

    crucial in order to tailor novel strategies for prophylaxis and treatment. This review will focus on advances in the field that possibly link HIV-induced alterations of the gut mucosa and consequent microbial translocation to cardiometabolic risk factors in HIV infection. Recent work suggests that markers...... translocation and cardiovascular risk factors will translate into increased risk of acute events, and whether strategies to target gut microbiota and microbial translocation might reduce such a risk....

  15. Psychological factors of financial risks management of budgetary process

    OpenAIRE

    Mubarakshina, Elvira; Koshkin, Irina

    2013-01-01

    In article such concepts are considered as the risk, budgetary risk, necessity of formation of system thinking at civil servants working in budgetary process. In article the concept of professional motivation for civil servants is considered. As in article necessity of the account of various psychological factors for managerial process by budgetary risks is proved and these factors are considered. In article risks in the field of public finances and a role of civil servants in the course of c...

  16. Fraud Risk Factors and Audit Programme Modifications: Evidence from Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modar Abdullatif

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explores how audit firms in Jordan deal with the presence of fraud risk factors in audit clients. In doing so, the study seeks to explore which fraud risk factors are more important to Jordanianauditors, and how Jordanian auditors consider modifying their audit programmes when fraud risk factors are present in clients. The study uses a structured questionnaire that was administered to seniorlevel auditors in the largest Jordanian audit firms. The findings show that almost all of the 20 fraud risk factors included in the questionnaire were only slightly important (if not unimportant, a finding that is arguably alarming. The perceived importance of modifying the audit programme in the presence of each fraud risk factor was related to the perceived importance of the fraud risk factor itself. However, changes in the nature and extent of audit procedures were more important than changes in the timing of the procedures or the members of the audit team. The most important fraud risk factors were related to the characteristics of management and its attitude towards the audit, while the least important fraud risk factors were related to the difficulties in the client’s financial performance. Factor analysis found that the fraud risk factors could be classified into four separate groups. Possible interpretations of the findings were discussed, such as considering the Jordanian business environment characteristics, and the findings were compared to those of extant international studies.

  17. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress

    OpenAIRE

    Milgrom Jeannette; Leigh Bronwyn

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite...

  18. CORRELATION OF RISK FACTORS WITH HPE GRADING IN BREAST CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Rudramurthy; Pradeep Kumar; Avanthi; Ira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To correlate risk factors for breast cancer with Histopathological grading. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A four year retrospective study was carried out from 2009-2012. 46 cases which were reported as breast cancer in due course were reviewed with histopathological (Scarff-Bloom-Richardson) grade of the tumor and familial, hormonal and acquired risk factors. The correlation of risk factors and the histopathological grade is done by using‘t’ test. RESULTS: Among 46 cases of breast cancer, a...

  19. Maternal Risk Factors for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    May, Philip A.; Gossage, J. Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Gathering information about drinking during pregnancy is one of the most difficult aspects of studying fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). This information is critical to linking specific risk factors to any particular diagnosis within the FASD continuum. This article reviews highlights from the literature on maternal risk factors for FASD and illustrates that maternal risk is multidimensional, including factors related to quantity, frequency, and timing of alcohol exposure; maternal age...

  20. Fraud Risk Factors and Audit Programme Modifications: Evidence from Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Modar Abdullatif

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how audit firms in Jordan deal with the presence of fraud risk factors in audit clients. In doing so, the study seeks to explore which fraud risk factors are more important to Jordanianauditors, and how Jordanian auditors consider modifying their audit programmes when fraud risk factors are present in clients. The study uses a structured questionnaire that was administered to seniorlevel auditors in the largest Jordanian audit firms. The findings show that almost all of th...

  1. Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Cardiovascular Risk Factor Management

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Puja K.; Minissian, Margo; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading health threat to American women. In addition to established risk factors for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking, and obesity, adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs) including pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, and gestational diabetes are now recognized as factors that increase a woman’s risk for future CVD. CVD risk factor burden is disproportionately higher in those of low socioeconomic status and in ethnic/racial minority women. Since younger wome...

  2. Risk Factors and Biomarkers of Ischemic Stroke in Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kwangsoo; Lee, Ji-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Stroke is common among cancer patients. However, risk factors and biomarkers of stroke in cancer patients are not well established. This study aimed to investigate risk factors and biomarkers as well as etiology of ischemic stroke in cancer patients. Methods A retrospective review was conducted in cancer patients with ischemic stroke who were admitted to a general hospital in Busan, Korea, between January 2003 and December 2012. The risk factors and biomarkers for strok...

  3. Sociodemographic Variation of Caries Risk Factors in Toddlers and Caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Eckert, G.J.; R. Jackson; Fontana, M

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. Dental caries is the most common chronic childhood disease, with numerous identified risk factors. Risk factor differences could indicate the need to target caregiver/patient education/preventive care intervention strategies based on population and/or individual characteristics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate caries risk factors differences by race/ethnicity, income, and education. Methods. We enrolled 396 caregiver-toddler pairs and administered a 105-item questionnair...

  4. Personal Factors That Influence Audit Manager’s Risk Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Ionescu Iancu Octavian; Turlea Eugeniu

    2011-01-01

    Risk is a fundamental concept in audit as well as in the business world at large. Yet, little is known about the personal factors that might influence the risk attitude of a decision maker. The business decision makers are usually faced with a degree of uncertainty when they have to assess risk and make decisions. This paper examines risk behaviour from an audit firm manager perspective and from an academic perspective. The emphasis is on the managerial risk behaviour in business decision mak...

  5. Analyzing Risk and Performance Using the Multi-Factor Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, Erik; Spronk, Jaap; Wijst, Nico

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we present a new model to analyze the risk and the expected level of firm performance. This model is based on the multi-factor approach to risk, in which unexpected performance is explained through sensitivities to unexpected changes of risk factors. Instead of using the multi-factor approach for the analysis of security portfolios, it is used to analyze performance measures of firms. In this paper the multi-factor approach is not only used to analyze risk, but also...

  6. Improving adolescents’ health by identifying behavioral risk factors and protective factors

    OpenAIRE

    Elaheh Baybordi; Zhila Khamnian; Reza Ziaei; Saeed Dastgiri

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce behavioral risk factors in the 21st century accurate and valid information is required on these factors and also about protective factors during these so called stormy years. . Attention to life-long behavioral risk factors and protective factors provides an alternative paradigm. Indeed, efforts to improve adolescent and pre-adolescent health typically features interventions designed to address specific health risk behaviors, such as physical inactivity...

  7. Staphylococcus aureus: resistance pattern and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Naghavi-Behzad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has emerged as a nosocomial pathogen of major worldwide importance and is an increasingly frequent cause of community-acquired infections. In this study, different risk factors and MRSA resistance pattern were investigated. Methods: In a 24 months period, all of the patients who were confined to bed in the surgery ward were included in the study. Then they were assessed to find out as if they had MRSA infection when hospitalized and once when they were discharged. Almost 48 h after admission, when patients were discharged, social and medical histories were acquired. Acquired samples were examined. Results: During the present study of 475 patients, 108 patients (22.8% had S. aureus. About frequency of antibiotic resistance among collected S. aureus colonies, erythromycin resistance, was the most frequent antibiotic resistance, also resistance to vancomycin was 0.4% that was the least. Only hospitalization duration had statistically significant correlation with antibiotic resistance, also resistance to erythromycin had statistically significant relation with history of surgery and alcohol consumption. Of all 34 MRSA species, 22 (64.7% samples were resistant to erythromycin, 17 (50.0% resistant to cefoxitin, 5 (14.7% resistant to mupirocin, 1 (2.9% resistant to vancomycin and 1 (2.9% resistant to linezolid. Conclusion: The results of the current study show that among hospitalized patients, there is resistance against methicillin. Since based on results of the study there is resistance against oxacillin and erythromycin in most cases, administering appropriate antibiotics have an important role in minimizing the resistance burden among bacterial species.

  8. Pediatric Nosocomial Infections; Incidence, Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Özçetin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to determine the prevalence and type of nosocomial infections, etiologic distrubition of organism in hospitalized children at Ege University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics for a 12 month period. It also investigated the duration of hospitalization. Material and Method: Patients diagnosed with nosocomial infection between January 2002-December 2002 at the inpatient unit of pediatrics were included in the study. Neonatal cases were excluded from the analysis. Diagnosis of nosocomoial infection was made based on CDC criteria. Statistical analysis was made by using SPSS 10.1 for Windows packet and p<0.05 was accepted as significant. Results: During the study period, 1811 patients were investigated and 96 nosocomial infection determined (5.3%. The majority were female at 52% (n=50. The most common infections in our study were bacteriemia and urinary tract infections, 50% and 40% respectively. Although bacteriemia was the commonest infection type in the intensive care unit, urinary tract infections were the most common infections in inpatient services. Enterobacteriaceae was the most common cause with 37.5% (n=36, coagulase negative staphylococci found in 16.4% (n=16 and yeast infection was isolated in 12.5% (n=12. The majority of patients (59.3% n=57 had one or more invasive procedures which make the patients susceptible to contracting nosocomial infections. Children who are hospitalized more than 7 days are more likely to have nosocomial infections (P<0.0001. Another predisposing factor for developing nosocomial infections was increased patient numbers receiving medical care by each nurse.Conclusion: Nosocomial infections have been increasing in pediatric patients. Long hospital stays and increased patient numbers needing medical care by each nurse were associated with nosocomial infections. They are estimated to more than double the mortality and morbidity risks of any admitted patient.

  9. HIGH SENSITIVE C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN CEREBROVASCULAR ISCHEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmalatha

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cerebrovascular ischemia is recognized as a major health problem, which causes significant morbidity and mortality. The main pathophysiology of ischemic stroke is atherosclerosis of cerebral vessels. Hs-CRP is a sensitive marker of inflammation tissue injury in the arterial wall, which contributes to atherosclerosis. In this study, we aim to investigate the association of hs-CRP in patients with ischemic stroke and to correlate hs-CRP levels with possible risk factors of ischemic stroke and to assess the prognostic value of hs-CRP in ischemic stroke. METHODS In the present case control study after meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria, 50 patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted in the medical ward, King George Hospital, during the period between April 2014 and October 2014 and 40 asymptomatic age and sex matched control subjects were included. RESULTS The mean hs-CRP value in cases is 3.78+5.28mg/dl and in controls is 0.425+0.305mg/dl. Mean hs-CRP value is higher (3.78mg/dl in cases when compared to controls (0.425mg/dl, which is statistically significant. P admitted with severe degree of weakness (0-1/5 power with mean hs-CRP value of 4.28+4.07 without significant improvement in the power at the time of discharge; 8(16%> with mean hs-CRP value of 10.43+7.74 were expired. CONCLUSION Acute ischemic patients had higher mean hs-CRP values when compared to healthy asymptomatic control subjects P0.05. Higher mean hs-CRP values were associated with poor outcome after acute ischemic stroke. P<0.001.

  10. Risk Factors of Periodontal Disease: Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef A. AlJehani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This paper aims to review the evidence on the potential roles of modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors associated with periodontal disease. Data. Original articles that reported on the risk factors for periodontal disease were included. Sources. MEDLINE (1980 to Jan 2014, PubMed (using medical subject headings, and Google Scholar were searched using the following terms in different combinations: “periodontal disease,” “periodontitis,” “risk factors,” and “causal.” This was supplemented by hand-searching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Conclusions. It is important to understand the etiological factors and the pathogenesis of periodontal disease to recognize and appreciate the associated risk factors. As periodontal disease is multifactorial, effective disease management requires a clear understanding of all the associated risk factors.

  11. Multi-factoral risk analysis and the sensitivity concept

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, Erik; Spronk, Jaap; Wijst, Nico

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn the multi-factor method unexpected performance changes are explained by sensitivities for unexpected changes of risk factors. In this paper, the following concepts used in the multi-factor method are defined: unexpected performance, risk factor, sensitivity and instruments. Furthermore, the relation between these concepts is investigated. Special attention is given to the way in which various instruments affect the sensitivity and the probability density function of unexpected ...

  12. NIRS-based noninvasive cerebrovascular regulation assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S.; Richmond, I.; Borgos, J.; Mitra, K.

    2016-03-01

    Alterations to cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been implicated in diverse neurological conditions, including mild traumatic brain injury, microgravity induced intracranial pressure (ICP) increases, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-measured regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (rSO2) provides an estimate of oxygenation of the interrogated cerebral volume that is useful in identifying trends and changes in oxygen supply to cerebral tissue and has been used to monitor cerebrovascular function during surgery and ventilation. In this study, CO2-inhalation-based hypercapnic breathing challenges were used as a tool to simulate CBF dysregulation, and NIRS was used to monitor the CBF autoregulatory response. A breathing circuit for the selective administration of CO2-compressed air mixtures was designed and used to assess CBF regulatory responses to hypercapnia in 26 healthy young adults using non-invasive methods and real-time sensors. After a 5 or 10 minute baseline period, 1 to 3 hypercapnic challenges of 5 or 10 minutes duration were delivered to each subject while rSO2, partial pressure of end tidal CO2 (PETCO2), and vital signs were continuously monitored. Change in rSO2 measurements from pre- to intrachallenge (ΔrSO2) detected periods of hypercapnic challenges. Subjects were grouped into three exercise factor levels (hr/wk), 1: 0, 2:>0 and 10. Exercise factor level 3 subjects showed significantly greater ΔrSO2 responses to CO2 challenges than level 2 and 1 subjects. No significant difference in ΔPETCO2 existed between these factor levels. Establishing baseline values of rSO2 in clinical practice may be useful in early detection of CBF changes.

  13. Gang Membership Risk Factors for Eighth-Grade Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Martinez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to identify the major risk factor domains for gang membership and the relationships of these risk factors to eighth grade students. The domains of risk factors include: individual characteristics, peer group influences, family conditions, school experiences and the community context, along with demographic information obtained from the Student Gang Survey items. Through logistic multiple regression, risk factors associated with school, peer, community-neighborhood, and family were used to predict gang membership. Demographic data were also used as predictor variables. Results indicated that an increase in Community-Neighborhood Risk was associated with a decrease in joining a gang. Non-significant findings for Peer Risk, School Risk, Family Risk and demographic variables are additionally discussed. The current research identifies issues which middle school youth encounter in a county setting; provides a homegrown report to assist stakeholders (administrators, teachers, parents, students, and law enforcement in identifying locally relevant risk factors of gang behavior; and substantiates risk factors for gang membership proliferation in those neighborhoods with no recently documented history of gangs.

  14. Risk Factors for Developing Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Carson, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    developing AD at 3 years of age. Our data suggested a strong heredity of AD and confirmed the risk associated with the non-functional FLG allele mutations after adjustments for confounders. Besides this mother's dermatitis and father's allergic rhinitis were found to increase the risk of AD. Perinatal...... 7 years follow-up period (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.05-1.99, p=0.024). The increased risk was still significant after confounder adjustment for mother's education, AD and smoking habits during the 3rd trimester. There was no association between alcohol intake during pregnancy and other atopic endpoints...

  15. Population impact of familial and environmental risk factors for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger Jelling; Nielsen, Philip Finn Rising; Pedersen, Carsten B;

    2014-01-01

    environmental risk factors. The authors present rate ratios (IRR), population-attributable risks (PAR) and sex-specific cumulative incidences of the following risk factors: parental history of mental illness, urban place of birth, advanced paternal age, parental loss and immigration status. We established a...... 4.50-5.31). The study showed that risk factors with highest predictive power on the individual level have a relatively low population impact. The challenge in future studies with direct genetic data is to examine gene-environmental interactions that can move research beyond current approaches and...

  16. Suicide Clusters: A Review of Risk Factors and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haw, Camilla; Hawton, Keith; Niedzwiedz, Claire; Platt, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Suicide clusters, although uncommon, cause great concern in the communities in which they occur. We searched the world literature on suicide clusters and describe the risk factors and proposed psychological mechanisms underlying the spatio-temporal clustering of suicides (point clusters). Potential risk factors include male gender, being an…

  17. Risk factors affecting somatosensory function after sagittal split osteotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Torben Henrik; Jensen, Allan Bardow; Helleberg, M; Norholt, SE; Jensen, John; Svensson, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate potential individual and intraoperative risk factors associated with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) and to correlate the findings with postoperative changes in somatosensory function. Patients and Methods A total of 18 men and 29 women (mean...... somatosensory function after BSSO is dependent on both intraoperative risk factors and preoperative sensation levels....

  18. FAMILY RISK FACTORS AS INDICATORS OF BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS WITH YOUTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranko KOVACHEVIKJ

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This project researches whether risk factors within family have any predictive power in describing youth behavioural problems. Family risk factors such as family functioning problems and conflicts within family have the strongest predictive power. Preventive actions and treatment must be directed toward the youth living in risky families.

  19. FAMILY RISK FACTORS AS INDICATORS OF BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS WITH YOUTH

    OpenAIRE

    KOVACHEVIKJ Ranko; BIJEDIKJ Meliha; KURALIKJ-KJISHIKJ Lejla; Edin MUFTIKJ

    2009-01-01

    This project researches whether risk factors within family have any predictive power in describing youth behavioural problems. Family risk factors such as family functioning problems and conflicts within family have the strongest predictive power. Preventive actions and treatment must be directed toward the youth living in risky families.

  20. Quantifying cardiovascular disease risk factors in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, I M; Skaaby, T; Ellervik, C;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a previous meta-analysis on categorical data we found an association between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease and associated risk factors. OBJECTIVES: To quantify the level of cardiovascular disease risk factors in order to provide additional data for the clinical management...

  1. What Are the Risk Factors for Kidney Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an oncocytoma , which is almost always benign (not cancer). Other risk factors Family history of kidney cancer People with a ... Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Kidney Cancer? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating ...

  2. Risk Factors for Attempting Suicide in Heroin Addicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Alec

    2010-01-01

    In order to examine risk factors for attempting suicide in heroin dependent patients, a group of 527 abstinent opiate dependent patients had a psychiatric interview and completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Patients who had or had never attempted suicide were compared on putative suicide risk factors. It was found that 207 of the 527…

  3. Risk factors for major amputation in hospitalised diabetic foot patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namgoong, Sik; Jung, Suyoung; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the main cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients. Eight hundred and sixty diabetic patients were admitted to the diabetic wound centre of the Korea University Guro Hospital for foot ulcers between January 2010 and December 2013. Among them, 837 patients were successfully monitored until complete healing. Ulcers in 809 patients (96·7%) healed without major amputation and those in 28 patients (3·3%) healed with major amputation. Data of 88 potential risk factors including demographics, ulcer condition, vascularity, bioburden, neurology and serology were collected from patients in the two groups and compared. Among the 88 potential risk factors, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed in 26 risk factors. In the univariate analysis, which was carried out for these 26 risk factors, statistically significant differences were observed in 22 risk factors. In a stepwise multiple logistic analysis, six of the 22 risk factors remained statistically significant. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios were 11·673 for ulcers penetrating into the bone, 8·683 for dialysis, 6·740 for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, 6·158 for hind foot ulcers, 0·641 for haemoglobin levels and 1·007 for fasting blood sugar levels. The risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients were bony invasions, dialysis, GI disorders, hind foot locations, low levels of haemoglobin and elevated fasting blood sugar levels. PMID:26478562

  4. Environmental risk factors for REM sleep behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postuma, R B; Montplaisir, J Y; Pelletier, A;

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder is a parasomnia characterized by dream enactment and is commonly a prediagnostic sign of parkinsonism and dementia. Since risk factors have not been defined, we initiated a multicenter case-control study to assess environmental and lifestyle risk factors for...... REM sleep behavior disorder....

  5. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: What Are the Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glossary Stay Informed Cancer Home What Are the Risk Factors for Colorectal Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... who are 50 years old or older. Other risk factors include having— Inflammatory bowel disease such as Crohn’s ...

  6. Risk factors for renal dysfunction after total hip joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Basim Kamil; Sahlström, Arne; Dessau, Ram Benny Christian

    2015-01-01

    , hypertension, general anesthesia, high ASA scores, low intra-operative systolic BP, and prophylactic dicloxacillin as significant risk factors. Low baseline systolic BP, low baseline diastolic blood pressure, and hip fracture diagnosis were independent risk factors for postoperative increase in serum...

  7. Psychosocial and vascular risk factors of depression in later life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldehinkel, AJ; Ormel, J; Brilman, EI; van den Berg, MD

    2003-01-01

    Background: Research on the aetiology of late-life depression has typically focused on either risk factors from the psychosocial stress-vulnerability domain or degenerative biological changes (for instance, vascular disease). We examined whether vascular risk factors could be interpreted within the

  8. Global prevalence and major risk factors of diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yau, Joanne W Y; Rogers, Sophie L; Kawasaki, Ryo;

    2012-01-01

    To examine the global prevalence and major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) among people with diabetes.......To examine the global prevalence and major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) among people with diabetes....

  9. The risk factors of colistin methanesulfonate associated nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Tükenmez Tigen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The risk factors of colistin methanesulfonate (CMS associated nephrotoxicity are important. Our study attempts look into the prevalence of CMS-associated nephrotoxicity in Intensive Care Units (ICUs, and related risk factors. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted between September 2010 and April 2012 on 55 patients who underwent CMS treatment. Nephrotoxicity risk was defined based on the Risk Injury Failure Loss End-stage kidney disease criteria. Results: Fifty-five patients included in the study. A total of 22 (40% patients developed nephrotoxicity. The correlation was detected between nephrotoxicity and patients over 65 with a high Acute Physiologic Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II score. APACHE II score was revealed an independent risk factor for nephrotoxicity. Conclusion: Advanced age and a high APACHE II score are significant risk factors in the development of nephrotoxicity at ICUs following CMS use. Patient selection and close monitoring are critical when starting CMS treatment.

  10. Risk Assessment of Girls : Are There Any Sex Differences in Risk Factors for Re-offending and in Risk Profiles?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Put, Claudia E.; Dekovic, Maja; Hoeve, Machteld; Stams, Geert Jan J. M.; van der Laan, Peter H.; Langewouters, Femke E. M.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were (a) to investigate sex differences in risk factors for re-offending and (b) to provide a risk assessment model for girls. The data of 1,396 adolescents who committed a criminal offense were examined. Both generic and sex-specific risk factors for re-offending were found.

  11. Identifying risk factors for suicide research and prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yi; 张一

    2013-01-01

    Research on risk factor for suicidal behaviors has been broadly conducted to enhance knowledge of suicide prevention. However, there are still challenges for risk factor research. Four major research gaps have been identified: (1) uncertain effectiveness of the population approach versus the high-risk approach for suicide prevention; (2) lack of a valid and convenient Chinese-version screening tool for the severity of suicidal ideation among adolescents; (3) demand for testing the prospectiv...

  12. Meat Consumption as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Neal Barnard; Susan Levin; Caroline Trapp

    2014-01-01

    Disease risk factors identified in epidemiological studies serve as important public health tools, helping clinicians identify individuals who may benefit from more aggressive screening or risk-modification procedures, allowing policymakers to prioritize intervention programs, and encouraging at-risk individuals to modify behavior and improve their health. These factors have been based primarily on evidence from cross-sectional and prospective studies, as most do not lend themselves to rando...

  13. Perinatal risk factors for asthma in Finnish adolescent twins

    OpenAIRE

    Rasanen, M.; Kaprio, J.; Laitinen, T.; Winter, T.; Koskenvuo, M.; Laitinen, L

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Previous studies have suggested that, in addition to genetic liability and environment in early childhood, intrauterine life also influences the risk for asthma beyond childhood. Low birth weight, prematurity, young maternal age, and maternal smoking have all shown an association with asthma. The effect of perinatal factors on the risk for asthma in relation to familial and social risk factors was studied in a nationwide population-based sample of adolescent tw...

  14. Risk Factors for Hyperglycaemia in Pregnancy in Tamil Nadu, India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Nielsen, Karoline Kragelund

    2016-01-01

    Nadu, India. Methodology Pregnant women underwent a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Data on potential risk factors was collected and analysed using logistical regression analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, sensitivity, specificity and predictive values were calculated for......Abstract Introduction Hyperglycaemia in pregnancy (HIP), i.e. gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and diabetes in pregnancy (DIP), increases the risk of various short- and long-term adverse outcomes. However, much remains to be understood about the role of different risk factors in development of...... HIP. Objective The aims of this observational study were to examine the role of potential risk factors for HIP, and to investigate whether any single or accumulated risk factor(s) could be used to predict HIP among women attending GDM screening at three centres in urban, semi-urban and rural Tamil...

  15. Yoga, Anxiety, and Some Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim CENGIZ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the effects of a yoga program on anxiety, and some cardiovascular risk factors. Forty - six elderly participants aged 40 – 51 years women. The yoga program was based on 3 times/week for 10 weeks a set of yoga techniques, in the form of asana (postures and deep relaxation technique, pranayama (breathing techniques and meditation three for 60 minutes three times a week. The level of anxiety and decreased the risk factors for cardiovascular disease risk factors (CVD. The yoga program reduced the level of anxiety and decreased the risk factors for cardiovascular disease risk factors (CVD in the experimental group. After 8 weeks of the yoga program. SBP, DBP, B MI, HR and WC values were improved. It is likely that the yoga practices of controlling body, mind, and spirit combine to provide useful physiological effects for healthy people and for people compromised by cardiovascular disease.

  16. Risk Factors for Hyperglycaemia in Pregnancy in Tamil Nadu, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline Kragelund Nielsen

    Full Text Available Hyperglycaemia in pregnancy (HIP, i.e. gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM and diabetes in pregnancy (DIP, increases the risk of various short- and long-term adverse outcomes. However, much remains to be understood about the role of different risk factors in development of HIP.The aims of this observational study were to examine the role of potential risk factors for HIP, and to investigate whether any single or accumulated risk factor(s could be used to predict HIP among women attending GDM screening at three centres in urban, semi-urban and rural Tamil Nadu, India.Pregnant women underwent a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Data on potential risk factors was collected and analysed using logistical regression analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves, sensitivity, specificity and predictive values were calculated for significant risk factors and a risk factor scoring variable was constructed.HIP was prevalent in 18.9% of the study population (16.3% GDM; 2.6% DIP. Increasing age and BMI as well as having a mother only or both parents with diabetes were significant independent risk factors for HIP. Among women attending the rural health centre a doubling of income corresponded to an 80% increased risk of HIP (OR 1.80, 95%CI 1.10-2.93; p = 0.019, whereas it was not significantly associated with HIP among women attending the other health centres. The performance of the individual risk factors and the constructed scoring variable differed substantially between the three health centres, but none of them were good enough to discriminate between those with and without HIP.The findings highlight the importance of socio-economic circumstances and intergenerational risk transmission in the occurrence of HIP as well as the need for universal screening.

  17. Risk Factors for Hyperglycaemia in Pregnancy in Tamil Nadu, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragelund Nielsen, Karoline; Damm, Peter; Kapur, Anil; Balaji, Vijayam; Balaji, Madhuri S.; Seshiah, Veerasamy; Bygbjerg, Ib C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hyperglycaemia in pregnancy (HIP), i.e. gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and diabetes in pregnancy (DIP), increases the risk of various short- and long-term adverse outcomes. However, much remains to be understood about the role of different risk factors in development of HIP. Objective The aims of this observational study were to examine the role of potential risk factors for HIP, and to investigate whether any single or accumulated risk factor(s) could be used to predict HIP among women attending GDM screening at three centres in urban, semi-urban and rural Tamil Nadu, India. Methodology Pregnant women underwent a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Data on potential risk factors was collected and analysed using logistical regression analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, sensitivity, specificity and predictive values were calculated for significant risk factors and a risk factor scoring variable was constructed. Results HIP was prevalent in 18.9% of the study population (16.3% GDM; 2.6% DIP). Increasing age and BMI as well as having a mother only or both parents with diabetes were significant independent risk factors for HIP. Among women attending the rural health centre a doubling of income corresponded to an 80% increased risk of HIP (OR 1.80, 95%CI 1.10–2.93; p = 0.019), whereas it was not significantly associated with HIP among women attending the other health centres. The performance of the individual risk factors and the constructed scoring variable differed substantially between the three health centres, but none of them were good enough to discriminate between those with and without HIP. Conclusions The findings highlight the importance of socio-economic circumstances and intergenerational risk transmission in the occurrence of HIP as well as the need for universal screening. PMID:26991305

  18. Behavioral Risk Factors: Selected Metropolitan Area Risk Trends (SMART) MMSA Prevalence Data (2010 and Prior)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2002-2010. BRFSS SMART MMSA Prevalence land line only data. The Selected Metropolitan Area Risk Trends (SMART) project uses the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance...

  19. Behavioral Risk Factors: Selected Metropolitan Area Risk Trends (SMART) County Prevalence Data (2010 and prior)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2002-2010. BRFSS SMART County Prevalence land line only data. The Selected Metropolitan Area Risk Trends (SMART) project uses the Behavioral Risk Factor...

  20. Cardiac diastolic dysfunction is associated with cerebral white matter lesions in elderly patients with risk factors for atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are considered to be the result of brain ischemic injury and a risk factor for clinical stroke. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between the cardiac diastolic function and cerebral white matter lesions in elderly patients with risk factors for atherosclerosis. The study subjects were 55 patients (75±7 years) with risk factors for atherosclerosis including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. Patients with symptomatic cerebrovascular events were excluded from the study. Cerebral white matter lesions, which were defined as exhibiting high intensity regions on brain MRI, were evaluated with the degrees of periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) according to the Japanese Brain Dock Guidelines of 2003. Peak early diastolic mitral annular velocity (E' velocity) was measured by tissue Doppler echocardiography, and was used as a parameter of cardiac diastolic function. The mean value of E' velocity was decreased due to the cardiac diastolic dysfunction (5.2±1.4 cm/s). In addition, the E' velocity was inversely correlated with the degree of PVH (ρ=-0.701, p<0.001). Stepwise regression analysis showed that the decrease in the E' velocity (β coefficient=-0.42, p<0.001) and the presence of hypertension (β coefficient=0.31, p=0.001) were independent determinants of the degree of PVH. Thus, cardiac diastolic dysfunction is correlated to the severity of cerebral white matter lesions, suggesting the cardio-cerebral connection in elderly patients with risk factors for atherosclerosis. (author)

  1. Diabetes, obesity and cancer: risk and anti-risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Mikhaylovich Bershteyn

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Observable diabetes and obesity epidemics may result in alteration of cancer morbidity and mortality. This increasingly recognized problem is reviewed here from the perspective of interplay between factors that differently modify association of diabetes mellitus with malignant neoplasms. Heterogeneity and familial aspects of diabetes and obesity, genomic traits, anti-diabetic medications and weight-reducing treatment are important examples of such factors. Addressing them might promote development of efficient preventive measures.

  2. Diabetes, obesity and cancer: risk and anti-risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Lev Mikhaylovich Bershteyn

    2012-01-01

    Observable diabetes and obesity epidemics may result in alteration of cancer morbidity and mortality. This increasingly recognized problem is reviewed here from the perspective of interplay between factors that differently modify association of diabetes mellitus with malignant neoplasms. Heterogeneity and familial aspects of diabetes and obesity, genomic traits, anti-diabetic medications and weight-reducing treatment are important examples of such factors. Addressing them might promote develo...

  3. Tratamiento de Terapia Ocupacional en el accidente cerebrovascular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo García, AM

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENEntre los muchos pacientes que necesitan tratamiento rehabilitador en Terapia Ocupacional están los que en la edad adulta han sufrido un accidente cerebrovascular.Uno de los factores de riesgo asociados con más frecuencia a las alteraciones del sistema nervioso central es el progresivo envejecimiento de la población, debido a esto orientaré el siguiente artículo hacia la intervención sobre la población geriátrica.La Terapia Ocupacional ofrece un tratamiento global que abarca las áreas funcional, motriz, sensorial, perceptivo y cognitiva. No debemos olvidar el asesoramiento realizado al paciente, a la familia y/ o cuidadores sobre el manejo de la persona que ha sufrido un ictus, la adaptación del entorno y la prescripción, uso y manejo de ayudas técnicas cuando sea necesario.Las propuestas terapéuticas que expondré a continuación, no son recetas únicas que se puedan emplear del mismo modo en todos las personas que hayan sufrido un ictus. Con cada paciente será necesario una evaluación individualizada de su situación y una adaptación de la terapia según sus déficit específicos.La meta final de la Terapia Ocupacional es la integración óptima del paciente dentro de su entorno familiar y social, con el mayor grado de autonomía posible.ABSTRACTAmong the patients who need Occupational Therapy’s rehabilitation treatment, there are those who have suffered a cerebrovascular damage when elderly.People’s gradual ageing is one of the risk factors in the nervous central system’s alterations and this is why I am going to write about intervention on geriatric population.The Occupational Therapy’s rehabilitation treatment works on the functional, motor, sensorial, perceptive and cognitive areas. Moreover, we should not forget to advise the patient and his/her family or caregivers about the way of treating ,the environment’s adaptation, the prescription and use of technical aids when needed.The following therapeutic

  4. Risk Factors of Dyslexia in Pre-school Children

    OpenAIRE

    Tūbele, Sarmīte

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to actualize early risk factors of dyslexia in pre-school children.There are a lot of research about dyslexia and its impact on the child/pupil's development, learning and other areas of life. Part of the research concerns the development of a child in pre-school age determining, what factors influence acquisition of reading skills and predict potential difficulties. The article is devoted to reveal early risk factors of specific reading disorder (dyslexia), touches dia...

  5. Risk factors for a first and recurrent venous thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Flinterman, Linda Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to identify new risk factors for first and recurrent venous thrombosis of both the upper and lower extremity, and assess the incidence of recurrence and mortality after a first venous thrombosis. An overview was provided of the current literature on risk factors and treatment for a first venous thrombosis of the upper extremity (chapter 2). We investigated the association between levels of coagulation factors, blood group and a first venous thrombosis of the upper e...

  6. Ergonomic, psychosocial factors and risks at work in informal mining

    OpenAIRE

    Milena Nunes Alves de Sousa; André Luiz Dantas Bezerra; Branca Maria de Oliveira Santos; José Eduardo Zaia; Dernival Bertoncello; Paulo Roberto Veiga Quemelo

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify ergonomic and psychosocial factors, and risks at informal work in the mining sector of the State of Paraíba, Brazil, from miners' perspective. A cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted with 371 informal mining workers. They responded two questionnaires for assessing work performed in three dimensions: ergonomic factors; psychosocial factors; and occupational risks. The scores of the items of each dimension were added so that, the higher the s...

  7. Tratamiento de Terapia Ocupacional en el accidente cerebrovascular

    OpenAIRE

    Domingo García, AM

    2006-01-01

    RESUMENEntre los muchos pacientes que necesitan tratamiento rehabilitador en Terapia Ocupacional están los que en la edad adulta han sufrido un accidente cerebrovascular.Uno de los factores de riesgo asociados con más frecuencia a las alteraciones del sistema nervioso central es el progresivo envejecimiento de la población, debido a esto orientaré el siguiente artículo hacia la intervención sobre la población geriátrica.La Terapia Ocupacional ofrece un tratamiento global que abarca las áreas ...

  8. Systematic review of psychosocial factors at work and private life as risk factors for back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, W.E.; Poppel, M.N.M. van; Bongers, P.M.; Koes, B.W.; Bouter, L.M.; Hoogendoorn, L.

    2000-01-01

    Study Design. A systematic review of observational studies. Objectives. To assess whether psychosocial factors at work and in private life are risk factors for the occurrence of back pain. Summary of Background Data. Several reviews on risk factors for back pain have paid attention to psychosocial f

  9. Factors Influencing Cancer Risk Perception in High Risk Populations: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Tilburt Jon C; James Katherine M; Sinicrope Pamela S; Eton David T; Costello Brian A; Carey Jantey; Lane Melanie A; Ehlers Shawna L; Erwin Patricia J; Nowakowski Katherine E; Murad Mohammad H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients at higher than average risk of heritable cancer may process risk information differently than the general population. However, little is known about clinical, demographic, or psychosocial predictors that may impact risk perception in these groups. The objective of this study was to characterize factors associated with perceived risk of developing cancer in groups at high risk for cancer based on genetics or family history. Methods We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Em...

  10. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Hypertension in Adults in an Urban Slum, Tirupati, A.P.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question : What is the prevalence of hypertension and its risk factors among adults aged 20-60 years residing years residing in an urban slum area of Tirupati town, A.P.? Objective : To study the prevalence of hypertension and its risk factors as well as its extent of diagnosis and management among adults aged 20-60 years residing in an urban slum area of Tirupati. Study design : Cross sectional. Study setting : Channa Reddy Colony (Urban slum area in Tirupati town, A.P. Study subjects : 1000 adults in the age group of 20-60 years (Males-500; Females-500 residing in an urban slum area of Tirupati town, A.P. Study variables : Age, sex, occupation, family history of hypertension, history of cerebrovascular/cardiovascular events, diabetes mellitus, saturated fat intake, intake of excess salt, smoking, alcohol intake and regular physical exercise. Outcome Variables : Number of hypertensives and mean blood pressure level estimations. Statistical analysis : Proportions, Chi--square tests, ′F′ ratios, ′t′ tests, Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results : The overall prevalence of hypertension was found to be 8.6%. Out of the 86 hypertensives, 72 (83.7% were aware of their hypertension; all of those aware were under treatment; among the treated, only 30 (41.7% had satisfactory control of their hypertension. Higher prevalence of hypertension was found with history of cerbrovascular/cardiovascular events (50.0%, diabetes mellitus (33.3%, family history of hypertension (23.3%, smoking (22.4%, age more than 50 years (22.2%, alcohol intake (20.0%, lack of physical exercise (15.8%, B.M.I.>25 (14.9%, male sex (9.6, non-vegetarian diet (8.8% and saturated fat intake (8.8%. The mean systolic as well as diastolic blood pressures were found to be higher among men, higher age groups, and in business occupation of the respondents. Conclusions : Despite treatment, most of the hypertensives had not achieved satisfactory control of blood

  11. PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS OF FINANCIAL RISKS MANAGEMENT OF BUDGETARY PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Rustamovna Mubarakshina

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In article such concepts are considered as the risk, budgetary risk, necessity of formation of system thinking at civil servants working in budgetary process. In article the concept of professional motivation for civil servants is considered. As in article necessity of the account of various psychological factors for managerial process by budgetary risks is proved and these factors are considered. In article risks in the field of public finances and a role of civil servants in the course of control over performance of the federal budget parameters and effective and target use of budgetary funds are considered. In article the urgency of the account of psychological factors at each stage of management by risks of budgetary process, in the answer constantly changing environmental conditions is proved.Aim: to reveal and characterize budgetary process risks. Object of research: psychological factors of financial risks. Result: Substantiation of necessity of the account of psychological factors such as style of thinking, the person, professional motivation of the employee at revealing and the analysis of risks of budgetary process and decrease in influence degree of risks on budgetary process.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-37

  12. Risk factors for miscarriage from a prevention perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feodor Nilsson, S; Andersen, Per Kragh; Strandberg-Larsen, K;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify modifiable risk factors for miscarriage and to estimate the preventable proportion of miscarriages that could be attributed to these. DESIGN: Nationwide observational follow-up study. SETTING: Denmark. POPULATION: Ninety-one thousand four hundred and twenty seven pregnancies...... outcome. Modifiable risk factors for miscarriage were identified by multiple Cox regression analysis, which provided the background for our estimations of population attributable fractions. In all, 88 373 pregnancies had full information on all covariates and were included in this analysis. MAIN OUTCOME...... MEASURES: Miscarriage before 22 completed weeks of gestation. RESULTS: The potentially modifiable pre-pregnant risk factors associated with increased miscarriage risk were: age of 30 years or more at conception, underweight, and obesity. During pregnancy the modifiable risk factors were: alcohol...

  13. Risk factors for chronic noncontiguous diseases: Twelve-week prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lapčević Mirjana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk factors (RF of chronic noncontiguous diseases (CND are mutual and cannot be observed individually since there is an inter-reaction (interaction of RF in various combinations, what makes so-called personality risk profile for development of particular disease. Almost all CND belong to the group of preventable diseases, because their course may be influenced and changed through RF modification and reduction. Bad habits also contribute to CND incidence. CND prevention is the first priority of primary health care physicians. The main objective of our study was to detect RF in patients during everyday activities of general practitioner, to estimate the risk of CND within the existing RF combination, to show the results of 12-week active monitoring of population with RF of CND, and with already present CND; while the secondary goal was to assess how much population is interested in active collaboration as well as to evaluate the qualification of general medicine teams for work based on defined methodology. The study was multicentric, prospective and interventional. The study included 2086 subjects, aged from 25-64 years, and it was carried out in 17 health centers throughout Serbia in the period January-April 2002. The subjects were selected by method of open clinical experiment. Thereafter, 12-week medical intervention was initiated involving non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment. The first control was scheduled after 8, and the second after 12 months of intervention. Congruence χ2 test, ANOVA for repeated measurements and Logistic regression were used for statistical data processing. Out of a total of 2086 subjects, the following proportion of them reported specific diagnosis in their medical histories: 77% of them reported arterial hypertension (HTA, 68% - increased body mass (BMI>27Kg/m2, 66% - hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP, 34% - diabetes mellitus (DM, 56% - inadequate physical activity (PA, and 23% - cigarette smoking (CS. On the

  14. Mixed Cerebrovascular Disease and the Future of Stroke Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Mark; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Cribbs, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Stroke prevention efforts typically focus on either ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. This approach is overly simplistic due to the frequent coexistence of ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease. This coexistence, termed “mixed cerebrovascular disease”, offers a conceptual framework that appears useful for stroke prevention strategies. Mixed cerebrovascular disease incorporates clinical and subclinical syndromes, including ischemic stroke, subclinical infarct, white matter disease of ...

  15. Cognitive impairments in patients with cerebrovascular steno-occlusive disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石丹

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between cerebrovascular steno-occlusive disease and neuropsychological performance by cognitive function assessment. Methods Using a case-control study,45 patients with cerebrovascular steno-occlusive lesions (patient group) and 59 control subjects without cerebrovascular

  16. Copula-based factor model for credit risk analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Meng-Jou; Chen, Cathy Yi-Hsuan; Härdle, Karl Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    A standard quantitative method to access credit risk employs a factor model based on joint multivariate normal distribution properties. By extending a one-factor Gaussian copula model to make a more accurate default forecast, this paper proposes to incorporate a state-dependent recovery rate into the conditional factor loading, and model them by sharing a unique common factor. The common factor governs the default rate and recovery rate simultaneously and creates their association implicitly....

  17. Risk factors and their identification. Third Part: Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkau, B; Eschwege, E

    1995-10-01

    This is the final of a series of three articles in Diabete & Metabolisme which reviews the identification of risk factors of a disease, here: diabetes or complications of diabetes. In the first of the series [1], we gave the definition of a risk factor, along with measures of its force-relative risk and odds ratio, followed by the epidemiological definitions of the diseases: diabetes, coronary heart disease and hypertension. Risk factors were further discussed and we completed the discussion by some observations on the bias which can arise from a study or from its analysis, which can lead the researcher to the wrong conclusion. The three types of epidemiological studies which are used to determine whether factors are associated with a disease: observational or cross-sectional studies, cohort studies and case-cohort studies are described in the second of the series [2]. Examples were provided of each of these study types and their advantages and disadvantages were discussed. This final paper provides some examples of the study types and the identification of risk factors from the literature. The first examples involve diabetes and pancreatic cancer, the second birth weight and non-insulin dependent diabetes. Having found an association between a risk factor and a disease, we then discuss whether it can be considered to be a risk factor, and if so and whether it is likely to be a cause of the disease. PMID:8529768

  18. Contribution of Individual Risk Factor Changes to Reductions in Population Absolute Cardiovascular Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Cochrane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Few studies have investigated individual risk factor contributions to absolute cardiovascular disease (CVD risk. Even fewer have examined changes in individual risk factors as components of overall modifiable risk change following a CVD prevention intervention. Design. Longitudinal study of population CVD risk factor changes following a health screening and enhanced support programme. Methods. The contribution of individual risk factors to the estimated absolute CVD risk in a population of high risk patients identified from general practice records was evaluated. Further, the proportion of the modifiable risk attributable to each factor that was removed following one year of enhanced support was estimated. Results. Mean age of patients (533 males, 68 females was 63.7 (6.4 years. High cholesterol (57% was most prevalent, followed by smoking (53% and high blood pressure (26%. Smoking (57% made the greatest contribution to the modifiable population CVD risk, followed by raised blood pressure (26% and raised cholesterol (17%. After one year of enhanced support, the modifiable population risk attributed to smoking (56%, high blood pressure (68%, and high cholesterol (53% was removed. Conclusion. Approximately 59% of the modifiable risk attributable to the combination of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and current smoking was removed after intervention.

  19. Risk factors for the development of psychopathology following trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Sehrish; Iacoviello, Brian M; Charney, Dennis S

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic experiences can lead to a range of mental health problems with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) leading as the most documented disorder following trauma. Epidemiological research has found the rate of exposure to trauma to far outweigh the prevalence of PTSD. Indicating that most people do not develop PTSD following a traumatic event, this phenomenon has led to an interest in evaluating risk factors to determine who develops PTSD. Risk factors for the development of psychopathology following trauma exposure fall into three categories: pre-trauma, peri-trauma and post-trauma factors. Pre-trauma factors can include age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, prior psychopathology, and neurobiological factors. Peri-trauma factors can include the duration/severity of trauma experience and the perception that the trauma has ended. Post-trauma factors can include access to needed resources, social support, specific cognitive patterns, and physical activity. To date, several important risk factors have been found to impact the risk of developing PTSD including gender, age, education, IQ, race and ethnicity, sexual orientation, pre-trauma psychopathology, prior trauma exposure, familial psychiatric history, and neurobiological factors. This article outlines the state of research findings on pretraumatic, peritraumatic, and posttraumatic risk factors for the development of PTSD and associated psychopathology following trauma. PMID:26206108

  20. Risk factors in young patients of acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Ischemic heart disease is a leading cause of death throughout the world. CAD has been recognized among younger age group more frequently in recent years. Very limited data is available regarding the prevalence of various risk factors in our younger patients that is why this study was planed. Objectives of the study were to look for the risk factors most prevalent in our young patient of first Acute Myocardial Infarction. And to also look for the number of Risk Factors present in each patient. Methods: We studied 100 consecutive patients from 16-45 years of age presenting with first acute MI. Twelve risk factors were studied namely, gender, family history of premature CAD, smoking hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity, mental stress (type A personality), alcohol, oral contraceptive pills (OCPs), physical activity, and diet. We divided the patients into two groups. Group A with patients 35 years of age or less and group B with patients 36-45 years of age. All risk factors were compared in both the groups. Results: Smoking, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and hypertension were statistically different between the two groups. Frequency wise risk factors were lined up as male sex (91%) Diet (66%), Dyslipidemia (62%), smoking (46%), Type A personality(46%), family history (32%), diabetes mellitus (28%), sedentary lifestyle (26%), hypertension (22%), obesity (17%), alcohol (3%), and OCPs (0%) Most of the patients that is 94% had 3 or more risk factors. Conclusion: Smoking, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia are the major modifiable risk factors in our young adults. If a young male who is smoker or a young female who is diabetic, presents in emergency room with chest pain, always suspect coronary artery disease. Other conventional risk factors are also prevalent but alcohol and OCPs are not a major health problem for us. (author)

  1. [Risk factors for delirium tremens: a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiercelin, N; Rabiah Lechevallier, Z; Rusch, E; Plat, A

    2012-01-01

    Delirium tremens (DT) is the most severe complication from alcohol withdrawal. Risk factors for DT (before the withdrawal begins) and early predictive factors for the development of the withdrawal syndrome towards DT (once withdrawal has started) are not clearly established. We reviewed the literature from PubMed/Medline database to identify risk factors for DT. Twenty-one studies were been selected. Three only were prospective. The most commonly identified risk factors included personal history of DT, seizures, presence of acute somatic comorbidity especially infectious, presence of early withdrawal symptoms, and genetic predisposition. Most of these risk factors are still debated and prospective studies might appear useful considering the DT prevalence and the absence of consensual both diagnostic and therapeutic protocols. PMID:21920639

  2. Tourette Syndrome (TS): Risk Factors and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Info For Families Bullying Info for Health Professionals Info for Education Professionals ... that likely occurs as a result of the effects of multiple genes interacting with other factors in ...

  3. Effects of Disasters: Risk and Resilience Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... long-lasting mental health issues. Certain factors increase resilience after disasters: Social support Social support is one of the keys to recovery after any trauma, including disaster. Social support increases ...

  4. Environmental Risk Factors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Molodecky, Natalie A; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune res...

  5. Critical factors and paths influencing construction workers' safety risk tolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiayuan; Zou, Patrick X W; Li, Penny P

    2016-08-01

    While workers' safety risk tolerances have been regarded as a main reason for their unsafe behaviors, little is known about why different people have different risk tolerances even when confronting the same situation. The aim of this research is to identify the critical factors and paths that influence workers' safety risk tolerance and to explore how they contribute to accident causal model from a system thinking perceptive. A number of methods were carried out to analyze the data collected through interviews and questionnaire surveys. In the first and second steps of the research, factor identification, factor ranking and factor analysis were carried out, and the results show that workers' safety risk tolerance can be influenced by four groups of factors, namely: (1) personal subjective perception; (2) work knowledge and experiences; (3) work characteristics; and (4) safety management. In the third step of the research, hypothetical influencing path model was developed and tested by using structural equation modeling (SEM). It is found that the effects of external factors (safety management and work characteristics) on risk tolerance are larger than that of internal factors (personal subjective perception and work knowledge & experiences). Specifically, safety management contributes the most to workers' safety risk tolerance through its direct effect and indirect effect; while personal subjective perception comes the second and can act as an intermedia for work characteristics. This research provides an in-depth insight of workers' unsafe behaviors by depicting the contributing factors as shown in the accident causal model developed in this research. PMID:26775077

  6. Diabetes Risk Factor Knowledge Varies Among Multiracial College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongiello, Lorraine Laccetti; Freudenberg, Nicholas; Jones, Hollie

    2016-10-01

    All racial/ethnic groups are at higher risk for type 2 diabetes compared to whites, but it is unknown if young adults recognize their risk. Risk knowledge and individual risk perception were examined in 1579 multiracial urban college students. Students have little knowledge of diabetes risk factors; identifying less than three of ten. Considerable variation exists in the understanding of risk; only .02 % of Asian, 14.0 % of Hispanic and 22.8 % of black students recognized that their race increased risk. Among those with ≥3 risk factors (n = 541) only 39 % perceived their risk. These under-estimators had lower knowledge scores (p = .03) than those who acknowledged their risk; indicating that the cause of under-estimating risk may be, at least, in part due to a lack of information. There is a pressing need to heighten understanding of type 2 diabetes risk among young adults to decrease the future burden of this disease. PMID:26169506

  7. Epigenetic Risk Factors in PTSD and Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Florian Joachim Raabe; Dietmar eSpengler

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown that children exposed to adverse experiences are at increased risk for the development of depression, anxiety disorders, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A history of child abuse and maltreatment increases the likelihood of being subsequently exposed to traumatic events or of developing PTSD as an adult. The brain is highly plastic during early life and encodes acquired information into lasting memories that normally subserve adaptation...

  8. Engaging Physicians in Risk Factor Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Springrose, James V.; Friedman, Felix; Gumnit, Stephen A.; Schmidt, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    OptumHealth tested the feasibility of physician-directed population management in 3 primary care practices and with 546 continuously insured patients who exhibited claims markers for coronary artery disease, diabetes, and/or hypertension. During the intervention portion of the study, we asked physicians to improve the following health measurements: blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, and smoking status. We offered a modest pay-for-outcomes incentive for each risk fac...

  9. Risk Factors for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jing; Han, Zhenhui; Li, Xueying; Ochs, Todd; Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Xi; Yang, Jinyan; Liu, Ping; Xiong, Zhenyu; Gai, Yong; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    Background Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is prevalent in children and adolescents and has a great impact on health. But its risk factors have not been fully understood. This study aimed to explore possible risk factors for children and adolescents with POTS. Methods and Findings 600 children and adolescents (test group) aged 7–18 (11.9±3.0) years old, 259 males and 341 females, were recruited for identifying its risk factors. Another 197 subjects aged from 7 to 18 (11.3±2.3) years old ...

  10. Fresh Chicken as Main Risk Factor for Campylobacteriosis, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, A; Niemann, J; Engberg, Jørgen H; Nielsen, EM; Gerner-Smidt, P; Wegener, HC; Molbak, K

    2006-01-01

    We report the findings of a case-control study of risk factors for sporadic cases of human campylobacteriosis in Denmark. In 3 different analytical models, the main domestic risk factor identified was eating fresh, unfrozen chicken. Specifically, 28 of 74 domestically acquired case-patients were...... exposed to fresh chicken compared with 21 of 114 controls (multivariate matched odds ratio 5.8; 95% confidence interval 2.1-15.9). In contrast, a risk from eating other poultry, including previously frozen chicken, was only indicated from borderline significant 2-factor interactions. The marked increase...

  11. Fresh chicken as main risk factor for campylobacteriosis, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Anne; Neimann, Jakob; Engberg, Jørgen; Nielsen, Eva Møller; Gerner-Smidt, P.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Mølbak, K.

    2006-01-01

    We report the findings of a case-control study of risk factors for sporadic cases of human campylobacteriosis in Denmark. In 3 different analytical models, the main domestic risk factor identified was eating fresh, unfrozen chicken. Specifically, 28 of 74 domestically acquired case-patients were...... exposed to fresh chicken compared with 21 of 114 controls (multivariate matched odds ratio 5.8; 95% confidence interval 2.1-15.9). In contrast, a risk from eating other poultry, including previously frozen chicken, was only indicated from borderline significant 2-factor interactions. The marked increase...

  12. Capsaicinoids Modulating Cardiometabolic Syndrome Risk Factors: Current Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicinoids are bioactive nutrients present within red hot peppers reported to cut ad libitum food intake, to increase energy expenditure (thermogenesis) and lipolysis, and to result in weight loss over time. In addition it has shown more benefits such as improvement in reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, improving vascular health, improving endothelial function, lowering blood pressure, reducing endothelial cytokines, cholesterol lowering effects, reducing blood glucose, improving insulin sensitivity, and reducing inflammatory risk factors. All these beneficial effects together help to modulate cardiometabolic syndrome risk factors. The early identification of cardiometabolic risk factors can help try to prevent obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. PMID:27313880

  13. Risk factors for local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast-conserving therapy has been widely accepted as a standard treatment for early breast cancer both in Western countries and in Japan. In Western countries, many studies have investigated the risk factors for local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy (BCT), but few such studies have been done in Japan. To determine the risk factors for local recurrence in 399 breast cancer patients (stage I and II, n=396; stage III, n=3) who had undergone BCT with or without postoperative radiation therapy, we evaluated their clinicopathological features by univariate and multivariate analyses. The patients were treated at Osaka National Hospital between February 1988 and December 1997. Univariate analysis showed that a young age (≤45 years; P=0.0005) was a significant risk factor for local recurrence, while radiation therapy (P=0.0058) and adjuvant endocrine therapy (P=0.0041) significantly reduced the risk of local recurrence. In patients with BCT, without radiation therapy a positive surgical margin significantly increased the risk of local recurrence (P=0.0470). Multivariate analysis showed that a young age (P=0.0285) was a significant independent risk factor for local recurrence, while radiation therapy (P=0.0457) significantly decreased recurrence. In patients with a negative surgical margin, radiation therapy (P=0.0158) and adjuvant endocrine therapy (P=0.0421) significantly reduced the relative risk of local recurrence, to 0.160 and 0.366, respectively. In patients with a positive surgical margin, radiation therapy marginally significantly (P=0.0756) reduced the relative risk of local recurrence, to 0.181, and adjuvant endocrine therapy significantly (P=0.0119) reduced the risk, to 0.076. Young age and lack of radiation therapy or adjuvant endocrine therapy were risk factors for local recurrence in breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving therapy, with surgical margin status also being a possible risk factor. (author)

  14. Meat Consumption as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Barnard

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Disease risk factors identified in epidemiological studies serve as important public health tools, helping clinicians identify individuals who may benefit from more aggressive screening or risk-modification procedures, allowing policymakers to prioritize intervention programs, and encouraging at-risk individuals to modify behavior and improve their health. These factors have been based primarily on evidence from cross-sectional and prospective studies, as most do not lend themselves to randomized trials. While some risk factors are not modifiable, eating habits are subject to change through both individual action and broader policy initiatives. Meat consumption has been frequently investigated as a variable associated with diabetes risk, but it has not yet been described as a diabetes risk factor. In this article, we evaluate the evidence supporting the use of meat consumption as a clinically useful risk factor for type 2 diabetes, based on studies evaluating the risks associated with meat consumption as a categorical dietary characteristic (i.e., meat consumption versus no meat consumption, as a scalar variable (i.e., gradations of meat consumption, or as part of a broader dietary pattern.

  15. Research on SAP Business One Implementation Risk Factors with Interpretive Structural Model

    OpenAIRE

    Jiajun Hou; Jiangping Wan

    2012-01-01

    The possible risk factors during SAP Business One implementation were studied with depth interview. The results are then adjusted by experts. 20 categories of risk factors that are totally 49 factors were found. Based on the risk factors during the SAP Business One implementation, questionnaire was used to study the key risk factors of SAP Business One implementation. Results illustrate ten key risk factors, these are risk of senior managers leadership, risk of project management, risk of pro...

  16. Study on the cerebrovascular reserve capacity by MR perfusion weighted imaging in SHR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Quan; Dong, Yang; Chen, WenLi; Lin, Xueying; Xing, Da; Huang, Li

    2007-05-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death, and approximately 50% of survivors have a residual neurologic deficit and greater than 25% require chronic care. Cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC) describes how far cerebral perfusion can increase from a baseline value after stimulation. High blood pressure is the most important independent risk factor for stroke and other vascular diseases. The incidence of stroke in the hypertensive is six times higher than in the patient with normal blood pressure. CVRC in the hypertensive was even lower than in control patients. MR perfusion weighted imaging (MR PWI) with the well-established acetazolamide (ACZ) stimulation test has been used for assessing brain function. The aim of this work is to assess the cerebrovascular reserve capacity by MR PWI with "ACZ" tolerance test in spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR) and to identify its value in evaluating the CVRC. Experimental animal including 3 groups: Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) (12-week-old) as control group, SHR (12-week-old and 20-week-old) as experimental group. MR PWI was performed respectively before and after acetazolamide administrated orally in 3 groups on a clinical 1.5 Tesla GE Signa MR fx/i whole-body MR system. The ROI was chosen in the bilateral frontal lobe to measure the value of rCBV, rCBF and MTT. The results showed that before ACZ-test, there was statistic differences between the WKY and SHR(12-week-old), and between SHR(12-week-old) and SHR(20-week-old) in the values of rCBV and rCBF (P>0.05), and after ACZ-test, there were statistic differences between WKY and SHR (20-week-old), and between SHR(12-week-old) and SHR(20-week-old) in the rCBV value (Pstress test" can provide more qualitative and half-quantitative information on the cerebral perfusion to evaluate the CVRC in SHR.

  17. A Bayesian Approach to Identifying New Risk Factors for Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yen-Hsia; Wu, Shihn-Sheng; Lin, Chun-Hung Richard; Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Yang, Pinchen; Chang, Yang-Pei; Tseng, Kuan-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dementia is one of the most disabling and burdensome health conditions worldwide. In this study, we identified new potential risk factors for dementia from nationwide longitudinal population-based data by using Bayesian statistics. We first tested the consistency of the results obtained using Bayesian statistics with those obtained using classical frequentist probability for 4 recognized risk factors for dementia, namely severe head injury, depression, diabetes mellitus, and vascular diseases. Then, we used Bayesian statistics to verify 2 new potential risk factors for dementia, namely hearing loss and senile cataract, determined from the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We included a total of 6546 (6.0%) patients diagnosed with dementia. We observed older age, female sex, and lower income as independent risk factors for dementia. Moreover, we verified the 4 recognized risk factors for dementia in the older Taiwanese population; their odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 3.469 to 1.207. Furthermore, we observed that hearing loss (OR = 1.577) and senile cataract (OR = 1.549) were associated with an increased risk of dementia. We found that the results obtained using Bayesian statistics for assessing risk factors for dementia, such as head injury, depression, DM, and vascular diseases, were consistent with those obtained using classical frequentist probability. Moreover, hearing loss and senile cataract were found to be potential risk factors for dementia in the older Taiwanese population. Bayesian statistics could help clinicians explore other potential risk factors for dementia and for developing appropriate treatment strategies for these patients. PMID:27227925

  18. Meta analysis of risk factors for colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Chen; Jiong-Liang Qiu; Yang Zhang; Yu-Wan Zhao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the risk factors for colorectal cancer in China.METHODS: A meta-analysis of the risk factors of colorectal cancer was conducted for 14 case-control studies, and reviewed 14 reports within 13 years which included 5034cases and 5205 controls. Dersimonian and Laird random effective models were used to process the results.RESULTS: Meta analysis of the 14 studies demonstrated that proper physical activites and dietary fibers were protective factors (pooled OR<0.8), while fecal mucohemorrhage,chronic diarrhea and polyposis were highly associated with colorectal cancer (all pooled OR>4). The stratified results showed that different OR values of some factors were due to geographic factors or different resourses.CONCLUSION: Risks of colorectal cancer are significantly associated with the histories of intestinal diseases or relative symptoms, high lipid diet, emotional trauma and family history of cancers. The suitable physical activities and dietary fibers are protective factors.

  19. Prophylactic cerebrovascular reconstructive surgery for occlusive cerebrovascular disease in patients with cardiac surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the outcomes of prophylactic cerebral reconstructive surgery aimed at reducing the incidence of perioperative cerebral infarction in patients with intracranial or extracranial occlusive cerebrovascular disease who were scheduled to undergo cardiac surgery. Before the surgery, carotid artery ultrasonography, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the carotid artery, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRA of the brain were performed on 875 patients. The high-risk group was defined as: patients with cervical carotid artery stenosis of at least 90%, those with a reduced cerebral perfusion reserve because of occlusion of the internal carotid or middle cerebral artery, and those with a reduced cerebral perfusion reserve because of major intracranial artery stenosis of at least 75%. According to the degree of cardiac reserve, patients in the high-risk group underwent carotid artery stenting (CAS), carotid endarterectomy (CEA), superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis, or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). Of the 875 patients, 29 (3.3%) were classified in the high-risk group, and 16 underwent prophylactic revascularization and cardiac surgery. Prophylactic revascularization included CAS in 7 patients (including stenting of the intracranial internal carotid artery in 1 patient), CEA in 4, STA-MCA in 4 and PTA in 1. Cardiac surgery was performed on 870 of the 875 patients, and perioperative cerebral infarction occurred in 11 (1.3%). It is uncertain whether our treatment strategy significantly reduced the incidence of perioperative cerebral infarction because of the lack of accurate information on the number of patients with this condition before the present study. However, 73% of patients had a score of 1 or 2 on the modified Rankin Scale 1 month after the onset of cerebral infarction, suggesting that our strategy improved the outcome. (author)

  20. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke. PMID:21734390