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Sample records for cerebrospinal fluid functions

  1. Embryonic Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier Formation and Function

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    David eBueno

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic development and adult life, brain cavities and ventricles are filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. CSF has attracted interest as an active signaling medium that regulates brain development, homeostasis and disease. CSF is a complex protein-rich fluid containing growth factors and signaling molecules that regulate multiple cell functions in the central nervous system (CNS. The composition and substance concentrations of CSF are tightly controlled. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that embryonic CSF (eCSF has a key function as a fluid pathway for delivering diffusible signals to the developing brain, thus contributing to the proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural progenitor cells, and to the expansion and patterning of the brain. From fetal stages through to adult life, CSF is primarily produced by the choroid plexus. The development and functional activities of the choroid plexus and other blood–brain barrier (BBB systems in adults and fetuses have been extensively analyzed. However, eCSF production and control of its homeostasis in embryos, from the closure of the anterior neuropore when the brain cavities become physiologically sealed, to the formation of the functional fetal choroid plexus, has not been studied in as much depth and remains open to debate. This review brings together the existing literature, some of which is based on experiments conducted by our research group, concerning the formation and function of a temporary embryonic blood–CSF barrier in the context of the crucial roles played by the molecules in eCSF.

  2. Conventional cerebrospinal fluid scanning

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    Schicha, H.

    1985-06-01

    Conventional cerebrospinal fluid scanning (CSF scanning) today is mainly carried out in addition to computerized tomography to obtain information about liquor flow kinetics. Especially in patients with communicating obstructive hydrocephalus, CSF scanning is clinically useful for the decision for shunt surgery. In patients with intracranial cysts, CSF scanning can provide information about liquor circulation. Further indications for CSF scanning include the assessment of shunt patency especially in children, as well as the detection and localization of cerebrospinal fluid leaks.

  3. RHABDOMYOBLASTS IN CEREBROSPINAL FLUID

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    Deepak Nayak; Sushma V

    2013-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is an aggressive soft tissue malignancy, not uncommonly seen in adults. The location of this malignancy is quite ubiquitous. However, a parameningeal location is uncommon and accounts for about 16% of all rhabdomyosarcomas. We report an instance where rhabdomyoblasts were seen infiltrati ng the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A 35 year old female patient presented to our hospita l with the primary complaints of bilateral nose block and left side...

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid sodium rhythms

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    Johnson Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF sodium levels have been reported to rise during episodic migraine. Since migraine frequently starts in early morning or late afternoon, we hypothesized that natural sodium chronobiology may predispose susceptible persons when extracellular CSF sodium increases. Since no mammalian brain sodium rhythms are known, we designed a study of healthy humans to test if cation rhythms exist in CSF. Methods Lumbar CSF was collected every ten minutes at 0.1 mL/min for 24 h from six healthy participants. CSF sodium and potassium concentrations were measured by ion chromatography, total protein by fluorescent spectrometry, and osmolarity by freezing point depression. We analyzed cation and protein distributions over the 24 h period and spectral and permutation tests to identify significant rhythms. We applied the False Discovery Rate method to adjust significance levels for multiple tests and Spearman correlations to compare sodium fluctuations with potassium, protein, and osmolarity. Results The distribution of sodium varied much more than potassium, and there were statistically significant rhythms at 12 and 1.65 h periods. Curve fitting to the average time course of the mean sodium of all six subjects revealed the lowest sodium levels at 03.20 h and highest at 08.00 h, a second nadir at 09.50 h and a second peak at 18.10 h. Sodium levels were not correlated with potassium or protein concentration, or with osmolarity. Conclusion These CSF rhythms are the first reports of sodium chronobiology in the human nervous system. The results are consistent with our hypothesis that rising levels of extracellular sodium may contribute to the timing of migraine onset. The physiological importance of sodium in the nervous system suggests that these rhythms may have additional repercussions on ultradian functions.

  5. RHABDOMYOBLASTS IN CEREBROSPINAL FLUID

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    Deepak Nayak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is an aggressive soft tissue malignancy, not uncommonly seen in adults. The location of this malignancy is quite ubiquitous. However, a parameningeal location is uncommon and accounts for about 16% of all rhabdomyosarcomas. We report an instance where rhabdomyoblasts were seen infiltrati ng the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. A 35 year old female patient presented to our hospita l with the primary complaints of bilateral nose block and left sided headache since1 month. Clinically, a deviated nasal septum was diagnosed which needed a septal surgery. Since t he hematological parameters showed a pancytopenia, the surgery was postponed. The patient pr esented 3 weeks later with additional complaints of worsening headache and significant blu rring of vision in her left eye. The MRI scan revealed a midline, dural-based mass. A therape utic tap of the cerebrospinal fluid sent to the clinical laboratory for analysis which showed l arge abnormal cells (figure 1. The bone marrow also showed similar cells, with karyomegaly, dense chromatin, and coalescing vacuoles which were Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS negative. The biopsy from the mass was diagnosed as rhabdomyosarcoma (parameningeal type. Immunohistoc hemistry showed positivity for Myogenin and Myo-D1.

  6. Cerebrospinal Fluid Orexin A Levels and Autonomic Function in Kleine-Levin Syndrome

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    Wang, Jing Yu; Han, Fang; Dong, Song X.; Li, Jing; An, Pei; Zhang, Xiao Zhe; Chang, Yuan; Zhao, Long; Zhang, Xue Li; Liu, Ya Nan; Yan, Han; Li, Qing Hua; Hu, Yan; Lv, Chang Jun; Gao, Zhan Cheng; Strohl, Kingman P.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare disorder of relapsing sleepiness. The hypothesis was that the syndrome is related to a change in the vigilance peptide orexin A. Methods: From 2002 to 2013, 57 patients with relapsing hypersomnolence were clinically assessed in a referral academic center in Beijing, China, and 44 (28 males and 16 females; mean age 18.3 ± 8.9 y (mean ± standard deviation, range 9–57 y) were determined to have clinical and behavioral criteria consistent with KLS. Cerebrospinal fluid orexin A levels and diurnal blood pressure were measured in relapse versus remission in a subgroup of patients. Results: Presenting symptoms included relapsing or remitting excessive sleepiness–associated parallel complaints of cognitive changes (82%), eating disorders (84%); depression (45%); irritability (36%); hypersexuality (18%); and compulsions (11%). Episodes were 8.2 ± 3.3 days in duration. In relapse, diurnal values for blood pressure and heart rate were lower (P < 0.001). In a subgroup (n = 34), cerebrospinal fluid orexin A levels were ∼31% lower in a relapse versus remission (215.7 ± 81.5 versus 319.2 ± 95.92 pg/ml, P < 0.001); in three patients a pattern of lower levels during subsequent relapses was documented. Conclusions: There are lower orexin A levels in the symptomatic phase than in remission and a fall and rise in blood pressure and heart rate, suggesting a role for orexin dysregulation in KLS pathophysiology. Citation: Wang JY, Han F, Dong SX, Li J, An P, Zhang XZ, Chang Y, Zhao L, Zhang XL, Liu YN, Yan H, Li QH, Hu Y, Lv CJ, Gao ZC, Strohl KP. Cerebrospinal fluid orexin A levels and autonomic function in Kleine-Levin syndrome. SLEEP 2016;39(4):855–860. PMID:26943469

  7. A balanced view of the cerebrospinal fluid composition and functions: Focus on adult humans.

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    Spector, Reynold; Robert Snodgrass, S; Johanson, Conrad E

    2015-11-01

    In this review, a companion piece to our recent examination of choroid plexus (CP), the organ that secretes the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), we focus on recent information in the context of reliable older data concerning the composition and functions of adult human CSF. To accomplish this, we define CSF, examine the methodology employed in studying the CSF focusing on ideal or near ideal experiments and discuss the pros and cons of several widely used analogical descriptions of the CSF including: the CSF as the "third circulation," the CSF as a "nourishing liquor," the similarities of the CSF/choroid plexus to the glomerular filtrate/kidney and finally the CSF circulation as part of the "glymphatic system." We also consider the close interrelationship between the CSF and extracellular space of brain through gap junctions and the paucity of data suggesting that the cerebral capillaries secrete a CSF-like fluid. Recently human CSF has been shown to be in dynamic flux with heart-beat, posture and especially respiration. Functionally, the CSF provides buoyancy, nourishment (e.g., vitamins) and endogenous waste product removal for the brain by bulk flow into the venous (arachnoid villi and nerve roots) and lymphatic (nasal) systems, and by carrier-mediated reabsorptive transport systems in CP. The CSF also presents many exogenous compounds to CP for metabolism or removal, indirectly cleansing the extracellular space of brain (e.g., of xenobiotics like penicillin). The CSF also carries hormones (e.g., leptin) from blood via CP or synthesized in CP (e.g., IGF-2) to the brain. In summary the CP/CSF, the third circulation, performs many functions comparable to the kidney including nourishing the brain and contributing to a stable internal milieu for the brain. These tasks are essential to normal adult brain functioning.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture

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    ... is a laboratory test to look for bacteria, fungi, and viruses in the fluid that moves in ... culture medium. Laboratory staff then observe if bacteria, fungi, or viruses grow in the dish. Growth means ...

  9. Biochemical, histological and functional correction of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB by intra-cerebrospinal fluid gene therapy.

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    Ribera, Albert; Haurigot, Virginia; Garcia, Miguel; Marcó, Sara; Motas, Sandra; Villacampa, Pilar; Maggioni, Luca; León, Xavier; Molas, Maria; Sánchez, Víctor; Muñoz, Sergio; Leborgne, Christian; Moll, Xavier; Pumarola, Martí; Mingozzi, Federico; Ruberte, Jesús; Añor, Sònia; Bosch, Fatima

    2015-04-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive tool for the treatment of monogenic disorders, in particular for lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) caused by deficiencies in secretable lysosomal enzymes in which neither full restoration of normal enzymatic activity nor transduction of all affected cells are necessary. However, some LSD such as Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB (MPSIIIB) are challenging because the disease's main target organ is the brain and enzymes do not efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier even if present at very high concentration in circulation. To overcome these limitations, we delivered AAV9 vectors encoding for α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) to the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) of MPSIIIB mice with the disease already detectable at biochemical, histological and functional level. Restoration of enzymatic activity in Central Nervous System (CNS) resulted in normalization of glycosaminoglycan content and lysosomal physiology, resolved neuroinflammation and restored the pattern of gene expression in brain similar to that of healthy animals. Additionally, transduction of the liver due to passage of vectors to the circulation led to whole-body disease correction. Treated animals also showed reversal of behavioural deficits and extended lifespan. Importantly, when the levels of enzymatic activity were monitored in the CSF of dogs following administration of canine NAGLU-coding vectors to animals that were either naïve or had pre-existing immunity against AAV9, similar levels of activity were achieved, suggesting that CNS efficacy would not be compromised in patients seropositive for AAV9. Our studies provide a strong rationale for the clinical development of this novel therapeutic approach as the treatment for MPSIIIB.

  10. Soluble CD163 levels are elevated in cerebrospinal fluid and serum in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and are associated with impaired peripheral nerve function

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    Kallestrup, M; Møller, Holger Jon; Tankisi, H;

    2015-01-01

    using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Soluble CD163 levels were significantly higher in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum of the participants with Type 2 diabetes compared with the control participants [cerebrospinal fluid: median (range) 107 (70-190) vs 84 (54-115) μg/l, P ....01 and serum: 2305 (920-7060) vs 1420 (780-2740) μg/l, P higher levels of soluble CD163 in the cerebrospinal fluid...... nerve function. Higher levels of soluble CD163 in people with diabetic polyneuropathy suggest that inflammation plays a role in the development of neural impairment. The relationship between cerebrospinal fluid soluble CD163 level and peripheral nerve conduction indicates that soluble CD163 may...

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis inhibits sonic hedgehog function

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    Drannik, Anna; Martin, Joan; Peterson, Randy; Ma, Xiaoxing; Jiang, Fan; Turnbull, John

    2017-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a morphogen essential to the developing nervous system that continues to play an important role in adult life by contributing to cell proliferation and differentiation, maintaining blood-brain barrier integrity, and being cytoprotective against oxidative and excitotoxic stress, all features of importance in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS is a fatal disease characterized by selective loss of motor neurons due to poorly understood mechanisms. Evidence indicates that Shh might play an important role in ALS, and that Shh signaling might be also adversely affected in ALS. Since little is known about the functional status of Shh pathway in patients with ALS, we therefore sought to determine whether Shh protein levels or biological activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was less in ALS patients than controls, and whether these measures could be correlated with ALS disease severity and disease progression, and with other CSF analytes of biological interest in ALS. Comparing Shh levels in the CSF of normal controls (n = 13), neurological controls (n = 12), and ALS patients (n = 9) measured by ELISA, we found that CSF Shh levels were not different between controls and ALS patients. However, when assessing Shh biological activity in CSF using in vitro cell-based assays, which measure Shh activity as inducible Gli-driven luminescence, we found that in the presence of exogenous recombinant Shh or the Shh agonist, purmorphamine, the inducible activity of CSF was significantly augmented in the control groups as expected, but not in the ALS group, suggesting the presence of an inhibitor of Shh signaling in ALS CSF samples. Since purmorphamine acts on Smoothened, downstream of Shh and its receptor Patched, the inhibitory action is downstream of Smoothened. Our results also demonstrated that while the inhibitory effect of ALS CSF on Shh signaling did not correlate significantly with ALS disease characteristics, the levels of IL-1β and TNF-α did. In

  12. Evolutionary development of embryonic cerebrospinal fluid composition and regulation: an open research field with implications for brain development and function.

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    Bueno, David; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi

    2016-03-15

    Within the consolidated field of evolutionary development, there is emerging research on evolutionary aspects of central nervous system development and its implications for adult brain structure and function, including behaviour. The central nervous system is one of the most intriguing systems in complex metazoans, as it controls all body and mind functions. Its failure is responsible for a number of severe and largely incurable diseases, including neurological and neurodegenerative ones. Moreover, the evolution of the nervous system is thought to be a critical step in the adaptive radiation of vertebrates. Brain formation is initiated early during development. Most embryological, genetic and evolutionary studies have focused on brain neurogenesis and regionalisation, including the formation and function of organising centres, and the comparison of homolog gene expression and function among model organisms from different taxa. The architecture of the vertebrate brain primordium also reveals the existence of connected internal cavities, the cephalic vesicles, which in fetuses and adults become the ventricular system of the brain. During embryonic and fetal development, brain cavities and ventricles are filled with a complex, protein-rich fluid called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). However, CSF has not been widely analysed from either an embryological or evolutionary perspective. Recently, it has been demonstrated in higher vertebrates that embryonic cerebrospinal fluid has key functions in delivering diffusible signals and nutrients to the developing brain, thus contributing to the proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural progenitor cells, and to the expansion and patterning of the brain. Moreover, it has been shown that the composition and homeostasis of CSF are tightly controlled in a time-dependent manner from the closure of the anterior neuropore, just before the initiation of primary neurogenesis, up to the formation of functional choroid plexuses. In

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid flow. Pt. 3; Pathological cerebrospinal fluid pulsations

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    Schroth, G. (Dept. of Neuradiology, Tuebingen Univ. (Germany)); Klose, U. (Dept. of Neuradiology, Tuebingen Univ. (Germany))

    1992-12-01

    Cardiac- and respiration-related movements of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated by MRI in 71 patients. In most patients with arteriosclerotic occlusive vascular disease CSF pulsations are normal. Decreased pulsatile flow is detectable in those with arteriovenous malformations, intracranial air and following lumbar puncture and withdrawal of CSF. Increased pulsatile flow in the cerebral aqueduct was found in 2 patients with large aneurysms, idiopathic communicating syringomyelia and in most cases of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). CSF flow in the cervical spinal canal is, however, reduced or normal in NPH, indicating reduction of the unfolding ability of the surface of the brain and/or inhibition of rapid CSF movements in the subrachnoid space over its convexity. (orig.)

  14. Functional analysis of Pro-inflammatory properties within the cerebrospinal fluid after subarachnoid hemorrhage in vivo and in vitro

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    Schneider Ulf C

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To functionally characterize pro-inflammatory and vasoconstrictive properties of cerebrospinal fluid after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in vivo and in vitro. Methods The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 10 patients suffering from SAH was applied to the transparent skinfold chamber model in male NMRI mice which allows for in vivo analysis of the microcirculatory response to a superfusat. Microvascular diameter changes were quantified and the numbers of rolling and sticking leukocytes were documented using intravital multifluorescence imaging techniques. Furthermore, the pro-inflammatory properties of CSF were assessed in vitro using a monocyte transendothelial migration assay. Results CSF superfusion started to induce significant vasoconstriction on days 4 and 6 after SAH. In parallel, CSF superfusion induced a microvascular leukocyte recruitment, with a significant number of leukocytes rolling (day 6 and sticking (days 2-4 to the endothelium. CSF of patients presenting with cerebral edema induced breakdown of blood vessel integrity in our assay as evidenced by fluorescent marker extravasation. In accordance with leukocyte activation in vivo, significantly higher in vitro monocyte migration rates were found after SAH. Conclusion We functionally characterized inflammatory and vasoactive properties of patients' CSF after SAH in vivo and in vitro. This pro-inflammatory milieu in the subarachnoid space might play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of early and delayed brain injury as well as vasospasm development following SAH.

  15. Data for a comprehensive map and functional annotation of the human cerebrospinal fluid proteome

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    Yang Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the normal human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF proteome serves as a baseline reference for CSF biomarker discovery and provides insight into CSF physiology. In this study, high-pH reverse-phase liquid chromatography (hp-RPLC was first integrated with a TripleTOF 5600 mass spectrometer to comprehensively profile the normal CSF proteome. A total of 49,836 unique peptides and 3256 non-redundant proteins were identified. To obtain high-confidence results, 2513 proteins with at least 2 unique peptides were further selected as bona fide CSF proteins. Nearly 30% of the identified CSF proteins have not been previously reported in the normal CSF proteome. More than 25% of the CSF proteins were components of CNS cell microenvironments, and network analyses indicated their roles in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. The top canonical pathway in which the CSF proteins participated was axon guidance signaling. More than one-third of the CSF proteins (788 proteins were related to neurological diseases, and these proteins constitute potential CSF biomarker candidates. The mapping results can be freely downloaded at http://122.70.220.102:8088/csf/, which can be used to navigate the CSF proteome. For more information about the data, please refer to the related original article [1], which has been recently accepted by Journal of Proteomics.

  16. Multiplicity of cerebrospinal fluid functions: New challenges in health and disease

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    Stopa Edward G

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review integrates eight aspects of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF circulatory dynamics: formation rate, pressure, flow, volume, turnover rate, composition, recycling and reabsorption. Novel ways to modulate CSF formation emanate from recent analyses of choroid plexus transcription factors (E2F5, ion transporters (NaHCO3 cotransport, transport enzymes (isoforms of carbonic anhydrase, aquaporin 1 regulation, and plasticity of receptors for fluid-regulating neuropeptides. A greater appreciation of CSF pressure (CSFP is being generated by fresh insights on peptidergic regulatory servomechanisms, the role of dysfunctional ependyma and circumventricular organs in causing congenital hydrocephalus, and the clinical use of algorithms to delineate CSFP waveforms for diagnostic and prognostic utility. Increasing attention focuses on CSF flow: how it impacts cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics, neural stem cell progression in the subventricular zone, and catabolite/peptide clearance from the CNS. The pathophysiological significance of changes in CSF volume is assessed from the respective viewpoints of hemodynamics (choroid plexus blood flow and pulsatility, hydrodynamics (choroidal hypo- and hypersecretion and neuroendocrine factors (i.e., coordinated regulation by atrial natriuretic peptide, arginine vasopressin and basic fibroblast growth factor. In aging, normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer's disease, the expanding CSF space reduces the CSF turnover rate, thus compromising the CSF sink action to clear harmful metabolites (e.g., amyloid from the CNS. Dwindling CSF dynamics greatly harms the interstitial environment of neurons. Accordingly the altered CSF composition in neurodegenerative diseases and senescence, because of adverse effects on neural processes and cognition, needs more effective clinical management. CSF recycling between subarachnoid space, brain and ventricles promotes interstitial fluid (ISF convection with both trophic

  17. Tissue polypeptide antigen activity in cerebrospinal fluid

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    Bach, F; Söletormos, Georg; Dombernowsky, P

    1991-01-01

    in the CSF and neurological clinical function. TPpA concentrations decreased in parallel with the clinical response and increased prior to CNS disease progression. As a marker for CNS metastases, the level of TPpA in the CSF in breast cancer patients appears to be superior to the level of protein, lactate......Tissue polypeptide antigen (TPpA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was measured in 59 consecutive breast cancer patients with suspected central nervous system (CNS) metastases. Subsequently, we determined that 13 patients had parenchymal brain metastases, 10 had leptomeningeal carcinomatosis...

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid stasis and its clinical significance.

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    Whedon, James M; Glassey, Donald

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesize that stasis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) occurs commonly and is detrimental to health. Physiologic factors affecting the normal circulation of CSF include cardiovascular, respiratory, and vasomotor influences. The CSF maintains the electrolytic environment of the central nervous system (CNS), influences systemic acid-base balance, serves as a medium for the supply of nutrients to neuronal and glial cells, functions as a lymphatic system for the CNS by removing the waste products of cellular metabolism, and transports hormones, neurotransmitters, releasing factors, and other neuropeptides throughout the CNS. Physiologic impedance or cessation of CSF flow may occur commonly in the absence of degenerative changes or pathology and may compromise the normal physiologic functions of the CSF. CSF appears to be particularly prone to stasis within the spinal canal. CSF stasis may be associated with adverse mechanical cord tension, vertebral subluxation syndrome, reduced cranial rhythmic impulse, and restricted respiratory function. Increased sympathetic tone, facilitated spinal segments, dural tension, and decreased CSF flow have been described as closely related aspects of an overall pattern of structural and energetic dysfunction in the axial skeleton and CNS. Therapies directed at affecting CSF flow include osteopathic care (especially cranial manipulation), craniosacral therapy, chiropractic adjustment of the spine and cranium, Network Care (formerly Network Chiropractic), massage therapy (including lymphatic drainage techniques), yoga, therapeutic breath-work, and cerebrospinal fluid technique. Further investigation into the nature and causation of CSF stasis, its potential effects upon human health, and effective therapies for its correction is warranted.

  19. The Maze of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Discovery

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    Leszek Herbowski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The author analyzes a historical, long, and tortuous way to discover the cerebrospinal fluid. At least 35 physicians and anatomists described in the text have laid the fundamentals of recognition of this biological fluid’s presence. On the basis of crucial anatomical, experimental, and clinical works there are four greatest physicians who should be considered as equal cerebrospinal fluid’s discoverers: Egyptian Imhotep, Venetian Nicolo Massa, Italian Domenico Felice Cotugno, and French François Magendie.

  20. Fibroblast growth factors 1 and 2 in cerebrospinal fluid are associated with HIV disease, methamphetamine use, and neurocognitive functioning

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    Bharti AR

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ajay R Bharti,1 Steven Paul Woods,2 Ronald J Ellis,3 Mariana Cherner,2 Debra Rosario,3 Michael Potter,3 Robert K Heaton,2 Ian P Everall,4 Eliezer Masliah,5 Igor Grant,2 Scott L Letendre1 On behalf of the Translational Methamphetamine AIDS Research Center Group 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, 3Department of Neurosciences, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA; 4Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 5Department of Pathology, University of Californa San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and methamphetamine use commonly affect neurocognitive (NC functioning. We evaluated the relationships between NC functioning and two fibroblast growth factors (FGFs in volunteers who differed in HIV serostatus and methamphetamine dependence (MAD. Methods: A total of 100 volunteers were categorized into four groups based on HIV serostatus and MAD in the prior year. FGF-1 and FGF-2 were measured in cerebrospinal fluid by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays along with two reference biomarkers (monocyte chemotactic protein [MCP]-1 and neopterin. Comprehensive NC testing was summarized by global and domain impairment ratings. Results: Sixty-three volunteers were HIV+ and 59 had a history of MAD. FGF-1, FGF-2, and both reference biomarkers differed by HIV and MAD status. For example, FGF-1 levels were lower in subjects who had either HIV or MAD than in HIV– and MAD– controls (P=0.003. Multivariable regression identified that global NC impairment was associated with an interaction between FGF-1 and FGF-2 (model R2=0.09, P=0.01: higher FGF-2 levels were only associated with neurocognitive impairment among subjects who had lower FGF-1 levels. Including other covariates in the model (including antidepressant use strengthened the model (model R2=0.18, P=0.004 but did not weaken the association with FGF-1 and FGF-2. Lower FGF-1 levels were associated with impairment

  1. Stereotactic injection of cerebrospinal fluid from anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis into rat dentate gyrus impairs NMDA receptor function.

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    Würdemann, Till; Kersten, Maxi; Tokay, Tursonjan; Guli, Xiati; Kober, Maria; Rohde, Marco; Porath, Katrin; Sellmann, Tina; Bien, Christian G; Köhling, Rüdiger; Kirschstein, Timo

    2016-02-15

    Autoimmune encephalitis is increasingly recognized in patients with otherwise unexplained encephalopathy with epilepsy. Among these, patients with anti-N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis present epileptic seizures, memory deficits, and psychiatric symptoms. However, the functional consequences of such autoantibodies are poorly understood. In order to investigate the pathophysiology of this disease, we stereotactically injected either cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from three anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients or commercially available anti-NMDAR1 into the dentate gyrus of adult female rats. Control animals were injected with either CSF obtained from three epilepsy patients (ganglioglioma, posttraumatic epilepsy, focal cortical dysplasia) lacking anti-NMDAR or saline. Intracellular recordings from dentate gyrus granule cells showed a significant reduction of the NMDAR-evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (NMDAR-EPSPs) in animals treated with anti-NMDAR. As a consequence of this, action potential firing in these cells by NMDAR-EPSPs was significantly impaired. Long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus was also significantly reduced in rats injected with anti-NMDAR as compared to control animals. This was accompanied by a significantly impaired learning performance in the Morris water maze hidden platform task when the animals had been injected with anti-NMDAR antibody-containing CSF. Our findings suggest that anti-NMDAR lead to reduced NMDAR function in vivo which could contribute to the memory impairment found in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

  2. Cerebral venous outflow and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

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    Clive B. Beggs

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the impact of restricted cerebral venous outflow on the biomechanics of the intracranial fluid system is investigated. The cerebral venous drainage system is often viewed simply as a series of collecting vessels channeling blood back to the heart. However there is growing evidence that it plays an important role in regulating the intracranial fluid system. In particular, there appears to be a link between increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pulsatility in the Aqueduct of Sylvius and constricted venous outflow. Constricted venous outflow also appears to inhibit absorption of CSF into the superior sagittal sinus. The compliance of the cortical bridging veins appears to be critical to the behaviour of the intracranial fluid system, with abnormalities at this location implicated in normal pressure hydrocephalus. The compliance associated with these vessels appears to be functional in nature and dependent on the free egress of blood out of the cranium via the extracranial venous drainage pathways. Because constricted venous outflow appears to be linked with increased aqueductal CSF pulsatility, it suggests that inhibited venous blood outflow may be altering the compliance of the cortical bridging veins.

  3. Complement Receptor 2 is increased in cerebrospinal fluid of multiple sclerosis patients and regulates C3 function.

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    Lindblom, Rickard P F; Aeinehband, Shahin; Ström, Mikael; Al Nimer, Faiez; Sandholm, Kerstin; Khademi, Mohsen; Nilsson, Bo; Piehl, Fredrik; Ekdahl, Kristina N

    2016-05-01

    Besides its vital role in immunity, the complement system also contributes to the shaping of the synaptic circuitry of the brain. We recently described that soluble Complement Receptor 2 (sCR2) is part of the nerve injury response in rodents. We here study CR2 in context of multiple sclerosis (MS) and explore the molecular effects of CR2 on C3 activation. Significant increases in sCR2 levels were evident in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from both patients with relapsing-remitting MS (n=33; 6.2ng/mL) and secondary-progressive MS (n=9; 7.0ng/mL) as compared to controls (n=18; 4.1ng/mL). Furthermore, CSF sCR2 levels correlated significantly both with CSF C3 and C1q as well as to a disease severity measure. In vitro, sCR2 inhibited the cleavage and down regulation of C3b to iC3b, suggesting that it exerts a modulatory role in complement activation downstream of C3. These results propose a novel function for CR2/sCR2 in human neuroinflammatory conditions.

  4. Limited cerebrospinal fluid penetration of docetaxel

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    ten Tije, Albert J; Loos, Walter J; Zhao, Ming; Baker, Sharyn D; Enting, Roelien H; van der Meulen, Hans; Verweij, Jaap; Sparreboom, Alex; Enting, Roeline

    2004-01-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration of docetaxel in cancer patients. Docetaxel was administered as a 1-h infusion at a dose of 75 mg/m2 to two patients with metastatic breast cancer and leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. CSF samples were obtained using a lumbar punct

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid tau proteins in status epilepticus.

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    Monti, Giulia; Tondelli, Manuela; Giovannini, Giada; Bedin, Roberta; Nichelli, Paolo F; Trenti, Tommaso; Meletti, Stefano; Chiari, Annalisa

    2015-08-01

    Tau protein is a phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, principally localized at neuronal level in the central nervous system (CNS). Tau levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are considered to index both axonal and neuronal damage. To date, however, no study has specifically evaluated the CSF levels of tau proteins in patients with status epilepticus (SE). We evaluated these established biomarkers of neuronal damage in patients with SE who received a lumbar puncture during SE between 2007 and 2014. Status epilepticus cases due to acute structural brain damage, including CNS infection, were excluded. Clinical, biological, therapeutic, and follow-up data were collected. Group comparison between patients stratified according to SE response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), disability, and epilepsy outcomes were performed. Twenty-eight patients were considered for the analyses (mean age 56 years): 14 patients had abnormally high CSF t-tau level, six patients had abnormally high CSF p-tau level, and only three patients had abnormally low Aβ1-42 level. Cerebrospinal fluid t-tau value was higher in patients who developed a refractory SE compared to patients with seizures controlled by AED. Cerebrospinal fluid t-tau values were positively correlated with SE duration and were higher in patients treated with propofol anesthesia compared to patients that had not received this treatment. Patients with higher CSF t-tau had higher risk of developing disability (OR = 32.5, p = 0.004) and chronic epilepsy (OR = 12; p = 0.016) in comparison with patients with lower CSF t-tau level. Our results suggest that CSF t-tau level might be proposed as a biomarker of SE severity and prognosis. Prospective studies are needed to evaluate the effects of propofol on tau pathology in this setting. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus".

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebrospinal fluid flow in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, R. [Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Magnetic Resonance Imaging Dept., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-06-30

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of flowing protons in cerebrospinal fluid is useful for demonstrating areas of obstruction or stenosis of the ventricular system causing hydrocephalus. This is used in pediatric patients to assess the circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid. This article discusses two studies. In the first, the cerebrospinal fluid flow study helped the neurosurgeon assess the patency after a third ventriculocisternostomy. The second study evaluated the cerebrospinal fluid flowing through the foramen magnum in a patient with cerebellar tonsilar descent (Chiari malformation) and a syringomyelia. Different techniques to evaluate the flow studies are also discussed. (author)

  7. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea in a patient with tentorial meningioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUNA Jing-yu; TONG Xiao-jie; WEI Xue-zhong

    2007-01-01

    @@ Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea is rarely found, especially in patients with brain tumors.Similarly, reports of tentorial meningioma coexisting with acquired Chiari Ⅰ malformation with hydromyelia are also few. No doubt, one patient with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea, tentorial meningioma and Chiari Ⅰ malformation with hydromyelia is hardly ever found. We reported one case of this rare condition.

  8. The morphology and biochemistry of nanostructures provide evidence for synthesis and signaling functions in human cerebrospinal fluid

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    Chavez Jesus N

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contacts many brain regions and may mediate humoral signaling distinct from synaptic neurotransmission. However, synthesis and transport mechanisms for such signaling are not defined. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether human CSF contains discrete structures that may enable the regulation of humoral transmission. Methods Lumbar CSF was collected prospectively from 17 participants: with no neurological or psychiatric disease, with Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, or migraine; and ventricular CSF from two cognitively healthy participants with long-standing shunts for congenital hydrocephalus. Cell-free CSF was subjected to ultracentrifugation to yield supernatants and pellets that were examined by transmission electron microscopy, shotgun protein sequencing, electrophoresis, western blotting, lipid analysis, enzymatic activity assay, and immuno-electron microscopy. Results Over 3,600 CSF proteins were identified from repeated shotgun sequencing of cell-free CSF from two individuals with Alzheimer's disease: 25% of these proteins are normally present in membranes. Abundant nanometer-scaled structures were observed in ultracentrifuged pellets of CSF from all 16 participants examined. The most common structures included synaptic vesicle and exosome components in 30-200 nm spheres and irregular blobs. Much less abundant nanostructures were present that derived from cellular debris. Nanostructure fractions had a unique composition compared to CSF supernatant, richer in omega-3 and phosphoinositide lipids, active prostanoid enzymes, and fibronectin. Conclusion Unique morphology and biochemistry features of abundant and discrete membrane-bound CSF nanostructures are described. Prostaglandin H synthase activity, essential for prostanoid production and previously unknown in CSF, is localized to nanospheres. Considering CSF bulk flow and its circulatory dynamics, we propose that these

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker candidates for parkinsonian disorders

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    Radu eConstantinescu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The parkinsonian disorders are a large group of neurodegenerative diseases including idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD and atypical parkinsonian disorders, such as multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and dementia with Lewy bodies. The etiology of these disorders is not known although it is considered to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. One of the greatest obstacles for developing efficacious disease-modifying treatment strategies is the lack of biomarkers. Reliable biomarkers are needed for early and accurate diagnosis, to measure disease progression and response to therapy. In this review several of the most promising cerebrospinal biomarker candidates are discussed. Alpha synuclein seems to be intimately involved in the pathogenesis of synucleinopathies and its levels can be measured in the cerebrospinal fluid and in plasma. In a similar way, tau protein accumulation seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of tauopathies. Urate, a potent antioxidant, seems to be associated to the risk of developing PD and with its progression. Neurofilament light chain levels are increased in atypical parkinsonian disorders compared with PD and healthy controls. The new "omics" techniques are potent tools offering new insights in the patho-etiology of these disorders. Some of the difficulties encountered in developing biomarkers are discussed together with future perspectives.

  10. Pseudo-cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea following traumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea surgery: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Pseudo-cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea is very rarely reported. In 1994, our hospital admitted such a case, and we report it here. CASE REPORT On May 28, 1994, a 37-year-old man was readmitted to our hospital one-year following treatment for head injury and cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea. He had been suffering from a recurrence of rhinorrhea for three months at the time of his readmission. One year prior, the patient had been suffering from a recurrence of the rhinorrhea for three meters. He complained of headaches, dizziness and a right rhinorrhea. The fluid was positive for glucose. Skull-base film showed a traverse fracture of the right petrous bone. For three months, conservative treatment of the rhinorrhea continued, then he was first admitted to our hospital. After admission, a right temperal craniotomy was performed. During surgery, a traverse fracture of the petrous bone was found. In addition, the dura matter over the fracture line was torn, and the fibrotic brain tissue with arachnoid protruded into the fracture fissure. The dura adhering to the edge of the fracture fissure was explored and the bared internal carotid artery discovered. The fracture fissure was occluded with free-muscle and fascia lata grafts. Postoperative intravenous antibiotic therapy and cerebrospinal fluid drainage were carried on for 72 hours. Ten days after the operation the patient was discharged without any symptoms.

  11. Imhotep and the Discovery of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned. PMID:24744920

  12. Imhotep and the Discovery of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patric Blomstedt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbowski (2013 suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned.

  13. Quantitative evaluation fo cerebrospinal fluid shunt flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chervu, S.; Chervu, L.R.; Vallabhajosyula, B.; Milstein, D.M.; Shapiro, K.M.; Shulman, K.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    The authors describe a rigorous method for measuring the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in shunt circuits implanted for the relief of obstructive hydrocephalus. Clearance of radioactivity for several calibrated flow rates was determined with a Harvard infusion pump by injecting the Rickham reservoir of a Rickham-Holter valve system with 100 ..mu..Ci of Tc-99m as pertechnetate. The elliptical and the cylindrical Holter valves used as adjunct valves with the Rickham reservoir yielded two different regression lines when the clearances were plotted against flow rats. The experimental regression lines were used to determine the in vivo flow rates from clearances calculated after injecting the Rickham reservoirs of the patients. The unique clearance characteristics of the individual shunt systems available requires that calibration curves be derived for an entire system identical to one implanted in the patient being evaluated, rather than just the injected chamber. Excellent correlation between flow rates and the clinical findings supports the reliability of this method of quantification of CSF shunt flow, and the results are fully accepted by neurosurgeons.

  14. Endoscopic endonasal management of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Ozmen; Polat, Senol; Uneri, Cuneyd

    2012-07-01

    The authors review their 5 years' experience with endonasal endoscopic repair of the anterior skull base fistulas presenting with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea. A total of 12 patients were managed endoscopically between 2004 and 2008. Seven patients (58.3%) had nonsurgical posttraumatic CSF rhinorrhea, 2 patients (16.7%) had CSF rhinorrhea due to surgical/iatrogenic trauma, and 3 patients (25%) had spontaneous onset of CSF rhinorrhea. Radiosurgical correlation for CSF fistula identification was positive in all patients. The most common site of leak was the fovea ethmoidalis. The repair method consisted of an extradural underlay closure of a defect with fascia lata. The largest diameter of a defect to be closed was 15 mm. Immediate results were good in all patients, but later in the follow-up, CSF rhinorrhea recurred in 2 patients, and each patient had a revision 2 times. In the first revisions, transcranial approach was used, whereas in the second revisions endonasal endoscopic route was resorted. The primary closure rate was 83.3%, and the overall closure rate was 100%. The average follow-up period thus far is 21 months. Endonasal endoscopic technique well known to otolaryngologists should be considered as the first choice of surgery in the repair of CSF rhinorrhea because of low morbidity and a higher closure rate. The possibility of revision with the same technique makes this approach ideal for the repair of cranionasal osteodural defects.

  15. Doxepin concentrations in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomburg, Robert; Remane, Daniela; Fassbender, Klaus; Maurer, Hans H; Spiegel, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Doxepin--like other antidepressant drugs (ADs)--shows a variable antidepressant effect in clinical practice. The cause for this variability is as yet unclear; however, pharmacokinetic factors such as the variable permeability of doxepin into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), may contribute to the difference in therapeutic efficacy. We measured and correlated the concentration of doxepin and its active metabolite nordoxepin in both the plasma and CSF. Plasma and CSF samples were taken simultaneously from 21 patients who were treated with doxepin due to different clinical indications. The plasma concentration of both doxepin and nordoxepin correlated significantly with the oral dosage of doxepin (doxepin: r = +0.66, p < 0.001; nordoxepin: r = +0.78, p < 0.0001; Spearman's correlation). Furthermore, we found significant correlations between the plasma and CSF concentrations of both doxepin (r = +0.71; p < 0.001; Pearson's correlation) and nordoxepin (r = +0.74; p < 0.001). These highly significant correlations between the plasma and CSF concentrations indicate a constant CSF permeability of doxepin and its active metabolite nordoxepin.

  16. Bloody cerebrospinal fluid: traumatic tap or child abuse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolo, J O

    1987-06-01

    A central nervous system dysfunction of nontraumatic etiology was initially suspected in three cases of shaken baby syndrome. Blood contaminating the cerebrospinal fluid was attributed to a traumatic lumbar puncture. Failure to detect retinal hemorrhages contributed to the misdiagnosis. Emergency physicians must consider the diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome in a critically ill infant with bloody cerebrospinal fluid. Ophthalmoscopy should be done routinely in these patients.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid space alterations in melancholic depression.

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    Esther Via

    Full Text Available Melancholic depression is a biologically homogeneous clinical entity in which structural brain alterations have been described. Interestingly, reports of structural alterations in melancholia include volume increases in Cerebro-Spinal Fluid (CSF spaces. However, there are no previous reports of CSF volume alterations using automated whole-brain voxel-wise approaches, as tissue classification algorithms have been traditionally regarded as less reliable for CSF segmentation. Here we aimed to assess CSF volumetric alterations in melancholic depression and their clinical correlates by means of a novel segmentation algorithm ('new segment', as implemented in the software Statistical Parametric Mapping-SPM8, incorporating specific features that may improve CSF segmentation. A three-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI was obtained from seventy patients with melancholic depression and forty healthy control subjects. Although imaging data were pre-processed with the 'new segment' algorithm, in order to obtain a comparison with previous segmentation approaches, tissue segmentation was also performed with the 'unified segmentation' approach. Melancholic patients showed a CSF volume increase in the region of the left Sylvian fissure, and a CSF volume decrease in the subarachnoid spaces surrounding medial and lateral parietal cortices. Furthermore, CSF increases in the left Sylvian fissure were negatively correlated with the reduction percentage of depressive symptoms at discharge. None of these results were replicated with the 'unified segmentation' approach. By contrast, between-group differences in the left Sylvian fissure were replicated with a non-automated quantification of the CSF content of this region. Left Sylvian fissure alterations reported here are in agreement with previous findings from non-automated CSF assessments, and also with other reports of gray and white matter insular alterations in depressive samples using automated approaches

  18. Praziquantel in the cerebrospinal fluid in neurocysticercosis

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    A. Spina-França

    1985-09-01

    Full Text Available In 10 patients with neurocysticercosis (NC, an assessment was made of the praziquantel (PZQ concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, in non-deproteinized serum and in protein-free serum: before administration of the drug and the 1st., 7th. and 21st. days of oral administration (50mg/kg/day during 21 days. Samples of CSF and blood were collected three hours after the last administration of the daily total dosage, on the 1st. and 21st days; and from 2 to 6 hours after drug administration on the 7th. day. The total daily dosage was distributed into three equal parts of 1/3 each, with a 4 hours' interval between intakes, except in the last 5 cases, who on the 21st. day only were given the total daily dosage on a single administration. Results have shown dispersion in serum concentrations, which are similar to those seen in normal subjects as recorded in literature. There is a correlation between PZQ levels in the CSF and in the serum, the latter being very close to those found in protein-free serum fraction. The statistical treatment of results allowed the following considerations: PZQ concentrations in the CSF and in the protein free serum are in balance from the pharmacodynamic standpoint on the first day; this balance is maintained up to the 21st. day although at different levels from those seen on the 7th. day; on the 21st. day PZQ contents in CSF goes back to its similar values as recorded on the 1st. day, and this suggests that the participation of drug interaction factors has been reduced to non-significant levels. However, several factors can influence PZQ concentration in CSF, as absorption rate, liver first-pass effect and blood-brain barrier changes, and individual dose should be established for each patient based on drug concentration monitoring in the serum and/or in the CSF.

  19. AUTOMATIC TURBIDIMETRY IN DETECTING PROTEIN IN URINE AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建荣; 李闻捷; 徐德安

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and validate the performance of automatic turbidimetry in detecting protein in urine and cerebrospinal fluid.Methods The detection limits, reportable range of results, precision and accuracy of the method were investigated by using the Roche chemical reagent, benzethonium chloride.Results The functional sensitivity was 0.08g/L of protein, the reportable range of result was between 0.08g/L and 2.0g/L; the intra-batch coefficient of variation(CV) was 1.5% and the inter-batch CV was 2.2%, and the regression relation between new method and routine SSA method in patient sample determination was Y1 = 0.86X+0.068, r=0.972 and Y2=0.86X+0.056, r=0.980 for urine and cerebrospinal fluid respectively.Conclusion This method is simple, accurate, time saving with minimal sample volume 5~15μl, and suitalbe for clinical practice.

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of infantile congenital hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbrick, David D.; Baksh, Brandon; Morgan, Clinton D.; Habiyaremye, Gakwaya; McAllister, James P.; Inder, Terrie E.; Mercer, Deanna; Holtzman, David M.; Strahle, Jennifer; Wallendorf, Michael J.; Morales, Diego M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Hydrocephalus is a complex neurological disorder with a pervasive impact on the central nervous system. Previous work has demonstrated derangements in the biochemical profile of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in hydrocephalus, particularly in infants and children, in whom neurodevelopment is progressing in parallel with concomitant neurological injury. The objective of this study was to examine the CSF of children with congenital hydrocephalus (CHC) to gain insight into the pathophysiology of hydrocephalus and identify candidate biomarkers of CHC with potential diagnostic and therapeutic value. Methods CSF levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and derivative isoforms (sAPPα, sAPPβ, Aβ42), tau, phosphorylated tau (pTau), L1CAM, NCAM-1, aquaporin 4 (AQP4), and total protein (TP) were measured by ELISA in 20 children with CHC. Two comparative groups were included: age-matched controls and children with other neurological diseases. Demographic parameters, ventricular frontal-occipital horn ratio, associated brain malformations, genetic alterations, and surgical treatments were recorded. Logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic curves were used to examine the association of each CSF protein with CHC. Results CSF levels of APP, sAPPα, sAPPβ, Aβ42, tau, pTau, L1CAM, and NCAM-1 but not AQP4 or TP were increased in untreated CHC. CSF TP and normalized L1CAM levels were associated with FOR in CHC subjects, while normalized CSF tau levels were associated with FOR in control subjects. Predictive ability for CHC was strongest for sAPPα, especially in subjects ≤12 months of age (p<0.0001 and AUC = 0.99), followed by normalized sAPPβ (p = 0.0001, AUC = 0.95), tau, APP, and L1CAM. Among subjects ≤12 months, a normalized CSF sAPPα cut-point of 0.41 provided the best prediction of CHC (odds ratio = 528, sensitivity = 0.94, specificity = 0.97); these infants were 32 times more likely to have CHC. Conclusions CSF proteins such as s

  1. Cerebrolysin reduces blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier permeability change, brain pathology, and functional deficits following traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Zimmermann-Meinzingen, Sibilla; Johanson, Conrad E

    2010-06-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) induce profound breakdown of the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers (BCSFB), brain pathology/edema, and sensory-motor disturbances. Because neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), are neuroprotective in models of brain and spinal cord injuries, we hypothesized that a combination of neurotrophic factors would enhance neuroprotective efficacy. In the present investigation, we examined the effects of Cerebrolysin, a mixture of different neurotrophic factors (Ebewe Neuro Pharma, Austria) on the brain pathology and functional outcome in a rat model of TBI. TBI was produced under Equithesin (3 mL/kg, i.p.) anesthesia by making a longitudinal incision into the right parietal cerebral cortex. Untreated injured rats developed profound disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to proteins, edema/cell injury, and marked sensory-motor dysfunctions on rota-rod and grid-walking tests at 5 h TBI. Intracerebroventricular administration of Cerebrolysin (10 or 30 microL) either 5 min or 1 h after TBI significantly reduced leakage of Evans blue and radioiodine tracers across the BBB and BCSFB, and attenuated brain edema formation/neuronal damage in the cortex as well as underlying subcortical regions. Cerebrolysin-treated animals also had improved sensory-motor functions. However, administration of Cerebrolysin 2 h after TBI did not affect these parameters significantly. These observations in TBI demonstrate that early intervention with Cerebrolysin reduces BBB and BCSFB permeability changes, attenuates brain pathology and brain edema, and mitigates functional deficits. Taken together, our observations suggest that Cerebrolysin has potential therapeutic value in TBI.

  2. Application of transport phenomena analysis technique to cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, C H; Hansen, E A; Hall, W A; Hubel, A

    2013-12-01

    The study of hydrocephalus and the modeling of cerebrospinal fluid flow have proceeded in the past using mathematical analysis that was very capable of prediction phenomenonologically but not well in physiologic parameters. In this paper, the basis of fluid dynamics at the physiologic state is explained using first established equations of transport phenomenon. Then, microscopic and molecular level techniques of modeling are described using porous media theory and chemical kinetic theory and then applied to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. Using techniques of transport analysis allows the field of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics to approach the level of sophistication of urine and blood transport. Concepts such as intracellular and intercellular pathways, compartmentalization, and tortuosity are associated with quantifiable parameters that are relevant to the anatomy and physiology of cerebrospinal fluid transport. The engineering field of transport phenomenon is rich and steeped in architectural, aeronautical, nautical, and more recently biological history. This paper summarizes and reviews the approaches that have been taken in the field of engineering and applies it to CSF flow.

  3. Usability of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in a tertiary memory clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C.; Bahl, J.C.; Heegaard, N.H.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Assays for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of total tau, phospho-tau protein and beta-amyloid 1-42 have been available for some years. The aim of the study was to assess the usability of these biomarkers in a mixed population of tertiary dementia referral patients in a university-based memory...

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G disrupts blood brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgari, Nasrin; Berg, Carsten Tue; Mørch, Marlene Thorsen;

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the significance of immunoglobulin G autoantibody specific for the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 in cerebrospinal fluid, aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G from a neuromyelitis optica patient was administered intrathecally to naïve mice, and the distribution and pathogenic impact...

  5. [Diagnostic significance of immunologic study of cerebrospinal fluid in neuroinfections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekonenko, E P; Umanskiĭ, K G; Andreeva, L S

    1985-01-01

    An increase in the antibody titre in the blood serum, previously considered sufficient for determining the etiology of neuroinfection can no longer be regarded as a satisfactory index in the light of the contemporary level of our knowledge. The literature and the authors' own data show the importance of a simultaneous examination of antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid and the blood serum in some neuroinfections. For example, the determination in the cerebrospinal fluid of antibodies to herpes simplex virus in herpetic encephalitis is considered sufficient (in the presence of the characteristic clinical picture) to make the diagnosis of this severe disease. The examination of antibodies to herpes simplex virus in the cerebrospinal fluid of 35 patients with a suspected herpetic encephalitis revealed their presence in 34% of those studied. The data obtained suggest that immunoassay of the cerebrospinal fluid and blood sera should be used on a broader scale in patients with acute and chronic neuroinfections. The method plays an the early diagnosis of these diseases and early administration of the appropriate treatment.

  6. Ongoing HIV replication in cerebrospinal fluid under successful monotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bierhoff (Marieke); C.A. Boucher (Charles); A. Fibriani (Azzania); R.W. ten Kate (Reinier)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe report a case of an HIV-infected patient who was successfully treated with ritonavir/lopinavir (r/LPV) monotherapy for several years. He presented with neurological symptoms and high HIV RNA levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Sequencing of the HIV from the CSF revealed mutations in

  7. Clinical value of determination HIV viral load in the cerebrospinal fluid of HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Musatov

    2015-01-01

    nervous system pathology HIV replication in the cerebrospinal fluid was detected. Observed in some patients HIV replication in the cerebrospinal fluid in the absence of morphological and laboratory changes in the composition of cerebrospinal fluid may reflect indirect effects of HIV the brain, manifested in the form of functional disorders of the central nervous system.

  8. [Cerebrospinal fluid sorption in the system of complex treatment of chronic cerebral ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulëv, Iu A; Starchenko, A A; Bikmullin, V N; Dorosh, K V; Martynov, B V

    1997-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid was investigated in 16 patients with chronic cerebral ischemia. Reactions of the local immune system of the liquor was shown to change by the autoimmune type. Medical efficiency of cerebrospinal fluid sorption was proved and it can be considered a method of detoxication aimed at breaking the pathogenetic chain: formation of abundance of the autoantibodies--increased amount of the circulating immunocomplexes--damage of the cell membranes--discharge of deep antigens--appearance of a new generation of autoantibodies. Using cerebrospinal fluid sorption as a test for the detection of latent functional reserves of the neurons not changed irreversibly in the zone of reduced perfusion of the cerebral tissue is thought to be a perspective method.

  9. Ultrastructural changes of bone marrow cells exposed for xenogenous cerebrospinal fluid

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    Shaymardanova L.R.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the scientifical investigations xenogenous cerebrospinal fluid was considered as possible substance for theproduction of powerful adaptogen of biological origin. One of the representative research in these field demonstrates morphologicaland functional changes of bone marrow as the central hemopoetic and immune organ. The article shows the ultramicroscopicchanges of bone marrow cells after the xenogenous cerebrospinal fluid exposure in Vistar rats of differentage. It was revealed the activation of synthetic processes in bone marrow cells of the first three age groups and exhaustion ofactivating mechanisms in the fourth age group, that was manifested in swelling and destruction of mytochondria, vacuolisationof cytoplasm, invagination of caryolemma.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide impairs amyloid beta efflux from brain: altered vascular sequestration, cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption, peripheral clearance and transporter function at the blood–brain barrier

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    Erickson Michelle A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defects in the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1 and p-glycoprotein (Pgp clearance of amyloid beta (Aβ from brain are thought to contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. We have recently shown that induction of systemic inflammation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS results in impaired efflux of Aβ from the brain. The same treatment also impairs Pgp function. Here, our aim is to determine which physiological routes of Aβ clearance are affected following systemic inflammation, including those relying on LRP-1 and Pgp function at the blood–brain barrier. Methods CD-1 mice aged between 6 and 8 weeks were treated with 3 intraperitoneal injections of 3 mg/kg LPS at 0, 6, and 24 hours and studied at 28 hours. 125I-Aβ1-42 or 125I-alpha-2-macroglobulin injected into the lateral ventricle of the brain (intracerebroventricular (ICV or into the jugular vein (intravenous (IV was used to quantify LRP-1-dependent partitioning between the brain vasculature and parenchyma and peripheral clearance, respectively. Disappearance of ICV-injected 14 C-inulin from brain was measured to quantify bulk flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Brain microvascular protein expression of LRP-1 and Pgp was measured by immunoblotting. Endothelial cell localization of LRP-1 was measured by immunofluorescence microscopy. Oxidative modifications to LRP-1 at the brain microvasculature were measured by immunoprecipitation of LRP-1 followed by immunoblotting for 4-hydroxynonenal and 3-nitrotyrosine. Results We found that LPS: caused an LRP-1-dependent redistribution of ICV-injected Aβ from brain parenchyma to brain vasculature and decreased entry into blood; impaired peripheral clearance of IV-injected Aβ; inhibited reabsorption of CSF; did not significantly alter brain microvascular protein levels of LRP-1 or Pgp, or oxidative modifications to LRP-1; and downregulated LRP-1 protein levels and caused LRP-1 mislocalization in cultured brain

  11. Vitamin B6 in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of children.

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    Monique Albersen

    Full Text Available Over the past years, the essential role of vitamin B6 in brain development and functioning has been recognized and genetic metabolic disorders resulting in functional vitamin B6 deficiency have been identified. However, data on B6 vitamers in children are scarce.B6 vitamer concentrations in simultaneously sampled plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 70 children with intellectual disability were determined by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. For ethical reasons, CSF samples could not be obtained from healthy children. The influence of sex, age, epilepsy and treatment with anti-epileptic drugs, were investigated.The B6 vitamer composition of plasma (pyridoxal phosphate (PLP > pyridoxic acid > pyridoxal (PL differed from that of CSF (PL > PLP > pyridoxic acid > pyridoxamine. Strong correlations were found for B6 vitamers in and between plasma and CSF. Treatment with anti-epileptic drugs resulted in decreased concentrations of PL and PLP in CSF.We provide concentrations of all B6 vitamers in plasma and CSF of children with intellectual disability (±epilepsy, which can be used in the investigation of known and novel disorders associated with vitamin B6 metabolism as well as in monitoring of the biochemical effects of treatment with vitamin B6.

  12. The history of cerebrospinal fluid analysis in Brazil

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    Jose Antonio Livramento

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Analysis on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in neurological diagnosis has always been considered to be a strong point among the main complementary examinations in Brazil. The present paper reviews the main events in the history of CSF in the neurological sciences, with emphasis on the founders of several CSF schools in our country from the beginning of the 20th century to the present time.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in the context of CNS demyelinating diseases

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    Sandro Luiz de Andrade Matas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system demyelinating diseases are a group of disorders with different etiologies, characterized by inflammatory lesions that are associated with loss of myelin and eventually axonal damage. In this group the most studied ones are multiple sclerosis (MS, neuromyelitis optic (NMO and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM. The cerebrospinal fluid is essential to differentiate between these different syndromes and to define multiple sclerosis, helping to assess the probability of Clinical Isolated Syndrome turn into multiple sclerosis.

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics and the Pathophysiology of Hydrocephalus: New Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinya; Kelly, Erin

    2016-04-01

    Many controversies remain regarding basic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physiology and the mechanism behind the development of hydrocephalus. Recent information obtained from CSF time spatial spin labeling inversion pulse method discovers different aspect of CSF dynamics. In this article, we would discuss how recent CSF imaging advances are leading to new concepts of CSF flow dynamics and the pathophysiology of hydrocephalus, with an emphasis on time spatial spin labeling inversion pulse imaging of CSF dynamics.

  15. A plasma polymerization technique to overcome cerebrospinal fluid shunt infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cökeliler, D; Caner, H; Zemek, J; Choukourov, A; Biederman, H; Mutlu, M

    2007-03-01

    Prosthetic devices, mainly shunts, are frequently used for temporary or permanent drainage of cerebrospinal fluid. The pathogenesis of shunt infection is a very important problem in modern medicine and generally this is characterized by staphylococcal adhesion to the cerebrospinal fluid shunt surfaces. In this paper, the prevention of the attachment of test microorganism Staphylococcus epidermidis on the cerebrospinal fluid shunt surfaces by 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) precursor modification in the plasma polymerization system, is reported. Different plasma polymerization conditions (RF discharge power 10-20-30 W, exposure time 5-10-15 min) were employed during the surface modification. The surface chemistry and topology of unmodified and modified shunts was characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Also, static contact angle measurements were performed to state the change of surface hydrophilicity. All samples were tested in vitro with Staphylococcus epidermidis. A plasma-polymerized HEMA film (PP HEMA) was found to be an alternative simple method to decrease the microorganism attachment and create bacterial anti-fouling surfaces. The attachment of the model microorganism Staphylococcus epidermidis on the shunt surface modified by PP HEMA at 20 W and 15 min was reduced 62.3% if compared to the unmodified control surface of the shunt.

  16. A plasma polymerization technique to overcome cerebrospinal fluid shunt infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coekeliler, D [Plasma Aided Bioengineering and Biotechnology Research Laboratory, Engineering Faculty, Hacettepe University, 06532, Ankara (Turkey); Caner, H [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Baskent University, 06610, Ankara (Turkey); Zemek, J [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53, Prague, Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Choukourov, A [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Biederman, H [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Mutlu, M [Plasma Aided Bioengineering and Biotechnology Research Laboratory, Engineering Faculty, Hacettepe University, 06532, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-03-01

    Prosthetic devices, mainly shunts, are frequently used for temporary or permanent drainage of cerebrospinal fluid. The pathogenesis of shunt infection is a very important problem in modern medicine and generally this is characterized by staphylococcal adhesion to the cerebrospinal fluid shunt surfaces. In this paper, the prevention of the attachment of test microorganism Staphylococcus epidermidis on the cerebrospinal fluid shunt surfaces by 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) precursor modification in the plasma polymerization system, is reported. Different plasma polymerization conditions (RF discharge power 10-20-30 W, exposure time 5-10-15 min) were employed during the surface modification. The surface chemistry and topology of unmodified and modified shunts was characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Also, static contact angle measurements were performed to state the change of surface hydrophilicity. All samples were tested in vitro with Staphylococcus epidermidis. A plasma-polymerized HEMA film (PP HEMA) was found to be an alternative simple method to decrease the microorganism attachment and create bacterial anti-fouling surfaces. The attachment of the model microorganism Staphylococcus epidermidis on the shunt surface modified by PP HEMA at 20 W and 15 min was reduced 62.3% if compared to the unmodified control surface of the shunt.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurodegeneration in chronic neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumani, Hayrettin; Teunissen, Charlotte; Süssmuth, Sigurd; Otto, Markus; Ludolph, Albert C; Brettschneider, Johannes

    2008-07-01

    Chronic neurological diseases (CND) like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), dementia or multiple sclerosis (MS) share a chronic progressive course of disease that frequently leads to the common pathological pathway of neurodegeneration, including neuroaxonal damage, apoptosis and gliosis. There is an ongoing search for biomarkers that could support early diagnosis of CND and help to identify responders to interventions in therapeutic treatment trials. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a promising source of biomarkers in CND, since the CSF compartment is in close anatomical contact with the brain interstitial fluid, where biochemical changes related to CND are reflected. We review recent advances in CSF biomarkers research in CND and thereby focus on markers associated with neurodegeneration.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Mercedes; Ormazábal, Aida; Antón, Jordi; Aróstegui, Juan I; García-Cazorla, Angels

    2009-12-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome is a category of autoinflammatory disorders caused by mutations of the NLRP3 gene, with chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular syndrome being the severest clinical phenotype. Various pterins have been reported as mediating immunologic functions in the central nervous system, but to date studies of pterin cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) values and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome have been lacking. A 2-year-old child was affected with a severe atypical form of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome, suspected based on the analysis of neopterin in CSF. He initially presented isolated neurologic manifestations mimicking a neuroregressive disorder. Blood and CSF analyses did not present any routine inflammatory markers, but CSF neopterin was elevated. Later, the patient developed arthritis and recurrent episodes of fever, and the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome diagnosis was confirmed by genetic studies. Neopterin was the most altered indicator over the time. Child neurologists should be on the alert when unexplained neurologic signs appear, giving consideration to the possibility of inflammatory or immune-mediated diseases. The present case demonstrates the clinical utility of measurement of CSF neopterin levels in screening for these immune-mediated diseases, especially when neurologic symptoms are associated with normal results on routine CSF tests.

  19. Abnormal expression of cerebrospinal fluid cation chloride cotransporters in patients with Rett syndrome.

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    Sofia Temudo Duarte

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Rett Syndrome is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder caused mainly by mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2. The relevance of MeCP2 for GABAergic function was previously documented in animal models. In these models, animals show deficits in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. Neuronal Cation Chloride Cotransporters (CCCs play a key role in GABAergic neuronal maturation, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor is implicated in the regulation of CCCs expression during development. Our aim was to analyse the expression of two relevant CCCs, NKCC1 and KCC2, in the cerebrospinal fluid of Rett syndrome patients and compare it with a normal control group. METHODS: The presence of bumetanide sensitive NKCC1 and KCC2 was analysed in cerebrospinal fluid samples from a control pediatric population (1 day to 14 years of life and from Rett syndrome patients (2 to 19 years of life, by immunoblot analysis. RESULTS: Both proteins were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid and their levels are higher in the early postnatal period. However, Rett syndrome patients showed significantly reduced levels of KCC2 and KCC2/NKCC1 ratio when compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced KCC2/NKCC1 ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid of Rett Syndrome patients suggests a disturbed process of GABAergic neuronal maturation and open up a new therapeutic perspective.

  20. [Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Andreia Gomes; Gago, Miguel Fernandes; Garrett, Carolina

    2011-12-01

    In current medical practice, the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease remains essentially clinical. This practice determines that the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is done in an already advanced neuropathological stage of the disease. The aim of this study is to review the validity of cerebrospinal fluid protein biological markers in the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. The a-synuclein and DJ-1 proteins, due to their role in the hereditary Parkinson's disease, have been the most widely studied cerebrospinal biomarkers. Nevertheless, they have had divergent results mostly owing to different processing, identification and control of laboratory techniques. The new proteomic techniques, directed to the detection of multiple undifferentiated proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (eg. ceruloplasmin, chromogranin B, apoH), are promising. The early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is imperious as it is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that causes extensive morbidity. Most of current scientific research in Parkinson's disease is focused on the discovery of neuroprotective drugs. Thus, the definition of biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is highly relevant.

  1. Acetylcholinesterase assay for cerebrospinal fluid using bupivacaine to inhibit butyrylcholinesterase

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    Anders Jens

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most test systems for acetylcholinesterase activity (E.C.3.1.1.7. are using toxic inhibitors (BW284c51 and iso-OMPA to distinguish the enzyme from butyrylcholinesterase (E.C.3.1.1.8. which occurs simultaneously in the cerebrospinal fluid. Applying Ellman's colorimetric method, we were looking for a non-toxic inhibitor to restrain butyrylcholinesterase activity. Based on results of previous in vitro studies bupivacaine emerged to be a suitable inhibitor. Results Pharmacokinetic investigations with purified cholinesterases have shown maximum inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase activity and minimal interference with acetylcholinesterase activity at bupivacaine final concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 mmol/l. Based on detailed analysis of pharmacokinetic data we developed three equations representing enzyme inhibition at bupivacaine concentrations of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 mmol/l. These equations allow us to calculate the acetylcholinesterase activity in solutions containing both cholinesterases utilizing the extinction differences measured spectrophotometrically in samples with and without bupivacaine. The accuracy of the bupivacaine-inhibition test could be confirmed by investigations on solutions of both purified cholinesterases and on samples of human cerebrospinal fluid. If butyrylcholinesterase activity has to be assessed simultaneously an independent test using butyrylthiocholine iodide as substrate (final concentration 5 mmol/l has to be conducted. Conclusions The bupivacaine-inhibition test is a reliable method using spectrophotometrical techniques to measure acetylcholinesterase activity in cerebrospinal fluid. It avoids the use of toxic inhibitors for differentiation of acetylcholinesterase from butyrylcholinesterase in fluids containing both enzymes. Our investigations suggest that bupivacaine concentrations of 0.1, 0.2 or 0.5 mmol/l can be applied with the same effect using 1 mmol/l acetylthiocholine iodide as substrate.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid hypersecretion in pediatric hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimy, Jason K; Duran, Daniel; Hu, Jamie K; Gavankar, Charuta; Gaillard, Jonathan R; Bayri, Yasar; Rice, Hunter; DiLuna, Michael L; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Marc Simard, J; Kahle, Kristopher T

    2016-11-01

    Hydrocephalus, despite its heterogeneous causes, is ultimately a disease of disordered CSF homeostasis that results in pathological expansion of the cerebral ventricles. Our current understanding of the pathophysiology of hydrocephalus is inadequate but evolving. Over this past century, the majority of hydrocephalus cases has been explained by functional or anatomical obstructions to bulk CSF flow. More recently, hydrodynamic models of hydrocephalus have emphasized the role of abnormal intracranial pulsations in disease pathogenesis. Here, the authors review the molecular mechanisms of CSF secretion by the choroid plexus epithelium, the most efficient and actively secreting epithelium in the human body, and provide experimental and clinical evidence for the role of increased CSF production in hydrocephalus. Although the choroid plexus epithelium might have only an indirect influence on the pathogenesis of many types of pediatric hydrocephalus, the ability to modify CSF secretion with drugs newer than acetazolamide or furosemide would be an invaluable component of future therapies to alleviate permanent shunt dependence. Investigation into the human genetics of developmental hydrocephalus and choroid plexus hyperplasia, and the molecular physiology of the ion channels and transporters responsible for CSF secretion, might yield novel targets that could be exploited for pharmacotherapeutic intervention.

  3. [Cerebrospinal fluid shunts for hydrocephalus and related disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masaki; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Saito, Hisayasu; Shimbo, Daisuke; Motegi, Hiroaki; Kawabori, Masahito; Miyamoto, Michiyuki; Yamauchi, Tomohiro

    2012-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunts are commonly employed to treat patients with hydrocephalus. A large number of papers have been published focusing on complications and failures of CSF shunts. However, there appears to be a paucity of knowledge comprehensively covering both common complications and rare ones. In this systematic review, we surveyed articles about surgical complications of CSF shunts as comprehensively as possible. Quantitative analysis was performed to determine the frequency of well-known complications, mortality and revision rates of CSF shunts. Furthermore, rare complications of CSF shunts have also been reviewed.

  4. Immunoblotting techniques with picogram sensitivity in cerebrospinal fluid protein detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nespolo, A; Bianchi, G; Salmaggi, A; Lazzaroni, M; Cerrato, D; Malesani Tajoli, L

    1989-01-01

    Agarose isoelectric focusing followed by blotting with nitrocellulose, nylon or polyvinylidene difluoride membranes, and immunochemical detection of cerebrospinal fluid IgG with various combinations of antisera, was evaluated. Polyvinylidene difluoride proved to be an easy-to-handle and reliable membrane for protein blotting. Among immunochemical visualization reactions, the most sensitive employed biotinylated goat anti-human IgG followed by streptavidin colloidal gold conjugate and silver enhancement in 20% w/v urea, allowing a sensitivity of less then 1 picogram IgG/band.

  5. [Immunoglobulins in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood in acute neuroinfections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekonenko, E P; Poliakova, T G; Ivanova, L A; Umanskiĭ, K G; Demidova, S A

    1988-01-01

    The authors have examined 42 patients with viral encephalitides and other central nervous system lesions using a complex of clinical and viroimmunological methods of examination. The main emphasis has been laid on measuring immunoglobulins A, M, and G in the blood serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The results have shown marked changes in humoral immunity. The degree of these changes is directly correlated with severity of encephalitis. Investigation into humoral immunity in patients with neuroinfections and other nervous system diseases contributes to the development of differential diagnostic criteria and better understanding of the relationship between severity and outcome of diseases.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid scintigraphy in traumas to the nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, P. (Meditsinska Akademiya, Sofia (Bulgaria). Nauchen Inst. po Rentgenologiya i Radiobiologiya)

    1983-01-01

    The results of cerebrospinal fluid scintigraphy in 48 patients who had undergone trauma to the nervous system were studied. This method has gained rather insufficient acceptance in the diagnosis of this disease, in fact, it was helpful in detecting a high percentage of pathologic changes (80 per cent). Their type and localization structure was as follows: Narrowing of the spinal CSF space in 25 patients and 1 suspective; encephalonasal fistula - 3 patients; blockade of the lateral pathway of the CSF to the brain convexity - 4 patients; pathologic CSF circulation; dilatation of the convex brain cysterns with disturbances at the resorption site - 3 patients; combined spino-encephalic lesion - 1 patient.

  7. Viral loads of cerebrospinal fluid in infants with enterovirus meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Hisashi; Ioi, Hiroaki; Ishii, Chiako; Hasegawa, Yuka; Amaha, Masahiro; Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Takekuma, Kouji; Hoshika, Akinori; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2008-01-01

    For a better understanding of the role of the viral load, free radicals, and cytokines in viral meningitis, we surveyed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from patients below 1 year of age who showed positive for enterovirus. In their first examinations interleukin (IL)-6 and free radicals increased whereas pleocytosis was rarely observed. IL-6 decreased within the short period. Viral loads and free radicals increased simultaneously. IL-6 and free radicals of CSF are helpful for diagnosis and treatment of viral meningitis at an early stage.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in neurological diseases in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahim, Pashtun; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Darin, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mattsson, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers is an integral part of neurology. Basic CSF biomarkers, such as CSF/serum albumin ratio and CSF cell counts, have been used to diagnose inflammatory and infectious CNS disorders in adults and children for decades. During recent years, however, numerous biomarkers for neuronal and astroglial injury, as well as disease-specific protein inclusions, have been developed for neurodegenerative disorders in adults. The overall aim of this paper is to give an updated overview of some of these biomarkers with special focus on their possible relevance to neurological disorders in children and adolescents.

  9. Cervical intradural disc herniation and cerebrospinal fluid leak

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    Ritesh Kansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical intradural disc herniation (IDH is a rare condition and only 25 cases of cervical have been reported. We report a 45-year-old male who presented with sudden onset right lower limb weakness after lifting heavy weight. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed C5/6 disc prolapse with intradural extension. The patient underwent C5/6 discectomy through anterior cervical approach. Postoperatively, the patient improved in stiffness but developed cerebrospinal fluid leak and the leak resolved with multiple lumbar punctures.

  10. Brain Gene Expression Signatures From Cerebrospinal Fluid Exosome RNA Profiling

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    Zanello, S. B.; Stevens, B.; Calvillo, E.; Tang, R.; Gutierrez Flores, B.; Hu, L.; Skog, J.; Bershad, E.

    2016-01-01

    While the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome observations have focused on ocular symptoms, spaceflight has been also associated with a number of other performance and neurologic signs, such as headaches, cognitive changes, vertigo, nausea, sleep/circadian disruption and mood alterations, which, albeit likely multifactorial, can also result from elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). We therefore hypothesize that these various symptoms are caused by disturbances in the neurophysiology of the brain structures and are correlated with molecular markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as indicators of neurophysiological changes. Exosomes are 30-200 nm microvesicles shed into all biofluids, including blood, urine, and CSF, carrying a highly rich source of intact protein and RNA cargo. Exosomes have been identified in human CSF, and their proteome and RNA pool is a potential new reservoir for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in brain gene expression via exosome analysis in patients suffering from ICP elevation of varied severity (idiopathic intracranial hypertension -IIH), a condition which shares some of the neuroophthalmological features of VIIP, as a first step toward obtaining evidence suggesting that cognitive function and ICP levels can be correlated with biomarkers in the CSF. Our preliminary work, reported last year, validated the exosomal technology applicable to CSF analysis and demonstrated that it was possible to obtain gene expression evidence of inflammation processes in traumatic brain injury patients. We are now recruiting patients with suspected IIH requiring lumbar puncture at Baylor College of Medicine. Both CSF (5 ml) and human plasma (10 ml) are being collected in order to compare the pattern of differentially expressed genes observed in CSF and in blood. Since blood is much more accessible than CSF, we would like to determine whether plasma biomarkers for

  11. Transferring Cut-off Values between Assays for Cerebrospinal Fluid Alzheimer's Disease Biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Barrado, Leandro; Coart, Els; Vanderstichele, Hugo M. J.; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Current technologies quantifying cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers to identify subjects with Alzheimer's disease pathology report different concentrations in function of technology and suffer from between-laboratory variability. Hence, lab- and technology-specific cut-off values are required. It is common practice to establish cut-off values on small datasets and, in the absence of well-characterized samples, to transfer the cut-offs to another assay format using 'side-by-side' testing of sample...

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's disease - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, A D; Binzer, M; Stenager, E; Gramsbergen, J B

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) relies on clinical history and physical examination, but misdiagnosis is common in early stages. Identification of biomarkers for PD may allow early and more precise diagnosis and monitoring of dopamine replacement strategies and disease modifying treatments. Developments in analytical chemistry allow the detection of large numbers of molecules in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid, associated with the pathophysiology or pathogenesis of PD. This systematic review includes cerebrospinal fluid biomarker studies focusing on different disease pathways: oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, lysosomal dysfunction and proteins involved in PD and other neurodegenerative disorders, focusing on four clinical domains: their ability to (1) distinguish PD from healthy subjects and other neurodegenerative disorders as well as their relation to (2) disease duration after initial diagnosis, (3) severity of disease (motor symptoms) and (4) cognitive dysfunction. Oligomeric alpha-synuclein might be helpful in the separation of PD from controls. Through metabolomics, changes in purine and tryptophan metabolism have been discovered in patients with PD. Neurofilament light chain (NfL) has a significant role in distinguishing PD from other neurodegenerative diseases. Several oxidative stress markers are related to disease severity, with the antioxidant urate also having a prognostic value in terms of disease severity. Increased levels of amyloid and tau-proteins correlate with cognitive decline and may have prognostic value for cognitive deficits in PD. In the future, larger longitudinal studies, corroborating previous research on viable biomarker candidates or using metabolomics identifying a vast amount of potential biomarkers, could be a good approach.

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Mechanics and Its Coupling to Cerebrovascular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linninger, Andreas A.; Tangen, Kevin; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Frim, David

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is not stagnant but displays fascinating oscillatory flow patterns inside the ventricular system and reversing fluid exchange between the cranial vault and spinal compartment. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of pulsatile CSF motion. Observations contradicting classical views about its bulk production and clearance are highlighted. A clinical account of diseases of abnormal CSF flow dynamics, including hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, Chiari malformation type 1, and pseudotumor cerebri, is also given. We survey medical imaging modalities used to observe intracranial dynamics in vivo. Additionally, we assess the state of the art in predictive models of CSF dynamics. The discussion addresses open questions regarding CSF dynamics as they relate to the understanding and management of diseases.

  14. Mannan-binding lectin in cerebrospinal fluid: a leptomeningeal protein

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    Reiber Hansotto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mannan-binding lectin (MBL, a protein of the innate immune response is attracting increasing clinical interest, in particularly in relation to its deficiency. Due to its involvement in brain diseases, identifying the source of MBL in CSF is important. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF can provide data that discriminates between blood-, brain-, and leptomeninges-derived proteins. To detect the source of MBL in CSF we need to consider three variables: the molecular size-dependent concentration gradient between CSF and blood, the variation in transfer between blood and CSF, and the CSF MBL concentration correlation with the albumin CSF/serum quotient (QAlb, i.e., with CSF flow rate. Methods MBL was assayed in samples of CSF and serum with an ELISA, coated with anti MBL antibodies. Routine parameters such as albumin-, immunoglobulin- CSF/serum quotients, oligoclonal IgG and cell count were used to characterize the patient groups. Groups comprised firstly, control patients without organic brain disease with normal CSF and normal barrier function and secondly, patients without inflammatory diseases but with increased QAlb, i.e. with a blood CSF barrier dysfunction. Results MBL concentration in CSF was at least five-fold higher than expected for a molecular-size-dependent passage from blood. Secondly, in a QIgM/QAlb quotient diagram (Reibergram 9/13 cases showed an intrathecal fraction in some cases over 80% of total CSF MBL concentration 3 The smaller inter-individual variation of MBL concentrations in CSF of the control group (CV = 66% compared to the MBL concentrations in serum (CV = 146% indicate an independent source of MBL in CSF. 4 The absolute MBL concentration in CSF increases with increasing QAlb. Among brain-derived proteins in CSF only the leptomeningeal proteins showed a (linear increase with decreasing CSF flow rate, neuronal and glial proteins are invariant to changes of QAlb. Conclusions MBL in CSF is

  15. High Blood Pressure Effects on the Blood to Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier and Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein Composition: A Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis Study in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

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    Ibrahim González-Marrero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is to analyze the cerebrospinal fluid proteomic profile, trying to find possible biomarkers of the effects of hypertension of the blood to CSF barrier disruption in the brain and their participation in the cholesterol and β-amyloid metabolism and inflammatory processes. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is a system linked to the brain and its composition can be altered not only by encephalic disorder, but also by systemic diseases such as arterial hypertension, which produces alterations in the choroid plexus and cerebrospinal fluid protein composition. 2D gel electrophoresis in cerebrospinal fluid extracted from the cistern magna before sacrifice of hypertensive and control rats was performed. The results showed different proteomic profiles between SHR and WKY, that α-1-antitrypsin, apolipoprotein A1, albumin, immunoglobulin G, vitamin D binding protein, haptoglobin and α-1-macroglobulin were found to be up-regulated in SHR, and apolipoprotein E, transthyretin, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, transferrin, α-1β-glycoprotein, kininogen and carbonic anhidrase II were down-regulated in SHR. The conclusion made here is that hypertension in SHR produces important variations in cerebrospinal fluid proteins that could be due to a choroid plexus dysfunction and this fact supports the close connection between hypertension and blood to cerebrospinal fluid barrier disruption.

  16. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone

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    Giannicola Iannella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection.

  17. A quantitative analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow in posttraumatic syringomyelia

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    Tobimatsu, Yoshiko; Nihei, Ryuuichi; Kimura, Tetsuhiko; Suyama, Tetsuo; Tobimatsu, Haruki (National Rehabilitation Center for the Disabled Hospital, Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan))

    1991-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow within the spinal canal and syrinx in posttraumatic syringomyelia were studied by cardiac-gated phase images of magnetic resonance imaging in 12 normal volunteers and 8 patients with syringomyelia. The cardiac-gated phase method was simple and useful for detection of CSF flow. Phase modulation was in direct proportion to flow velocity. Phase modulation was not affected by the T1 or T2 relaxation time. In normal volunteers, CSF flows caudally during systole and cranially during diastole. The maximum caudal CSF flow velocity at C2 level was from 0.45 cm/sec to 1.71 cm/sec, average; 1.27 cm/sec. All of symptomatic posttraumatic syringomyelia patients had the flow in the syrinx. (author).

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid proteome of patients with acute Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Thomas E; Jacobs, Jon M; Smith, Robert P; Pasternack, Mark S; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A; Shukla, Anil; Gilmore, Edward C; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Warren, H Shaw

    2012-10-05

    During acute Lyme disease, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS), leading to the development of meningitis and other neurologic symptoms. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing a deep view into the proteome for patients diagnosed with early disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified differences in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry-based methods. We identified 108 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease from controls. Comparison between infected patients and control subjects revealed differences in proteins in the CSF associated with cell death localized to brain synapses and others that likely originate from brain parenchyma.

  19. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the cerebrospinal fluid of dogs with seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Orit; Sommer, Adi; Zimmerman, Gabriel; Soreq, Hermona; Friedman, Alon; Bdolah-Abram, Tali; Aroch, Itamar; Shamir, Merav H

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies in animal models have focused on the role of cholinergic elements, mainly acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the 'readthrough' acetylcholinesterase isoform (AChE-R), in seizures. A prospective double-masked study was conducted to assess the activity of AChE and AChE-R in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 26 dogs post-seizure, 28 dogs with intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) and 16 healthy dogs. AChE was also measured in the serum in the post-seizure and IVDD groups. The results showed no significant differences in CSF AChE among the three groups. AChE-R was not detected in any dog and AChE in the serum was similar between groups. This preliminary study provides new information on AChE and AChE-R in the CSF and sera of dogs following naturally-occurring seizures.

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid galactorrhea: a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sai-Cheung; Chen, Jyi-Feng; Tu, Po-Hsun; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2008-06-01

    In this report we describe a 26-year-old woman who had an intra-abdominal pseudocyst located at the peritoneal catheter tip following ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunt implantation. Retrograde cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flowed outside the catheter and communicated with the right breast lactiferous ductal system and leaked from the nipple orifice. CSF galactorrhea only occurs when the lactiferous duct is injured during VP shunt implantation, in combination with the formation of an intra-abdominal CSF pseudocyst prior to lactiferous duct healing. Leakage of CSF from the nipple orifice can be successfully treated by simply guiding the peritoneal catheter tip into the peritoneal cavity through a new laparotomy; that is, shunt revision is not always required.

  1. Idiopathic cerebrospinal fluid overproduction: case-based review of the pathophysiological mechanism implied in the cerebrospinal fluid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisi, Gianluca; Frassanito, Paolo; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2014-08-28

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) overproduction results from either CSF infection or choroid plexus hypertrophy or tumor, with only a single idiopathic case described so far. We report a unique case of a male infant with Crouzon syndrome who presented with intracranial hypertension, caused by up to 4-fold increase in CSF daily production. Conditions related to CSF overproduction, namely central nervous system infections and choroid plexus hypertrophy or tumor, were ruled out by repeated magnetic resonance imaging and CSF samples. Medical therapy failed to reduce CSF production and the patient underwent several shunting procedures, cranial expansion, and endoscopic coagulation of the choroid plexus. This article thoroughly reviews pertinent literature on CSF production mechanisms and possible therapeutic implications.

  2. EDA-containing fibronectin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupek, Małgorzata; Jasonek, Jolanta; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Fibronectin containing an alternatively spliced extra domain A (EDA-FN) participates in diverse biological cell functions, being also directly or indirectly engaged during an inflammatory response to brain injury and/or neuron regeneration. We analyzed FN and EDA-FN isoform levels by ELISA in 85 cerebrospinal fluid samples and 67 plasma samples obtained from children suffering from bacterial or viral meningitis and non-meningitis peripheral inflammation. We have found that the cerebrospinal level of EDA-FN was significantly lower in the bacterial meningitis group than in the viral- and non-meningitis groups. In the patients' plasma, EDA-FN was almost undetectable. The determination of fibronectin containing the EDA segment might be considered as an additional diagnostic marker of bacterial meningitis in children.

  3. Highly potent soluble amyloid-β seeds in human Alzheimer brain but not cerebrospinal fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Stephan A.; Maia, Luis F.; Portelius, Erik; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Kaminski, Clemens F.; Winkler, David T.; Maetzler, Walter; Keyvani, Kathy; Spitzer, Philipp; Wiltfang, Jens; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Jucker, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    The soluble fraction of brain samples from patients with Alzheimer’s disease contains highly biologically active amyloid-β seeds. In this study, we sought to assess the potency of soluble amyloid-β seeds derived from the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. Soluble Alzheimer’s disease brain extracts were serially diluted and then injected into the hippocampus of young, APP transgenic mice. Eight months later, seeded amyloid-β deposition was evident even when the hippocampus received subattomole amounts of brain-derived amyloid-β. In contrast, cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Alzheimer’s disease, which contained more than 10-fold higher levels of amyloid-β peptide than the most concentrated soluble brain extracts, did not induce detectable seeding activity in vivo. Similarly, cerebrospinal fluid from aged APP-transgenic donor mice failed to induce cerebral amyloid-β deposition. In comparison to the soluble brain fraction, cerebrospinal fluid largely lacked N-terminally truncated amyloid-β species and exhibited smaller amyloid-β-positive particles, features that may contribute to the lack of in vivo seeding by cerebrospinal fluid. Interestingly, the same cerebrospinal fluid showed at least some seeding activity in an in vitro assay. The present results indicate that the biological seeding activity of soluble amyloid-β species is orders of magnitude greater in brain extracts than in the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:25212850

  4. Drug delivery to the human brain via the cerebrospinal fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howden, L.; Aroussi, A. [Univ. of Nottingham, School of Mechanical, Material, Manufacturing Engineering and Managements, Nottingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: eaxljh@nottingham.ac.uk; Vloeberghs, M. [Queens Medical Centre, Dept. of Child Health, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    This Study investigates the flow of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) inside the human ventricular system with particular emphasis on drug path flow for the purpose of medical drug injections. The investigation is conducted using the computational fluid dynamics package FLUENT. The role of the ventricular system is very important in protecting the brain from injury by cushioning it against the cranium during sudden movements. If for any reason the passage of CSF through the ventricular system is blocked (usually by stenosis) then a condition known as Hydrocephalus occurs, where by the blocked CSF causes the Intra Cranial Pressure (ICP) inside the brain to rise. If this is not treated then severe brain damage and death can occur. Previous work conducted by the authors on this subject has focused on the technique of ventriculostomy to treat hydrocephalus. The present study carries on from the previous work but focuses on delivering medical drugs to treat brain tumors that are conventionally not accessible and which require complicated surgical procedures to remove them. The study focuses on the possible paths for delivering drugs to tumors in the human nervous system through conventionally accessible locations without major surgery. The results of the investigation have shown that it is possible to reach over 95% of the ventricular system by injection of drugs however the results also show that there are many factors that can affect the drug flow paths through the ventricular system and thus the areas reachable, by these drugs. (author)

  5. Rapid distribution of intraventricularly administered sucrose into cerebrospinal fluid cisterns via subarachnoid velae in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghersi-Egea, J F; Finnegan, W; Chen, J L; Fenstermacher, J D

    1996-12-01

    perivascular spaces and/or walls of pial arteries and arterioles for more than 3 h. Certain transport proteins, protease inhibitors, growth factors and other neurobiologically active materials are present in cerebrospinal fluid, and their distribution to the brain and its blood vessels may be important. The present work shows, in the rat, that the flow of cerebrospinal fluid and the disposition of its constituents is fairly complex and differs among regions. Flow was rapid throughout the ventricular system and into various subarachnoid velae and cisterns, but was surprisingly slow and slight over the cerebral and cerebellar cortices. The cerebrospinal fluid-to-tissue flux of material was relatively free at many interfaces, but was greatly restricted at others, the latter indicating that the old concept of a "cerebrospinal fluid-brain barrier" may hold at such places. Finally, radiolabeled sucrose was retained longer within the walls and perivascular spaces of pial arteries and arterioles than in other subarachnoid tissues; one function of the cerebrospinal fluid system or "third circulation" may thus be delivering factors and agents to these pial blood vessels.

  6. Virtual MRI endoscopy of the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigematsu, Y.; Korogi, Y.; Hirai, T. [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Okuda, T.; Ikushima, I.; Sugahara, T.; Liang, L.; Ge, Y.; Takahashi, M.

    1998-10-01

    We used constructive interference in steady state (CISS) 3D Fourier transform (3DFT) MRI data sets to obtain three-dimensional (3D) virtual MRI endoscopic views of the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces, processing them with a commercially available perspective endoscopic algorithm. We investigated the potential of the intracranial virtual MRI endoscopy applied to visualisation of the pathology in 13 patients with surgically confirmed trigeminal neuralgia (3), hemifacial spasm (3), acoustic neuroma (3), suprasellar germinoma (1), Langerhans cell histiocytosis (1), lateral ventricle nodules (1) and pituitary dwarfism (1). All images were acquired using a 1.5-T imager employing a circular polarised head coil. The CISS-3DFT data sets were transferred to a workstation for processing with the perspective endoscopic algorithm. Postprocessing for virtual MRI endoscopy was possible for all data sets. The lesions in 12 patients, and their complex anatomical relationships with the surrounding structures, were well seen on the 3D images. A small acoustic neuroma in the internal auditory meatus was not seen using virtual endoscopy. Although virtual MRI endoscopy has limitations, it provides 3D images which cannot be acquired using any other procedure. (orig.) With 6 figs., 16 refs.

  7. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A Pilot Study

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    Ashley M. Brouillette

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases, including the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA, would benefit from the identification of reliable biomarkers that could serve as disease subtype-specific and stage-specific indicators for the development and monitoring of treatments. We analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF level of tau, α-synuclein, DJ-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, proteins previously associated with neurodegenerative processes, in patients with the autosomal dominant SCA1, SCA2, and SCA6, and the sporadic disease multiple system atrophy, cerebellar type (MSA-C, compared with age-matched controls. We estimated disease severity using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA. Most proteins measured trended higher in disease versus control group yet did not reach statistical significance. We found the levels of tau in both SCA2 and MSA-C patients were significantly higher than control. We found that α-synuclein levels were lower with higher SARA scores in SCA1 and tau levels were higher with greater SARA in MSA-C, although this final correlation did not reach statistical significance after post hoc correction. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed to improve the power of these studies and validate the use of CSF biomarkers in SCA and MSA-C.

  8. Intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid outflow conductance in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albeck, M J; Børgesen, S E; Gjerris, F; Schmidt, J F; Sørensen, P S

    1991-04-01

    Conductance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow (Cout) is an important parameter to be considered in patients with CSF circulation abnormalities. In patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus it is the single most important parameter in determining if the patient needs CSF shunting. The lower normal limit for Cout has been estimated from the effect of shunting in patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus, from patients retrospectively reevaluated after recovering from illness, and from patients with known abnormalities in the brain or the CSF system. The true value of Cout in normal individuals, however, has hitherto not been reported. In the present study, Cout has been measured by a lumbar infusion test in eight young volunteers with no suspicion of disease. The mean intracranial pressure (ICP) was 11 mm Hg and a linear relationship was found between CSF absorption and ICP. The mean Cout was 0.11 ml/min/mm Hg and the lower 95% confidence level was 0.10 ml/min/mm Hg. These values are in accordance with those obtained from previous studies.

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology studies of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus

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    CHEN Lin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NP-SLE is the central nervous system (CNS involvement of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. The diagnosis of NP-SLE may be difficult due to the lack of specific biomarker. CNS cerebrospinal fluid (CSF cytology is diagnostic significant to CNS autoimmune disease. This paper described the characteristics of CSF cytology and evaluated its diagnostic value in NP-SLE. Methods Seventy-six eligible patients with clear diagnosis of NP-SLE were collected for CSF cytological examinations. Results The CSF cytology findings of 25 cases in 76 were abnormal, among which 16 cases showed lymphocytic inflammatory reactions; 8 cases had slight increase of neutrophile granulocyte percent; 9 cases showed lymphocyte-neutrophile inflammation. Activated lymphocytes together with monocytes were present in 24 cases. Among those cases, abnormal endocytosis of monocytes, which presented as monocytes phagocytosing lymphocytes or plasmocytes, was shown in 17 cases; plasmocytes were found in 17 cases. Conclusion The diagnosis of NP-SLE is based on clinical, neuroimaging and CSF studies. Among these methods, the CSF cytology findings are quite useful in practice, since the CSF cytological inflammatory reactions, especially the presentation of abnormal phagocytes in CSF is typical in NP-SLE and indicates its vasculitic mechanism.

  10. Raltegravir cerebrospinal fluid concentrations in HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Yilmaz

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Raltegravir is an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor currently used in treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients resistant to other drug classes. In order to assess its central nervous system penetration, we measured raltegravir concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma in subjects receiving antiretroviral treatment regimens containing this drug. METHODS: Raltegravir concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in 25 paired CSF and plasma samples from 16 HIV-1-infected individuals. The lower limit of quantitation was 2.0 ng/ml for CSF and 10 ng/ml for plasma. RESULTS: Twenty-four of the 25 CSF samples had detectable raltegravir concentrations with a median raltegravir concentration of 18.4 ng/ml (range, <2.0-126.0. The median plasma raltegravir concentration was 448 ng/ml (range, 37-5180. CSF raltegravir concentrations correlated with CSF:plasma albumin ratios and CSF albumin concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Approximately 50% of the CSF specimens exceeded the IC(95 levels reported to inhibit HIV-1 strains without resistance to integrase inhibitors. In addition to contributing to control of systemic HIV-1 infection, raltegravir achieves local inhibitory concentrations in CSF in most, but not all, patients. Blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers likely restrict drug entry, while enhanced permeability of these barriers enhances drug entry.

  11. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Dementia Patients with Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-feng Li; Fang-fang Ge; Yong Zhang; Hui You; Zhen-xin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the changes of biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Methods Levels of amyloid proteinβ (Aβ42, Aβ40) and phosphorylated Tau-protein (P-tau) in CSF and ratio of Aβ42/Aβ40 were tested in 5 cases with CAA dementia and 20 cases with Alzheimer's disease collected at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from December 2001 to March 2011. Results The levels of Aβ42, Aβ40, and P-tau in CSF and ratio of Aβ42/Aβ40 were (660.4±265.2) ng/L, (7111.0±1033.4) ng/L, (71.8±51.5) ng/L, and 0.077±0.033, respectively in CAA dementia and (663.6±365.6) ng/L, (5115.0±2931.1) ng/L, (47.7±38.8) ng/L, and 0.192±0.140, respectively in Alzheimer's disease patients. There were no statistically significant differences between CAA dementia and Alzheimer's disease in terms of these CSF biomarkers (allP>0.05). Conclusion Measurements of CSF biomarkers may not be helpful in differential diagnosis of CAA and Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  13. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpulainen, Elina; Välitalo, Pyry; Kokki, Merja; Lehtonen, Marko; Hooker, Andrew; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Kokki, Hannu

    2010-01-01

    AIMS This study was designed to characterize paediatric pharmacokinetics and central nervous system exposure of flurbiprofen. METHODS The pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen were studied in 64 healthy children aged 3 months to 13 years, undergoing surgery with spinal anaesthesia. Children were administered preoperatively a single dose of flurbiprofen intravenously as prodrug (n = 27) or by mouth as syrup (n = 37). A single cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample (n = 60) was collected at the induction of anaesthesia, and plasma samples (n = 304) before, during and after the operation (up to 20 h after administration). A population pharmacokinetic model was built using the NONMEM software package. RESULTS Flurbiprofen concentrations in plasma were well described by a three compartment model. The apparent bioavailability of oral flurbiprofen syrup was 81%. The estimated clearance (CL) was 0.96 l h−1 70 kg−1. Age did not affect the clearance after weight had been included as a covariate. The estimated volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) was 8.1 l 70 kg−1. Flurbiprofen permeated into the CSF, reaching concentrations that were seven-fold higher compared with unbound plasma concentrations. CONCLUSIONS Flurbiprofen pharmacokinetics can be described using only weight as a covariate in children above 6 months, while more research is needed in neonates and in younger infants. PMID:20840447

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid ferritin in children with viral and bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, M; Mamishi, S; Mahmoudi, S; Pourakbari, B; Khotaei, G; Daneshjou, K; Hashemi, N

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that the prognosis of bacterial meningitis has been improved by the influence of antibiotics, this disease is still one of the significant causes of morbidity and mortality in children. Rapid differentiation between bacterial and aseptic meningitis, and the need for immediate antibiotic treatment in the former, is crucial in the prognosis of these patients. Ferritin is one of the most sensitive biochemical markers investigated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for the early diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. The present study aims to evaluate the diagnostic capability of CSF ferritin in differentiating bacterial and viral meningitis in the paediatric setting. A cross-sectional study was carried out in the referral Children's Medical Center Hospital, Tehran, during 2008 and 2009. According to the inclusion criteria, CSF samples from 42 patients with suspected meningitis were obtained and divided into two meningitis groups, bacterial (n = 18) and viral (n = 24). Ferritin and other routine determinants (i.e., leucocytes, protein and glucose) were compared between the two groups. Ferritin concentration in the bacterial meningitis group was 106.39 +/- 86.96 ng/dL, which was considerably higher than in the viral meningitis group (10.17 +/- 14.09, P meningitis group and showed a positive correlation with CSF ferritin. In conclusion, this study suggests that CSF ferritin concentration is an accurate test for the early differentiation of bacterial and aseptic meningitis; however, further investigation on a larger cohort of patients is required to confirm this finding.

  15. The longitudinal cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Elizabeth; Larkin, James R; Claridge, Tim D W; Talbot, Kevin; Sibson, Nicola R; Turner, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Neurochemical biomarkers are urgently sought in ALS. Metabolomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy is a highly sensitive method capable of revealing nervous system cellular pathology. The (1)H-NMR CSF metabolomic signature of ALS was sought in a longitudinal cohort. Six-monthly serial collection was performed in ALS patients across a range of clinical sub-types (n = 41) for up to two years, and in healthy controls at a single time-point (n = 14). A multivariate statistical approach, partial least squares discriminant analysis, was used to determine differences between the NMR spectra from patients and controls. Significantly predictive models were found using those patients with at least one year's interval between recruitment and the second sample. Glucose, lactate, citric acid and, unexpectedly, ethanol were the discriminating metabolites elevated in ALS. It is concluded that (1)H-NMR captured the CSF metabolomic signature associated with derangements in cellular energy utilization connected with ALS, and was most prominent in comparisons using patients with longer disease duration. The specific metabolites identified support the concept of a hypercatabolic state, possibly involving mitochondrial dysfunction specifically. Endogenous ethanol in the CSF may be an unrecognized novel marker of neuronal tissue injury in ALS.

  16. Simulating transitional hydrodynamics of the cerebrospinal fluid at extreme scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kartik; Roller, Sabine; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    Chiari malformation type I is a disorder characterized by the herniation of cerebellar tonsils into the spinal canal through the foramen magnum resulting in obstruction to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow. The flow of pulsating bidirectional CSF is of acutely complex nature due to the anatomy of the conduit containing it - the subarachnoid space. We report lattice Boltzmann method based direct numerical simulations on patient specific cases with spatial resolution of 24 μm amounting meshes of up to 2 billion cells conducted on 50000 cores of the Hazelhen supercomputer in Stuttgart. The goal is to characterize intricate dynamics of the CSF at resolutions that are of the order of Kolmogorov microscales. Results unfold velocity fluctuations up to ~ 10 KHz , turbulent kinetic energy ~ 2 times of the mean flow energy in Chiari patients whereas the flow remains laminar in a control subject. The fluctuations confine near the cranio-vertebral junction and are commensurate with the extremeness of pathology and the extent of herniation. The results advocate that the manifestation of pathological conditions like Chiari malformation may lead to transitional hydrodynamics of the CSF, and a prudent calibration of numerical approach is necessary to avoid overlook of such phenomena.

  17. Head movement, an important contributor to human cerebrospinal fluid circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Yu, Sheng-Bo; Zheng, Nan; Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Chi, Yan-Yan; Liu, Cong; Wang, Xue-Mei; Lin, Xiang-Tao; Sui, Hong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The suboccipital muscles are connected to the upper cervical spinal dura mater via the myodural bridges (MDBs). Recently, it was suggested that they might work as a pump to provide power for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of the suboccipital muscles contractions on the CSF flow. Forty healthy adult volunteers were subjected to cine phase-contrast MR imaging. Each volunteer was scanned twice, once before and once after one-minute-head-rotation period. CSF flow waveform parameters at craniocervical junction were analyzed. The results showed that, after the head rotations, the maximum and average CSF flow rates during ventricular diastole were significantly increased, and the CSF stroke volumes during diastole and during entire cardiac cycle were significantly increased. This suggested that the CSF flow was significantly promoted by head movements. Among the muscles related with head movements, only three suboccipital muscles are connected to the upper cervical spinal dura mater via MDBs. It was believed that MDBs might transform powers of the muscles to CSF. The present results suggested that the head movements served as an important contributor to CSF dynamics and the MDBs might be involved in this mechanism. PMID:27538827

  18. Establishing the proteome of normal human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E Schutzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knowledge of the entire protein content, the proteome, of normal human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF would enable insights into neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Until now technologic hurdles and access to true normal samples hindered attaining this goal. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied immunoaffinity separation and high sensitivity and resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine CSF from healthy normal individuals. 2630 proteins in CSF from normal subjects were identified, of which 56% were CSF-specific, not found in the much larger set of 3654 proteins we have identified in plasma. We also examined CSF from groups of subjects previously examined by others as surrogates for normals where neurologic symptoms warranted a lumbar puncture but where clinical laboratory were reported as normal. We found statistically significant differences between their CSF proteins and our non-neurological normals. We also examined CSF from 10 volunteer subjects who had lumbar punctures at least 4 weeks apart and found that there was little variability in CSF proteins in an individual as compared to subject to subject. CONCLUSIONS: Our results represent the most comprehensive characterization of true normal CSF to date. This normal CSF proteome establishes a comparative standard and basis for investigations into a variety of diseases with neurological and psychiatric features.

  19. Dynamic oxygen-enhanced MRI of cerebrospinal fluid.

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    Taha M Mehemed

    Full Text Available Oxygen causes an increase in the longitudinal relaxation rate of tissues through its T1-shortening effect owing to its paramagnetic properties. Due to such effects, MRI has been used to study oxygen-related signal intensity changes in various body parts including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF space. Oxygen enhancement of CSF has been mainly studied using MRI sequences with relatively longer time resolution such as FLAIR, and T1 value calculation. In this study, fifteen healthy volunteers were scanned using fast advanced spin echo MRI sequence with and without inversion recovery pulse in order to dynamically track oxygen enhancement of CSF. We also focused on the differences of oxygen enhancement at sulcal and ventricular CSF. Our results revealed that CSF signal after administration of oxygen shows rapid signal increase in both sulcal CSF and ventricular CSF on both sequences, with statistically significant predominant increase in sulcal CSF compared with ventricular CSF. CSF is traditionally thought to mainly form from the choroid plexus in the ventricles and is absorbed at the arachnoid villi, however, it is also believed that cerebral arterioles contribute to the production and absorption of CSF, and controversy remains in terms of the precise mechanism. Our results demonstrated rapid oxygen enhancement in sulcal CSF, which may suggest inhaled oxygen may diffuse into sulcal CSF space rapidly probably due to the abundance of pial arterioles on the brain sulci.

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Markers in Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

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    Andrea Galassi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD is the commonest form of human prion diseases, accounting for about 85% of all cases. Current criteria for intra vitam diagnosis include a distinct phenotype, periodic sharp and slow-wave complexes at electroencephalography (EEG, and a positive 14-3-3-protein assay in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. In sCJD, the disease phenotype may vary, depending upon the genotype at codon 129 of the prion protein gene (PRNP, a site of a common methionine/valine polymorphism, and two distinct conformers of the pathological prion protein. Based on the combination of these molecular determinants, six different sCJD subtypes are recognized, each with distinctive clinical and pathologic phenotypes. We analyzed CSF samples from 127 subjects with definite sCJD to assess the diagnostic value of 14-3-3 protein, total tau protein, phosphorylated181 tau, and amyloid beta (Aβ peptide 1-42, either alone or in combination. While the 14-3-3 assay and tau protein levels were the most sensitive indicators of sCJD, the highest sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value were obtained when all the above markers were combined. The latter approach also allowed a reliable differential diagnosis with other neurodegenerative dementias.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea: a case report and review of the management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolo, J O

    1988-12-01

    A case of a complicated penetrating nasal injury is presented. The rapid diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea, with appropriate bedside tests and imaging techniques, is essential for the prevention of bacterial meningitis.

  2. Contrast enhancement of the cerebrospinal fluid on MRI in two cases of spirochaetal meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, C.D.; Jaeger, H.R. [Lysholm Radiological Department, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom)

    2000-06-01

    We report two patients with meningitis due to spirochaetal infection, both of whom showed diffusely enhancing meninges around the brain and spinal cord. In addition, there was enhancement of the cerebrospinal fluid after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA. (orig.)

  3. Serum procalcitonin and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines level in children with meningitis

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    Erdal Taskın

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine the level of serum procalcitonin and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines in children with bacterial or viral meningitis and to document the use of these parameters in differential diagnosis.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid tau and phosphorylated tau protein are elevated in corticobasal syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, M.B.; Esselink, R.A.J.; Bloem, B.R.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Differentiating corticobasal syndrome (CBS) from progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) can be difficult. To investigate the additional value of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in the diagnostic differentiation of parkinsonism, we analyzed the CSF concentra

  5. [Nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by the neutrophils of the cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood and by the monocytic-reticular cells of the cerebrospinal fluid in neuroinfections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharska-Demczuk, K

    1980-01-01

    Using the method of Park et al. the author studied spontaneous and stimulated NBT reduction by neutrophil granulocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood, and by monocytic-reticular cells in the cerebrospinal fluid of the patients with bacterial and viral meningitis and meningismus. The author performed 333 investigations in 74 patients. Significantly higher mean values of the index of spontaneous and stimulated NBT reduction by the granulocytes and cerebrospinal fluid were observed in cases of bacterial meningitis as compared with the granulocytes of the peripheral blood in healthy subjects. It was demonstrated that in patients with bacterial meningitis blood and fluid granulocytes showed a similar phagocytic acitivty independent of the humoral environment. In the patients with bacterial and viral meningitis the monocytic-reticular cells the cerebrospinal fluid showed a similar, sometimes high, phagocytic activity depending on the phase and severity of the disease. On the otherhand, in most cases of meningismus these cells failed to manifest any phagocytic and bactericidal activity. In only few isolated cells in the fluid weak NBT reduction was observed. The obtained results of investigations showed the usefulness of the NBT test not only for the differential diagnosis of the aetiology of neuroinfections but also for the assessment of immune processes taking place in the nervous system.

  6. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Presenting with Seizure due to Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage after Spinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Gokhan; Yaman, Mesut Emre

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid leakage may commonly occur during spinal surgeries and it may cause dural tears. These tears may result in hemorrhage in the entire compartments of the brain. Most common site of such hemorrhages are the veins in the cerebellar region. We report a case of hemorrhage, mimicking aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a cerebrospinal fluid leakage following lumbar spinal surgery and discuss the possible mechanisms of action.

  7. Quantitative determination of cerebrospinal fluid bilirubin on a high throughput chemistry analyzer

    OpenAIRE

    Said Ahmed, Degmo

    2009-01-01

    Background Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a condition with high rates of mortality and morbidity. The diagnosis requires an urgent cerebral computed tomography scan and also a lumbar puncture if the scan fails to demonstrate intracranial blood. In Sweden the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is analyzed by spectrophotometric scanning for the presence of hemoglobin and bilirubin. The aim of the study was to develop a quantitative diazo reagent based analysis of cerebrospinal fluid bilirubin as a replaceme...

  8. Effect of cerebrospinal fluid displacement through lumbar puncture on function recover of nerve system in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients%腰穿脑脊液置换对蛛网膜下腔出血患者神经系统功能恢复的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨职; 江先娣; 袁莉

    2002-01-01

    Background: Death and disability of subarachnoid hemorrhage(SAH) are caused by lesions of cerebral hernia, spasm of cerebral blood vessels, injuries the blood brain barrier, or communicating hydrocephalus.Cerebrospinal fluid displacement through lumbar puncture can clear the bloody cerebrospinal fluid and reduce the blood pollution of the cerebrospinal fluid, shorten xanthochromia time, reduce the intracranial pressure early and meninges stimulation. Intrathecal injection of dexamethasone can reduce defense reaction of the meninges, tissue adhesion and organization at the same time.

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in Chiari malformation associated with syringomyelia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bin; WANG Zhen-yu; XIE Jing-cheng; HAN Hong-bin; PEI Xin-long

    2007-01-01

    Background About 50%-70% of patients with Chiari malformation I (CMI) presented with syringomyelia (SM), which is supposed to be related to abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow around the foramen magnum. The aim of this study was to investigate the cerebrospinal fluid dynamics at levels of the aqueduct and upper cervical spine in patients with CMI associated with SM, and to discuss the possible mechanism of formation of SM.Methods From January to April 2004, we examined 10 adult patients with symptomatic CMI associated with SM and 10 healthy volunteers by phase-contrast MRI. CSF flow patterns were evaluated at seven regions of interest (ROI): the aqueduct and ventral and dorsal subarachnoid spaces of the spine at levels of the cerebellar tonsil, C2-3, and C5-6. The CSF flow waveforms were analyzed by measuring CSF circulation time, durations and maximum velocities of cranial- and caudal-directed flows, and the ratio between the two maximum velocities. Data were analyzed by ttest using SPSS 11.5.Results We found no definite communication between the fourth ventricle and syringomyelia by MRI in the 10 patients.In both the groups, we observed cranial-directed flow of CSF in the early cardiac systolic phase, which changed the direction from cranial to caudal from the middle systolic phase to the early diastolic phase, and then turned back in cranial direction in the late diastolic phase. The CSF flow disappeared at the dorsal ROI at the level of C2-3 in 3 patients and 1 volunteer, and at the level of C5-6 in 6 patients and 3 volunteers. The durations of CSF circulation at all the ROIs were significantly shorter in the patients than those in the healthy volunteers (P=0.014 at the midbrain aqueduct, P=0.019 at the inferior margin of the cerebellar tonsil, P=0.014 at the level of C2-3, and P=0.022 at the level of C5-6). No significant difference existed between the two groups in the initial point and duration of the caudal-directed CSF flow during a cardiac cycle at

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid interleukin-6 in central nervous system inflammatory diseases.

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    Alexandre Wullschleger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interleukin (IL-6 is recognised as an important cytokine involved in inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS. OBJECTIVE: To perform a large retrospective study designed to test cerebrospinal fluid (CSF IL-6 levels in the context of neurological diseases, and evaluate its usefulness as a biomarker to help discriminate multiple sclerosis (MS from other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed 374 CSF samples for IL-6 using a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Groups tested were composed of demyelinating diseases of the CNS (DD, n = 117, including relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS, n = 65, primary progressive MS (PPMS, n = 11, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS, n = 11, optic neuritis (ON, n = 30; idiopathic transverse myelitis (ITM, n = 10; other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND, n = 35; and non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND, n = 212. Differences between groups were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test. RESULTS: CSF IL-6 levels exceeded the positivity cut-off of 10 pg/ml in 18 (51.4% of the 35 OIND samples, but in only three (3.9% of the 76 MS samples collected. CSF IL-6 was negative for all NIND samples tested (0/212. IL-6 cut-off of 10 pg/ml offers 96% sensitivity to exclude MS. CONCLUSION: CSF IL-6 may help to differentiate MS from its major differential diagnosis group, OIND.

  11. Two-compartment model of radioimmunotherapy delivered through cerebrospinal fluid

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    He, Ping [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kramer, Kim; Cheung, Nai-Kong V. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pediatrics, New York, NY (United States); Smith-Jones, Peter; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Zanzonico, Pat; Humm, John [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using {sup 131}I-3F8 injected into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was a safe modality for the treatment of leptomeningeal metastases (JCO, 25:5465, 2007). A single-compartment pharmacokinetic model described previously (JNM 50:1324, 2009) showed good fitting to the CSF radioactivity data obtained from patients. We now describe a two-compartment model to account for the ventricular reservoir of {sup 131}I-3F8 and to identify limiting factors that may impact therapeutic ratio. Each parameter was examined for its effects on (1) the area under the radioactivity concentration curve of the bound antibody (AUC[C{sub IAR}]), (2) that of the unbound antibody AUC[C{sub IA}], and (3) their therapeutic ratio (AUC[C{sub IAR}]/AUC[C{sub IA}]). Data fitting showed that CSF kBq/ml data fitted well using the two-compartment model (R = 0.95 {+-} 0.03). Correlations were substantially better when compared to the one-compartment model (R = 0.92 {+-} 0.11 versus 0.77 {+-} 0.21, p = 0.005). In addition, we made the following new predictions: (1) Increasing immunoreactivity of {sup 131}I-3F8 from 10% to 90% increased both (AUC[C{sub IAR}]) and therapeutic ratio (AUC[C{sub IAR}]/AUC[C{sub IA}]) by 7.4 fold, (2) When extrapolated to the clinical setting, the model predicted that if {sup 131}I-3F8 could be split into 4 doses of 1.4 mg each and given at {>=}24 hours apart, an antibody affinity of K{sub D} of 4 x 10{sup -9} at 50% immunoreactivity were adequate in order to deliver {>=}100 Gy to tumor cells while keeping normal CSF exposure to <10 Gy. This model predicted that immunoreactivity, affinity and optimal scheduling of antibody injections were crucial in improving therapeutic index. (orig.)

  12. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid pressure in patients with Alzheimer's disease

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    Fellmann Jere

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF production and turnover, seen in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH and in Alzheimer's disease (AD, may be an important cause of amyloid retention in the brain and may relate the two diseases. There is a high incidence of AD pathology in patients being shunted for NPH, the AD-NPH syndrome. We now report elevated CSF pressure (CSFP, consistent with very early hydrocephalus, in a subset of AD patients enrolled in a clinical trial of chronic low-flow CSF drainage. Our objective was to determine the frequency of elevated CSFP in subjects meeting National Institutes of Neurological and Communicative Diseases and Stroke – Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCDS-ADRDA criteria for AD, excluding those with signs of concomitant NPH. Methods AD subjects by NINCDS-ADRDA criteria (n = 222, were screened by history, neurological examination, and radiographic imaging to exclude those with clinical or radiographic signs of NPH. As part of this exclusion process, opening CSFP was measured supine under general anesthesia during device implantation surgery at a controlled pCO2 of 40 Torr (40 mmHg. Results Of the 222 AD subjects 181 had pressure measurements recorded. Seven subjects (3.9% enrolled in the study had CSFP of 220 mmH20 or greater, mean 249 ± 20 mmH20 which was significantly higher than 103 ± 47 mmH2O for the AD-only group. AD-NPH patients were significantly younger and significantly less demented on the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS. Conclusion Of the AD subjects who were carefully screened to exclude those with clinical NPH, 4% had elevated CSFP. These subjects were presumed to have the AD-NPH syndrome and were withdrawn from the remainder of the study.

  13. Summary of cerebrospinal fluid routine parameters in neurodegenerative diseases.

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    Jesse, Sarah; Brettschneider, Johannes; Süssmuth, Sigurd D; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard G; von Arnim, Christine A F; Ludolph, Albert C; Tumani, Hayrettin; Otto, Markus

    2011-06-01

    In neurodegenerative diseases, cerebrospinal fluid analysis (CSF) is predominantly performed to exclude inflammatory diseases and to perform a risk assessment in dementive disorders by measurement of tau proteins and amyloid beta peptides. However, large scale data on basic findings of CSF routine parameters are generally lacking. The objective of the study was to define a normal reference spectrum of routine CSF parameters in neurodegenerative diseases. Routine CSF parameters (white cell count, lactate and albumin concentrations, CSF/serum quotients of albumin (Q (alb)), IgG, IgA, IgM, and oligoclonal IgG bands (OCB)) were retrospectively analyzed in an academic research setting. A total of 765 patients (Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), vascular dementia (VD), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multisystem atrophy (MSA), motor neuron diseases (MND), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), Huntington's disease (HD)) and non-demented control groups including a group of patients with muscular disorders (MD). The main outcome measures included statistical analyses of routine CSF parameters. Mildly elevated Q (alb) were found in a small percentage of nearly all subgroups and in a higher proportion of patients with PSP, MSA, VD, PDD, and MND. With the exception of 1 MND patient, no intrathecal Ig synthesis was observed. Isolated OCBs in CSF were sometimes found in patients with neurodegenerative diseases without elevated cell counts; lactate levels were always normal. A slightly elevated Q (alb) was observed in a subgroup of patients with neurodegenerative diseases and does not exclude the diagnosis. Extensive elevation of routine parameters is not characteristic and should encourage a re-evaluation of the clinical diagnosis.

  14. Amyloid and tau cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in HIV infection

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    Rosengren Lars

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the emerging intersections of HIV infection and Alzheimer's disease, we examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers related of amyloid and tau metabolism in HIV-infected patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study we measured soluble amyloid precursor proteins alpha and beta (sAPPα and sAPPβ, amyloid beta fragment 1-42 (Aβ1-42, and total and hyperphosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau in CSF of 86 HIV-infected (HIV+ subjects, including 21 with AIDS dementia complex (ADC, 25 with central nervous system (CNS opportunistic infections and 40 without neurological symptoms and signs. We also measured these CSF biomarkers in 64 uninfected (HIV- subjects, including 21 with Alzheimer's disease, and both younger and older controls without neurological disease. Results CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ concentrations were highly correlated and reduced in patients with ADC and opportunistic infections compared to the other groups. The opportunistic infection group but not the ADC patients had lower CSF Aβ1-42 in comparison to the other HIV+ subjects. CSF t-tau levels were high in some ADC patients, but did not differ significantly from the HIV+ neuroasymptomatic group, while CSF p-tau was not increased in any of the HIV+ groups. Together, CSF amyloid and tau markers segregated the ADC patients from both HIV+ and HIV- neuroasymptomatics and from Alzheimer's disease patients, but not from those with opportunistic infections. Conclusions Parallel reductions of CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ in ADC and CNS opportunistic infections suggest an effect of CNS immune activation or inflammation on neuronal amyloid synthesis or processing. Elevation of CSF t-tau in some ADC and CNS infection patients without concomitant increase in p-tau indicates neural injury without preferential accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau as found in Alzheimer's disease. These biomarker changes define pathogenetic pathways to brain injury in ADC that differ from those

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid PKR level predicts cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease.

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    Julien Dumurgier

    Full Text Available The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of the proapoptotic kinase R (PKR and its phosphorylated PKR (pPKR are increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD, but whether CSF PKR concentrations are associated with cognitive decline in AD patients remain unknown. In this study, 41 consecutive patients with AD and 11 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI from our Memory Clinic were included. A lumbar puncture was performed during the following month of the clinical diagnosis and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE evaluations were repeated every 6 months during a mean follow-up of 2 years. In AD patients, linear mixed models adjusted for age and sex were used to assess the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between MMSE scores and baseline CSF levels of Aβ peptide (Aβ 1-42, Tau, phosphorylated Tau (p-Tau 181, PKR and pPKR. The mean (SD MMSE at baseline was 20.5 (6.1 and MMSE scores declined over the follow-up (-0.12 point/month, standard error [SE] = 0.03. A lower MMSE at baseline was associated with lower levels of CSF Aβ 1-42 and p-Tau 181/Tau ratio. pPKR level was associated with longitudinal MMSE changes over the follow-up, higher pPKR levels being related with an exacerbated cognitive deterioration. Other CSF biomarkers were not associated with MMSE changes over time. In aMCI patients, mean CSF biomarker levels were not different in patients who converted to AD from those who did not convert.These results suggest that at the time of AD diagnosis, a higher level of CSF pPKR can predict a faster rate of cognitive decline.

  16. Endostatin level in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

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    Salza, Romain; Oudart, Jean-Baptiste; Ramont, Laurent; Maquart, François-Xavier; Bakchine, Serge; Thoannès, Henri; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the level of endostatin, a fragment of collagen XVIII that accumulates in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), in the cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The concentrations of total protein, endostatin, amyloid-β1-42 peptide, tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in CSF of patients with AD (n = 57), behavioral frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, n = 22), non AD and non FTD dementia (nAD/nFTD, n = 84), and 45 subjects without neurodegenerative diseases. The statistical significance of the results was assessed by Mann-Whitney and Kruskal and Wallis tests, and by ROC analysis. The concentration of endostatin in CSF was higher than the levels of the three markers of AD both in control subjects and in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The endostatin/amyloid-β1-42 ratio was significantly increased in patients with AD (257%, p < 0.0001) and nAD/nFTD (140%, p < 0.0001) compared to controls. The endostatin/tau protein ratio was significantly decreased in patients with AD (-49%, p < 0.0001) but was increased in bvFTD patients (89%, p < 0.0001) compared to controls. In the same way, the endostatin/hyperphosphorylated tau protein ratio was decreased in patients with AD (-21%, p = 0.0002) but increased in patients with bvFTD (81%, p = 0.0026), compared to controls. The measurement of endostatin in CSF and the calculation of its ratio relative to well-established AD markers improve the diagnosis of bvFTD patients and the discrimination of patients with AD from those with bvFTD and nAD/nFTD.

  17. Preliminary analysis of cerebrospinal fluid proteome in patients with neurocysticercosis

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    TIAN Xiao-jun; LI Jing-yi; HUANG Yong; XUE Yan-ping

    2009-01-01

    Background Neurocysticercosis is the infection of the nervous system by the larvae of Taenia solium (T. solium). Despite continuous effort, the experimental diagnosis of neurocysticercosis remains unresolved. Since the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contacts with the brain, dynamic information about pathological processes of the brain is likely to be reflected in CSF. Therefore, CSF may serve as a rich source of putative biomarkers related to neurocysticercosis. Comparative proteomic analysis of CSF of neurocysticercosis patients and control subjects may find differentially expressed proteins. Methods Two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) was used to investigate differentially expressed proteins in CSF of patients with neurocysticercosis by comparing the protein profile of CSF from neurocysticercosis patients with that from control subjects. The differentially expressed spots/proteins were recognized with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-time of flight (MALDI-TOF-TOF) mass spectrometry. Results Forty-four enzyme digested peptides were obtained from 4 neurocysticercotic patients. Twenty-three were identified through search of the NCBI protein database with Mascot software, showing 19 up-expressed and 4 down-expressed. Of these proteins, 26S proteosome related to ATP- and ubiquitin-dependent degradation of proteins and lipocalin type prostaglandin D synthase involved in PGD2-synthesis and extracellular transporter activities were up-expressed, while transferrin related to iron metabolism within the brain was down-expressed. Conclusions This study established the proteomic profile of pooled CSF from 4 patients with neurocysticercosis, suggesting the potential value of proteomic analysis for the study of candidate biomarkers involved in the diagnosis or pathogenesis of neurocysticercosis.

  18. Surgical challenge: endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak

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    Martín-Martín Carlos

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebrospinal fluid leaks (CSF result from an abnormal communication between the subarachnoid space and the extracranial space. Approximately 90% of CSF leak at the anterior skull base manifests as rhinorrhea and can become life-threatening condition. Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS has become a common otolaryngologist procedure. The aim of this article is to consider our experience and to evaluate the outcomes in patients who underwent a purely endoscopic repair of CSF leaks of the anterior skull base. Findings Retrospective chart review was performed of all patients surgically treated for CSF leaks presenting to the Section of Nasal and Sinus Disorders at the Service of ENT–Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela (CHUS, between 2004 and 2010. A total of 30 patients who underwent repair CSF leak by ESS. The success rate was 93.4% at the first attempt; only two patients (6.6% required a second surgical procedure, and none of it was necessary to use a craniotomy for closure. Follow-up periods ranged from 4 months to 6 years. Conclusion Identifying the size, site, and etiology of the CSF leak remains the most important factor in the surgical success. It is generally accepted that the ESS have made procedures minimally invasive, and CSF leak is now one of its well-established indications with low morbidity and high success rate, with one restriction for fistulas of the posterior wall of the frontal sinus should be repaired in conjunction with open techniques.

  19. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease.

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    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip S; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P Alzheimer's disease. Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β may be more strongly related to early stage Alzheimer's disease, whereas increased positron emission tomography amyloid-β may be more strongly related to disease

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of central catecholamine deficiency in Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies.

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    Goldstein, David S; Holmes, Courtney; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2012-06-01

    Central catecholamine deficiency characterizes α-synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease. We hypothesized that cerebrospinal fluid levels of neuronal metabolites of catecholamines provide neurochemical biomarkers of these disorders. To test this hypothesis we measured cerebrospinal fluid levels of catechols including dopamine, norepinephrine and their main respective neuronal metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and dihydroxyphenylglycol in Parkinson's disease and two other synucleinopathies, multiple system atrophy and pure autonomic failure. Cerebrospinal fluid catechols were assayed in 146 subjects-108 synucleinopathy patients (34 Parkinson's disease, 54 multiple system atrophy, 20 pure autonomic failure) and 38 controls. In 14 patients cerebrospinal fluid was obtained before or within 2 years after the onset of parkinsonism. The Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and pure autonomic failure groups all had lower cerebrospinal fluid dihydroxyphenylacetic acid [0.86 ± 0.09 (SEM), 1.00 ± 0.09, 1.32 ± 0.12 nmol/l] than controls (2.15 ± 0.18 nmol/l; P Parkinson's disease than in pure autonomic failure. Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid was 100% sensitive at 89% specificity in separating patients with recent onset of parkinsonism from controls but was of no value in differentiating Parkinson's disease from multiple system atrophy. Synucleinopathies feature cerebrospinal fluid neurochemical evidence for central dopamine and norepinephrine deficiency. Parkinson's disease and pure autonomic failure involve differential dopaminergic versus noradrenergic lesions. Cerebrospinal fluid dihydroxyphenylacetic acid seems to provide a sensitive means to identify even early Parkinson's disease.

  1. Successful reversal of immediate paraplegia associated with repair of acute Type A aortic dissection using cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

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    Shimura, Shinichiro; Cho, Yasunori; Aki, Akira; Ueda, Toshihiko

    2013-12-01

    We present a case of a 49-year old man who suffered from immediate paraplegia upon awakening from anaesthesia after surgery for acute aortic dissection Type A. A catheter was promptly inserted into the spinal canal for cerebrospinal fluid drainage, and the cerebrospinal fluid pressure was maintained paraplegia and was able to walk by himself after rehabilitation. In some cases, cerebrospinal fluid drainage can be effective for the treatment of immediate postoperative spinal cord damage.

  2. Research of essential elements composition in the cerebrospinal fluid in patients with outcomes of traumatic brain injury

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    Aliev, M. A.; MAMADALIEV A.M.; MAMADALIEVA S.A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the essential elements composition in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with different outcomes of traumatic brain injury before and after complex treatment with the use of endolumbal and intracystal introduction of ozone and pyracetam in dynamics. Essential elements composition was investigated in the cerebrospinal fluid of 83 patients. Thus, it may be noted positive changes in the metabolism of essential elements in the cerebrospinal fluid of pat...

  3. The clinical and cerebrospinal fluid cytological features of tuberculous meningitis

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    YANG Xiao

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the clinical and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF cytological features of patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM, to improve early diagnostic accuracy and treatment of TBM. Methods Clinical presentations, etiology and biochemical and cytological features of CSF were analyzed retrospectively among 60 adult cases with TBM hospitalized at Neurology Department of General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University from January 2005 to May 2011. Results Most patients (58/60, 96.67% had fever and headache at onset. In some patients, disturbance of consciousness (9/60, 15.00%, seizure (5/60, 8.33% occurred in 1 week and focal neurological signs developed during the course. Forty?four patients (73.33% had pulmonary tuberculosis history. In CSF examination, acid?fast bacillus positive was found in 8 patients. Positive acid ? fast myobacterium tuberculous culture was detected in 5 patients and positive myobacterium tuberculosis DNA were seen in 5 patients. The main changes of CSF were intracranial hypertension, increase of protein, and decrease of glucose. CSF presented mixed cellular response with predominace in the increasing of leucocytes. During early stage the mean percentage of neutrophil in CSF was less than 40%. After short term (as long as 2 months of regular antituberculotic therapy no significant changes in total cell count and the proportion of neutrophils were seen. In 60 patients, 44 patients were ameliorated, 11 were not healed or were discharged or transferred to other hospital and 5 were dead. Prognosis of patients treated within 3 weeks after onsets was superiorly to those treated at more than 3 weeks after onset. Conclusion There are no specific clinical features in TBM and it is hard to perform early diagnosis for TBM, particularly, existing of low efficiency in pathogenic detection, but pulmonary tuberculosis is of accessary value to diagnose TBM. Whereas mixed cellular response may complementarily provide the diagnosis of

  4. 四君子汤含药脑脊液对溃疡性结肠炎肠黏膜淋巴细胞功能的影响%Effect of cerebrospinal fluid contained Sijunzi Decoction on function of colon mucosa lymphocytes of ulcerative colitis in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李进安; 王永多; 王奎; 贾道勇

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effects of cerebrospinal fluid contained Sijunzi Decoction on function of colon mucosa lymphocytes of ulcerative colitis in vitro. Methods: Prepared the rat cerebrospinal fluid contained Sijunzi Decoction or Mesalamine. Collected colon mucosa of the 12 healthy ( as normal group ) and 18 ulcerative colitis, then isolated and obtained lymphocytes from these samples. The lymphocytes were divided into pathological group, IL-12 group, cerebrospinal fluid group cerebrospinal fluid contained Sijunzi Decoction group, cerebrospinal fluid contained Mesalamine group. After exposing to various treatment,the proliferative capacity was measured by CCK-8,the cell cycle and the ratio of CD4+T was analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM), the content of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α was detected by ELISA. The expression of IL-2 were detected by Western blot analysis. Results:Compared the cerebrospinal fluid contained Sijunzi Decoction group with the IL-12 group or cerebrospinal fluid group,the proliferative capacity and the percentage of CD4+T was decreased, the cells significantly arrested at G0/G1 phase, the secretory capability of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α were obviously reduced; the expression of IL-2 was also significantly down-regulated. Conclusion:The cerebrospinal fluid contained Sijunzi Decoction could decrease the function of colon mucosa lymphocytes of ulcerative colitis,the mechanism involved in may be Sijunzi Decoction regulating the secretory capability of IL-1,IL-6 and TNF-α.%目的:探讨四君子汤含药脑脊液对体外培养的溃疡性结肠炎肠黏膜淋巴细胞功能的影响。方法:制备大鼠四君子汤和美沙拉嗪含药脑脊液,收集并分离12例健康体检者(作为正常对照组)和18例溃疡性结肠炎肠黏膜固有层淋巴细胞,分为5组:病理组、IL-12诱导组、空白脑脊液组、含药脑脊液组、美沙拉嗪脑脊液组;通过不同处理方式体外作用细胞后,采用CCK-8

  5. Clusterin in cerebrospinal fluid: analysis of carbohydrates and quantification of native and glycosylated forms.

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    Nilselid, A-M; Davidsson, Pia; Nägga, Katarina; Andreasen, Niels; Fredman, Pam; Blennow, Kaj

    2006-06-01

    Clusterin is suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Clusterin expression is increased in brain tissue in affected regions of Alzheimer patients, and intense clusterin staining is found in both senile plaques and in neuronal and glia cells. In contrast, the cerebrospinal fluid level of clusterin in Alzheimer patients has, thus far, been found unchanged. Clusterin is a glycosylated protein, and an alteration of its glycosylation in Alzheimer's disease might influence accurate quantification in cerebrospinal fluid through interference of antibody binding to the protein. Using enzymatic deglycosylation of clusterin isolated from cerebrospinal fluid, we found that the carbohydrates attached to clusterin were of the N-linked type and sialic acids. Based on this finding, cerebrospinal fluid samples from Alzheimer patients (n=99) and controls (n=39) were analysed. The samples were treated with peptide: N-glycanase F, cleaving off N-linked carbohydrates, and clusterin was quantified before and after deglycosylation using a new sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Clusterin was significantly increased in Alzheimer patients, in both native (7.17+/-2.43 AU versus 5.73+/-2.09 AU; p=0.002), and deglycosylated samples (12.19+/-5.00 AU versus 9.68+/-4.38 AU; p=0.004). Deglycosylation led to increased measured levels of clusterin by 70% (pquantification. The results show that clusterin is significantly increased in cerebrospinal fluid from Alzheimer patients as a group, supporting that clusterin might be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the individual clusterin levels overlap between the two groups, and thus cerebrospinal fluid clusterin measurement is not suitable as a biochemical marker in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Effect of nitazoxanide on albendazole pharmacokinetics in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma in rats.

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    Ruiz-Olmedo, María Isabel; González-Hernández, Iliana; Palomares-Alonso, Francisca; Franco-Pérez, Javier; González F, María de Lourdes; Jung-Cook, Helgi

    2017-03-01

    Background: Although albendazole is the drug-of-choice for the treatment of neurocysticercosis, its efficacy is limited due to its low bioavailability. An alternative for optimizing pharmacological treatment is through drug combinations. In vitro studies have shown that nitazoxanide and tizoxanide (the active metabolite of nitazoxanide) exhibit cysticidal activity and that the combination of tizoxanide with albendazole sulfoxide (the active metabolite of albendazole) produced an additive effect. Objectives: (1) To assess the concentration profile of tizoxanide in plasma and in cerebrospinal fluid; and (2) to evaluate the influence of nitazoxanide on the pharmacokinetics of albendazole in plasma and in cerebrospinal fluid. Methods: Two different studies were conducted. In study 1, 10 male Sprague-Dawley rats received a single oral dose of 7.5 mg/kg of nitazoxanide and serial blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected over a period of 4 h. In study 2, 38 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: one of these received a single dose of albendazole (15 mg/kg) and, in the other group, albendazole (15 mg/kg) was co-administered with nitazoxanide (7.5 mg/kg). Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from 0 to 16 h after administration. Albendazole sulfoxide and tizoxanide levels were assayed by using HPLC or LC/MS techniques. Results: In study 1, tizoxanide reached a maximum plasma concentration of 244.42 ± 31.98 ng/mL at 0.25 h; however, in cerebrospinal fluid, this could be detected only at 0.5 h, and levels were below the quantification limit (10 ng/mL). These data indicate low permeation of tizoxanide into the blood brain barrier. In study 2, Cmax, the area under the curve, and the mean residence time of albendazole sulfoxide in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid were not affected by co-administration with nitazoxanide. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that in rats at the applied doses

  7. 1H-NMR studies of cerebrospinal fluid: endogenous ethanol in patients with cervical myelopathy.

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    Meshitsuka, S; Morio, Y; Nagashima, H; Teshima, R

    2001-10-01

    Endogenous ethanol was observed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the course of screening for cerebrospinal fluid of the patients with cervical myelopathy. Ethanol was detected in 10 out of 20 patients. It seems likely that the presence of endogenous ethanol is related to the severity of myelopathy. Also, the concentration of ethanol was correlated with that of lactate in the cerebrospinal fluid. This implies that ethanol may be formed as the end product of glycolysis or in an unknown pathway in the case of severely insulted myelonic tissues.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics at the lumbosacral level in patients with spinal stenosis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Se-Woong; Lee, Hack-Jin; Nam, Koong-Ho; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Kim, Kwang Dong; Jeong, Eun-Jin; Chung, Sun G; Kim, Keewon; Kim, Dong-Joo

    2017-01-01

    Spinal stenosis is a common degenerative condition. However, how neurogenic claudication develops has not been clearly elucidated. Moreover, cerebrospinal fluid physiology at the lumbosacral level has not received adequate attention. This study was conducted to compare cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics at the lumbosacral spinal level between patients with spinal stenosis and healthy controls. Twelve subjects (four patients and eight healthy controls; 25-77 years old; seven males) underwent phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to quantify cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. The cerebrospinal fluid flow velocities were measured at the L2 and S1 levels. All subjects were evaluated at rest and after walking (to provoke neurogenic claudication in the patients). The caudal peak flow velocity in the sacral spine (-0.25 ± 0.28 cm/s) was attenuated compared to that in the lumbar spine (-0.93 ± 0.46 cm/s) in both patients and controls. The lumbar caudal peak flow velocity was slower in patients (-0.65 ± 0.22 cm/s) than controls (-1.07 ± 0.49 cm/s) and this difference became more pronounced after walking (-0.66 ± 0.37 cm/s in patients, -1.35 ± 0.52 cm/s in controls; p = 0.028). The sacral cerebrospinal fluid flow after walking was barely detectable in patients (caudal peak flow velocity: -0.09 ± 0.03 cm/s). Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the lumbosacral spine were more attenuated in patients with spinal stenosis than healthy controls. After walking, the patients experiencing claudication did not exhibit an increase in the cerebrospinal fluid flow rate as the controls did. Altered cerebrospinal fluid dynamics may partially explain the pathophysiology of spinal stenosis. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:104-112, 2017.

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea decreases central nervous system-derived proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yo-El S; Finn, Mary Beth; Sutphen, Courtney L; Herries, Elizabeth M; Jerome, Gina M; Ladenson, Jack H; Crimmins, Daniel L; Fagan, Anne M; Holtzman, David M

    2016-07-01

    We hypothesized that one mechanism underlying the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Alzheimer's disease is OSA leading to decreased slow wave activity (SWA), increased synaptic activity, decreased glymphatic clearance, and increased amyloid-β. Polysomnography and lumbar puncture were performed in OSA and control groups. SWA negatively correlated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid-β-40 among controls and was decreased in the OSA group. Unexpectedly, amyloid-β-40 was decreased in the OSA group. Other neuronally derived proteins, but not total protein, were also decreased in the OSA group, suggesting that OSA may affect the interaction between interstitial and cerebrospinal fluid. Ann Neurol 2016;80:154-159.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid chitinase-3-like 2 and chitotriosidase are potential prognostic biomarkers in early multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllgaard, M; Vinter, Matilda Degn; Sellebjerg, F;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The role of chitinases and chitinase-like proteins in multiple sclerosis (MS) is currently unknown; however, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) predict prognosis in early MS. Whether this applies to other chitinases and chitinase-like proteins...... is yet to be established. Our objective was to investigate the potential of chitinase 3-like 2 (CHI3L2) and chitotriosidase as prognostic biomarkers in optic neuritis (ON) as the first demyelinating episode and to evaluate the ability of CHI3L2 to predict long-term MS risk and disability. METHODS......, immunoglobulin G index and leukocyte count were investigated. Long-term MS risk and disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale, Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite components) were examined in a retrospective cohort of 78 patients with ON as the first demyelinating episode (mean follow-up 14 years...

  11. Research into the Physiology of Cerebrospinal Fluid Reaches a New Horizon: Intimate Exchange between Cerebrospinal Fluid and Interstitial Fluid May Contribute to Maintenance of Homeostasis in the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATSUMAE, Mitsunori; SATO, Osamu; HIRAYAMA, Akihiro; HAYASHI, Naokazu; TAKIZAWA, Ken; ATSUMI, Hideki; SORIMACHI, Takatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) plays an essential role in maintaining the homeostasis of the central nervous system. The functions of CSF include: (1) buoyancy of the brain, spinal cord, and nerves; (2) volume adjustment in the cranial cavity; (3) nutrient transport; (4) protein or peptide transport; (5) brain volume regulation through osmoregulation; (6) buffering effect against external forces; (7) signal transduction; (8) drug transport; (9) immune system control; (10) elimination of metabolites and unnecessary substances; and finally (11) cooling of heat generated by neural activity. For CSF to fully mediate these functions, fluid-like movement in the ventricles and subarachnoid space is necessary. Furthermore, the relationship between the behaviors of CSF and interstitial fluid in the brain and spinal cord is important. In this review, we will present classical studies on CSF circulation from its discovery over 2,000 years ago, and will subsequently introduce functions that were recently discovered such as CSF production and absorption, water molecule movement in the interstitial space, exchange between interstitial fluid and CSF, and drainage of CSF and interstitial fluid into both the venous and the lymphatic systems. Finally, we will summarize future challenges in research. This review includes articles published up to February 2016. PMID:27245177

  12. Sphingolipid metabolism correlates with cerebrospinal fluid Beta amyloid levels in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred N Fonteh

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are important in many brain functions but their role in Alzheimer's disease (AD is not completely defined. A major limit is availability of fresh brain tissue with defined AD pathology. The discovery that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contains abundant nanoparticles that include synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles offer an accessible sample to study these organelles, while the supernatant fluid allows study of brain interstitial metabolism. Our objective was to characterize sphingolipids in nanoparticles representative of membrane vesicle metabolism, and in supernatant fluid representative of interstitial metabolism from study participants with varying levels of cognitive dysfunction. We recently described the recruitment, diagnosis, and CSF collection from cognitively normal or impaired study participants. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we report that cognitively normal participants had measureable levels of sphingomyelin, ceramide, and dihydroceramide species, but that their distribution differed between nanoparticles and supernatant fluid, and further differed in those with cognitive impairment. In CSF from AD compared with cognitively normal participants: a total sphingomyelin levels were lower in nanoparticles and supernatant fluid; b levels of ceramide species were lower in nanoparticles and higher in supernatant fluid; c three sphingomyelin species were reduced in the nanoparticle fraction. Moreover, three sphingomyelin species in the nanoparticle fraction were lower in mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal participants. The activity of acid, but not neutral sphingomyelinase was significantly reduced in the CSF from AD participants. The reduction in acid sphingomylinase in CSF from AD participants was independent of depression and psychotropic medications. Acid sphingomyelinase activity positively correlated with amyloid β42 concentration in CSF from cognitively normal but

  13. A micromethod for the determination of pH and PCO2 in human cerebrospinal fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijst, A.N.P. van; Visser, B.F.; Maas, A.H.J.

    1961-01-01

    With the Astrup apparatus which is used for the microdetermination of pH and Pco₂ in whole blood we have determined the pH and Pco₂ of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The CSF was obtained from patients with different neurological diseases but without respiratory alterations. As all other chemical tests s

  14. CEREBROSPINAL FLUID FROM PRETERM PIGS WITH NECROTIZING ENTEROCOLITIS HAS ALTERED CYTOKINE PROFILE AND PROMOTES HIPPOCAMPAL NEURITOGENESIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, S.; Sun, J.; Li, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants is associated with neurodevelopmental delay and cerebral palsy. We hypothesized that intestinal NEC lesions affect inflammatory cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) which in turn may affect neurite differentiation. Methods...... explain that NEC lesions, via changes in CSF cytokine levels, may affect neurodevelopment in preterm neonates...

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid flow and production in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus studied by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1994-01-01

    An interleaved velocity-sensitised fast low-angle shot pulse sequence was used to study cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the cerebral aqueduct, and supratentorial CSF production in 9 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) and 9 healthy volunteers. The peak aqueduct CSF flow, both caudal...

  16. Interleukin-10 and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors in cerebrospinal fluid of children with bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornelisse, R.F.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Mulder, P.H.G.; Suur, M.H.; Straaten, van der P.J.C.; Heijden, van der A.J.; Sukhai, R.N.; Hählen, K.; Neijens, H.J.; Groot, de R.

    1996-01-01

    The antiinflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-10 and soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors p55 (sTNFR-55) and sTNFR-75 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 37 children with bacterial meningitis were studied. CSF concentrations of IL-10, sTNFR-55, and sTNFR-75 and of the proinflammatory cytoki

  17. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric assay for propofol in cerebrospinal fluid of traumatic brain patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, Mariska Y. M.; Kuiper, Hiltjo; Greijdanus, Ben; van der Naalt, Joukje; Knibbe, Catherijne A. J.; Uges, Donald R. A.

    2007-01-01

    A sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for measuring propofol in cerebrospinal fluid is described, validated and applied to four patients after traumatic brain injury. The limit of quantitation was 2 mu g/L using a volume of 0.5 mL. The inter- and intra-assay coefficients of variati

  18. Fourier analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow velocities: MR imaging study. The Scandinavian Flow Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Ståhlberg, F; Stubgaard, M;

    1990-01-01

    An interleaved pseudocinematographic FLASH (fast low-angle shot) sequence with additional pulsed gradients for flow encoding was used to quantify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow velocities and CSF production. Flow-dependent phase information was obtained by subtracting two differently encoded phase...

  19. The Alzheimer's Association external quality control program for cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattsson, N.; Andreasson, U.; Persson, S.; Arai, H.; Batish, S.D.; Bernardini, S.; Bocchio-Chiavetto, L.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Carrillo, M.C.; Chalbot, S.; Coart, E.; Chiasserini, D.; Cutler, N.; Dahlfors, G.; Duller, S.; Fagan, A.M.; Forlenza, O.; Frisoni, G.B.; Galasko, D.; Galimberti, D.; Hampel, H.; Handberg, A.; Heneka, M.T.; Herskovits, A.Z.; Herukka, S.K.; Holtzman, D.M.; Humpel, C.; Hyman, B.T.; Iqbal, K.; Jucker, M.; Kaeser, S.A.; Kaiser, E.; Kapaki, E.; Kidd, D.; Klivenyi, P.; Knudsen, C.S.; Kummer, M.P.; Lui, J.; Llado, A.; Lewczuk, P.; Li, Q.X.; Martins, R.; Masters, C.; McAuliffe, J.; Mercken, M.; Moghekar, A.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Montine, T.J.; Nowatzke, W.; O'Brien, R.; Otto, M.; Paraskevas, G.P.; Parnetti, L.; Petersen, R.C.; Prvulovic, D.; Reus, H.P. de; Rissman, R.A.; Scarpini, E.; Stefani, A.; Soininen, H.; Schroder, J.; Shaw, L.M.; Skinningsrud, A.; Skrogstad, B.; Spreer, A.; Talib, L.; Teunissen, C.; Trojanowski, J.Q.; Tumani, H.; Umek, R.M.; Broeck, B. Van; Vanderstichele, H.; Vecsei, L.; Verbeek, M.M.; Windisch, M.; Zhang, Jing; Zetterberg, H.; Blennow, K.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid beta (Abeta)-42, total-tau (T-tau), and phosphorylated-tau (P-tau) demonstrate good diagnostic accuracy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are large variations in biomarker measurements between studies, and between and within lab

  20. Increased total-Tau levels in cerebrospinal fluid of pediatric hydrocephalus and brain tumor patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bont, Judith M.; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Reddingius, Roel E.; Pieters, Rob; van Gool, Stefdan W.

    2008-01-01

    Total Tau (t-Tau), hyperphosphorylated Tau (p-Tau((181P))) and beta-amyloid((1-42)) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have shown to be markers of neuronal and axonal degeneration in various neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the presence of

  1. miRNA Expression Profiles in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Blood of Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølvsten Sørensen, Sofie; Nygaard Hillig, Ann-Britt; Nielsen, Ming-Yuan;

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the study were (1) to determine whether miRNAs (microRNAs) can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood of patients with ischemic stroke and (2) to compare these miRNA profiles with corresponding profiles from other neurological patients to address whether the miRNA prof...

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Moxifloxacin in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Plasma in Patients with Tuberculous Meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alffenaar, J. W. C.; van Altena, R.; Bokkerink, H. J.; Luijckx, G. J.; van Soolingen, D.; Aarnoutse, R. E.; van der Werf, T. S.

    2009-01-01

    Moxifloxacin cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration was evaluated by obtaining full plasma and CSF time concentration curves for 4 patients with tuberculous meningitis. The geometric mean ratio of the areas under the curve for CSF to plasma were 0.82 (range, 0.70-0.94) at 400 mg once per day and 0.71

  3. Identification of a novel panel of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, A.H.; McGuire, J.; Podust, V.N.

    2008-01-01

    An early and accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is required to initiate symptomatic treatment with currently approved drugs and will be of even greater importance if disease modifying compounds in development display a clinical effect. Protein profiles of human cerebrospinal fluid sam...

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Familial Forms of Alzheimer's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Nina; Waldemar, Gunhild; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik;

    2015-01-01

    and are important when developing new therapies. Today, the core protein biomarkers amyloid-β42, total tau and phosphorylated tau in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are used to diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD), because these biomarkers have shown to reflect the underlying amyloid and tau pathology. However...

  5. Diagnostic Accuracy of Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-beta Isoforms for Early and Differential Dementia Diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struyfs, Hanne; Van Broeck, Bianca; Timmers, Maarten; Fransen, Erik; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; De Deyn, Peter P.; Streffer, Johannes R.; Mercken, Marc; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Overlapping cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers (CSF) levels between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and non-AD patients decrease differential diagnostic accuracy of the AD core CSF biomarkers. Amyloid-beta (A beta) isoforms might improve the AD versus non-AD differential diagnosis. Objective: To de

  6. Therapy failure following selection of enfuvirtide-resistant HIV-1 in cerebrospinal fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lelyveld, S F L; Nijhuis, M; Baatz, F; Wilting, I; van den Bergh, W M; Kurowski, M; de Jong, D.; Hoepelman, A I M; Wensing, A M J

    2010-01-01

    We report the selection of enfuvirtide-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in cerebrospinal fluid, resulting in subsequent loss of viral suppression in the plasma. This case report emphasizes the potential danger of low-level penetration of entry inhibitors into the central nervous system.

  7. Recommendations to standardize preanalytical confounding factors in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers: an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Campo, M.; Mollenhauer, B.; Bertolotto, A.; Engelborghs, S.; Hampel, H.; Simonsen, A.H.; Kapaki, E.; Kruse, N.; Bastard, N. le; Lehmann, S.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Parnetti, L.; Perret-Liaudet, A.; Saez-Valero, J.; Saka, E.; Urbani, A.; Vanmechelen, E.; Verbeek, M.M.; Visser, P.J.; Teunissen, C.

    2012-01-01

    Early diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's (AD) or Parkinson's disease (PD) is needed to slow down or halt the disease at the earliest stage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers can be a good tool for early diagnosis. However, their use in clinical practice is challenging du

  8. Anxiety is related to Alzheimer cerebrospinal fluid markers in subjects with mild cognitive impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramakers, I.H.; Verhey, F.R.J.; Scheltens, P.; Hampel, H.; Soininen, H.; Aalten, P.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.; Verbeek, M.M.; Spiru, L.; Blennow, K.; Trojanowski, J.Q.; Shaw, L.M.; Visser, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety, apathy and depression are common in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and may herald Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated whether these symptoms correlated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers for AD in subjects with MCI. Method Subjects with MCI (n=268) were

  9. Therapeutic drug monitoring of cerebrospinal fluid vancomycin concentration during intraventricular administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, D; Loewenstein, L; Lam, S W; Neuner, E A; Ahrens, C L; Bhimraj, A

    2016-02-01

    Limited data are available on intraventricular vancomycin dosing for meningitis. This study explored clinical characteristics that correlated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations. Over a nine-year period, 13 patients with 34 CSF vancomycin concentrations were evaluated. CSF output and time from dose correlated with CSF vancomycin concentration. No relationship was seen with regards to CSF protein, white blood cell count or glucose.

  10. Glycemia and Levels of Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid and Tau in Patients Attending a Memory Clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exalto, Lieza G.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Scheltens, Phillip; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the association between markers of glycemia and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid beta 1-42 (A beta 42) and tau levels in patients attending a memory clinic. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Memory clinic. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred forty-five consecutive patients atte

  11. Complement-dependent pathogenicity of brain-specific antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgari, Nasrin; Khorooshi, Reza; Lillevang, Søren T;

    2013-01-01

    The specificity and potential pathogenicity of autoantibodies vary between neurological diseases. It is often unclear whether their detection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a consequence or a cause of pathology. The goal was to test whether administration of brain-specific antibodies into CSF...

  12. Favorable outcome of neonatal cerebrospinal fluid shunt-associated Candida meningitis with caspofungin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jans, J.; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Christmann, V.; Verweij, P.E.; Warris, A.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive Candida infections associated with medical devices are very difficult to cure without device removal. We present a case of neonatal cerebrospinal fluid shunt-associated Candida meningitis, in which removal of the device was precluded, that was successfully treated with caspofungin. Pharmaco

  13. Structural and quantitative comparison of cerebrospinal fluid glycoproteins in Alzheimer's disease patients and healthy individuals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sihlbom, C.; Davidsson, P.; Sjogren, M.; Wahlund, L.O.; Nilsson, C.L.

    2008-01-01

    Glycoproteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are altered in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients compared to control individuals. We have utilized albumin depletion prior to 2D gel electrophoresis to enhance glycoprotein concentration for image analysis as well as structural glycoprotein determination wi

  14. Primary low cerebrospinal fluid pressure syndrome with galactorrhea: findings at MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, A.; Morita, N.; Yoshida, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Hashimoto, K. [Kochi Medical School (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    A case of primary low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure syndrome with galactorrhea is reported. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated diffusely enhanced meninges, edematous brian, and enlarged pituitary gland. Coincidental enlargement of pituitary gland and edematous brain due to low CSF pressure compressed the pituitary portal system. The low-perfused anterior lobe of pituitary gland would be the mechanism of galactorrhea. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Biomarker discovery in human cerebrospinal fluid: The need for integrative metabolome and proteome databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Schwarz (Emanuel); F.E. Torrey; P.C. Guest (Paul); S. Bahn (Sabine)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe number of metabolites identified in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has steadily increased over the past 5 years, and in this issue of Genome Medicine David Wishart and colleagues provide a comprehensive update that brings the number of metabolites listed in the CSF metabolome databa

  16. Bace1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid and its relation to markers of ad pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, S.D.; Flier, W.M. van der; Verheijen, J.H.; Mulder, C.; Scheltens, P.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Hack, C.E.; Veerhuis, R.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that reduced amyloid-β 1-42 (Aβ {42}) and increased tau levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reflect increased Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in the brain. β-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is thought to be the major β-secretase involved in Aβ production in the brain,

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid P-tau(181P) : biomarker for improved differential dementia diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struyfs, Hanne; Niemantsverdriet, Ellis; Goossens, Joery; Fransen, Erik; Martin, Jean-Jacques; De Deyn, Peter P.; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the value of tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-tau(181p)) in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker panel for differential dementia diagnosis in autopsy confirmed AD and non-AD patients. The study population consisted of 140 aut

  18. Regulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in neurodegenerative, neurovascular and neuroinflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew J; Iliff, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation and turnover provides a sink for the elimination of solutes from the brain interstitium, serving an important homeostatic role for the function of the central nervous system. Disruption of normal CSF circulation and turnover is believed to contribute to the development of many diseases, including neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, ischemic and traumatic brain injury, and neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis. Recent insights into CSF biology suggesting that CSF and interstitial fluid exchange along a brain-wide network of perivascular spaces termed the 'glymphatic' system suggest that CSF circulation may interact intimately with glial and vascular function to regulate basic aspects of brain function. Dysfunction within this glial vascular network, which is a feature of the aging and injured brain, is a potentially critical link between brain injury, neuroinflammation and the development of chronic neurodegeneration. Ongoing research within this field may provide a powerful new framework for understanding the common links between neurodegenerative, neurovascular and neuroinflammatory disease, in addition to providing potentially novel therapeutic targets for these conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuro Inflammation edited by Helga E. de Vries and Markus Schwaninger.

  19. DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein in human cerebrospinal fluid as biomarkers of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhen; Shi, Min; Chung, Kathryn A; Quinn, Joseph F; Peskind, Elaine R; Galasko, Douglas; Jankovic, Joseph; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Leverenz, James B; Baird, Geoffrey; Montine, Thomas J; Hancock, Aneeka M; Hwang, Hyejin; Pan, Catherine; Bradner, Joshua; Kang, Un J; Jensen, Poul H; Zhang, Jing

    2010-03-01

    Biomarkers are urgently needed for the diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression in Parkinson's disease. Both DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein, two proteins critically involved in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis, have been tested as disease biomarkers in several recent studies with inconsistent results. These have been largely due to variation in the protein species detected by different antibodies, limited numbers of patients in some studies, or inadequate control of several important variables. In this study, the nature of DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein in human cerebrospinal fluid was studied by a combination of western blotting, gel filtration and mass spectrometry. Sensitive and quantitative Luminex assays detecting most, if not all, species of DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein in human cerebrospinal fluid were established. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein from 117 patients with Parkinson's disease, 132 healthy individuals and 50 patients with Alzheimer's disease were analysed using newly developed, highly sensitive Luminex technology while controlling for several major confounders. A total of 299 individuals and 389 samples were analysed. The results showed that cerebrospinal fluid DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein levels were dependent on age and influenced by the extent of blood contamination in cerebrospinal fluid. Both DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein levels were decreased in Parkinson's patients versus controls or Alzheimer's patients when blood contamination was controlled for. In the population aged > or = 65 years, when cut-off values of 40 and 0.5 ng/ml were chosen for DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein, respectively, the sensitivity and specificity for patients with Parkinson's disease versus controls were 90 and 70% for DJ-1, and 92 and 58% for alpha-synuclein. A combination of the two markers did not enhance the test performance. There was no association between DJ-1 or alpha-synuclein and the severity of Parkinson's disease. Taken together, this represents

  20. Prediction of bacterial meningitis based on cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Águeda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Children with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis are frequently treated with parenteral antibiotics, but only a few have bacterial meningitis. Although some clinical prediction rules, such as bacterial meningitis score, are of well-known value, the cerebrospinal fluid white blood cells count can be the initial available information. Our aim was to establish a cutoff point of cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count that could distinguish bacterial from viral and aseptic meningitis. A retrospective study of children aged 29 days to 17 years who were admitted between January 1st and December 31th, 2009, with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis (white blood cell > 7 µL-1 was conducted. The cases of traumatic lumbar puncture and of antibiotic treatment before lumbar puncture were excluded. There were 295 patients with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, 60.3% females, medium age 5.0 ± 4.3 years distributed as: 12.2% 1-3 months; 10.5% 3-12 months; 29.8% 12 months to 5 years; 47.5% >5 years. Thirty one children (10.5% were diagnosed with bacterial meningitis, 156 (52.9% viral meningitis and 108 (36.6% aseptic meningitis. Bacterial meningitis was caused by Neisseria meningi tidis (48.4%, Streptococcus pneumoniae (32.3%, other Streptococcus species (9.7%, and other agents (9.7%. cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count was significantly higher in patients with bacterial meningitis (mean, 4839 cells/µL compared to patients with aseptic meningitis (mean, 159 cells/µL, p < 0.001, with those with aseptic meningitis (mean, 577 cells/µL, p < 0.001 and with all non-bacterial meningitis cases together (p < 0.001. A cutoff value of 321 white blood cell/µL showed the best combination of sensitivity (80.6% and specificity (81.4% for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis (area under receiver operating characteristic curve 0.837. Therefore, the value of cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count was found to be a useful and rapid diagnostic test to distinguish

  1. Simulating Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow and Spinal Cord Movement Associated with Syringomyelia

    OpenAIRE

    Vinje, Vegard

    2016-01-01

    Syringomyelia is a progressive disease where fluid filled cavities develop inside the spinal cord, and is frequently seen together with Chiari Malformation I (CMI). CMI is characterized by downwards displacements of the Cerebellar Tonsils obstructing flow in the Subarachnoid space, (SAS) which causes abnormal Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. Many theories on the pathogenesis of syringomyelia have been proposed, many related to abnormal CSF flow, but a full explanation has not yet been given. I...

  2. Immuno-reactive somatostatin in the cerebro-spinal fluid. Immunreaktives Somatostatin im Liquor cerebrospinalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, J.

    1983-01-01

    In the present work the lumbar cerebro-spinal fluid of 178 patients with different neurological affections was examined with the aid of a specific radioimmunoassay for somatostatin. 18 patients without any pathologic neurological findings served as controls. In degenerative diseases of the brain, reduced somatostatin levels in the cerebro-spinal fluid as compared to the controls were measured. In 3 patients with isolated cerebellar atrophy no reduction of the somatostatin content was found; rather the values were highly normal. Huntington-Chorea also is a case apart. In patients with manifest affections, the somatostatin reduction, amounting to 54.6%, was particularly notable as compared to the controls. By contrast, degenerative diseases with predominant medullary and spastic affection are characterized by significantly increased somatostatin levels. Again, in non-spastic patients the values were not significantly different from those of the controls. Patients with inflammations of the brain and meminges as well as with tumors of the nervous system showed somatostatin levels increased by about 60.8% respectively 51.8% as compared to the controls. Epileptic patients normally exhibit a reduced somatostatin level in the cerebro-spinal fluid, but the reduction is not significant. Disseminated encephalomyclitis, whether chromic or acute, is not found to be associated with significant modifications of the somatostatin level in the cerebro-spinal fluid. Strikingly, however, patients in which the disease took a serious or very serious clinical course showed also the lowest somatostatin levels in the cerebro-spinal fluid. In patients exhibiting the roof compression symptom in consequence of a prolapse of the disk, no significant modifications were found. By contrast, in patients with the symptoms of a transverse lesion, significantly increased somatostatin values were measured.

  3. Cortisol in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with brain ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selaković Vesna M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction One of the reactions to ischemia is increased release of glucocorticoid hormones, included in regulation of effects of numerous mediators/modulators that could be released in the acute phase of brain ischemia. The aim of our investigation was to define temporal dynamics of cortisol concentrations in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with different types of ischemic brain disease. Material and methods The study included 263 patients of both sexes, aged 55-68 years. History, clinical examination and cerebral computerized tomography were performed to establish the diagnosis. 97 patients had brain infarction, 66 had a reversible ischemic attack, 66 had a transient ischemic attack, and 34 patients had chronic encephalopathy. The control group included 22 age- and sex- matched patients, subjected to diagnostic lumbar radiculography, without disturbances in the cerebrospinal fluid passage. Cortisol concentrations were measured by direct radioimmunoassay. Results and discussion Results obtained in this research showed that in acute brain ischemic period there was a significant increase of cortisol concentration in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid. The increase was highest in patients with brain infarction, somewhat lower in reversible ischemic attack, and the lowest in transient ischemic attack compared to controls (331.7±92.8 pmol/ml of plasma and 2.5±1.1 pmol/ml of cerebrospinal fluid. Maximum concentrations were found during the first two days after insult. The main potentially protective effects of increased cortisol concentrations in patients with acute stroke could be the decrease of effects of deleterious reactions induced by ischemia. This mechanism might be an attempt of organism to compensate for disturbed homeostasis. Conclusion Measurement of cortisol in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid in patients with acute stroke is significant for monitoring the intensity of response of an organism to acute brain damage.

  4. Beta2-Microglobulin as a Diagnostic Marker in Cerebrospinal Fluid: A Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Svatoňová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta2-Microglobulin (β2-m is a low molecular weight protein occurring in all body fluids. Its concentration increases in various pathologies. Increased values in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are ascribed to an activation of immune system. Using immunoturbidimetry, we examined concentrations of beta2-microglobulin in cerebrospinal fluid in a large group of 6274 patients with defined neurological diseases. Cell counts, total protein, albumin, glucose, lactic acid, immunoglobulins concentrations, and isofocusing (IEF were also evaluated. We found substantial changes of CSF β2-m concentrations in purulent meningitis, leptomeningeal metastasis, viral meningitis/encephalitis, and neuroborreliosis, while in multiple sclerosis these changes were not significant. Intrathecal synthesis and immune activation were present in these clinical entities. A new normative study enables better understanding of beta2-microglobulin behavior in CSF.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Technologies for Quantifying Extracellular Vesicles (EVs in Clinical Cerebrospinal Fluids (CSF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny C Akers

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs have emerged as a promising biomarker platform for glioblastoma patients. However, the optimal method for quantitative assessment of EVs in clinical bio-fluid remains a point of contention. Multiple high-resolution platforms for quantitative EV analysis have emerged, including methods grounded in diffraction measurement of Brownian motion (NTA, tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS, vesicle flow cytometry (VFC, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Here we compared quantitative EV assessment using cerebrospinal fluids derived from glioblastoma patients using these methods. For EVs 150 nm in diameter, NTA consistently detected lower number of EVs relative to TRPS. These results unveil the strength and pitfalls of each quantitative method alone for assessing EVs derived from clinical cerebrospinal fluids and suggest that thoughtful synthesis of multi-platform quantitation will be required to guide meaningful clinical investigations.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid tau and amyloid-β1-42 in patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillbäck, Tobias; Farahmand, Bahman Y; Rosén, Christoffer; Mattsson, Niklas; Nägga, Katarina; Kilander, Lena; Religa, Dorota; Wimo, Anders; Winblad, Bengt; Schott, Jonathan M; Blennow, Kaj; Eriksdotter, Maria; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2015-09-01

    Progressive cognitive decline in combination with a cerebrospinal fluid biomarker pattern of low levels of amyloid-β1-42 and high levels of total tau and phosphorylated tau is typical of Alzheimer's disease. However, several neurodegenerative disorders may overlap with Alzheimer's disease both in regards to clinical symptoms and neuropathology. In a uniquely large cohort of dementia patients, we examined the associations of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease molecular pathology with clinical dementia diagnoses and disease severity. We cross-referenced the Swedish Dementia Registry with the clinical laboratory database at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital. The final data set consisted of 5676 unique subjects with a clinical dementia diagnosis and a complete set of measurements for cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42, total tau and phosphorylated tau. In cluster analysis, disregarding clinical diagnosis, the optimal natural separation of this data set was into two clusters, with the majority of patients with early onset Alzheimer's disease (75%) and late onset Alzheimer's disease (73%) assigned to one cluster and the patients with vascular dementia (91%), frontotemporal dementia (94%), Parkinson's disease dementia (94%) and dementia with Lewy bodies (87%) to the other cluster. Frontotemporal dementia had the highest cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid-β1-42 and the lowest levels of total tau and phosphorylated tau. The highest levels of total tau and phosphorylated tau and the lowest levels of amyloid-β1-42 and amyloid-β1-42:phosphorylated tau ratios were found in Alzheimer's disease. Low amyloid-β1-42, high total tau and high phosphorylated tau correlated with low Mini-Mental State Examination scores in Alzheimer's disease. In Parkinson's disease dementia and vascular dementia low cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 was associated with low Mini-Mental State Examination score. In the vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with

  7. Development of a theoretical framework for analyzing cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Benjamin; Voorhees, Abram; Vedel, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date hydrocephalus researchers acknowledge the need for rigorous but utilitarian fluid mechanics understanding and methodologies in studying normal and hydrocephalic intracranial dynamics. Pressure volume models and electric circuit analogs introduced pressure into volume conservat......Background: To date hydrocephalus researchers acknowledge the need for rigorous but utilitarian fluid mechanics understanding and methodologies in studying normal and hydrocephalic intracranial dynamics. Pressure volume models and electric circuit analogs introduced pressure into volume...

  8. Quantification of the cerebrospinal fluid from a new whole body MRI sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebret, Alain; Petit, Eric; Durning, Bruno; Hodel, Jérôme; Rahmouni, Alain; Decq, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    Our work aims to develop a biomechanical model of hydrocephalus both intended to perform clinical research and to assist the neurosurgeon in diagnosis decisions. Recently, we have defined a new MR imaging sequence based on SPACE (Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrast using different flip-angle Evolution). On these images, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) appears as a homogeneous hypersignal. Therefore such images are suitable for segmentation and for volume assessment of the CSF. In this paper we present a fully automatic 3D segmentation of such SPACE MRI sequences. We choose a topological approach considering that CSF can be modeled as a simply connected object (i.e. a filled sphere). First an initial object which must be strictly included in the CSF and homotopic to a filled sphere, is determined by using a moment-preserving thresholding. Then a priority function based on an Euclidean distance map is computed in order to control the thickening process that adds "simple points" to the initial thresholded object. A point is called simple if its addition or its suppression does not result in change of topology neither for the object, nor for the background. The method is validated by measuring fluid volume of brain phantoms and by comparing our volume assessments on clinical data to those derived from a segmentation controlled by expert physicians. Then we show that a distinction between pathological cases and healthy adult people can be achieved by a linear discriminant analysis on volumes of the ventricular and intracranial subarachnoid spaces.

  9. Effect of Yishen Qiqiao Fang on dopamine content in serum and cerebrospinal fluid of patients in persistent vegetative statec

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been demonstrated that the attack of persistent vegetative state is associated with the damaged neuron, which produces dopamine, and nervous pathway, the reduce of dopamine or malfunction of dopamine.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of self-made traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) Yishen Qiqiao Fang,which has the functions of supplementing qi and nourishing blood, resolving phlegm by promoting blood circulation, restoring consciousness and inducing resuscitation, on the contents of dopamine in serum and cerebrospinal fluid of patients in persistent vegetative state.DESIGN: An open randomized controlled clinical trial.SETTINGS: Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing Zijin Hospital.PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-eight inpatients of persistent vegetative state were selected from the Department of Neurology, Nanjing Zijin Hospital from August 2005 to November 2006. The patients were diagnosed according to the diagnostic standards set by the summary of a meeting for specialists in Nanjing. Informed contents were obtained from their relatives. According to the order of admission, the enrolled patients were divided into control group (n =20) and TCM treated group (n =20).METHODS: In the control group, the patients were treated with routine treatments for the symptoms. In the TCM treated group, the patients were treated with Yishen Qiqiao Fang besides the same treatments in the control group. TCM dispensing granules: each bag of mongolian milkvetch root, Chinese angelica and peach seed equaled to 10 g crude drug respectively; each bag of grassleaf sweetflag rhizome and dahurian angelica root equaled to 6 g crude drug respectively; Musk 0.05 g. The daily dosage for adults: 4 bags of mongolian milkvetch root, 2 bags of Chinese angelica, 0.05 g musk, 1 bag of peach seed, 2 bags of grassleaf sweetflag rhizome and 2 bags of dahurian angelica root, which should be given though nasal feeding or gastrostogavage before breakfast and supper every day

  10. A novel unbiased proteomic approach to detect the reactivity of cerebrospinal fluid in neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Krishnakumar N; Steer, David L; Short, Martin; Petratos, Steven; Smith, Ian; Bernard, Claude C A

    2011-06-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis represent global health issues. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to understand the pathogenesis of this and other central nervous system disorders, so that more effective therapeutics can be developed. Cerebrospinal fluid is a potential source of important reporter molecules released from various cell types as a result of central nervous system pathology. Here, we report the development of an unbiased approach for the detection of reactive cerebrospinal fluid molecules and target brain proteins from patients with multiple sclerosis. To help identify molecules that may serve as clinical biomarkers for multiple sclerosis, we have biotinylated proteins present in the cerebrospinal fluid and tested their reactivity against brain homogenate as well as myelin and myelin-axolemmal complexes. Proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, blotted onto membranes and probed separately with biotinylated unprocessed cerebrospinal fluid samples. Protein spots that reacted to two or more multiple sclerosis-cerebrospinal fluids were further analyzed by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In addition to previously reported proteins found in multiple sclerosis cerebrospinal fluid, such as αβ crystallin, enolase, and 14-3-3-protein, we have identified several additional molecules involved in mitochondrial and energy metabolism, myelin gene expression and/or cytoskeletal organization. These include aspartate aminotransferase, cyclophilin-A, quaking protein, collapsin response mediator protein-2, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1, and cofilin. To further validate these findings, the cellular expression pattern of collapsin response mediator protein-2 and ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 were investigated in human chronic-active MS lesions by immunohistochemistry. The observation that in multiple sclerosis lesions phosphorylated collapsin

  11. The relationship between cerebrospinal fluid markers of Alzheimer pathology and positron emission tomography tau imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Brian A; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brier, Matthew; Blazey, Tyler; Su, Yi; Christensen, Jon; Aldea, Patricia; McConathy, Jonathan; Holtzman, David M; Cairns, Nigel J; Morris, John C; Fagan, Anne M; Ances, Beau M; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2016-08-01

    The two primary molecular pathologies in Alzheimer's disease are amyloid-β plaques and tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles. Investigations into these pathologies have been restricted to cerebrospinal fluid assays, and positron emission tomography tracers that can image amyloid-β plaques. Tau tracers have recently been introduced into the field, although the utility of the tracer and its relationship to other Alzheimer biomarkers are still unknown. Here we examined tau deposition in 41 cognitively normal and 11 cognitively impaired older adults using the radioactive tau ligand (18)F-AV-1451 (previously known as T807) who also underwent a lumbar puncture to assess cerebrospinal fluid levels of total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181 (p-tau181) and amyloid-β42 Voxel-wise statistical analyses examined spatial patterns of tau deposition associated with cognitive impairment. We then related the amount of tau tracer uptake to levels of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. All analyses controlled for age and gender and, when appropriate, the time between imaging and lumbar puncture assessments. Symptomatic individuals (Clinical Dementia Rating > 0) demonstrated markedly increased levels of tau tracer uptake. This elevation was most prominent in the temporal lobe and temporoparietal junction, but extended more broadly into parietal and frontal cortices. In the entire cohort, there were significant relationships among all cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and tracer uptake, notably for tau-related cerebrospinal fluid markers. After controlling for levels of amyloid-β42, the correlations with tau uptake were r = 0.490 (P < 0.001) for t-tau and r = 0.492 (P < 0.001) for p-tau181 Within the cognitively normal cohort, levels of amyloid-β42, but not t-tau or p-tau181, were associated with elevated tracer binding that was confined primarily to the medial temporal lobe and adjacent neocortical regions. AV-1451 tau binding in the medial temporal, parietal, and frontal cortices

  12. 小儿闭合性颅脑损伤血清和脑脊液中β-EP含量、红细胞免疫功能的变化%Levels of beta-endorphine in serum and cerebrospinal fluid and changes in erythrocyte immunological function in children with closed craniocerebral injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜晓东; 陈宇; 张雅清

    2001-01-01

    目的:研究小儿闭合性颅脑损伤血清和脑脊液中β-内啡肽(β-EP)含量及红细胞免疫功能的变化。方法:选择46例闭合性颅脑损伤患儿(观察组)和30例同年龄组非神经系统疾病患儿(对照组),分别测定他们的血清和脑脊液中β-EP含量及红细胞粘附肿瘤花环率。结果:观察组血清和脑脊液中β-EP含量较对照组明显升高,红细胞粘附肿瘤花环率则明显下降,而且病情越重,β-EP升高、红细胞粘附肿瘤花环率下降的越明显。结论:β-EP对红细胞免疫功能具有双重调节作用,且β-EP和红细胞免疫功能二者与病情相关。%Objective: To study the levels of beta-endorphine(β-EP) in serum and cerebrospinal fluid and the changes in erythrocyte immunological function in closed craniocerebral injury children. Methods: Observation group (46 closed craniocerebral injury children) and control group (30 age-matched children with no nervous system diseases) were selected. The levels of beta-endorphine in serum and cerebrospinal fluid and the rate of erythrocyte natural adhesion to tumor cell were determined. Results: Compared with the control group, the levels of β-EP in serum and cerebrospinal fluid obviously rose and the rate of erythrocyte natural adhesion to tumor cell obviously fell in observation group. What is more, the more severe the condition of disease was, the higher the levels of β-EP in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were, and the lower the rate of erythrocyte natural adhesion to tumor cell was. Conclusion: Beta-endorphine has the dual regulation of erythrocyte immunological function, and both of them correlate with the disease condition.

  13. Age-specific characteristics and coupling of cerebral arterial inflow and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Schmid Daners

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to quantify age-related differences in the characteristics and coupling of cerebral arterial inflow and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF dynamics. To this end, 3T phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging blood and CSF flow data of eleven young (24 ± 3 years and eleven elderly subjects (70 ± 5 years with a comparable sex-ratio were acquired. Flow waveforms and their frequency composition, transfer functions from blood to CSF flows and cross-correlations were analyzed. The magnitudes of the frequency components of CSF flow in the aqueduct differ significantly between the two age groups, as do the frequency components of the cervical spinal CSF and the arterial flows. The males' aqueductal CSF stroke volumes and average flow rates are significantly higher than those of the females. Transfer functions and cross-correlations between arterial blood and CSF flow reveal significant age-dependence of phase-shift between these, as do the waveforms of arterial blood, as well as cervical-spinal and aqueductal CSF flows. These findings accentuate the need for age- and sex-matched control groups for the evaluation of cerebral pathologies such as hydrocephalus.

  14. Viral immunoblotting: a sensitive method for detecting viral-specific oliogoclonal bands in unconcentrated cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, S; Keir, G; Thompson, E J

    1984-06-01

    A new method for detecting viral antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid is described. The technique has many advantages over previously published methods in that it is highly sensitive eliminating the need to concentrate the CSF, takes 5 h to complete, avoids the use of radionucleides, and most importantly circumvents problems associated with prozone effects which occur in immunoprecipitation reaction since the viral antigen is immobilized on nitrocellulose membranes.

  15. [Our management protocol and surgical technique in cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea treated with an endonasal approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengot, M; Campos, A; Pérez, A; Izquierdo, J; Alba, J R; Basterra, J

    2000-10-01

    Five patients with cerebrospinal fluid fistula (CFF) have been treated with intratecal fluoresceine, 2 cc at 2%, and endoscopic nasal surgery. In 3 patients CFF was postraumatic; one case spontaneous and another case iatrogenic. In all the cases CFF have been solved in the first time. Postoperatory follow-up vary from 8 to 14 months, and no recurrence was observed. Fluorescein must be managed adequately for prevent neural complications.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in the HIV infection and compartmentalization of HIV in the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Sérgio Monteiro Almeida

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system plays an important role in HIV infection. The purpose of this review is to discuss the indications for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis in HIV infection in clinical practice. CSF analysis in HIV infection is indicated for the diagnosis of opportunistic infections and co-infections, diagnosis of meningitis caused by HIV, quantification of HIV viral load, and analysis of CNS HIV compartmentalization. Although several CSF biomarkers have been investigated, none are clinicall...

  17. Guidelines on routine cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Report from an EFNS task force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deisenhammer, F; Bartos, A; Egg, R

    2006-01-01

    A great variety of neurological diseases require investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to prove the diagnosis or to rule out relevant differential diagnoses. The objectives were to evaluate the theoretical background and provide guidelines for clinical use in routine CSF analysis including...... be evaluated whenever pleocytosis is found or leptomeningeal metastases or pathological bleeding is suspected. Computed tomography-negative intrathecal bleeding should be investigated by bilirubin detection....

  18. Increase in β-Amyloid Levels in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Children with Down Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Englund, Hillevi; Annerén, Göran; Gustafsson, Jan; Wester, Ulrika; Wiltfang, Jens; Lannfelt, Lars; Blennow, Kaj; Höglund, Kina

    2013-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) invariably develop Alzheimer’s disease (AD) during their life span. It is therefore of importance to study young DS patients when trying to elucidate early events in AD pathogenesis. Aim: To investigate how levels of different amyloid- _ (A _ ) peptides, as well as tau and phosphorylated tau, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from children with DS change over time. The first CSF sample was taken at 8 months and the following two samples at 20–40 and ...

  19. Factors influencing the measurement of lysosomal enzymes activity in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Persichetti

    Full Text Available Measurements of the activities of lysosomal enzymes in cerebrospinal fluid have recently been proposed as putative biomarkers for Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. To define the operating procedures useful for ensuring the reliability of these measurements, we analyzed several pre-analytical factors that may influence the activity of β-glucocerebrosidase, α-mannosidase, β-mannosidase, β-galactosidase, α-fucosidase, β-hexosaminidase, cathepsin D and cathepsin E in cerebrospinal fluid. Lysosomal enzyme activities were measured by well-established fluorimetric assays in a consecutive series of patients (n = 28 with different neurological conditions, including Parkinson's disease. The precision, pre-storage and storage conditions, and freeze/thaw cycles were evaluated. All of the assays showed within- and between-run variabilities below 10%. At -20°C, only cathepsin D was stable up to 40 weeks. At -80°C, the cathepsin D, cathepsin E, and β-mannosidase activities did not change significantly up to 40 weeks, while β-glucocerebrosidase activity was stable up to 32 weeks. The β-galactosidase and α-fucosidase activities significantly increased (+54.9±38.08% after 4 weeks and +88.94±36.19% after 16 weeks, respectively. Up to four freeze/thaw cycles did not significantly affect the activities of cathepsins D and E. The β-glucocerebrosidase activity showed a slight decrease (-14.6% after two freeze/thaw cycles. The measurement of lysosomal enzyme activities in cerebrospinal fluid is reliable and reproducible if pre-analytical factors are accurately taken into consideration. Therefore, the analytical recommendations that ensue from this study may contribute to the establishment of actual values for the activities of cerebrospinal fluid lysosomal enzymes as putative biomarkers for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Amplification and characterization of herpesvirus DNA in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with acute encephalitis.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    A single pair of oligonucleotide primers selected within a highly conserved region of the DNA polymerase gene of the herpesviruses was designed to amplify related viral genomes, i.e., herpes simplex virus type 1, herpes simplex virus type 2, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus, by the polymerase chain reaction. A simple restriction enzyme analysis of these amplified products allowed accurate characterization of the herpesvirus type. Ninety-nine cerebrospinal fluid samples from 36 patients...

  1. Ferritin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid predict Alzheimer's disease outcomes and are regulated by APOE

    OpenAIRE

    Ayton, Scott; Faux, Noel G.; Bush, Ashley I.; Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack Jr, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Leslie M Shaw

    2015-01-01

    Brain iron elevation is implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, but the impact of iron on disease outcomes has not been previously explored in a longitudinal study. Ferritin is the major iron storage protein of the body; by using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of ferritin as an index, we explored whether brain iron status impacts longitudinal outcomes in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort. We show that baseline CSF ferritin levels were negatively asso...

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid purine metabolite and neuron-specific enolase concentrations after febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Núñez, A; Cid, E; Rodríguez-García, J; Camiña, F; Rodríguez-Segade, S; Castro-Gago, M

    2000-10-01

    If febrile seizures cause significant compromise of neuronal metabolism (whether permanent or reversible), this should be reflected in an increase in the cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and/or adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown products. In the present study, AMP, IMP, inosine, adenosine, guanosine, adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and NSE concentrations were determined in the cerebrospinal fluid of 90 children 1 h after febrile seizure (73 simple febrile seizures (SFS); 17 complex febrile seizures (CFS)), and in a control group of 160 children. There was no statistically significant difference between the SFS group and the control group for any of the substances determined, suggesting that SFS neither significantly depletes neuronal ATP concentration, nor significantly increases NSE concentration; thus, SFS do not appear to constitute a threat to neuronal integrity. However, patients with CFS showed significantly lower IMP concentrations and significantly higher adenine concentrations than controls, and significantly higher AMP concentrations than SFS patients; these results suggest that CFS may affect energy metabolism in the brain. However, NSE concentrations were normal in the cerebrospinal fluid of both SFS and CFS patients, suggesting that neither type of seizure causes significant neuronal damage, at least early after the seizure.

  3. Neuron-specific enolase in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of patients with acute ischemic brain disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selaković Vesna M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine the dynamics of change of neuron-specific enolase concentration in patients with acute ischemic brain disease in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma. The study included 103 patients, their mean age 58-66 years. The control group consisted of 16 patients, of matching age and sex, with radicular lesions of discal origin, subjected to diagnostic radiculography. Concentration of neuron-specific enolase was measured by a flouroimmunometric method. The results showed that the concentration of neuron-specific enolase in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of patients with brain ischemic disease within first seven days significantly increased compared to the control. The highest increase of concentration was established in brain infarction, somewhat lower in reversible ischemic attack, and the lowest in transient ischemic attack. Maximal concentration was established on the 3rd-4th day upon the brain infarction. Neuron-specific enolase concentration in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma may be an indicator of pathophysiological processes in the acute phase of brain ischemia and is significant in early diagnostics and therapy of the disease.

  4. [A successfully treated case of cerebrospinal fluid fistula caused by fracture of the sella turcica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuge, Atsushi; Kinjo, Toshihiko; Kayama, Takamasa

    2003-05-01

    Fracture of the sella turcica is rare and is associated with many complications. We successfully treated a cerebrospinal fluid fistula caused by a fracture of the sella turcica. A 66-year-old male in a motor vehicle accident was admitted to an outside hospital with disturbance of consciousness. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the head revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage and pneumocephalus. Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea developed after admission. Repair of the fistula was attempted without success, and the patient was transferred to our hospital for further examination and treatment. A fracture of the sella turcica was clearly visualized on coronal and sagittal head CT and on a three-dimensional reconstructed CT (3D-CT) image. The source of the CSF fistula was thought to be the anterior wall of the sella turcica. Through a bifrontal interhemispheric approach, the cerebrospinal fluid fistula was repaired microscopically with the assistance of endoscopy. Postoperatively, the fistula stopped completely. Coronal and sagittal head CT and 3D-CT images are useful for making a diagnosis of CSF leakage. Endoscopic images can assist in observation of the dead angle of the microscope.

  5. Nerve growth factor expression in astrocytoma and cerebrospinal fluid: a new biomarker for prognosis of astrocytoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiao-yu; FENG Yun; XU Wen-lin; YANG Yong; ZHANG Yan; ZHANG Zhi-jian; GONG Ai-hua; YUAN Zhi-cheng; LU Pei-song; ZHAN Li-ping; WANG Peng

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent studies have discovered that nuclear translocation of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor fragments function differently from the traditional model. This study aimed to uncover the nuclear expression of NGF in astrocytoma and its biological significance.Methods Ninety-four paraffin-embedded astrocytoma specimens were subjected to immunohistochemical (IHC) and hemotoxylin & eosin (HE) staining. Preoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens and intraoperative snap-frozen astrocytoma tissues were assayed for NGF expression by ELISA and Western blotting. The outcome of patients who contributed samples was tracked. Each ten tissue samples from patients with traumatic brain injury who had received decompression surgery and CSF samples from patients undergoing spinal anesthesia but with no history of nervous system disease were taken as control.Results NGF-positive immunoreactive products were distributed in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of astrocytoma, but were only located in the cytoplasm of traumatic brain injury (TBI) tissue. NGF nuclear-positive rate (NPR) of grades Ⅲ-Ⅳ astrocytomas (70.0%) was higher than that of grades Ⅰ-Ⅱ astrocytoma (28.6%, P<0.05). NGF-NP expression positively correlated with the NGF concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (r=0.755, P<0.01). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis indicated that the median survival time was 25 months for NGF-NP astrocytoma grade Ⅰ-Ⅱ patients and 42 months in NGF nuclear negative (NGF-NN) astrocytoma grade Ⅰ-Ⅱ patients (P<0.05). In astrocytoma Ⅲ-Ⅳ patients, the median survival was 7 months for NGF-NP patients and 24 months for NGF-NN patients (P<0.01). Two types of NGF with molecular weights of 13 and 36 kDa were present in astrocytoma, but only the 36 kDa NGF was found in the CSF. NGF expression elevated as the malignancy increased.Conclusions NGF-NP expression and NGF level in CSF were significant prognostic factors in astrocytoma patients.Because of the easy

  6. Levels of soluble delta-like ligand 1 in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of tuberculous meningitis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinghong Li; Jinyi Li; Yanjie Jia

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the levels of soluble delta-like ligand 1 in cerebrospinal fluid and serum of 50 patients with tuberculous meningitis, 30 patients with viral meningitis, 20 patients with purulent meningitis and 40 subjects without central nervous system disease were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean levels of soluble delta-like ligand 1 in both cerebrospinal fluid and serum from patients with tuberculous meningitis were significantly higher compared with those from patients with viral meningitis or purulent meningitis or from subjects without central nervous system disease. Meanwhile, the level of soluble delta-like ligand 1 gradually decreased as tuberculous meningitis patients recovered. If patients deteriorated after treatment, the level of soluble delta-like ligand 1 in cerebrospinal fluid gradually increased. There was no correlation between the level of soluble delta-like ligand 1 and the protein level/cell number in cerebrospinal fluid. Our findings in-dicate that the levels of soluble delta-like ligand 1 in cerebrospinal fluid and serum are reliable markers for the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis and for monitoring treatment progress. At the same time, this index is not influenced by protein levels or cell numbers in cerebrospinal fluid.

  7. Vasopressin content in the cerebrospinal fluid and fluid perfusing cerebral ventricles in rats after the afferent vagus nerve fibres stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlowska-Majdak, M.; Traczyk, W.Z. [Akademia Medyczna, Lodz (Poland). Katedra Fizjologii

    1996-12-31

    Experiments were carried out on male rats in urethane anaesthesia. Cerebroventricular system was perfused with McIlwain-Rodniht`s solution from lateral ventricles to cerebellomedullary cistern. Both vagus nerves were cut and the central ends of the nerves were electrically stimulated during the collection of the third 30-min portion of perfusing fluid. Vasopressin (AVP) was determined by radioimmunoassay in samples of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (the first portion) and in five successive samples of the perfusing fluid. AVP concentration in the CSF was several times greater than in the fluid perfusing cerebral ventricles. Alternate electrical stimulation of both vagus nerves did not change considerably the release of AVP into the fluid perfusing the cerebral ventricles in rat, although a certain upward tendency could be observed. It seems that only AVP raised in circulating blood and not in CSF, after vagus nerves stimulation may act on the central nervous structures. (author). 37 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab.

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Blood Biomarkers of Neuroaxonal Damage in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Dujmovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Following emerging evidence that neurodegenerative processes in multiple sclerosis (MS are present from its early stages, an intensive scientific interest has been directed to biomarkers of neuro-axonal damage in body fluids of MS patients. Recent research has introduced new candidate biomarkers but also elucidated pathogenetic and clinical relevance of the well-known ones. This paper reviews the existing data on blood and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neuroaxonal damage in MS and highlights their relation to clinical parameters, as well as their potential predictive value to estimate future disease course, disability, and treatment response. Strategies for future research in this field are suggested.

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid proteomics and protein biomarkers in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: Current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeckl, Patrick; Steinacker, Petra; Feneberg, Emily; Otto, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) comprises a spectrum of rare neurodegenerative diseases with an estimated prevalence of 15-22 cases per 100,000 persons including the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA), semantic dementia (SD), FTD with motor neuron disease (FTD-MND), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS). The pathogenesis of the diseases is still unclear and clinical diagnosis of FTLD is hampered by overlapping symptoms within the FTLD subtypes and with other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Intracellular protein aggregates in the brain are a major hallmark of FTLD and implicate alterations in protein metabolism or function in the disease's pathogenesis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) which surrounds the brain can be used to study changes in neurodegenerative diseases and to identify disease-related mechanisms or neurochemical biomarkers for diagnosis. In the present review, we will give an overview of the current literature on proteomic studies in CSF of FTLD patients. Reports of targeted and unbiased proteomic approaches are included and the results are discussed in regard of their informative value about disease pathology and the suitability to be used as diagnostic biomarkers. Finally, we will give some future perspectives on CSF proteomics and a list of candidate biomarkers which might be interesting for validation in further studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in neuroscience and neurology.

  10. The circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the spinal canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Antonio L.; Martinez-Bazan, Carlos; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2016-11-01

    Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) is secreted in the choroid plexus in the lateral sinuses of the brain and fills the subarachnoid space bathing the external surfaces of the brain and the spinal canal. Absence of CSF circulation has been shown to impede its physiological function that includes, among others, supplying nutrients to neuronal and glial cells and removing the waste products of cellular metabolism. Radionuclide scanning images published by Di Chiro in 1964 showed upward migration of particle tracers from the lumbar region of the spinal canal, thereby suggesting the presence of an active bulk circulation responsible for bringing fresh CSF into the spinal canal and returning a portion of it to the cranial vault. However, the existence of this slow moving bulk circulation in the spinal canal has been a subject of dispute for the last 50 years. To date, there has been no physical explanation for the mechanism responsible for the establishment of such a bulk motion. We present a perturbation analysis of the flow in an idealized model of the spinal canal and show how steady streaming could be responsible for the establishment of such a circulation. The results of this analysis are compared to flow measurements conducted on in-vitro models of the spinal canal of adult humans.

  11. Effects of cerebrospinal fluid proteins on brain atrophy rates in cognitively healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip; Nosheny, Rachel; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M; Jack, Clifford R; Tosun, Duygu; Weiner, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Biomarkers associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like brain atrophy in healthy individuals may identify mechanisms involved in early stage AD. Aside from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) β-amyloid42 (Aβ42) and tau, no studies have tested associations between CSF proteins and AD-like brain atrophy. We studied 90 healthy elders, who underwent lumbar puncture at baseline, and serial magnetic resonance imaging scans for up to 4 years. We tested statistical effects of baseline CSF proteins (N = 70 proteins related to Aβ42-metabolism, microglial activity, and synaptic/neuronal function) on atrophy rates in 7 AD-related regions. Besides the effects of Aβ42 and phosphorylated tau (P-tau) that were seen in several regions, novel CSF proteins were found to have effects in inferior and middle temporal cortex (including apolipoprotein CIII, apolipoprotein D, and apolipoprotein H). Several proteins (including S100β and matrix metalloproteinase-3) had effects that depended on the presence of brain Aβ pathology, as measured by CSF Aβ42. Other proteins (including P-tau and apolipoprotein D) had effects even after adjusting for CSF Aβ42. The statistical effects in this exploratory study were mild and not significant after correction for multiple comparisons, but some of the identified proteins may be associated with brain atrophy in healthy persons. Proteins interacting with CSF Aβ42 may be related to Aβ brain pathology, whereas proteins associated with atrophy even after adjusting for CSF Aβ42 may be related to Aβ-independent mechanisms.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid norepinephrine and cognition in subjects across the adult age span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lucy Y; Murphy, Richard R; Hanscom, Brett; Li, Ge; Millard, Steven P; Petrie, Eric C; Galasko, Douglas R; Sikkema, Carl; Raskind, Murray A; Wilkinson, Charles W; Peskind, Elaine R

    2013-10-01

    Adequate central nervous system noradrenergic activity enhances cognition, but excessive noradrenergic activity may have adverse effects on cognition. Previous studies have also demonstrated that noradrenergic activity is higher in older than younger adults. We aimed to determine relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) norepinephrine (NE) concentration and cognitive performance by using data from a CSF bank that includes samples from 258 cognitively normal participants aged 21-100 years. After adjusting for age, gender, education, and ethnicity, higher CSF NE levels (units of 100 pg/mL) are associated with poorer performance on tests of attention, processing speed, and executive function (Trail Making A: regression coefficient 1.5, standard error [SE] 0.77, p = 0.046; Trail Making B: regression coefficient 5.0, SE 2.2, p = 0.024; Stroop Word-Color Interference task: regression coefficient 6.1, SE 2.0, p = 0.003). Findings are consistent with the earlier literature relating excess noradrenergic activity with cognitive impairment.

  13. Vitamin B6 in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albersen, Monique; Bosma, M.; Jans, Judith J M; Hofstede, FC; van Hasselt, PM; De Sain-van Der Velden, Monique G M; Visser, Gepke; Verhoeven-Duif, NM

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the past years, the essential role of vitamin B6 in brain development and functioning has been recognized and genetic metabolic disorders resulting in functional vitamin B6 deficiency have been identified. However, data on B6 vitamers in children are scarce. Materials and Methods B6

  14. Elevated Cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in Macaques Following Early Life Stress (ELS and Inverse Association with Hippocampal Volume: Preliminary Implications for Serotonin-Related Function in Mood and Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D Coplan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early life stress (ELS is cited as a risk for mood and anxiety disorders, potentially through altered serotonin neurotransmission. We examined the effects of ELS, utilizing the variable foraging demand (VFD macaque model, on adolescent monoamine metabolites. We sought to replicate an increase in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA observed in two previous VFD cohorts. We hypothesized that elevated cisternal 5-HIAA was associated with reduced neurotrophic effects , conceivably due to excessive negative feedback at somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors. A putatively decreased serotonin neurotransmission would be reflected by reductions in hippocampal volume and white matter (WM fractional anisotropy (FA. Methods: When infants were 2-6 months of age, bonnet macaque mothers were exposed to VFD. We employed cisternal CSF taps to measure monoamine metabolites in VFD (N = 22 and non-VFD (N = 14 offspring (mean age = 2.61 years. Metabolites were correlated with hippocampal volume obtained by MRI and WM FA by diffusion tensor imaging in young adulthood in 17 males [10 VFD (mean age = 4.57 years].Results: VFD subjects exhibited increased CSF 5-HIAA compared to non-VFD controls. An inverse correlation between right hippocampal volume and 5-HIAA was noted in VFD- but not controls. CSF HVA and MHPG correlated inversely with hippocampal volume only in VFD. CSF 5-HIAA correlated inversely with FA of the WM tracts of the anterior limb of the internal capsule (ALIC only in VFD. Conclusions: Elevated cisternal 5-HIAA in VFD may reflect increased dorsal raphe serotonin, potentially inducing excessive autoreceptor activation, inducing a putative serotonin deficit in terminal fields. Resultant reductions in neurotrophic activity are reflected by smaller right hippocampal volume. Convergent evidence of reduced neurotrophic activity in association with high CSF 5-HIAA in VFD was reflected by reduced FA of the ALIC.

  15. Cryptococcal cerebrospinal fluid shunt infection treated with fluconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Eymard

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old woman with a cadaveric renal allotransplantation required intra-cranial shunting devices after a presumptive episode of tuberculous meningitis. Six months later, she developed a culture-proven cryptococcal meningitis. Without having her ventriculo-auricular shunt removed, she was successfully treated with a short course of amphotericin B (335 mg and flucytosine (nine days followed by prolonged therapy with oral fluconazole (400 mg daily for 72 days. Three years post treatment she had no evidence of relapse, and normal renal graft function.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma oxytocin concentrations are positively correlated and negatively predict anxiety in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, D S; Berquist, S W; Trujillo, T H; Garner, J P; Hannah, S L; Hyde, S A; Sumiyoshi, R D; Jackson, L P; Moss, J K; Strehlow, M C; Cheshier, S H; Partap, S; Hardan, A Y; Parker, K J

    2015-09-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) exerts anxiolytic and prosocial effects in the central nervous system of rodents. A number of recent studies have attempted to translate these findings by investigating the relationships between peripheral (e.g., blood, urinary and salivary) OXT concentrations and behavioral functioning in humans. Although peripheral samples are easy to obtain in humans, whether peripheral OXT measures are functionally related to central OXT activity remains unclear. To investigate a possible relationship, we quantified OXT concentrations in concomitantly collected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood samples from child and adult patients undergoing clinically indicated lumbar punctures or other CSF-related procedures. Anxiety scores were obtained in a subset of child participants whose parents completed psychometric assessments. Findings from this study indicate that plasma OXT concentrations significantly and positively predict CSF OXT concentrations (r=0.56, P=0.0064, N=27). Moreover, both plasma (r=-0.92, P=0.0262, N=10) and CSF (r=-0.91, P=0.0335, N=10) OXT concentrations significantly and negatively predicted trait anxiety scores, consistent with the preclinical literature. Importantly, plasma OXT concentrations significantly and positively (r=0.96, P=0.0115, N=10) predicted CSF OXT concentrations in the subset of child participants who provided behavioral data. This study provides the first empirical support for the use of blood measures of OXT as a surrogate for central OXT activity, validated in the context of behavioral functioning. These preliminary findings also suggest that impaired OXT signaling may be a biomarker of anxiety in humans, and a potential target for therapeutic development in individuals with anxiety disorders.

  17. Insulin transport into the brain and cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Denovan P

    2015-01-01

    The pancreatic hormone insulin plays a well-described role in the periphery, based principally on its ability to lower circulating glucose levels via activation of glucose transporters. However, insulin also acts within the central nervous system (CNS) to alter a number of physiological outcomes ranging from energy balance and glucose homeostasis to cognitive performance. Insulin is transported into the CNS by a saturable receptor-mediated process that is proposed to be dependent on the insulin receptor. Transport of insulin into the brain is dependent on numerous factors including diet, glycemia, a diabetic state and notably, obesity. Obesity leads to a marked decrease in insulin transport from the periphery into the CNS and the biological basis of this reduction of transport remains unresolved. Despite decades of research into the effects of central insulin on a wide range of physiological functions and its transport from the periphery to the CNS, numerous questions remain unanswered including which receptor is responsible for transport and the precise mechanisms of action of insulin within the brain.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum cytokine profiles in narcolepsy with cataplexy: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Jaussent, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Scholz, Sabine; Bayard, Sophie; Cristol, Jean Paul; Blain, Hubert; Dupuy, Anne-Marie

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide strong support that narcolepsy-cataplexy is an immune-mediated disease. Only few serum cytokine studies with controversial results were performed in narcolepsy and none in the cerebrospinal fluid. We measured a panel of 12 cytokines by a proteomic approach in the serum of 35 patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to 156 healthy controls, and in the cerebrospinal fluid of 34 patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to 17 non-narcoleptic patients; and analyzed the effect of age, duration and severity of disease on the cytokine levels. After multiple adjustments we reported lower serum IL-2, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1 and EGF levels, and a tendency for higher IL-4 level in narcolepsy compared to controls. Significant differences were only found for IL-4 in cerebrospinal fluid, being higher in narcolepsy. Positive correlations were found in serum between IL-4, daytime sleepiness, and cataplexy frequency. The expression of some pro-inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, VEGF, EGF, IL2, IL-1β, IFN-γ) in either serum or CSF was negatively correlated with disease severity and duration. No correlation was found for any specific cytokine in 18 of the patients with narcolepsy with peripheral and central samples collected the same day. Significant decreased pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine profiles were found at peripheral and central levels in narcolepsy, together with a T helper 2/Th1 serum cytokine secretion imbalance. To conclude, we showed some evidence for alterations in the cytokine profile in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to controls at peripheral and central levels, with the potential role of IL-4 and significant Th1/2 imbalance in the pathophysiology of narcolepsy.

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid beta-2-microglobulin in adult patients with acute leukemia or lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Kjeldsen, L; Dalhoff, K

    1992-01-01

    Beta-2-microglobulin (B2m) was measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum from 18 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloblastic leukemia or lymphoma in order to detect early central nervous system (CNS) involvement or relapse. Six had CNS-involvement documented by neurologic...... determination of CSF-B2m alone may be a useful and sensitive marker of CNS-dissemination in acute leukemia and malignant lymphoma. Using the criteria of CSF-B2m greater than 160 nmol/l as a positive diagnostic test the sensitivity of the test was 100%, the specificity was 76%. The same values for the CSF...

  20. Total glutamine synthetase levels in cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients are unchanged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmer, Nienke M; Herbert, Megan K; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Kuiperij, H Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2015-03-01

    Decreased cerebral protein and activity levels of glutamine synthetase (GS) have been reported for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Using a recently established method, we quantified total GS levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from AD patients and control subjects. Furthermore, we investigated if total GS levels in CSF could differentiate AD from frontotemperal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies patients. As we found no significantly altered total GS levels in any of the patient groups compared with control subjects, we conclude that levels of total GS in CSF have no diagnostic value for AD, dementia with Lewy bodies, or frontotemperal dementia.

  1. Clinical study of radioisotope clearance from the cerebrospinal fluid space using single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchiwaki, H.; Nagasaka, M.; Takada, S.; Ishiguri, H.; Kameyama, H.; Aoyama, Y.

    1989-07-01

    Radioisotope cisternography with statistical analysis was evaluated in 18 patients with suspected hydrocephalus shown by conventional CT, and 4 control patients. Regions of interest were located at cisterna magna, basal cistern, lateral cistern Silvii, interhemispheric cistern, and lateral ventricle using three dimensional SPECT images. A value for constant K was determined for each exponential radioactivity decay curve. On the basis of SPECT-derived K values our patients were grouped into hydrocephalus, nonhydrocephalus, and control patients. Twelve of 14 hydrocephalus patients were treated by shunt operation. Our less-invasive method showed reliable criteria for assessing the cerebrospinal fluid circulation. (orig.).

  2. The Alzheimer's Association external quality control program for cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Andreasson, Ulf; Persson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    . The Alzheimer's Association has initiated a global quality control program to estimate and monitor variability of measurements, quantify batch-to-batch assay variations, and identify sources of variability. In this article, we present the results from the first two rounds of the program.......The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid β (Aβ)-42, total-tau (T-tau), and phosphorylated-tau (P-tau) demonstrate good diagnostic accuracy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are large variations in biomarker measurements between studies, and between and within laboratories...

  3. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecsei, L.; Csala, B.; Widerloev, E.E.; Ekman, R.; Czopf, J.; Palffy, G. (Univ. of Lund (Sweden))

    1990-09-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y were investigated by use of radioimmunoassay in patients suffering from chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The somatostatin level was significantly decreased in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis compared to the control group. The magnitude of this change was more pronounced in patients with severe clinical symptoms of the illness. The CSF neuropeptide Y concentration did not differ from the control values. These findings suggest a selective involvement of somatostatin neurotransmission in multiple sclerosis.

  4. Serum Levels of Progranulin Do Not Reflect Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels in Neurodegenerative Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Carlo; Gillardon, Frank; Deuschle, Christian; Dubois, Evelyn; Hobert, Markus A; Müller vom Hagen, Jennifer; Krüger, Stefanie; Biskup, Saskia; Blauwendraat, Cornelis; Hruscha, Michael; Kaeser, Stephan A; Heutink, Peter; Maetzler, Walter; Synofzik, Matthis

    2016-01-01

    Altered progranulin levels play a major role in neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's dementia (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), even in the absence of GRN mutations. Increasing progranulin levels could hereby provide a novel treatment strategy. However, knowledge on progranulin regulation in neurodegenerative diseases remains limited. We here demonstrate that cerebrospinal fluid progranulin levels do not correlate with its serum levels in AD, FTD and ALS, indicating a differential regulation of its central and peripheral levels in neurodegeneration. Blood progranulin levels thus do not reliably predict central nervous progranulin levels and their response to future progranulin-increasing therapeutics.

  5. [The role of biology in the diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid leaks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaouti, K; Kraoul, L; Alyousef, L; Lahoud, G Abi; Rousset, S Brovedani; Lancelin, F; Mouchet, E; Piketty, M-L

    2009-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid leakage is a rare but critical condition with a substantial risk of intracranial infection, therefore its diagnosis and treatment is of major importance. CSF leakage diagnostic can be a challenging problem. Nephelometric measurement of beta-trace protein in the liquorrhoea is a non-invasive and fast method that can be used for CSF leakage diagnosis. It should kept in mind, however, that the cut-off of 1.1 mg/L is not suitable for patients with bacterial meningitis and those with a reduced glomerular filtration rate. Complementary use of beta-trace protein assay and beta2-transferrin detection is therefore recommended.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels in type 1 narcolepsy patients very close to onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Pizza, Fabio; Knudsen, Stine;

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by a loss of hypocretin (orexin) signaling in the brain. Genetic data suggests the disorder is caused by an autoimmune attack on hypocretin producing neurons in hypothalamus. This hypothesis has however not yet been confirmed by consistent findings of autoreactive....... In this study, we tested whether an active immune process in the brain could be detected in these patients, as reflected by increased cytokine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Using multiplex analysis, we measured the levels of 51 cytokines and chemokines in the CSF of 40 type 1 narcolepsy patients...

  7. Biofilm-associated infection: the hidden face of cerebrospinal fluid shunt malfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounier, Roman; Kapandji, Natacha; Birnbaum, Ron; Cook, Fabrice; Rodriguez, Cristophe; Nebbad, Bibba; Lobo, David; Dhonneur, Gilles

    2016-12-01

    Diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt infection is difficult. Growing evidence links this pattern to biofilm-associated infections (BAI). Biofilm may explain the indolent development of the infection, and the poor efficiency of traditional microbiologic methods. We report the case of a patient admitted for hydrocephalus associated to CSF shunt malfunction. None of the clinical, serum, or CSF laboratory findings were in favor of an infectious process. Only scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the presence of biofilm. Hence, despite a broad CSF shunt infection definition, some infections could remain undiagnosed by the traditional approach. This study is the first to provide some direct evidence for bacterial biofilm-associated CSF shunt infection.

  8. Amino acid composition of cerebrospinal fluid in actue neuroinfections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buryakova, A V; Sytinsky, I A

    1975-01-01

    A survey of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amino acids, glutamine, and glutamic and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids was made in 168 children, aged 1 to 14 years, with various neurological infections. The glutamic acid and glutamine concentrations in the CSF of children with severe forms of acute serous and bacterial meningitis were about three to four times as great as in controls. The indices returned almost to normal during recovery. GABA is absent in normal CSF, but appeared in the CSF of patients with bacterial meningitis. Its determination may be used as an additional test to differentiate between serous and bacterial meningitis.

  9. [Cerebrospinal fluid pressure studies after the intravenous administration of the steroid narcotic, alphaxolone + alphadolone acetate (Althesin)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekhart, E; List, W F; Vadon, P; Oberbauer, R

    1979-09-30

    The effect of alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate on cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), mean arterial blood pressure (MPA), heart rate (BMP) and blood gases was investigated in 18 patients. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was calculated from the difference MAP minus CSFP. Alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate lowered the normal CSFP and normalized ketamin induced increase of CSFP. Premedication with alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate delayed the ketamin induced increase of CSFP, which returned to norm after a second dose of alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate. This effect was seen despite elevation of pCO2 in all patients breathing spontaneously.

  10. Nested PCR for Rapid Detection of Mumps Virus in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Neurological Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Poggio, Gustavo Palacios; Rodriguez, Claudia; Cisterna, Daniel; Freire, María Cecilia; Cello, Jerónimo

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a reverse transcription (RT)-nested polymerase chain reaction (n-PCR) for the detection of mumps virus RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with neurological infections. A specific 112-bp fragment was amplified by this method with primers from the nucleoprotein of the mumps virus genome. The mumps virus RT–n-PCR was capable of detecting 0.001 PFU/ml and 0.005 50% tissue culture infective dose/ml. This method was found to be specific, since no PCR pro...

  11. Longitudinal assessment of tau and amyloid beta in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Mattison, Hayley A; Liu, Changqin; Ginghina, Carmen; Auinger, Peggy; McDermott, Michael P; Stewart, Tessandra; Kang, Un Jung; Cain, Kevin C; Shi, Min

    2013-11-01

    Tau gene has been consistently associated with the risk of Parkinson disease in recent genome wide association studies. In addition, alterations of the levels of total tau, phosphorylated tau [181P], and amyloid beta 1-42 in cerebrospinal fluid have been reported in patients with sporadic Parkinson disease and asymptomatic carriers of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mutations, in patterns that clearly differ from those typically described for patients with Alzheimer disease. To further determine the potential roles of these molecules in Parkinson disease pathogenesis and/or in tracking the disease progression, especially at early stages, the current study assessed all three proteins in 403 Parkinson disease patients enrolled in the DATATOP (Deprenyl and tocopherol antioxidative therapy of parkinsonism) placebo-controlled clinical trial, the largest cohort to date with cerebrospinal fluid samples collected longitudinally. These initially drug-naive patients at early disease stages were clinically evaluated, and cerebrospinal fluid was collected at baseline and then at endpoint, defined as the time at which symptomatic anti-Parkinson disease medications were determined to be required. General linear models were used to test for associations between baseline cerebrospinal fluid biomarker levels or their rates of change and changes in the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (total or part III motor score) over time. Robust associations among candidate markers are readily noted. Baseline levels of amyloid beta were weakly but negatively correlated with baseline Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale total scores. Baseline phosphorylated tau/total tau and phosphorylated tau/amyloid beta were significantly and negatively correlated with the rates of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale change. While medications (deprenyl and/or tocopherol) did not appear to alter biomarkers appreciably, a weak but significant positive correlation between the rate of change in total

  12. Proteomics for Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Identification in Parkinsons Disease: Methods and Critical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Conti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, similar with other neurodegenerative disorders, would benefit from the identification of early biomarkers for differential diagnosis and prognosis to address prompt clinical treatments. Together with hypothesis driven approaches, PD has been investigated by high-throughput differential proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF protein content. The principal methodologies and techniques utilized in the proteomics field for PD biomarker discovery from CSF are presented in this mini review. The positive aspects and challenges in proteome-based biomarker research are also discussed.

  13. Swiftly Decreasing Cerebrospinal Fluid Cathelicidin Concentration Predicts Improved Outcome in Childhood Bacterial Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savonius, Okko; Helve, Otto; Roine, Irmeli; Andersson, Sture; Fernández, Josefina; Peltola, Heikki; Pelkonen, Tuula

    2016-06-01

    We investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cathelicidin concentrations in childhood bacterial meningitis on admission and during antimicrobial treatment. CSF cathelicidin concentrations on admission correlated with CSF white cell counts and protein levels but not with bacterial etiology. A greater decrease in the concentration in response to treatment was associated with a better outcome. Since the CSF cathelicidin concentration reflects the degree of central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, it may be used as a novel biomarker in childhood bacterial meningitis. An early decrease during treatment likely signals more rapid mitigation of the disease process and thus a better outcome.

  14. Use of the Directigen Latex Agglutination Test for Detection of Haemphilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis Antigens in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Meningitis Patients,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reprint: Use of the Directigen Latex Agglutination Test for Detection of Haemphilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae , and Neisseria meningitidis Antigens in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Meningitis Patients.

  15. Progressive multiple sclerosis cerebrospinal fluid induces inflammatory demyelination, axonal loss, and astrogliosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofanilli, Massimiliano; Rosenthal, Hannah; Cymring, Barbara; Gratch, Daniel; Pagano, Benjamin; Xie, Boxun; Sadiq, Saud A

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammatory demyelination and neurodegeneration throughout the CNS, which lead over time to a condition of irreversible functional decline known as progressive MS. Currently, there are no satisfactory treatments for this condition because the mechanisms that underlie disease progression are not well understood. This is partly due to the lack of a specific animal model that represents progressive MS. We investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular injections of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) derived from untreated primary progressive (PPMS), secondary progressive (SPMS), and relapsing/remitting (RRMS) MS patients into mice. We found discrete inflammatory demyelinating lesions containing macrophages, B cell and T cell infiltrates in the brains of animals injected with CSF from patients with progressive MS. These lesions were rarely found in animals injected with RRMS-CSF and never in those treated with control-CSF. Animals that developed brain lesions also presented extensive inflammation in their spinal cord. However, discrete spinal cord lesions were rare and only seen in animals injected with PPMS-CSF. Axonal loss and astrogliosis were seen within the lesions following the initial demyelination. In addition, Th17 cell activity was enhanced in the CNS and in lymph nodes of progressive MS-CSF injected animals compared to controls. Furthermore, CSF derived from MS patients who were clinically stable following therapy had greatly diminished capacity to induce CNS lesions in mice. Finally, we provided evidence suggesting that differential expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines present in the progressive MS CSF might be involved in the observed mouse pathology. Our data suggests that the agent(s) responsible for the demyelination and neurodegeneration characteristic of progressive MS is present in patient CSF and is amenable to further characterization in experimental models of the disease.

  16. European Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups are Associated with Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Inflammation in HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, David C.; Kallianpur, Asha R.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Bush, William S.; Letendre, Scott; Franklin, Donald; Grant, Igor; Hulgan, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are ancestry-related patterns of single-nucleotide polymorphisms that are associated with differential mitochondrial function in model systems, neurodegenerative diseases in HIV-negative populations, and chronic complications of HIV infection, including neurocognitive impairment. We hypothesized that mtDNA haplogroups are associated with neuroinflammation in HIV-infected adults. Methods CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) is a US-based observational study of HIV-infected adults who underwent standardized neurocognitive assessments. Participants who consented to DNA collection underwent whole blood mtDNA sequencing, and a subset also underwent lumbar puncture. IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α (high-sensitivity), and IP-10 were measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by immunoassay. Multivariable regression of mtDNA haplogroups and log-transformed CSF biomarkers were stratified by genetic ancestry using whole-genome nuclear DNA genotyping (European [EA], African [AA], or Hispanic ancestry [HA]), and adjusted for age, sex, antiretroviral therapy (ART), detectable CSF HIV RNA, and CD4 nadir. A total of 384 participants had both CSF cytokine measures and genetic data (45% EA, 44% AA, 11% HA, 22% female, median age 43 years, 74% on ART). Results In analyses stratified by the 3 continental ancestry groups, no haplogroups were significantly associated with the 4 biomarkers. In the subgroup of participants with undetectable plasma HIV RNA on ART, European haplogroup H participants had significantly lower CSF TNF-α (P = 0.001). Conclusions Lower CSF TNF-α may indicate lower neuroinflammation in the haplogroup H participants with well-controlled HIV on ART.

  17. Neural Differentiation of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Cerebrospinal Fluid

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    Shirin FARIVAR*

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: : Farivar S, Mohamadzade Z, Shiari R, Fahimzad AR. Neural Differentiation of Human Umbilical CordMesenchymal Stem Cells by Cerebrospinal Fluid. . Iran J Child Neurol. 2015 Winter; 9(1:87-93.  Abstract Objective Wharton’s jelly (WJ is the gelatinous connective tissue from the umbilical cord. It is composed of mesenchymal stem cells, collagen fibers, and proteoglycans. The stem cells in WJ have properties that are interesting for research. For example, they are simple to harvest by noninvasive methods, provide large numbers of cells without risk to the donor, the stem cell population may be expanded in vitro, cryogenically stored, thawed, genetically manipulated, and differentiated in vitro. In our study, we investigated the effect of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF on neural differentiation of human WJ stem cells.Material & Methods The cells in passage 2 were induced into neural differentiation with different concentrations of human cerebrospinal fluid. Differentiation along with neural lineage was documented by expression of three neural markers: Nestin, Microtubule-Associated Protein 2 (MAP2, and Glial Fibrillary Astrocytic Protein (GFAP for 21 days. The expression of the identified genes was confirmed by Reverse Transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR.Results Treatment with 100 and 200μg/ml CSF resulted in the expression of GFAP and glial cells marker on days 14 and 21. The expression of neural-specific genes following CSF treatment was dose-dependent and time-dependent. Treatment of the cells with a twofold concentration of CSF, led to the expression of MAP2 on day 14 of induction. No expression of GFAP was detected before day 14 or MAP2 before day 21, which shows the importance of the treatment period. In the present study, expression analysis for the known neural markers: Nestin, GFAP, and MAP2 using RT-PCR were performed. The data demonstrated that CSF could play a role as a strong inducer.Conclusion RT-PCR showed that

  18. Evidence for Elevated Cerebrospinal Fluid ERK1/2 Levels in Alzheimer Dementia

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    Philipp Spitzer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from 33 patients with Alzheimer dementia (AD, 21 patients with mild cognitive impairment who converted to AD during followup (MCI-AD, 25 patients with stable mild cognitive impairment (MCI-stable, and 16 nondemented subjects (ND were analyzed with a chemiluminescence immunoassay to assess the levels of the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. The results were evaluated in relation to total Tau (tTau, phosphorylated Tau (pTau, and beta-amyloid 42 peptide (Aβ42. CSF-ERK1/2 was significantly increased in the AD group as compared to stable MCI patients and the ND group. Western blot analysis of a pooled cerebrospinal fluid sample revealed that both isoforms, ERK1 and ERK2, and low amounts of doubly phosphorylated ERK2 were detectable. As a predictive diagnostic AD biomarker, CSF-ERK1/2 was inferior to tTau, pTau, and Aβ42.

  19. Olfactory route for cerebrospinal fluid drainage into the cervical lymphatic system in a rabbit experimental model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haisheng Liu; Zhili Ni; Yetao Chen; Dong Wang; Yan Qi; Qiuhang Zhang; Shijie Wang

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyzed the anatomical association between intracranial subarachnoid space and the cervical lymphatic system. X-ray contrast medium and Microfil(R) (Microfil compounds fill and opacify microvascular and other spaces of non-surviving animals and post-mortem tissue under physiological injection pressure) were injected into the cisterna magna of the rabbit, and perineural routes of cerebrospinal fluid outflow into the lymphatic system were visualized. Under a surgical operating microscope, Microfil was found within the subarachnoid space and along the olfactory nerves. At the nasal mucosa, a lymphatic network was identified near the olfactory nerves, which crossed the nasopharyngeal region and finally emptied into the superficial and deep cervical lymph nodes. Under a light microscope, Microfil was visible around the olfactory nerves and within lymphatic vessels. These results suggested that cerebrospinal fluid drained from the subarachnoid space along the olfactory nerves to nasal lymphatic vessels, which in turn, emptied into the cervical lymph nodes. This anatomical route, therefore, allowed connection between the central nervous system and the lymphatic system.

  20. A Rare Case of Spontaneous Pneumocephalus Associated with Nontraumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

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    Murad Baba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Spontaneous nontraumatic pneumocephalus (PNC and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leaks are both very uncommon conditions. We report a rare case of spontaneous pneumocephalus associated with CSF leak secondary to right sphenoid sinus bony defect without history of trauma. Case Description. 51-year-old Hispanic female with past medical history of hypertension and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri presented to the emergency room complaining of headache and clear discharge from the right nostril. Physical examination was significant for right frontal sinus tenderness and clear discharge from right nostril. Computed Tomography (CT scan of the brain showed moderate amount of extra-axial air within the right cerebral hemisphere indicative of pneumocephalus. CT scan of facial bones showed bony defect along the right sphenoid sinus with abnormal CSF collection. The patient was started on intravenous antibiotics for meningitis prophylaxis and subsequently underwent transsphenoidal repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak with abdominal fat graft. CSF rhinorrhea stopped completely after the surgery with near complete resolution of pneumocephalus before discharge. Conclusions. Early identification of pneumocephalus and surgical intervention can help decrease the morbidity and avoid possible complications. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, although rare, can lead to CSF leak and pneumocepahlus.

  1. Effect of continuous cisternal cerebrospinal fluid drainage for patients with thin subarachnoid hemorrhage

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    Yasunari Otawara

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Yasunari Otawara, Kuniaki Ogasawara, Yoshitaka Kubo, Masayuki Sasoh, Akira OgawaDepartment of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505, JapanAbstract: External cerebrospinal fluid (CSF drainage is an effective method to remove massive subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, but carries the risk of meningitis and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus. This study investigated whether postoperative cisternal CSF drainage affects the incidence of cerebral vasospasm and clinical outcome in patients with thin SAH. Seventy-eight patients with thin SAH, 22 men and 56 women aged from 17 to 73 years (mean 51.2 years, underwent surgical repair for ruptured anterior circulation aneurysm. Patients were divided into groups with (38 patients and without (40 patients postoperative cisternal CSF drainage, and the incidences of angiographical and symptomatic vasospasm, shunt-dependent hydrocephalus, meningitis, and the clinical outcome were compared. The incidences of angiographical vasospasm (31.6% vs 50.0%, symptomatic vasospasm (7.9% vs 12.5%, shunt-dependent hydrocephalus (5.3% vs 0%, and meningitis (2.6% vs 0% did not differ between patients with and without cisternal CSF drainage. All patients in both groups resulted in good recovery. Postoperative cisternal CSF drainage does not affect the incidence of cerebral vasospasm or the clinical outcome in patients with thin SAH.Keywords: subarachnoid hemorrhage; cerebrospinal fluid drainage; cerebral vasospasm; meningitis; hydrocephalus; ruptured intracranial aneurysm

  2. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid S100B concentrations in patients with neurocysticercosis

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    J.E. Lima

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical manifestations of neurocysticercosis (NC are varied and depend on the number and location of cysts, as well as on the host immune response. Symptoms usually occur in NC when cysticerci enter a degenerative course associated with an inflammatory response. The expression of brain damage markers may be expected to increase during this phase. S100B is a calcium-binding protein produced and released predominantly by astrocytes that has been used as a marker of reactive gliosis and astrocytic death in many pathological conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the levels of S100B in patients in different phases of NC evolution. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum S100B concentrations were measured in 25 patients with NC: 14 patients with degenerative cysts (D, 8 patients with viable cysts (V and 3 patients with inactive cysts. All NC patients, except 1, had five or less cysts. In most of them, symptoms had been present for at least 1 month before sample collection. Samples from 8 normal controls (C were also assayed. The albumin quotient was used to estimate the blood-brain barrier permeability. There were no significant differences in serum (P = 0.5 or cerebrospinal fluid (P = 0.91 S100B levels among the V, D, and C groups. These findings suggest that parenchymal changes associated with a relatively small number of degenerating cysts probably have a negligible impact on glial tissue.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid prohormone processing and neuropeptides stimulating feed intake of dairy cows during early lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhla, Björn; Laeger, Thomas; Husi, Holger; Mullen, William

    2015-02-01

    After parturition, feed intake of dairy cows increases within the first weeks of lactation, but the molecular mechanisms stimulating or delaying the slope of increase are poorly understood. Some of the molecules controlling feed intake are neuropeptides that are synthesized as propeptides and subsequently processed before they bind to specific receptors in feeding centers of the brain. Cerebrospinal fluid surrounds most of the feed intake regulatory centers and contains numerous neuropeptides. In the present study, we used a proteomic approach to analyze the neuropeptide concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid taken from dairy cows between day -18 and -10, and between day +10 and +20 relative to parturition. We found 13 proteins which were only present in samples taken before parturition, 13 proteins which were only present in samples taken after parturition, and 25 proteins which were commonly present, before and after parturition. Among them, differences in pro-neuropeptide Y, proenkephalin-A, neuroendocrine convertase-2, neurosecretory protein VGF, chromogranin-A, and secretogranin-1 and -3 concentrations relative to parturition highlight propeptides and prohormone processings involved in the control of feed intake and energy homeostasis. Scaffold analysis further emphasized an increased tone of endogenous opioids associated with the postparturient increase of feed intake.

  4. A fibromyalgia patient with traumatic cerebrospinal fluid leak: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, K; Moriyama, E; Ishikawa, S

    2008-09-01

    We present a fibromyalgia patient with traumatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. A woman was referred because of widespread pain, general fatigue, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and deterioration of memory after a traffic accident. These signs and symptoms in a sitting or standing position were more deteriorated than in a recumbent position. Although she was diagnosed with fibromyalgia, her widespread pain was unusually severe. She was diagnosed with traumatic CSF leak based on radioisotope cisternography. Her widespread pain was slightly decreased after epidural blood patches, but the nausea completely disappeared and dizziness was eased. A second radioisotope cisternography revealed that the leak of cerebrospinal fluid was discontinued. CSF leak is characterized by headache, nausea, dizziness, and visual impairment. The symptoms and signs resemble Barre-Lieou syndrome. Another characteristic is that these symptoms and signs in a sitting or standing position are more deteriorated than in a recumbent position. Fibromyalgia after trauma is sometimes comorbid with traumatic CSF leak. Radioisotope cisternography is essential for diagnosis. It demonstrates direct findings such as radioisotope leak into the spinal epidural space and indirect findings such as early bladder filling and/or the rapid disappearance of radioisotopes from the CSF space. A beneficial treatment is an epidural blood patch. Patients with fibromyalgia and traumatic CSF leak are likely to suffer more severe signs and symptoms such as increased widespread pain than patients with fibromyalgia alone. Patients with fibromyalgia and traumatic CSF leak are often refractory to treatment.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid from rats given hypoxic preconditioning protects neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Bo; Guo, Zheng-Dong; Li, Mei-Yi; Li, Si-Jie; Niu, Jing-Zhong; Yang, Ming-Feng; Ji, Xun-Ming; Lv, Guo-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning activates endogenous mechanisms that protect against cerebral ischemic and hypoxic injury. To better understand these protective mechanisms, adult rats were housed in a hypoxic environment (8% O2/92% N2) for 3 hours, and then in a normal oxygen environment for 12 hours. Their cerebrospinal fluid was obtained to culture cortical neurons from newborn rats for 1 day, and then the neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation for 1.5 hours. The cerebrospinal fluid from rats subjected to hypoxic preconditioning reduced oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury, increased survival rate, upregulated Bcl-2 expression and downregulated Bax expression in the cultured cortical neurons, compared with control. These results indicate that cerebrospinal fluid from rats given hypoxic preconditioning protects against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury by affecting apoptosis-related protein expression in neurons from newborn rats.

  6. [The marker of discogenic diseases of the nervous system in the cerebrospinal fluid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatokhina, S N; Kuznetsova, V S; Shabalin, V N

    2011-01-01

    Using a novel diagnostic technology that allows to investigate the structure of a biological fluid formed during its phase transition into a dried film, we revealed a cause of mistaken results of protein concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with discogenic radiculitis. The traditional laboratory study does not reveal the elevated content of protein in patients with discogenic radiculitis and hernia of invertebral discs due to its more active binding with salts with the following sedimentation during centrifugation. It can be explained by the involvement of salt crystals in the formation of the inert organic-mineral aggregate with protein molecules which structure was changed by dystrophy, ischemia, hypoxia, mechanic damage, tumor process. The aggregate is characterized by abnormally tight links. This phenomenon is known as biomineralization, the universal mechanism preventing the organism from toxic effects of products of degraded tissues.

  7. Identification of Oropouche Orthobunyavirus in the cerebrospinal fluid of three patients in the Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Michele de Souza; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes; Naveca, Felipe Gomes; Monte, Rossicleia Lins; Lessa, Natália; Pinto de Figueiredo, Regina Maria; Gimaque, João Bosco de Lima; Pivoto João, Guilherme; Ramasawmy, Rajendranath; Mourão, Maria Paula Gomes

    2012-04-01

    Oropouche fever is the second most frequent arboviral infection in Brazil, surpassed only by dengue. Oropouche virus (OROV) causes large and explosive outbreaks of acute febrile illness in cities and villages in the Amazon and Central-Plateau regions. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 110 meningoencephalitis patients were analyzed. The RNA extracted from fluid was submitted to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and sequencing to identify OROV. Three CSF samples showed the presence of OROV causing infection in the central nervous system (CNS). These patients are adults. Two of the patients had other diseases affecting CNS and immune systems: neurocysticercosis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, respectively. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the OROV from the CSF of these patients belonged to genotype I. We show here that severe Oropouche disease is occurring during outbreaks of this virus in Brazil.

  8. Alterations in amyloid beta-protein and apolipoprotein E in cerebrospinal fluid after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinzhong Wen; Yonghong Zhang; Leiming Huo

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The findings about the alterations in cerebrospinal fluid beta-amyloid protein (Aβ) and apolipoprotein E (ApoE) after subarachnoid hemorrhage indicate that they have significant correlation with prognosis of patients.OBJECTIVE: To observe the alterations in cerebrospinal fluid Aβ and ApoE after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH).DESIGN: Contrast observation.SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, the First Hospital of Lanzhou University.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 25 SAH patients including 16 males and 9 females aged from 13 to 72 years were selected form Department of Neurosurgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Lanzhou University from October 2003 to February 2004. The Hunt-Hess grade ranged from Ⅰ to Ⅳ, and patients admitted hospital in 24 hours after invasion, affirmed by the brain CT scan and lumbar vertebra puncture, no other severe complications and important organs' functional defect and severe infection, no hematological system disease.METHODS: All admitted patients were collected CSF by lumbar vertebra puncture in 24 hours. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of control group came from the admitted 15 patients of our hospital that have no nervous system disease. Aβ content was detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the kit was provided by the Central Laboratory of the First Hospital of Lanzhou University; ApoE concentration was detected by monoclone enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the kit was provided by the Immunotechnique Research Institute of the Fourth Military Medical University. S100B concentration was detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay double antibody sandwich method, the kit was provided by the Physiological Research Room of the Fourth Military Medical University. The data were indicated on Mean±SD and were analyzed by SPSS 10.0 statistical package. All data were handled through test of significance variance analysis, and groups were compared through independent sampler t test. The concentration was

  9. Detection of miRNAs contents in cerebrospinal fluid and serum of patients with epilepsy and their regulating effect on related cytokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the contents of miRNAs in cerebrospinal fluid and serum of patients with epilepsy and their regulating effect on related cytokines. Methods:Serum and cerebrospinal fluid of epilepsy group and non-epilepsy group were collected to detect the contents of miR-146a, miR-221, miR-222, miR-21 and miR-34a as well as inflammatory factors and apoptosis molecules. Results:miR-146a, miR-221, miR-222 and miR-21 contents in cerebrospinal fluid of epilepsy group were significantly lower than those of non-epilepsy group, and miR-34a content was higher than that of non-epilepsy group;miR-146a, miR-221, miR-222 and miR-21 contents in serum were significantly higher than those of non-epilepsy group, and miR-34a content was lower than that of non-epilepsy group;TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and ICAM-1 contents in cerebrospinal fluid of epilepsy group were higher than those of non-epilepsy group and negatively correlated with miR-146a, miR-221 and miR-222 contents;Bax, Bim, Caspase-3 and Caspase-9 contents in cerebrospinal fluid of epilepsy group were higher than those of non-epilepsy group and negatively correlated with miR-21, and Bcl-2 content was lower than that of non-epilepsy group and negatively correlated with miR-34a. Conclusion:miR-146a, miR-221, miR-222 and miR-21 contents decrease while miR-34a content increases in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with epilepsy, and miRNAs can regulate the expression of inflammatory factors and apoptosis molecules and be involved in the changes of neuron function.

  10. Interaction between SCO-spondin and low density lipoproteins from embryonic cerebrospinal fluid modulates their roles in early neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    América eVera

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available During early stages of development, encephalic vesicles are composed by a layer of neuroepithelial cells surrounding a central cavity filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (eCSF. This fluid contains several morphogens that regulate proliferation and differentiation of neuroepithelial cells. One of these neurogenic factors is SCO-spondin, a giant protein secreted to the eCSF from early stages of development. Inhibition of this protein in vivo or in vitro drastically decreases the neurodifferentiation process. Other important neurogenic factors of the eCSF are low density lipoproteins (LDL, the depletion of which generates a 60% decrease in mesencephalic explant neurodifferentiation. The presence of several LDL receptor class A (LDLrA domains (responsible for LDL binding in other proteins in the SCO-spondin sequence suggests a possible interaction between both molecules. This possibility was analyzed using three different experimental approaches: 1 Bioinformatics analyses of the SCO-spondin region, that contains eight LDLrA domains in tandem, and of comparisons with the LDL receptor consensus sequence; 2 Analysis of the physical interactions of both molecules through immunohistochemical colocalization in embryonic chick brains and through the immunoprecipitation of LDL with anti-SCO-spondin antibodies; and 3 Analysis of functional interactions during the neurodifferentiation process when these molecules were added to a culture medium of mesencephalic explants. The results revealed that LDL and SCO-spondin interact to form a complex that diminishes the neurogenic capacities that both molecules have separately. Our work suggests that the embryonic cerebrospinal fluid is an active signaling center with a complex regulation system that allows for correct brain development.

  11. Total-tau and phospho-tau(181Thr) in cerebrospinal fluid of neurologically intact population increase with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, J; Psujek, M; Bartosik-Psujek, H

    2009-01-01

    Tau protein is a microtubule-associated molecule playing a crucial role in maintenance of neuronal integrity and in many neurodegenerative processes; its pathology has become a hallmark feature at the tissue level. The aim of the study was to estimate total tau and phospho-tau (Thr181) concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid of healthy population. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were taken from 129 subjects (age 18-77 years) without known neurologic or psychiatric condition. Both total-tau and phospho-tau levels showed significant correlation with age, which was more pronounced in older population.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid bactericidal activity against cephalosporin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in children with meningitis treated with high-dosage cefotaxime.

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    We determined cefotaxime and desacetyl-cefotaxime concentrations in children with bacterial meningitis receiving high-dose cefotaxime (300 mg/kg of body weight/day) and concomitant dexamethasone therapy. The median peak cerebrospinal fluid cefotaxime and desacetyl-cefotaxime concentrations were 4.7 and 8.1 microg/ml, respectively. In vitro bactericidal activity (>99.9% killing in 6 h) was found in 17 (94%), 13 (72%), and 8 (44%) of 18 cerebrospinal fluid specimens against cefotaxime-susceptib...

  13. Protein profiling reveals inter-individual protein homogeneity of arachnoid cyst fluid and high qualitative similarity to cerebrospinal fluid

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    Berle Magnus

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms behind formation and filling of intracranial arachnoid cysts (AC are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate AC fluid by proteomics to gain further knowledge about ACs. Two goals were set: 1 Comparison of AC fluid from individual patients to determine whether or not temporal AC is a homogenous condition; and 2 Evaluate the protein content of a pool of AC fluid from several patients and qualitatively compare this with published protein lists of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma. Methods AC fluid from 15 patients with temporal AC was included in this study. In the AC protein comparison experiment, AC fluid from 14 patients was digested, analyzed by LC-MS/MS using a semi-quantitative label-free approach and the data were compared by principal component analysis (PCA to gain knowledge of protein homogeneity of AC. In the AC proteome evaluation experiment, AC fluid from 11 patients was pooled, digested, and fractionated by SCX chromatography prior to analysis by LC-MS/MS. Proteins identified were compared to published databases of proteins identified from CSF and plasma. AC fluid proteins not found in these two databases were experimentally searched for in lumbar CSF taken from neurologically-normal patients, by a targeted protein identification approach called MIDAS (Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM initiated detection and sequence analysis. Results We did not identify systematic trends or grouping of data in the AC protein comparison experiment, implying low variability between individual proteomic profiles of AC. In the AC proteome evaluation experiment, we identified 199 proteins. When compared to previously published lists of proteins identified from CSF and plasma, 15 of the AC proteins had not been reported in either of these datasets. By a targeted protein identification approach, we identified 11 of these 15 proteins in pooled CSF from neurologically-normal patients, demonstrating that

  14. Effect of resting pressure on the estimate of cerebrospinal fluid outflow conductance

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    Andersson Kennet

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A lumbar infusion test is commonly used as a predictive test for patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus and for evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF shunt function. Different infusion protocols can be used to estimate the outflow conductance (Cout or its reciprocal the outflow resistance (Rout, with or without using the baseline resting pressure, Pr. Both from a basic physiological research and a clinical perspective, it is important to understand the limitations of the model on which infusion tests are based. By estimating Cout using two different analyses, with or without Pr, the limitations could be explored. The aim of this study was to compare the Cout estimates, and investigate what effect Prhad on the results. Methods Sixty-three patients that underwent a constant pressure infusion protocol as part of their preoperative evaluation for normal pressure hydrocephalus, were included (age 70.3 ± 10.8 years (mean ± SD. The analysis was performed without (Cexcl Pr and with (Cincl Pr Pr. The estimates were compared using Bland-Altman plots and paired sample t-tests (p Results Mean Cout for the 63 patients was: Cexcl Pr = 7.0 ± 4.0 (mean ± SD μl/(s kPa and Cincl Pr = 9.1 ± 4.3 μl/(s kPa and Rout was 19.0 ± 9.2 and 17.7 ± 11.3 mmHg/ml/min, respectively. There was a positive correlation between methods (r = 0.79, n = 63, p Cout= -2.1 ± 2.7 μl/(s kPa between methods was significant (p Rout was 1.2 ± 8.8 mmHg/ml/min. The Bland-Altman plot visualized that the variation around the mean difference was similar all through the range of measured values and there was no correlation between ΔCout and Cout. Conclusions The difference between Cout estimates, obtained from analyses with or without Pr, needs to be taken into consideration when comparing results from studies using different infusion test protocols. The study suggests variation in CSF formation rate, variation in venous pressure or a pressure dependent Cout

  15. Association of Brucella Meningoencephalitis with Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt in A Child: A Case Report

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    Babak ABDINIA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is an endemic zoonosis in Iran. It is a systemic infection that can involve any organs or systems of the body and have variable presentations. Ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunt infections due to brucellosis have been rarely reported in the literatures.This is the history of a four years old boy who developed Brucella meningoencephalitis at the age of 42 months, whilst he had a VP shunt in situ for hydrocephalus treatment. Also, he presented brucellosis as acute abdomen. This patient was treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin and rifampicin. The shunt was extracted and all clinical and laboratory test abnormalities subsided through this management.We propose that in a patient with Brucella meningoencephalitis, the cerebrospinal fluid shunt system can be extracted and treatment with appropriate combination of antibiotics could be successful. Moreover, it shows that brucellosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for acute abdomen and ascites in endemic regions.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament light chain levels predict visual outcome after optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modvig, S; Degn, M; Sander, B;

    2016-01-01

    -L), myelin basic protein, osteopontin and chitinase-3-like-1) predict visual outcome after optic neuritis. METHODS: We included 47 patients with optic neuritis as a first demyelinating episode. Patients underwent visual tests, optical coherence tomography (OCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and lumbar......BACKGROUND: Optic neuritis is a good model for multiple sclerosis relapse, but currently no tests can accurately predict visual outcome. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of tissue damage and remodelling (neurofilament light chain (NF...... puncture. Biomarkers were measured in CSF by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Patients were followed up six months after onset and this included visual tests and OCT. Outcome measures were inter-ocular differences in low contrast visual acuity (LCVA), retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) and ganglion...

  17. Kinetics of HIV-1 in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma in cryptococcal meningitis

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    Jorge A. Benetucci

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine HIV-1 kinetics in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM, we undertook a prospective collection of paired CSF/plasma samples from antiretroviral therapy- free HIV-infected patients with CM. Samples were obtained at baseline (S1 and at the second (S2 and third (S3 weeks of antifungal therapy. HIV-1 CSF concentrations were significantly lower in both S2 and S3 with respect to S1. Plasma concentrations remained stable. HIV-1 concentrations were higher in plasma than CSF in all cases. Patients who survived the episode of CM (but not those who died showed a decrease in CSF viral load, what suggests different viral kinetics of HIV-1 in the CSF according to the clinical course of this opportunistic disease.

  18. Kinetics of HIV-1 in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma in cryptococcal meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Diego M.; Cañizal, Ana M.; Rojas, Haroldo; Arechavala, Alicia; Negroni, Ricardo; Bouzas, María B.; Benetucci, Jorge A.

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine HIV-1 kinetics in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM), we undertook a prospective collection of paired CSF/plasma samples from antiretroviral therapy-free HIV-infected patients with CM. Samples were obtained at baseline (S1) and at the second (S2) and third (S3) weeks of antifungal therapy. HIV-1 CSF concentrations were significantly lower in both S2 and S3 with respect to S1. Plasma concentrations remained stable. HIV-1 concentrations were higher in plasma than CSF in all cases. Patients who survived the episode of CM (but not those who died) showed a decrease in CSF viral load, what suggests different viral kinetics of HIV-1 in the CSF according to the clinical course of this opportunistic disease. PMID:24470944

  19. Kinetics of HIV-1 in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma in cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Diego M; Cañizal, Ana M; Rojas, Haroldo; Arechavala, Alicia; Negroni, Ricardo; Bouzas, María B; Benetucci, Jorge A

    2012-04-27

    In order to determine HIV-1 kinetics in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM), we undertook a prospective collection of paired CSF/plasma samples from antiretroviral therapy-free HIV-infected patients with CM. Samples were obtained at baseline (S1) and at the second (S2) and third (S3) weeks of antifungal therapy. HIV-1 CSF concentrations were significantly lower in both S2 and S3 with respect to S1. Plasma concentrations remained stable. HIV-1 concentrations were higher in plasma than CSF in all cases. Patients who survived the episode of CM (but not those who died) showed a decrease in CSF viral load, what suggests different viral kinetics of HIV-1 in the CSF according to the clinical course of this opportunistic disease.

  20. Multiple simultaneous intracerebral hemorrhages following accidental massive lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Sandoval Jose

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple simultaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH are uncommon. We report the case of an 80-year-old woman with previous diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus and who was brought to our hospital with altered mental status and urinary incontinence. Medical history of hypertension, hematological disorders or severe head trauma was absent. Platelet count and coagulation profile were unremarkable. An initial head computed tomography (CT showed sulcal enlargement and ventricular dilatation, but no evidence of ICH. A tap test indicated as a guide to case selection for shunt surgery accidentally resulted in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF overdrainage. The patient presented sudden neurological deterioration, with sluggishly responsive pupils and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. A new head CT demonstrated multiple supra and infratentorial ICH. The patient became comatose and had a fatal course. Hence, CSF overdrainage may either cause or precipitate multiple simultaneous ICHs, affecting both the infratentorial and supratentorial regions.

  1. An analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabe, Hideo; Nagai, Hajime (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Banno, Tatsuo

    1994-07-01

    Using a cine mode technique and a gradient-echo magnetic resonance (MR) sequencing, the MR signal intensity of the aqueduct has been evaluated in twelve patients suspected of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). In patients with a substantial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation disturbance in the subarachnoid space, marked changes in the signal intensity of the aqueduct were seen during heart cycles, whereas in patients with less of a CSF circulation disturbance, changes in the signal intensity of the aqueduct were not as marked. Further, all patients manifesting marked changes in the signal intensity of the aqueduct showed a clinical improvement in their symptoms after undergoing a shunt. These results suggest that cine-mode MRI is useful for assessing the CSF dynamics and may be helpful in selecting patients who would benefit from shunt therapy. (author).

  2. Clinical value of HIV-1 matched detection in patients’ blood and cerebrospinal fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Stepanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative investigation has been applied to 100 HIV infected patients with CD4 lymphocytes rate <350 cells/microliter, demanding HAART prescription, divided into two groups: 1 – without clinical features of CNS damage (54 people and 2 – with features of CNS damage of various etiology (46 people. HIV viral load (VL indices in blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF have been examined. 45,7% of damages are caused with mixed infections. CSF HIV VL level with the 2 group patients is 7,6 times as high as that of 1 group patients. HIV VL in plasma is considerably higher than in CSF. Eight patients showed increased CSF HIV VL. Brain damages of various etiology with clinical implications violate hematoencephalic barrier integrity, contribute to HIV accumulation in CSF and intensify virus replication in brain tissue. It has been concluded that CSF examination for HIV is expedient.

  3. Zebrafish models of idiopathic scoliosis link cerebrospinal fluid flow defects to spine curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, D T; Boswell, C W; Morante, N F C; Henkelman, R M; Burdine, R D; Ciruna, B

    2016-06-10

    Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) affects 3% of children worldwide, yet the mechanisms underlying this spinal deformity remain unknown. Here we show that ptk7 mutant zebrafish, a faithful developmental model of IS, exhibit defects in ependymal cell cilia development and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. Transgenic reintroduction of Ptk7 in motile ciliated lineages prevents scoliosis in ptk7 mutants, and mutation of multiple independent cilia motility genes yields IS phenotypes. We define a finite developmental window for motile cilia in zebrafish spine morphogenesis. Notably, restoration of cilia motility after the onset of scoliosis blocks spinal curve progression. Together, our results indicate a critical role for cilia-driven CSF flow in spine development, implicate irregularities in CSF flow as an underlying biological cause of IS, and suggest that noninvasive therapeutic intervention may prevent severe scoliosis.

  4. Cognitive impairment and major depressive disorder in HIV infection and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro de

    2013-09-01

    Cognitive impairment and major depressive disorder (MDD) are common HIV-1 central nervous system (CNS) complications. Their frequencies in AIDS patients are 36% and 45%, respectively. The diagnoses of HIV cognitive impairment are made by clinical criteria, no single laboratory test or biomarker establishes the diagnosis. Factors of indirect neuronal injury related with the pathophysiology of the HIV infection in the CNS, are the factors studied as biomarkers. In the present no biomarker is established to the diagnosis of HIV cognitive impairment, much still needs to be done. We review in this paper some biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid that could be valuable to the diagnosis of HIV cognitive impairment. Diagnosing depression in the context of HIV can be challenging, to identify a biomarker that could help in the diagnosis would be very important, although MDD risks and neurobiology are still poorly understood.

  5. Cognitive impairment and major depressive disorder in HIV infection and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Monteiro de Almeida

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment and major depressive disorder (MDD are common HIV-1 central nervous system (CNS complications. Their frequencies in AIDS patients are 36% and 45%, respectively. The diagnoses of HIV cognitive impairment are made by clinical criteria, no single laboratory test or biomarker establishes the diagnosis. Factors of indirect neuronal injury related with the pathophysiology of the HIV infection in the CNS, are the factors studied as biomarkers. In the present no biomarker is established to the diagnosis of HIV cognitive impairment, much still needs to be done. We review in this paper some biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid that could be valuable to the diagnosis of HIV cognitive impairment. Diagnosing depression in the context of HIV can be challenging, to identify a biomarker that could help in the diagnosis would be very important, although MDD risks and neurobiology are still poorly understood.

  6. YKL-40 is elevated in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with purulent meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, C; Johansen, JS; Benfield, Thomas;

    2002-01-01

    cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples taken on admission from patients suspected of having meningitis (48 with purulent meningitis, 49 with lymphocytic meningitis, 5 with encephalitis, and 32 without evidence of meningitis). YKL-40 levels in CSF were significantly higher in patients with purulent meningitis (median......, 663 microg/liter [range, 20 to 8,960]) and encephalitis (5,430 microg/liter [620 to 11,600]) than in patients with lymphocytic meningitis (137 microg/liter [41 to 1,865]) or patients without meningitis (167 microg/liter [24 to 630]) (Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn multiple comparison tests, P ... YKL-40 levels were also determined for 26 patients with purulent meningitis having a repuncture, and patients who died (n = 5) had significantly higher YKL-40 levels than patients who survived (n = 21) (2,100 microg/liter [1,160 to 7,050] versus 885 microg/liter [192 to 15,400], respectively; Mann...

  7. Identification of Biomarkers in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Serum of Multiple Sclerosis Patients by Immunoproteomics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Colomba

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. At present, the molecular mechanisms causing the initiation, development and progression of MS are poorly understood, and no reliable proteinaceous disease markers are available. In this study, we used an immunoproteomics approach to identify autoreactive antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients to use as candidate markers with potential diagnostic value. We identified an autoreactive anti-transferrin antibody that may have a potential link with the development and progression of MS. We found this antibody at high levels also in the serum of MS patients and created an immunoenzymatic assay to detect it. Because of the complexity and heterogeneity of multiple sclerosis, it is difficult to find a single marker for all of the processes involved in the origin and progression of the disease, so the development of a panel of biomarkers is desirable, and anti-transferrin antibody could be one of these.

  8. Analysis of Glutamic Acid in Cerebrospinal Fluid by Capillary Electrophoresis with High Frequency Conductivity Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Yun ZHAI; Jun Mei WANG; Xiao Li YAO; Xue Cai TAN; Pei Xiang CAI; Zuan Guang CHEN

    2005-01-01

    A rapid method to determine glutamic acid (Glu) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by capillary electrophoresis with high frequency conductivity detection (contactless conductivity detection) was described. The CSF sample was pretreated with silver cation resin to remove high concentration of Cl- ions in CSF. The separation was achieved in the buffer solution of 10 mmol/L Tris and 8 mmol/L boric acid at the separation voltage of 20.0 kV. Glu showed linear response in the range of 5.0×10-6 to 6.0×10-3 mol/L, the limit of detection was 1.0×10-6 mol/L. The method was used for analysis Glu in CSF satisfactorily with a recovery of 97.8-98.8%.

  9. Detection and genotyping of enteroviruses in cerebrospinal fluid in patients in Victoria, Australia, 2007-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgina; Chibo, Doris; Druce, Julian; Catton, Michael; Birch, Chris

    2014-09-01

    Genotyping by VP1 fragment polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nucleic acid sequencing to detect enterovirus (EV) genotypes was performed directly on 729 EV PCR positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected between 2007 and 2012 from Victorian hospital inpatients. The overall genotype identification rate from CSF-positive material was 43%. The four most common genotypes identified were Echovirus 6 (24%), Echovirus 30 (17%), Echovirus 25 (10%), and Coxsackievirus A9 (10%), together comprising 61% of all EVs typed. The seasonal distribution of all EVs identified followed the recognized pattern of mainly summer epidemics. Three of the four predominant genotypes were present in each of the 6 years in which the study was conducted, with 20 other EV genotypes also detected, often in only a single year. Genotyping of EVs directly in CSF is faster, simpler and more sensitive than traditional virus neutralization assays performed on EV positive samples.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid production and dynamics in normal aging: a MRI phase-mapping study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Thomsen, C; Ståhlberg, F

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phase mapping was used for non-invasive evaluation of the to-and-fro motion of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the cerebral aqueduct, and to measure the supratentorial CSF production in vivo, in 13 healthy volunteers to determine whether normal aging affects...... these parameters. Eight young healthy volunteers (mean age 29.8 years) and five elderly healthy volunteers (mean age 69.0 years) were examined, all were normal on conventional MRI. Slightly higher aqueductal CSF peak flow velocities and peak volume flow in both the caudal and rostral directions were found...... in fact occurs at this relatively high rate. Our study further suggests that the differences found in human CSF production rates are caused by interindividual factors other than age....

  11. Comparison of Three Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays of Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestetti, Arabella; Pierotti, Chiara; Terreni, Mariarosa; Zappa, Alessandra; Vago, Luca; Lazzarin, Adriano; Cinque, Paola

    2001-01-01

    The diagnostic reliabilities of three cytomegalovirus (CMV) nucleic acid amplification assays of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were compared by using CSF samples from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with a postmortem histopathological diagnosis of CMV encephalitis (n = 15) or other central nervous system conditions (n = 16). By using a nested PCR assay, the quantitative COBAS AMPLICOR CMV MONITOR PCR, and the NucliSens CMV pp67 nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay, sensitivities were 93.3, 86.6, and 93.3%, respectively, and specificities were 93.7, 93.7, and 87.5%, respectively. The COBAS AMPLICOR assay revealed significantly higher CMV DNA levels in patients with diffuse ventriculoencephalitis than in patients with focal periventricular lesions. PMID:11230445

  12. [Chromatographic analysis of low molecular weight fraction of cerebrospinal fluid in children with acute neuroinfections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, L A; Shatik, S V; Sorokina, M N; Karasev, V V

    2002-05-01

    Low molecular-weight (oligopeptide) fraction of the cerebrospinal fluid was analyzed by high-performance reversed phase liquid chromatography in 30 children with bacterial and viral neuroinfections. The incidence and height of chromathoraphic peaks in bacterial meningitis depended on the disease etiology, stage, and severity. Qualitative and quantitative composition of low molecular-weight fraction of the liquor varied in patients with viral neuroinfections, depending on the severity of the cerebral parenchyma involvement. Differences in chromatographic profiles in complicated and uneventful course of neuroinfections indicate a possible damaging, protective, or regulatory effect of the liquor peptides. These data focus the attention on the role of oligopeptides in the genesis of neuroinfectious process, significance of search for peptide markers, their further isolation, identification, and development of test systems available for clinical application.

  13. Ferritin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid predict Alzheimer's disease outcomes and are regulated by APOE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayton, Scott; Faux, Noel G; Bush, Ashley I

    2015-05-19

    Brain iron elevation is implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, but the impact of iron on disease outcomes has not been previously explored in a longitudinal study. Ferritin is the major iron storage protein of the body; by using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of ferritin as an index, we explored whether brain iron status impacts longitudinal outcomes in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort. We show that baseline CSF ferritin levels were negatively associated with cognitive performance over 7 years in 91 cognitively normal, 144 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 67 AD subjects, and predicted MCI conversion to AD. Ferritin was strongly associated with CSF apolipoprotein E levels and was elevated by the Alzheimer's risk allele, APOE-ɛ4. These findings reveal that elevated brain iron adversely impacts on AD progression, and introduce brain iron elevation as a possible mechanism for APOE-ɛ4 being the major genetic risk factor for AD.

  14. Do genes and environment meet to regulate cerebrospinal fluid dynamics? Relevance for schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana A Palha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopment disorder in which the interplay of genes and environment contributes to disease onset and establishment. The most consistent pathological feature in schizophrenic patients is an enlargement of the brain ventricles. Yet, so far, no study has related this finding with dysfunction of the choroid plexus, the epithelial cell monolayer located within the brain ventricles that is responsible for the production of most of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Enlarged brain ventricles are already present at the time of disease onset (young adulthood and, of notice, isolated mild ventriculomegaly detected in utero is associated with subsequent mild neurodevelopmental abnormalities similar to those observed in children at high risk of developing schizophrenia. Here we propose that an altered choroid plexus/CSF dynamics during neurodevelopment may be considered as a risk, causative and/or participating-key factor for development of schizophrenia.

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in the HIV infection and compartmentalization of HIV in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Monteiro de Almeida

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system plays an important role in HIV infection. The purpose of this review is to discuss the indications for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis in HIV infection in clinical practice. CSF analysis in HIV infection is indicated for the diagnosis of opportunistic infections and co-infections, diagnosis of meningitis caused by HIV, quantification of HIV viral load, and analysis of CNS HIV compartmentalization. Although several CSF biomarkers have been investigated, none are clinically applicable. The capacity of HIV to generate genetic diversity, in association with the constitutional characteristics of the CNS, facilitates the generation of HIV quasispecies in the CNS that are distinct from HIV in the systemic circulation. CSF analysis has a well-defined and valuable role in the diagnosis of CNS infections in HIV/AIDS patients. Further research is necessary to establish a clinically applicable biomarker for the diagnosis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

  16. A collective review of syndrome of transient headache and neurological deficits with cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-hua WU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of transient headache and neurological deficits with cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis (HaNDL is characterized by recurrent attacks of paroxysmal headache, accompanying with neurological deficits and lymphocytic pleocytosis. Clinical features of the syndrome are nonspecific that it is bound to be confused with transient ischemic attack, intracranial tumor, viral encephalitis, migraine and other diseases. In fact, it is usually mis-diagnosed at the initial visits. So far, there is only one HaNDL case reported in China. Therefore the etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment are herewith reviewed to improve the knowledge regarding this syndrome. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.04.16

  17. Delayed presentation of traumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyer, Richard A; Turner, Justin H

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is one of several complications that can occur after traumatic skull base injury. Although most patients present soon after the injury occurs, some can present years later, with resulting morbidity and the need for additional procedures. We present a case of a patient with a sphenoid sinus CSF leak who presented 12 years after a closed head injury that included a sphenoethmoid skull base fracture. We also reviewed the literature on this topic, with a discussion of previous reports of CSF leaks that occurred months, years, or decades after trauma. A late onset CSF leak appears to be a rare but important complication of traumatic skull base injury. This case highlights the need for clinicians to remain vigilant to the possibility of delayed CSF rhinorrhea, even years after traumatic head injury.

  18. Aortic dissection-induced acute flaccid paraplegia treated with cerebrospinal fluid drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Leal Adam

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening event in which prompt and correctdiagnosis is associated with better outcomes. In most cases, there is chestor back pain. However, in rare cases, patients have little or no pain andother symptoms are more conspicuous at presentation. The autors reportsthe case of a 47-year-old female patient who sought medical attention forsudden-onset paraplegia. The physical examination was normal except forbilateral lower limb flaccid paralysis, with abolition of deep tendon reflexes andparaesthesia in both feet. Computed tomography showed aortic dissection,with partial thrombosis of the false lumen, starting after the emergence of theleft subclavian artery and extending, toward the bifurcation of the aorta, to theleft iliac artery. After cerebrospinal fluid drainage, the evolution was favorable.

  19. The progress of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in patients with neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Wei-zhi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases include a heterogeneous group of diseases with complicated and overlapped clinical phenotypes. It is difficult to diagnose or identify this kind of disease due to insidious onset and chronic and progressive development. Since processes in the brain can be monitored by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, abundant research efforts focus on the efficacy of biomarkers in CSF to indicate specific neurodegenerative lesions and to assist the diagnosis process, assessing whether one biomarker or several biomarkers together could be the reliable tools for diagnosis of specific neurodegenerative diseases. This article mainly reviews the research status and supplementary value in diagnosis and differentiation of CSF biomarkers in common degenerative diseases [e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS, Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS].

  20. Diagnostic cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's disease: a pathogenetically based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Karin D; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Drukarch, Benjamin; Jimenez, Connie R; Groenewegen, Henk J; Berendse, Henk W; van de Berg, Wilma D J

    2010-09-01

    The inaccuracy of the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been a major incentive for studies aimed at the identification of biomarkers. Brain-derived cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteins are potential biomarkers considering the major role that proteins play in PD pathogenesis. In this review, we discuss the current hypotheses about the pathogenesis of PD and identify the most promising candidate biomarkers among the CSF proteins studied so far. The list of potential markers includes proteins involved in various pathogenetic processes, such as oxidative stress and protein aggregation. This list will undoubtedly grow in the near future by application of CSF proteomics and subsequent validation of identified proteins. Probably a single biomarker will not suffice to reach high sensitivity and specificity, because PD is pathogenetically heterogeneous and shares etiological factors with other neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, identified candidate biomarkers will have to be thoroughly validated before they can be implemented as diagnostic aids.

  1. Recommendations to standardize preanalytical confounding factors in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Campo, Marta; Mollenhauer, Brit; Bertolotto, Antonio; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Hampel, Harald; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Kruse, Niels; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Lehmann, Sylvain; Molinuevo, Jose L; Parnetti, Lucilla; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Sáez-Valero, Javier; Saka, Esen; Urbani, Andrea; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Verbeek, Marcel; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Teunissen, Charlotte

    2012-08-01

    Early diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's (AD) or Parkinson's disease (PD) is needed to slow down or halt the disease at the earliest stage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers can be a good tool for early diagnosis. However, their use in clinical practice is challenging due to the high variability found between centers in the concentrations of both AD CSF biomarkers (Aβ42, total tau and phosphorylated tau) and PD CSF biomarker (α-synuclein). Such a variability has been partially attributed to different preanalytical procedures between laboratories, thus highlighting the need to establish standardized operating procedures. Here, we merge two previous consensus guidelines for preanalytical confounding factors in order to achieve one exhaustive guideline updated with new evidence for Aβ42, total tau and phosphorylated tau, and α-synuclein. The proposed standardized operating procedures are applicable not only to novel CSF biomarkers in AD and PD, but also to biomarkers for other neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. A Case of Hypogammaglobulinemia with Enteroviral Meningoencephalitis, Associated with Increased Adenosine Deaminase in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alborizi Abdolvahab

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the development of enterovirus meningoencephalitis associated with increased adenosine deaminase in cerebrospinal fluid of a 12-year-old boy, a known case of hypogamaglobulinemia despite monthly replacement of IVIg.The patient was referred to our center with fever, headache and vomiting for 10 days. CSF analysis was compatible with aseptic meningoencephalitis but high CSF protein (>200mg/dl and high level of adenosine deaminase in CSF (30IU/L were against the diagnosis of simple viral meningoencephalitis. Nested PCR of CSF for entrovirus was positive. Treatment with daily high-dose IVIg was commenced, with significant clinical improvement. For patients with increased ADA and lymphocytic pleocytosis in CSF, differential diagnoses should include enteroviral meningitis. Antibodies, although crucial, cannot on their own prevent enteroviral infection in some hypogamaglbulinemic patients.

  3. Clinical analysis on intracranial infection after nasal endoscopic repair surgery for cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang ZHAI

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available From June 2005 to October 2012, there were 135 cases with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF rhinorrhea admitted in our hospital who underwent nasal endoscopic repair surgery, and intracranial infection happened in 3 cases after surgery, including intracranial mucormycosis in one case, brain abscess in one case and bacterial infection in one case. These 3 cases underwent surgery to clear up the focus of infection, supplemented by antifungal drugs or antibiotic therapy. Case 1 and Case 2 were followed up for 2 years without CSF rhinorrhea or intracranial infection; Case 3 died due to multiple organ failure. The intracranial complications after nasal endoscopic surgery for repairing CSF leakage are rare and need combined treatment of relevant departments. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.08.016

  4. [Viridans streptococci isolated from cerebrospinal fluid. Clinical significance of 9 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, D; Guerra, A; Peña, P; Molina, F

    1997-02-01

    Viridans streptococci (VS) are often isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). However, the significance of such isolates is poorly understood. In the present study we carry out a retrospective analysis of 9 patients in whom VS were isolated from CSF during a 1-year period at La Paz Hospital. Two patients (22.2%) had meningitis diagnosed through clinical, laboratory and bacteriologic findings. Both patients had predisposition diseases (previous difficult spinal tap, ventriculo-peritoneal shunt). The other isolations were considered as contaminants. Three patients (33.3%) with no VS meningitis had other different serious disease (sepsis without bacteriologic confirmation). VS are isolated with relative frequency from CSF, although they cause meningitis in less than one-quarter of the cases (those who have a predisposition disease). In the other cases, VS are isolated as contaminants of CSF and other disease should be search as cause of patient symptoms.

  5. Novel myelin penta- and hexa-acetyl-galactosyl-ceramides: structural characterization and immunoreactivity in cerebrospinal fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podbielska, Maria; Dasgupta, Somsankar; Levery, Steven B

    2010-01-01

    -acetylation of the 2-hydroxy-fatty acid. The immuno-reactivity in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to these acetylated glycolipids was examined in central nervous system (CNS) infectious disease, noninflammatory disorders, and multiple sclerosis (MS). Screening for lipid binding in MS and other neurological disease...... groups revealed that the greatest anti-hydrophobic FMC reactivity was observed in the inflammatory CNS diseases (meningitis, meningo-encephalitis, and subacute sclerosing panencephalitis). Some MS patients had increased reactivity with the hydrophobic FMCs and with glycoglycerophospholipid MfGL-II from...... Mycoplasma fermentans. The cross-reactivity of highly acetylated GalCer with microbial acyl-glycolipid raises the possibility that myelin-O-acetyl-cerebrosides, bacterial infection, and neurological disease are linked....

  6. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay for the quantification of free and total sialic acid in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, M. van der; Koning, T.J. de; Lefeber, D.J.; Fleer, A.; Prinsen, B.H.; Sain-van der Velden, M.G. de

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Analysis of sialic acid (SA) metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is important for clinical diagnosis. In the present study, a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) method for free sialic acid (FSA) and total sialic acid (TSA) in human CSF was v

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of nitric oxide metabolites predict response to methylprednisolone treatment in multiple sclerosis and optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Giovannoni, G; Hand, A;

    2002-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in multiple sclerosis (MS) is not clear. We found increased cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of the NO degradation products nitrate (NO(x)) in clinically definite MS but not in clinically isolated syndromes. High CSF concentrations of NO(x) correlated with long att...

  8. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of vasopressin and oxytocin of the rat during various light-dark regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mens, W.B.J.; Andringa-Bakker, E.A.D.; Wimersma Greidanus, T.B. van

    1982-01-01

    Levels of arginine-vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OXT) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of rats were determined at various times of the day and the night under normal and changed light-dark conditions. During a regular daily 14 h and 10 h dark cycle (lights on 06.00 h, off 20.00 h), AVP in CSF reached

  9. Pittsburgh compound B imaging and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β in a multicentre European memory clinic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leuzy, Antoine; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Hasselbalch, Steen G;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the agreement between data on cerebral amyloidosis, derived using Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography and (i) multi-laboratory INNOTEST enzyme linked immunosorbent assay derived cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of amyloid-β42; (ii) centrally me...

  10. Preoperative protein profiles in cerebrospinal fluid in elderly hip fracture patients at risk for delirium : A proteomics and validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westhoff, Dunja; Witlox, Joost; van Aalst, Corneli; Scholtens, Rikie M.; de Rooij, Sophia E; van Munster, Barbara C; de Jonghe, Jos F M; Houdijk, Alexander P J; Eikelenboom, Piet; van Westerloo, David J; van de Beek, Diederik; van Gool, Willem A; Koenderman, Leo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A neuroinflammatory response is suggested to play an important role in delirium, a common complication in older hospitalized patients. We examined whether hip fracture patients who develop postoperative delirium have a different proteome in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) prior to surgery. MET

  11. Baseline correlation and comparative kinetics of cerebrospinal fluid colony-forming unit counts and antigen titers in cryptococcal meningitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.E.; Teparrukkul, P.; Pinpraphaporn, S.; Larsen, R.A.; Chierakul, W.; Peacock, S.; Day, N.; White, N.J.; Harrison, T.S.

    2005-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cryptococcal colony-forming unit counts and CSF cryptococcal antigen titers serve as alternative measures of organism load in cryptococcal meningitis. For these measures, we correlated baseline values and rates of decline during the first 2 weeks of therapy in 68 human immu

  12. Point-of-care diagnosis and prognostication of cryptococcal meningitis with the cryptococcal antigen lateral flow assay on cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanda, Taseera; Siedner, Mark J; Klausner, Jeffrey D; Muzoora, Conrad; Boulware, David R

    2014-01-01

    The cryptococcal antigen (CRAG) lateral flow assay (LFA) had 100% sensitivity and specificity on cerebrospinal fluid samples. Pretreatment LFA titers correlated with quantitative cultures (R(2) = 0.7) and predicted 2- and 10-week mortality. The CRAG LFA is an accurate diagnostic assay for CSF and should be considered for point-of-care diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis.

  13. Relationship of cerebrospinal fluid pressure, fungal burden and outcome in patients with cryptococcal meningitis undergoing serial lumbar punctures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bicanic, T.; Brouwer, A.E.; Meintjes, G.; Rebe, K.; Limmathurotsakul, D.; Chierakul, W.; Teparrakkul, P.; Loyse, A.; White, N.J.; Wood, R.; Jaffar, S.; Harrison, T.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess impact of serial lumbar punctures on association between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure and prognosis in HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis; to explore time course and relationship of opening pressure with neurological findings, CSF fungal burden, immune respons

  14. EpCAM-based flow cytometry in cerebrospinal fluid greatly improves diagnostic accuracy of leptomeningeal metastases from epithelial tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milojkovic Kerklaan, B.; Pluim, Dick; Bol, Mijke; Hofland, Ingrid; Westerga, Johan; van Tinteren, Harm; Beijnen, Jos H; Boogerd, Willem; Schellens, Jan H M; Brandsma, Dieta

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Moderate diagnostic accuracy of MRI and initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology analysis results in at least 10%-15% false negative diagnoses of leptomeningeal metastases (LM) of solid tumors, thus postponing start of therapy. The aim of this prospective clinical study was to determin

  15. Detection of Neisseria meningitidis from Negative Blood Cultures and Cerebrospinal Fluid with the FilmArray Blood Culture Identification Panel

    OpenAIRE

    Pardo, Joe; Klinker, Kenneth P.; Borgert, Samuel J.; Butler, Brittany M.; Rand, Kenneth H.; Iovine, Nicole M.

    2014-01-01

    The FilmArray blood culture identification (BCID) panel is a rapid molecular diagnostic test approved for use with positive blood culture material. We describe a fatal case of meningococcemia with central nervous system (CNS) involvement detected using the BCID test with culture-negative blood and cerebrospinal fluid.

  16. Detection of Neisseria meningitidis from negative blood cultures and cerebrospinal fluid with the FilmArray blood culture identification panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Joe; Klinker, Kenneth P; Borgert, Samuel J; Butler, Brittany M; Rand, Kenneth H; Iovine, Nicole M

    2014-06-01

    The FilmArray blood culture identification (BCID) panel is a rapid molecular diagnostic test approved for use with positive blood culture material. We describe a fatal case of meningococcemia with central nervous system (CNS) involvement detected using the BCID test with culture-negative blood and cerebrospinal fluid.

  17. Rupture of the lateral ventricle secondary to a fourth ventricle tumour resulting in an indirect nontraumatic cerebrospinal fluid fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, S.P.; Liew, W.F. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Yaacob Latif, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Abdullah, B.J.J. [Department of Radiology, University Malaya Medical Centre (Malaysia); Waran, V. [Department of Neurosurgery, University Malaya Medical Centre (Malaysia)

    2003-01-01

    We present a rare indirect nontraumatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula secondary to a fourth ventricle ependymoma. The fistula resulted from rupture of the left temporal horn, distant from the tumour. The fistula was well demonstrated by MRI. High-resolution CT demonstrated a defect in the roof of the sphenoid sinus, but no leakage of CSF was seen on CT cisternography. (orig.)

  18. The cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta42/40 ratio in the differentiation of Alzheimer's disease from non-Alzheimer's dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spies, P E; Slats, D; Sjögren, J M C; Kremer, B P H; Verhey, F R J; Rikkert, M G M Olde; Verbeek, M M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amyloid beta(40) (Abeta(40)) is the most abundant Abeta peptide in the brain. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of Abeta(40) might therefore be considered to most closely reflect the total Abeta load in the brain. Both in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in normal aging the Abeta load in t

  19. Senescent Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid Circulatory Physiology and Their Role in the Pathogenesis of Normal-tension Glaucoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wostyn, Peter; De Groot, Veva; Van Dam, Debby; Audenaert, Kurt; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the evidence supporting a role for senescent changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulatory physiology in the pathogenesis of normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). DESIGN: Literature review and personal perspective of the authors. METHODS: Analysis of selected articles in the peer-re

  20. SPARC/osteonectin, an endogenous mechanism for targeting albumin to the blood-cerebrospinal fluid interface during brain development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liddelow, S A; Dziegielewska, K M; Møllgård, K

    2011-01-01

    Specialized populations of choroid plexus epithelial cells have previously been shown to be responsible for the transfer of individual plasma proteins from blood to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), contributing to their characteristically high concentrations in CSF of the developing brain. The mech...

  1. A differentially expressed set of microRNAs in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) can diagnose CNS malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drusco, Alessandra; Bottoni, Arianna; Laganà, Alessandro; Acunzo, Mario; Fassan, Matteo; Cascione, Luciano; Antenucci, Anna; Kumchala, Prasanthi; Vicentini, Caterina; Gardiman, Marina P; Alder, Hansjuerg; Carosi, Mariantonia A; Ammirati, Mario; Gherardi, Stefano; Luscrì, Marilena; Carapella, Carmine; Zanesi, Nicola; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-08-28

    Central Nervous System malignancies often require stereotactic biopsy or biopsy for differential diagnosis, and for tumor staging and grading. Furthermore, stereotactic biopsy can be non-diagnostic or underestimate grading. Hence, there is a compelling need of new diagnostic biomarkers to avoid such invasive procedures. Several biological markers have been proposed, but they can only identify specific prognostic subtype of Central Nervous System tumors, and none of them has found a standardized clinical application.The aim of the study was to identify a Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature that could differentiate among Central Nervous System malignancies.CSF total RNA of 34 neoplastic and of 14 non-diseased patients was processed by NanoString. Comparison among groups (Normal, Benign, Glioblastoma, Medulloblastoma, Metastasis and Lymphoma) lead to the identification of a microRNA profile that was further confirmed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization.Hsa-miR-451, -711, 935, -223 and -125b were significantly differentially expressed among the above mentioned groups, allowing us to draw an hypothetical diagnostic chart for Central Nervous System malignancies.This is the first study to employ the NanoString technique for Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling. In this article, we demonstrated that Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling mirrors Central Nervous System physiologic or pathologic conditions. Although more cases need to be tested, we identified a diagnostic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature with good perspectives for future diagnostic clinical applications.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of methotrexate in the cerebrospinal fluid after intracerebroventricular administration in patients with meningeal carcinomatosis and altered cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, K.T.; Wilkinson, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters of the distribution and elimination of intracerebroventricularly administered methotrexate (MTX) were evaluated in three patients with meningeal carcinomatosis. Abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics, which were not otherwise clinically evident, were diagnosed by 111In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate radionuclide imaging. Alterations in CSF flow resulted in large changes in MTX distribution. Reduced cortical convexity (type III), spinal subarachnoid (type II), or ventricular (type I) CSF flow resulted in a prolongation of the single-pass mean residence time of MTX in the peripheral compartment by as much as eightfold and a reduction in intercompartmental clearance by 94-99%. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis can affect both CSF MTX distribution and elimination, each to a different extent, within the same patient. Total MTX clearance from the CSF was reduced by 79-93% in the patients studied. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model, with elimination occurring from the peripheral compartment, gave values for the distribution rate constant from the central to the peripheral compartment (k12), which decreased with the extent of CSF flow abnormality. However, the elimination rate constant from the peripheral compartment (k20) was reduced to an extent apparently independent of CSF flow abnormality (percentage reduction in k12 and k20, respectively: type III, 18 and 66; type II, 67 and 86; type I, 78 and 48). Inadequate distribution and locally high concentrations of MTX within the CSF may contribute to therapeutic failure and neurotoxicity. Monitoring of MTX levels in the CSF may be deceiving when samples are drawn from the site of injection, since the distribution kinetics are altered by abnormal CSF flow dynamics.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in cerebrospinal fluid and serum of rabbits: validation of an animal model used to measure drug concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, A; Cioffe, C; Mian, U; Burroughs, M; Tuomanen, E; Mayers, M; Schwartz, E; Miller, M

    1994-09-01

    Complete concentration-time data describing the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following a single dose are not available for humans or animals. We studied the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole with an indwelling intracisternal needle as described by R.G. Dacey and M.A. Sande (Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 6:437-441, 1974). To determine whether the presence of an intracisternal needle alters pharmacokinetics in the CSF, we validated this model with uninfected rabbits by measuring pharmacokinetic constants following direct intracisternal and intravenous administration of fluconazole. Following direct injection, there was no alteration of elimination rates in the CSF with increasing sample number or time. Following intravenous administration, the penetration and kinetic constants were the same in individual animals from which multiple CSF samples were obtained as in a composite subject constructed by pooling virgin samples from different animals. The presence of the intracisternal needle did not alter CSF chemistry or leukocyte counts, and erythrocyte contamination was < 0.001%. While drug concentrations were measured by a microbiological assay, we also compared the sensitivity and reproducibility of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay with those of the microbiological assay. Following a single intravenous dose, the maximum concentration of the drug in serum, the time to maximum concentration of the drug in serum, the terminal elimination half-life in the CSF, and the percent penetration by fluconazole were 6.12 micrograms/ml, 1 h, 9.0 h, and 84.3%, respectively. We conclude that the sampling of CSF via an indwelling needle does not alter fluconazole pharmacokinetics, cause inflammation, or alter chemical parameters; that the microbiological assay is at least equivalent in sensitivity and reproducibility to the HPLC assay; and that robust parameters describing the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole are possible with this

  4. Quantitative evaluation of changes in gait after extended cerebrospinal fluid drainage for normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Felix; Hickman, Thu-Trang; Tinl, Megan; Iracheta, Christine; Chen, Grace; Flynn, Patricia; Shuman, Matthew E; Johnson, Tatyana A; Rice, Rebecca R; Rice, Isaac M; Wiemann, Robert; Johnson, Mark D

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is characterized by gait instability, urinary incontinence and cognitive dysfunction. These symptoms can be relieved by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, but the time course and nature of the improvements are poorly characterized. Attempts to prospectively identify iNPH patients responsive to CSF drainage by evaluating presenting gait quality or via extended lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage (eLCD) trials are common, but the reliability of such approaches is unclear. Here we combine eLCD trials with computerized quantitative gait measurements to predict shunt responsiveness in patients undergoing evaluation for possible iNPH. In this prospective cohort study, 50 patients presenting with enlarged cerebral ventricles and gait, urinary, and/or cognitive difficulties were evaluated for iNPH using a computerized gait analysis system during a 3day trial of eLCD. Gait speed, stride length, cadence, and the Timed Up and Go test were quantified before and during eLCD. Qualitative assessments of incontinence and cognition were obtained throughout the eLCD trial. Patients who improved after eLCD underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, and symptoms were reassessed serially over the next 3 to 15months. There was no significant difference in presenting gait characteristics between patients who improved after drainage and those who did not. Gait improvement was not observed until 2 or more days of continuous drainage in most cases. Symptoms improved after eLCD in 60% of patients, and all patients who improved after eLCD also improved after shunt placement. The degree of improvement after eLCD correlated closely with that observed after shunt placement.

  5. Prevention of postoperative intracranial infection in patients with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhi-jun; ZHONG Hong-liang; WANG Zhen-min; ZHAO Fu; LIU Pi-nan

    2011-01-01

    Background Intracranial infection is a common postoperative complication of neurosurgery.This study aimed to identify risk factors of postoperative intracranial infection in patients with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea and to suggest proposals for the prevention.Methods A total of 167 patients (113 males and 54 males,average age of 34.4 years) with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea operated on by the senior author were retrospectively reviewed.The data collected included etiology,previous history,clinical manifestation,site of bone defect,operative approach,and postoperative complications.Risk factor(s) for postoperative infection were analyzed using the stepwise multiple Logistic regression.Results Eighteen (10.8%) patients were infected post-operatively.The independent risk factors for infection were the site of defect (RR=0.508,95% Cl 0.306-0.843,P=0.009) and historical meningitis (RR=0.290,95% Cl 0.094-0.893,P=0.031).Patients with multiple defects and saddle floor defects had a higher infection rate.The germiculture was positive in 11 patients,and vancomycin was sensitive to all the pathogenesis.Nine infected patients needed lumbar drainage.Ten patients had hyponatremia,and hydrocephalus occurred in two patients with serious trauma.Conclusions To prevent the infection,we should pay closer attention to the high-risk patients pre-operation.During the operation,the methods those can improve wound healing,such as using blood-supply materials,reliable fixation,and eliminating dead space are all helpful.Conducting lumbar drainage and choosing effective prophylactic antibiotics in the early postoperative stage for the high-risk patients are methods of postoperative management.

  6. Effects of irregular cerebrospinal fluid production rate in human brain ventricular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzri, Edi Azali; Shamsudin, Amir Hamzah; Osman, Kahar; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Aziz, Azian Abd

    2012-06-01

    Hydrocephalus is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the ventricles and cavities in the brain. It occurs when the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow or absorption is blocked or when excessive CSF is secreted. The excessive accumulation of CSF results in an abnormal widening of the ventricles. This widening creates potentially harmful pressure on the tissues of the brain. In this study, flow analysis of CSF was conducted on a three-dimensional model of the third ventricle and aqueduct of Sylvius, derived from MRI scans. CSF was modeled as Newtonian Fluid and its flow through the region of interest (ROI) was done using EFD. Lab software. Different steady flow rates through the Foramen of Monro, classified by normal and hydrocephalus cases, were modeled to investigate its effects. The results show that, for normal and hydrocephalus cases, the pressure drop of CSF flow across the third ventricle was observed to be linearly proportionally to the production rate increment. In conclusion, flow rates that cause pressure drop of 5 Pa was found to be the threshold for the initial sign of hydrocephalus.

  7. LYMPHOCYTE SUBSETS AND CYTOKINES IN BLOOD AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID IN CHILDREN WITH VIRAL AND BACTERIAL MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Alekseeva

    2016-01-01

    an expressed system response of IL-8 and IL-10. Liquor T-lymphocyte content was relatively correlated with blood indicators whereas the fraction of NK exceeded it, and B-lymphocyte content was 3–4 times higher than in patients with viral meningitis. There was IL-6, IL-10, IFNγ and IL-4 response intrathecally, and 10-multiply-growth of IgG level. Thus, the redistribution of lymphocyte subpopulations, and system and local cytokine response in children with meningitis have both common and special features depending on the aetiology and severity of disease. Phenotyping of lymphocytes and determination of both cytokines and immunoglobulins simultaneously in two biologic fluid allow to clear up the pathogenetic value of immunologic abnormalities in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the patients in the aspect of interactions between cell and humoral factors of system and local immune response in neuroinfections of various aetiology.

  8. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Selective Metabolic Adaptation of Streptococcus suis to Porcine Blood and Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Koczula

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen that can cause severe pathologies such as septicemia and meningitis in its natural porcine host as well as in humans. Establishment of disease requires not only virulence of the infecting strain but also an appropriate metabolic activity of the pathogen in its host environment. However, it is yet largely unknown how the streptococcal metabolism adapts to the different host niches encountered during infection. Our previous isotopologue profiling studies on S. suis grown in porcine blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF revealed conserved activities of central carbon metabolism in both body fluids. On the other hand, they suggested differences in the de novo amino acid biosynthesis. This prompted us to further dissect S. suis adaptation to porcine blood and CSF by RNA deep sequencing (RNA-seq. In blood, the majority of differentially expressed genes were associated with transport of alternative carbohydrate sources and the carbohydrate metabolism (pentose phosphate pathway, glycogen metabolism. In CSF, predominantly genes involved in the biosynthesis of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids were differentially expressed. Especially, isoleucine biosynthesis seems to be of major importance for S. suis in CSF because several related biosynthetic genes were more highly expressed. In conclusion, our data revealed niche-specific metabolic gene activity which emphasizes a selective adaptation of S. suis to host environments.

  9. MicroRNAs in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid as potential markers for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, Takehiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    The development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers remains an unmet challenge, and new approaches that can improve current AD biomarker strategies are needed. Recent reports suggested that microRNA (miRNA) profiling of biological fluids has emerged as a diagnostic tool for several pathologic conditions. In this study, we measured six candidate miRNAs (miR-9, miR-29a, miR-29b, miR-34a, miR-125b, and miR-146a) in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD and normal subjects by using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to evaluate their potential usability as AD biomarkers. The qRT-PCR results showed that plasma miR-34a and miR-146a levels, and CSF miR-34a, miR-125b, and miR-146a levels in AD patients were significantly lower than in control subjects. On the other hand, CSF miR-29a and miR-29b levels were significantly higher than in control subjects. Our results provide a possibility that miRNAs detected in plasma and CSF can serve as biomarkers for AD.

  10. Flow induced by ependymal cilia dominates near-wall cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the lateral ventricles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siyahhan, Bercan; Knobloch, Verena; de Zélicourt, Diane; Asgari, Mahdi; Schmid Daners, Marianne; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-05-06

    While there is growing experimental evidence that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow induced by the beating of ependymal cilia is an important factor for neuronal guidance, the respective contribution of vascular pulsation-driven macroscale oscillatory CSF flow remains unclear. This work uses computational fluid dynamics to elucidate the interplay between macroscale and cilia-induced CSF flows and their relative impact on near-wall dynamics. Physiological macroscale CSF dynamics are simulated in the ventricular space using subject-specific anatomy, wall motion and choroid plexus pulsations derived from magnetic resonance imaging. Near-wall flow is quantified in two subdomains selected from the right lateral ventricle, for which dynamic boundary conditions are extracted from the macroscale simulations. When cilia are neglected, CSF pulsation leads to periodic flow reversals along the ventricular surface, resulting in close to zero time-averaged force on the ventricle wall. The cilia promote more aligned wall shear stresses that are on average two orders of magnitude larger compared with those produced by macroscopic pulsatile flow. These findings indicate that CSF flow-mediated neuronal guidance is likely to be dominated by the action of the ependymal cilia in the lateral ventricles, whereas CSF dynamics in the centre regions of the ventricles is driven predominantly by wall motion and choroid plexus pulsation.

  11. Analysis of CD4+CD8+ double-positive T cells in blood, cerebrospinal fluid and multiple sclerosis lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waschbisch, A; Sammet, L; Schröder, S; Lee, D-H; Barrantes-Freer, A; Stadelmann, C; Linker, R A

    2014-01-01

    T cells with a CD4+ CD8+ double-positive (DP) phenotype are present in small numbers in the peripheral blood of healthy humans and may have anti-viral capacities. Here we investigate numbers and function of DP T cells in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), either treatment-naive or under therapy with natalizumab. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that frequencies of circulating DP T cells in treatment-naive and natalizumab-treated MS patients are comparable to healthy controls. These cells have a memory phenotype with cytotoxic potential, express high levels of CD49d and are similarly functional in treatment-naive as well as natalizumab-treated MS patients. DP T cells were enriched in the cerebrospinal fluid, but do not invade acutely inflamed MS lesions. In conclusion, DP T cells are functional in MS and may play a role in the immune surveillance of the central nervous system, but do not display functional impairment under natalizumab therapy. PMID:24730443

  12. Soluble CD14 levels in the serum, synovial fluid, and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with various stages of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, B; Noring, R; Steere, A C; Klempner, M S; Hu, L T

    2000-03-01

    Levels of circulating soluble CD14 (sCD14) in patients with various stages of Lyme disease (LD) were examined. Patients with early or untreated late LD had significantly higher levels of sCD14 than did healthy controls (P=.0001 and .0007, respectively); levels returned to normal within 3 months after antibiotic therapy. Patients with persistent posttreatment symptoms of LD had sCD14 levels equivalent to those of healthy controls. Differences in the serum sCD14 levels in patients with various stages of LD are likely to be directly correlated with differences in bacterial burden, suggesting that posttreatment symptoms may not require continued presence of the organism. sCD14 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with any stage of LD were no different from those of control subjects. Levels of synovial fluid sCD14 from patients with Borrelia burgdorferi in their joints were elevated, compared with levels in normal serum, and may play a role in the pathogenesis of arthritis.

  13. Association of Brucella Meningoencephalitis with Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt in A Child: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak ABDINIA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Abdinia B, Barzegar M, Maleki M, Behbod H, Oskoui Sh. Association of Brucella Meningoencephalitis with Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt in a Child: a Case Report. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Winter:7(1:35-38. Brucellosis is an endemic zoonosis in Iran. It is a systemic infection that can involve any organs or systems of the body and have variable presentations. Ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunt infections due to brucellosis have been rarely reported in the literatures.This  is  the  history  of  a  four  years  old  boy  who  developed  Brucella meningoencephalitis at the age of 42 months, whilst he had a VP shunt in situ for hydrocephalus treatment. Also, he presented brucellosis as acute abdomen. This patient was treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin and rifampicin. The shunt was extracted and all clinical and laboratory test abnormalities subsided through this management.We propose that in a patient with Brucella meningoencephalitis, the cerebrospinal  fluid shunt  system  can  be  extracted  and  treatment  with appropriate combination of antibiotics could be successful. Moreover, it shows that brucellosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for acute abdomen and ascites in endemic regions.References1. Hasanjani Roushan MR, Mohrez M, Samilnejad Gangi SM, Soleimani Amiri MJ, Hajiahmadi M. Epidemiological features and clinical manifestations in 469 adult patients with brucellosis in babol, Northern Iran. Epidemiol infect 2004;132(6:1109-142. Bouza E, García de la Torre M, Parras F, Guerrero A, Rodríguez-Créixems M, Gobernado J. Brucellar meningitis. Brucellar meningitis. Rev Infect Dis 1987; 9(4:810-22.3. Young EJ. Brucella species. In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R, eds. Mandell, Douglas and Bennetts Õs Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 5th ed. New York: Churchill Livingstone; 2000. p. 86-93.4. Feiz J, Sabbaghian H, Miralai M. Brucellosis due to Brucella

  14. Changes of insulin-like growth factor-Ⅱ and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in cerebrospinal fluid of children with tuberculous meningitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have found that insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) have stronger neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects. But whether their levels in cerebrospinal fluid could be used as an auxiliary indicator in differentially diagnosing tuberculous meningitis and viral encephalitis is not yet clear.OBJECTIVE: To explore the changes of insulin-like growth factor-Ⅱ (IGF-Ⅱ ) and IGFBP-3 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of children with tuberculous meningitis and the significance of the changes.DESIGN: A non-randomized concurrent controlled study.SETTING: Department of Pediatric Internal Medicine, the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical College.PARTICIPANTS: Thirty children with tuberculous meningitis (14 males and 16 females) were selected from the Department of Pediatric Internal Medicine, the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical College from January 2005 to December 2006. Tuberculous meningitis was diagnosed according to their clinical manifestations, the history of close contact with tuberculosis, typical cerebrospinal fluid changes of tuberculous meningitis, positive tuberculosis antibody and effective antituberculosis treatment. There were 30 children (13 males and 17 females) with viral encephalitis, and viral encephalitis was diagnosed according to epidemiological history, clinical manifestations, conventional and biochemical changes of cerebrospinal fluid, and negative bacteriology judgment. Meanwhile, 30 children (13 males and 17 females) without infectious and central nervous system disease were selected as the control group. Informed consent was obtained from the parents of all the enrolled children.METHODS: ① The lumbar puncture operation was implemented immediately to obtain cerebrospinal fluid (3 mL). The contents of IGF-Ⅱ and IGFBP-3 were detected with immunoradiometric assay. The concentrations of glucose and protein in cerebrospinal fluid were determined

  15. Substance P content in the cerebrospinal fluid and fluid perfusing cerebral ventricles during elicitation and inhibition of trigemino-hypoglossal reflex in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycka, Maria; Janecka, Anna

    2002-06-21

    The aim of this study was to establish whether tooth pulp and periaqueductal central gray (PAG) stimulation affects the release of substance P (SP) into the fluid perfusing the cerebral ventricles in rats. The content of substance P in the cerebrospinal fluid and fluid perfusing cerebral ventricles was determined during incisor pulp stimulation with electrical impulses inducing nociceptive trigemino-hypoglossal reflex and then during inhibition of the reflex by stimulation of PAG. Perfusion of the cerebral ventricles was carried out using artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF). SP-like immunoreactivity (SP-LI) was determined in the samples by radioimmunoassay. Samples were collected in four groups: first group-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF); second group-aCSF perfusates without stimulation; third group-aCSF perfusates during incisor pulp stimulation; fourth group-aCSF perfusates during incisor pulp stimulation and simultaneous inhibition of trigemino-hypoglossal reflex by PAG stimulation. It was shown that incisor pulp stimulation led to the increased release of SP-LI into the fluid perfusing cerebral ventricles. Stimulation of PAG reduced the release of SP-LI into the cerebro-ventricular system to the values obtained before the tooth pulp stimulation. The results indicate that PAG significantly inhibits the release of SP-LI into the rat cerebral ventricular system and may be involved in the inhibition of trigemino-hypoglossal reflex.

  16. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons of the monkey and cat spinal central canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMotte, C C

    1987-04-22

    Neurons immediately adjacent to the central canal were demonstrated in the cat and monkey to be immunoreactive for the peptide vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), by means of the peroxidase antiperoxidase method. Most of the cells were found in the thoracic and sacral segments, although a few were present at each level. The thoracic neurons were multipolar and either ependymal or subependymal; they usually had a large, thick dendrite that was oriented radially toward the center of the central canal; this dendrite penetrated through the ependymal layer and ended as a large, fringed podlike process (4-5-microns diameter) along the canal surface in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). From the basal surface of the thoracic cell arose several small dendrites and a varicose axon. A few of the thoracic VIP neurons also contained two nuclei. In the sacral cord, the VIP neurons that lie along the central canal were of several types. They were round or multipolar and were either subependymal, within the ependyma, or supraependymal. Many had long dendrites and thin varicose axons stretching for long distances parallel to the cord surface. Other VIP neurons were smaller cells with short, highly branched, varicose processes. Most prominent in the sacral cord of the cat was a massive intricate network of intensely labelled processes extending in parallel along the canal surface. This network contained thick dendrites, highly varicose axons, and small neurons. Electron microscopy demonstrated VIP axons and varicosities containing small round clear vesicles and dense core vesicles. These processes were in desmosomal contact with ependymal cells and in direct contact with the CSF space. VIP processes were also found along the pial surface of the spinal cord at each level. In some cases single axons and bundles of axons arising from the area around the central canal could be traced to terminal fields along the ventral median fissure and the ventral and ventral lateral

  17. Chronic Treatment with a Clinically Relevant Dose of Methylphenidate Increases Glutamate Levels in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Impairs Glutamatergic Homeostasis in Prefrontal Cortex of Juvenile Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Felipe; Pierozan, Paula; Rodrigues, André F; Biasibetti, Helena; Coelho, Daniella M; Mussulini, Ben Hur; Pereira, Mery S L; Parisi, Mariana M; Barbé-Tuana, Florencia; de Oliveira, Diogo L; Vargas, Carmen R; Wyse, Angela T S

    2016-05-01

    The understanding of the consequences of chronic treatment with methylphenidate is very important since this psychostimulant is extensively prescribed to preschool age children, and little is known about the mechanisms underlying the persistent changes in behavior and neuronal function related with the use of methylphenidate. In this study, we initially investigate the effect of early chronic treatment with methylphenidate on amino acids profile in cerebrospinal fluid and prefrontal cortex of juvenile rats, as well as on glutamatergic homeostasis, Na(+),K(+)-ATPase function, and balance redox in prefrontal cortex of rats. Wistar rats at early age received intraperitoneal injections of methylphenidate (2.0 mg/kg) or an equivalent volume of 0.9% saline solution (controls), once a day, from the 15th to the 45th day of age. Twenty-four hours after the last injection, the animals were decapitated and the cerebrospinal fluid and prefrontal cortex were obtained. Results showed that methylphenidate altered amino acid profile in cerebrospinal fluid, increasing the levels of glutamate. Glutamate uptake was decreased by methylphenidate administration, but GLAST and GLT-1 were not altered by this treatment. In addition, the astrocyte marker GFAP was not altered by MPH. The activity and immunocontent of catalytic subunits (α1, α2, and α3) of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were decreased in prefrontal cortex of rats subjected to methylphenidate treatment, as well as changes in α1 and α2 gene expression of catalytic α subunits of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were also observed. CAT activity was increased and SOD/CAT ratio and sulfhydryl content were decreased in rat prefrontal cortex. Taken together, our results suggest that chronic treatment with methylphenidate at early age induces excitotoxicity, at least in part, due to inhibition of glutamate uptake probably caused by disturbances in the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase function and/or in protein damage observed in the prefrontal cortex.

  18. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of cerebrospinal fluid pressure in Chiari malformation and syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Elizabeth C; Fletcher, David F; Stoodley, Marcus A; Bilston, Lynne E

    2013-07-26

    The pathogenesis of syringomyelia in association with Chiari malformation (CM) is unclear. Studies of patients with CM have shown alterations in the CSF velocity profile and these could contribute to syrinx development or enlargement. Few studies have considered the fluid mechanics of CM patients with and without syringomyelia separately. Three subject-specific CFD models were developed for a normal participant, a CM patient with syringomyelia and a CM patient without syringomyelia. Model geometries, CSF flow rate data and CSF velocity validation data were collected from MRI scans of the 3 subjects. The predicted peak CSF pressure was compared for the 3 models. An extension of the study performed geometry and flow substitution to investigate the relative effects of anatomy and CSF flow profile on resulting spinal CSF pressure. Based on 50 monitoring locations for each of the models, the CM models had significantly higher magnitude (psyringomyelia mechanisms and relative effects of CSF velocity profile and spinal geometry on CSF pressure.

  19. Genome-wide copy number analysis of cerebrospinal fluid tumor cells and their corresponding archival primary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magbanua, Mark Jesus M; Roy, Ritu; Sosa, Eduardo V; Hauranieh, Louai; Kablanian, Andrea; Eisenbud, Lauren E; Ryazantsev, Artem; Au, Alfred; Scott, Janet H; Melisko, Michelle; Park, John W

    2014-12-01

    A debilitating complication of breast cancer is the metastatic spread of tumor cells to the leptomeninges or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Patients diagnosed with this aggressive clinical syndrome, known as leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, have very poor prognosis. Despite improvements in detecting cerebrospinal fluid tumor cells (CSFTCs), information regarding their molecular biology is extremely limited. In our recent work, we utilized a protocol previously used for circulating tumor cell isolation to purify tumor cells from the CSF. We then performed genomic characterization of CSFTCs as well as archival tumors from the same patient. Here, we describe the microarray data and quality controls associated with our study published in the Cancer Research journal in 2013 [1]. We also provide an R script containing code for quality control of microarray data and assessment of copy number calls. The microarray data has been deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus under accession # GSE46068.

  20. Case of acute meningitis with clear cerebrospinal fluid: value of computed tomography for the diagnosis of central nervous system tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesari, V.

    1986-11-06

    The author reports a case of acute meningitis with clear cerebrospinal fluid in which extensive bacteriologic investigations were negative making the etiologic diagnosis exceedingly difficult. Initiation of empiric antituberculous therapy was rapidly followed by clinical and biological improvement, without complications, and by resolution of abnormal findings on computed tomography of the brain. On these grounds, meningitis secondary to a tuberculoma in the temporal lobe was diagnosed. The author points out that tuberculous meningitis is still a severe, potentially fatal condition; this, together with the fact that tubercle bacilli are often very scarce or absent, requires that tuberculous meningitis be routinely considered in every patient with clear cerebrospinal fluid meningitis whose condition deteriorates. Computed tomography of the brain is essential to ensure rapid diagnosis and prompt initiation of antituberculous therapy. Lastly, the author points out that nowadays herpes simplex virus encephalopathy should also be considered.

  1. Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid Beta and Tau Concentrations Are Not Modulated by 16 Weeks of Moderate- to High-Intensity Physical Exercise in Patients with Alzheimer Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Steen; Portelius, Erik; Siersma, Volkert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical exercise may have some effect on cognition in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). However, the underlying biochemical effects are unclear. Animal studies have shown that amyloid beta (Aβ), one of the pathological hallmarks of AD, can be altered with high levels of physical...... of Life, Physical Health and Functional Ability in Alzheimer's Disease: The Effect of Physical Exercise (ADEX) study we analyzed cerebrospinal fluid samples for Aβ species, total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and soluble amyloid precursor protein (sAPP) species. We also assessed the patients...

  2. Super-Resolution Microscopy of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers as a Tool for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, William I; Antonios, Gregory; Rabano, Alberto; Bayer, Thomas A; Schneider, Anja; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is neuropathologically characterized by aggregates of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) and tau proteins. The consensus in the AD field is that Aβ and tau should serve as diagnostic biomarkers for AD. However, their aggregates have been difficult to investigate by conventional fluorescence microscopy, since their size is below the diffraction limit (∼200 nm). To solve this, we turned to a super-resolution imaging technique, stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, which has a high enough precision to allow the discrimination of low- and high-molecular weight aggregates prepared in vitro. We used STED to analyze the structural organization of Aβ and tau in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 36 AD patients, 11 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 21 controls. We measured the numbers of aggregates in the CSF samples, and the aggregate sizes and intensities. These parameters enabled us to distinguish AD patients from controls with a specificity of ∼87% and a sensitivity of ∼79% . In addition, the aggregate parameters determined with STED microscopy correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment in AD patients. Finally, these parameters may be useful as predictive tools for MCI cases. The STED parameters of two MCI patients who developed AD during the course of the study, as well as of MCI patients whose Aβ ELISA values fall within the accepted range for AD, placed them close to the AD averages. We suggest that super-resolution imaging is a promising tool for AD diagnostics.

  3. Possible role of the cavernous sinus veins in cerebrospinal fluid absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Lena

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this investigation was to enhance our understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF absorption pathways. To achieve this, Microfil (a coloured silastic material was infused into the subarachnoid space (cisterna magna of sheep post mortem, and the relevant tissues examined macroscopically and microscopically. The Microfil was taken up by an extensive network of extracranial lymphatic vessels in the olfactory turbinates. In addition however, Microfil also passed consistently through the dura at the base of the brain. Microfil was noted in the spaces surrounding the venous network that comprises the cavernous sinus, in the adventitia of the internal carotid arteries and adjacent to the pituitary gland. Additionally, Microfil was observed within the endoneurial spaces of the trigeminal nerve and in lymphatic vessels emerging from the epineurium of the nerve. These results suggest several unconventional pathways by which CSF may be removed from the subarachnoid space. The movement of CSF to locations external to the cranium via these routes may lead to its absorption into veins and lymphatics outside of the skull. The physiological importance of these pathways requires further investigation.

  4. Connective tissue spectrum abnormalities associated with spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Eyal; Pariani, Mitchel; Bannykh, Serguei; Rimoin, David L; Schievink, Wouter I

    2013-04-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of connective tissue abnormalities among patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks in a prospective study using a large cohort of patients. We enrolled a consecutive group of 50 patients, referred for consultation because of CSF leak. All patients have been carefully examined for the presence of connective tissue abnormalities, and based on findings, patients underwent genetic testing. Ancillary diagnostic studies included echocardiography, eye exam, and histopathological examinations of skin and dura biopsies in selected patients. We identified nine patients with heritable connective tissue disorders, including Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and other unclassified forms. In seven patients, spontaneous CSF leak was the first noted manifestation of the genetic disorder. We conclude that spontaneous CSF leaks are associated with a spectrum of connective tissue abnormalities and may be the first noted clinical presentation of the genetic disorder. We propose that there is a clinical basis for considering spontaneous CSF leak as a clinical manifestation of heritable connective tissue disorders, and we suggest that patients with CSF leaks should be screened for connective tissue and vascular abnormalities.

  5. Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters for Selective Detection of Dopamine in Cerebrospinal fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraju, Saravanan; Ankireddy, Seshadri Reddy; Viswanath, Buddolla; Kim, Jongsung; Yun, Kyusik

    2017-01-01

    Since the last two decades, protein conjugated fluorescent gold nanoclusters (NCs) owe much attention in the field of medical and nanobiotechnology due to their excellent photo stability characteristics. In this paper, we reported stable, nontoxic and red fluorescent emission BSA-Au NCs for selective detection of L-dopamine (DA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The evolution was probed by various instrumental techniques such as UV-vis spectroscopy, High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The synthesised BSA-Au NCs were showing 4–6 nm with high fluorescent ~8% Quantum yield (QY). The fluorescence intensity of BSA-Au NCs was quenched upon the addition of various concentrations of DA via an electron transfer mechanism. The decrease in BSA-Au NCs fluorescence intensity made it possible to determine DA in PBS buffer and the spiked DA in CSF in the linear range from 0 to 10 nM with the limit of detection (LOD) 0.622 and 0.830 nM respectively. Best of our knowledge, as-prepared BSA-Au NCs will gain possible strategy and good platform for biosensor, drug discovery, and rapid disease diagnosis such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer diseases. PMID:28067307

  6. Subarachnuid cerebral hemorrhage treated with unequal volume of cerebrospinal fluid replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Min; Zhejiang; Tongxiang; Shen jinsong; Lu jianhong; Xu Yusi; Cai Aiying; Qiu Jiannin

    2000-01-01

    Objective To asscss the effcct and safely of treatment with unequal volume replacement of cerebrospinal fluid(CSF) in cases of subarachnosd hemorrhage(SAH). Background 48 cases of SAH were seleeted which comply to the diagnostic standard set bh the 2nd National meeting of cerebro-vascular diseases and confirmed by CT and CSF examination. Randomly 24 cases were treated as above called treated cases and the other 24 cases as control. Method Treated Treated cases, after successful spinal puncture, 5to 10 ml of CSF were withdrawn. Normal saline were replaced but the volume were 2ml less than the amount withdraw. This is repeated until 6-10ml were withdrawn. The last injeetion of normal saline was aeeompanied with 5mg of dexamethasonum. Cases treated replacement were between 1 to 4times. Result After replacement intracranial pressure (ICP) were generally lowered and headache immediately lcssened or relieved. No further bleeding or herniation of brain occurred. Discussion At present the replaccment of CSF are generally of equal volame. This may cause recurrent bleeding or herniation of brain. After unequal volume replacement, great fluctuation of ICP bu comparison may be lowered. In treated cases duration of headache cerebral vasospasm(CVS), ocurance of hydrocephlus were generally less than the control cases(p<0.05). No intracranial infection in treated casea. Conelusion Unequal volume replacement of CSF in treatment of SAH is effeetive. It is safer than equal volume replacement

  7. Hepatic cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh C

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An abdominal pseudocyst is a rare, but important complication in patients with a ventriculo-peritoneal (VP shunt insertion. Several predisposing factors for this complication have been suggested, including infection, obstruction or dislodgement, but the pathophysiology is still unknown. However, the abdominal inflammatory process is accepted widely as a hypothesis for the formation of an abdominal pseudocyst. In this study, we report the case of a 21-year-old male that presented with a high-grade fever, poor appetite, shortness of breath and unconsciousness 1 week after receiving a VP shunt insertion for obstructive hydrocephalus. Ultrasonography and computed tomographic scans of the abdomen revealed a well-defined large hepatic cyst surrounding the peritoneal tube of the VP shunt. A hepatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF cyst was diagnosed and Staphylococcus epidermis was cultured via CSF. After externalization of the VP shunt and adequate antibiotic treatment, the hepatic cyst was resolved. There was no recurrence observed in the regular follow up.

  8. Mechanism for measurement of flow rate of cerebrospinal fluid in hydrocephalus shunts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Sathish; Kovar, Spencer; Qu, Peng; Inwald, David; Williams, Evan; Qu, Hongwei; Zakalik, Karol

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the flow rate of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or existence of CSF flow inside the shunt tube after shunt implant have been reported as tedious process for both patients and doctors; this paper outlines a potential in vitro flow rate measurement method for CSF in the hydrocephalus shunt. The use of implantable titanium elements in the shunt has been proposed to allow for an accurate temperature measurement along the shunt for prediction of CSF flow rate. The CSF flow velocity can be deduced by decoupling the thermal transfer in the measured differential time at a pair of measurement spots of the titanium elements. Finite element analyses on the fluidic and thermal behaviors of the shunt system have been conducted. Preliminary bench-top measurements on a simulated system have been carried out. The measured flow rates, ranging from 0.5 mm/sec to 1.0 mm/sec, which is clinically practical, demonstrate good agreements with the simulation results.

  9. Volume transmission of beta-endorphin via the cerebrospinal fluid; a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that non-synaptic communication by volume transmission in the flowing CSF plays an important role in neural mechanisms, especially for extending the duration of behavioral effects. In the present review, we explore the mechanisms involved in the behavioral and physiological effects of β-endorphin (β-END), especially those involving the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as a message transport system to reach distant brain areas. The major source of β-END are the pro-opio-melano-cortin (POMC) neurons, located in the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (ARH), bordering the 3rd ventricle. In addition, numerous varicose β-END-immunoreactive fibers are situated close to the ventricular surfaces. In the present paper we surveyed the evidence that volume transmission via the CSF can be considered as an option for messages to reach remote brain areas. Some of the points discussed in the present review are: release mechanisms of β-END, independence of peripheral versus central levels, central β-END migration over considerable distances, behavioral effects of β-END depend on location of ventricular administration, and abundance of mu and delta opioid receptors in the periventricular regions of the brain. PMID:22883598

  10. Trans-sphenoidal treatment of postsurgical cerebrospinal fluid fistula: CT-guided closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floris, R. [Rome-2 Univ., Rome (Italy). Dept. of Radiology]|[IRCCS Santa Lucia, Rome (Italy)]|[Via A. Caroncini 27, I-00197 Rome (Italy); Salvatore, C.; Simonetti, G. [Rome-2 Univ., Rome (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Fraioli, B.; Pastore, F.S.; Vagnozzi, R. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Rome ``Tor Vergata``, Rome (Italy)

    1998-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage after trans-sphenoidal surgery is a troublesome complication with a risk of meningitis and pneumocephalus. We suggest CT-guided intrasphenoidal injection of fibrin sealant through a 12-gauge needle as a simple alternative to surgical management of CSF fistulae. We treated eight patients, operated via the trans-sphenoidal route (five pituitary adenomas, three craniopharyngiomas), for a postoperative CSF leak by CT-guided intrasphenoidal injection of fibrin sealant alone in three cases and fibrin sealant and autologous blood in 5. CT was obtained 10 days after the procedure in all cases. In four patients, the CSF leak was closed successfully at the first attempt. The procedure was repeated on the four remaining patients because only a reduction in leakage was obtained at the first attempt. This procedure preserves olfaction and avoids the risk of frontal lobe damage. It could therefore represent the treatment of choice in many cases of anterior cranial fossa postsurgical CSF leaks. (orig.) (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 30 refs.

  11. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Patients with and without Communicating Hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasel, C.; Gentzsch, S.; Heimberger, K. [Cerebrovascular Imaging Workgroup of the Div. of Neuroradiology, Dept. of Radiology, Medical Univ. Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-09-15

    Background: Recent concepts about cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation in communicating hydrocephalus (CoHy), which is also termed 'restricted arterial pulsation hydrocephalus,' suggest reduced arterial pulsations of subarachnoid vessels with a smaller amount of CSF shifted in subarachnoid spaces during the early systole. The postulated restriction of subarachnoid arterial pulsations in CoHy should induce a smaller motion artifact and reduced local stream effects in CSF in magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Purpose: To investigate the maximum diffusivity in CSF in patients with and without CoHy using DWI. Material and Methods: 12 patients without CSF circulation disturbances and six cases with proven CoHy were assessed. Diffusion was measured in six non collinear directions without triggering the arterial pulse wave (scan time 6:45 min, voxel size 2x2x2 mm). Due to expected artifacts, the calculated maximum diffusivity was called apparent diffusivity. Regional high and low apparent diffusivity was assessed in CSF spaces on newly created 3D CSF motion maps. Results: Patients with regular CSF circulation exhibited high apparent diffusivity in CSF in basal subarachnoid spaces, whereas apparent diffusivity was low there in patients with CoHy. Conclusion: DWI opens a feasible approach to study CSF motion in the neurocranium. Restricted arterial pulsations seem to be involved in CoHy.

  12. Assessment of cerebrospinal fluid outflow conductance using an adaptive observer--experimental and clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, K; Manchester, I R; Andersson, N; Shiriaev, A; Malm, J; Eklund, A

    2007-11-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) patients have a disturbance in the dynamics of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) system. The outflow conductance, C, of the CSF system has been suggested to be prognostic for positive outcome after treatment with a CSF shunt. All current methods for estimation of C have drawbacks; these include lack of information on the accuracy and relatively long investigation times. Thus, there is a need for improved methods. To accomplish this, the theoretical framework for a new adaptive observer (OBS) was developed which provides real-time estimation of C. The aim of this study was to evaluate the OBS method and to compare it with the constant pressure infusion (CPI) method. The OBS method was applied to data from infusion investigations performed with the CPI method. These consisted of repeated measurements on an experimental set-up and 30 patients with suspected INPH. There was no significant difference in C between the CPI and the OBS method for the experimental set-up. For the patients there was a significant difference, -0.84+/-1.25 microl (s kPa)(-1), mean +/- SD (paired sample t-test, poutflow conductance.

  13. Intracranial pressure and conductance to outflow of cerebrospinal fluid in normal-pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Børgesen, S E; Gjerris, F; Sørensen, S C

    1979-04-01

    Forty patients with clinical evidence of normal-pressure hydrocephalus were studied by monitoring intraventricular pressure during a 24-hour period, and by a lumboventricular perfusion test for measurement of the conductance to outflow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The purpose of the study was to investigate whether there is a relationship between intraventricular pressure and conductance to outflow of CSF, and whether it is possible to use the results from pressure monitoring in the selection of patients who may be expected to benefit from shunting therapy. The conductance to outflow was used as an evaluation factor in the selection of patients to be treated by a shunt. The conductance to CSF outflow differed by twelvefold between the lowest and highest values. The level of resting intraventricular pressure was within normal limits in all patients. Accordingly, there was no evidence of a relationship between conductance to outflow and intraventricular pressure. So-called B-waves were seen more frequently in patients with decreased conductance to outflow, but were also present in patients with high conductance to outflow. Therefore, the presence of B-waves does not imply a low conductance to outflow of CSF.

  14. The late and dual origin of cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons in the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracca, Yanina L; Sartoretti, Maria Micaela; Di Bella, Daniela J; Marin-Burgin, Antonia; Carcagno, Abel L; Schinder, Alejandro F; Lanuza, Guillermo M

    2016-03-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms that control the production of specialized neuronal types. However, how the timing of differentiation contributes to neuronal diversity in the developing spinal cord is still a pending question. In this study, we show that cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (CSF-cNs), an anatomically discrete cell type of the ependymal area, originate from surprisingly late neurogenic events in the ventral spinal cord. CSF-cNs are identified by the expression of the transcription factors Gata2 and Gata3, and the ionic channels Pkd2l1 and Pkd1l2. Contrasting with Gata2/3(+) V2b interneurons, differentiation of CSF-cNs is independent of Foxn4 and takes place during advanced developmental stages previously assumed to be exclusively gliogenic. CSF-cNs are produced from two distinct dorsoventral regions of the mouse spinal cord. Most CSF-cNs derive from progenitors circumscribed to the late-p2 and the oligodendrogenic (pOL) domains, whereas a second subset of CSF-cNs arises from cells bordering the floor plate. The development of these two subgroups of CSF-cNs is differentially controlled by Pax6, they adopt separate locations around the postnatal central canal and they display electrophysiological differences. Our results highlight that spatiotemporal mechanisms are instrumental in creating neural cell diversity in the ventral spinal cord to produce distinct classes of interneurons, motoneurons, CSF-cNs, glial cells and ependymal cells.

  15. Anti-leishmania antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid from dogs with visceral leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M.F. Lima

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil is caused by Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi and the dog is its most important reservoir. The clinical features in dogs include loss of weight, lymphadenopathy, renal failure, skin lesions, fever, hypergammaglobulinemia, hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, and, rarely, neurological symptoms. Most infected animals develop active disease, characterized by high anti-leishmania antibody titers and depressed lymphoproliferative ability. Antibody production is not primarily important for protection but might be involved in the pathogenesis of tissue lesions. An ELISA test was used to determine if there is an association between neurological symptoms and the presence of anti-L. chagasi antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Thirty serum and CSF samples from symptomatic mixed breed dogs (three with neurological symptoms from a region of high incidence of visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil were examined for antibody using total parasite antigen and anti-dog IgG peroxidase conjugate. A high level of L. chagasi antibodies was observed in sera (mean absorbance ± SD, 1.939 ± 0.405; negative control, N = 20, 0.154 ± 0.074 and CSF (1.571 ± 0.532; negative control, N = 10, 0.0195 ± 0.040 from all animals studied. This observation suggests that L. chagasi can cause breakdown of filtration barriers and the transfer of antibodies and antigens from the blood to the CSF compartment. No correlation was observed between antibody titer in CSF and neurological symptoms.

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Alzheimer Disease in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Won Seok; Kim, Hyeong Jun; Shin, Ho Sik; Kim, Saeromi; Im, Ji Young; Ahn, Sang Il; Min, Kyoung Dae; Yim, Soo Jae; Ye, Byoung Seok; Seo, Sang Won; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Park, Kyung Won; Choi, Seong Hye; Na, Duk L.

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory-specific reference values for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarkers are necessary. Our objective was to apply well-known CSF biomarkers and redetermine their diagnostic cutoff values for AD in South Korea. CSF samples from matched control subjects (n=71), patients with AD dementia (ADD, n=76), and other neurological disorders with cognitive decline (OND, n=47) were obtained from 6 Korean dementia clinics according to a standardized protocol. CSF biomarker concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CSF biomarkers differed significantly between the ADD and control groups (P<0.001 for all), and between the ADD and OND groups (P<0.001 for all). The areas under the curve in differentiation of ADD from control subjects were 0.97 for Aβ42, 0.93 for total tau (tTau), 0.86 for pTau, and 0.99 for both tTau/Aβ42 and pTau/Aβ42 ratios. Our revised cutoff value for Aβ42 was higher than our previous one, whereas the values for the Tau proteins were similar. The tTau/Aβ42 ratio had the highest accuracy, 97%. Our findings highlight the usefulness of CSF AD biomarkers in South Korea, and the necessity of continually testing the reliability of cutoff values. PMID:28030437

  17. Increased concentrations of homocysteine in the cerebrospinal fluid in patients with fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regland, B; Andersson, M; Abrahamsson, L; Bagby, J; Dyrehag, L E; Gottfries, C G

    1997-01-01

    Twelve outpatients, all women, who fulfilled the criteria for both fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome were rated on 15 items of the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale (CPRS-15). These items were chosen to constitute a proper neurasthenic subscale. Blood laboratory levels were generally normal. The most obvious finding was that, in all the patients, the homocysteine (HCY) levels were increased in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). There was a significant positive correlation between CSF-HCY levels and fatiguability, and the levels of CSF-B12 correlated significantly with the item of fatiguability and with CPRS-15. The correlations between vitamin B12 and clinical variables of the CPRS-scale in this study indicate that low CSF-B12 values are of clinical importance. Vitamin B12 deficiency causes a deficient remethylation of HCY and is therefore probably contributing to the increased homocysteine levels found in our patient group. We conclude that increased homocysteine levels in the central nervous system characterize patients fulfilling the criteria for both fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid cytomorphologic findings in 41 intracranial tumors: a retrospective review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Sá

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this retrospective review of clinical and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF data from 41 patients with intracranial tumors diagnosed between 1975 and 1989, is to report the role that the finding of neoplastic cells in CSF plays, specially when cerebral CT-scanning and MRI were not currently done. Another objective is to study the CSF proteic abnormalities in cerebral tumors. CSF cell count, cytomorphologic pictures obtained after sedimentation and protein findings are described. Tumor cells were seen in 12 cases (29%: medulloblastomas - 6, meningeal carcinomatosis - 3, multiforme glioblastoma - 1, ependymoma -1, cerebral metastasis -1; in two cases it was an unexpected finding. We noticed that tumoral localization next to the ventricles favoured cell exfoliation. Although pleocytosis was rare and uncorrelated with the presence of neoplastic cells, pathological cytomorphologic pictures appeared in most of the cases including all "positive" ones. Our results stress that the appearance of neoplastic cells in CSF remains helpful specially when it is an unexpected finding.

  19. A comparative study on neurochemistry of cerebrospinal fluid in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H; Iacono, R P; Schoonenberg, T; Kuniyoshi, S; Buchholz, J

    1999-02-01

    This study addresses two issues: (1) the comparative neurochemistry of classic tremor type of Parkinson's disease or PD-A and akinetic type of Parkinson's disease or PD-B; and (2) the neurochemistry of levodopa failure syndrome (LDFS). Cerebrospinal fluid from the lateral ventricle was collected from 50 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease of PD-A and PD-B. Levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and metabolites were determined using high performance liquid chromatography. We have found that (1) 5-hydroxylindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) level is significantly lower in PD-B than in PD-A; (2) 5-HIAA level is inversely associated with score of part one of United Parkinson's Disease Rating Score (UPDRS); (3) 5-HIAA level is inversely associated with score of part four of UPDRS; (4) 3-O-methyldopa (3-OMD) level is positively associated with levodopa failure syndrome (LDFS) assessed by part four of UPDRS and inversely associates with 5-HIAA. From these data, it can be inferred that serotonergic activity is decreased in PD-B to a greater extent than in PD-A and that decreased serotonergic activity plays a role in LDFS.

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vis, J.B. de; Zwanenburg, J.J.; Kleij, L.A. van der; Spijkerman, J.M.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Biessels, G.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Petersen, E.T. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hvidovre Hospital, Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre (Denmark)

    2016-05-15

    To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T{sub 2} of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T{sub 1}-weighted and CSF MRI were performed. The first echo data of the CSF MRI sequence was used to obtain intracranial volume, CSF partial volume was measured voxel-wise to obtain CSF volume (V{sub CSF}) and the T{sub 2} of CSF (T{sub 2,CSF}) was calculated. The correlation between V{sub CSF} / T{sub 2,CSF} and brain atrophy scores [global cortical atrophy (GCA) and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA)] was evaluated. Relative total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular V{sub CSF} increased significantly with increased scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.83, 0.78 and 0.78 and R = 0.72, 0.62 and 0.86). Total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular T{sub 2} of the CSF increased significantly with higher scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.72, 0.70 and 0.49 and R = 0.60, 0.57 and 0.41). A fast, fully automated CSF MRI volumetric sequence is an alternative for qualitative atrophy scales. The T{sub 2} of the CSF is related to brain atrophy and could thus be a marker of neurodegenerative disease. (orig.)

  1. Volume transmission of beta-endorphin via the cerebrospinal fluid; a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veening Jan G

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is increasing evidence that non-synaptic communication by volume transmission in the flowing CSF plays an important role in neural mechanisms, especially for extending the duration of behavioral effects. In the present review, we explore the mechanisms involved in the behavioral and physiological effects of β-endorphin (β-END, especially those involving the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, as a message transport system to reach distant brain areas. The major source of β-END are the pro-opio-melano-cortin (POMC neurons, located in the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (ARH, bordering the 3rd ventricle. In addition, numerous varicose β-END-immunoreactive fibers are situated close to the ventricular surfaces. In the present paper we surveyed the evidence that volume transmission via the CSF can be considered as an option for messages to reach remote brain areas. Some of the points discussed in the present review are: release mechanisms of β-END, independence of peripheral versus central levels, central β-END migration over considerable distances, behavioral effects of β-END depend on location of ventricular administration, and abundance of mu and delta opioid receptors in the periventricular regions of the brain.

  2. An alternative method of chronic cerebrospinal fluid collection via the cisterna magna in conscious rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilberto, David B; Zeoli, Angela H; Szczerba, Peter J; Gehret, John R; Holahan, Marie A; Sitko, Gary R; Johnson, Colena A; Cook, Jacquelynn J; Motzel, Sherri L

    2003-07-01

    Models of chronic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection previously have been established for nonhuman primates and canines; many of these methods implement stainless-steel cannulas into the lateral or 4th ventricles or catheters into the cerebral or spinal subarachnoid space. These models have proved successful and reliable but unfortunately require invasive techniques to pass through the skull or require a laminectomy to enter the spinal subarachnoid space, involve the use of expensive and highly specialized stereotaxic equipment for the precise placement of the implants, and may require exteriorized hardware which is cumbersome to maintain and unaesthetic. The model we developed for the rhesus monkey allows for direct access to CSF outflow from the cisterna magna by using a 3.5-French fenestrated silicone catheter which was placed 1.0 cm into the cisterna. The catheter was attached to a titanium port placed subcutaneously between the scapulae to permit easy access for sampling CSF in a conscious, chaired rhesus monkey. We currently have instrumented animals from which we have consistently collected CSF for over 18 months. This novel, economical, less-invasive method permits chronic, reliable collection of CSF in conscious rhesus monkeys and has the additional advantages that the model is easier to maintain and more aesthetic.

  3. Quantitative analysis of cerebrospinal fluid brain derived neurotrophic factor in the patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashayekhi, Farhad; Salehi, Zivar; Jamalzadeh, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common cause ofnontraumatic neurological disability in Europe and North America. Growth factor expression could participate in the repair process of the demyelinating disease. Among growth factors, brain derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF) has been demonstrated to play an important role in neuronal and axonal survival. In the central nervous system (CNS), neurons are the main source of BDNF. Another potential source are activated astrocytes, which are present in inflamed areas in the CNS as shown in MS. In this study, total protein concentration (TPC) and BDNF levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from the patients with MS (n = 48) and control subjects (n = 53) were measured using a Bio-Rad protein assay and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). No significant change in the CSF TPC of patients with MS was seen as compared to normal CSF. The presence of BDNF in the CSF samples was shown by Western blot. Using ELISA, it was shown that the level of BDNF in the MS CSF is higher than in normal CSF. It is concluded that BDNF is a constant component of human CSF. Moreover, it could be implicated in the pathophysiology of MS.

  4. Associations between a locus downstream DRD1 gene and cerebrospinal fluid dopamine metabolite concentrations in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreou, Dimitrios; Söderman, Erik; Axelsson, Tomas; Sedvall, Göran C; Terenius, Lars; Agartz, Ingrid; Jönsson, Erik G

    2016-04-21

    Dopamine activity, mediated by the catecholaminergic neurotransmitter dopamine, is prominent in the human brain and has been implicated in schizophrenia. Dopamine targets five different receptors and is then degraded to its major metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA). We hypothesized that genes encoding dopamine receptors may be associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HVA concentrations in patients with psychotic disorder. We searched for association between 67 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the five dopamine receptor genes i.e., DRD1, DRD2, DRD3, DRD4 and DRD5, and the CSF HVA concentrations in 74 patients with psychotic disorder. Nominally associated SNPs were also tested in 111 healthy controls. We identified a locus, located downstream DRD1 gene, where four SNPs, rs11747728, rs11742274, rs265974 and rs11747886, showed association with CSF HVA concentrations in psychotic patients. The associations between rs11747728, which is a regulatory region variant, and rs11742274 with HVA remained significant after correction for multiple testing. These associations were restricted to psychotic patients and were absent in healthy controls. The results suggest that the DRD1 gene is implicated in the pathophysiology of psychosis and support the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia.

  5. Endonasal endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea in a series of 69 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Huiping; Zuo, Jian; Zhao, Huoyu; Liu, Shixi; An, Huiming; Liu, Yafeng

    2010-06-01

    We presented our experiences in treatment of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea with an endoscopic endonasal surgery approach, and showed the severe postoperative complications and failures we experienced, in order to outline some of the characteristic problems that can occur. We performed a retrospective analysis of all of the patients with CSF rhinorrhea. All of the patients were managed with an endonasal endoscopic procedure. Data collected included the site of leakage, the surgical interventions, and the postoperative complications. Sixty-nine patients (33 females and 36 males) were included in this study. All patients underwent an endoscopic repair approach with a multilayer reconstructive technique. The success rates of the first attempt in our study were 89%. Four patients presented with postoperative meningitis and brain abscess and one of these patients died of the brain abscess. Our results indicate that an endoscopic endonasal surgery approach provides a wide, safe, and direct route for treatment of CSF rhinorrhea. The precise location of leakage prior to surgery and proper patient selection, eliminating those with large leakages, are helpful in ensuring a successful endoscopic CSF repair with minimal mortality.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurodegeneration are decreased or normal in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Pedersen, Lars Østergaard; Bahl, Justyna Maria Czarna;

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of neurodegeneration are altered in narcolepsy in order to evaluate whether the hypocretin deficiency and abnormal sleep-wake pattern in narcolepsy leads to neurodegeneration. METHODS: Twenty-one patients with central...... hypersomnia (10 type 1 narcolepsy, 5 type 2 narcolepsy, and 6 idiopathic hypersomnia cases) aged 33 years on average, and with a disease duration of 2-29 years, and 12 healthy controls underwent CSF analyses of levels of β-amyloid, total tau protein (T-tau), phosphorylated tau protein (P-tau181), α......-synuclein, neurofilament light chain (NF-L), and chitinase 3-like protein-1 (CHI3L1). RESULTS: Levels of β-amyloid were lower in patients with type 1 narcolepsy (375.4 ±143.5 pg/ml) and type 2 narcolepsy (455.9 ± 65.0 pg/ml) compared with controls (697.9 ± 167.3 pg/ml, p

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels in type 1 narcolepsy patients very close to onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Pizza, Fabio; Knudsen, Stine; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Jennum, Poul; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by a loss of hypocretin (orexin) signaling in the brain. Genetic data suggests the disorder is caused by an autoimmune attack on hypocretin producing neurons in hypothalamus. This hypothesis has however not yet been confirmed by consistent findings of autoreactive antibodies or T-cells in patient samples. One explanation for these negative results may be that the autoimmune process is no longer active when patients present to the clinic. With increasing awareness in recent years, more and more patients have been diagnosed closer and closer to disease onset. In this study, we tested whether an active immune process in the brain could be detected in these patients, as reflected by increased cytokine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Using multiplex analysis, we measured the levels of 51 cytokines and chemokines in the CSF of 40 type 1 narcolepsy patients having varying disease duration. For comparison, we used samples from 9 healthy controls and 9 patients with other central hypersomnia. Cytokine levels did not differ significantly between controls and patients, even in 5 patients with disease onset less than a month prior to CSF sampling.

  8. Identification of a biomarker in cerebrospinal fluid for neuronopathic forms of Gaucher disease.

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    Hila Zigdon

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease, a recessive inherited metabolic disorder caused by defects in the gene encoding glucosylceramidase (GlcCerase, can be divided into three subtypes according to the appearance of symptoms associated with central nervous system involvement. We now identify a protein, glycoprotein non-metastatic B (GPNMB, that acts as an authentic marker of brain pathology in neurological forms of Gaucher disease. Using three independent techniques, including quantitative global proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in samples from Gaucher disease patients that display neurological symptoms, we demonstrate a correlation between the severity of symptoms and GPNMB levels. Moreover, GPNMB levels in the CSF correlate with disease severity in a mouse model of Gaucher disease. GPNMB was also elevated in brain samples from patients with type 2 and 3 Gaucher disease. Our data suggest that GPNMB can be used as a marker to quantify neuropathology in Gaucher disease patients and as a marker of treatment efficacy once suitable treatments towards the neurological symptoms of Gaucher disease become available.

  9. Identification of a biomarker in cerebrospinal fluid for neuronopathic forms of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigdon, Hila; Savidor, Alon; Levin, Yishai; Meshcheriakova, Anna; Schiffmann, Raphael; Futerman, Anthony H

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease, a recessive inherited metabolic disorder caused by defects in the gene encoding glucosylceramidase (GlcCerase), can be divided into three subtypes according to the appearance of symptoms associated with central nervous system involvement. We now identify a protein, glycoprotein non-metastatic B (GPNMB), that acts as an authentic marker of brain pathology in neurological forms of Gaucher disease. Using three independent techniques, including quantitative global proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in samples from Gaucher disease patients that display neurological symptoms, we demonstrate a correlation between the severity of symptoms and GPNMB levels. Moreover, GPNMB levels in the CSF correlate with disease severity in a mouse model of Gaucher disease. GPNMB was also elevated in brain samples from patients with type 2 and 3 Gaucher disease. Our data suggest that GPNMB can be used as a marker to quantify neuropathology in Gaucher disease patients and as a marker of treatment efficacy once suitable treatments towards the neurological symptoms of Gaucher disease become available.

  10. Recruitment of dendritic cells to the cerebrospinal fluid in bacterial neuroinfections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashenkov, Mikhail; Teleshova, Natalia; Kouwenhoven, Mathilde; Smirnova, Tatiana; Jin, Ya Ping; Kostulas, Vasilios; Huang, Yu Min; Pinegin, Boris; Boiko, Alexey; Link, Hans

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) accumulate in the CNS during inflammation and may contribute to local immune responses. Two DC subsets present in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are probably recruited from myeloid (CD11c(+)CD123(dim)) and plasmacytoid (CD11c(-)CD123(high)) blood DC. In bacterial meningitis and especially in Lyme meningoencephalitis, numbers of myeloid and plasmacytoid DC in CSF were increased, compared to non-inflammatory neurological diseases, and correlated with chemotactic activity of CSF for immature monocyte-derived DC (moDC). Multiple DC chemoattractants, including macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1beta, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, MCP-3, RANTES and stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1alpha were elevated in CSF in these two neuroinfections. Chemotaxis of immature moDC induced by these CSFs could be partially inhibited by mAbs against CXCR4, the receptor for SDF-1alpha, and CD88, the receptor for C5a. SDF-1alpha present in CSF also chemoattracted mature moDC, which in vivo could correspond to a diminished migration of antigen-bearing DC from the CSF to secondary lymphoid organs. Regulation of DC trafficking to and from the CSF may represent a mechanism of controlling the CNS inflammation.

  11. [Ultrastructural location of enzymes in peripheral blood neutrophils and in cerebrospinal fluid neutrophils in neuroinfections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotarczak, B

    1993-01-01

    Using cytochemical methods the location and activity were determined of alkaline phosphatase, ATP-ase and succinate dehydrogenase as representative enzymes for the metabolic processes in neutrophils isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with meningococcal meningoencephalitis as compared with peripheral blood neutrophils in a control group. The study showed presence of phosphatase on the membranes of many intracellular structures. The activity of the enzymes was higher than in the control group in the membranes of neutrophils in blood and CSF. This is explained as an effect of action of the chemotactic factor on the cell membrane and activation of the cell to movements and phagocytosis. ATP-ase activity in peripheral blood neutrophils in controls was found in all membranous structures in the cell. However, in peripheral blood neutrophils and CSF neutrophils in the acute stage of the disease the active enzyme was noted, in the first place, in cell membranes and digesting vacuoles, which reflected probably the direction of metabolic processes for phagocytosis and destroying of bacteria. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase was found in mitochondrial membranes. Peripheral blood and CSF neutrophils showed a high activity of the enzyme. In the CSF cells in acute phase atypical sites of succinate dehydrogenase activity were noted, which was explained as a sign of cell destruction.

  12. Update on the core and developing cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Mirjana; Švob Štrac, Dubravka; Mück-Šeler, Dorotea; Pivac, Nela; Stanić, Gabrijela; Hof, Patrick R.; Šimić, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder, whose prevalence will dramatically rise by 2050. Despite numerous clinical trials investigating this disease, there is still no effective treatment. Many trials showed negative or inconclusive results, possibly because they recruited only patients with severe disease, who had not undergone disease-modifying therapies in preclinical stages of AD before severe degeneration occurred. Detection of AD in asymptomatic at risk individuals (and a few presymptomatic individuals who carry an autosomal dominant monogenic AD mutation) remains impractical in many of clinical situations and is possible only with reliable biomarkers. In addition to early diagnosis of AD, biomarkers should serve for monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. To date, the most promising biomarkers are cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuroimaging biomarkers. Core CSF biomarkers (amyloid β1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau) showed a high diagnostic accuracy but were still unreliable for preclinical detection of AD. Hence, there is an urgent need for detection and validation of novel CSF biomarkers that would enable early diagnosis of AD in asymptomatic individuals. This article reviews recent research advances on biomarkers for AD, focusing mainly on the CSF biomarkers. In addition to core CSF biomarkers, the potential usefulness of novel CSF biomarkers is discussed. PMID:25165049

  13. A more sensitive radioimmunoassay for neuron-specific enolase suitable for cerebrospinal fluid determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parma, A M; Marangos, P J; Goodwin, F K

    1981-03-01

    Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and non-neuronal enolase (NNE) have been shown to be highly specific neuronal and glial products respectively and are therefore useful as biochemical markers of the two major cell types in the vertebrate central nervous system. An iodinated radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedure for human NSE (NSE-H) with approximately 50-fold greater sensitivity than the previously available tritiated assay is described. This assay is capable of detecting 100 pg of NSE-H per assay. NSE levels in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) which were previously undetectable with the tritiated RIA are now easily measured and have been shown to be approximately 2 ng/ml of CSF. Furthermore, results obtained with the newly described assay procedure on more concentrated brain tissue extracts are comparable to the tritiated RIA. The iodinated NSE RIA is also shown to be capable of accurately detecting added amounts of NSE in human CSF, indicating the potential clinical usefulness of this assay in determining elevated levels of NSE in CSF.

  14. Direct Identification of Enteroviruses in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Suspected Meningitis by Nested PCR Amplification

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    Alexandr Krasota

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Enteroviruses, the most common human viral pathogens worldwide, have been associated with serous meningitis, encephalitis, syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis, myocarditis and the onset of diabetes type 1. In the future, the rapid identification of the etiological agent would allow to adjust the therapy promptly and thereby improve the course of the disease and prognosis. We developed RT-nested PCR amplification of the genomic region coding viral structural protein VP1 for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical specimens and compared it with the existing analogs. One-hundred-fifty-nine cerebrospinal fluids (CSF from patients with suspected meningitis were studied. The amplification of VP1 genomic region using the new method was achieved for 86 (54.1% patients compared with 75 (47.2%, 53 (33.3% and 31 (19.5% achieved with previously published methods. We identified 11 serotypes of the Enterovirus species B in 2012, including relatively rare echovirus 14 (E-14, E-15 and E-32, and eight serotypes of species B and 5 enteroviruses A71 (EV-A71 in 2013. The developed method can be useful for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical material with the low virus loads such as CSF.

  15. Neural differentiation of choroid plexus epithelial cells: role of human traumatic cerebrospinal fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Hashemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the key producer of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, the choroid plexus (CP provides a unique protective system in the central nervous system. CSF components are not invariable and they can change based on the pathological conditions of the central nervous system. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of non-traumatic and traumatic CSF on the differentiation of multipotent stem-like cells of CP into the neural and/or glial cells. CP epithelial cells were isolated from adult male rats and treated with human non-traumatic and traumatic CSF. Alterations in mRNA expression of Nestin and microtubule-associated protein (MAP2, as the specific markers of neurogenesis, and astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP in cultured CP epithelial cells were evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR. The data revealed that treatment with CSF (non-traumatic and traumatic led to increase in mRNA expression levels of MAP2 and GFAP. Moreover, the expression of Nestin decreased in CP epithelial cells treated with non-traumatic CSF, while treatment with traumatic CSF significantly increased its mRNA level compared to the cells cultured only in DMEM/F12 as control. It seems that CP epithelial cells contain multipotent stem-like cells which are inducible under pathological conditions including exposure to traumatic CSF because of its compositions.

  16. Portable lactate analyzer for measuring lactate in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma ? method-comparison evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Monteiro de Almeida

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Increased plasma lactate levels can indicate the presence of metabolic disorders in HIV infected individuals. Objective: To determine whether a portable analyzer is valid for measuring cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma lactate levels in HIV infected individuals. Method: CSF and plasma were collected from 178 subjects. Samples tested by the Accutrend® portable analyzer were compared to those tested by a reference device (SYNCHRON LX® 20. Results: The portable analyzer had in plasma sensitivity of 0.95 and specificity 0.87. For CSF the specificity was 0.95; the sensitivity 0.33; the negative predictive value was 95% and the positive predictive value 33%. Conclusions: These findings support the validity of the portable analyzer in measuring lactate concentrations in CSF that fall within the normal range. The relatively poor positive predictive value indicates that a result above the reference range may represent a “false positive test”, and should be confirmed by the reference device before concluding abnormality.

  17. Simultaneous Detection of Five Pathogens from Cerebrospinal Fluid Specimens Using Luminex Technology

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    Linfu Zhou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for the outcome of central nervous system (CNS infections. In this study, we developed a multiplex PCR-Luminex assay for the simultaneous detection of five major pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, which frequently cause CNS infections. Through the hybridization reaction between multiplex PCR-amplified targets and oligonucleotide “anti-TAG” sequences, we found that the PCR-Luminex assay could detect as low as 101–102 copies of synthetic pathogen DNAs. Furthermore, 163 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF specimens from patients with suspected CNS infections were used to evaluate the efficiency of this multiplex PCR-Luminex method. Compared with Ziehl-Neelsen stain, this assay showed a high diagnostic accuracy for tuberculosis meningitis (sensitivity, 90.7% and specificity, 99.1%. For cryptococcal meningitis, the sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 97.1%, respectively, compared with the May Grunwald Giemsa (MGG stain. For herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 encephalitis, the sensitivities were 80.8% and 100%, and the specificities were 94.2% and 99%, respectively, compared with Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA assays. Taken together, this multiplex PCR-Luminex assay showed potential efficiency for the simultaneous detection of five pathogens and may be a promising supplement to conventional methods for diagnosing CNS infections.

  18. Detection of heat stable mycobacterial antigen in cerebrospinal fluid by Dot-Immunobinding assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathai A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF specimen in patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM is infrequent and carries low sensitivity. Thus development of an alternative laboratory diagnostic test is essential for the early diagnosis and treatment of TBM. Objective: A simple, rapid Dot immunobinding assay (Dot-Iba, for the laboratory diagnosis of TBM is devised. This method minimizes the risk of handling infectious material in the laboratory. Method: The Dot-Iba was standardized with heat-inactivated M tuberculosis antigen (PPD. The heat-inactivated CSF from TBM and non-TBM patients was similarly assayed and it can detect antigen upto 1ng/ml in CSF. Result: A positive result was obtained in all the five culture positive patients with TBM and in 20/25 probable TBM. A negative result was obtained in 38/40 CSF from disease control group. The overall sensitivity and specificity of Dot-Iba was 83.3% and 95% respectively. Conclusion: Dot-Iba can be used as an adjunct for the laboratory diagnosis of TBM, particularly in culture negative TBM patients and also in those clinical situations where no laboratory tests are available to distinguish between TBM and partially treated pyogenic meningitis.

  19. Identification of Disease Markers in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Using Lipidomic and Proteomic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred N. Fonteh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipids comprise the bulk of the dry mass of the brain. In addition to providing structural integrity to membranes, insulation to cells and acting as a source of energy, lipids can be rapidly converted to mediators of inflammation or to signaling molecules that control molecular and cellular events in the brain. The advent of soft ionization procedures such as electrospray ionization (ESI and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI have made it possible for compositional studies of the diverse lipid structures that are present in brain. These include phospholipids, ceramides, sphingomyelin, cerebrosides, cholesterol and their oxidized derivatives. Lipid analyses have delineated metabolic defects in disease conditions including mental retardation, Parkinson's Disease (PD, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's Disease (AD, depression, brain development, and ischemic stroke. In this review, we examine the structure of the major lipid classes in the brain, describe methods used for their characterization, and evaluate their role in neurological diseases. The potential utility of characterizing lipid markers in the brain, with specific emphasis on disease mechanisms, will be discussed. Additionally, we describe several proteomic strategies for characterizing lipid-metabolizing proteins in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. These proteins may be potential therapeutic targets since they transport lipids required for neuronal growth or convert lipids into molecules that control brain physiology. Combining lipidomics and proteomics will enhance existing knowledge of disease pathology and increase the likelihood of discovering specific markers and biochemical mechanisms of brain diseases.

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes in children with bacterial and aseptic meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinovitch, Moshe; Finkelstein, Yaron; Elishkevitz, Keren Politi; Volovitz, Benjamin; Harel, Daniella; Klinger, Gil; Razon, Yaron; Nussinovitch, Udi; Nussinovitch, Naomi

    2009-10-01

    Differentiation of bacterial from aseptic meningitis may be difficult. Our aim was to determine the pattern of distribution of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with bacterial and aseptic meningitis. One hundred and fifty-seven patients with suspected meningitis were enrolled in the study. They were divided into 3 groups according to the culture- or bacterial antigen assay-proven diagnosis and CSF findings: bacterial meningitis (n = 31), aseptic meningitis (n = 65), and non-meningitis (n = 61). Total LDH level and percentages of LDH isoenzymes in the CSF were measured in each patient. Each group showed a distinct LDH isoenzyme distribution pattern, with a statistically significant difference among the groups in the percentages of the various isoenzymes. Compared with the non-meningitis group, total LDH activity in the CSF was high in the aseptic meningitis group (49.82+/-35.59 U/L, P < 0.001) and exaggerated in the bacterial meningitis group (944.53+/-112.3 U/L, P < 0.001). Low LDH-2 levels were unique to bacterial meningitis (P < 0.01), whereas high LDH-3 levels were characteristic of aseptic meningitis (P < 0.05). Both groups had low levels of LDH-1 and high levels of LDH-4 and LDH-5. In conclusion, the LDH isoenzyme pattern may be of clinical diagnostic value in meningitis, particularly when culture results are pending.

  1. Measurement of fluorescent probes concentration ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbater, Osnat; Gannot, Israel

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenic process of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, begins years before the clinical diagnosis. Here, we suggest a novel method which may detect AD up to nine years earlier than current exams, minimally invasive, with minimal risk, pain and side effects. The method is based on previous reports which relate the concentrations of biomarkers in the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) (Aβ and Tau proteins) to the future development of AD in mild cognitive impairment patients. Our method, which uses fluorescence measurements of the relative concentrations of the CSF biomarkers, replaces the lumbar puncture process required for CSF drawing. The process uses a miniature needle coupled trough an optical fiber to a laser source and a detector. The laser radiation excites fluorescent probes which were prior injected and bond to the CSF biomarkers. Using the ratio between the fluorescence intensities emitted from the two biomarkers, which is correlated to their concentration ratio, the patient's risk of developing AD is estimated. A theoretical model was developed and validated using Monte Carlo simulations, demonstrating the relation between fluorescence emission and biomarker concentration. The method was tested using multi-layered tissue phantoms simulating the epidural fat, the CSF in the sub-arachnoid space and the bone. These phantoms were prepared with different scattering and absorption coefficients, thicknesses and fluorescence concentrations in order to simulate variations in human anatomy and in the needle location. The theoretical and in-vitro results are compared and the method's accuracy is discussed.

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis : CSF Biomarkers of SIV Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissel, Stephanie J; Kofler, Julia; Nyaundi, Julia; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Wiley, Clayton A

    2016-06-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has led to increased survival of HIV-infected patients but also increased prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. We previously identified YKL40 as a potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker of lentiviral central nervous system (CNS) disease in HIV-infected patients and in the macaque model of HIV encephalitis. The aim of this study was to define the specificity and sensitivity along with the predictive value of YKL40 as a biomarker of encephalitis and to assess its relationship to CSF viral load. CSF YKL40 and SIV RNA concentrations were analyzed over the course of infection in 19 SIV-infected pigtailed macaques and statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship to encephalitis. Using these relationships, CSF alterations of 31 neuroimmune markers were studied pre-infection, during acute and asymptomatic infection, at the onset of encephalitis, and at necropsy. YKL40 CSF concentrations above 1122 ng/ml were found to be a specific and sensitive biomarker for the presence of encephalitis and were highly correlated with CSF viral load. Macaques that developed encephalitis had evidence of chronic CNS immune activation during early, asymptomatic, and end stages of infection. At the onset of encephalitis, CSF demonstrated a rise of neuroimmune markers associated with macrophage recruitment, activation and interferon response. CSF YKL40 concentration and viral load are valuable biomarkers to define the onset of encephalitis. Chronic CNS immune activation precedes the development of encephalitis while some responses suggest protection from CNS lentiviral disease.

  3. Progranulin Levels in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid in Granulin Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeter, Lieke H.H.; Patzke, Holger; Loewen, Gordon; Dopper, Elise G.P.; Pijnenburg, Yolande A.L.; van Minkelen, Rick; van Swieten, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pathogenic mutations in the granulin gene (GRN) are causative in 5-10% of patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), mostly leading to reduced progranulin protein (PGRN) levels. Upcoming therapeutic trials focus on enhancing PGRN levels. Methods Fluctuations in plasma PGRN (n = 41) and its relationship with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, n = 32) and specific single nucleotide polymorphisms were investigated in pre- and symptomatic GRN mutation carriers and controls. Results Plasma PGRN levels were lower in carriers than in controls and showed a mean coefficient of variation of 5.3% in carriers over 1 week. Although plasma PGRN correlated with CSF PGRN in carriers (r = 0.54, p = 0.02), plasma only explained 29% of the variability in CSF PGRN. rs5848, rs646776 and rs1990622 genotypes only partly explained the variability of PGRN levels between subjects. Conclusions Plasma PGRN is relatively stable over 1 week and therefore seems suitable for treatment monitoring of PGRN-enhancing agents. Since plasma PGRN only moderately correlated with CSF PGRN, CSF sampling will additionally be needed in therapeutic trials. PMID:27703466

  4. Direct Identification of Enteroviruses in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Suspected Meningitis by Nested PCR Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasota, Alexandr; Loginovskih, Natalia; Ivanova, Olga; Lipskaya, Galina

    2016-01-06

    Enteroviruses, the most common human viral pathogens worldwide, have been associated with serous meningitis, encephalitis, syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis, myocarditis and the onset of diabetes type 1. In the future, the rapid identification of the etiological agent would allow to adjust the therapy promptly and thereby improve the course of the disease and prognosis. We developed RT-nested PCR amplification of the genomic region coding viral structural protein VP1 for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical specimens and compared it with the existing analogs. One-hundred-fifty-nine cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) from patients with suspected meningitis were studied. The amplification of VP1 genomic region using the new method was achieved for 86 (54.1%) patients compared with 75 (47.2%), 53 (33.3%) and 31 (19.5%) achieved with previously published methods. We identified 11 serotypes of the Enterovirus species B in 2012, including relatively rare echovirus 14 (E-14), E-15 and E-32, and eight serotypes of species B and 5 enteroviruses A71 (EV-A71) in 2013. The developed method can be useful for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical material with the low virus loads such as CSF.

  5. Picornaviruses in cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis in Luanda, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelkonen, Tuula; Roine, Irmeli; Anjos, Elizabete; Kaijalainen, Svetlana; Roivainen, Merja; Peltola, Heikki; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2012-07-01

    Human enteroviruses are the most common cause of viral meningitis. Viral-bacterial interaction may affect the clinical course and outcome of bacterial meningitis. In Africa, viruses might be responsible for 14-25% of all meningitis cases. However, only few studies from Africa have reported detection of viruses in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or mixed viral-bacterial infections of the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of picornaviruses in the CSF of children suffering from meningitis in Luanda, Angola. The study included 142 consecutive children enrolled in a prospective study of bacterial meningitis in Luanda between 2005 and 2006, from whom a CSF sample was available. CSF samples were obtained at hospital admission, stored in a deep-freeze, and transported to Finland for testing by real-time PCR for picornaviruses. Enteroviruses were detected in 4 (3%) of 142 children with presumed bacterial meningitis. A 5-month-old girl with rhinovirus and Haemophilus influenzae meningitis recovered uneventfully. An 8-year-old girl with human enterovirus and pneumococcal meningitis developed no sequelae. A 2-month-old girl with human enterovirus and malaria recovered quickly. A 7-month-old girl with human enterovirus was treated for presumed tuberculous meningitis and survived with severe sequelae. Mixed infections of the CNS with picornaviruses and bacteria are rare. Detection of an enterovirus does not affect the clinical picture and outcome of bacterial meningitis.

  6. Harnessing Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Potential and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dana; Kim, Young-Sam; Shin, Dong Wun; Park, Chang-Shin

    2016-01-01

    No disease-modifying therapies (DMT) for neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) have been established, particularly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unclear why candidate drugs that successfully demonstrate therapeutic effects in animal models fail to show disease-modifying effects in clinical trials. To overcome this hurdle, patients with homogeneous pathologies should be detected as early as possible. The early detection of AD patients using sufficiently tested biomarkers could demonstrate the potential usefulness of combining biomarkers with clinical measures as a diagnostic tool. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for NDs are being incorporated in clinical trials designed with the aim of detecting patients earlier, evaluating target engagement, collecting homogeneous patients, facilitating prevention trials, and testing the potential of surrogate markers relative to clinical measures. In this review we summarize the latest information on CSF biomarkers in NDs, particularly AD and PD, and their use in clinical trials. The large number of issues related to CSF biomarker measurements and applications has resulted in relatively few clinical trials on CSF biomarkers being conducted. However, the available CSF biomarker data obtained in clinical trials support the advantages of incorporating CSF biomarkers in clinical trials, even though the data have mostly been obtained in AD trials. We describe the current issues with and ongoing efforts for the use of CSF biomarkers in clinical trials and the plans to harness CSF biomarkers for the development of DMT and clinical routines. This effort requires nationwide, global, and multidisciplinary efforts in academia, industry, and regulatory agencies to facilitate a new era.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid T-regulatory cells recognize Borrelia burgdorferi NAPA in chronic Lyme borreliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amedei, A; Codolo, G; Ozolins, D; Ballerini, C; Biagioli, T; Jaunalksne, I; Zilevica, A; D Elios, S; De Bernard, M; D' Elios, M M

    2013-01-01

    The NapA protein of B. burgdorferi is essential for the persistence of spirochetes in ticks. One of the most intriguing aspects of NapA is its potential to interfere with the host immune system. Here, we investigated the role of the acquired immune responses induced by NapA in the cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) of patients with chronic Lyme borreliosis. We evaluated the cytokine profile induced in microglia cells and CSF T cells following NapA stimulation. We report here that NapA induced a regulatory T (Treg) response in the CSF of patients with chronic Lyme borreliosis and it is able to expand this suppressive response by promoting the production of TGF-beta and IL-10 by microglia cells. Collectively, these data strongly support a central role of NapA in promoting both Treg response and immune suppression in the CSF of patients with chronic Lyme borreliosis and suggest that NapA and the Treg pathway may represent novel therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of the disease.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for differentiation of frontotemporal lobar degeneration from Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, David J; Trojanowski, John Q; Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Accurate ante mortem diagnosis in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is crucial to the development and implementation of etiology-based therapies. Several neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins, including the major protein constituents of inclusions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) associated with amyloid-beta (Aβ(1-42)) plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle pathology, can be measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for diagnostic applications. Comparative studies using autopsy-confirmed samples suggest that CSF total-tau (t-tau) and Aβ(1-42) levels can accurately distinguish FTLD from AD, with a high t-tau to Aβ(1-42) ratio diagnostic of AD; however, there is also an urgent need for FTLD-specific biomarkers. These analytes will require validation in large autopsy-confirmed cohorts and face challenges of standardization of within- and between-laboratory sources of error. In addition, CSF biomarkers with prognostic utility and longitudinal study of CSF biomarker levels over the course of disease are also needed. Current goals in the field include identification of analytes that are easily and reliably measured and can be used alone or in a multi-modal approach to provide an accurate prediction of underlying neuropathology for use in clinical trials of disease modifying treatments in FTLD. To achieve these goals it will be of the utmost importance to view neurodegenerative disease, including FTLD, as a clinicopathological entity, rather than exclusively a clinical syndrome.

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Differentiation of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration from Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Irwin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Accurate ante mortem diagnosis in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD is crucial to the development and implementation of etiology-based therapies. Several neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins, including the major protein constituents of inclusions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD associated with amyloid-beta (Aβ1-42 plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle pathology, can be measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF for diagnostic applications. Comparative studies using autopsy-confirmed samples suggest that CSF total-tau (t-tau and Aβ1-42 levels can accurately distinguish FTLD from AD, with a high t-tau to Aβ1-42 ratio diagnostic of AD; however, there is also an urgent need for FTLD-specific biomarkers. These analytes will require validation in large autopsy-confirmed cohorts and face challenges of standardization of within- and between-laboratory sources of error. In addition, CSF biomarkers with prognostic utility and longitudinal study of CSF biomarker levels over the course of disease are also needed. Current goals in the field include identification of analytes that are easily and reliably measured and can be used alone or in a multi-modal approach to provide an accurate prediction of underlying neuropathology for use in clinical trials of disease modifying treatments in FTLD. To achieve these goals it will be of the utmost importance to view neurodegenerative disease, including FTLD, as a clinicopathological entity, rather than exclusively a clinical syndrome.

  10. Leptin levels are negatively correlated with 2-arachidonoylglycerol in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Nicholson

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence in humans that peripheral endocannabinoid signaling is disrupted in obesity. However, little is known about the corresponding central signaling. Here, we have investigated the relationship between gender, leptin, body mass index (BMI and levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of primarily overweight to obese patients with osteoarthritis.Patients (20 females, 15 males, age range 44-78 years, BMI range 24-42 undergoing total knee arthroplasty for end-stage osteoarthritis were recruited for the study. Endocannabinoids were quantified by liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry. AEA and 2-AG levels in the serum and CSF did not correlate with either age or BMI. However, 2-AG levels in the CSF, but not serum, correlated negatively with CSF leptin levels (Spearman's ρ -0.48, P=0.0076, n=30. No such correlations were observed for AEA and leptin.In the patient sample investigated, there is a negative association between 2-AG and leptin levels in the CSF. This is consistent with pre-clinical studies in animals, demonstrating that leptin controls the levels of hypothalamic endocannabinoids that regulate feeding behavior.

  11. Regulation of human cerebrospinal fluid malate dehydrogenase 1 in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Matthias; Llorens, Franc; Pracht, Alexander; Thom, Tobias; Correia, Ângela; Zafar, Saima; Ferrer, Isidre; Zerr, Inga

    2016-01-01

    The identification of reliable diagnostic biomarkers in differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases is an ongoing topic. A previous two-dimensional proteomic study on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed an elevated level of an enzyme, mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 1 (MDH1), in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients. Here, we could demonstrate the expression of MDH1 in neurons as well as in the neuropil. Its levels are lower in sCJD brains than in control brains. An examination of CSF-MDH1 in sCJD patients by ELISA revealed a significant elevation of CSF-MDH1 levels in sCJD patients (independently from the PRNP codon 129 MV genotype or the prion protein scrapie (PrPSc) type) in comparison to controls. In combination with total tau (tau), CSF-MDH1 detection exhibited a high diagnostic accuracy for sCJD diagnosis with a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 95.6%. A correlation study of MDH1 level in CSF with other neurodegenerative marker proteins revealed a significant positive correlation between MDH1 concentration with tau, 14-3-3 and neuron specific enolase level. In conclusion, our study indicated the potential of MDH1 in combination with tau as an additional biomarker in sCJD improving diagnostic accuracy of tau markedly. PMID:27852982

  12. Detection of Antibodies to Brucella Cytoplasmic Proteins in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Neurobrucellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Pablo C.; Araj, George F.; Racaro, Graciela C.; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of human neurobrucellosis usually relies on the detection of antibodies to Brucella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by agglutination tests or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Here we describe the detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) to cytoplasmic proteins (CP) of Brucella spp. by ELISA and Western blotting in seven CSF samples from five patients with neurobrucellosis. While IgG to CP (titers of 200 to 12,800) and IgG to LPS (800 to 6,400) were found in the CSF of these patients, these antibodies were not detected in CSF samples from two patients who had systemic brucellosis without neurological involvement. The latter, however, had serum IgG and IgM to both LPS and CP. No reactivity to these antigens was found in CSF samples from 14 and 20 patients suffering from nonbrucellar meningitis and noninfectious diseases, respectively. These findings suggest that, in addition to its usefulness in the serological diagnosis of human systemic brucellosis, the ELISA with CP antigen can be used for the specific diagnosis of human neurobrucellosis. PMID:10473531

  13. Fibrinogen is not elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis

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    Ehling Rainer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated plasma fibrinogen levels are a well known finding in acute infectious diseases, acute stroke and myocardial infarction. However its role in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of acute and chronic central (CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS diseases is unclear. Findings We analyzed CSF and plasma fibrinogen levels together with routine parameters in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, acute inflammatory diseases of the CNS (bacterial and viral meningoencephalitis, BM and VM and PNS (Guillain-Barré syndrome; GBS, as well as in non-inflammatory neurological controls (OND in a total of 103 patients. Additionally, MS patients underwent cerebral MRI scans at time of lumbar puncture. CSF and plasma fibrinogen levels were significantly lower in patients with MS and OND patients as compared to patients with BM, VM and GBS. There was a close correlation between fibrinogen levels and albumin quotient (rho = 0.769, p Conclusions Although previous work has shown clear evidence of the involvement of fibrinogen in MS pathogenesis, this is not accompanied by increased fibrinogen in the CSF compartment.

  14. Elevated nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3 levels in cerebrospinal fluid of children with hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhaus, Frederike; Koehne, Petra; Schäper, Christoph; Butenandt, Otfrid; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Ring-Mrozik, Elfride; Obladen, Michael; Bührer, Christoph

    2001-01-01

    Background Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) resulting from impaired drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) causes hydrocephalus with damage to the central nervous system. Clinical symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in infants may be difficult to diagnose, leading to delayed treatment by shunt placement. Until now, no biochemical marker of elevated ICP has been available for clinical diagnosis and monitoring. In experimental animal models, nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) have been shown to be produced by glial cells as an adaptive response to hypoxia. We investigated whether concentrations of NGF and NT-3 are increased in the CSF of children with hydrocephalus. Methods NGF was determined in CSF samples collected from 42 hydrocephalic children on 65 occasions (taps or shunt placement surgery). CSF samples obtained by lumbar puncture from 22 children with suspected, but unconfirmed bacterial infection served as controls. Analysis was performed using ELISA techniques. Results NGF concentrations in hydrocephalic children were over 50-fold increased compared to controls (median 225 vs 4 pg/mL, p 1 pg/mL) in 14/31 hydrocephalus samples at 2–51 pg/mL but in none of 11 control samples (p = 0.007). Conclusion NGF and NT-3 concentrations are increased in children with hydrocephalus. This may represent an adaptive response of the brain to elevated ICP. PMID:11580868

  15. Elevated nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3 levels in cerebrospinal fluid of children with hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felderhoff-Mueser Ursula

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP resulting from impaired drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF causes hydrocephalus with damage to the central nervous system. Clinical symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP in infants may be difficult to diagnose, leading to delayed treatment by shunt placement. Until now, no biochemical marker of elevated ICP has been available for clinical diagnosis and monitoring. In experimental animal models, nerve growth factor (NGF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 have been shown to be produced by glial cells as an adaptive response to hypoxia. We investigated whether concentrations of NGF and NT-3 are increased in the CSF of children with hydrocephalus. Methods NGF was determined in CSF samples collected from 42 hydrocephalic children on 65 occasions (taps or shunt placement surgery. CSF samples obtained by lumbar puncture from 22 children with suspected, but unconfirmed bacterial infection served as controls. Analysis was performed using ELISA techniques. Results NGF concentrations in hydrocephalic children were over 50-fold increased compared to controls (median 225 vs 4 pg/mL, p 1 pg/mL in 14/31 hydrocephalus samples at 2–51 pg/mL but in none of 11 control samples (p = 0.007. Conclusion NGF and NT-3 concentrations are increased in children with hydrocephalus. This may represent an adaptive response of the brain to elevated ICP.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid soluble L-selectin (sCD62L) in meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bührer, C; Herold, R; Stibenz, D; Henze, G; Obladen, M

    1996-01-01

    The leucocyte adhesion molecule L-selectin (CD62L) is rapidly cleaved off proteolytically after cell activation, generating soluble L-selectin (sCD62L) molecules. sCD62L concentrations were determined in 185 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from children aged 1 month to 17 years. In 36 CSF samples of children with meningoencephalitis, sCD62L was significantly higher (median 209 fmol/ml) than in samples of children with other febrile diseases (n = 67, median 50 fmol/ml) or non-febrile disorders (n = 82, median 44 fmol/ml). There was a positive correlation between CSF protein and CSF sCD62L (rS = 0.68), suggesting that a disturbed blood-brain barrier contributes to raised sCD62L concentrations in the CSF. However, the CSF sCD62L/protein ratio of children with meningoencephalitis was significantly higher than in children with other febrile diseases or non-febrile disorders, indicating that sCD62L concentrations in children with meningoencephalitis were higher than expected from plasma leakage alone. It is concluded that both an impaired blood-brain barrier and the generation of sCD62L by infiltrating leucocytes contribute to raised CSF sCD62L concentrations in children with meningoencephalitis. PMID:8669926

  17. Increased cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of soluble Fas (CD95/Apo-1) in hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderhoff-Mueser, U; Herold, R; Hochhaus, F; Koehne, P; Ring-Mrozik, E; Obladen, M; Buhrer, C

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—The ventricular enlargement observed in children with chronically raised intracranial pressure (ICP) causes a secondary loss of brain tissue. In animal studies of hydrocephalus, programmed cell death (apoptosis) has been found as a major mechanism of neuronal injury. One of the regulators of the apoptotic cell death programme is the receptor mediated Fas/Fas ligand interaction.
METHODS—The apoptosis regulating cytokines soluble Fas (sFas) and soluble Fas ligand (sFasL) were studied in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 31 hydrocephalic children undergoing shunt surgery for symptomatic hydrocephalus and 18controls.
RESULTS—High concentrations of sFas were observed in children with hydrocephalus (median 252 ng/ml); in controls sFas was below the detection limit (0.5 ng/ml). sFasL was undetectable in all but one sample.
CONCLUSION—High concentrations of sFas in the CSF of children with hydrocephalus suggest intrinsic sFas production, potentially antagonising pressure mediated Fas activation.

 PMID:11259245

  18. Harnessing Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Potential and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dana; Kim, Young Sam; Shin, Dong Wun; Park, Chang Shin; Kang, Ju Hee

    2016-10-01

    No disease-modifying therapies (DMT) for neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) have been established, particularly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unclear why candidate drugs that successfully demonstrate therapeutic effects in animal models fail to show disease-modifying effects in clinical trials. To overcome this hurdle, patients with homogeneous pathologies should be detected as early as possible. The early detection of AD patients using sufficiently tested biomarkers could demonstrate the potential usefulness of combining biomarkers with clinical measures as a diagnostic tool. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for NDs are being incorporated in clinical trials designed with the aim of detecting patients earlier, evaluating target engagement, collecting homogeneous patients, facilitating prevention trials, and testing the potential of surrogate markers relative to clinical measures. In this review we summarize the latest information on CSF biomarkers in NDs, particularly AD and PD, and their use in clinical trials. The large number of issues related to CSF biomarker measurements and applications has resulted in relatively few clinical trials on CSF biomarkers being conducted. However, the available CSF biomarker data obtained in clinical trials support the advantages of incorporating CSF biomarkers in clinical trials, even though the data have mostly been obtained in AD trials. We describe the current issues with and ongoing efforts for the use of CSF biomarkers in clinical trials and the plans to harness CSF biomarkers for the development of DMT and clinical routines. This effort requires nationwide, global, and multidisciplinary efforts in academia, industry, and regulatory agencies to facilitate a new era.

  19. A Three years retrospective analysis of agents isolated from cerebrospinal fluid in a University Hospital

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    Barış Otlu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study, we aimed to investigate the agents which were isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples in our hospital for three years, retrospectively.Materials and methods: The CSF samples, which were sent our laboratory, of the patients those had presumptive diagnosis of meningitis between September 2008 and September 2011 were included into the study. Isolated bacteria were identified with conventional methods, biochemical tests and/or Phonix (BD, US kits. Antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains were investigated according to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI recommendations.Results: 11 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 8 Klebsiella pneumoniae, 7 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 7 Acinetobacter baumannii, 5 Escherichia coli, 4 Enterococcus spp., 2 Enterobacter spp., 25 Coagulase-negative staphylococcus, 1 Morganella morganii, 2 Neisseria meningitidis, 1 Brucella spp., and 1 Candida albicans were isolated (overall n:74; 5.2% from total 1408 CSF samples. In susceptibility test, 2 S.pneumonia was found as penicillin-resistant, and one E.coli and two K.pneumoniae were found as extended spectrum of beta-lactamase producers. Additionally, carbapenem resistance was detected in three A.baumannii and one P.aeruginosa strains.Conclusion: Determination of agent profile and antimicrobial resistance pattern from different localizations and patients’ groups will help to improve protective and therapeutic health policies.

  20. Interleukin-5 and interleukin-10 are major cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with active neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Jr. V.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NCC is a common neurological disorder especially in developing countries, caused by infection of the brain with encysted larvae of the tapeworm Taenia solium. Seizures are a common finding associated with this disease. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between the levels of various cytokines present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with NCC and the severity of the disease. The levels of the cytokines IL-1ß, TNF-alpha, IL-5, IL-10 and IFN-gamma were determined in the CSF of 22 patients with active NCC, 13 patients with inactive NCC and 15 control subjects. CSF from patients with active NCC presented significantly higher IL-5 levels compared to control subjects. IL-5 and IL-10 levels in CSF from NCC patients with inflammatory CSF were significantly higher than those detected in non-inflammatory CSF. These results show a predominant Th2 lymphocyte activation in human NCC and also indicate the possible use of cytokines in the CSF as a marker for the differential diagnosis between inactive disease and the active form of NCC.

  1. Gelatinase activity of matrix metalloproteinases in the cerebrospinal fluid of various patient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, M A; Cartier, L; Collados, L; Kettlun, A M; Araya, F; Concha, C; Flores, L; Wolf, M E; Mosnaim, A D

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the enzymatic gelatinolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of samples obtained from 67 individuals, twenty-one nonneurological patients (considered controls) and 46 subjects with various neurological disorders e.g., vascular lesions, demyelination, inflammatory, degenerative and prion diseases. Biochemical characterization of MMPs, a family of neutral proteolytic enzymes involved in extracellular matrix modeling, included determination of substrate specificity and Ca+2 dependency, as well as the effects of protease inactivators, carboxylic and His (histidine) residue modifiers, and antibiotics. Whereas all CSF samples expressed MMP-2 (gelatinase A) activity, it corresponded in most cases (normal and pathological samples) to its latent form (proenzyme; pMMP-2). In general, inflammatory neurological diseases (especially meningitis and neurocisticercosis) were associated with the presence of a second enzyme, MMP-9 (or gelatinase B). Whereas MMP-9 was found in the CSF of every tropical spastic paraparesis patient studied, its presence in samples from individuals with vascular lesions was uncommon. Patients blood-brain barrier damage was ascertained by determining total CSF protein content using both, the conventional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis procedure under denaturing conditions and capillary zone electrophoresis.

  2. Approach to Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Biomarker Discovery and Evaluation in HIV Infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Richard W.; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Angel, Thomas E.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena S.; Smith, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Gisslen, Magnus

    2013-12-13

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a nearly universal facet of systemic HIV infection that varies in character and neurological consequences. While clinical staging and neuropsychological test performance have been helpful in evaluating patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers present a valuable and objective approach to more accurate diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects and understanding of evolving pathobiology. We review some lessons from our recent experience with CSF biomarker studies. We have used two approaches to biomarker analysis: targeted, hypothesis-driven and non-targeted exploratory discovery methods. We illustrate the first with data from a cross-sectional study of defined subject groups across the spectrum of systemic and CNS disease progression and the second with a longitudinal study of the CSF proteome in subjects initiating antiretroviral treatment. Both approaches can be useful and, indeed, complementary. The first is helpful in assessing known or hypothesized biomarkers while the second can identify novel biomarkers and point to broad interactions in pathogenesis. Common to both is the need for well-defined samples and subjects that span a spectrum of biological activity and biomarker concentrations. Previouslydefined guide biomarkers of CNS infection, inflammation and neural injury are useful in categorizing samples for analysis and providing critical biological context for biomarker discovery studies. CSF biomarkers represent an underutilized but valuable approach to understanding the interactions of HIV and the CNS and to more objective diagnosis and assessment of disease activity. Both hypothesis-based and discovery methods can be useful in advancing the definition and use of these biomarkers.

  3. Does Caffeine Consumption Modify Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travassos, Maria; Santana, Isabel; Baldeiras, Inês

    2015-01-01

    in the CSF were determined using sandwich ELISA methods and other Aβ species, Aβ(X-38), Aβ(X-40), and Aβ(X-42), with the MSD Aβ Triplex assay. The concentration of caffeine was 0.79±1.15 μg/mL in the CSF and 1.20±1.88 μg/mL in the plasma. No correlation was found between caffeine consumption and Aβ42......Caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD) by modulating amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolic pathways. The present work aimed to study a possible association of caffeine consumption with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, particularly Aβ. The study included 88 patients with AD or mild...... cognitive impairment. The consumption of caffeine and theobromine was evaluated using a validated food questionnaire. Quantification of caffeine and main active metabolites was performed with liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The levels of A(1-42), total tau, and phosphorylated tau...

  4. Sandwich wound closure reduces the risk of cerebrospinal fluid leaks in posterior fossa surgery

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    Verena Heymanns

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Posterior fossa surgery is demanding and hides a significant number of obstacles starting from the approach to the wound closure. The risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage in posterior fossa surgery given in the literature is around 8%. The present study aims to introduce a sandwich closure of the dura in posterior fossa surgery, which reduces significantly the number of CSF leaks (3.8% in the patients treated in our department. Three hundred and ten patients treated in our hospital in the years 2009-2013 for posterior fossa pathologies were retrospectively evaluated. The dura closure method was as following: lyophilized dura put under the dura and sealed with fibrin glue and sutures, dura adapting stitches, TachoSil® (Takeda Pharma A/S, Roskilde, Denmark, Gelfoam® (Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA and polymethylmethacrylate (osteoclastic craniotomy. The incidence of postsurgical complications associated with the dural closure like CSF leakage, infections, bleeding is evaluated. Only 3.8% of patients developed CSF leakage and only 0.5% needed a second surgery for CSF leakage closure. Two percent had a cerebellar bleeding with no need for re-operation and 3% had a wound infection treated with antibiotics. The sandwich wound closure we are applying for posterior fossa surgery in our patients correlates with a significant reduction of CSF leaks compared to the literature.

  5. Higher level of NT-proCNP in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasiuk, Ryszard; Lipowski, Dariusz; Szlufik, Stanislaw; Peplinska, Krystyna; Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Malgorzata

    2016-02-12

    Aminoterminal pro-C type natriuretic peptide (NT-proCNP) as an active form of CNP, has been recently proven to be a potential marker of sepsis and to be linked to inflammatory diseases. So far, there are no studies describing the level of NT-proCNP in meningitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of NT-proCNP in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with meningitis and to compare it with the serum level of CRP and procalcitonin (PCT) in this group of patients. The results were compared to serum levels of CRP, PCT and CSF levels of cytosis, protein and lactate. NT-proCNP levels were statistically significant between the control group and the meningitis groups (p=0.02; R=0.3). We also noted a correlation between the level of NT-proCNP in the CSF of all of the study groups (controls and meningitis patients) and the CSF levels of cytosis (p0.05; R=0.11). These results suggest that NT-proCNP could be a potential marker of meningitis, but it cannot be used to distinguish between the types of meningitis.

  6. Distinct cerebrospinal fluid proteomes differentiate post-treatment lyme disease from chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E Schutzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurologic Post Treatment Lyme disease (nPTLS and Chronic Fatigue (CFS are syndromes of unknown etiology. They share features of fatigue and cognitive dysfunction, making it difficult to differentiate them. Unresolved is whether nPTLS is a subset of CFS. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from nPTLS patients, CFS patients, and healthy volunteers were comprehensively analyzed using high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS, coupled with immunoaffinity depletion methods to reduce protein-masking by abundant proteins. Individual patient and healthy control CSF samples were analyzed directly employing a MS-based label-free quantitative proteomics approach. We found that both groups, and individuals within the groups, could be distinguished from each other and normals based on their specific CSF proteins (p<0.01. CFS (n = 43 had 2,783 non-redundant proteins, nPTLS (n = 25 contained 2,768 proteins, and healthy normals had 2,630 proteins. Preliminary pathway analysis demonstrated that the data could be useful for hypothesis generation on the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying these two related syndromes. CONCLUSIONS: nPTLS and CFS have distinguishing CSF protein complements. Each condition has a number of CSF proteins that can be useful in providing candidates for future validation studies and insights on the respective mechanisms of pathogenesis. Distinguishing nPTLS and CFS permits more focused study of each condition, and can lead to novel diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.

  7. Characteristic abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid biochemistry in children with cerebral malaria compared to viral encephalitis

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    Atmakuri RM

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In developing countries where Plasmodium falciparum malaria is endemic, viral encephalitis and cerebral malaria are found in the same population, and parasitemia with Plasmodium falciparum is common in asymptomatic children. The objective of this study was to investigate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemistry in children with cerebral malaria compared to those with presumed viral encephalitis. Methods We studied the following CSF parameters: cell count, glucose, protein, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH and adenosine deaminase (ADA levels, in children with cerebral malaria, with presumed viral encephalitis, and in control subjects who had a lumbar puncture after a febrile convulsion with postictal coma. Results We recruited 12 children with cerebral malaria, 14 children with presumed viral encephalitis and 20 controls prospectively, over 2 years in the Government General Hospital in Kakinada, India. Patients with cerebral malaria had significantly lower CSF glucose, and higher protein, LDH, CSF/blood LDH ratio and CSF ADA levels but a lower CSF/serum ADA ratio compared to controls (p Conclusion CSF/serum ADA ratio and CSF glucose levels were the best discriminators of cerebral malaria from presumed viral encephalitis in our study. Further studies are needed to explore their usefulness in epidemiological studies.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin: an informative biomarker of central nervous system immune activation in HIV-1 infection

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    Bestetti Arabella

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV-1 invades the central nervous system (CNS in the context of acute infection, persists thereafter in the absence of treatment, and leads to chronic intrathecal immunoactivation that can be measured by the macrophage activation marker, neopterin, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. In this review we describe our experience with CSF neopterin measurements in 382 untreated HIV-infected patients across the spectrum of immunosuppression and HIV-related neurological diseases, in 73 untreated AIDS patients with opportunistic CNS infections, and in 233 treated patients. In untreated patients, CSF neopterin concentrations are almost always elevated and increase progressively as immunosuppression worsens and blood CD4 cell counts fall. However, patients with HIV dementia exhibit particularly high CSF neopterin concentrations, above those of patients without neurological disease, though patients with CNS opportunistic infections, including CMV encephalitis and cryptococcal meningitis, also exhibit high levels of CSF neopterin. Combination antiretroviral therapy, with its potent effect on CNS HIV infection and CSF HIV RNA, mitigates both intrathecal immunoactivation and lowers CSF neopterin. However, despite suppression of plasma and CSF HIV RNA to below the detection limits of clinical assays ( Although nonspecific, CSF neopterin can serve as a useful biomarker in the diagnosis of HIV dementia in the setting of confounding conditions, in monitoring the CNS inflammatory effects of antiretroviral treatment, and give valuable information to the cause of ongoing brain injury.

  9. Immunocytochemical demonstration of feline infectious peritonitis virus within cerebrospinal fluid macrophages.

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    Ives, Edward J; Vanhaesebrouck, An E; Cian, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    A 4-month-old female entire domestic shorthair cat presented with an acute onset of blindness, tetraparesis and subsequent generalised seizure activity. Haematology and serum biochemistry demonstrated a moderate, poorly regenerative anaemia, hypoalbuminaemia and hyperglobulinaemia with a low albumin:globulin ratio. Serology for feline coronavirus antibody was positive with an elevated alpha-1 acid glycoprotein. Analysis of cisternal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) demonstrated markedly elevated protein and a mixed, predominately neutrophilic pleocytosis. Immunocytochemistry for feline coronavirus was performed on the CSF, with positive staining observed inside macrophages. The cat was subsequently euthanased, and both histopathology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with a diagnosis of feline infectious peritonitis. This is the first reported use of immunocytochemistry for detection of feline coronavirus within CSF macrophages. If this test proves highly specific, as for identification of feline coronavirus within tissue or effusion macrophages, it would be strongly supportive of an ante-mortem diagnosis of feline infectious peritonitis in cats with central nervous system involvement without the need for biopsy.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels in type 1 narcolepsy patients very close to onset

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    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Pizza, Fabio; Knudsen, Stine; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Jennum, Poul; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 Narcolepsy is caused by a loss of hypocretin (orexin) signaling in the brain. Genetic data suggests the disorder is caused by an autoimmune attack on hypocretin producing neurons in hypothalamus. This hypothesis has however not yet been confirmed by consistent findings of autoreactive antibodies or T-cells in patient samples. One explanation for these negative results may be that the autoimmune process is no longer active when patients present to the clinic. With increasing awareness in recent years, more and more patients have been diagnosed closer and closer to disease onset. In this study, we tested whether an active immune process in the brain could be detected in these patients, as reflected by increased cytokine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Using multiplex analysis, we measured the levels of 51 cytokines and chemokines in the CSF of 40 Type 1 Narcolepsy patients having varying disease duration. For comparison, we used samples from 9 healthy controls and 9 patients with other central hypersomnia. Cytokine levels did not differ significantly between controls and patients, even in 5 patients with disease onset less than a month prior to CSF sampling. PMID:25771509

  11. Normalisation of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers parallels improvement of neurological symptoms following HAART in HIV dementia – case report

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    Blennow Kaj

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the introduction of HAART the incidence of HIV dementia has declined and HAART seems to improve neurocognitive function in patients with HIV dementia. Currently, HIV dementia develops mainly in patients without effective treatment, though it has also been described in patients on HAART and milder HIV-associated neuropsychological impairment is still frequent among HIV-1 infected patients regardless of HAART. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of markers of neural injury and immune activation have been found in HIV dementia, but neither of those, nor CSF HIV-1 RNA levels have been proven useful as diagnostic or prognostic pseudomarkers in HIV dementia. Case presentation We report a case of HIV dementia (MSK stage 3 in a 57 year old antiretroviral naïve man who was introduced on zidovudine, lamivudine and ritonavir boosted indinavir, and followed with consecutive lumbar punctures before and after two and 15 months after initiation of HAART. Improvement of neurocognitive function was paralleled by normalisation of CSF neural markers (NFL, Tau and GFAP levels and a decline in CSF and serum neopterin and CSF and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels. Conclusion The value of these CSF markers as prognostic pseudomarkers of the effect of HAART on neurocognitive impairment in HIV dementia ought to be evaluated in longitudinal studies.

  12. Tanycyte-Like Cells Form a Blood–Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier in the Circumventricular Organs of the Mouse Brain

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Tanycytes are highly specialized ependymal cells that form a blood–cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier at the level of the median eminence (ME), a circumventricular organ (CVO) located in the tuberal region of the hypothalamus. This ependymal layer harbors well-organized tight junctions, a hallmark of central nervous system barriers that is lacking in the fenestrated portal vessels of the ME. The displacement of barrier properties from the vascular to the ventricular side allows the diffusion o...

  13. Concentration of Donepezil in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of AD Patients: Evaluation of Dosage Sufficiency in Standard Treatment Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Valis, Martin; Masopust, Jiri; Vysata,Oldrich; Hort, Jakub; Dolezal, Rafael; Tomek, Jiri; Misik, Jan; Kuca, Kamil; Karasova, Jana Zdarova

    2016-01-01

    Although some studies have described the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of donepezil in the peripheral compartment, studies focused on drug transport across the blood–brain barrier are still very rare. To our knowledge, the fluctuation in the cerebrospinal fluid concentration of donepezil after administration of the drug has not been described in the literature so far. We recruited 16 patients regularly taking a standard therapeutic dose of donepezil (10 mg per day). All patients (Cauc...

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in infectious diseases of the nervous system: when to ask, what to ask, what to expect

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    Luis dos Ramos Machado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis very frequently makes the difference to the diagnosis, not only in relation to infections but also in other diseases of the nervous system such as inflammatory, demyelinating, neoplastic and degenerative diseases. The authors review some practical and important features of CSF analysis in infectious diseases of the nervous system, with regard to acute bacterial meningitis, herpetic meningoencephalitis, neurotuberculosis, neurocryptococcosis, neurocysticercosis and neurosyphilis.

  15. Cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis with cerebrospinal fluid circulation block after the first methotrexate administration by lumbar puncture

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    Bienfait, H.P. [Gelre Hospital, location Lukas, Apeldoorn, Department of Neurology, Albert Schweitzerlaan 31, PO Box 9014, 7300 DS Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Department of Neuro-Oncology, Daniel den Hoed Kliniek, Academisch Ziekenhuis Rotterdam, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands); Gijtenbeek, J.M.M. [Department of Neuro-Oncology, Daniel den Hoed Kliniek, Academisch Ziekenhuis Rotterdam, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Nijmegen, St Radboud, Postlaan 4, 6525 GC Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bent, M.J. van [Department of Neuro-Oncology, Daniel den Hoed Kliniek, Academisch Ziekenhuis Rotterdam, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bruin, H.G. de [Department of Radiology, Daniel den Hoed Kliniek, Academisch Ziekenhuis Rotterdam, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands); Voogt, P.J. [Department of Hematology, Daniel den Hoed Kliniek, Academisch Ziekenhuis Rotterdam, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pillay, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Daniel den Hoed Kliniek, Academisch Ziekenhuis Rotterdam, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2002-11-01

    We report a patient treated for small lymphocytic lymphoma/leukemia with cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis (CVST) after lumbar puncture with intrathecal administration of methotrexate (MTX). He also developed a cerebrospinal fluid flow block. This is the first report of an association between lumbar puncture and intrathecally administered MTX and the development of CVST. Intrathecal treatment in this patient was discontinued and he was successfully treated with high-dose low-molecular-weight heparin subcutaneously. (orig.)

  16. Osmolality of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH.

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    Elisabeth A Wibroe

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a disorder of increased intracranial fluid pressure (ICP of unknown etiology. This study aims to investigate osmolality of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with IIH.We prospectively collected CSF from individuals referred on suspicion of IIH from 2011-2013. Subjects included as patients fulfilled Friedman and Jacobson's diagnostic criteria for IIH. Individuals in whom intracranial hypertension was refuted were included as controls. Lumbar puncture with ICP measurement was performed at inclusion and repeated for patients after three months of treatment. Osmolality was measured with a Vapor Pressure Osmometer.We collected 90 CSF samples from 38 newly diagnosed patients and 28 controls. At baseline 27 IIH-samples and at 3 months follow-up 35 IIH-samples were collected from patients. We found no significant differences in osmolality between 1 patients at baseline and controls (p = 0. 86, 2 patients at baseline and after 3 months treatment (p = 0.97, and 3 patients with normalized pressure after 3 months and their baseline values (p = 0.79. Osmolality in individuals with normal ICP from 6-25 cmH2O (n = 41 did not differ significantly from patients with moderately elevated ICP from 26-45 cmH2O (n = 21 (p = 0.86 and patients with high ICP from 46-70 cmH2O (n = 4 (p = 0.32, respectively. There was no correlation between osmolality and ICP, BMI, age and body height, respectively. Mean CSF osmolality was 270 mmol/kg (± 1 SE, 95% confidence interval 267-272 for both patients and controls.CSF osmolality was normal in patients with IIH, and there was no relation to treatment, ICP, BMI, age and body height. Mean CSF osmolality was 270 mmol/kg and constitutes a reference for future studies. Changes in CSF osmolality are not responsible for development of IIH. Other underlying pathophysiological mechanisms must be searched.

  17. Prion-seeding activity in cerebrospinal fluid of deer with chronic wasting disease.

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    Nicholas J Haley

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, or prion diseases, are a uniformly fatal family of neurodegenerative diseases in mammals that includes chronic wasting disease (CWD of cervids. The early and ante-mortem identification of TSE-infected individuals using conventional western blotting or immunohistochemistry (IHC has proven difficult, as the levels of infectious prions in readily obtainable samples, including blood and bodily fluids, are typically beyond the limits of detection. The development of amplification-based seeding assays has been instrumental in the detection of low levels of infectious prions in clinical samples. In the present study, we evaluated the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of CWD-exposed (n=44 and naïve (n=4 deer (n=48 total for CWD prions (PrP(d using two amplification assays: serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification with polytetrafluoroethylene beads (sPMCAb and real-time quaking induced conversion (RT-QuIC employing a truncated Syrian hamster recombinant protein substrate. Samples were evaluated blindly in parallel with appropriate positive and negative controls. Results from amplification assays were compared to one another and to obex immunohistochemistry, and were correlated to available clinical histories including CWD inoculum source (e.g. saliva, blood, genotype, survival period, and duration of clinical signs. We found that both sPMCAb and RT-QuIC were capable of amplifying CWD prions from cervid CSF, and results correlated well with one another. Prion seeding activity in either assay was observed in approximately 50% of deer with PrP(d detected by IHC in the obex region of the brain. Important predictors of amplification included duration of clinical signs and time of first tonsil biopsy positive results, and ultimately the levels of PrP(d identified in the obex by IHC. Based on our findings, we expect that both sPMCAb and RT-QuIC may prove to be useful detection assays for the detection of prions in

  18. Utility of cerebrospinal fluid drug concentration as a surrogate for unbound brain concentration in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Yoko; Nozaki, Yoshitane; Kobayashi, Kazumasa; Takenaka, Osamu; Nakatani, Yosuke; Kusano, Kazutomi; Yoshimura, Tsutomu; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    In central nervous system drug discovery, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drug concentration (C(CSF)) has been widely used as a surrogate for unbound brain concentrations (C(u,brain)). However, previous rodent studies demonstrated that when drugs undergo active efflux by transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), at the blood-brain barrier, the C(CSF) overestimates the corresponding C(u,brain). To investigate the utility of C(CSF) as a surrogate for interstitial fluid (ISF) concentration (C(ISF)) in nonhuman primates, this study simultaneously determined the C(CSF) and C(ISF) of 12 compounds, including P-gp substrates, under steady-state conditions in cynomolgus monkeys using intracerebral microdialysis coupled with cisternal CSF sampling. Unbound plasma concentrations of non- or weak P-gp substrates were within 2.2-fold of the C(ISF) or C(CSF), whereas typical P-gp substrates (risperidone, verapamil, desloratadine, and quinidine) showed ISF-to-plasma unbound (K(p,uu,ISF)) and CSF-to-plasma unbound concentration ratios (K(p,uu,CSF)) that were appreciably lower than unity. Although the K(p,uu,CSF) of quinidine, verapamil, and desloratadine showed a trend of overestimating the K(p,uu,ISF), K(p,uu,CSF) showed a good agreement with K(p,uu,ISF) within 3-fold variations for all compounds examined. C(u,brain) of some basic compounds, as determined using brain homogenates, overestimated the C(ISF) and C(CSF). Therefore, C(CSF) could be used as a surrogate for C(ISF) in nonhuman primates.

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid flow impedance is elevated in Type I Chiari malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Nicholas; Martin, Bryn A; Rocque, Brandon; Madura, Casey; Wieben, Oliver; Iskandar, Bermans J; Dombrowski, Stephen; Luciano, Mark; Oshinski, John N; Loth, Francis

    2014-02-01

    Diagnosis of Type I Chiari malformation (CMI) is difficult because the most commonly used diagnostic criterion, cerebellar tonsillar herniation (CTH) greater than 3-5 mm past the foramen magnum, has been found to have little correlation with patient symptom severity. Thus, there is a need to identify new objective measurement(s) to help quantify CMI severity. This study investigated longitudinal impedance (LI) as a parameter to assess CMI in terms of impedance to cerebrospinal fluid motion near the craniovertebral junction. LI was assessed in CMI patients (N = 15) and age-matched healthy controls (N = 8) using computational fluid dynamics based on subject-specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of the cervical spinal subarachnoid space. In addition, CTH was measured for each subject. Mean LI in the CMI group (551 ± 66 dyn/cm5) was significantly higher than in controls (220 ± 17 dyn/cm5, p < 0.001). Mean CTH in the CMI group was 9.0 ± 1.1 mm compared to -0.4 ± 0.5 mm in controls. Regression analysis of LI versus CTH found a weak relationship (R2 = 0.46, p < 0.001), demonstrating that CTH was not a good indicator of the impedance to CSF motion caused by cerebellar herniation. These results showed that CSF flow impedance was elevated in CMI patients and that LI provides different information than a standard CTH measurement. Further research is necessary to determine if LI can be useful in CMI patient diagnosis.

  20. MicroRNAs in Cerebrospinal Fluid as Potential Biomarkers for Parkinson's Disease and Multiple System Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Tainá M; Kuiperij, H Bea; Bruinsma, Ilona B; van Rumund, Anouke; Aerts, Marjolein B; Esselink, Rianne A J; Bloem, Bas R; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2016-11-14

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) are both part of the spectrum of neurodegenerative movement disorders and α-synucleinopathies with overlap of symptoms especially at early stages of the disease but with distinct disease progression and responses to dopaminergic treatment. Therefore, having biomarkers that specifically classify patients, which could discriminate PD from MSA, would be very useful. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate protein translation and are observed in biological fluids, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and may therefore have potential as biomarkers of disease. The aim of our study was to determine if miRNAs in CSF could be used as biomarkers for either PD or MSA. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), we evaluated expression levels of 10 miRNAs in CSF patient samples from PD (n = 28), MSA (n = 17), and non-neurological controls (n = 28). We identified two miRNAs (miR-24 and miR-205) that distinguished PD from controls and four miRNAs that differentiated MSA from controls (miR-19a, miR-19b, miR-24, and miR-34c). Combinations of miRNAs accurately discriminated either PD (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.96) or MSA (AUC = 0.86) from controls. In MSA, we also observed that miR-24 and miR-148b correlated with cerebellar ataxia symptoms, suggesting that these miRNAs are involved in cerebellar degeneration in MSA. Our findings support the potential of miRNA panels as biomarkers for movement disorders and may provide more insights into the pathological mechanisms related to these disorders.

  1. The diagnosis of metachromatic leucodystrophy during life: metachromatic lipids in saliva and cerebrospinal fluid sediments and in the parotid glands

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    Horacio M. Canelas

    1964-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the study of saliva sediment in 4 cases of juvenile metachromatic leucodystrophy belonging to the same family (and else in a sister of one of these cases presenting the characteristic neurological picture but with no metachromasia demonstrable by the Austin test in urine or by biopsies, in 6 normal relatives of the patients with Scholz disease, in 9 cases of various diseases of the nervous system, and in 10 normal subjects. The presence of metachromatic bodies staining in a pinkish red colour with acid blue toluidine dye was demonstrated in the saliva sediment of the 4 cases of metachromatic leucodystrophy. In 2 of these patients biopsies of the parotid gland, stained with cresyl violet dye, showed the presence of intracellular brownish metachromatic bodies. In these 2 cases the study of cerebrospinal fluid sediment also disclosed the presence of metachromatic bodies. Furthermore, a chromatographic qualitative test for metachromatic lipids yielded positive results in saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine sediments. The conclusion was drawn that the search for metachromatic bodies in cerebrospinal fluid and mainly in saliva sediment may be of help in disclosing or ratifying the diagnosis of metachromatic leucodystrophy during life.

  2. Chemokine biomarkers in central nervous system tissue and cerebrospinal fluid in the Theiler's virus model mirror those in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachner, Andrew R; Li, Libin; Gilli, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Chemokines have increasingly been implicated in inflammatory and infectious disease of the central nervous system, both as biomarkers and as molecules important in pathogenesis. Multiple sclerosis is a disabling disease of unknown etiology, and recently chemokines have been identified as being upregulated molecules in the disease. We were interested in how the chemokine expression patterns in the central nervous system of a viral model of multiple sclerosis, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD), compared to that in humans with multiple sclerosis. Cerebrospinal fluid and spinal cord tissue were analyzed for expression of a range of cytokines and chemokines. Three chemokines, CXCL10, CXCL9, and CCL5 were strongly and specifically upregulated in both the cerebrospinal fluid and spinal cord in chronic disease, a pattern identical to that in multiple sclerosis. These data, the first study of cytokines in central nervous system tissue and cerebrospinal fluid in TMEV-IDD, support the hypothesis that multiple sclerosis is caused by chronic infection with an as-yet unidentified pathogen, possibly a picornavirus.

  3. A coaxial tube model of the cerebrospinal fluid pulse propagation in the spinal column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirovic, Srdjan

    2009-02-01

    The dynamics of the movement of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may play an important role in the genesis of pathological neurological conditions such as syringomyelia, which is characterized by the presence of a cyst (syrinx) in the spinal cord. In order to provide sound theoretical grounds for the hypotheses that attribute the formation and growth of the syrinx to impediments to the normal movement of the CSF, it is necessary to understand various modes through which CSF pulse in the spinal column propagates. Analytical models of small-amplitude wave propagation in fluid-filled coaxial tubes, where the outer tube represents dura, the inner tube represents the spinal cord, and the fluid is the CSF, have been used to that end. However, so far, the tendency was to model one of the two tubes as rigid and to neglect the effect of finite thickness of the tube walls. The aim of this study is to extend the analysis in order to address these two potentially important issues. To that end, classical linear small-amplitude analysis of wave propagation was applied to a system consisting of coaxial tubes of finite thickness filled with inviscid incompressible fluid. General solutions to the governing equations for the case of harmonic waves in the long wave limit were replaced with the boundary conditions to yield the characteristic (dispersion) equation for the system. The four roots of the characteristic equation correspond to four modes of wave propagation, of which the first three are associated with significant motion of the CSF. For the normal range of parameters the speeds of the four modes are c(1)=13 ms, c(2)=14.7 ms, c(3)=30.3 ms, and c(4)=124.5 ms, which are well within the range of values previously reported in experimental and theoretical studies. The modes with the highest and the lowest speeds of propagation can be attributed to the dura and the spinal cord, respectively, whereas the remaining two modes involve some degree of coupling between the two. When the

  4. Increased prothrombin, apolipoprotein A-IV, and haptoglobin in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Huntington's disease.

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    Yen-Chu Huang

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by an unstable CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion. The need for biomarkers of onset and progression in HD is imperative, since currently reliable outcome measures are lacking. We used two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to analyze the proteome profiles in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 6 pairs of HD patients and controls. Prothrombin, apolipoprotein A-IV (Apo A-IV and haptoglobin were elevated in CSF of the HD patients in comparison with the controls. We used western blot as a semi-quantified measurement for prothrombin and Apo A-IV, as well as enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for measurement of haptoglobin, in 9 HD patients and 9 controls. The albumin quotient (Qalb, a marker of blood-brain barrier (BBB function, was not different between the HD patients and the controls. The ratios of CSF prothrombin/albumin (prothrombin/Alb and Apo A-IV/albumin (Apo A-IV/Alb, and haptoglobin level were significantly elevated in HD. The ratio of CSF prothrombin/Alb significantly correlated with the disease severity assessed by Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS. The results implicate that increased CSF prothrombin, Apo A-IV, and haptoglobin may be involved in pathogenesis of HD and may serve as potential biomarkers for HD.

  5. The rapid flow of cerebrospinal fluid from ventricles to cisterns via subarachnoid velae in the normal rat.

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    Fenstermacher, J D; Ghersi-Egea, J F; Finnegan, W; Chen, J L

    1997-01-01

    14C-sucrose in 0.5 microliter of buffered saline was infused over 30 sec into one lateral ventricle, and its subsequent distribution was determined in brain, meninges, cerebral blood vessels, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by quantitative autoradiography. Within 3.5 min, infused radiotracer had moved into the third ventricle, the velum interpositum (an extension of the subarchnoid system that contains many blood vessels), the aqueduct, the mesencephalic and fourth ventricles, and the superior medullary velum (a part of the subarachnoid system that touches the mesencephalic and fourth ventricles). The CSF within both of these velae appears to empty into the quadrigeminal and ambient cisterns. Within 5 min radioactive sucrose was also found in the interpeduncular cistern. About 15% of the injected sucrose quickly left the ventricles and entered these large cisterns. In contrast to most CSF-brain interfaces, little sucrose moved from CSF into the medulla next to the lateral recesses and tissues such as the superior colliculus that lie adjacent to the large CSF cisterns. A thick, multilayered glia limitans visible on electron micrographs seemed to form a CSF-brain barrier at these interfaces. Some of the infused 14C-sucrose persisted in the perivascular spaces and walls of arteries and arterioles for more than 3.5 hr. These findings suggest that CSF may function to deliver various agents and factors to pial and parenchymal arteries and arterioles.

  6. Líquido cefalorraqueano em 50 pacientes com AIDS Cerebrospinal fluid in 50 AIDS patients

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    S. L. Hinrichsen

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados 50 pacientes com AIDS. Todos estes pacientes apresentavam anticorpos anti-HIV1 (ELISA e preenchiam os critérios de pontuação OPAS/Caracas de definição de casos de AIDS em adultos. A análise do liquido cefalorraqueano (LCR incluiu: pressão; citologia (número de células e aspectos citomorfológicos; proteína total e eletroforese; concentrações de glicose, cloretos e testes imunológicos para sífilis, toxoplasmose e infecções virais (citomegalovírus, varicela-zoster, Herpes simplex, e HI VI. Investigações bacteriológicas e micológicas (pesquisa direta e cultura, além de teste de aglutinação (látex para Cryptococcus foram também realizados. Os testes imunológicos usados foram fixação do complemento, imunofluorescência indireta, hemaglutinação passiva e/ou ELISA. Todos os LCR foram analisados no mesmo laboratório seguindo sempre a mesma metodologia. O LCR esteve alterado em 45 pacientes (90,0% dos 50 pacientes estudados. As principais alterações encontradas no LCR foram: aumento de gamaglobulina em 25 casos (55,5%; aumento da proteína total em 23 (51,1%; hipercitose em 22 (48,9% e diminuição dos cloretos em 18(40,0%. A detecção de anticorpos anti- HIV1 estiveram presentes em 42 pacientes (93,3%. Toxoplasmose isolada ou associada a outros agentes foi a infecção oportunista mais freqüente, detectada em 26 casos (57,7%. O LCR deverá ser sempre analisado em todos os pacientes com AIDS, com ou sem sintomas neurológicos.Fifty AIDS patients were studied. AH patients had anti-HIV antibodies (ELISA present and met OPAS/ Caracas punctuation criteria for AIDS cases in adults. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis included pressure, cytology (number and cytomorphological aspects, total protein and electrophoresis, glucose and chloride concentration. Bacteriological and mycological investigations were performed as well as agglutination tests for Cryptococcus. Complement fixation, indirect immunoflorescence

  7. Variables that influence HIV-1 cerebrospinal fluid viral load in cryptococcal meningitis: a linear regression analysis

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    Cecchini Diego M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central nervous system is considered a sanctuary site for HIV-1 replication. Variables associated with HIV cerebrospinal fluid (CSF viral load in the context of opportunistic CNS infections are poorly understood. Our objective was to evaluate the relation between: (1 CSF HIV-1 viral load and CSF cytological and biochemical characteristics (leukocyte count, protein concentration, cryptococcal antigen titer; (2 CSF HIV-1 viral load and HIV-1 plasma viral load; and (3 CSF leukocyte count and the peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocyte count. Methods Our approach was to use a prospective collection and analysis of pre-treatment, paired CSF and plasma samples from antiretroviral-naive HIV-positive patients with cryptococcal meningitis and assisted at the Francisco J Muñiz Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina (period: 2004 to 2006. We measured HIV CSF and plasma levels by polymerase chain reaction using the Cobas Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor Test version 1.5 (Roche. Data were processed with Statistix 7.0 software (linear regression analysis. Results Samples from 34 patients were analyzed. CSF leukocyte count showed statistically significant correlation with CSF HIV-1 viral load (r = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.13-0.63, p = 0.01. No correlation was found with the plasma viral load, CSF protein concentration and cryptococcal antigen titer. A positive correlation was found between peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocyte count and the CSF leukocyte count (r = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.125-0.674, p = 0.0123. Conclusion Our study suggests that CSF leukocyte count influences CSF HIV-1 viral load in patients with meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans.

  8. Changes in oxidative damage, inflammation and [NAD(H] with age in cerebrospinal fluid.

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    Jade Guest

    Full Text Available An extensive body of evidence indicates that oxidative stress and inflammation play a central role in the degenerative changes of systemic tissues in aging. However a comparatively limited amount of data is available to verify whether these processes also contribute to normal aging within the brain. High levels of oxidative damage results in key cellular changes including a reduction in available nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+, an essential molecule required for a number of vital cellular processes including DNA repair, immune signaling and epigenetic processing. In this study we quantified changes in [NAD(H] and markers of inflammation and oxidative damage (F2-isoprostanes, 8-OHdG, total antioxidant capacity in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of healthy humans across a wide age range (24-91 years. CSF was collected from consenting patients who required a spinal tap for the administration of anesthetic. CSF of participants aged >45 years was found to contain increased levels of lipid peroxidation (F2-isoprostanes (p = 0.04 and inflammation (IL-6 (p = 0.00 and decreased levels of both total antioxidant capacity (p = 0.00 and NAD(H (p = 0.05, compared to their younger counterparts. A positive association was also observed between plasma [NAD(H] and CSF NAD(H levels (p = 0.03. Further analysis of the data identified a relationship between alcohol intake and CSF [NAD(H] and markers of inflammation. The CSF of participants who consumed >1 standard drink of alcohol per day contained lower levels of NAD(H compared to those who consumed no alcohol (p0-1 (p1 (p<0.05 standard alcoholic drinks per day compared to those who did not drink alcohol. Taken together these data suggest a progressive age associated increase in oxidative damage, inflammation and reduced [NAD(H] in the brain which may be exacerbated by alcohol intake.

  9. Approach to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker discovery and evaluation in HIV infection.

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    Price, Richard W; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Angel, Thomas E; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena; Smith, Richard D; Jacobs, Jon M; Brown, Joseph N; Gisslen, Magnus

    2013-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a nearly universal facet of systemic HIV infection that varies in character and neurological consequences. While clinical staging and neuropsychological test performance have been helpful in evaluating patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers present a valuable and objective approach to more accurate diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects and understanding of evolving pathobiology. We review some lessons from our recent experience with CSF biomarker studies. We have used two approaches to biomarker analysis: targeted, hypothesis-driven and non-targeted exploratory discovery methods. We illustrate the first with data from a cross-sectional study of defined subject groups across the spectrum of systemic and CNS disease progression and the second with a longitudinal study of the CSF proteome in subjects initiating antiretroviral treatment. Both approaches can be useful and, indeed, complementary. The first is helpful in assessing known or hypothesized biomarkers while the second can identify novel biomarkers and point to broad interactions in pathogenesis. Common to both is the need for well-defined samples and subjects that span a spectrum of biological activity and biomarker concentrations. Previously-defined guide biomarkers of CNS infection, inflammation and neural injury are useful in categorizing samples for analysis and providing critical biological context for biomarker discovery studies. CSF biomarkers represent an underutilized but valuable approach to understanding the interactions of HIV and the CNS and to more objective diagnosis and assessment of disease activity. Both hypothesis-based and discovery methods can be useful in advancing the definition and use of these biomarkers.

  10. Incorporating and Compensating Cerebrospinal Fluid in Surface-Based Forward Models of Magneto- and Electroencephalography

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    Stenroos, Matti; Nummenmaa, Aapo

    2016-01-01

    MEG/EEG source imaging is usually done using a three-shell (3-S) or a simpler head model. Such models omit cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that strongly affects the volume currents. We present a four-compartment (4-C) boundary-element (BEM) model that incorporates the CSF and is computationally efficient and straightforward to build using freely available software. We propose a way for compensating the omission of CSF by decreasing the skull conductivity of the 3-S model, and study the robustness of the 4-C and 3-S models to errors in skull conductivity. We generated dense boundary meshes using MRI datasets and automated SimNIBS pipeline. Then, we built a dense 4-C reference model using Galerkin BEM, and 4-C and 3-S test models using coarser meshes and both Galerkin and collocation BEMs. We compared field topographies of cortical sources, applying various skull conductivities and fitting conductivities that minimized the relative error in 4-C and 3-S models. When the CSF was left out from the EEG model, our compensated, unbiased approach improved the accuracy of the 3-S model considerably compared to the conventional approach, where CSF is neglected without any compensation (mean relative error 40%). The error due to the omission of CSF was of the same order in MEG and compensated EEG. EEG has, however, large overall error due to uncertain skull conductivity. Our results show that a realistic 4-C MEG/EEG model can be implemented using standard tools and basic BEM, without excessive workload or computational burden. If the CSF is omitted, compensated skull conductivity should be used in EEG. PMID:27472278

  11. Comparison of Antibodies with Amylase Activity from Cerebrospinal Fluid and Serum of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

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    Vasilii B Doronin

    Full Text Available We have recently shown that IgGs from serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of MS patients are active in hydrolysis of DNA and myelin basic protein. According to literature data, anti-DNA and anti-MBP abzymes may promote important neuropathologic mechanisms in this chronic inflammatory disorder and in MS pathogenesis development. At the same time, the involvement of antibodies with amylase activity in the pathogenesis of any autoimmune disease has not yet been identified. Electrophoretically and immunologically homogeneous IgGs were obtained by a sequential affinity chromatography of the CSF proteins on protein G-Sepharose and FPLC gel filtration. We are able to present the first unpredictable evidence showing that IgGs from CSF possess amylase activity and efficiently hydrolyze maltoheptaose; their average specific Ab activity is ~30-fold higher than that of antibodies from sera of the same MS patients. Specific average RA (SAA for IgGs from healthy volunteers was approximately ~1000 lower than that for MS patients. In addition, it was shown that a relative SAA of total proteins of CSF (including Abs ~15-fold lower than that for purified IgGs, while the relative SAA of the total sera protein is higher than that of sera IgGs by a factor of 1033. This result speaks in favor of the fact that amylolytic activity of CSF proteins is mainly caused by the activity of amylase abzymes. One cannot exclude, that amylase abzymes of CSF can play a, as yet unknown, role in the pathogenesis of MS. Some possible reasons of these findings are discussed.

  12. Monochloroacetic acid lethality in the rat in relation to lactic acid accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid

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    Mitroka, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    Potential antidotes for human exposure to monochloroacetic acid (MCA) were evaluated using a rodent model. Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) and phenobarbital (PB) but not ethanol or phenytoin, were found to be effective antidotes to monochloroacetic acid (MCA) in rats. DCA (110 mg/kg, ip), administered to rats 15 minutes after a LD-80 of MCA (80 mg/kg, iv), consistently reduced mortality to 0%, while PB reduced mortality to less than 20%. Both DCA and PB were found to be similarly effective in mice. The hypothesis that PB reduces mortality in MCA treated rats by altering the metabolic disposition of MCA was evaluated and rejected. Administration of PB to rats treated with a lethal dose of ({sup 14}C)MCA did not alter the concentrations of MCA or its metabolites in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or the extent of covalent binding between radioactivity equivalent to ({sup 14}C)MCA and brain proteins. The relationship between altered blood-brain barrier permeability and death in MCA treated rats was investigated. Treatment with MCA (80 mg/kg, iv) was associated with a significant (50%) increase in the permeability of the rat blood-brain barrier to ({sup 125}I)BSA. The effect was not altered by treatment with PB, however, suggesting that altered blood-brain barrier permeability does not have an important role in the lethal effect of MCA in rats. The effect of MCA on brain carbohydrate metabolism in vivo was investigated. CSF and blood lactic acid concentrations increased in MCA treated rats, and the increase in CSF levels was dose related. In individual MCA treated rats, CSF lactate concentrations paralleled the time course of ataxia and a discrete threshold for death (18 mmol/L) was observed. The relationship between excess brain lactate levels and death in MCA treated rats was investigated further.

  13. Proteomics comparison of cerebrospinal fluid of relapsing remitting and primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

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    Marcel P Stoop

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Based on clinical representation of disease symptoms multiple sclerosis (MScl patients can be divided into two major subtypes; relapsing remitting (RR MScl (85-90% and primary progressive (PP MScl (10-15%. Proteomics analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF has detected a number of proteins that were elevated in MScl patients. Here we specifically aimed to differentiate between the PP and RR subtypes of MScl by comparing CSF proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CSF samples (n = 31 were handled according to the same protocol for quantitative mass spectrometry measurements we reported previously. In the comparison of PP MScl versus RR MScl we observed a number of differentially abundant proteins, such as protein jagged-1 and vitamin D-binding protein. Protein jagged-1 was over three times less abundant in PP MScl compared to RR MScl. Vitamin D-binding protein was only detected in the RR MScl samples. These two proteins were validated by independent techniques (western blot and ELISA as differentially abundant in the comparison between both MScl types. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The main finding of this comparative study is the observation that the proteome profiles of CSF in PP and RR MScl patients overlap to a large extent. Still, a number of differences could be observed. Protein jagged-1 is a ligand for multiple Notch receptors and involved in the mediation of Notch signaling. It is suggested in literature that the Notch pathway is involved in the remyelination of MScl lesions. Aberration of normal homeostasis of Vitamin D, of which approximately 90% is bound to vitamin D-binding protein, has been widely implicated in MScl for some years now. Vitamin D directly and indirectly regulates the differentiation, activation of CD4+ T-lymphocytes and can prevent the development of autoimmune processes, and so it may be involved in neuroprotective elements in MScl.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis, predictors of bacterial meningitis: a study in 312 patients with suspected meningial infection

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    Seyed Mohammad Alavi; Naser Moshiri

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis are routinely admitted to the hospital and treated with parenteral antibiotics, although few have bacterial meningitis (BM). The aim of this study was to evaluate predictors to dif-ferentiate BM from aseptic meningitis (ASM). Methods:The study was conducted in Razi hospital, a training center affiliated to Ahvaz Joundishapoor University of Medical Sciences in Iran. And all patients were 18 years old or above and were treated in the hospital between 2003 and 2007. Data of those who had meningitis, tested as CSF pleocytosis but had not received antibiotic treatment before lumbar puncture were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Among 312 patients with CSF pleocytosis, two hundred fifteen (68.9%) had BM and ninety seven (31.1%) had ASM. The mean age for patients with BM was (34.7±17.7) years (P=0.22, NS). Sixty percent of the BM cases and 61.2% of the ASM cases occurred in men (P=0.70, NS). We identified the following predictors of BM:CSF-WBC count > 100 per micro liter, CSF-glucose level 80 mg/dL. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV of these predictors, and LR for BM are 86.5% ,52.6% ,80.2%, 63.7% and 104. 1 for CSF-WBC count and 72.1%, 83.5%, 90.6% ,57.4% and 164.2% for CSF glucose, and 49.7%, 91.8%, 93.4% ,45. 2% and 104.5% for CSF protein. Conclusion:The CSF WBC count should not be used alone to rule out bacterial meningitis. When it is combined with other factors such as CSF glucose and protein improved decision making in patients with suspected BM may occur.

  15. Cytotoxicity of ventricular cerebrospinal fluid from Parkinson patients: correlation with clinical profiles and neurochemistry.

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    Mandybur, George T; Miyagi, Yasushi; Yin, Wei; Perkins, Eddie; Zhang, John H

    2003-01-01

    Other investigators have reported that the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) might contain endogenous dystrophic factors. Using CSF samples drawn from individual PD patients during surgery, we investigated the toxic effect of ventricular CSF (vCSF) on the growth of PC12 cells and the correlation between the clinical profiles of the patients and CSF neurochemistry. Ventricular CSF samples from 28 patients with PD or essential tremor (ET) were collected during ventriculography for stereotactic pallidotomy or thalamotomy. PC12 cells were incubated with 20% vCSF from both clinical groups for up to 72 h. Microdialysis was used to analyze four neurochemical parameters (glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and glutamate) in each vCSF sample. We observed that vCSF drawn from PD patients exerted nonspecific growth inhibition on PC12 cells in a time-dependent manner. The growth inhibitory action of PD-vCSF decreased significantly after heat treatment. Microdialysis demonstrated no statistical differences between PD and ET samples among the four parameters studied. In addition, PC12 cell survival after 72 h incubation with PD-vCSF correlated with no neurochemical parameter or individual clinical profile (age, onset age, duration of disease, Hoehn & Yahr stage, disease progression rate), except for a slight correlation between vCSF and disease progression rate in heat treated samples from female patients. One or more endogenous cytotoxic factors in PD-vCSF inhibit PC12 cell growth. This factor or factors are partially sensitive to heat which suggests proteins or peptides as possible agents. The cytotoxic effect of PD-vCSF did not directly correlate with any clinical profiles studied or energy metabolism of PD brain.

  16. High Resolution Discovery Proteomics Reveals Candidate Disease Progression Markers of Alzheimer's Disease in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid.

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    Ronald C Hendrickson

    Full Text Available Disease modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD constitute a major goal in medicine. Current trends suggest that biomarkers reflective of AD neuropathology and modifiable by treatment would provide supportive evidence for disease modification. Nevertheless, a lack of quantitative tools to assess disease modifying treatment effects remains a major hurdle. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemical markers such as total tau, p-tau and Ab42 are well established markers of AD; however, global quantitative biochemical changes in CSF in AD disease progression remain largely uncharacterized. Here we applied a high resolution open discovery platform, dMS, to profile a cross-sectional cohort of lumbar CSF from post-mortem diagnosed AD patients versus those from non-AD/non-demented (control patients. Multiple markers were identified to be statistically significant in the cohort tested. We selected two markers SME-1 (p<0.0001 and SME-2 (p = 0.0004 for evaluation in a second independent longitudinal cohort of human CSF from post-mortem diagnosed AD patients and age-matched and case-matched control patients. In cohort-2, SME-1, identified as neuronal secretory protein VGF, and SME-2, identified as neuronal pentraxin receptor-1 (NPTXR, in AD were 21% (p = 0.039 and 17% (p = 0.026 lower, at baseline, respectively, than in controls. Linear mixed model analysis in the longitudinal cohort estimate a decrease in the levels of VGF and NPTXR at the rate of 10.9% and 6.9% per year in the AD patients, whereas both markers increased in controls. Because these markers are detected by mass spectrometry without the need for antibody reagents, targeted MS based assays provide a clear translation path for evaluating selected AD disease-progression markers with high analytical precision in the clinic.

  17. Performance of laser bonded glass/polyimide microjoints in cerebrospinal fluid.

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    Mian, A; Newaz, G; Georgiev, D G; Rahman, N; Vendra, L; Auner, G; Witte, R; Herfurth, H

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, laser bonded microjoints between glass and polyimide is considered to examine their potential applicability in encapsulating neural implants. To facilitate bonding between polyimide and glass, a thin titanium film with a thickness of 2 microm was deposited on borosilicate glass plates by a physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. Titanium coated glass was then joined with polyimide by using a cw fiber laser emitting at a wavelength of 1.1 microm (1.0 W) to prepare several tensile samples. Some of the samples were exposed to artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) at 37 degrees C for two weeks to assess long-term integrity of the joints. Both the as-received and aCSF soaked samples were subjected to uniaxial tensile loads for bond strengths measurements. The bond strengths for the as-received and aCSF soaked samples were measured to be 7.31 and 5.33 N/mm, respectively. Although the long-term exposure of the microjoints to aCSF has resulted in 26% reduction of bond strength, the samples still retain considerably high strength as compared with the titanium-polyimide samples. The failed glass/polyimide samples were also analyzed using optical microscopy, and failure mechanisms are discussed. In addition, a two dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to understand the stress distribution within the substrate materials while the samples are in tension. The FEA results match reasonably well with the experimental load-displacement curves for as-received samples. Detailed discussion on various stress contours is presented in the paper, and the failure mechanisms observed from the experiment are shown in good agreement with the FEA predicted ones.

  18. Analysis of clinical features, serologic and cerebrospinal fluid tests in patients with neurosyphilis at different stages

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    Bao-jie WANG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical features, serologic, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF tests in patients with neurosyphilis at different stages.  Methods A retrospective analysis was made on the clinical features, imaging, serologic and CSF tests, treatment and prognosis of 12 cases diagnosed as neurosyphilis. In those cases, 5 cases were early-stage neurosyphilis, including 4 syphilitic meningitis (meningomyelitis and one meningovascular syphilis; 7 cases were late-stage neurosyphilis, all of whom were general paresis.  Results The serum Treponema pallidum antibody (TP-Ab and rapid plasma regain (RPR tests were positive in all 12 cases. The CSF TP-Ab tests of 12 cases were all positive and CSF RPR tests were positive in 9 cases. In 5 cases of early-stage neurosyphilis, one case had elevated intracranial pressure (ICP, 3 cases presented with elevated white blood cell (WBC, 4 cases had elevated protein concentration. In 7 cases of late-stage neurosyphilis, one case had elevated ICP, 7 cases presented with elevated WBC and protein concentration. CSF cytology showed lymphocyte reaction, mainly small lymphocytes. All cases were treated with different doses of intravenous penicillin or ceftriaxone sodium by intramuscular injection, among whom 8 cases presented improved neuropsychiatric symptoms, while 4 cases had no significant improvement.  Conclusions Neurosyphilis is easy to be misdiagnosed because of various styles of onset and nontypical clinical manifestations. A definite diagnosis depends on clinical manifestations and serologic and CSF examinations. Early diagnosis and standard treatment is essential for improving prognosis and reducing complications. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.07.005

  19. Fructose levels are markedly elevated in cerebrospinal fluid compared to plasma in pregnant women.

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    Janice J Hwang

    Full Text Available Fructose, unlike glucose, promotes feeding behavior in rodents and its ingestion exerts differential effects in the human brain. However, plasma fructose is typically 1/1000 th of glucose levels and it is unclear to what extent fructose crosses the blood-brain barrier. We investigated whether local endogenous central nervous system (CNS fructose production from glucose via the polyol pathway (glucose → sorbitol → fructose contributes to brain exposure to fructose.In this observational study, fasting glucose, sorbitol and fructose concentrations were measured using gas-chromatography-liquid mass spectroscopy in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, maternal plasma, and venous cord blood collected from 25 pregnant women (6 lean, 10 overweight/obese, and 9 T2DM/gestational DM undergoing spinal anesthesia and elective cesarean section.As expected, CSF glucose was ~ 60% of plasma glucose levels. In contrast, fructose was nearly 20-fold higher in CSF than in plasma (p < 0.001, and CSF sorbitol was ~ 9-times higher than plasma levels (p < 0.001. Moreover, CSF fructose correlated positively with CSF glucose (ρ 0.45, p = 0.02 and sorbitol levels (ρ 0.75, p < 0.001. Cord blood sorbitol was also ~ 7-fold higher than maternal plasma sorbitol levels (p = 0.001. There were no differences in plasma, CSF, and cord blood glucose, fructose, or sorbitol levels between groups.These data raise the possibility that fructose may be produced endogenously in the human brain and that the effects of fructose in the human brain and placenta may extend beyond its dietary consumption.

  20. A tomographic study of the skull base in primary spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks

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    Giannetti, Alexandre Varella [Hospital das Clinicas, Service of Neurosurgery, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Federal University of Minas Gerais, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Guimaraes, Roberto Eustaquio S. [Hospital das Clinicas, Services Otorhinolaryngology, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Federal University of Minas Gerais, Department of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Santiago, Ana Paula M.S. [Hospital das Clinicas, Services Radiology, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Perpetuo, Francisco Otaviano L.; Machado, Marco Antonio O. [Computed Tomography Center of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    This study aims to evaluate the existence of anatomic abnormalities in the skull base that could contribute to the origin of primary spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks (PSL). Twenty PSL patients were compared with 20 healthy individuals. The following features were measured through an analysis of computed tomography scans: the angles of the petrosal bones and skull base in both the sagittal and coronal planes; the anteroposterior and mediolateral diameters of the anterior skull base, sella, and sphenoid sinus; the depth of the olfactory fossa; the pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus; the position of the crista galli; and the state of the dorsum sellae. Body mass index (BMI) was compared. There were no differences between the two groups with respect to the angles and diameters of the anterior cranial fossa and the sphenoid sinus or the depth of the olfactory fossa. Pneumatization of the lateral recess of the sphenoid sinus was more frequent in the PSL group (55%) than in the control group (25%, p = 0.053). The dorsum sellae were eroded in 30% of the PSL patients but intact in all healthy subjects. PSL subjects showed higher sellae (1.0 versus 0.8 cm, p = 0.002). The average BMI of PSL patients was higher than that of the control group. Global alterations in the skull base of PSL patients were not found. The increase in the height of sellae and the erosion of its dorsum suggest intracranial hypertension. The higher BMI in the case group confirms the relation between obesity and PSL. (orig.)

  1. In vitro study of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in a shaken basal cistern after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

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    Ulrich Kertzscher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral arterial vasospasm leads to delayed cerebral ischemia and constitutes the major delayed complication following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Cerebral vasospasm can be reduced by increased blood clearance from the subarachnoid space. Clinical pilot studies allow the hypothesis that the clearance of subarachnoid blood is facilitated by means of head shaking. A major obstacle for meaningful clinical studies is the lack of data on appropriate parameters of head shaking. Our in vitro study aims to provide these essential parameters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A model of the basal cerebral cistern was derived from human magnetic resonance imaging data. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was simulated by addition of dyed experimental blood to transparent experimental cerebrospinal fluid (CSF filling the model of the basal cerebral cistern. Effects of various head positions and head motion settings (shaking angle amplitudes and shaking frequencies on blood clearance were investigated using the quantitative dye washout method. Blood washout can be divided into two phases: Blood/CSF mixing and clearance. The major effect of shaking consists in better mixing of blood and CSF thereby increasing clearance rate. Without shaking, blood/CSF mixing and blood clearance in the basal cerebral cistern are hampered by differences in density and viscosity of blood and CSF. Blood clearance increases with decreased shaking frequency and with increased shaking angle amplitude. Head shaking facilitates clearance by varying the direction of gravitational force. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: From this in vitro study can be inferred that patient or head shaking with large shaking angles at low frequency is a promising therapeutic strategy to increase blood clearance from the subarachnoid space.

  2. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with meningitis using nested PCR.

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    Rios-Sarabia, Nora; Hernández-González, Olivia; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge; Gordillo, Guadalupe; Vázquez-Rosales, Guillermo; Muñoz-Pérez, Leopoldo; Torres, Javier; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2016-10-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the most severe form of tuberculosis. It is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis; MT) and it is very difficult to diagnose. The symptoms are similar to other infectious neurological diseases, such as neurocysticercosis, neuroborreliosis, or herpes viral infection. The aim of this study was to identify tuberculosis (TB) in cases of meningitis with clinical and laboratory evidence suggestive of TBM, and to confirm our findings with molecular tests for TB infection. We recruited patients with neurological symptoms who were examined at the neurology services of Hospitals of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) in Mexico City. A total of 144 consecutive patients with suggestive infectious meningitis were initially included; 94 cases of meningitis with clinical and laboratory evidence suggestive of TBM were included, but only 50 of these cases fulfilled the criteria for probable TBM. As the controls, we included 50 cases of meningitis with clinical and laboratory evidence suggestive of non-TBM. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected from all 100 patients (cases and controls) and tested for TB by multiplex and nested PCR analyses. Nested PCR detected 0.1 fg of M. tuberculosis DNA. TB infection was confirmed with molecular tests in 49 patients from the 50 cases suggestive of TBM and in 1 of the 50 non-TBM cases. The analysis exhibited a sensitivity of 98.0%, a specificity of 92.0%, a positive predictive value of 88.0% and a negative predictive value of 98.0%. The use CSF for the analyses proved to be effective for the rapid diagnosis of TBM using a developed system of multiplex and nested PCR analyses in patients presenting neurological symptoms.

  3. Detection of 65 kD heat shock protein in cerebrospinal fluid of tuberculous meningitis patients

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    Taori Girdhar M

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM is difficult. Rapid confirmatory diagnosis is essential to initiate required therapy. There are very few published reports about the diagnostic significance of 65 kD heat shock protein (hsp in TBM patients, which is present in a wide range of Mycobacterium tuberculosis species and elicits a cellular and humoral immune response. In the present study we have conducted a prospective evaluation for the demonstration of 65 kD hsp antigen in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of TBM patients, by indirect ELISA method using monoclonal antibodies (mAb against the 65 kD hsp antigen, for the diagnosis of TBM. Methods A total of 160 CSF samples of different groups of patients (confirmed TBM {n = 18}, clinically suspected TBM {n = 62}, non TBM infectious meningitis {n = 35} and non-infectious neurological diseases {n = 45} were analyzed by indirect ELISA method using mAb to 65 kD hsp antigen. The Kruskal Wallis test (Non-Parametric ANOVA with the Dunnett post test was used for statistical analysis. Results The indirect ELISA method yielded 84% sensitivity and 90% specificity for the diagnosis of TBM using mAb to 65 kD hsp antigen. The mean absorbance value of 65 kD hsp antigen in TBM patients was [0.70 ± 0.23 (0.23–1.29], significantly higher than the non-TBM infectious meningitis group [0.32 ± 0.14 (0.12–0.78, P P P Conclusion The presence of 65 kD hsp antigen in the CSF of confirmed and suspected cases of TBM would indicate that the selected protein is specific to M. tuberculosis and could be considered as a diagnostic marker for TBM.

  4. The relation of cerebrospinal fluid and plasma glycine levels in propionic acidaemia, a 'ketotic hyperglycinaemia'.

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    Scholl-Bürgi, S; Korman, S H; Applegarth, D A; Karall, D; Lillquist, Y; Heinz-Erian, P; Davidson, A G F; Haberlandt, E; Sass, J O

    2008-06-01

    The characteristic elevation of plasma glycine concentrations observed in propionic acidaemia (PA) and other 'ketotic hyperglycinaemias' has been attributed to secondary inhibition of the hepatic glycine cleavage system (GCS) by accumulating CoA derivatives of branched-chain amino acid metabolites. In nonketotic hyperglycinaemia (NKH), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma glycine levels and their ratio are increased due to primary deficiency of central nervous system (CNS) as well as hepatic GCS. Whether the GCS in the CNS is also inhibited in PA is unclear, as there are scant data available on CSF glycine levels in this disorder. We studied the relation of CSF and plasma glycine levels in 6 paired samples from 4 PA patients, including one PA patient with bacterial meningitis who underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunting and multiple CSF analyses (n = 26). In contrast to the CSF glycine levels which were generally elevated in all four PA patients, the CSF/plasma glycine concentration ratios in paired samples were normal (0.016-0.029), with the exception of a single sample (0.132) with extremely high CSF protein concentration (2010 mg/L) during the course of meningitis indicating a disturbed blood-brain barrier. This finding of normal CSF/plasma glycine ratio in PA suggests that the observed elevations of CSF glycine levels are a reflection of the concurrent hyperglycinaemia resulting from secondary inhibition of hepatic GCS, but that brain GCS is not affected, in contrast to the situation in NKH. The neurological sequelae in PA are therefore unlikely to be related to disturbed glycine metabolism.

  5. Associations of fatty acids in cerebrospinal fluid with peripheral glucose concentrations and energy metabolism.

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    Reiner Jumpertz

    Full Text Available Rodent experiments have emphasized a role of central fatty acid (FA species, such as oleic acid, in regulating peripheral glucose and energy metabolism. Thus, we hypothesized that central FAs are related to peripheral glucose regulation and energy expenditure in humans. To test this we measured FA species profiles in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma of 32 individuals who stayed in our clinical inpatient unit for 6 days. Body composition was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and glucose regulation by an oral glucose test (OGTT followed by measurements of 24 hour (24EE and sleep energy expenditure (SLEEP as well as respiratory quotient (RQ in a respiratory chamber. CSF was obtained via lumbar punctures; FA concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. As expected, FA concentrations were higher in plasma compared to CSF. Individuals with high concentrations of CSF very-long-chain saturated FAs had lower rates of SLEEP. In the plasma moderate associations of these FAs with higher 24EE were observed. Moreover, CSF monounsaturated long-chain FA (palmitoleic and oleic acid concentrations were associated with lower RQs and lower glucose area under the curve during the OGTT. Thus, FAs in the CSF strongly correlated with peripheral metabolic traits. These physiological parameters were most specific to long-chain monounsaturated (C16:1, C18:1 and very-long-chain saturated (C24:0, C26:0 FAs.Together with previous animal experiments these initial cross-sectional human data indicate that central FA species are linked to peripheral glucose and energy homeostasis.

  6. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of E-selectin in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

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    T. Tanriverdi

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to determine concentrations of E-selectin in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and serum of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH and to evaluate the correlation between the clinical parameters and E-selectin levels. Both CSF and serum samples obtained from 12 patients with aneurysmal SAH and 8 patients with hydrocephalus (control group without any other known central nervous system disease were assayed for E-selectin by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the results were compared between the two groups. Mean levels of soluble forms of E-selectin within the first 3 days and on the 5th and 7th days of SAH were 4.0 ± 7.9, 2.8 ± 5.2, and 3.1 ± 4.9 ng/ml in the patient's CSF, and 33.7 ± 9.2, 35.1 ± 7.0, and 35.2 ± 8.7 ng/ml in serum, respectively. In contrast, mean E-selectin levels were 0.1 ± 0.2 ng/ml in CSF and 8.7 ± 5.0 ng/ml in serum of control patients. The difference between groups was statistically significant regarding both CSF and serum E-selectin levels (P < 0.05. Thus, we have demonstrated a marked increase of E-selectin concentration in both CSF and serum of patients with aneurysmal SAH compared with control and suggest that blocking the interaction between E-selectin and vascular endothelium may have a beneficial effect on vasospasms.

  7. Does Caffeine Consumption Modify Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease?

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    Travassos, Maria; Santana, Isabel; Baldeiras, Inês; Tsolaki, Magda; Gkatzima, Olymbia; Sermin, Genc; Yener, Görsev G; Simonsen, Anja; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Mara, Bourbouli; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Agostinho, Paula; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mendes, Vera M; Manadas, Bruno; de Mendon, Alexandreça

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD) by modulating amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolic pathways. The present work aimed to study a possible association of caffeine consumption with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, particularly Aβ. The study included 88 patients with AD or mild cognitive impairment. The consumption of caffeine and theobromine was evaluated using a validated food questionnaire. Quantification of caffeine and main active metabolites was performed with liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The levels of A(1-42), total tau, and phosphorylated tau in the CSF were determined using sandwich ELISA methods and other Aβ species, Aβ(X-38), Aβ(X-40), and Aβ(X-42), with the MSD Aβ Triplex assay. The concentration of caffeine was 0.79±1.15 μg/mL in the CSF and 1.20±1.88 μg/mL in the plasma. No correlation was found between caffeine consumption and Aβ42 in the CSF. However, a significant positive correlation was found between the concentrations of theobromine, both in the CSF and in the plasma, with Aβ42 in the CSF. Theobromine in the CSF was positively correlated with the levels of other xanthines in the CSF, but not in the plasma, suggesting that it may be formed by central metabolic pathways. In conclusion, caffeine consumption does not modify the levels of CSF biomarkers, and does not require to be controlled for when measuring CSF biomarkers in a clinical setting. Since theobromine is associated with a favorable Aβ profile in the CSF, the possibility that it might have a protective role in AD should be further investigated.

  8. Automatic Volumetry of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Space in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

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    Kazunari Ishii

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To measure the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF space volume in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH, we developed a software that allows us to automatically measure the regional CSF space and compared the volumes of the ventricle systems (VS, Sylvian fissures (SF and sulci at high convexity and midline (SHM among INPH patients, Alzheimer's disease (AD patients and healthy volunteers (HVs. Methods: Fifteen INPH patients, 15 AD patients and 15 HVs were retrospectively selected for this study. 3D-T1 MR images were obtained. We improved upon an automatic gray matter volume system to measure CSF spaces, adopting new regions for the template of INPH-characteristic CSF spaces and measured them. The VS, SF and SHM volumes were calculated relative to the intracranial volume. Results: The relative SHM volume of the INPH group (0.0237 ± 0.0064 was the smallest among the 3 groups (AD: 0.0477 ± 0.0109, HV: 0.0542 ± 0.0045. The VS (0.0499 ± 0.0135 and SF (0.0187 ± 0.0037 volumes of the INPH group were significantly larger than those of the AD (VS: 0.0311 ± 0.0075, SF: 0.0146 ± 0.0026 and HV groups (VS: 0.0167 ± 0.0065, SF: 0.0111 ± 0.017. Conclusion: Automatic volume measurement can be used to delineate the characteristic changes in CSF space in patients with INPH and is useful in the diagnosis of INPH.

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid absorption disorder of arachnoid villi in a canine model of hydrocephalus

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    Zhao Ke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydrocephalus results from inadequate passage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from its point of production within the cerebral ventricles to its point of absorption into systemic circulation. Aims: The objective of this study was to investigate the disorders of CSF absorption by arachnoid villi during the different phases of hydrocephalus. Materials and Methods: Silicone oil was injected into the fourth ventricle of 15 canines as an experimental group. Saline solution (0.9% NaCl was injected in another nine canines as a control group. In order to block CSF transport through the cribriform plate, an external ethmoidectomy was performed in five dogs from experimental group and three dogs from control group at three days (acute stage, two weeks (sub-acute stage, and 12 weeks (chronic stage respectively. Tritiated water was injected into the canines′ cortical subarachnoid space and blood levels were measured at intervals of 1h, 4h, 8h, 16h and 48h respectively. Time-concentration curve of tritiated water was drafted. The area under the curve (AUC was calculated for variance analysis and t-testing. Results: In the chronic group, the tritiated water concentration rose slowly to a peak at 16h. It was significantly lower than other groups at 1h, 4h, 8h and 16h, but was higher than other groups at 48h. Analysis of the AUC showed significant differences among all the groups (P<0.01. There were no significant differences in the AUC between control groups, the acute group, and the sub-acute group (P>0.05; however, the AUC of the chronic group was significantly lower than other groups (P<0.05. Conclusions: The CSF absorption ability of arachnoid villi is significantly damaged in a long-term state of hydrocephalus.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid adenosine deaminase activity: A complimentary tool in the early diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis

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    Taori Girdhar M

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculous meningitis (TBM is the commonest form of neurotuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli (MTB. The diagnosis of TBM is often difficult. A reliable, cost-effective and rapid diagnostic test, which can be performed in any standard pathology laboratory, could be of help in the diagnosis of TBM. In the present study we measured the adenosine deaminase (ADA activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of TBM and non-TBM patients. Method ADA activity in CSF was determined according to a method based on the Berthlot reaction, which is the formation of a colored indophenol complex from ammonia liberated from adenosine, and quantified spectrophotometrically. Results The CSF ADA activity from TBM patients was compared with CSF ADA from non-TBM infectious meningitis patients, and from patients with non-infectious neurological disorders. The mean CSF ADA activity was found to be significantly higher in CSF of TBM patients, 14.31 ± 3.87 (2.99–26.94, mean ± SD with range, than in the CSF from non-TBM infectious meningitis, 9.25 ± 2.14 (4.99–13.96 and from the non-infectious neurological disorders group, 2.71 ± 1.96 (0.00–7.68, P Conclusion This study demonstrated that ADA activity in the CSF of TBM patients, using a cut-off value 11.39 U/L/min, can be useful for the early differential diagnosis of TBM. This test can be performed in any pathology laboratory where more sophisticated methods are not available.

  11. Insulin resistance is associated with higher cerebrospinal fluid tau levels in asymptomatic APOE ε4 carriers

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    Starks, Erika J.; O'Grady, J. Patrick; Hoscheidt, Siobhan M.; Racine, Annie M.; Carlsson, Cindy M.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.; Puglielli, Luigi; Asthana, Sanjay; Dowling, N. Maritza; Gleason, Carey E.; Anderson, Rozalyn M.; Davenport-Sis, Nancy J.; DeRungs, LeAnn M.; Sager, Mark A.; Johnson, Sterling C.; Bendlin, Barbara B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance (IR) is linked with the occurrence of pathological features observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD), including neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques. However, the extent to which IR is associated with AD pathology in the cognitively asymptomatic stages of preclinical AD remains unclear. Objective To determine the extent to which IR is linked with amyloid and tau pathology in late-middle-age. Method Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected from 113 participants enrolled in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention study (mean age = 60.6 years), were assayed for AD-related markers of interest: Aβ42, P-Tau181, and T-Tau. IR was determined using the Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). Linear regression was used to test the effect of IR, and APOE ε4, on tau and amyloid pathology. We hypothesized that greater IR would be associated with higher CSF P-Tau181 and T-Tau, and lower CSF Aβ42. Results No significant main effects of HOMA-IR on P-Tau181, T-Tau, or Aβ42 were observed; however, significant interactions were observed between HOMA-IR and APOE ε4 on CSF markers related to tau. Among APOE ε4 carriers, higher HOMA-IR was associated with higher P-Tau181 and T-Tau. Among APOE ε4 non-carriers, HOMA-IR was negatively associated with P-Tau181 and T-Tau. We found no effects of IR on Aβ42 levels in CSF. Conclusion IR among asymptomatic APOE ε4 carriers was associated with higher P-Tau181 and T-Tau in late-middle age. The results suggest that IR may contribute to tau-related neurodegeneration in preclinical AD. The findings may have implications for developing prevention strategies aimed at modifying IR in mid-life. PMID:25812851

  12. Cellular Composition of Cerebrospinal Fluid in HIV-1 Infected and Uninfected Subjects.

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    Ho, Emily L; Ronquillo, Rollie; Altmeppen, Hermann; Spudich, Serena S; Price, Richard W; Sinclair, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    In order to characterize the cellular composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a healthy state and in the setting of chronic pleocytosis associated with HIV-1 (HIV) infection, multi-parameter flow cytometry was used to identify and quantitate cellular phenotypes in CSF derived from HIV-uninfected healthy controls and HIV-infected subjects across a spectrum of disease and treatment. CD4+ T cells were the most frequent CSF population and the CD4:CD8 ratio was significantly increased in the CSF compared to blood (p = 0.0232), suggesting preferential trafficking of CD4+ over CD8+ T cells to this compartment. In contrast, in HIV-infection, CD8+ T cells were the major cellular component of the CSF and were markedly increased compared to HIV-uninfected subjects (p<0.001). As with peripheral blood, the CSF CD4:CD8 ratio was reversed in HIV-infected subjects compared to HIV-uninfected subjects. Monocytes, B cells and NK cells were rare in the CSF in both groups, although absolute counts of CSF NK cells and B cells were significantly increased in HIV-infected subjects (p<0.05). Our studies show that T cells are the major cellular component of the CSF in HIV-infected and uninfected subjects. The CSF pleocytosis characteristic of HIV infection involves all lymphocyte subsets we measured, except for CD4+ T cells, but is comprised primarily of CD8+ T cells. The reduced proportion of CD4+ T cells in the CSF may reflect both HIV-related peripheral loss and changes in trafficking patterns in response to HIV infection in the central nervous system.

  13. Cellular Composition of Cerebrospinal Fluid in HIV-1 Infected and Uninfected Subjects.

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    Emily L Ho

    Full Text Available In order to characterize the cellular composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in a healthy state and in the setting of chronic pleocytosis associated with HIV-1 (HIV infection, multi-parameter flow cytometry was used to identify and quantitate cellular phenotypes in CSF derived from HIV-uninfected healthy controls and HIV-infected subjects across a spectrum of disease and treatment. CD4+ T cells were the most frequent CSF population and the CD4:CD8 ratio was significantly increased in the CSF compared to blood (p = 0.0232, suggesting preferential trafficking of CD4+ over CD8+ T cells to this compartment. In contrast, in HIV-infection, CD8+ T cells were the major cellular component of the CSF and were markedly increased compared to HIV-uninfected subjects (p<0.001. As with peripheral blood, the CSF CD4:CD8 ratio was reversed in HIV-infected subjects compared to HIV-uninfected subjects. Monocytes, B cells and NK cells were rare in the CSF in both groups, although absolute counts of CSF NK cells and B cells were significantly increased in HIV-infected subjects (p<0.05. Our studies show that T cells are the major cellular component of the CSF in HIV-infected and uninfected subjects. The CSF pleocytosis characteristic of HIV infection involves all lymphocyte subsets we measured, except for CD4+ T cells, but is comprised primarily of CD8+ T cells. The reduced proportion of CD4+ T cells in the CSF may reflect both HIV-related peripheral loss and changes in trafficking patterns in response to HIV infection in the central nervous system.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid HIV infection and pleocytosis: Relation to systemic infection and antiretroviral treatment

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    Petropoulos Christos J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central nervous system (CNS exposure to HIV is a universal facet of systemic infection. Because of its proximity to and shared barriers with the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF provides a useful window into and model of human CNS HIV infection. Methods Prospective study of the relationships of CSF to plasma HIV RNA, and the effects of: 1 progression of systemic infection, 2 CSF white blood cell (WBC count, 3 antiretroviral therapy (ART, and 4 neurological performance. One hundred HIV-infected subjects were cross-sectionally studied, and 28 were followed longitudinally after initiating or changing ART. Results In cross-sectional analysis, HIV RNA levels were lower in CSF than plasma (median difference 1.30 log10 copies/mL. CSF HIV viral loads (VLs correlated strongly with plasma VLs and CSF WBC counts. Higher CSF WBC counts associated with smaller differences between plasma and CSF HIV VL. CSF VL did not correlate with blood CD4 count, but CD4 counts In subjects starting ART, those with lower CD4 counts had slower initial viral decay in CSF than in plasma. In all subjects, including five with persistent plasma viremia and four with new-onset ADC, CSF HIV eventually approached or reached the limit of viral detection and CSF pleocytosis resolved. Conclusion CSF HIV infection is common across the spectrum of infection and is directly related to CSF pleocytosis, though whether the latter is a response to or a contributing cause of CSF infection remains uncertain. Slowing in the rate of CSF response to ART compared to plasma as CD4 counts decline indicates a changing character of CSF infection with systemic immunological progression. Longer-term responses indicate that CSF infection generally responds well to ART, even in the face of systemic virological failure due to drug resistance. We present simple models to explain the differing relationships of CSF to plasma HIV in these settings.

  15. Chromosomal rearrangements and protein globularity changes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from cerebrospinal fluid

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    Seow Hoon Saw

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Meningitis is a major cause of mortality in tuberculosis (TB. It is not clear what factors promote central nervous system invasion and pathology but it has been reported that certain strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb might have genetic traits associated with neurotropism. Methods In this study, we generated whole genome sequences of eight clinical strains of Mtb that were isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients presenting with tuberculous meningitis (TBM in Malaysia, and compared them to the genomes of H37Rv and other respiratory Mtb genomes either downloaded from public databases or extracted from local sputum isolates. We aimed to find genomic features that might be distinctly different between CSF-derived and respiratory Mtb. Results Genome-wide comparisons revealed rearrangements (translocations, inversions, insertions and deletions and non-synonymous SNPs in our CSF-derived strains that were not observed in the respiratory Mtb genomes used for comparison. These rearranged segments were rich in genes for PE (proline-glutamate/PPE (proline-proline-glutamate, transcriptional and membrane proteins. Similarly, most of the ns SNPs common in CSF strains were noted in genes encoding PE/PPE proteins. Protein globularity differences were observed among mycobacteria from CSF and respiratory sources and in proteins previously reported to be associated with TB meningitis. Transcription factors and other transcription regulators featured prominently in these proteins. Homologs of proteins associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis and Neisseria meningitidis virulence were identified in neuropathogenic as well as respiratory mycobacterial spp. examined in this study. Discussion The occurrence of in silico genetic differences in CSF-derived but not respiratory Mtb suggests their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of TBM. However, overall findings in this comparative analysis support the postulation that TB

  16. In vitro correlates of benzodiazepine cerebrospinal fluid uptake, pharmacodynamic action and peripheral distribution.

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    Arendt, R M; Greenblatt, D J; deJong, R H; Bonin, J D; Abernethy, D R; Ehrenberg, B L; Giles, H G; Sellers, E M; Shader, R I

    1983-10-01

    Factors influencing the rate and extent of benzodiazepine uptake into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), peripheral tissue distribution and electroencephalographic (EEG) effects were evaluated in a model utilizing anesthetized male cats. A single (0.25-10 mg/kg) dose of the following eight benzodiazepines was administered i.v.: diazepam, desmethyldiazepam, midazolam, lorazepam, alprazolam, triazolam, flunitrazepam and clobazam. Multiple samples were simultaneously drawn from arterial blood and cisternal CSF over the next 4 hr and the EEG was continuously monitored. Concentrations of benzodiazepines in plasma and CSF samples were measured by electron-capture gas-liquid chromatography and plasma protein binding determined by equilibrium dialysis. Physicochemical properties of lipophilicity of each benzodiazepine were determined by measurement of the octanol/buffer partition ratio at physiologic pH and by the high-pressure liquid chromatographic (HPLC) retention on a reverse-phase C18 column at neutral pH. Disappearance of all benzodiazepines from plasma was consistent with a linear sum of two or three exponential terms. After correction for individual differences in protein binding, volume of distribution (Vd) of unbound drug was highly correlated with HPLC retention (r = 0.91), but not significantly related to octanol/buffer partition coefficient. Diazepam and midazolam, having the longest HPLC retention also had the largest unbound Vd. All benzodiazepines rapidly entered CSF, with peak concentrations usually attained within 15 min of dosage. More lipophilic drugs tended to enter CSF most rapidly, but associations of entry rate and in vitro lipophilicity were not significant. After distribution equilibrium was attained, disappearance of benzodiazepines from both plasma and CSF occurred in parallel. Equilibrium CSF/total plasma concentration ratios of all drugs were much less than unity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Intracranial pressure pulse waveform correlates with aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid stroke volume.

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    Hamilton, Robert; Baldwin, Kevin; Fuller, Jennifer; Vespa, Paul; Hu, Xiao; Bergsneider, Marvin

    2012-11-01

    This study identifies a novel relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stroke volume through the cerebral aqueduct and the characteristic peaks of the intracranial pulse (ICP) waveform. ICP waveform analysis has become much more advanced in recent years; however, clinical practice remains restricted to mean ICP, mainly due to the lack of physiological understanding of the ICP waveform. Therefore, the present study set out to shed some light on the physiological meaning of ICP morphological metrics derived by the morphological clustering and analysis of continuous intracranial pulse (MOCAIP) algorithm by investigating their relationships with a well defined physiological variable, i.e., the stroke volume of CSF through the cerebral aqueduct. Seven patients received both overnight ICP monitoring along with a phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) of the cerebral aqueduct to quantify aqueductal stroke volume (ASV). Waveform morphological analysis of the ICP signal was performed by the MOCAIP algorithm. Following extraction of morphological metrics from the ICP signal, nine temporal ICP metrics and two amplitude-based metrics were compared with the ASV via Spearman's rank correlation. Of the nine temporal metrics correlated with the ASV, only the width of the P2 region (ICP-Wi2) reached significance. Furthermore, both ICP pulse pressure amplitude and mean ICP did not reach significance. In this study, we showed the width of the second peak (ICP-Wi2) of an ICP pulse wave is positively related to the volume of CSF movement through the cerebral aqueduct. This finding is an initial step in bridging the gap between ICP waveform morphology research and clinical practice.

  18. Endostatin/Collagen XVIII Is Increased in Cerebrospinal Fluid after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Hao Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor endostatin/collagen XVIII might play an important role in the secondary brain injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI. In this study, we measured endostatin/collagen XVIII concentrations serially for 1 week after hospitalization by using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 30 patients with TBI and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score of 8 or less on admission. There was a significant trend toward increased CSF levels of endostatin after TBI versus control from 72 h after injury. In patients with GCS score of 3–5, CSF endostatin concentration was substantially higher at 72 h after injury than that in patients with GCS score of 6–8 (P<0.05 and peaked rapidly at day 5 after injury, but decreased thereafter. The CSF endostatin concentration in 12 patients with an unfavorable outcome was significantly higher than that in 18 patients with a favorable outcome at day 5 (P=0.043 and day 7 (P=0.005 after trauma. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis suggested a reliable operating point for the 7-day CSF endostatin concentration predicting poor prognosis to be 67.29 pg/mL. Our preliminary findings provide new evidence that endostatin/collagen XVIII concentration in the CSF increases substantially in patients with sTBI. Its dynamic change may have some clinical significance on the judgment of brain injury severity and the assessment of prognosis. This trial is registered with the ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01846546.

  19. Risk factors for postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningitis after expanded endoscopic endonasal surgery.

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    Ivan, Michael E; Iorgulescu, J Bryan; El-Sayed, Ivan; McDermott, Michael W; Parsa, Andrew T; Pletcher, Steven D; Jahangiri, Arman; Wagner, Jeffrey; Aghi, Manish K

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a serious complication of transsphenoidal surgery, which can lead to meningitis and often requires reparative surgery. We sought to identify preoperative risk factors for CSF leaks and meningitis. We reviewed 98 consecutive expanded endoscopic endonasal surgeries performed from 2008-2012 and analyzed preoperative comorbidities, intraoperative techniques, and postoperative care. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The most common pathologies addressed included pituitary adenoma, Rathke cyst, chordoma, esthesioneuroblastoma, meningioma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. There were 11 CSF leaks (11%) and 10 central nervous system (CNS) infections (10%). Univariate and multivariate analysis of preoperative risk factors showed that patients with non-ideal body mass index (BMI) were associated with higher rate of postoperative CSF leak and meningitis (both p<0.01). Also, patients with increasing age were associated with increased CSF leak (p = 0.03) and the length of time a lumbar drain was used postoperatively was associated with infection in a univariate analysis. In addition, three of three endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries combined with open cranial surgery had a postoperative CSF leak and CNS infection rate which was a considerably higher rate than for transsphenoidal surgeries alone or surgeries staged with open cases (p<0.01 and p=0.04, respectively) In this series of expanded endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries, preoperative BMI remains the most important preoperative predictor for CSF leak and infection. Other risk factors include age, intraoperative CSF leak, lumbar drain duration, and cranial combined cases. Risks associated with complex surgical resections when combining open and endoscopic approaches could be minimized by staging these procedures.

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypocretin-1 (Orexin-A Level Fluctuates with Season and Correlates with Day Length.

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    Kim Boddum

    Full Text Available The hypocretin/orexin neuropeptides (hcrt are key players in the control of sleep and wakefulness evidenced by the fact that lack of hcrt leads to the sleep disorder Narcolepsy Type 1. Sleep disturbances are common in mood disorders, and hcrt has been suggested to be poorly regulated in depressed subjects. To study seasonal variation in hcrt levels, we obtained data on hcrt-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from 227 human individuals evaluated for central hypersomnias at a Danish sleep center. The samples were taken over a 4 year timespan, and obtained in the morning hours, thus avoiding impact of the diurnal hcrt variation. Hcrt-1 concentration was determined in a standardized radioimmunoassay. Using biometric data and sleep parameters, a multivariate regression analysis was performed. We found that the average monthly CSF hcrt-1 levels varied significantly across the seasons following a sine wave with its peak in the summer (June-July. The amplitude was 19.9 pg hcrt/mL [12.8-26.9] corresponding to a 10.6% increase in midsummer compared to winter. Factors found to significantly predict the hcrt-1 values were day length, presence of snow, and proximity to the Christmas holiday season. The hcrt-1 values from January were much higher than predicted from the model, suggestive of additional factors influencing the CSF hcrt-1 levels such as social interaction. This study provides evidence that human CSF hcrt-1 levels vary with season, correlating with day length. This finding could have implications for the understanding of winter tiredness, fatigue, and seasonal affective disorder. This is the first time a seasonal variation of hcrt-1 levels has been shown, demonstrating that the hcrt system is, like other neurotransmitter systems, subjected to long term modulation.

  1. A Poroelastic Fluid/Structure-Interaction Model of Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics in the Cord With Syringomyelia and Adjacent Subarachnoid-Space Stenosis.

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    Bertram, C D; Heil, M

    2017-01-01

    An existing axisymmetric fluid/structure-interaction (FSI) model of the spinal cord, pia mater, subarachnoid space, and dura mater in the presence of syringomyelia and subarachnoid-space stenosis was modified to include porous solids. This allowed investigation of a hypothesis for syrinx fluid ingress from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Gross model deformation was unchanged by the addition of porosity, but pressure oscillated more in the syrinx and the subarachnoid space below the stenosis. The poroelastic model still exhibited elevated mean pressure in the subarachnoid space below the stenosis and in the syrinx. With realistic cord permeability, there was slight oscillatory shunt flow bypassing the stenosis via the porous tissue over the syrinx. Weak steady streaming flow occurred in a circuit involving craniocaudal flow through the stenosis and back via the syrinx. Mean syrinx volume was scarcely altered when the adjacent stenosis bisected the syrinx, but increased slightly when the syrinx was predominantly located caudal to the stenosis. The fluid content of the tissues over the syrinx oscillated, absorbing most of the radial flow seeping from the subarachnoid space so that it did not reach the syrinx. To a lesser extent, this cyclic swelling in a boundary layer of cord tissue just below the pia occurred all along the cord, representing a mechanism for exchange of interstitial fluid (ISF) and cerebrospinal fluid which could explain recent tracer findings without invoking perivascular conduits. The model demonstrates that syrinx volume increase is possible when there is subarachnoid-space stenosis and the cord and pia are permeable.

  2. Correlations of Ventricular Enlargement with Rheologically Active Surfactant Proteins in Cerebrospinal Fluid

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    Schob, Stefan; Weiß, Alexander; Dieckow, Julia; Richter, Cindy; Pirlich, Mandy; Voigt, Peter; Surov, Alexey; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Quaeschling, Ulf; Preuß, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Surfactant proteins (SPs) are involved in the regulation of rheological properties of body fluids. Concentrations of SPs are altered in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of hydrocephalus patients. The common hallmark of hydrocephalus is enlargement of the brain ventricles. The relationship of both phenomena has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between SP concentrations in the CSF and enlargement of the brain ventricles. Procedures: Ninty-six individuals (41 healthy subjects and 55 hydrocephalus patients) were included in this retrospective analysis. CSF specimens were analyzed for SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D concentrations by use of enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Ventricular enlargement was quantified in T2 weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sections using an uni-dimensional (Evans’ Index) and a two-dimensional approach (lateral ventricles area index, LVAI). Results: CSF-SP concentrations (mean ± standard deviation in ng/ml) were as follows: SP-A 0.71 ± 0.58, SP-B 0.18 ± 0.43, SP-C 0.89 ± 0.77 and SP-D 7.4 ± 5.4. Calculated values of Evans’ Index were 0.37 ± 0.11, a calculation of LVAI resulted in 0.18 ± 0.15 (each mean ± standard deviation). Significant correlations were identified for Evans’ Index with SP-A (r = 0.388, p < 0.001) and SP-C (r = 0.392, p < 0.001), LVAI with SP-A (r = 0.352, p = 0.001), SP-C (r = 0.471, p < 0.001) and SP-D (r = 0.233, p = 0.025). Furthermore, SP-C showed a clear inverse correlation with age (r = −0.357, p = 0.011). Conclusion: The present study confirmed significant correlations between SPs A, C and D in the CSF with enlargement of the inner CSF spaces. In conclusion, SPs clearly play an important role for CSF rheology. CSF rheology is profoundly altered in hydrocephalic diseases, however, diagnosis and therapy of hydrocephalic conditions are still almost exclusively based on ventricular enlargement. Until now it was unclear, whether the

  3. Impact of cerebrospinal fluid shunting for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus on the amyloid cascade.

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    Masao Moriya

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether the improvement of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF flow dynamics by CSF shunting, can suppress the oligomerization of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ, by measuring the levels of Alzheimer's disease (AD-related proteins in the CSF before and after lumboperitoneal shunting. Lumbar CSF from 32 patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH (samples were obtained before and 1 year after shunting, 15 patients with AD, and 12 normal controls was analyzed for AD-related proteins and APLP1-derived Aβ-like peptides (APL1β (a surrogate marker for Aβ. We found that before shunting, individuals with iNPH had significantly lower levels of soluble amyloid precursor proteins (sAPP and Aβ38 compared to patients with AD and normal controls. We divided the patients with iNPH into patients with favorable (improvement ≥ 1 on the modified Rankin Scale and unfavorable (no improvement on the modified Rankin Scale outcomes. Compared to the unfavorable outcome group, the favorable outcome group showed significant increases in Aβ38, 40, 42, and phosphorylated-tau levels after shunting. In contrast, there were no significant changes in the levels of APL1β25, 27, and 28 after shunting. After shunting, we observed positive correlations between sAPPα and sAPPβ, Aβ38 and 42, and APL1β25 and 28, with shifts from sAPPβ to sAPPα, from APL1β28 to 25, and from Aβ42 to 38 in all patients with iNPH. Our results suggest that Aβ production remained unchanged by the shunt procedure because the levels of sAPP and APL1β were unchanged. Moreover, the shift of Aβ from oligomer to monomer due to the shift of Aβ42 (easy to aggregate to Aβ38 (difficult to aggregate, and the improvement of interstitial-fluid flow, could lead to increased Aβ levels in the CSF. Our findings suggest that the shunting procedure can delay intracerebral deposition of Aβ in patients with iNPH.

  4. Fast circulation of cerebrospinal fluid: an alternative perspective on the protective role of high intracranial pressure in ocular hypertension.

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    Wostyn, Peter; De Groot, Veva; Van Dam, Debby; Audenaert, Kurt; Killer, Hanspeter Esriel; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2016-05-01

    As ocular hypertension refers to a condition in which the intraocular pressure is consistently elevated but without development of glaucoma, study of it may provide important clues to factors that may play a protective role in glaucoma. β-amyloid, one of the key histopathological findings in Alzheimer's disease, has been reported to increase by chronic elevation of intraocular pressure in animals with experimentally induced ocular hypertension and to cause retinal ganglion cell death, pointing to similarities in molecular cell death mechanisms between glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, recent studies have reported that intracranial pressure is higher in patients with ocular hypertension compared with controls, giving rise to the idea that elevated intracranial pressure may provide a protective effect for the optic nerve by decreasing the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference. The speculation that the higher intracranial pressure reported in ocular hypertension patients may protect against glaucoma mainly through a lower trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference remains at least questionable. Here, we present an alternative viewpoint, according to which the protective effect of higher intracranial pressure could be due, at least in part, to a pressure-independent mechanism, namely faster cerebrospinal fluid production leading to increased cerebrospinal fluid turnover with enhanced removal of potentially neurotoxic waste products that accumulate in the optic nerve. This suggests a new hypothesis for glaucoma, which, just like Alzheimer's disease, may be considered then as an imbalance between production and clearance of neurotoxins, including β-amyloid. If confirmed, then strategies to improve cerebrospinal fluid flow are reasonable and could provide a new therapeutic approach for stopping the neurotoxic β-amyloid pathway in glaucoma.

  5. Clinical characteristics and cerebrospinal fluid parameters in patients with peripheral facial palsy caused by Lyme neuroborreliosis compared with facial palsy of unknown origin (Bell's palsy)

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    Hagberg Lars; Bremell Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Bell's palsy and Lyme neuroborreliosis are the two most common diagnoses in patients with peripheral facial palsy in areas endemic for Borrelia burgdorferi. Bell's palsy is treated with corticosteroids, while Lyme neuroborreliosis is treated with antibiotics. The diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis relies on the detection of Borrelia antibodies in blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid, which is time consuming. In this study, we retrospectively analysed clinical and cerebrospinal...

  6. Distribution in cerebrospinal fluid, blood, and lymph of epidurally injected morphine and inulin in dogs

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    Durant, P.A.; Yaksh, T.L.

    1986-06-01

    We describe procedures for catheterizing the epidural space, the azygos vein, and the thoracic lymph duct of dogs without using fluoroscopy. The success rates of the procedures were 100, 80, and 50%, respectively (n = 10). To assess the validity of the model, /sup 3/H-morphine and unlabeled morphine (2 mg) were injected epidurally in ten dogs. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), azygos venous blood, arterial blood, and lymph were sampled before and 5, 20, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300 and 360 min after injection. During the first 20 min, morphine levels in the azygos vein were about three and ten times greater than arterial and lymphatic levels, respectively (n = 3; P less than 0.01). Morphine levels were significantly greater in the azygos vein (n = 8) and the femoral artery (n = 10) during the first 20 and 60 min than they were later, respectively (P less than 0.05). In the lymph (n = 5), the levels of morphine at 60 min were statistically greater (P less than 0.05) than levels at 4, 5, and 6 hr. At no time were the concurrent arterial and lymph levels different from each other. In the lumbar CSF, the morphine peak concentration was reached 5-60 min after epidural injection and ranged between 5 and 93 micrograms/ml. In the CSF, the levels of morphine were significantly greater during the first 20 min than later (n = 7; P less than 0.05). The washout of the lumbar CSF curve for morphine appeared to be fitted by a two-compartment open model. The t1/2-alpha and t1/2-beta values were 14.7 +/- 7.2 min and 106 +/- 45 min, respectively (mean +/- SD). Cumulative percentages of the epidural dose of morphine passed into the azygos system within the first 5, 20, 60, and 120 min after injection were calculated to be 4.0 +/- 2.1, 23.5 +/- 14.6, 49.2 +/- 34.2, and 55.9 +/- 35.3, respectively (mean +/- SD; n = 8).

  7. Turnover rate of cerebrospinal fluid in female sheep: changes related to different light-dark cycles

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    Malpaux Benoit

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sheep are seasonal breeders. The key factor governing seasonal changes in the reproductive activity of the ewe is increased negative feedback of estradiol at the level of the hypothalamus under long-day conditions. It has previously been demonstrated that when gonadotropin secretions are inhibited during long days, there is a higher concentration of estradiol in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF than during short days. This suggests an involvement of the CSF and choroid plexus in the neuroendocrine regulatory loop, but the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unknown. One possible explanation of this difference in hormonal content is an effect of concentration or dilution caused by variations in CSF secretion rate. The aim of this study was thus to investigate changes in the CSF turnover rate related to light-dark cycles. Methods The turnover rate of the CSF was estimated by measuring the time taken for the recovery of intraventricular pressure (IVP after removal of a moderate volume (0.5 to 2 ml of CSF (slope in mmHg/min. The turnover rate was estimated three times in the same group of sheep: during a natural period of decreasing day-length corresponding to the initial period when gonadotropin activity is stimulated (SG1, during a long-day inhibitory period (IG, and finally during a short-day stimulatory period (SG2. Results The time taken and the speed of recovery of initial IVP differed between groups: 8 min 30 sec, 0.63 ± 0.07 mmHg/min(SG1, 11 min 1 sec, 0.38 ± 0.06 mmHg/min (IG and 9 min 0 sec, 0.72 ± 0.15 mmHg/min (SG2. Time changes of IVP differed between groups (ANOVA, p p p = 0.41, but was significantly different from IG: 71.33 ± 16.59 μl/min (p = 0.016. Conclusion This study shows that the turnover rate of CSF in ewes changes according to the light-dark cycle; it is increased during short day periods and reduced in long day periods. This phenomenon could account for differences in hormonal concentrations in

  8. Effect of the drainage of cerebrospinal fluid in patients with aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage

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    Qian, Cong; Yu, Xiaobo; Chen, Jingyin; Gu, Chi; Wang, Lin; Chen, Gao; Dai, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives: Vasospasm-related injury such as delayed ischemic neurological defect (DIND) or cerebral infarction is an important prognostic factor for aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage can achieve a better outcome in aneurismal SAH patients after coiling or clipping remains the subject of debate. Here, we report a meta-analysis of the related available literature to assess the effect of continuous CSF drainage on clinical outcomes in patients with aneurismal SAH. Methods: Case-control studies regarding the association between aneurismal SAH and CSF drainage were systematically identified through online databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Elsevier Science Direct, and Springer Link). Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined for the eligible studies. The fixed-effects model was performed when homogeneity was indicated. Alternatively, the random-effects model was utilized. Results: This meta-analysis included 11 studies. Continuous CSF drainage obviously improved patients’ long-term outcome (odds ratio [OR] of 2.86, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37–5.98, P < 0.01). CSF drainage also reduced angiographic vasospasm (OR of 0.35, 95% CI, 0.23–0.51, P < 0.01), symptomatic vasospasm (OR of 0.32, 95% CI, 0.32–0.43, P < 0.01), and DIND (OR of 0.48, 95% CI, 0.25–0.91, P = 0.03), but there was no significant difference between the CSF drainage group and the no CSF drainage group on shunt-dependent hydrocephalus (SDHC) prevention (OR of 1.04, 95% CI, 0.52–2.07, P = 0.91). Further analysis on lumbar drainage (LD) and external ventricular drainage (EVD) indicated that LD had a better outcome (OR of 3.11, 95% CI, 1.18–8.23, P = 0.02), whereas no significant difference in vasospasm-related injury was detected between the groups (OR of 1.13, 95% CI, 0.54–2.37, P = 0.75). Conclusion: Continuous CSF drainage is an effective treatment for aneurismal SAH patients; lumbar drainage

  9. Disease biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with first-onset psychosis.

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    Jeffrey T-J Huang

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psychosis is a severe mental condition that is characterized by a loss of contact with reality and is typically associated with hallucinations and delusional beliefs. There are numerous psychiatric conditions that present with psychotic symptoms, most importantly schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, and some forms of severe depression referred to as psychotic depression. The pathological mechanisms resulting in psychotic symptoms are not understood, nor is it understood whether the various psychotic illnesses are the result of similar biochemical disturbances. The identification of biological markers (so-called biomarkers of psychosis is a fundamental step towards a better understanding of the pathogenesis of psychosis and holds the potential for more objective testing methods. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry was employed to profile proteins and peptides in a total of 179 cerebrospinal fluid samples (58 schizophrenia patients, 16 patients with depression, five patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, ten patients with Alzheimer disease, and 90 controls. Our results show a highly significant differential distribution of samples from healthy volunteers away from drug-naïve patients with first-onset paranoid schizophrenia. The key alterations were the up-regulation of a 40-amino acid VGF-derived peptide, the down-regulation of transthyretin at approximately 4 kDa, and a peptide cluster at approximately 6,800-7,300 Da (which is likely to be influenced by the doubly charged ions of the transthyretin protein cluster. These schizophrenia-specific protein/peptide changes were replicated in an independent sample set. Both experiments achieved a specificity of 95% and a sensitivity of 80% or 88% in the initial study and in a subsequent validation study, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the application of modern proteomics techniques, particularly mass

  10. Analysis of chiral amino acids in cerebrospinal fluid samples linked to different stages of Alzheimer disease.

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    Samakashvili, Shorena; Ibáñez, Clara; Simó, Carolina; Gil-Bea, Francisco J; Winblad, Bengt; Cedazo-Mínguez, Angel; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2011-10-01

    Chiral micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection (chiral-MEKC-LIF) was used to investigate D- and L-amino acid contents in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples related to different Alzheimer disease (AD) stages. CSF samples were taken from (i) control subjects (S1 pool), (ii) subjects showing a mild cognitive impairment who remained stable (S2 pool), (iii) subjects showing an mild cognitive impairment that progressed to AD (S3 pool) and (iv) subjects diagnosed with AD (S4 pool). The optimized procedure only needed 10 μL of CSF and it included sample cleaning, derivatization with FITC and chiral-MEKC-LIF separation. Eighteen standard amino acids were baseline separated with efficiencies up to 703,000 plates/m, high sensitivity (LODs in the nM range) and good resolution (values ranging from 2.6 to 9.5). Using this method, L-Arg, L-Leu, L-Gln, γ-aminobutyric acid, L-Ser, D-Ser, L-Ala, Gly, L-Lys, L-Glu and L-Asp were detected in all the CSF samples. S3 and S4 samples (i.e. AD subjects) showed significant lower amounts of L-Arg L-Lys, L-Glu and L-Asp compared to the non-AD S1 and S2 samples, showing in the S4 group the lowest amounts of L-Arg L-Lys, L-Glu and L-Asp. Moreover, γ-aminobutyric acid was significantly higher in AD subjects with the highest amount also found for S4. No significant differences were observed for the rest of amino acids including D-Ser. Based on the obtained chiral-MEKC-LIF data, it was possible to correctly classify all the samples into the four groups. These results demonstrate that the use of enantioselective procedures as the one developed in this work can provide some new light on the investigations of AD, including the discovery of new biomarkers related to different stages of AD.

  11. Peptide fingerprinting of Alzheimer's disease in cerebrospinal fluid: identification and prospective evaluation of new synaptic biomarkers.

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    Holger Jahn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Today, dementias are diagnosed late in the course of disease. Future treatments have to start earlier in the disease process to avoid disability requiring new diagnostic tools. The objective of this study is to develop a new method for the differential diagnosis and identification of new biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD using capillary-electrophoresis coupled to mass-spectrometry (CE-MS and to assess the potential of early diagnosis of AD. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 159 out-patients of a memory-clinic at a University Hospital suffering from neurodegenerative disorders and 17 cognitively-healthy controls was used to create differential peptide pattern for dementias and prospective blinded-comparison of sensitivity and specificity for AD diagnosis against the Criterion standard in a naturalistic prospective sample of patients. Sensitivity and specificity of the new method compared to standard diagnostic procedures and identification of new putative biomarkers for AD was the main outcome measure. CE-MS was used to reliably detect 1104 low-molecular-weight peptides in CSF. Training-sets of patients with clinically secured sporadic Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, and cognitively healthy controls allowed establishing discriminative biomarker pattern for diagnosis of AD. This pattern was already detectable in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. The AD-pattern was tested in a prospective sample of patients (n = 100 and AD was diagnosed with a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 83%. Using CSF measurements of beta-amyloid1-42, total-tau, and phospho(181-tau, AD-diagnosis had a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 67% in the same sample. Sequence analysis of the discriminating biomarkers identified fragments of synaptic proteins like proSAAS, apolipoprotein J, neurosecretory protein VGF, phospholemman, and chromogranin A. CONCLUSIONS: The method may allow early differential

  12. Predictive role of cerebrospinal fluid hydrogen sulfide in central nervous system leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Shu-xu; XIAO Jiang; GUAN Feng; SUN Li-ming; WU Wan-shui; TANG Hong; DU Jun-bao; TANG Chao-shu; JIN Hong-fang

    2011-01-01

    Background Central nervous system leukemia (CNSL) is an important relapse in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).We investigated the possible role of endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in predicting CNSL.Methods From August 2008 to December 2010,380 children were enrolled in this study at Shijitan Hospital,China.These children were from 2 to 16 years old,and the median age was 6.5 years.They were divided into a CNSL group (7 cases),a leukemia group (307 cases),a non-leukemia group (26 cases) and a healthy group (40 children).CSF specimens were obtained from conventional lumbar punctured,then centrifuged and supernatants preserved for H2Sdetection.Leukemic cells precipitates from CSF were found in three cases,the hCSE and hCBS mRNA expression was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR),and H2S levels in serum were also measured.The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and area under curve (AUC) were used to assess the predictive diagnosis role of CSF H2S in children with ALL and CNSL.Results The serum H2S contents of the CNSL and leukemia groups were (96.98+15.77) μmol/L and (93.35+17.16)μmol/L respectively,much higher than those of healthy,(44.29+2.15) μmol/L,and non-leukemia,(46.32±6.54) μmol/L,groups (P <0.01).Compared with the leukemia group,CSF H2S content of the CNSL group was significantly high (P <0.01).Meanwhile,in contrast to the non-leukemia group,CSF H2S contents of the CNSL and leukemia groups were both significantly increased (P <0.01).In addition,leukemic cells from CSF precipitations could express CBS and CSE mRNA.Furthermore,the ROC analysis showed the UAC was 0.929 (95% Cl:0.857-1.000),and the optimum cut-off value of CSF H2S was 12.08μmol/L,and the sensitivity and specificity were 83.3% and 97.2% respectively.Conclusions CSF H2S contents were significantly increased in children with CNSL.After treatment,H2S contents were decreased subsequently

  13. SNPs associated with cerebrospinal fluid phospho-tau levels influence rate of decline in Alzheimer's disease.

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    Carlos Cruchaga

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's Disease (AD is a complex and multifactorial disease. While large genome-wide association studies have had some success in identifying novel genetic risk factors for AD, case-control studies are less likely to uncover genetic factors that influence progression of disease. An alternative approach to identifying genetic risk for AD is the use of quantitative traits or endophenotypes. The use of endophenotypes has proven to be an effective strategy, implicating genetic risk factors in several diseases, including anemia, osteoporosis and heart disease. In this study we identify a genetic factor associated with the rate of decline in AD patients and present a methodology for identification of other such factors. We have used an established biomarker for AD, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (ptau(181 levels as an endophenotype for AD, identifying a SNP, rs1868402, in the gene encoding the regulatory sub-unit of protein phosphatase B, associated with CSF ptau(181 levels in two independent CSF series (P(combined = 1.17 x 10(-05. We show no association of rs1868402 with risk for AD or age at onset, but detected a very significant association with rate of progression of disease that is consistent in two independent series (P(combined = 1.17 x 10(-05. Our analyses suggest that genetic variants associated with CSF ptau(181 levels may have a greater impact on rate of progression, while genetic variants such as APOE4, that are associated with CSF Aβ(42 levels influence risk and onset but not the rate of progression. Our results also suggest that drugs that inhibit or decrease tau phosphorylation may slow cognitive decline in individuals with very mild dementia or delay the appearance of memory problems in elderly individuals with low CSF Aβ(42 levels. Finally, we believe genome-wide association studies of CSF tau/ptau(181 levels should identify novel genetic variants which will likely influence rate of progression of

  14. Nested PCR for rapid detection of mumps virus in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with neurological diseases.

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    Poggio, G P; Rodriguez, C; Cisterna, D; Freire, M C; Cello, J

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a reverse transcription (RT)-nested polymerase chain reaction (n-PCR) for the detection of mumps virus RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with neurological infections. A specific 112-bp fragment was amplified by this method with primers from the nucleoprotein of the mumps virus genome. The mumps virus RT-n-PCR was capable of detecting 0.001 PFU/ml and 0.005 50% tissue culture infective dose/ml. This method was found to be specific, since no PCR product was detected in each of the CSF samples from patients with proven non-mumps virus-related meningitis or encephalitis. Mumps virus RNA was detected in all 18 CSF samples confirmed by culture to be infected with mumps virus. Positive PCR results were obtained for the CSF of 26 of 28 patients that were positive for signs of mumps virus infection (i.e., cultivable virus from urine or oropharyngeal samples or positivity for anti-mumps virus immunoglobulin M) but without cultivable virus in their CSF. Overall, mumps virus RNA was detected in CSF of 96% of the patients with a clinical diagnosis of viral central nervous system (CNS) disease and confirmed mumps virus infection, while mumps virus was isolated in CSF of only 39% of the patients. Furthermore, in a retrospective study, we were able to detect mumps virus RNA in 25 of 55 (46%) CSF samples from patients with a clinical diagnosis of viral CNS disease and negative laboratory evidence of viral infection including mumps virus infection. The 25 patients represent 12% of the 236 patients who had a clinical diagnosis of viral CNS infections and whose CSF was examined at our laboratory for a 2-year period. The findings confirm the importance of mumps virus as a causative agent of CNS infections in countries with low vaccine coverage rates. In summary, our study demonstrates the usefulness of the mumps virus RT-n-PCR for the diagnosis of mumps virus CNS disease and suggests that this assay may soon become the "gold standard" test

  15. The cerebrospinal fluid proteome in HIV infection: change associated with disease severity.

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    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Spudich, Serena S.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Liegler, Teri; Zetterberg, Henrik; Camp, David G.; Price, Richard W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-03-20

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a constant feature of systemic HIV infection with a clinical spectrum that ranges from chronic asymptomatic infection to severe cognitive and motor dysfunction. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has played an important part in defining the character of this evolving infection and response to treatment. To further characterize CNS HIV infection and its effects, we applied advanced high-throughput proteomic methods to CSF to identify novel proteins and their changes with disease progression and treatment. After establishing an accurate mass and time (AMT) tag database containing 23,141 AMT tags for CSF peptides, we analyzed 91 CSF samples by LC-MS from 12 HIV-uninfected and 14 HIV-infected subjects studied in the context of initiation of antiretroviral and correlated abundances of identified proteins (a) within and between subjects, (b) with all other proteins across the entire sample set, and (c) with 'external' CSF biomarkers of infection (HIV RNA), immune activation (neopterin) and neural injury (neurofilament light chain protein, NFL). We identified a mean of 2,333 +/- 328 (SD) peptides covering 307 +/-16 proteins in the 91 CSF sample set. Protein abundances differed both between and within subjects sampled at different time points and readily separated those with and without HIV infection. Proteins also showed inter-correlations across the sample set that were associated with biologically relevant dynamic processes. One-hundred and fifty proteins showed correlations with the external biomarkers. For example, using a threshold of cross correlation coefficient (Pearson's) {le}0.3 and {ge}0.3 for potentially meaningful relationships, a total of 99 proteins correlated with CSF neopterin (43 negative and 56 positive correlations) and related principally to neuronal plasticity and survival and to innate immunity. Pathway analysis defined several networks connecting the identified proteins, including one with

  16. The cerebrospinal fluid proteome in HIV infection: change associated with disease severity

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    Angel Thomas E

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central nervous system (CNS infection is a nearly universal feature of untreated systemic HIV infection with a clinical spectrum that ranges from chronic asymptomatic infection to severe cognitive and motor dysfunction. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF has played an important part in defining the character of this evolving infection and response to treatment. To further characterize CNS HIV infection and its effects, we applied advanced high-throughput proteomic methods to CSF to identify novel proteins and their changes with disease progression and treatment. Results After establishing an accurate mass and time (AMT tag database containing 23,141 AMT tags for CSF peptides, we analyzed 91 CSF samples by LC-MS from 12 HIV-uninfected and 14 HIV-infected subjects studied in the context of initiation of antiretroviral therapy and correlated abundances of identified proteins a within and between subjects, b with all other proteins across the entire sample set, and c with "external" CSF biomarkers of infection (HIV RNA, immune activation (neopterin and neural injury (neurofilament light chain protein, NFL. We identified a mean of 2,333 +/- 328 (SD peptides covering 307 +/-16 proteins in the 91 CSF sample set. Protein abundances differed both between and within subjects sampled at different time points and readily separated those with and without HIV infection. Proteins also showed inter-correlations across the sample set that were associated with biologically relevant dynamic processes. One-hundred and fifty proteins showed correlations with the external biomarkers. For example, using a threshold of cross correlation coefficient (Pearson's ≤ -0.3 and ≥0.3 for potentially meaningful relationships, a total of 99 proteins correlated with CSF neopterin (43 negative and 56 positive correlations and related principally to neuronal plasticity and survival and to innate immunity. Pathway analysis defined several networks connecting

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker and brain biopsy findings in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

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    Okko T Pyykkö

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The significance of amyloid precursor protein (APP and neuroinflammation in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH and Alzheimer's disease (AD is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of soluble APP (sAPP and amyloid beta (Aβ isoforms, proinflammatory cytokines, and biomarkers of neuronal damage in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in relation to brain biopsy Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau (HPτ findings. METHODS: The study population comprised 102 patients with possible NPH with cortical brain biopsies, ventricular and lumbar CSF samples, and DNA available. The final clinical diagnoses were: 53 iNPH (91% shunt-responders, 26 AD (10 mixed iNPH+AD, and 23 others. Biopsy samples were immunostained against Aβ and HPτ. CSF levels of AD-related biomarkers (Aβ42, p-tau, total tau, non-AD-related Aβ isoforms (Aβ38, Aβ40, sAPP isoforms (sAPPα, sAPPβ, proinflammatory cytokines (several interleukins (IL, interferon-gamma, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and biomarkers of neuronal damage (neurofilament light and myelin basic protein were measured. All patients were genotyped for APOE. RESULTS: Lumbar CSF levels of sAPPα were lower (p<0.05 in patients with shunt-responsive iNPH compared to non-iNPH patients. sAPPβ showed a similar trend (p = 0.06. CSF sAPP isoform levels showed no association to Aβ or HPτ in the brain biopsy. Quantified Aβ load in the brain biopsy showed a negative correlation with CSF levels of Aβ42 in ventricular (r = -0.295, p = 0.003 and lumbar (r = -0.356, p = 0.01 samples, while the levels of Aβ38 and Aβ40 showed no correlation. CSF levels of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers of neuronal damage did not associate to the brain biopsy findings, diagnosis, or shunt response. Higher lumbar/ventricular CSF IL-8 ratios (p<0.001 were seen in lumbar samples collected after ventriculostomy compared to the samples collected before the procedure

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum biomarkers of cerebral malaria mortality in Ghanaian children

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    Wiredu Edwin K

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum can cause a diffuse encephalopathy known as cerebral malaria (CM, a major contributor to malaria associated mortality. Despite treatment, mortality due to CM can be as high as 30% while 10% of survivors of the disease may experience short- and long-term neurological complications. The pathogenesis of CM and other forms of severe malaria is multi-factorial and appear to involve cytokine and chemokine homeostasis, inflammation and vascular injury/repair. Identification of prognostic markers that can predict CM severity will enable development of better intervention. Methods Postmortem serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples were obtained within 2–4 hours of death in Ghanaian children dying of CM, severe malarial anemia (SMA, and non-malarial (NM causes. Serum and CSF levels of 36 different biomarkers (IL-1β, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IL-12 (p70, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, Eotaxin, FGF basic protein, CRP, G-CSF, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IP-10, MCP-1 (MCAF, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, SDF-1α, CXCL11 (I-TAC, Fas-ligand [Fas-L], soluble Fas [sFas], sTNF-R1 (p55, sTNF-R2 (p75, MMP-9, TGF-β1, PDGF bb and VEGF were measured and the results compared between the 3 groups. Results After Bonferroni adjustment for other biomarkers, IP-10 was the only serum biomarker independently associated with CM mortality when compared to SMA and NM deaths. Eight CSF biomarkers (IL-1ra, IL-8, IP-10, PDGFbb, MIP-1β, Fas-L, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2 were significantly elevated in CM mortality group when compared to SMA and NM deaths. Additionally, CSF IP-10/PDGFbb median ratio was statistically significantly higher in the CM group compared to SMA and NM groups. Conclusion The parasite-induced local cerebral dysregulation in the production of IP-10, 1L-8, MIP-1β, PDGFbb, IL-1ra, Fas-L, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2 may be involved in CM neuropathology, and their immunoassay may have potential utility in predicting

  19. MGMT promoter methylation in serum and cerebrospinal fluid as a tumor-specific biomarker of glioma.

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    Wang, Zheng; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Yahong; Guo, Yang; Cong, Zheng; DU, Fangfang; Song, Bin

    2015-07-01

    O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation is a conventional technique to predict the prognosis or individualized treatment of glioma in tumor tissue following surgery or biopsy. However, the technique cannot be applied in those glioma patients with concomitant neurological dysfunctions or advanced age. The present study aimed to find a new minimally invasive and efficient alternative method for the detection of MGMT promoter methylation. The expression of MGMT promoter methylation was assessed in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and compared to the corresponding tumor tissue from glioma patients. The 89 patients in the study [32 World Health Organization (WHO) grade II, 19 WHO grade III and 38 WHO grade IV) were pathologically-diagnosed glioma and received radiation therapy following sample collection. The resected glioma tumor tissue (89), corresponding serum (89) and CSF (78) samples were collected for the detection of MGMT promoter methylation using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. The sensitivity and specificity of detecting MGMT promoter methylation in CSF and serum were compared. Among the tumor tissue samples, 51/89 (57.3%) showed MGMT promoter methylation. The specificity of the detection in the CSF and serum samples reached 100%. The sensitivity of MGMT promoter methylation detection in CSF and serum were 26/40 (65.0%) and 19/51 (37.3%), respectively (PMGMT promoter methylation detection using CSF were 8/12 (66.7%), 11/18 (61.1%) and 7/10 (70.0%), respectively, which were significantly higher than the sensitivities using serum (7/21, 33.3%; 7/19, 36.8%; and 5/11, 45.5%, respectively PMGMT promoter methylation using CSF and serum were 18/25 (72.0%) and 10/24 (41.7%), respectively, both of which were significantly higher than the corresponding values for patients without residual tumors (8/15, 53.3% and 6/19, 31.6%, respectively; PMGMT promoter methylation in CSF specimens shows higher sensitivity

  20. Reduction of astrogliosis and microgliosis by cerebrospinal fluid shunting in experimental hydrocephalus

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    Miller Janet M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive gliosis has the potential to alter biomechanical properties of the brain, impede neuronal regeneration and affect plasticity. Determining the onset and progression of reactive astrogliosis and microgliosis due to hydrocephalus is important for designing better clinical treatments. Methods Reactive astrogliosis and microgliosis were evaluated as the severity of hydrocephalus increased with age in hydrocephalic H-Tx rats and control littermates. Previous studies have suggested that gliosis may persist after short-term drainage (shunt treatment of the cerebrospinal fluid. Therefore shunts were placed in 15d hydrocephalic rats that were sacrificed after 6d (21d of age or after 21d (36d of age. Tissue was processed for Western blot procedures and immunohistochemistry, and probed for the astrocytic protein, Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP and for microglial protein, Isolectin B4 (ILB4. Results In the parietal cortex of untreated hydrocephalic animals, GFAP levels increased significantly at 5d and at 12d compared to age-matched control rats. There was a continued increase in GFAP levels over control at 21d and at 36d. Shunting prevented some of the increase in GFAP levels in the parietal cortex. In the occipital cortex of untreated hydrocephalic animals, there was a significant increase over control in levels of GFAP at 5d. This trend continued in the 12d animals, although not significantly. Significant increases in GFAP levels were present in 21d and in 36d animals. Shunting significantly reduced GFAP levels in the 36d shunted group. Quantitative grading of immuno-stained sections showed similar changes in GFAP stained astrocytes. Immuno-stained microglia were altered in shape in hydrocephalic animals. At 5d and 12d, they appeared to be developmentally delayed with a lack of processes. Older 21d and 36d hydrocephalic animals exhibited the characteristics of activated microglia, with thicker processes and enlarged

  1. Identification and validation of novel cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for staging early Alzheimer's disease.

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    Richard J Perrin

    Full Text Available Ideally, disease modifying therapies for Alzheimer disease (AD will be applied during the 'preclinical' stage (pathology present with cognition intact before severe neuronal damage occurs, or upon recognizing very mild cognitive impairment. Developing and judiciously administering such therapies will require biomarker panels to identify early AD pathology, classify disease stage, monitor pathological progression, and predict cognitive decline. To discover such biomarkers, we measured AD-associated changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF proteome.CSF samples from individuals with mild AD (Clinical Dementia Rating [CDR] 1 (n = 24 and cognitively normal controls (CDR 0 (n = 24 were subjected to two-dimensional difference-in-gel electrophoresis. Within 119 differentially-abundant gel features, mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS identified 47 proteins. For validation, eleven proteins were re-evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. Six of these assays (NrCAM, YKL-40, chromogranin A, carnosinase I, transthyretin, cystatin C distinguished CDR 1 and CDR 0 groups and were subsequently applied (with tau, p-tau181 and Aβ42 ELISAs to a larger independent cohort (n = 292 that included individuals with very mild dementia (CDR 0.5. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses using stepwise logistic regression yielded optimal biomarker combinations to distinguish CDR 0 from CDR>0 (tau, YKL-40, NrCAM and CDR 1 from CDR<1 (tau, chromogranin A, carnosinase I with areas under the curve of 0.90 (0.85-0.94 95% confidence interval [CI] and 0.88 (0.81-0.94 CI, respectively.Four novel CSF biomarkers for AD (NrCAM, YKL-40, chromogranin A, carnosinase I can improve the diagnostic accuracy of Aβ42 and tau. Together, these six markers describe six clinicopathological stages from cognitive normalcy to mild dementia, including stages defined by increased risk of cognitive decline. Such a panel might improve clinical trial efficiency by guiding

  2. Genetic and infectious profiles influence cerebrospinal fluid IgG abnormality in Japanese multiple sclerosis patients.

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    Satoshi Yoshimura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abnormal intrathecal synthesis of IgG, reflected by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF oligoclonal IgG bands (OBs and increased IgG index, is much less frequently observed in Japanese multiple sclerosis (MS cohorts compared with Western cohorts. We aimed to clarify whether genetic and common infectious backgrounds influence CSF IgG abnormality in Japanese MS patients. METHODOLOGY: We analyzed HLA-DRB1 alleles, and IgG antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori, Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA, and varicella zoster virus (VZV in 94 patients with MS and 367 unrelated healthy controls (HCs. We defined CSF IgG abnormality as the presence of CSF OBs and/or increased IgG index (>0.658. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CSF IgG abnormality was found in 59 of 94 (62.8% MS patients. CSF IgG abnormality-positive patients had a significantly higher frequency of brain MRI lesions meeting the Barkhof criteria compared with abnormality-negative patients. Compared with HCs, CSF IgG abnormality-positive MS patients showed a significantly higher frequency of DRB1 1501, whereas CSF IgG abnormality-negative patients had a significantly higher frequency of DRB1 0405. CSF IgG abnormality-positive MS patients had a significantly higher frequency of anti-C. pneumoniae IgG antibodies compared with CSF IgG abnormality-negative MS patients, although there was no difference in the frequency of anti-C. pneumoniae IgG antibodies between HCs and total MS patients. Compared with HCs, anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies were detected significantly less frequently in the total MS patients, especially in CSF IgG abnormality-negative MS patients. The frequencies of antibodies against EBNA and VZV did not differ significantly among the groups. CONCLUSIONS: CSF IgG abnormality is associated with Western MS-like brain MRI features. DRB1 1501 and C. pneumoniae infection confer CSF IgG abnormality, while DRB1 0405 and H. pylori infection are positively and negatively

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid glucose and lactate: age-specific reference values and implications for clinical practice.

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    Wilhelmina G Leen

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis is an important tool in the diagnostic work-up of many neurological disorders, but reference ranges for CSF glucose, CSF/plasma glucose ratio and CSF lactate based on studies with large numbers of CSF samples are not available. Our aim was to define age-specific reference values. In 1993 The Nijmegen Observational CSF Study was started. Results of all CSF samples that were analyzed between 1993 and 2008 at our laboratory were systematically collected and stored in our computerized database. After exclusion of CSF samples with an unknown or elevated erythrocyte count, an elevated leucocyte count, elevated concentrations of bilirubin, free hemoglobin, or total protein 9,036 CSF samples were further studied for CSF glucose (n = 8,871, CSF/plasma glucose ratio (n = 4,516 and CSF lactate values (n = 7,614. CSF glucose, CSF/plasma glucose ratio and CSF lactate were age-, but not sex dependent. Age-specific reference ranges were defined as 5-95(th percentile ranges. CSF glucose 5(th percentile values ranged from 1.8 to 2.9 mmol/L and 95(th percentile values from 3.8 to 5.6 mmol/L. CSF/plasma glucose ratio 5(th percentile values ranged from 0.41 to 0.53 and 95(th percentile values from 0.82 to 1.19. CSF lactate 5(th percentile values ranged from 0.88 to 1.41 mmol/L and 95(th percentile values from 2.00 to 2.71 mmol/L. Reference ranges for all three parameters were widest in neonates and narrowest in toddlers, with lower and upper limits increasing with age. These reference values allow a reliable interpretation of CSF results in everyday clinical practice. Furthermore, hypoglycemia was associated with an increased CSF/plasma glucose ratio, whereas hyperglycemia did not affect the CSF/plasma glucose ratio.

  4. Post-traumatic cerebrospinal fluid fistula: a case report; Fistula liquorica pos-traumatica - relato de um caso

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    Tamburus, Wander Miguel; Figueiredo Wanderley, Eliana Christina; Maciel, Damacio Ramon Kaimen; Narciso, Avelino Jose Soares; Sendenski, Mauricio Michalak [Universidade Estadual de Londrina, PR (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude

    1996-10-01

    Fronto-basal fracture occurs in around 5% of cranioencephalic trauma. the involved structures are: arachnoid, dura-mater, osseous base and the mucosa, and there us contact between the brain and the environment. Even with rupture of all these structures cerebrospinal fluid leakage may not occur; regardless of this, there may be infectious complications, such as bacterial meningitis or brain abscess. the authors report the case of a patient with head injury and four bacterial meningitis, the diagnosis of post-traumatic liquoric fistula being made only through magnetic resonance imaging. (author) 10 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Mirror Image of the Amyloid-β Species in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Cerebral Amyloid in Alzheimer's Disease.

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    Catania, Marcella; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Tonoli, Elisa; Benussi, Luisa; Pasquali, Claudio; Giaccone, Giorgio; Maderna, Emanuela; Ghidoni, Roberta; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation in brain that is paralleled by Aβ(1-42) reduction in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We analyzed the pattern of Aβ peptides, including the N- and C-terminal truncated fragments, in brain and CSF from two familial and one sporadic AD cases. We found that (i) each patient is characterized by a distinct Aβ profile in CSF and brain deposits and (ii) the CSF Aβ pattern mirrors the Aβ profile of cerebral amyloid. These results suggest the existence of different molecular AD subtypes which can be recognized by CSF analysis, enabling patient stratification.

  6. Neuron-specific Enclose and Myelin Basic Protein in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with First Episode Schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shuying; WU Hanrong; GUO Huirong; ZHAO Zheng

    2006-01-01

    In order to study whether patients with schizophrenia have cerebral injury, neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and myelin basic protein (MBP)in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 33 patients with first episode schizophrenia and 9 from the control group were determined by double antibody sandwich enzyme immunoassay method. The results showed that there was significant difference in the NSE contents between the experimental group and control group (P<0.01). The NSE contents in CSF in the experimental group were positively correlated with MBP in schizophrenia patients (P<0.05). These findings suggested that patients with schizophrenia had cerebral injury.

  7. Molecular biology of the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers: similarities and differences

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    Redzic Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Efficient processing of information by the central nervous system (CNS represents an important evolutionary advantage. Thus, homeostatic mechanisms have developed that provide appropriate circumstances for neuronal signaling, including a highly controlled and stable microenvironment. To provide such a milieu for neurons, extracellular fluids of the CNS are separated from the changeable environment of blood at three major interfaces: at the brain capillaries by the blood-brain barrier (BBB, which is localized at the level of the endothelial cells and separates brain interstitial fluid (ISF from blood; at the epithelial layer of four choroid plexuses, the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF barrier (BCSFB, which separates CSF from the CP ISF, and at the arachnoid barrier. The two barriers that represent the largest interface between blood and brain extracellular fluids, the BBB and the BCSFB, prevent the free paracellular diffusion of polar molecules by complex morphological features, including tight junctions (TJs that interconnect the endothelial and epithelial cells, respectively. The first part of this review focuses on the molecular biology of TJs and adherens junctions in the brain capillary endothelial cells and in the CP epithelial cells. However, normal function of the CNS depends on a constant supply of essential molecules, like glucose and amino acids from the blood, exchange of electrolytes between brain extracellular fluids and blood, as well as on efficient removal of metabolic waste products and excess neurotransmitters from the brain ISF. Therefore, a number of specific transport proteins are expressed in brain capillary endothelial cells and CP epithelial cells that provide transport of nutrients and ions into the CNS and removal of waste products and ions from the CSF. The second part of this review concentrates on the molecular biology of various solute carrier (SLC transport proteins at those two barriers and underlines

  8. Characterization of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma NPY levels in normal volunteers over a 24-h timeframe.

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    Baker, Dewleen G; Bertram, Tobias Moeller; Patel, Piyush M; Barkauskas, Donald A; Clopton, Paul; Patel, Sejal; Geracioti, Thomas D; Haji, Uzair; O'Connor, Daniel T; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Hauger, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is abundant in mammals, where it contributes to diverse behavioral and physiological functions, centrally and peripherally, but little information is available in regard to NPY cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/plasma concentration relationships and dynamics. Since plasma NPY levels are commonly used as proxy "biomarkers" for central NPY activity in stress and mental health research in humans this study aims to better characterize the CSF/plasma NPY relationships. Subjects were eleven healthy male volunteers, admitted to the clinical research center for placement of an indwelling CSF catheter, as well as venous catheter, for 24-h collection of CSF NPY (cNPY) and plasma NPY (pNPY) samples. As observed in prior studies, group mean (SE) cNPY concentrations [792.1 (7.80) pg/mL] were higher than pNPY concentrations [220.0 (3.63) pg/mL]. For the eleven normal volunteers who had sufficient common (hourly) pNPY and cNPY data points, analysis of pNPY/cNPY concentration ratios and lagged cross-correlation analysis was completed. Average pNPY/cNPY concentration ratios ranged from .20 to .40 across study subjects, with a mean of .29. pNPY/cNPY cross correlation analyses, computed at varying time lags, were non-significant. An attempt was made to analyze the circadian rhythmicity of NPY secretion, but circadian components were not detectable. Using 24-h data collection, we characterized CSF/plasma NPY relationships, including presentation of evidence of weak CSF and plasma correlations, an important consideration for study design of NPY in stress or mental health.

  9. Relationship between cerebrospinal fluid flow through the ventriculo-peritoneal shunt and computed tomographic images of hydrocephalic patients

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    Ikeda, Kiyonobu; Itoh, Haruhide; Someya, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Shinjiro

    1988-04-01

    Quantitative measurements of cerebrospinal fluid flow through the ventriculo-peritoneal shunt using radioisotope were carried out on 34 hydrocepalic patients (18 children and 16 adults) and the relationship between the flow rates and the computed tomographic (CT) images was studied. 1) The flow rates in the prone position was 0.04 - 0.20(mean +- SD, 0.10 +- 0.05) ml/min in 13 patients whose shunt systems were functioning adequately. There was a good correlation between the flow rates and closing pressures of the shunt valves. 2) The 21 patients with malfunctioning shunt systems were devided into two groups as follows; the obstruction or lower flow group in which the shunt flow was in 0 approx. 0.05 ml/min and the over-flow groups with rates over 0.20 ml/min. In the former group, there were 3 cases in which the shunt flow in a sitting position was very low and the cause of the malfunction was thought to be placement of an inadequate system with a higher pressure valve. 3) In 4 cases of 5 children in which the ventricles were of normal size during shunt malfunction, their ventricular sizes on CT images changed to small or slit-like ventricles after shunt revision. 4) A few cases of hydrocephalic adults, in which the shunt-catheters were thought to be obstructed with no shunt flow in the prone and sitting positions showing no progressive dilatation of the ventricles on CT images, were diagnosed with the added findings of RI cisternography as shunt-dependent arrested hydrocephalus. In the diagnosis of shunt malfunction and selection of the most adequate system in shunt revision, it is necessary to analyze together the data on CT images, quantitative measurement of shunt flow rates and RI cisternography as well as the clinical manifestations.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid derived from progressive multiple sclerosis patients promotes neuronal and oligodendroglial differentiation of human neural precursor cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofanilli, M; Cymring, B; Lu, A; Rosenthal, H; Sadiq, S A

    2013-10-10

    In the adult CNS, tissue-specific germinal niches, such as the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, contain multipotent neural precursor cells (NPCs) with the capacity to self-renew and differentiate into functional brain cells (i.e. neurons, astrocytes or oligodendrocytes). Due to their intrinsic plasticity, NPCs can be considered an essential part of the cellular mechanism(s) by which the CNS tries to repair itself after an injury. In inflammatory CNS disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), neurogenesis and gliogenesis occur as part of an 'intrinsic' self-repair process. However, full and long-lasting repair in progressive MS is not achieved. Recent data suggest that endogenous NPCs, while trying to repair the damaged CNS in MS, may become the target of the disease itself. It is possible that factors produced during MS, like CNS-infiltrating blood-borne inflammatory mononuclear cells, reactive CNS-resident cells, and humoral mediators, can alter the physiological properties of NPCs, ultimately impairing their ability to promote neural regeneration. Here, we investigate the effect of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) derived from primary progressive (PPMS) and secondary progressive (SPMS) MS patients (CSF-MS) on the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of commercially available human embryonic-derived NPCs named ENStem-A. We found that PPMS derived CSF markedly reduced the proliferation of ENStem-A and increased their differentiation toward neuronal and oligodendroglial cells, compared to control CSF. Similar but less striking results were seen when ENstem-A were treated with SPMS derived CSF. Our findings suggest that in both SPMS and PPMS the CNS milieu, as determined by extrapolation from CSF findings, may stimulate the endogenous pool of NPCs to differentiate into neurons and oligodendrocytes.

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid tau protein as a biomarker for severity of spinal cord injury in dogs with intervertebral disc herniation.

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    Roerig, A; Carlson, R; Tipold, A; Stein, V M

    2013-08-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) is a common cause of spinal cord injury (SCI) in dogs. Microtubule-associated protein tau derives predominantly from neurons and axons, making it a potential marker of neuronal injury. A retrospective study, including 51 dogs with thoracolumbar or cervical IVDH and 12 clinically normal dogs, was designed to describe associations between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau concentration, degree of neurological signs and motor functional recovery in dogs with IVDH. Signalment, degree of neurological dysfunction and outcome were recorded. Cisternal CSF tau values were determined by ELISA. Associations between CSF tau concentration and various clinical parameters were evaluated. Receiver-operating characteristics curve (ROC) analyses were performed to assess the validity of protein tau measurements. CSF tau concentrations were significantly higher in dogs showing plegia (median, 79.9 pg/mL; range, 0-778.7 pg/mL; P=0.016) compared to healthy dogs and dogs with paresis (median, 30.1 pg/mL; range, 0-193.1 pg/mL; P=0.025). Plegic dogs that improved by one neurological grade within 1 week had significantly lower tau protein levels compared to plegic dogs that needed more time for recovery or did not show an improvement (P=0.008). A CSF tau concentration >41.3 pg/mL had a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 83% to predict an unsuccessful outcome in plegic dogs based on ROC analysis (area under the curve, 0.887; P=0.007, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.717-1.057). CSF protein tau levels are positively associated with the severity of spinal cord damage and may serve as a prognostic indicator in dogs with IVDH.

  12. Autoantibody profiling on human proteome microarray for biomarker discovery in cerebrospinal fluid and sera of neuropsychiatric lupus.

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    Chaojun Hu

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE may be potential biomarkers for prediction, diagnosis, or prognosis of NPSLE. We used a human proteome microarray with~17,000 unique full-length human proteins to investigate autoantibodies associated with NPSLE. Twenty-nine CSF specimens from 12 NPSLE, 7 non-NPSLE, and 10 control (non-systemic lupus erythematosuspatients were screened for NPSLE-associated autoantibodies with proteome microarrays. A focused autoantigen microarray of candidate NPSLE autoantigens was applied to profile a larger cohort of CSF with patient-matched sera. We identified 137 autoantigens associated with NPSLE. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that these autoantigens were enriched for functions involved in neurological diseases (score = 43.Anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA was found in the CSF of NPSLE and non-NPSLE patients. The positive rates of 4 autoantibodies in CSF specimens were significantly different between the SLE (i.e., NPSLE and non-NPSLE and control groups: anti-ribosomal protein RPLP0, anti-RPLP1, anti-RPLP2, and anti-TROVE2 (also known as anti-Ro/SS-A. The positive rate for anti-SS-A associated with NPSLE was higher than that for non-NPSLE (31.11% cf. 10.71%; P = 0.045.Further analysis showed that anti-SS-A in CSF specimens was related to neuropsychiatric syndromes of the central nervous system in SLE (P = 0.009. Analysis with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient indicated that the titers of anti-RPLP2 and anti-SS-A in paired CSF and serum specimens significantly correlated. Human proteome microarrays offer a powerful platform to discover novel autoantibodies in CSF samples. Anti-SS-A autoantibodies may be potential CSF markers for NPSLE.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and CSF acetylcholinesterase activity are reduced in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

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    Per Johansson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known of vitamin D concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in Alzheimer's disease (AD and its relation with CSF acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity, a marker of cholinergic function. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 52 consecutive patients under primary evaluation of cognitive impairment and 17 healthy controls. The patients had AD dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI diagnosed with AD dementia upon follow-up (n = 28, other dementias (n = 12, and stable MCI (SMCI, n = 12. We determined serum and CSF concentrations of calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD, and CSF activities of AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE. FINDINGS: CSF 25OHD level was reduced in AD patients (P < 0.05, and CSF AChE activity was decreased both in patients with AD (P < 0.05 and other dementias (P < 0.01 compared to healthy controls. None of the measured variables differed between BuChE K-variant genotypes whereas the participants that were homozygous in terms of the apolipoprotein E (APOE ε4 allele had decreased CSF AChE activity compared to subjects lacking the APOE ε4 allele (P = 0.01. In AD patients (n=28, CSF AChE activity correlated positively with CSF levels of total tau (T-tau (r = 0.44, P < 0.05 and phosphorylated tau protein (P-tau (r = 0.50, P < 0.01, but CSF activities of AChE or BuChE did not correlate with serum or CSF levels of 25OHD. CONCLUSIONS: In this pilot study, both CSF 25OHD level and CSF AChE activity were reduced in AD patients. However, the lack of correlations between 25OHD levels and CSF activities of AChE or BuChE might suggest different mechanisms of action, which could have implications for treatment trials.

  14. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage and their correlation with recovery of neurological functions%高血压脑出血患者脑源性神经营养因子水平变化及其与神经功能的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈胜利; 龚涛; 李长清; 张书琼; 李莉

    2011-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) contents in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were detected by ELISA method in 30 cases of hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage (HCH group) and 30 healthy subjects (control group).The performance and neurological functions of patients were evaluated by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale( NIHSS),Hamilton Depression Scale ( HAMD),Barthel Index of Daily Living Skills.The result showed that the contents of BDNF in blood and CSF of HCH patients in recovery stage were significantly higher than those in acute stage and those of control group ( P < 0.05 ) ; the contents of BDNF in blood and CSF were negatively correlated with neurological impairment degree ( P <0.05).The results suggest that BDNF in the blood or the CSF may promote the recovery of neurological function in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage.%采用ELISA法检测30例高血压脑出血患者(观察组,因检测时间点不同而分为M1、M2亚组),30名正常人(对照组)血液和脑脊液中脑源性神经营养因子(BDNF)的含量;用美国国立卫生院神经功能评分量表(NIHSS)、汉密顿抑郁量表(HAMD)、日常生活能力Barthel指数对观察组患者按不同的时间点(发病后≤7 d,发病后≥21 d)进行评分.结果显示高血压脑出血患者恢复期血液和脑脊液BDNF显著高于急性期患者和对照组(P<0.05);血液和脑脊液BDNF含量与出院时神经功能缺损程度呈显著负相关(P<0.05).脑脊液或血液中的BDNF对高血压脑出血患者神经功能的恢复具有促进作用.

  15. Effect of Head Position on Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure in Cats: Comparison with Artificial Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarica, Marijan; Radoš, Milan; Draganić, Pero; Erceg, Gorislav; Orešković, Darko; Maraković, Jurica; Bulat, Marin

    2006-01-01

    Aim To demonstrate that changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure in the cranial cavity and spinal canal after head elevation from the horizontal level occur primarily due to the biophysical characteristics of the CSF system, ie, distensibility of the spinal dura. Methods Experiments in vivo were performed on cats and a new artificial model of the CSF system with dimensions similar to the CSF system in cats, consisting of non-distensible cranial and distensible spinal part. Measurements of the CSF pressure in the cranial and spinal spaces were performed in chloralose-anesthetized cats (n = 10) in the horizontal position on the base of a stereotaxic apparatus (reference zero point) and in the position in which the head was elevated to 5 cm and 10 cm above that horizontal position. Changes in the CSF pressure in the cranial and spinal part of the model were measured in the cranial part positioned in the same way as the head in cats (n = 5). Results When the cat was in the horizontal position, the values of the CSF pressure in the cranial (11.9 ± 1.1 cm H2O) and spinal (11.8 ± 0.6 cm H2O) space were not significantly different. When the head was elevated 5 cm or 10 cm above the reference zero point, the CSF pressure in the cranium significantly decreased to 7.7 ± 0.6 cm H2O and 4.7 ± 0.7 cm H2O, respectively, while the CSF pressure in the spinal space significantly increased to 13.8 ± 0.7 cm H2O and 18.5 ± 1.6 cm H2O, respectively (P<0.001 for both). When the artificial CSF model was positioned in the horizontal level and its cranial part elevated by 5 cm and 10 cm, the changes in the pressure were the same as those in the cats when in the same hydrostatic position. Conclusions The new model of the CSF system used in our study faithfully mimicked the changes in the CSF pressure in cats during head elevation in relation to the body. Changes in the pressure in the model were not accompanied by the changes in fluid volume in

  16. Association of neuroelectrophysiology and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin with pathogenetic conditions of patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haibin Huang; Xunliang Mai; Xiaohong Ye

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is an autoimmune disease which is characterized by demyelination of peripheral nerve and nerve root, and inflammatory reaction of lymphocyte and macrophage. Neuroelectrophysiological examination and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis are of significance for its diagnosis.OBJECTIVE: To study the association of neuroelectrophysiology and cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin (CSF-Ig) with pathogenetic conditions of patients with GBS.DESIGN: Case control study.SETTING: Department of Neurology, Shenzhen Municipal Shekou Group Hospital; Department of Neuroelectrophysiology, People's Hospital of Guangdong Province.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 32 GBS patients including 18 males and 14 females who aged from 17 to 72 years were selected as experimental group from the Department of Neurology, People's Hospital of Guangdong Province from January 2004 to December 2005. All cases conformed with GBS diagnostic criteria established by Asbury in 1990 and they were divided into three types according to neurological criteria established by Chinese Neurology and Psychology Journal in 1993: mild, moderate and severe types. Another 30 patients with vascular headache were selected as control group from the same hospital including 14 males and 16 females who aged from 17 to 79 years.METHODS: ① Neuroelectrophysiological examination: Multiple-functional electromyography device provided by Nicolet Company, USA was used to measure nerve conduction velocity (NCV), including motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV); meanwhile, electromyologram (EMG), somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and electroencephalogram (EEG) were also measured. ② Detection of CSF-Ig: Concentrations of IgG, IgA and IgM were measured with immunofixation electrophoresis. ③ Follow-up: Among 32 GBS patients, 14 cases received follow-up after treatment and the longest follow-up time was 1 year after onset. Among them, 8 cases were reexaminined

  17. [A Case of Leptospirosis in which the Causative Pathogen was Detected Using Cerebrospinal Fluid PCR Eight Days after Onset].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Yuki; Tono, Toshihiro; Hosoda, Tomohiro; Taguchi, Hiroaki; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Osone, Yasuo; Nozaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient with leptospirosis caused by infection with Leptospira interrogans serovar Rachmati. A 30-year-old Japanese man took part in a survival camp on Iriomote Island, Okinawa, from July 9 to July 15, 2014. During the camp, he swam in the river and kayaked. He developed a high fever and fatigue 7 days after completing his trip and was admitted to our hospital on July 22. On admission, he complained of a posterior cervical pain and a loss of appetite. Laboratory findings revealed granulocytosis, mildly elevated AST and ALT levels, elevated BUN and Cr levels, and a significantly elevated CRP level. No pathogenic bacteria were isolated from blood, urine, or cerebrospinal fluid cultures. We included leptospirosis in the differential diagnosis because of the patient's history of participating in a survival camp on Iriomote Island. Minocycline 200 mg, p.o. showed an excellent efficacy. The Leptospira flagellar gene FlaB was detected using a cerebrospinal fluid PCR. A microscopic agglutination test (MAT) during the convalescent stage demonstrated significant increases in antibodies against L. interrogans serovar Rachmati, confirming the diagnosis of leptospirosis. A medical history including occupation and recent travel history, and an adequate specimen sampling are crucial for the accurate and early diagnosis of leptospirosis.

  18. Low neuropeptide Y in cerebrospinal fluid in bipolar patients is associated with previous and prospective suicide attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Johan V; Jakobsson, Joel; Pålsson, Erik; Landén, Mikael; Mathé, Aleksander A

    2014-12-01

    The attempted and accomplished suicide rates in patients with bipolar disorder are 40-50% and 15-20%, respectively. No biological markers that help predict suicide been identified. Human and experimental animal data indicate that dysregulation of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) system plays a role in depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The aim of this study was to explore if low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) NPY is associated with (1) past suicide attempts, (2) future suicide attempts, and (3) trait anxiety. Lumbar puncture was performed on 120 clinically stable patients with bipolar disorder enrolled in the St Göran Bipolar Project, where the number of previous suicide attempts was documented. NPY-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI) was determined in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Patients were reexamined one year after the lumbar puncture and suicide attempts were recorded. NPY-LI was significantly lower in patients with a history of suicide attempt than in patients who had not attempted suicide prior to lumbar puncture. Importantly, NPY-LI was markedly lower in patients who made a suicide attempt during the follow-up period compared to patients who did not. Patients who attempted suicide during the follow-up also had markedly lower NPY-LI than those with previous suicide attempts who did not reattempt. Our results suggest that low CSF NPY-LI predicts future suicide attempts. The data are in line with the hypothesis that NPY signaling is altered in affective disorders and states of emotional dysregulation.

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea as a complication of ACTH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma in a patient with morbid obesity

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    Dar'ya Viktorovna Petrova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cushing's disease (CD is a progressive neuroendocrine disease caused by a pituitary tumor producing excessive amounts of ACTH. In most cases (80-85% the cause of the disease is a pituitary corticotroph microadenomas (located within the sella, measuring 3–10 mm, rarely multiple microadenomas and only 15% of cases are presented as corticotroph hyperplasia or pituitary macroadenoma extending beyond the sella. The macroadenomas in CD usually extend suprasellar (10%, infrasellar tumor growth is relatively rare (5%. If the clinical picture is subtle, the symptoms are caused by the development "mass effect" of the tumor as it propagates to the surrounding pituitary structures. Suprasellar growth leads to compression of the optic chiasm with narrowing of visual fields, infrasellar growth destructs the bottom of the sella turcica and may cause nasal cerebrospinal fluid leak, which is dangerous due depressurization of the cranial cavity and its communication with environmental pathogens, development of life-threatening conditions such as meningitis, meningoencephalitis, ventriculitis. Leading life-threatening complications of the CD are infectious and cardiovascular. But in the case of nasal liquorrhea with expansion of the tumor in sphenoid sinus with destruction of the bottom of the sella, there is an immediate threat to the life of the patient. This article presents an example of a patient with morbid obesity and lack of specific clinical manifestations of CD, in whom the diagnosis of disease CD was made on the results of laboratory and instrumental examination, which experienced a spontaneous nasal cerebrospinal fluid leak.

  20. Estimation of the Lateral Ventricles Volumes from a 2D Image and Its Relationship with Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaarani Bader

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This work suggests a fast estimation method of the lateral ventricles volume from a 2D image and then determines if this volume is correlated with the cerebrospinal fluid flow at the aqueductal and cerebral levels in neurodegenerative diseases. Materials and Methods. FForty-five elderly patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease (19, normal pressure hydrocephalus (13, and vascular dementia (13 were involved and underwent anatomical and phase contrast MRI scans. Lateral ventricles and stroke volumes were assessed on anatomical and phase contrast scans, respectively. A common reference plane was used to calculate the lateral ventricles’ area on 2D images. Results. The largest volumes were observed in hydrocephalus patients. The linear regression between volumes and areas was computed, and a strong positive correlation was detected (R2=0.9. A derived equation was determined to represent the volumes for any given area. On the other hand, no significant correlations were detected between ventricles and stroke volumes (R2≤0.15. Conclusion. Lateral ventricles volumes are significantly proportional to the 2D reference section area and could be used for patients’ follow-up even if 3D images are unavailable. The cerebrospinal fluid fluctuations in brain disorders may depend on many physiological parameters other than the ventricular morphology.

  1. A cytopreparatory method for cerebrospinal fluid in which the cell yield is high and the fluid is saved for chemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutuarima, J A; Hische, E A; Sylva-Steenland, R M; van der Helm, H J

    1988-01-01

    A method for the concentration of cells from cerebrospinal fluid is described. An adaptation of a commercial cytochamber, consisting of a holder that fixes a disposable chamber directly on a microscope slide, was used. The cells were spun down in a conventional swing-out centrifuge, which was provided with a bucket for the cytochamber system. After removing most of the supernatant with a pipette, the remaining fluid was absorbed by means of a suction device consisting of a disposable pipette tip covered with a piece of Leukopor and filled with Sephadex G10 beads. The method gives a high recovery of cells (90%), together with a good preservation of cell morphology, and leaves about 80% of the fluid available for analysis of the soluble components.

  2. Regional cortical thinning and cerebrospinal biomarkers predict worsening daily functioning across the Alzheimer disease spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Gad A.; Lorius, Natacha; Locascio, Joseph J.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Impairment in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) heralds the transition from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia and is a major source of burden for both the patient and caregiver. Objective To investigate the relationship between IADL and regional cortical thinning and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarkers cross-sectionally and longitudinally in clinically normal (CN) elderly, MCI, and mild AD dementia subjects. Methods Two hundred and twenty nine CN, 395 MCI, and 188 AD dementia subjects participating in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative underwent baseline magnetic resonance imaging, baseline lumbar puncture, and clinical assessments, including the Functional Activities Questionnaire used to measure IADL, every 6 to 12 months up to 3 years. General linear regression and mixed effects models were employed. Results IADL impairment was associated with the interactions between lower inferior temporal cortical thickness and diagnosis (p<0.0001), greater lateral occipital cortical thickness and diagnosis (p<0.0001), and greater amyloid-beta 1-42 (Aβ1-42) and diagnosis (p=0.0002) at baseline (driven by AD dementia). Lower baseline supramarginal (p=0.02) and inferior temporal (p=0.05) cortical thickness, lower Aβ1-42 (p<0.0001), and greater total tau (t-tau) (p=0.02) were associated with greater rate of IADL impairment over time. Conclusions Temporal atrophy is associated with IADL impairment in mild AD dementia at baseline, while baseline parietal and temporal atrophy, lower CSF Aβ1-42, and greater t-tau predict worsening IADL impairment over time across the AD spectrum. These results emphasize the importance of assessing IADL at the stage of MCI and even at the transition from CN to MCI. PMID:24685624

  3. Brain MRI in patients with multiple sclerosis with oligoclonal cerebrospinal fluid bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesaroš Šarlota

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Locally produced oligoclonal IgG bands (OCB are present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 95% patients with multiple sclerosis (MS[2,3]. The most sensitive method for the detection of OCB is isoelectric focusing (IEF [1]. Occasional patients with clinically definite MS lack evidence for intrathecal IgG synthesis [2,9]. This study was designed to compare brain magnetic resonance imagining (MRI findings between CSF OCB positive and negative MS patients. The study comprised 22 OB negative patients with clinically definite MS and 22 OCB positive controls matched for age, disease duration, activity and course of MS. In the both groups clinical assessment was performed by using Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS score. T2 weighted MRI of the brain was performed on a Siemens Magnetom (1.0 T. Lesions were countred and sized for 15 anatomically defined locations:7 periventricular (PV and 8 non-periventricular (NPV regions. An arbitrary scoring system weighted for lesions size was used to estimate total and regional lesions loads: a1 point was given for each lesion with a diameter 1-5 mm, b 2 points for one lesion with a diameter 6-10 mm, c 3 points for one over 10 mm, and confluent lesions scored one extra point [16]. Atrophy were scored as follows: 0-normal size, 1-mild atrophy, 2-moderate atrophy and 3-severe atrophy. Mean score of total brain MRI loads was lower in OCB negative than in OCB positive MS patients (44 vs. 50 but the difference was not statistically significant. Mean periventricular (32 vs. 23 non-periventricular (26 vs. 19 and infratentorial (11 vs. 9 scores were higher in OCB positive MS group in comparison with OCB negative patients but non-significant (figure 1. There was no correlation between EDSS score and total MRI lesions load in OCB negative MS patients, while in OCB positive group we detected significant correlation between EDSS score and total MRI lesions load (p=0.026 (figure 2. The results of this study demonstrate that

  4. miRNA expression profiles in cerebrospinal fluid and blood of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia: an exploratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølvsten Sørensen, Sofie; Nygaard Hillig, Ann-Britt; Christensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that function as posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. Measurements of miRNAs in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood have just started gaining attention as a novel diagnostic tool for various neurological conditions....... The purpose of this exploratory investigation was to analyze the expression of miRNAs in CSF and blood of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders in order to identify potential miRNA biomarker candidates able to separate AD from other types of dementia. METHODS: CSF...... was collected by lumbar puncture performed on 10 patients diagnosed with AD and 10 patients diagnosed with either vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia or dementia with Lewy bodies. Blood samples were taken immediately after. Total RNA was extracted from cell free fractions of CSF and plasma...

  5. A genome-wide association study of kynurenic acid in cerebrospinal fluid: implications for psychosis and cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellgren, C M; Kegel, M E; Bergen, S E; Ekman, C J; Olsson, S; Larsson, M; Vawter, M P; Backlund, L; Sullivan, P F; Sklar, P; Smoller, J W; Magnusson, P K E; Hultman, C M; Walther-Jallow, L; Svensson, C I; Lichtenstein, P; Schalling, M; Engberg, G; Erhardt, S; Landén, M

    2016-01-01

    Elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the glia-derived N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (KYNA) have consistently been implicated in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Here, we conducted a genome-wide association study based on CSF KYNA in bipolar disorder and found support for an association with a common variant within 1p21.3. After replication in an independent cohort, we linked this genetic variant—associated with reduced SNX7 expression—to positive psychotic symptoms and executive function deficits in bipolar disorder. A series of post-mortem brain tissue and in vitro experiments suggested SNX7 downregulation to result in a caspase-8-driven activation of interleukin-1β and a subsequent induction of the brain kynurenine pathway. The current study demonstrates the potential of using biomarkers in genetic studies of psychiatric disorders, and may help to identify novel drug targets in bipolar disorder. PMID:26666201

  6. Expression of TRPM8 in the distal cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons in the brain mesencephalon of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Licai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown that distal cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (dCSF-CNs exist near the ventral midline of the midbrain aqueduct and also in the grey matter of the inferior third ventricle and the fourth ventricle floor in the superior segment of the pons. The dCSF-CNs communicate between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and the brain parenchyma and may participate in the transduction and regulation of pain signals. The cold sensation receptor channel, TRPM8 is involved in analgesia for neuropathic pain, but whether the TRPM8 receptor exists on dCSF-CNs remains unknown. However, there is preliminary evidence that TRPM8 is expressed in dCSF-CNs and may participate in the transmission and regulation of sensory information between brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in rats. Methods Retrograde tracing of the cholera toxin subunit B labeled with horseradish peroxidase (CB-HRP injected into the lateral ventricle was used to identify dCSF-CNs. A double-labeled immunofluorescent technique and laser scanning confocal microscopy were used to identify the expression of TRPM8 in dCSF-CNs. Software Image-Pro Plus was used to count the number of neurons in three sections where CB-HRP positive neurons were located in the mesencephalon of six rats. Results The cell bodies of CB-HRP-positive dCSF-CNs were found in the brain parenchyma near the midline of the ventral Aq, also in the grey of the 3V, and the 4V floor in the superior segment of the pons. In the mesencephalon their processes extended into the CSF. TRPM8 labeled neurons were also found in the same area as were CB-HRP/TRPM8 double-labeled neurons. CB-HRP/TRPM8 double-labeled neurons were found in 42.9 ± 2.3% of neurons labeled by TRPM8, and all CB-HRP-labeled neurons were also labeled with TPRM8. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that the cold sensation receptor channel, TRPM8, is localised within the dCSF-CNs of the mesencephalon. TRPM8 acts as receptor of d

  7. Human cerebrospinal fluid fatty acid levels differ between supernatant fluid and brain-derived nanoparticle fractions, and are altered in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred N Fonteh

    Full Text Available Although saturated (SAFA, monounsaturated (MUFA, and polyunsaturated (PUFA fatty acids are important structural components of neuronal membranes and precursors of signaling molecules, knowledge of their metabolism in Alzheimer's disease (AD is limited. Based on recent discovery that lipids in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are distributed in both brain-derived nanoparticles (NP and supernatant fluid (SF, we hypothesized that fatty acid (FA abundance and distribution into these compartments is altered in early AD pathology.We assayed the FA composition and abundance in CSF fractions from cognitively healthy (CH, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and AD study participants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In the SF fraction, concentration of docosahexaenoic acid [DHA, (C22:6n-3] was less in AD compared with CH, while alpha linolenic acid [α-LNA, (C18:3n-3] was lower in MCI compared with CH. In the NP fraction, levels of SAFAs (C15:0, C16:0 and a MUFA (C15:1 differentiated CH from MCI, while two MUFAs (C15:1, C19:1 and four PUFAs (C20:2n-6, C20:3n-3, C22:4n-6, C22:5n-3 were higher in AD compared with CH. Levels of even-chain free SAFA and total free FA levels were higher in AD, levels of odd-chain free SAFAs, MUFAs, n-3 PUFAs, and total PUFA, were lower in AD compared with CH. Free n-6 PUFA levels were similar in all three groups.FA metabolism is compartmentalized differently in NP versus SF fractions of CSF, and altered FA levels reflect the importance of abnormal metabolism and oxidative pathways in AD. Depleted DHA in CSF fractions in AD is consistent with the importance of n-3 PUFAs in cognitive function, and suggests that disturbed PUFA metabolism contributes to AD pathology. This study of FA levels in CSF fractions from different cognitive stages shows potential AD biomarkers, and provides further insight into cell membrane dysfunctions, including mechanisms leading to amyloid production.

  8. Systemic Administration of Glibenclamide Fails to Achieve Therapeutic Levels in the Brain and Cerebrospinal Fluid of Rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Lahmann

    Full Text Available Activating mutations in the Kir6.2 (KCNJ11 subunit of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel cause neonatal diabetes (ND. Patients with severe mutations also suffer from neurological complications. Glibenclamide blocks the open KATP channels and is the treatment of choice for ND. However, although glibenclamide successfully restores normoglycaemia, it has a far more limited effect on the neurological problems. To assess the extent to which glibenclamide crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB in vivo, we quantified glibenclamide concentrations in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, and brain tissue of rats, control mice, and mice expressing a human neonatal diabetes mutation (Kir6.2-V59M selectively in neurones (nV59M mice. As only small sample volumes can be obtained from rodents, we developed a highly sensitive method of analysis, using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry acquisition with pseudo-selected reaction monitoring, achieving a quantification limit of 10ng/ml (20nM glibenclamide in a 30μl sample. Glibenclamide was not detectable in the CSF or brain of rats after implantation with subcutaneous glibenclamide pellets, despite high plasma concentrations. Further, one hour after a suprapharmacological glibenclamide dose was administered directly into the lateral ventricle of the brain, the plasma concentration was twice that of the CSF. This suggests the drug is rapidly exported from the CSF. Elacridar, an inhibitor of P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein (major multidrug resistance transporters at the BBB, did not affect glibenclamide levels in CSF and brain tissue. We also identified a reduced sensitivity to volatile anaesthetics in nV59M mice and showed this was not reversed by systemic delivery of glibenclamide. Our results therefore suggest that little glibenclamide reaches the central nervous system when given systemically, that glibenclamide is rapidly removed across the BBB when given intracranioventricularly

  9. Quantification of vitamin B6 vitamers in human cerebrospinal fluid by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, M. van der, E-mail: M.vanderHam-3@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Metabolic Diseases and Netherlands Metabolomics Center, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC02.069.1, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Albersen, M., E-mail: M.Albersen@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Metabolic Diseases and Netherlands Metabolomics Center, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC02.069.1, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Koning, T.J. de, E-mail: T.deKoning@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Pediatric Metabolic Diseases, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC03.063.0, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Visser, G., E-mail: G.Visser-4@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Pediatric Metabolic Diseases, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC03.063.0, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Middendorp, A., E-mail: Alfred_Middendorp@waters.com [Waters Chromatography B.V., Florijnstraat 19, Postbus 379, 4870 AJ Etten-Leur (Netherlands); Bosma, M., E-mail: M.Bosma@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Metabolic Diseases and Netherlands Metabolomics Center, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC02.069.1, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Verhoeven-Duif, N.M., E-mail: N.Verhoeven@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Metabolic Diseases and Netherlands Metabolomics Center, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC02.069.1, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Sain-van der Velden, M.G.M. de, E-mail: M.G.deSain@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Metabolic Diseases and Netherlands Metabolomics Center, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC02.069.1, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a sensitive UPLC-MS/MS method for quantification of B6 vitamers in human CSF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our method is very accurate since stable isotope labeled internal standards are used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present data on light sensitivity, temperature dependence and rostrocaudal gradient. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With PN supplementation, concentrations of PL, PM, PN and PA in CSF are increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our fully validated method is suitable for implementation in a diagnostic setting. - Abstract: Since vitamin B6 is essential for normal functioning of the central nervous system, there is growing need for sensitive analysis of B6 vitamers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This manuscript describes the development and validation of a rapid, sensitive and accurate method for quantification of the vitamin B6 vitamers pyridoxal (PL), pyridoxamine (PM), pyridoxine (PN), pyridoxic acid (PA), pyridoxal 5 Prime -phosphate (PLP), pyridoxamine 5 Prime -phosphate (PMP) and pyridoxine 5 Prime -phosphate (PNP) in human CSF. The method is based on ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) with a simple sample preparation procedure of protein precipitation using 50 g L{sup -1} trichloroacetic acid containing stable isotope labeled internal standards: PL-D{sub 3} for PL and PM, PN-{sup 13}C{sub 4} for PN, PA-D{sub 2} for PA and PLP-D{sub 3} for the phosphorylated vitamers. B6 vitamers were separated (Acquity HSS-T3 UPLC column) with a buffer containing acetic acid, heptafluorobutyric acid and acetonitrile. Positive electrospray ionization was used to monitor transitions m/z 168.1 {yields} 150.1 (PL), 169.1 {yields} 134.1 (PM), 170.1 {yields} 134.1 (PN), 184.1 {yields} 148.1 (PA), 248.1 {yields} 150.1 (PLP), 249.1 {yields} 232.1 (PMP) and 250.1 {yields} 134.1 (PNP). The method was validated at three concentration levels for each B6 vitamer in CSF

  10. Clinical application value of bilirubin detection in cerebrospinal fluid of neonates with hyperbilirubinemia%高胆红素血症新生儿脑脊液胆红素检测的临床应用价值探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周柏林; 王全震; 吕清秀; 董静

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore the clinical application value of unconjugated bilirubin detection in cerebrospinal fluid of neonates with hyperbilirubinemia.Methods:The levels of unconjugated bilirubin in cerebrospinal fluid and blood of 285 neonates with hyperbilirubinemia were detected,the ratio of unconjugated bilirubin to albumin (B/A) was calculated,and neonatal behavioral neurological assessment (NBNA) was performed.Results:The levels of unconjugated bilirubin in blood and cerebrospinal fluid,B/A in blood in neonates with bilirubin encephalopathy at warning period and spasm period were statistically significantly higher than those in neonates with simple hyperbilirubinemia (P < 0.05),the level of unconjugated bilirubin in cerebrospinal fluid of neonates with bilirubin encephalopathy at spasm period was statistically significantly higher than that of neonates with bilirubin encephalopathy at warning period (P < 0.05),the levels of unconjugated bilirubin in blood and cerebrospinal fluid,B/A in cerebrospinal fluid of neonates with abnormal NBNA score were statistically significantly higher than those of neonates with normal NBNA score,there was a significant correlation between unconjugated bilirubin and NBNA score in cerebrospinal fluid.Conclusion:Unconjugated bilirubin detection in cerebrospinal fluid not only diagnose bilirubin encephalopathy early,but also reflect the brain function of neonates with hyperbilirubinemia.%目的:探讨脑脊液中未结合胆红素检测在高胆红素血症新生儿中的临床应用价值.方法:对285例高胆红素血症新生儿的脑脊液和血液未结合胆红素水平进行检测,计算未结合胆红素/白蛋白比值(B/A),并进行新生儿行为神经评分(NBNA).结果:警告期和痉挛期的胆红素脑病新生儿血中未结合胆红素(UCB)、脑脊液(CSF)中UCB和血B/A比值均明显高于单纯高胆红素血症的新生儿,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),并且出现痉挛期的新生儿CSF中UCB高于警

  11. Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and prealbumin in cerebrospinal fluid from depressed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1988-01-01

    fluid, both compared to cisternal fluid. Whereas prealbumin was found evenly distributed in CSF, albumin was relatively enriched in lumbar fluid. The concentrations of NCAM-sol and prealbumin were measured in lumbar CSF from psychiatric patients. Prealbumin was increased 7.2% and NCAM-sol was decreased...

  12. Blocking of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid augments bacteremia and increases lethality in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels;

    2005-01-01

    The role of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the evolution of the pathophysiological changes that occur in bacterial meningitis is unclear. Here, we investigate how leukocyte recruitment to the CSF, modulated by the leukocyte blocker fucoidin, affects the extent of brain......, blocking leukocyte entry to the central nervous system in experimental pneumococcal meningitis compromises the survival prognosis but does not affect the risk of brain damage or level of infection in this compartment. Conversely, poorer prognosis was associated with an increase in bacterial load in blood...... damage and outcome in pneumococcal meningitis in rats treated with ceftriaxone from 28 h after infection. Rats treated with fucoidin from time of infection had an excess risk of a fatal outcome compared to rats not receiving fucoidin (25/63 versus 5/34, p=0.012), whereas the risk of cortical damage...

  13. Fatal Psychrobacter sp. infection in a pediatric patient with meningitis identified by metagenomic next-generation sequencing in cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna María; Segura-Candelas, José Miguel; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Gonzalez-Durán, Elizabeth; Rodríguez-Castillo, Araceli; Alcántara-Pérez, Patricia; Wong-Arámbula, Claudia; González-Villa, Maribel; León-Ávila, Gloria; García-Chéquer, Adda Jeanette; Diaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2016-03-01

    The genus Psychrobacter contains environmental, psychrophilic and halotolerant gram-negative bacteria considered rare opportunistic pathogens in humans. Metagenomics was performed on the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a pediatric patient with meningitis. Nucleic acids were extracted, randomly amplified, and sequenced with the 454 GS FLX Titanium next-generation sequencing (NGS) system. Sequencing reads were assembled, and potential virulence genes were predicted. Phylogenomic and phylogenetic studies were performed. Psychrobacter sp. 310 was identified, and several virulence genes characteristic of pathogenic bacteria were found. The phylogenomic study and 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis showed that the closest relative of Psychrobacter sp. 310 was Psychrobacter sanguinis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a meningitis case associated with Psychrobacter sp. identified by NGS metagenomics in CSF from a pediatric patient. The metagenomic strategy based on NGS was a powerful tool to identify a rare unknown pathogen in a clinical case.

  14. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of the histone deacetylase inhibitor, belinostat (PXD101), in non-human primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warren, K.E.; McCully, C.; Dvinge, H.;

    2008-01-01

    is a novel, potent, pan-HDAC inhibitor with antiproliferative activity on a wide variety of tumor cell lines. We studied the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration of intravenous (IV) belinostat in a non-human primate model as a surrogate for blood:brain barrier penetration. DESIGN: Five adult rhesus monkeys...... received increasing doses of belinostat (10-60 mg/kg) as a 30-min IV infusion. Serial blood and CSF samples were collected over 48 h. Plasma and CSF concentrations of belinostat were quantified with an LC/MS/MS assay. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using non-compartmental methods, and CSF....... CSF drug exposure was drug exposure and drug exposure. CONCLUSION: IV belinostat is rapidly cleared from plasma and has limited penetration into the CSF Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8...

  15. Real-time PCR for detection of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 in cerebrospinal fluid of human patients with meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nga, Tran Vu Thieu; Nghia, Ho Dang Trung; Tu, Le Thi Phuong; Diep, To Song; Mai, Nguyen Thi Hoang; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Sinh, Dinh Xuan; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Nga, Tran Thi Thu; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Campbell, James; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Hien, Tran Tinh; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is an emerging zoonotic pathogen and is the main cause of acute bacterial meningitis in adult patients in Vietnam. We developed an internally controlled real-time PCR for detection of S. suis serotype 2 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples targeted at the cps2J gene. Sensitivity and specificity in culture-confirmed clinical samples were 100%. The PCR detected S. suis serotype 2 infection in 101 of 238 (42.4%) prospectively collected CSF samples, of which 55 (23%) were culture positive. Culture-negative but PCR-positive CSF samples were significantly associated with the use of antimicrobial agents before admission. S. suis serotype 2 infection was more common than infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis combined. Our results strikingly illustrate the additional diagnostic value of PCR in patients who are pretreated with antimicrobial agents and demonstrate the extremely high prevalence of S. suis infections among Vietnamese adult patients with bacterial meningitis. PMID:21767702

  16. Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis DNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Eosinophilic Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Xayavong, Maniphet; da Silva, Ana Cristina Aramburu; Park, Sarah Y; Whelen, A Christian; Calimlim, Precilia S; Sciulli, Rebecca H; Honda, Stacey A A; Higa, Karen; Kitsutani, Paul; Chea, Nora; Heng, Seng; Johnson, Stuart; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Fox, LeAnne M; da Silva, Alexandre J

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the most common infectious cause of eosinophilic meningitis. Timely diagnosis of these infections is difficult, partly because reliable laboratory diagnostic methods are unavailable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of A. cantonensis DNA in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens. A total of 49 CSF specimens from 33 patients with eosinophilic meningitis were included: A. cantonensis DNA was detected in 32 CSF specimens, from 22 patients. Four patients had intermittently positive and negative real-time PCR results on subsequent samples, indicating that the level of A. cantonensis DNA present in CSF may fluctuate during the course of the illness. Immunodiagnosis and/or supplemental PCR testing supported the real-time PCR findings for 30 patients. On the basis of these observations, this real-time PCR assay can be useful to detect A. cantonensis in the CSF from patients with eosinophilic meningitis.

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is present in the cerebrospinal fluid of a majority of infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, F; Keys, B; Albert, J; Hagberg, L; Lundeberg, J; Uhlén, M; Fenyö, E M; Norkrans, G

    1992-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from 63 patients with different severities of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection, including asymptomatic virus carriers, were examined for the presence of HIV-1 by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and virus isolation. Polyadenylated RNA, presumably associated with virus particles, was extracted and reverse transcribed, and the pol region was amplified in a nested PCR. Virus could be detected in 90% of the CSF specimens examined by PCR, and data on isolation of virus from CSF were in agreement with these figures. In fact, when several CSF specimens from the same individual were studied, HIV-1 could be isolated from 80% of the patients. The presence of the viral RNA in CSF was independent of the clinical stage of infection and of neurological symptoms. These results show that the spread of HIV-1 to the brain represents an early event during infection and occurs in the majority of asymptomatic individuals. PMID:1629333

  18. Isolation of Toscana virus from the cerebrospinal fluid of a man with meningitis in Marseille, France, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nougairede, Antoine; Bichaud, Laurence; Thiberville, Simon-Djamel; Ninove, Laetitia; Zandotti, Christine; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Brouqui, Philippe; Charrel, Remi N

    2013-09-01

    Toscana virus (TOSV; Bunyaviridae, Phlebovirus) is an emerging arthropod-borne virus transmitted by phlebotomine sandflies. TOSV is a frequent cause of central nervous system infection during the warm season in several countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Here, we report a case of TOSV aseptic meningitis diagnosed in 2012 in Marseille, France. The virus strain was recovered in cell culture from the cerebrospinal fluid. New-generation sequencing based on Ion Torrent technology was used to determine its complete genome sequence. Phylogenetic analysis based on the partial L segment revealed that this isolate belongs to the lineage B together with other French, Spanish, and Moroccan strains. Although several cases of TOSV meningitis are reported in the literature, few of them are diagnosed by RT-PCR combined with virus isolation and further sequence characterization. This case report supports that virus isolation should be attempted whenever possible because this remains the gold standard technique for diagnosis of arthropod-borne viral infections.

  19. [Case of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A with increased cerebrospinal fluid proteins and nerve root hypertrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigami, Noriko; Kondo, Masaki; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2008-06-01

    We report herein a 54-year-old man who first noticed muscle weakness of the hands and legs and hypesthesia of the legs at 20-years-old. Symptoms gradually worsened. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT 1A) was diagnosed on the basis of a nerve conduction study and PMP22 gene duplication. Increased levels of cerebrospinal fluid proteins were identified and cervical and lumbosacral nerve root hypertrophy was evident on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CMT 1A with increased CSF proteins and nerve root hypertrophy was carefully evaluated clinically and electrophysiologically to rule out other motor sensory neuropathies such as CIDP. Increased levels of CSF proteins in this case might have resulted from circulatory disturbance of CSF in hypertrophic nerve roots.

  20. Zika Virus, Chikungunya Virus, and Dengue Virus in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Adults with Neurological Manifestations, Guayaquil, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Waggoner, Jesse; Rodriguez, Michelle; Rivera, Lissette; Landivar, José; Pinsky, Benjamin; Zambrano, Hector

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV), chikungunya virus (CHIKV), and dengue virus (DENV) have been associated with clinical presentations that involve acute neurological complaints. In the current study, we identified ZIKV, CHIKV, and DENV in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients admitted to the Hospital Luis Vernaza (Guayaquil, Ecuador) to the Emergency Room or the Intensive Care Unit, with neurological symptoms and/or concern for acute arboviral infections. Viral RNA from one or more virus was detected in 12/16 patients. Six patients were diagnosed with meningitis or encephalitis, three with Guillain–Barré Syndrome, and one with CNS vasculitis. Two additional patients had a systemic febrile illness including headache that prompted testing of CSF. Two patients, who were diagnosed with encephalitis and meningoencephalitis, died during their hospitalizations. These cases demonstrate the breadth and significance of neurological manifestations associated with ZIKV, CHIKV, and DENV infections. PMID:28174559

  1. Toxoplasma-SPECIFIC IgG SUBCLASS ANTIBODY RESPONSE IN CEREBROSPINAL FLUID SAMPLES FROM PATIENTS WITH CEREBRAL TOXOPLASMOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda S. NASCIMENTO

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Cerebral toxoplasmosis can be highly debilitating and occasionally fatal in persons with immune system deficiencies. In this study, we evaluated the Toxoplasma gondii-specific IgG subclass antibody response in 19 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis who had a positive IgG anti-T. gondii ELISA standardized with a cyst antigen preparation. There were no significant differences between the rates of positivity and the antibody concentrations (arithmetic means of the ELISA absorbances, MEA for IgG1 and IgG2, but the rates of positivity and MEA values for these two IgG subclasses were significantly higher than those for IgG3 and IgG4. The marked IgG2 response in CSF from patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis merits further investigation.

  2. Toxoplasma-SPECIFIC IgG SUBCLASS ANTIBODY RESPONSE IN CEREBROSPINAL FLUID SAMPLES FROM PATIENTS WITH CEREBRAL TOXOPLASMOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Fernanda S; Suzuki, Lisandra A; Branco, Nilson; Franco, Regina M B; Andrade, Paula D; Costa, Sandra C B; Pedro, Marcelo N; Rossi, Cláudio L

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis can be highly debilitating and occasionally fatal in persons with immune system deficiencies. In this study, we evaluated the Toxoplasma gondii-specific IgG subclass antibody response in 19 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis who had a positive IgG anti-T. gondii ELISA standardized with a cyst antigen preparation. There were no significant differences between the rates of positivity and the antibody concentrations (arithmetic means of the ELISA absorbances, MEA) for IgG1 and IgG2, but the rates of positivity and MEA values for these two IgG subclasses were significantly higher than those for IgG3 and IgG4. The marked IgG2 response in CSF from patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis merits further investigation.

  3. Bacterial Meningitis in the Absence of Cerebrospinal Fluid Pleocytosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Hase

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elevation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF cell count is a key sign in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. However, there have been reports of bacterial meningitis with no abnormalities in initial CSF testing. This type of presentation is extremely rare in adult patients. Here, a case involving an 83-year-old woman who was later diagnosed with bacterial meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis is described, in whom CSF at initial and second lumbar puncture did not show elevation of cell counts. Twenty-six non-neutropenic adult cases of bacterial meningitis in the absence of CSF pleocytosis were reviewed. The frequent causative organisms were Streptococcus pneumoniae and N meningitidis. Nineteen cases had bacteremia and seven died. The authors conclude that normal CSF at lumbar puncture at an early stage cannot rule out bacterial meningitis. Therefore, repeat CSF analysis should be considered, and antimicrobial therapy must be started immediately if there are any signs of sepsis or meningitis.

  4. Determination of the complement components C1q, C4 and C3 in serum and cerebrospinal fluid by radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dujardin, B.C.G.; Roijers, A.F.M.; Driedijk, P.C.; Out, T.A.

    1985-06-25

    Non-competitive 2-site radioimmunoassays (RIA) for the determination of the complement proteins C1q, C4 and C3 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are described. The quantitative results of the RIAs were the same as those obtained by other assay methods: radial immunodiffusion and turbidimetry and, in the case of C4, the haemolytic assay. The ratios (concentration in CSF)/(concentration in serum) of the complement proteins correlated poorly with that of albumin. In contrast, the ratio of IgG was significantly correlated with that of albumin. The ratios of the complement proteins were higher than might be expected on the basis of their molecular masses. This suggests that these proteins may be synthesized within the normal central nervous system. (Auth.). 20 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs.

  5. Characterization and stability of transthyretin isoforms in cerebrospinal fluid examined by immunoprecipitation and high-resolution mass spectrometry of intact protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Keld; Bahl, Justyna M C; Tanassi, Julia T;

    2012-01-01

    in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A single free cysteine thiol group in TTR possesses the ability to form mixed disulfides potentially related to diseases such as TTR amyloidosis and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Additionally, TTR-Cys10 S-thiolations might mirror the oxidative stress and redox balance...

  6. Structural biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid within 24 h after a traumatic spinal cord injury: a descriptive analysis of 16 subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouw, M.H.; Kwon, B.K.; Verbeek, M.M.; Vos, P.E.; Kampen, A. van; Fisher, C.G.; Street, J.; Paquette, S.J.; Dvorak, M.F.; Boyd, M.C.; Hosman, A.J.F.; Meent, H. van de

    2014-01-01

    Study design:Prospective cohort study.Objectives:To characterize the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of glial fibrillary acidic protein, neuron specific enolase (NSE), S-100beta, tau and neurofilament heavy chain (NFH) within 24 h of an acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), and to corre

  7. Tryptophan hydroxylase gene 1 (TPH1) variants associated with cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid and homovanillic acid concentrations in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreou, Dimitrios; Saetre, Peter; Werge, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in serotonin synthesis. We investigated possible relationships between five TPH1 gene polymorphisms and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the major serotonin metabolite 5-hy