WorldWideScience

Sample records for cerebral spinal fluid

  1. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection

    ... Ventricular puncture; Lumbar puncture; Cisternal puncture; Cerebrospinal fluid culture ... the meaning of your specific test results. The examples above show the common measurements for results for ...

  2. Effect of cerebral spinal fluid suppression for diffusional kurtosis imaging.

    Yang, Alicia W; Jensen, Jens H; Hu, Caixia C; Tabesh, Ali; Falangola, Maria F; Helpern, Joseph A

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) partial volume effect on diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) metrics in white matter and cortical gray matter. Four healthy volunteers participated in this study. Standard DKI and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) DKI experiments were performed using a twice-refocused-spin-echo diffusion sequence. The conventional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean, axial, and radial diffusivity (MD, D[symbol in text], D[symbol in text] together with DKI metrics of mean, axial, and radial kurtosis (MK, K[symbol in text], K[symbol in text], were measured and compared. Single image slices located above the lateral ventricles, with similar anatomical features for each subject, were selected to minimize the effect of CSF from the ventricles. In white matter, differences of less than 10% were observed between diffusion metrics measured with standard DKI and FLAIR-DKI sequences, suggesting minimal CSF contamination. For gray matter, conventional DTI metrics differed by 19% to 52%, reflecting significant CSF partial volume effects. Kurtosis metrics, however, changed by 11% or less, indicating greater robustness with respect to CSF contamination. Kurtosis metrics are less sensitive to CSF partial voluming in cortical gray matter than conventional diffusion metrics. The kurtosis metrics may then be more specific indicators of changes in tissue microstructure, provided the effect sizes for the changes are comparable. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Urine Test Strips to Exclude Cerebral Spinal Fluid Blood

    Marshall, Robin A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Determining the presence or absence of red blood cells (RBC or their breakdown products in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is essential for the evaluation of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in headache patients. Current methodology for finding blood in the CSF is either spectrophotometric detection of pigment, which is time consuming and labor intensive, or visual assesment of samples for color change (xanthochromia, which is inaccurate. Bayer Multistix® urine test strips are designed to test urine for RBC by detecting the presence of hemoglobin. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the perfomance of urine reagent test strips for ruling out the presence of RBC in CSF.Methods: We compared color changes on Multistix® urine test strips to the standard of spectrophotometric absorbtion at 415nm and initial RBC counts in 138 visually clear CSF samples.Results: We performed Pearson Chi-Square and likelihood ratios on the results and found a correlation between a negative result on the urine test strip and less than 5 RBC per high power field and a spectrophotometric absorbance of less than 0.02% at 415nm in a CSF sample.Conclusion: These results warrant further investigation in the form of a prospective clinical validation as it may alter the emergency department evaluation for SAH. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1:63-66.

  4. Labyrinth and cerebral-spinal fluid pressure changes in guinea pigs and monkeys during simulated zero G

    Parker, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    This study was undertaken to explore the hypothesis that shifts of body fluids from the legs and torso toward the head contribute to the motion sickness experienced by astronauts and cosmonauts. The shifts in body fluids observed during zero-G exposure were simulated by elevating guinea pigs' and monkeys' torsos and hindquarters. Cerebral-spinal fluid pressure was recorded from a transducer located in a brain ventricle; labyrinth fluid pressure was recorded from a pipette cemented in a hole in a semicircular canal. An anticipated divergence in cerebral-spinal fluid pressure and labyrinth fluid pressure during torso elevation was not observed. The results of this study do not support a fluid shift mechanism of zero-G-induced motion sickness. However, a more complete test of the fluid shift mechanism would be obtained if endolymph and perilymph pressure changes were determined separately; we have been unable to perform this test to date.

  5. Reversible and non-reversible enlargement of cerebral spinal fluid spaces in anorexia nervosa

    Artmann, H.; Grau, H.; Adelmann, M.; Schleiffer, R.

    1985-01-01

    Brain CT studies of 35 patients with anoxia nervosa confirmed the observations of other authors: cerebral dystrophic changes correlate with weight loss and the reversibility of these changes also correlates with the normalization of body weight. Other corroborated facts are: the most numerous and most pronounced enlargements are of the cortical sulci and the interhemispheric fissure, moderate widening affects the ventricles and the rarest and most insignificant changes are those of the cerebellum. The reversibility of the changes showed a parallel to the extent of the changes themselves and to the duration of improvement of the body weight. The reversibility of the enlargement of the cortical sulci and of the distances between the frontal horns of the lateral ventricles was more often significant than that of the abnormal measurements of the cella media. This difference is based on minimal early acquired brain damage which occurs in 60% of our patients. This high incidence of early acquired minimal brain disease in patients with anorexia nervosa is here discussed as a nonspecific predisposing factor. Although there is no exact explanation of the etiology of the reversible enlargement of cerenral spinal fluid (CSF) spaces in anorexia nervosa, the changes resemble those in alcoholics. The mechanisms of brain changes in alcoholism, as shown experimentally, seem to us to throw light on the probable mechanism of reversible dystrophic brain changes in anorexia nervosa. (orig.)

  6. Reversible and non-reversible enlargement of cerebral spinal fluid spaces in anorexia nervosa

    Artmann, H.; Grau, H.; Adelmann, M.; Schleiffer, R.

    1985-07-01

    Brain CT studies of 35 patients with anoxia nervosa confirmed the observations of other authors: cerebral dystrophic changes correlate with weight loss and the reversibility of these changes also correlates with the normalization of body weight. Other corroborated facts are: the most numerous and most pronounced enlargements are of the cortical sulci and the interhemispheric fissure, moderate widening affects the ventricles and the rarest and most insignificant changes are those of the cerebellum. The reversibility of the changes showed a parallel to the extent of the changes themselves and to the duration of improvement of the body weight. The reversibility of the enlargement of the cortical sulci and of the distances between the frontal horns of the lateral ventricles was more often significant than that of the abnormal measurements of the cella media. This difference is based on minimal early acquired brain damage which occurs in 60% of our patients. This high incidence of early acquired minimal brain disease in patients with anorexia nervosa is here discussed as a nonspecific predisposing factor. Although there is no exact explanation of the etiology of the reversible enlargement of cerenral spinal fluid (CSF) spaces in anorexia nervosa, the changes resemble those in alcoholics. The mechanisms of brain changes in alcoholism, as shown experimentally, seem to us to throw light on the probable mechanism of reversible dystrophic brain changes in anorexia nervosa.

  7. microRNA in Cerebral Spinal Fluid as Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease Risk After Brain Injury

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0318 TITLE: microRNA in Cerebral Spinal Fluid as Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease Risk After Brain Injury...After Brain Injury 5b. GRANT NUMBER AZ14046 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) J 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER...responses to brain injury that precede, and likely drive, changes in protein expression that lead to the development of AD. We have additional preliminary

  8. Tumor DNA in cerebral spinal fluid reflects clinical course in a patient with melanoma leptomeningeal brain metastases

    Li, Yingmei; Pan, Wenying; Connolly, Ian D.; Reddy, Sunil; Nagpal, Seema

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) from brain tumor patients contains tumor cellular and cell-free DNA (cfDNA), which provides a less-invasive and routinely accessible method to obtain tumor genomic information. In this report, we used droplet digital PCR to test mutant tumor DNA in CSF of a patient to monitor the treatment response of metastatic melanoma leptomeningeal disease (LMD). The primary melanoma was known to have a BRAFV600E mutation, and the patient was treated with whole brain radiotherapy and BRAF inhibitors. We collected 9 CSF samples over 6 months. The mutant cfDNA fraction gradually decreased from 53 % (time of diagnosis) to 0 (time of symptom alleviation) over the first 6 time points. Three months after clinical improvement, the patient returned with severe symptoms and the mutant cfDNA was again detected in CSF at high levels. The mutant DNA fraction corresponded well with the patient’s clinical response. We used whole exome sequencing to examine the mutation profiles of the LMD tumor DNA in CSF before therapeutic response and after disease relapse, and discovered a canonical cancer mutation PTENR130* at both time points. The cellular and cfDNA revealed similar mutation profiles, suggesting cfDNA is representative of LMD cells. This study demonstrates the potential of using cellular or cfDNA in CSF to monitor treatment response for LMD. PMID:26961773

  9. Presence of virus neutralizing antibodies in cerebral spinal fluid correlates with non-lethal rabies in dogs.

    Clement W Gnanadurai

    Full Text Available Rabies is traditionally considered a uniformly fatal disease after onset of clinical manifestations. However, increasing evidence indicates that non-lethal infection as well as recovery from flaccid paralysis and encephalitis occurs in laboratory animals as well as humans.Non-lethal rabies infection in dogs experimentally infected with wild type dog rabies virus (RABV, wt DRV-Mexico correlates with the presence of high level of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF and mild immune cell accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS. By contrast, dogs that succumbed to rabies showed only little or no VNA in the serum or in the CSF and severe inflammation in the CNS. Dogs vaccinated with a rabies vaccine showed no clinical signs of rabies and survived challenge with a lethal dose of wild-type DRV. VNA was detected in the serum, but not in the CSF of immunized dogs. Thus the presence of VNA is critical for inhibiting virus spread within the CNS and eventually clearing the virus from the CNS.Non-lethal infection with wt RABV correlates with the presence of VNA in the CNS. Therefore production of VNA within the CNS or invasion of VNA from the periphery into the CNS via compromised blood-brain barrier is important for clearing the virus infection from CNS, thereby preventing an otherwise lethal rabies virus infection.

  10. Effective scattering coefficient of the cerebral spinal fluid in adult head models for diffuse optical imaging

    Custo, Anna; Wells, William M., III; Barnett, Alex H.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Boas, David A.

    2006-07-01

    An efficient computation of the time-dependent forward solution for photon transport in a head model is a key capability for performing accurate inversion for functional diffuse optical imaging of the brain. The diffusion approximation to photon transport is much faster to simulate than the physically correct radiative transport equation (RTE); however, it is commonly assumed that scattering lengths must be much smaller than all system dimensions and all absorption lengths for the approximation to be accurate. Neither of these conditions is satisfied in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Since line-of-sight distances in the CSF are small, of the order of a few millimeters, we explore the idea that the CSF scattering coefficient may be modeled by any value from zero up to the order of the typical inverse line-of-sight distance, or approximately 0.3 mm-1, without significantly altering the calculated detector signals or the partial path lengths relevant for functional measurements. We demonstrate this in detail by using a Monte Carlo simulation of the RTE in a three-dimensional head model based on clinical magnetic resonance imaging data, with realistic optode geometries. Our findings lead us to expect that the diffusion approximation will be valid even in the presence of the CSF, with consequences for faster solution of the inverse problem.

  11. Neurological and neuropsychological effects of cerebral spinal fluid shunting in children with assumed arrested ("normal pressure") hydrocephalus.

    Torkelson, R D; Leibrock, L G; Gustavson, J L; Sundell, R R

    1985-08-01

    Normocephalic children found to have ventriculomegaly during evaluation of long-standing (4.5-8.5 years) neurological disorder were tested for academic achievement, intellectual quotient and neuropsychological functioning. Radioactive iodinated serum cisternography, pre and post-shunt electrophysiological studies (visual evoked responses, brainstem auditory evoked potentials, sleep electroencephalograms) and radiological studies (skull radiographs computed tomography) were recorded. Four children who have been followed more than one year after insertion of ventricular-peritoneal shunts are presented. All demonstrated improvement in psychometric findings along with some improvement in CT scan and EEG studies. The most marked initial changes were noted on measures of neuropsychological performance, accompanied later by improvement in measures of intelligence. Achievement test scores showed no consistent pattern of change. This sample suggests that there is a group of asymptomatic children with apparent clinically stable (arrested) hydrocephalus in whom abnormal neuropsychological testing indicates the need for cerebrospinal fluid shunting, with subsequent improvement.

  12. Differentiation of normal pressure hydrocephalus and cerebral atrophy by computed tomography and spinal infusion test

    Tans, J T.J. [Nijverheidsorganisatie TNO, The Hague (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurology and Research Unit TNO for Clinical Neurophysiology

    1979-01-01

    The diagnostic value of computed tomography (CT) and spinal infusion test (SIT) was investigated in 27 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) and 35 patients with cerebral atrophy. The most consistent CT finding of NPH was dilatation of the temporal horns, that of cerebral atrophy widening of the convexity sulci. However, 43% of patients with cerebral atrophy demonstrated no cortical atrophy. The SIT showed an excellent relation with isotope cisternography and continuous intracranial pressure recording. NPH and cerebral atrophy were correctly differentiated in 71% by CT and SIT. A normal SIT and a CT scan without the typical features of NPH exclude impairment of cerebrospinal fluid absorption. An abnormal SIT and a CT scan showing ventricular enlargement without dilatation of convexity sulci, require isotope cisternography and possibly intracranial pressure recording to determine the degree of the absorption deficit.

  13. Cerebral Vasospasm with Ischemia following a Spontaneous Spinal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Sophia F. Shakur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vasospasm is a well-known consequence of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH triggered by blood breakdown products. Here, we present the first case of cerebral vasospasm with ischemia following a spontaneous spinal SAH. A 67-year-old woman, who was on Coumadin for atrial fibrillation, presented with chest pain radiating to the back accompanied by headache and leg paresthesias. The international normalized ratio (INR was 4.5. Ten hours after presentation, she developed loss of movement in both legs and lack of sensation below the umbilicus. Spine MRI showed intradural hemorrhage. Her coagulopathy was reversed, and she underwent T2 to T12 laminectomies. A large subarachnoid hematoma was evacuated. Given her complaint of headache preoperatively and the intraoperative finding of spinal SAH, a head CT was done postoperatively that displayed SAH in peripheral sulci. On postoperative day 5, she became obtunded. Brain MRI demonstrated focal restricted diffusion in the left frontoparietal area. Formal angiography revealed vasospasm in anterior cerebral arteries bilaterally and right middle cerebral artery. Vasospasm was treated, and she returned to baseline within 48 hours. Spontaneous spinal SAH can result in the same sequelae typically associated with aneurysmal SAH, and the clinician must have a degree of suspicion in such patients. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying cerebral vasospasm may explain this unique case.

  14. Myelopathy secondary to cerebral and spinal neurocysticercosis

    Carlos Huaraca-Hilario

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is the most common CNS parasitic disease but spinal presentation of this condition is rare, with a higher incidence in developing countries like ours. We report the case of a male patient 61 of age diagnosed with generalized neurocysticercosis in addition to the secondary presentation of hypertensive hydrocephalus and compression of the spinal cord, the latter is characterized by the appearance of paraparesis, changes in sensitivity and urinary retention. The final diagnosis was made by an MRI, so we have to emphasize the importance of neuroimaging in the definitive diagnosis of this disease.

  15. Measurements of auto-antibodies to α-synuclein in the serum and cerebral spinal fluids of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Akhtar, Rizwan S; Licata, Joseph P; Luk, Kelvin C; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2018-03-03

    Biomarkers for α-synuclein are needed for diagnosis and prognosis in Parkinson's disease (PD). Endogenous auto-antibodies to α-synuclein could serve as biomarkers for underlying synucleinopathy, but previous assessments of auto-antibodies have shown variability and inconsistent clinical correlations. We hypothesized that auto-antibodies to α-synuclein could be diagnostic for PD and explain its clinical heterogeneity. To test this hypothesis, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for measuring α-synuclein auto-antibodies in human samples. We evaluated 69 serum samples (16 healthy controls (HC) and 53 PD patients) and 145 CSF samples (52 HC and 93 PD patients) from our Institution. Both serum and CSF were available for 24 participants. Males had higher auto-antibody levels than females in both fluids. CSF auto-antibody levels were significantly higher in PD patients as compared to HC, whereas serum levels were not significantly different. CSF auto-antibody levels did not associate with amyloid-β 1-42 , total tau, or phosphorylated tau. CSF auto-antibody levels correlated with performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, even when controlled for CSF amyloidβ 1-42 . CSF hemoglobin levels, as a proxy for contamination of CSF by blood during lumbar puncture, did not influence these observations. Using recombinant α-synuclein with N- and C-terminal truncations, we found that CSF auto-antibodies target amino acids 100 through 120 of α-synuclein. We conclude that endogenous CSF auto-antibodies are significantly higher in PD patients as compared to HC, suggesting that they could indicate the presence of underlying synucleinopathy. These auto-antibodies associate with poor cognition, independently of CSF amyloidβ 1-42 ., and target a select C-terminal region of α-synuclein. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Cerebral venous thrombosis after spinal anesthesia: case report

    Flora Margarida Barra Bisinotto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is a rare but serious complication after spinal anesthesia. It is often related to the presence of predisposing factors, such as pregnancy, puerperium, oral contraceptive use, and malignancies. Headache is the most common symptom. We describe a case of a patient who underwent spinal anesthesia and had postoperative headache complicated with CVT. Case report: Male patient, 30 years old, ASA 1, who underwent uneventful arthroscopic knee surgery under spinal anesthesia. Forty-eight hours after the procedure, the patient showed frontal, orthostatic headache that improved when positioned supine. Diagnosis of sinusitis was made in the general emergency room, and he received symptomatic medication. In subsequent days, the headache worsened with holocranial location and with little improvement in the supine position. The patient presented with left hemiplegia followed by tonic–clonic seizures. He underwent magnetic resonance venography; diagnosed with CVT. Analysis of procoagulant factors identified the presence of lupus anticoagulant antibody. The patient received anticonvulsants and anticoagulants and was discharged on the eighth day without sequelae. Discussion: Any patient presenting with postural headache after spinal anesthesia, which intensifies after a plateau, loses its orthostatic characteristic or become too long, should undergo imaging tests to rule out more serious complications, such as CVT. The loss of cerebrospinal fluid leads to dilation and venous stasis that, coupled with the traction caused by the upright position, can lead to CVT in some patients with prothrombotic conditions. Resumo: Introdução: A trombose venosa cerebral (TVC é uma complicação rara, mas grave, após raquianestesia. Está frequentemente relacionada com a presença de fatores predisponentes, como gestação, puerpério, uso de contraceptivos orais e doenças malignas. O sintoma mais frequente é a cefaleia

  17. Cerebral venous outflow and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    Clive B. Beggs

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the impact of restricted cerebral venous outflow on the biomechanics of the intracranial fluid system is investigated. The cerebral venous drainage system is often viewed simply as a series of collecting vessels channeling blood back to the heart. However there is growing evidence that it plays an important role in regulating the intracranial fluid system. In particular, there appears to be a link between increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pulsatility in the Aqueduct of Sylvius and constricted venous outflow. Constricted venous outflow also appears to inhibit absorption of CSF into the superior sagittal sinus. The compliance of the cortical bridging veins appears to be critical to the behaviour of the intracranial fluid system, with abnormalities at this location implicated in normal pressure hydrocephalus. The compliance associated with these vessels appears to be functional in nature and dependent on the free egress of blood out of the cranium via the extracranial venous drainage pathways. Because constricted venous outflow appears to be linked with increased aqueductal CSF pulsatility, it suggests that inhibited venous blood outflow may be altering the compliance of the cortical bridging veins.

  18. Fatal scuba diving incident with massive gas embolism in cerebral and spinal arteries

    Ozdoba, C.; Weis, J.; Plattner, T.; Dirnhofer, R.; Yen, K.

    2005-01-01

    CT and MRI have the potential to become useful adjuncts to forensic autopsy in the near future. The examination of fatal injuries facilitates a profound experience in the clinical-radiological examination of these cases; the more severe findings in corpses with autopsy verification can help one to understand the tiny signs seen in clinical cases of surviving victims. We present the case of a 44-year-old male diver who died from severe decompression sickness after rapid ascent from approximately 120 m. Post-mortem CT and MRI studies of the brain and spinal cord revealed extensive gas inclusions in cerebral arteries, spinal arteries and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces, while the intracranial venous sinuses remained unaffected. These findings were confirmed at autopsy. Appropriate imaging techniques can help forensic pathologists to aim their autopsies at findings that might otherwise remain undetected. (orig.)

  19. Influence of spinal cord injury on cerebral sensorimotor systems : A PET study

    Roelcke, U; Curt, A; Otte, A; Missimer, J; Maguire, RP; Dietz, [No Value; Leenders, KL

    Objectives-To assess the effect of a transverse spinal cord lesion on cerebral energy metabolism in view of sensorimotor reorganisation. Methods-PET and F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose were used to study resting cerebral glucose metabolism in 11 patients with complete paraplegia or tetraplegia after spinal

  20. CT study in primary low spinal fluid pressure syndrome

    Hoshino, Moritoshi; Okayama, Kenji; Kubo, Hiromasa; Watanabe, Hiromi; Endou, Riuko (Ohmiya Red Cross Hospital, Yono, Saitama (Japan))

    1991-02-01

    CT findings in primary low spinal fluid pressure syndrome were studied on the basis of 3 cases. Case 1 was a 43-year-old male with a complicated bilateral isodense subdural hematoma (SDH). Case 2 was a 45-year-old female with a complicated bilateral high dense SDH. Case 3 was a 36-year-old female discharged without any complications after spinal fluid pressure normalized. Slight downward displacement of the brain under low spinal fluid pressure was shown as the narrowing of a Sylvian fissures and infratentorial cisterns on CT. On the other hand, in this syndrome with a complicated bilateral isodense SDH, in addition to this finding, CT revealed distortion and narrowing of body lateral ventricles, which might be differential findings from this syndrome without complicated SDH. Under low spinal fluid pressure, bridging veins are more stretched by a downward displacement of the brain. And consequently they were easily injured and SDH was developed. (author).

  1. Measles Antibodies in the Serum and Cerebro- spinal Fluid in ...

    5 Januarie 1974-. Measles Antibodies in the Serum and Cerebro- spinal Fluid in Subacute Sclerosing. Panencephalitis. A. KIPPS, W. DU T. NAUDE, T. SMITH, D. 1. M. MACKENZIE, R. McDONALD. SUMMARY. The levels of complement-fixing antibodies to measles antigen in the sera and cerebrospinal fluids of 17 patients.

  2. Immature spinal locomotor output in children with Cerebral Palsy

    Germana Cappellini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Detailed descriptions of gait impairments have been reported in cerebral palsy (CP, but it is still unclear how maturation of the spinal motoneuron output is affected. Spatiotemporal alpha-motoneuron activation during walking can be assessed by mapping the electromyographic activity profiles from several, simultaneously recorded muscles onto the anatomical rostrocaudal location of the motoneuron pools in the spinal cord, and by means of factor analysis of the muscle activity profiles. Here, we analysed gait kinematics and EMG activity of 11 pairs of bilateral muscles with lumbosacral innervation in 35 children with CP (19 diplegic, 16 hemiplegic, 2-12 years and 33 typically developing (TD children (1-12 years. TD children showed a progressive reduction of EMG burst durations and a gradual reorganization of the spatiotemporal motoneuron output with increasing age. By contrast, children with CP showed very limited age-related changes of EMG durations and motoneuron output, as well as of limb intersegmental coordination and foot trajectory control (on both sides for diplegic children and the affected side for hemiplegic children. Factorization of the EMG signals revealed a comparable structure of the motor output in children with CP and TD children, but significantly wider temporal activation patterns in children with CP, resembling the patterns of much younger TD infants. A similar picture emerged when considering the spatiotemporal maps of alpha-motoneuron activation. Overall, the results are consistent with the idea that early injuries to developing motor regions of the brain substantially affect the maturation of the spinal locomotor output and consequently the future locomotor behaviour.

  3. Maladaptation of cerebral perfusion in the spinal cord injured individuals

    Cho, Ihn Ho; Chun, Kyung A.; Lee, Hyoung Woo; Ahn, Sang Ho; Hayashida, Kohei [National Cardiovascular Center, Osaka (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tilt-induced alteration of cerebral perfusion of spinal cord injured individuals. Supine and upright sitting brain SPECT was performed using a 1-day protocol with {sup 99m}Tc-ethylcysteinate dimer (ECD) in 11 SCI individuals (mean age, 32.6 y), with lesions between C3 and T4, ad 5 AB individuals (mean age, 31.4 y). The patients rested on a wheelchair in the supine position. Then, they sat up and, at the same time 555MBq of ECD was injected. The upright SPECT was done. Finally, 740MBq of ECD was injected and supine SPECT was performed again. The SPECT data were acquired with dual head gamma camera (E-cam, Siemens). For semiquantitative analysis, 14 ROIs were drawn on the brain. In the SCI individuals, the radiotracer uptake in the frontal, temporal and parietal areas were significantly decreased in the upright SPECT. No postural changes was evident in the occipital lobe, basal ganglia and thalamus in the SCI individuals. In the AB individuals, there were no such changes on the upright SPECT. Postural cerebral hypoperfusion in the frontal, temporal and parietal areas in the SCI individuals might relate to maladaptation of the vascular response during the upright position.

  4. Automatic, accurate, and reproducible segmentation of the brain and cerebro-spinal fluid in T1-weighted volume MRI scans and its application to serial cerebral and intracranial volumetry

    Lemieux, Louis

    2001-07-01

    A new fully automatic algorithm for the segmentation of the brain and cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) from T1-weighted volume MRI scans of the head was specifically developed in the context of serial intra-cranial volumetry. The method is an extension of a previously published brain extraction algorithm. The brain mask is used as a basis for CSF segmentation based on morphological operations, automatic histogram analysis and thresholding. Brain segmentation is then obtained by iterative tracking of the brain-CSF interface. Grey matter (GM), white matter (WM) and CSF volumes are calculated based on a model of intensity probability distribution that includes partial volume effects. Accuracy was assessed using a digital phantom scan. Reproducibility was assessed by segmenting pairs of scans from 20 normal subjects scanned 8 months apart and 11 patients with epilepsy scanned 3.5 years apart. Segmentation accuracy as measured by overlap was 98% for the brain and 96% for the intra-cranial tissues. The volume errors were: total brain (TBV): -1.0%, intra-cranial (ICV):0.1%, CSF: +4.8%. For repeated scans, matching resulted in improved reproducibility. In the controls, the coefficient of reliability (CR) was 1.5% for the TVB and 1.0% for the ICV. In the patients, the Cr for the ICV was 1.2%.

  5. Cerebral activation is correlated to regional atrophy of the spinal cord and functional motor disability in spinal cord injured individuals

    Lundell, Henrik; Christensen, Mark Schram; Barthélemy, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Recovery of function following lesions in the nervous system requires adaptive changes in surviving circuitries. Here we investigate whether changes in cerebral activation are correlated to spinal cord atrophy and recovery of functionality in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). 19...... hand and the functional ability of the SCI participants measured by the clinical motor score on the other. There was no significant correlation between activation in any other cerebral area and the motor score. Activation in ipsilateral somatosensory cortex (S1), M1 and PMC was negatively correlated...... to the width of the spinal cord in the left-right direction, where the corticospinal tract is located, but not in the antero-posterior direction. There was a tendency for a negative correlation between cerebral activation in ipsilateral S1, M1 and PMC and the amplitude of motor evoked potentials...

  6. Comparing patients with spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction: clinical characteristics, and short-term outcome

    Naess H

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Halvor Naess, Fredrik RomiDepartment of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, NorwayBackground: To compare the clinical characteristics, and short-term outcome of spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction.Methods: Risk factors, concomitant diseases, neurological deficits on admission, and short-term outcome were registered among 28 patients with spinal cord infarction and 1075 patients with cerebral infarction admitted to the Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Multivariate analyses were performed with location of stroke (cord or brain, neurological deficits on admission, and short-term outcome (both Barthel Index [BI] 1 week after symptom onset and discharge home or to other institution as dependent variables.Results: Multivariate analysis showed that patients with spinal cord infarction were younger, more often female, and less afflicted by hypertension and cardiac disease than patients with cerebral infarction. Functional score (BI was lower among patients with spinal cord infarctions 1 week after onset of symptoms (P < 0.001. Odds ratio for being discharged home was 5.5 for patients with spinal cord infarction compared to cerebral infarction after adjusting for BI scored 1 week after onset (P = 0.019.Conclusion: Patients with spinal cord infarction have a risk factor profile that differs significantly from that of patients with cerebral infarction, although there are some parallels to cerebral infarction caused by atherosclerosis. Patients with spinal cord infarction were more likely to be discharged home when adjusting for early functional level on multivariate analysis.Keywords: spinal cord infarction, cerebral infarction, risk factors, short-term outcome

  7. Immuno-reactive somatostatin in the cerebro-spinal fluid

    Kohler, J.

    1983-01-01

    In the present work the lumbar cerebro-spinal fluid of 178 patients with different neurological affections was examined with the aid of a specific radioimmunoassay for somatostatin. 18 patients without any pathologic neurological findings served as controls. In degenerative diseases of the brain, reduced somatostatin levels in the cerebro-spinal fluid as compared to the controls were measured. In 3 patients with isolated cerebellar atrophy no reduction of the somatostatin content was found; rather the values were highly normal. Huntington-Chorea also is a case apart. In patients with manifest affections, the somatostatin reduction, amounting to 54.6%, was particularly notable as compared to the controls. By contrast, degenerative diseases with predominant medullary and spastic affection are characterized by significantly increased somatostatin levels. Again, in non-spastic patients the values were not significantly different from those of the controls. Patients with inflammations of the brain and meminges as well as with tumors of the nervous system showed somatostatin levels increased by about 60.8% respectively 51.8% as compared to the controls. Epileptic patients normally exhibit a reduced somatostatin level in the cerebro-spinal fluid, but the reduction is not significant. Disseminated encephalomyclitis, whether chromic or acute, is not found to be associated with significant modifications of the somatostatin level in the cerebro-spinal fluid. Strikingly, however, patients in which the disease took a serious or very serious clinical course showed also the lowest somatostatin levels in the cerebro-spinal fluid. In patients exhibiting the roof compression symptom in consequence of a prolapse of the disk, no significant modifications were found. By contrast, in patients with the symptoms of a transverse lesion, significantly increased somatostatin values were measured. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Effects of spinal immobilization at a 20° angle on cerebral oxygen saturations measured by INVOS™.

    Aksel, Gökhan

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate whether performing the immobilization at 20° instead of 0° changes cerebral oxygenation. 33 volunteers were put in a hard cervical collar and backboard at 0° and immobilized for 30min. The cerebral oxygen saturations of the volunteers were measured at 1, 5, and 30min after the start of the procedure (Group 1). The volunteers were asked to return the day after the Group 1 procedure but at the same time. Serial cerebral oxygen saturations were obtained at the same time intervals as in Group 1, but for Group 2, the backboard was set to 20°. When the cerebral oxygen saturations of the two groups were compared, there was a slight decrease when the backboard position was changed from 0° to 20°, but it was not statistically significant (P=0.220 and P=0.768, respectively). The results revealed that immobilizing the patients with a spinal backboard at 20° instead of 0° did not alter the cerebral oxygen saturations. Our study results revealed that spinal immobilization at 20°, which was a new suggestion for spinal immobilization following a report that this position reduced the decrease in pulmonary function secondary to spinal immobilization, did not alter the cerebral oxygenation, so this suggestion is safe at least from the standpoint of cerebral oxygenation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Neural control of locomotion and training-induced plasticity after spinal and cerebral lesions.

    Knikou, Maria

    2010-10-01

    Standing and walking require a plethora of sensorimotor interactions that occur throughout the nervous system. Sensory afferent feedback plays a crucial role in the rhythmical muscle activation pattern, as it affects through spinal reflex circuits the spinal neuronal networks responsible for inducing and maintaining rhythmicity, drives short-term and long-term re-organization of the brain and spinal cord circuits, and contributes to recovery of walking after locomotor training. Therefore, spinal circuits integrating sensory signals are adjustable networks with learning capabilities. In this review, I will synthesize the mechanisms underlying phase-dependent modulation of spinal reflexes in healthy humans as well as those with spinal or cerebral lesions along with findings on afferent regulation of spinal reflexes and central pattern generator in reduced animal preparations. Recovery of walking after locomotor training has been documented in numerous studies but the re-organization of spinal interneuronal and cortical circuits need to be further explored at cellular and physiological levels. For maximizing sensorimotor recovery in people with spinal or cerebral lesions, a multidisciplinary approach (rehabilitation, pharmacology, and electrical stimulation) delivered during various sensorimotor constraints is needed. Copyright 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Spinal deformity in patients with Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism).

    Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Demosthenous, Nestor; McMaster, Michael J

    2009-04-01

    Retrospective review of a case series. To present the clinical characteristics and progression of spinal deformity in patients with Sotos syndrome. There is limited information on the development of spinal deformity and the need for treatment in this condition. The medical records and spinal radiographs of 5 consecutive patients were reviewed. All patients were followed to skeletal maturity (mean follow-up: 6.6 y). The mean age at diagnosis of spinal deformity was 11.9 years (range: 5.8 to 14.5) with 4 patients presenting in adolescence. The type of deformity was not uniform. Two patients presented in adolescence with relatively small and nonprogressive thoracolumbar and lumbar scoliosis, which required observation but no treatment until the end of spinal growth. Three patients underwent spinal deformity correction at a mean age of 11.7 years (range: 6 to 15.4). The first patient developed a double structural thoracic and lumbar scoliosis and underwent a posterior spinal arthrodesis extending from T3 to L4. Five years later, she developed marked degenerative changes at the L4/L5 level causing symptomatic bilateral lateral recess stenosis and affecting the L5 nerve roots. She underwent spinal decompression at L4/L5 and L5/S1 levels followed by extension of the fusion to the sacrum. The second patient developed a severe thoracic kyphosis and underwent a posterior spinal arthrodesis. The remaining patient presented at the age of 5.9 years with a severe thoracic kyphoscoliosis and underwent a 2-stage antero-posterior spinal arthrodesis. The development of spinal deformity is a common finding in children with Sotos syndrome and in our series it occurred in adolescence in 4 out of 5 patients. There is significant variability on the pattern of spine deformity, ranging from a scoliosis through kyphoscoliosis to a pure kyphosis, and also the age at presentation and need for treatment.

  11. Cervical spinal cord injury during cerebral angiography with MRI confirmation: case report

    Bejjani, G.K.; Rizkallah, R.G.; Tzortidis, F. [Department of Neurosurgery, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Mark, A.S. [Department of Neuroradiology, Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-01-01

    We report the first case of MRI-documented cervical spinal cord injury during cerebral angiography. A 54-year-old woman underwent an angiogram for subarachnoid hemorrhage. Her head was secured in a plastic head-holder. At the end of the procedure, she was found to have a left hemiparesis. MRI revealed high signal in the cervical spinal cord. The etiology may have been mechanical due to patient positioning, or toxic, from contrast medium injection in the vessels feeding the spinal cord, or a combination of both. (orig.) With 3 figs., 26 refs.

  12. Spinal cerebrospinal fluid seeding of a clival chordoma; A case report

    Baek, Seung Hwan; Yu, In Kyu; Kim, Seong Min; Park, Ki Seok; Son, Hyun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Chordomas originate from remnants of the embryonic notochord and account for < 2% of all malignant bone tumors. Chordomas have a high rate of local recurrence. However, spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) seeding of a chordoma is extremely rare. Here, we present a very rare case of clival chordoma with spinal seeding. Radiologists should consider spinal CSF seeding of a clival chordoma, particularly when accompanied by signs of dural perforation or caudal extension

  13. Spinal cerebrospinal fluid seeding of a clival chordoma; A case report

    Baek, Seung Hwan; Yu, In Kyu; Kim, Seong Min; Park, Ki Seok; Son, Hyun Jin [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Chordomas originate from remnants of the embryonic notochord and account for < 2% of all malignant bone tumors. Chordomas have a high rate of local recurrence. However, spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) seeding of a chordoma is extremely rare. Here, we present a very rare case of clival chordoma with spinal seeding. Radiologists should consider spinal CSF seeding of a clival chordoma, particularly when accompanied by signs of dural perforation or caudal extension.

  14. Gd-DOTA enhancement of cerebral and spinal tumors on MR imaging

    Berry, I.; Manelfe, C.; Chastin, I.; Arrue, P.; Prere, J.

    1987-01-01

    The use of Gd-DOTA as a contrast agent in MR imaging to improve the diagnosis of cerebral and spinal tumors was assessed in 20 patients, ten with brain tumors and ten with spinal tumors. Imaging was performed with a 0.5-T Magniscan 5000 unit. T1-weighted (spin-echo and gradient-echo) and T2-weighted (spin-echo) images were acquired before and after intravenous injection of Gd-DOTA, 0.1 mmol/kg. On T1-weighted images, Gd-DOTA enhanced sites of presumed disruption of the blood-brain barrier. This made some brain tumors more conspicuous and helped target biopsies, but did not reveal any additional lesions. On the other hand, the use of Gd-DOTA significantly improved the reliability of spinal tumor imaging compared to imaging performed without contrast agent, allowing delineation of abnormalities on T1-weighted images, which frequently contain fewer artifacts than the most sensitive T2-weighted images. Images obtained with Gd-DOTA could be used by the physician to rule out residual tumor after surgery and to assess recurrences. Additional work should be done to discover whether spinal tumor exploration with MR imaging could include solely T1-weighted sequences, performed before and after contrast agent administration, without T2-weighted sequences

  15. Development and treatment of spinal deformity in patients with cerebral palsy

    Tsirikos Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Scoliosis is a common deformity in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. This is usually associated with pelvic obliquity due to extension of the curve to the sacrum. Sagittal plane deformity is less common and often develops along with scoliosis. Spinal deformity in patients with severe neurological handicaps can affect their ability to sit and cause significant back pain or pain due to rib impingement against the elevated side of the pelvis on the concavity of the curvature. Surgical correction followed by spinal arthrodesis is indicated in patients with progressive deformities which interfere with their level of function and quality of life. Spinal deformity correction is a major task in children with multiple medical co-morbidities and can be associated with a high risk of complications including death. A well-coordinated multidisciplinary approach is required in the assessment and treatment of this group of patients with the aim to minimize the complication rate and secure a satisfactory surgical outcome. Good knowledge of the surgical and instrumentation techniques, as well as the principles of management is needed to achieve optimum correction of the deformity and balancing of the spine and pelvis. Spinal fusion has a well-documented positive impact even in children with quadriplegia or total body involvement and is the only surgical procedure which has such a high satisfaction rate among parents and caregivers.

  16. Pelvic-Spinal Analysis and the Impact of Onabotulinum toxin A Injections on Spinal Balance in one Child With Cerebral Palsy

    Emmanuelle Chaléat-Valayer MD

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In children with cerebral palsy, primary (eg, abnormal muscle tone and weakness and secondary impairments (eg, contractures can modify pelvic-spinal alignment. The main aim of this article was to establish a new approach to pelvic-spinal analysis in children with cerebral palsy, taking into account the whole pelvis-spine complex, illustrated by a case study. Methods: This is a case study of an ambulatory child with cerebral palsy (spastic diplegia who underwent analysis of the pelvic-spine complex from X-ray images taken in standing position from C2 to the proximal femur. Pelvic shape was characterized by the pelvic incidence angle, which is the sum of sacral slope and pelvic tilt, before and after the treatment by regular onabotulinumtoxinA injections into the hip flexors, and the use of soft lumbar brace over 5 years. Results: The sagittal balance of the spine was improved following the treatment, with a reduction in lumbar lordosis and sacral slope. The reduction in lumbar hyperextension likely reduced the risk of spondylolysis, low back pain, and degenerative spondylolisthesis in adulthood. Conclusion: A biomechanical approach to the evaluation of the pelvic-spinal complex offers new perspectives to increase the understanding of spinal balance in children with cerebral palsy, providing more options for treatment, such as onabotulinumtoxinA.

  17. Respiratory Adaptations in Acid-base Disturbances: Role of Cerebral Fluids,

    1979-06-19

    The respiratory and metabolic components of acid-base homeostasis are defined. A quantitative empirical description of the (incomplete) mutual...literature. Respiratory adaptations in steady acid-base disturbances of metabolic origin (hyperventilation with hypocapnia in primary metabolic acidosis, and...hypoventilation with hypercapnia in metabolic alkalosis ) are analyzed as a function of the acidity of the cerebral fluids (cerebrospinal and cerebral interstitial fluid). (Author)

  18. [Monitorization of the effects of spinal anaesthesia on cerebral oxygen saturation in elder patients using near-infrared spectroscopy].

    Kusku, Aysegul; Demir, Guray; Cukurova, Zafer; Eren, Gulay; Hergunsel, Oya

    2014-01-01

    Central blockage provided by spinal anaesthesia enables realization of many surgical procedures, whereas hemodynamic and respiratory changes influence systemic oxygen delivery leading to the potential development of series of problems such as cerebral ischemia, myocardial infarction and acute renal failure. This study was intended to detect potentially adverse effects of hemodynamic and respiratory changes on systemic oxygen delivery using cerebral oxymetric methods in patients who underwent spinal anaesthesia. Twenty-five ASA I-II Group patients aged 65-80 years scheduled for unilateral inguinal hernia repair under spinal anaesthesia were included in the study. Following standard monitorization baseline cerebral oxygen levels were measured using cerebral oximetric methods. Standardized Mini Mental Test (SMMT) was applied before and after the operation so as to determine the level of cognitive functioning of the cases. Using a standard technique and equal amounts of a local anaesthetic drug (15mg bupivacaine 5%) intratechal blockade was performed. Mean blood pressure (MBP), maximum heart rate (MHR), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and cerebral oxygen levels (rSO2) were preoperatively monitored for 60min. Pre- and postoperative haemoglobin levels were measured. The variations in data obtained and their correlations with the cerebral oxygen levels were investigated. Significant changes in pre- and postoperative measurements of haemoglobin levels and SMMT scores and intraoperative SpO2 levels were not observed. However, significant variations were observed in intraoperative MBP, MHR and rSO2 levels. Besides, a correlation between variations in rSO2, MBP and MHR was determined. Evaluation of the data obtained in the study demonstrated that post-spinal decline in blood pressure and also heart rate decreases systemic oxygen delivery and adversely effects cerebral oxygen levels. However, this downward change did not result in deterioration of cognitive functioning

  19. Monitorization of the effects of spinal anaesthesia on cerebral oxygen saturation in elder patients using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Kusku, Aysegul; Demir, Guray; Cukurova, Zafer; Eren, Gulay; Hergunsel, Oya

    2014-01-01

    Central blockage provided by spinal anaesthesia enables realization of many surgical procedures, whereas hemodynamic and respiratory changes influence systemic oxygen delivery leading to the potential development of series of problems such as cerebral ischemia, myocardial infarction and acute renal failure. This study was intended to detect potentially adverse effects of hemodynamic and respiratory changes on systemic oxygen delivery using cerebral oxymetric methods in patients who underwent spinal anaesthesia. Twenty-five ASA I-II Group patients aged 65-80 years scheduled for unilateral inguinal hernia repair under spinal anaesthesia were included in the study. Following standard monitorization baseline cerebral oxygen levels were measured using cerebral oximetric methods. Standardized Mini Mental Test (SMMT) was applied before and after the operation so as to determine the level of cognitive functioning of the cases. Using a standard technique and equal amounts of a local anaesthetic drug (15mg bupivacaine 5%) intratechal blockade was performed. Mean blood pressure (MBP), maximum heart rate (MHR), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and cerebral oxygen levels (rSO2) were preoperatively monitored for 60min. Pre- and postoperative haemoglobin levels were measured. The variations in data obtained and their correlations with the cerebral oxygen levels were investigated. Significant changes in pre- and postoperative measurements of haemoglobin levels and SMMT scores and intraoperative SpO2 levels were not observed. However, significant variations were observed in intraoperative MBP, MHR and rSO2 levels. Besides, a correlation between variations in rSO2, MBP and MHR was determined. Evaluation of the data obtained in the study demonstrated that post-spinal decline in blood pressure and also heart rate decreases systemic oxygen delivery and adversely effects cerebral oxygen levels. However, this downward change did not result in deterioration of cognitive functioning

  20. Safety of Diagnostic Cerebral and Spinal Digital Subtraction Angiography in a Developing Country: A Single-Center Experience.

    Bashir, Qasim; Ishfaq, Asim; Baig, Ammad Anwar

    2018-02-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard imaging modality for cerebrovascular disorders. In contrast to developed countries, the safety of the procedure is not extensively reported from the developing countries. Herein, we present a retrospective analysis of the basic technique, indications, and outcomes in 286 patients undergoing diagnostic cerebral and spinal angiography in a developing country, Pakistan. A retrospective review of patient demographics, procedural technique and complication rates of 286 consecutive patients undergoing the diagnostic cerebral/spinal angiography procedure at one institution from May 2013 to December 2015 was performed. Neurological, systemic, or local complications occurring within and after 24 h of the procedure were recorded. Mean age reported for all patients was 49.7 years. Of all the 286 cases, 175 were male (61.2%) and the rest female (111, 38.8%). Cerebral DSA was performed in 279 cases (97.6%), with 7 cases of spinal DSA (2.4%). Subarachnoid hemorrhage was the most common indication for DSA accounting for 88 cases (30.8%), closely followed by stroke (26.6%) and arteriosclerotic vascular disease (23.1%). No intra- or post-procedural neurological complications of any severity were seen in any of the 286 cases. One case of asymptomatic aortic dissection was reported (0.3%) in the entire cohort of patient population. Diagnostic cerebral/spinal digital subtraction angiography was found to be safe in Pakistan, with complication rates at par with and comparable to those reported in the developed world.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid ionic regulation, cerebral blood flow, and glucose use during chronic metabolic alkalosis

    Schroeck, H.K.; Kuschinsky, W.

    1989-01-01

    Chronic metabolic alkalosis was induced in rats by combining a low K+ diet with a 0.2 M NaHCO3 solution as drinking fluid for either 15 or 27 days. Local cerebral blood flow and local cerebral glucose utilization were measured in 31 different structures of the brain in conscious animals by means of the iodo-[14C]antipyrine and 2-[14C]deoxy-D-glucose method. The treatment induced moderate [15 days, base excess (BE) 16 mM] to severe (27 days, BE 25 mM) hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and K+ depletion. During moderate metabolic alkalosis no change in cerebral glucose utilization and blood flow was detectable in most brain structures when compared with controls. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) K+ and H+ concentrations were significantly decreased. During severe hypochloremic alkalosis, cerebral blood flow was decreased by 19% and cerebral glucose utilization by 24% when compared with the control values. The decrease in cerebral blood flow during severe metabolic alkalosis is attributed mainly to the decreased cerebral metabolism and to a lesser extent to a further decrease of the CSF H+ concentration. CSF K+ concentration was not further decreased. The results show an unaltered cerebral blood flow and glucose utilization together with a decrease in CSF H+ and K+ concentrations at moderate metabolic alkalosis and a decrease in cerebral blood flow and glucose utilization together with a further decreased CSF H+ concentration at severe metabolic alkalosis

  2. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma with hemiparesis mimicking acute cerebral infarction: Two case reports

    Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Miki, Takanori; Miyaji, Yuki; Minami, Hiroaki; Masuda, Atsushi; Tominaga, Shogo; Yoshida, Yasuhisa; Yamaura, Ikuya; Matsumoto, Shigeo; Natsume, Shigeatsu; Yoshida, Kozo

    2012-01-01

    Context Acute hemiparesis is a common initial presentation of ischemic stroke. Although hemiparesis due to spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is an uncommon symptom, a few cases have been reported and misdiagnosed as cerebral infarction. Design Case reports of SSEH with acute hemiparesis. Findings In these two cases, acute stroke was suspected initially and administration of intravenous alteplase therapy was considered. In one case, the presentation was neck pain and in the other case, it was Lhermitte's sign; brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography were negative for signs of ischemic infarction, hemorrhage, or arterial dissection. Cervical MRI was performed and demonstrated SSEH. Conclusion Clinicians who perform intravenous thrombolytic treatment with alteplase need to be aware of this possible contraindication. PMID:22925753

  3. The circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the spinal canal

    Sanchez, Antonio L.; Martinez-Bazan, Carlos; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2016-11-01

    Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) is secreted in the choroid plexus in the lateral sinuses of the brain and fills the subarachnoid space bathing the external surfaces of the brain and the spinal canal. Absence of CSF circulation has been shown to impede its physiological function that includes, among others, supplying nutrients to neuronal and glial cells and removing the waste products of cellular metabolism. Radionuclide scanning images published by Di Chiro in 1964 showed upward migration of particle tracers from the lumbar region of the spinal canal, thereby suggesting the presence of an active bulk circulation responsible for bringing fresh CSF into the spinal canal and returning a portion of it to the cranial vault. However, the existence of this slow moving bulk circulation in the spinal canal has been a subject of dispute for the last 50 years. To date, there has been no physical explanation for the mechanism responsible for the establishment of such a bulk motion. We present a perturbation analysis of the flow in an idealized model of the spinal canal and show how steady streaming could be responsible for the establishment of such a circulation. The results of this analysis are compared to flow measurements conducted on in-vitro models of the spinal canal of adult humans.

  4. Cerebral, spinal and peripheral inhibition of gastrointestinal transit by PI017: differential antagonism by naloxonazine

    Williams, C.L.; Heyman, J.S.; Porreca, F.; Burks, T.F.

    1986-03-05

    The authors were interested in characterizing the relative importance of central (cerebral, spinal) and peripheral opioid receptors in inhibition of gastrointestinal transit. The mu-receptor selective agonist, (NMePhe/sup 3/,D-Pro/sup 4/)morphiceptin (PL017), was evaluated for its effectiveness in slowing gastrointestinal transit after subcutaneous, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) or intrathecal (i.th.) administration when given alone or after pretreatment with naloxonazine, an irreversible mu/sub 1/ selective opioid receptor antagonist. Male, ICR mice (20-25 g) were pretreated with saline, naloxone or naloxonazine (35 mg/kg, s.c.) 25 hr prior to testing. Gastrointestinal transit was evaluated in previously fasted (18 hr) mice by oral administration of a liquid radiolabelled marker (Na/sub 2//sup 51/CrO/sub 4/). I.th. PL017 (100-1000 ng) was effective in slowing transit, but was essentially insensitive to naloxone or naloxonazine pretreatment. PL017 produced a dose-related inhibition of transit when given by either the i.c.v. (100-1000 ng) or s.c.(1-10 mg/kg) route; this effect was not sensitive to naloxone pretreatment but was antagonized by naloxonazine. These results indicate that the opioid receptors mediating gastrointestinal transit in the brain and periphery may be mu/sub 1/. In contrast, the insensitivity to naloxonazine suggests that the gastrointestinal effects of PL017 in the spinal cord may be the result of activation of mu/sub 2/ or possibly delta opioid receptors.

  5. Rupture of spinal dermoid tumors with spread of fatty droplets in the cerebrospinal fluid pathways

    Calabro, F. [Neuroradiology Section, T. M. A., Genoa (Italy); Capellini, C. [Neuroradiology Section, Ospedale Sant' Andrea, La Spezia (Italy); Jinkins, J.R. [Neuroimaging Research Department of Radiology, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Cranial and spinal MRI was carried out at 0.5 or 1.5 T in five patients with spinal dermoid tumours. Free fatty material was appreciated within the normally communicating cerebrospinal fluid pathways in all five cases and in one case fat droplets were also observed within a dilated central canal of the spinal cord. While dissemination of lipid within the subarachnoid space and ventricles is easily understandable, the presence of lipid droplets within the central canal is more difficult to explain, since the central canal is only potential in the adult. When a dermoid tumor is suspected, we recommend MRI of the entire central nervous system, to detect possible leakage of fat from rupture of a cystic portion of the tumour. (orig.)

  6. Rupture of spinal dermoid tumors with spread of fatty droplets in the cerebrospinal fluid pathways

    Calabro, F.; Capellini, C.; Jinkins, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    Cranial and spinal MRI was carried out at 0.5 or 1.5 T in five patients with spinal dermoid tumours. Free fatty material was appreciated within the normally communicating cerebrospinal fluid pathways in all five cases and in one case fat droplets were also observed within a dilated central canal of the spinal cord. While dissemination of lipid within the subarachnoid space and ventricles is easily understandable, the presence of lipid droplets within the central canal is more difficult to explain, since the central canal is only potential in the adult. When a dermoid tumor is suspected, we recommend MRI of the entire central nervous system, to detect possible leakage of fat from rupture of a cystic portion of the tumour. (orig.)

  7. Brain washing : Transport of cerebral extracellular fluids and solutes

    Bedussi, B.

    2017-01-01

    Regulation of extracellular volume and fluid composition provides a robust microenvironment for brain cells. In peripheral tissue, fluid surplus and solutes are removed from the interstitium via drainage into lymphatic channels. Since the central nervous system lacks a proper lymphatic vasculature,

  8. Performance of Aspergillus PCR in cerebrospinal fluid for the diagnosis of cerebral aspergillosis.

    Imbert, S; Brossas, J-Y; Palous, M; Joly, I; Meyer, I; Fekkar, A

    2017-11-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis is a rare but often fatal form of invasive aspergillosis that remains difficult to diagnose. The literature has shown the value of Aspergillus PCR in blood-derived samples for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis but provides far less information for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in cerebral aspergillosis. Here, we evaluated the usefulness of an Aspergillus PCR assay performed on CSF for the diagnosis of cerebral aspergillosis. This retrospective study involved 72 patients with suspected cerebral aspergillosis for a total of 88 CSF samples in whom CSF Aspergillus PCR was performed. Seventeen patients had proven/probable invasive aspergillosis according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group criteria, including 12 cases of proven/probable cerebral aspergillosis. Aspergillus PCR in CSF was positive in nine of the twelve patients with cerebral aspergillosis, i.e. 75% sensitivity. In contrast, CSF culture was positive for Aspergillus in only two patients. In the non-cerebral aspergillosis group (60 patients), PCR was positive in one patient, i.e. 98.3% specificity. In this particular population of high-risk patients with suspicion of cerebral aspergillosis, the disease incidence was 16.7%. Therefore, the positive and negative predictive values of PCR were 90% and 95.2%, respectively. The results of this study indicate that Aspergillus PCR in CSF is an interesting tool that may eliminate the need for cerebral biopsy in patients with suspected cerebral aspergillosis. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. Influences on cerebral hemodynamic and cerebrospinal fluid pressure--chemical autoregulation

    Meyer, J.S.; Tachibana, H.; Hardenberg, J.P.; Dowell, R.E. Jr.; Kitagawa, Y.; Mortel, K.F.

    1984-01-01

    Blood flow in the cerebral gray matter was measured in normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease by 133Xe inhalation. Flow values in the frontal and temporal gray matter increased after lowering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure by lumbar puncture in normal pressure hydrocephalus (p less than 0.05) and also after shunting. One case with cerebral complications did not improve clinically. In Alzheimer disease the reverse (decreases in flow in the gray matter) occurred after removal of CSF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus was associated with impaired cerebral vasomotor responsiveness during 100% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide inhalation. This complication was restored toward normal after CSF removal and/or shunting. Cerebral blood flow measurements appear to be useful for confirming the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus and predicting the clinical benefit from shunting

  10. A Multicenter, Randomized Controlled Trial of Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage in Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    2017-10-01

    barriers to recruitment and potential solutions . 15. SUBJECT TERMS acute spinal cord injury, cerebrospinal fluid drainage, mean arterial pressure...form.  University of Arizona has received approvals for English and Spanish consent forms.  Develop & Validate eCRF o The Electronic Data...take place in Q4 2018 with the aim of discussing barriers to recruitment and potential solutions . The result of this meeting may be a protocol

  11. Radioimmunoasay of calcitonin in plasma and cerebro-spinal fluid

    Cecchettin, M.; Comberti, E.; Quinzanini, M.; Albertini, A.; Tarquini, B.

    1985-01-01

    An acceptable radioimmunoassay of calcitonin (CT) in man requires a highly purified antigen that can be labelled without loss of immunoreactivity. Radiolabelled synthetic CT showed an additional large peak of radiopeptides with high molecular weight. Therefore, a standard electrofocussing experiment was performed. Standards exhibiting an atypical behaviour after radioiodination showed a pI different from synthetic human monomer. CT electrophoretogram shows a larger component at pI 7.9 and two smaller contaminations at pI 8.6. Besides, the antisera available for CT assay are considered in healthy subjects. 0H 2 and COOH assays give non-homogeneous results. A CT assay in cerebrospinal fluid is performed. The direct assay was unable to detect significant correlation between serum and cerebrospinal levels both in physiological and pathological conditions. Finally, the quality control of the CT assay is discussed. (Auth./G.J.P.)

  12. [Effect of electric acupuncture on the expression of NgR in the cerebral cortex, the medulla oblongata, and the spinal cord of hypertensive rats after cerebral infarction].

    Tan, Feng; Chen, Jie; Liang, Yan-Gui; Li, Yan-Ping; Wang, Xue-Wen; Meng, Di; Cheng, Nan-Fang

    2014-03-01

    To observe the effect of electric acupuncture (EA) on the Nogo receptors (NgR) protein expression in the cerebral cortex, the medulla oblongata, and the spinal cord of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) stroke-prone renovascular hypertensive rats (RHRSP) with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) at different time points, and to investigate its possible mechanisms for remote-organ injury of acute cerebral infarction (ACI). The RHRSP model was duplicated in male SPF grade SD rats. Then the MCAO model was prepared by a thread stringing method. Rats were divided into the hypertension group,the sham-operation group, the MCAO group, the EA group, and the sham-acupoint group by random number table method, 60 in each group. Rats in the MCAO group only received MCAO reperfusion treatment. Those in the sham-operation group only received surgical trauma. Baihui (DU20) and Dazhui (DU14) were needled in the EA group, once daily for a total of 28 days.The needles were acupunctured at the skin one cun distant from Baihui (DU20) and Dazhui (DU14) and then the same EA treatment was performed in the sham-acupoint group. At day 1, 7, 14, 28 after treatment, six rats were executed from each group, and their right cortex and medulla oblongata, and the left spinal cord were isolated. The infarct volume was detected by Nissl's staining method. The NgR expression was detect by Western blot. (1) In the cortex area: compared with the hypertension group,the NgR expression increased in the MCAO group at day 1,7,14,and 28 after MCAO (P 0.05). At day 7, 14,and 28 after MCAO, the NgR expression decreased in the EA group (P 0.05). (2) In the medulla oblongata area: compared with the hypertension group, the NgR expression was equivalent in the sham-operation group. the MCAO group,the EA group, and the sham-acupoint group at 1 day after MCAO (P > 0.05). At day 7.14, and 28 after MCAO, the NgR expression increased in the MCAO group (P 0.05). (3) In the spinal cord area: compared with the

  13. Fluid management of hypernatraemic dehydration to prevent cerebral oedema: a retrospective case control study of 97 children in China.

    Fang, Chengqing; Mao, Jianhua; Dai, Yuwen; Xia, Yonghui; Fu, Haidong; Chen, Yifang; Wang, Yaping; Liu, Aimin

    2010-06-01

    To compare the fluid management of hypernatraemic dehydration in acute gastroenteritis in those who developed cerebral oedema (cases) versus those who did not (controls). A retrospective study of 97 cases of hypernatraemic dehydration at a tertiary children's hospital in China over five years, in which rehydration regimes of 49 children who developed cerebral oedema were compared with 48 children who made an uneventful recovery. Risk factors for cerebral oedema (vs. no cerebral oedema) were an initial fluid bolus (29/49 vs. 15/48, P=0.006), the mean rate of bolus infusion (14.7+/-2.2 vs. 10.8+/-1.4 mL/kg/hr, Pdehydration were too rapid a rate of rehydration, an initial fluid bolus to rapidly expand plasma volume and the severity of the hypernatraemia. Thus, we conclude that a uniformly slow rate of rehydration is the best way of preventing cerebral oedema.

  14. Biomarkers for severity of spinal cord injury in the cerebrospinal fluid of rats.

    Joanna M Lubieniecka

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges in management of spinal cord injury (SCI is that the assessment of injury severity is often imprecise. Identification of reliable, easily quantifiable biomarkers that delineate the severity of the initial injury and that have prognostic value for the degree of functional recovery would significantly aid the clinician in the choice of potential treatments. To find such biomarkers we performed quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS analyses of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF collected from rats 24 h after either a moderate or severe SCI. We identified a panel of 42 putative biomarkers of SCI, 10 of which represent potential biomarkers of SCI severity. Three of the candidate biomarkers, Ywhaz, Itih4, and Gpx3 were also validated by Western blot in a biological replicate of the injury. The putative biomarkers identified in this study may potentially be a valuable tool in the assessment of the extent of spinal cord damage.

  15. Biomarkers for Severity of Spinal Cord Injury in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Rats

    Lubieniecka, Joanna M.; Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H. T.; Stoynov, Nikolay; Liu, Jie; Mottus, Randy; Pfeifer, Tom; Kwon, Brian K.; Coorssen, Jens R.; Foster, Leonard J.; Grigliatti, Thomas A.; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges in management of spinal cord injury (SCI) is that the assessment of injury severity is often imprecise. Identification of reliable, easily quantifiable biomarkers that delineate the severity of the initial injury and that have prognostic value for the degree of functional recovery would significantly aid the clinician in the choice of potential treatments. To find such biomarkers we performed quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from rats 24 h after either a moderate or severe SCI. We identified a panel of 42 putative biomarkers of SCI, 10 of which represent potential biomarkers of SCI severity. Three of the candidate biomarkers, Ywhaz, Itih4, and Gpx3 were also validated by Western blot in a biological replicate of the injury. The putative biomarkers identified in this study may potentially be a valuable tool in the assessment of the extent of spinal cord damage. PMID:21559420

  16. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery vascular hyperintensities in predicting cerebral hyperperfusion after intracranial arterial stenting

    Wan, Chih-Cheng; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Lee, Kun-Yu; Chiang, Chen-Hua; Chen, Chi-Jen [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shuang-Ho Hospital, New Taipei City (China); Taipei Medical University, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei (China); Yan, Feng-Xian [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shuang-Ho Hospital, New Taipei City (China)

    2017-08-15

    No reliable imaging sign predicting cerebral hyperperfusion after intracranial arterial stenting (IAS) had been described in the literature. This study evaluated the effect of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery vascular hyperintensities (FVHs), also called hyperintense vessel sign on T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (T2-FLAIR) MR images, in predicting significant increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) defined by arterial spin labeling (ASL) after IAS. We reviewed ASL CBF images and T2-FLAIR MR images before (D0), 1 day after (D1), and 3 days after (D3) IAS of 16 patients. T1-weighted MR images were used as cerebral maps for calculating CBF. The changes in CBF values after IAS were calculated in and compared among stenting and nonstenting vascular territories. An increase more than 50% of CBF was considered as hyperperfusion. The effect of FVHs in predicting hyperperfusion was calculated. The D1 CBF value was significantly higher than the D0 CBF value in stenting vascular, contralateral anterior cerebral artery, contralateral middle cerebral artery, and contralateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territories (all P <.05). The D1 and D3 CBF values were significantly higher than the D0 CBF value in overall vascular (P <.001), overall nonstenting vascular (P <.001), and ipsilateral PCA (P <.05) territories. The rate of more than 50% increases in CBF was significantly higher in patients who exhibited asymmetric FVHs than in those who did not exhibit these findings. FVHs could be a critical predictor of a significant increase in CBF after IAS. (orig.)

  17. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery vascular hyperintensities in predicting cerebral hyperperfusion after intracranial arterial stenting

    Wan, Chih-Cheng; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Lee, Kun-Yu; Chiang, Chen-Hua; Chen, Chi-Jen; Yan, Feng-Xian

    2017-01-01

    No reliable imaging sign predicting cerebral hyperperfusion after intracranial arterial stenting (IAS) had been described in the literature. This study evaluated the effect of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery vascular hyperintensities (FVHs), also called hyperintense vessel sign on T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (T2-FLAIR) MR images, in predicting significant increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) defined by arterial spin labeling (ASL) after IAS. We reviewed ASL CBF images and T2-FLAIR MR images before (D0), 1 day after (D1), and 3 days after (D3) IAS of 16 patients. T1-weighted MR images were used as cerebral maps for calculating CBF. The changes in CBF values after IAS were calculated in and compared among stenting and nonstenting vascular territories. An increase more than 50% of CBF was considered as hyperperfusion. The effect of FVHs in predicting hyperperfusion was calculated. The D1 CBF value was significantly higher than the D0 CBF value in stenting vascular, contralateral anterior cerebral artery, contralateral middle cerebral artery, and contralateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territories (all P <.05). The D1 and D3 CBF values were significantly higher than the D0 CBF value in overall vascular (P <.001), overall nonstenting vascular (P <.001), and ipsilateral PCA (P <.05) territories. The rate of more than 50% increases in CBF was significantly higher in patients who exhibited asymmetric FVHs than in those who did not exhibit these findings. FVHs could be a critical predictor of a significant increase in CBF after IAS. (orig.)

  18. [The examination of cerebro-spinal fluid in the viroses of the central nervous system (author's transl)].

    Bonomi, U

    1977-01-01

    The general outlines for the isolation of viruses from the cerebro-spinal fluid are described. It is suggested to associate to the virus cultivation of the cerebrospinal fluid even the cultivation from other pathological materials as faringeal swabs and stools and the search for antibodies in the blood serum. Researches of viruses in cerebro-spinal fluid done by the Service of Microbiology of the Hospital of Verona have given in 55 cases examined during the year 1976 2 positive isolates; in both mumps virus has been isolated.

  19. Dual-energy CT myelography on detection of spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid leaks: initial study

    Zhang Qiaowei; Wang Dan; Zhang Jinhua; Wang Jin; Zhang Shizheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of dual-energy computed tomography myelography (CTM) on detecting leaks of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). Methods: Six patients with SIH underwent spinal CTM on a 2nd generation dual-source CT with tube voltage set at 100 and 140 kVp (with tin filter). The virtual non-contrast (VNC) and iodine map images were calculated from dual-energy images. The average weighted (AW) CTM images were mixed from two kVp images with mix factor of 0.5. Two radiologists evaluated CSF leak using two sets of images respectively: VNC + iodine map images and AW-CTM images. The results from two reading methods were compared. The level of CSF leaks along the nerve roots, C1-2 retrospinal CSF collections, epidural CSF collections and spinal epidural venous plexus were marked. The consensus about leak sites and CSF collections was made by two radiologists in the third session. Kappa statistics were used to measure the agreement between the two methods. Results: Forty-one leaks were detected using VNC + iodine map images. Forty-three leaks were detected on AW images. The agreement between two methods was excellent (Kappa = 0.997, P<0.01). There were no differences in the detection of C1-2 retrospinal CSF collections (n=2), epidural CSF collections (n=3) or spinal epidural venous plexus (n=1). VNC and iodine map images demonstrated superior visual effects than AW images. Conclusion: Dual-energy CTM can be used to diagnose spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid leaks in SIH patient, (authors)

  20. Bernoulli's Principle Applied to Brain Fluids: Intracranial Pressure Does Not Drive Cerebral Perfusion or CSF Flow.

    Schmidt, Eric; Ros, Maxime; Moyse, Emmanuel; Lorthois, Sylvie; Swider, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    In line with the first law of thermodynamics, Bernoulli's principle states that the total energy in a fluid is the same at all points. We applied Bernoulli's principle to understand the relationship between intracranial pressure (ICP) and intracranial fluids. We analyzed simple fluid physics along a tube to describe the interplay between pressure and velocity. Bernoulli's equation demonstrates that a fluid does not flow along a gradient of pressure or velocity; a fluid flows along a gradient of energy from a high-energy region to a low-energy region. A fluid can even flow against a pressure gradient or a velocity gradient. Pressure and velocity represent part of the total energy. Cerebral blood perfusion is not driven by pressure but by energy: the blood flows from high-energy to lower-energy regions. Hydrocephalus is related to increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resistance (i.e., energy transfer) at various points. Identification of the energy transfer within the CSF circuit is important in understanding and treating CSF-related disorders. Bernoulli's principle is not an abstract concept far from clinical practice. We should be aware that pressure is easy to measure, but it does not induce resumption of fluid flow. Even at the bedside, energy is the key to understanding ICP and fluid dynamics.

  1. Changes in cerebral artery blood flow velocity after intermittent cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

    Kempley, S T; Gamsu, H R

    1993-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound was used to measure blood flow velocity in the anterior cerebral artery of six premature infants with posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus, before and after intermittent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, on 23 occasions. There was a significant increase in mean blood flow velocity after the drainage procedures (+5.6 cm/s, 95% confidence interval +2.9 to +8.3 cm/s), which was accompanied by a decrease in velocity waveform pulsatility. CSF pressure also fell significantly. In pat...

  2. Steady-streaming effects on the motion of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the spinal canal

    Lawrence, Jenna; Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio; Lasheras, Juan

    2017-11-01

    With each heart beat the oscillatory blood supply to the rigid cranial vault produces a time-periodic variation of the intracranial pressure that drives the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) periodically in and out of the compliant spinal canal. We have recently conducted an analysis of this flow-structure interaction problem taking advantage of the small compliance of the dura membrane bounding externally the CSF and of the disparity of length scales associated with the geometry of the subarachnoid space. We have shown in an idealized geometry that the steady-streaming motion associated with this periodic flow, resulting from the nonlinear cumulative effects of convective acceleration, causes a bulk recirculation of CSF inside the spinal canal, which has been observed in many radiological studies. We extend here our study to investigate the possible contribution arising from the flow around the nerve roots protruding from the spinal cord, an effect that was neglected in our previous work. For this purpose, we consider the oscillatory motion around a cylindrical post confined between two parallel plates. For large values of the relevant Strouhal number we find at leading order a harmonic Stokes flow, whereas steady-streaming effects enter in the first-order corrections, which are computed for realistic values of the Womersley number and of the cylinder height-to-radius ratio.

  3. Simulated spinal cerebrospinal fluid leak repair: an educational model with didactic and technical components.

    Ghobrial, George M; Anderson, Paul A; Chitale, Rohan; Campbell, Peter G; Lobel, Darlene A; Harrop, James

    2013-10-01

    In the era of surgical resident work hour restrictions, the traditional apprenticeship model may provide fewer hours for neurosurgical residents to hone technical skills. Spinal dura mater closure or repair is 1 skill that is infrequently encountered, and persistent cerebrospinal fluid leaks are a potential morbidity. To establish an educational curriculum to train residents in spinal dura mater closure with a novel durotomy repair model. The Congress of Neurological Surgeons has developed a simulation-based model for durotomy closure with the ongoing efforts of their simulation educational committee. The core curriculum consists of didactic training materials and a technical simulation model of dural repair for the lumbar spine. Didactic pretest scores ranged from 4/11 (36%) to 10/11 (91%). Posttest scores ranged from 8/11 (73%) to 11/11 (100%). Overall, didactic improvements were demonstrated by all participants, with a mean improvement between pre- and posttest scores of 1.17 (18.5%; P = .02). The technical component consisted of 11 durotomy closures by 6 participants, where 4 participants performed multiple durotomies. Mean time to closure of the durotomy ranged from 490 to 546 seconds in the first and second closures, respectively (P = .66), whereby the median leak rate improved from 14 to 7 (P = .34). There were also demonstrative technical improvements by all. Simulated spinal dura mater repair appears to be a potentially valuable tool in the education of neurosurgery residents. The combination of a didactic and technical assessment appears to be synergistic in terms of educational development.

  4. The late and dual origin of cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons in the mouse spinal cord.

    Petracca, Yanina L; Sartoretti, Maria Micaela; Di Bella, Daniela J; Marin-Burgin, Antonia; Carcagno, Abel L; Schinder, Alejandro F; Lanuza, Guillermo M

    2016-03-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms that control the production of specialized neuronal types. However, how the timing of differentiation contributes to neuronal diversity in the developing spinal cord is still a pending question. In this study, we show that cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (CSF-cNs), an anatomically discrete cell type of the ependymal area, originate from surprisingly late neurogenic events in the ventral spinal cord. CSF-cNs are identified by the expression of the transcription factors Gata2 and Gata3, and the ionic channels Pkd2l1 and Pkd1l2. Contrasting with Gata2/3(+) V2b interneurons, differentiation of CSF-cNs is independent of Foxn4 and takes place during advanced developmental stages previously assumed to be exclusively gliogenic. CSF-cNs are produced from two distinct dorsoventral regions of the mouse spinal cord. Most CSF-cNs derive from progenitors circumscribed to the late-p2 and the oligodendrogenic (pOL) domains, whereas a second subset of CSF-cNs arises from cells bordering the floor plate. The development of these two subgroups of CSF-cNs is differentially controlled by Pax6, they adopt separate locations around the postnatal central canal and they display electrophysiological differences. Our results highlight that spatiotemporal mechanisms are instrumental in creating neural cell diversity in the ventral spinal cord to produce distinct classes of interneurons, motoneurons, CSF-cNs, glial cells and ependymal cells. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. A differentially expressed set of microRNAs in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) can diagnose CNS malignancies.

    Drusco, Alessandra; Bottoni, Arianna; Laganà, Alessandro; Acunzo, Mario; Fassan, Matteo; Cascione, Luciano; Antenucci, Anna; Kumchala, Prasanthi; Vicentini, Caterina; Gardiman, Marina P; Alder, Hansjuerg; Carosi, Mariantonia A; Ammirati, Mario; Gherardi, Stefano; Luscrì, Marilena; Carapella, Carmine; Zanesi, Nicola; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-08-28

    Central Nervous System malignancies often require stereotactic biopsy or biopsy for differential diagnosis, and for tumor staging and grading. Furthermore, stereotactic biopsy can be non-diagnostic or underestimate grading. Hence, there is a compelling need of new diagnostic biomarkers to avoid such invasive procedures. Several biological markers have been proposed, but they can only identify specific prognostic subtype of Central Nervous System tumors, and none of them has found a standardized clinical application.The aim of the study was to identify a Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature that could differentiate among Central Nervous System malignancies.CSF total RNA of 34 neoplastic and of 14 non-diseased patients was processed by NanoString. Comparison among groups (Normal, Benign, Glioblastoma, Medulloblastoma, Metastasis and Lymphoma) lead to the identification of a microRNA profile that was further confirmed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization.Hsa-miR-451, -711, 935, -223 and -125b were significantly differentially expressed among the above mentioned groups, allowing us to draw an hypothetical diagnostic chart for Central Nervous System malignancies.This is the first study to employ the NanoString technique for Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling. In this article, we demonstrated that Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling mirrors Central Nervous System physiologic or pathologic conditions. Although more cases need to be tested, we identified a diagnostic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature with good perspectives for future diagnostic clinical applications.

  6. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose and cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Yanai, Kazuhiko; Miyabayashi, Shigeaki; Iinuma, Kazuie; Tada, Keiya; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Ito, Masatoshi; Matsuzawa, Taiju.

    1987-01-01

    Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglu) and cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites were measured in two cases of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) with different clinical courses. A marked decrease in rCMRglu was found in the cortical gray matter of a patient with rapidly developing SSPE (3.6 - 4.2 mg/100 g brain tissue/min). However, the rCMRglu was preserved in the caudate and lenticular nuclei of the patient (7.7 mg/100 g/min). The rCMRglu in a patient with slowly developing SSPE revealed patterns and values similar to those of the control. Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites ; homovanilic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, were decreased in both rapidly and slowly developing SSPE. These data indicated that rCMRglu correlated better with the neurological and psychological status and that dopaminergic and serotonergic abnormalities have been implicated in pathophysiology of SSPE. (author)

  7. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) using porous media modeling predicts recurrence after coiling of cerebral aneurysms.

    Umeda, Yasuyuki; Ishida, Fujimaro; Tsuji, Masanori; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Shiba, Masato; Yasuda, Ryuta; Toma, Naoki; Sakaida, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to predict recurrence after coil embolization of unruptured cerebral aneurysms with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) using porous media modeling (porous media CFD). A total of 37 unruptured cerebral aneurysms treated with coiling were analyzed using follow-up angiograms, simulated CFD prior to coiling (control CFD), and porous media CFD. Coiled aneurysms were classified into stable or recurrence groups according to follow-up angiogram findings. Morphological parameters, coil packing density, and hemodynamic variables were evaluated for their correlations with aneurysmal recurrence. We also calculated residual flow volumes (RFVs), a novel hemodynamic parameter used to quantify the residual aneurysm volume after simulated coiling, which has a mean fluid domain > 1.0 cm/s. Follow-up angiograms showed 24 aneurysms in the stable group and 13 in the recurrence group. Mann-Whitney U test demonstrated that maximum size, dome volume, neck width, neck area, and coil packing density were significantly different between the two groups (P CFD and larger RFVs in the porous media CFD. Multivariate logistic regression analyses demonstrated that RFV was the only independently significant factor (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.11; P = 0.016). The study findings suggest that RFV collected under porous media modeling predicts the recurrence of coiled aneurysms.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid pressures resulting from experimental traumatic spinal cord injuries in a pig model.

    Jones, Claire F; Lee, Jae H T; Burstyn, Uri; Okon, Elena B; Kwon, Brian K; Cripton, Peter A

    2013-10-01

    Despite considerable effort over the last four decades, research has failed to translate into consistently effective treatment options for spinal cord injury (SCI). This is partly attributed to differences between the injury response of humans and rodent models. Some of this difference could be because the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer of the human spine is relatively large, while that of the rodents is extremely thin. We sought to characterize the fluid impulse induced in the CSF by experimental SCIs of moderate and high human-like severity, and to compare this with previous studies in which fluid impulse has been associated with neural tissue injury. We used a new in vivo pig model (n = 6 per injury group, mean age 124.5 days, 20.9 kg) incorporating four miniature pressure transducers that were implanted in pairs in the subarachnoid space, cranial, and caudal to the injury at 30 mm and 100 mm. Tissue sparing was assessed with Eriochrome Cyanine and Neutral Red staining. The median peak pressures near the injury were 522.5 and 868.8 mmHg (range 96.7-1430.0) and far from the injury were 7.6 and 36.3 mmHg (range 3.8-83.7), for the moderate and high injury severities, respectively. Pressure impulse (mmHg.ms), apparent wave speed, and apparent attenuation factor were also evaluated. The data indicates that the fluid pressure wave may be sufficient to affect the severity and extent of primary tissue damage close to the injury site. However, the CSF pressure was close to normal physiologic values at 100 mm from the injury. The high injury severity animals had less tissue sparing than the moderate injury severity animals; this difference was statistically significant only within 1.6 mm of the epicenter. These results indicate that future research seeking to elucidate the mechanical origins of primary tissue damage in SCI should consider the effects of CSF. This pig model provides advantages for basic and preclinical SCI research due to its

  9. Comprehensive validation of computational fluid dynamics simulationsof in-vivo blood flow in patient-specific cerebral aneurysms

    Sun, Q.; Groth, A.; Aach, T.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, image-based computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations have been proposed to investigate the local hemodynamics inside human cerebral aneurysms. It is suggested that the knowledge ofthe computed three-dimensional flow fields can be used to assist clinical risk assessment and

  10. A pilot study on the use of cerebrospinal fluid cell-free DNA in intramedullary spinal ependymoma.

    Connolly, Ian David; Li, Yingmei; Pan, Wenying; Johnson, Eli; You, Linya; Vogel, Hannes; Ratliff, John; Hayden Gephart, Melanie

    2017-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) represents a promising source of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) for tumors of the central nervous system. A CSF-based liquid biopsy may obviate the need for riskier tissue biopsies and serve as a means for monitoring tumor recurrence or response to therapy. Spinal ependymomas most commonly occur in adults, and aggressive resection must be delicately balanced with the risk of injury to adjacent normal tissue. In patients with subtotal resection, recurrence commonly occurs. A CSF-based liquid biopsy matched to the patient's spinal ependymoma mutation profile has potential to be more sensitive then surveillance MRI, but the utility has not been well characterized for tumors of the spinal cord. In this study, we collected matched blood, tumor, and CSF samples from three adult patients with WHO grade II intramedullary spinal ependymoma. We performed whole exome sequencing on matched tumor and normal DNA to design Droplet Digital™ PCR (ddPCR) probes for tumor and wild-type mutations. We then interrogated CSF samples for tumor-derived cfDNA by performing ddPCR on extracted cfDNA. Tumor cfDNA was not reliably detected in the CSF of our cohort. Anatomic sequestration and low grade of intramedullary spinal cord tumors likely limits the role of CSF liquid biopsy.

  11. Use of intraoperative cerebral and spinal digital angiography as an aid to vascular neurosurgery

    Joseph, G.J.; Barrow, D.L.; Hoffman, J.C.; O'Brien, M.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the utility of intraoperative digital subtraction angiography (IODSA) in evaluating completeness of resection/clipping of vascular abnormalities of the central nervous system. IODSA was performed in 61 patients undergoing resection of intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVMs) (n = 25), aneurysms (n = 33), and spinal AVMs (n = 3). Results were reviewed immediately; if further surgery was required, additional studies were performed until resection was considered radiographically and surgically complete. All patients with AVM and 15 with aneurysm underwent postoperative angiography for confirmation of IODSA findings

  12. Spinal cord stimulation modulates cerebral neurobiology: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Moens, Maarten [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Neurosurgery and Center for Neuroscience, Brussels (Belgium); Marien, Peter [ZNA Middelheim General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Antwerp (Belgium); Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Clinical and Experimental Neurolinguistics, Brussels (Belgium); Brouns, Raf; Smedt, Ann de [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Neurology and Center for Neuroscience, Brussels (Belgium); Poelaert, Jan [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Anesthesiology, Brussels (Belgium); Buyl, Ronald [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, Brussels (Belgium); Droogmans, Steven [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Cardiology, Brussels (Belgium); Schuerbeek, Peter van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Sunaert, Stefan [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Department of Radiology, UZ Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Nuttin, Bart [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Neurosurgery, UZ Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-08-15

    Although spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a widely used treatment for chronic neuropathic pain secondary to spinal surgery, little is known about the underlying physiological mechanisms. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the neural substrate underlying short-term SCS by means of {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy with short echo time, in 20 patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Marked increase of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and decrease in glucose in the ipsilateral thalamus were found between baseline situation without SCS and after 9' of SCS, indicating the key role of the ipsilateral thalamus as a mediator of chronic neuropathic pain. In addition, this study also showed a progressive decrease in glucose in the ipsilateral thalamus over time, which is in line with the findings of previous studies reporting deactivation in the ipsilateral thalamic region. The observation of GABA increase and glucose decrease over time in the ipsilateral thalamus may be the causal mechanism of the pain relief due to SCS or an epiphenomenon. (orig.)

  13. Spinal cord stimulation modulates cerebral neurobiology: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Moens, Maarten; Marien, Peter; Brouns, Raf; Smedt, Ann de; Poelaert, Jan; Buyl, Ronald; Droogmans, Steven; Schuerbeek, Peter van; Sunaert, Stefan; Nuttin, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Although spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a widely used treatment for chronic neuropathic pain secondary to spinal surgery, little is known about the underlying physiological mechanisms. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the neural substrate underlying short-term SCS by means of 1 H MR spectroscopy with short echo time, in 20 patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Marked increase of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and decrease in glucose in the ipsilateral thalamus were found between baseline situation without SCS and after 9' of SCS, indicating the key role of the ipsilateral thalamus as a mediator of chronic neuropathic pain. In addition, this study also showed a progressive decrease in glucose in the ipsilateral thalamus over time, which is in line with the findings of previous studies reporting deactivation in the ipsilateral thalamic region. The observation of GABA increase and glucose decrease over time in the ipsilateral thalamus may be the causal mechanism of the pain relief due to SCS or an epiphenomenon. (orig.)

  14. Myelin basic protein determination in cerebro-spinal fluid of children with tuberculous meningitis

    Samuel, A.M.; Dhalla, A.S.; Mazarello, T.

    1986-01-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP), an indicator of neural tissue damage in cerebro-spinal fluid, was studied in patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM). MBP levels were elevated in 62% of the cases of TBM, the levels being 13.3+-18.8 ng/mL, compared with control levels of 1.34+-0.55 ng/mL(p<0.001). MBP level was related to certain clinical features of the disease, such as level of consciousness, neurological characteristics associated with signs of raised intracranial tension and the presence of arteritis associated with hydrocephalus. However, its greatest significance was its correlation with the progress of disease. Persistence of high levels of MBP over a period of a few weeks was associated with little or no improvement in the clinical state of the patient or a higher mortality rate. Return to normal levels of MBP indicated a more favourable outcome of disease. Hence MBP estimation gave not only an indicator of the degree of neurological damage but also an important marker to evaluate patients' progress and response to treatment. (author)

  15. Hyperintensity on diffusion weighted image along ipsilateral cortical spinal tract after cerebral ischemic stroke: A diffusion tensor analysis

    Liu Xiang; Tian Wei; Li Lilin; Kolar, Balasubramanya; Qiu Xing; Chen, Feng; Dogra, Vikram S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Hyperintensity along the ipsilateral cortical spinal tract (CST) on a diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) has been reported to may be associated with motor disability after brain infarction and can be misdiagnosed as a new infarction. However, the underlying patho-physiology related to this finding is not clear. The goal of our study was to analyze the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) changes in patients with this hyperintensity. Materials and methods: Eight patients (50 ± 10 years) who exhibited hyperintensity on DWI along ipsilateral CST from 3 to 21 days after stroke onset were reviewed as positive group, including 5 patients with serial DTI examinations. Twelve patients without hyperintensity during the matched examination time were classified as reference group. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA), and eigenvalues and their ratios (ipsilateral/contralateral value) in cerebral peduncle were measured, their correlation with motor function scale at eight months after stroke onset were evaluated. Results: The serial examinations showed that hyperintensity could eventually disappear. Both the ipsilateral ADC and FA values were significantly decreased (p < 0.05) compared to the contralateral side. The ipsilateral FA significantly correlated with motor function scale in both groups (r = 0.875, 0.738; p = 0.004, 0.006 respectively). Conclusions: The hyperintensity on DWI is a transient pathological process of Wallerian degeneration after ischemic stroke, its diffusion characteristics include concurrent significant decrease of ipsilateral ADC and FA. The ipsilateral FA value has the potential to predict neurological motor function outcome in such patients.

  16. Spinal cord stimulation modulates cerebral function: an fMRI study

    Moens, M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Neurosurgery and Center for Neuroscience, Brussels (Belgium); Sunaert, S.; Peeters, R. [UZ Leuven, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Marien, P. [ZNA Middelheim General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Antwerp (Belgium); Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Clinical and Experimental Neurolinguistics, Brussels (Belgium); Brouns, R.; Smedt, A. de [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Neurology and Center for Neuroscience, Brussels (Belgium); Droogmans, S. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Cardiology, Brussels (Belgium); Schuerbeek, P. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Poelaert, J. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Anesthesiology, Brussels (Belgium); Nuttin, B. [UZ Leuven, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Department of Neurosurgery, Leuven (Belgium)

    2012-12-15

    Although spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is widely used for chronic neuropathic pain after failed spinal surgery, little is known about the underlying physiological mechanisms. This study aims to investigate the neural substrate underlying short-term (30 s) SCS by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging in 20 patients with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Twenty patients with FBSS, treated with externalized SCS, participated in a blocked functional magnetic resonance imaging design with stimulation and rest phases of 30 s each, repeated eight times in a row. During scanning, patients rated pain intensity over time using an 11-point numerical rating scale with verbal anchors (0 = no pain at all to 10 = worst pain imaginable) by pushing buttons (left hand, lesser pain; right hand, more pain). This scale was back projected to the patients on a flat screen allowing them to manually direct the pain indicator. To increase the signal-to-noise ratio, the 8-min block measurements were repeated three times. Marked deactivation of the bilateral medial thalamus and its connections to the rostral and caudal cingulate cortex and the insula was found; the study also showed immediate pain relief obtained by short-term SCS correlated negatively with activity in the inferior olivary nucleus, the cerebellum, and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex. Results indicate the key role of the medial thalamus as a mediator and the involvement of a corticocerebellar network implicating the modulation and regulation of averse and negative affect related to pain. The observation of a deactivation of the ipsilateral antero-medial thalamus might be used as a region of interest for further response SCS studies. (orig.)

  17. Spinal cord stimulation modulates cerebral function: an fMRI study

    Moens, M.; Sunaert, S.; Peeters, R.; Marien, P.; Brouns, R.; Smedt, A. de; Droogmans, S.; Schuerbeek, P. van; Poelaert, J.; Nuttin, B.

    2012-01-01

    Although spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is widely used for chronic neuropathic pain after failed spinal surgery, little is known about the underlying physiological mechanisms. This study aims to investigate the neural substrate underlying short-term (30 s) SCS by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging in 20 patients with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Twenty patients with FBSS, treated with externalized SCS, participated in a blocked functional magnetic resonance imaging design with stimulation and rest phases of 30 s each, repeated eight times in a row. During scanning, patients rated pain intensity over time using an 11-point numerical rating scale with verbal anchors (0 = no pain at all to 10 = worst pain imaginable) by pushing buttons (left hand, lesser pain; right hand, more pain). This scale was back projected to the patients on a flat screen allowing them to manually direct the pain indicator. To increase the signal-to-noise ratio, the 8-min block measurements were repeated three times. Marked deactivation of the bilateral medial thalamus and its connections to the rostral and caudal cingulate cortex and the insula was found; the study also showed immediate pain relief obtained by short-term SCS correlated negatively with activity in the inferior olivary nucleus, the cerebellum, and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex. Results indicate the key role of the medial thalamus as a mediator and the involvement of a corticocerebellar network implicating the modulation and regulation of averse and negative affect related to pain. The observation of a deactivation of the ipsilateral antero-medial thalamus might be used as a region of interest for further response SCS studies. (orig.)

  18. Phantom-based experimental validation of computational fluid dynamics simulations on cerebral aneurysms

    Sun Qi; Groth, Alexandra; Bertram, Matthias; Waechter, Irina; Bruijns, Tom; Hermans, Roel; Aach, Til [Philips Research Europe, Weisshausstrasse 2, 52066 Aachen (Germany) and Institute of Imaging and Computer Vision, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstrasse 24, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Philips Research Europe, Weisshausstrasse 2, 52066 Aachen (Germany); Philips Healthcare, X-Ray Pre-Development, Veenpluis 4-6, 5684PC Best (Netherlands); Institute of Imaging and Computer Vision, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstrasse 24, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Recently, image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation has been applied to investigate the hemodynamics inside human cerebral aneurysms. The knowledge of the computed three-dimensional flow fields is used for clinical risk assessment and treatment decision making. However, the reliability of the application specific CFD results has not been thoroughly validated yet. Methods: In this work, by exploiting a phantom aneurysm model, the authors therefore aim to prove the reliability of the CFD results obtained from simulations with sufficiently accurate input boundary conditions. To confirm the correlation between the CFD results and the reality, virtual angiograms are generated by the simulation pipeline and are quantitatively compared to the experimentally acquired angiograms. In addition, a parametric study has been carried out to systematically investigate the influence of the input parameters associated with the current measuring techniques on the flow patterns. Results: Qualitative and quantitative evaluations demonstrate good agreement between the simulated and the real flow dynamics. Discrepancies of less than 15% are found for the relative root mean square errors of time intensity curve comparisons from each selected characteristic position. The investigated input parameters show different influences on the simulation results, indicating the desired accuracy in the measurements. Conclusions: This study provides a comprehensive validation method of CFD simulation for reproducing the real flow field in the cerebral aneurysm phantom under well controlled conditions. The reliability of the CFD is well confirmed. Through the parametric study, it is possible to assess the degree of validity of the associated CFD model based on the parameter values and their estimated accuracy range.

  19. Phantom-based experimental validation of computational fluid dynamics simulations on cerebral aneurysms

    Sun Qi; Groth, Alexandra; Bertram, Matthias; Waechter, Irina; Bruijns, Tom; Hermans, Roel; Aach, Til

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation has been applied to investigate the hemodynamics inside human cerebral aneurysms. The knowledge of the computed three-dimensional flow fields is used for clinical risk assessment and treatment decision making. However, the reliability of the application specific CFD results has not been thoroughly validated yet. Methods: In this work, by exploiting a phantom aneurysm model, the authors therefore aim to prove the reliability of the CFD results obtained from simulations with sufficiently accurate input boundary conditions. To confirm the correlation between the CFD results and the reality, virtual angiograms are generated by the simulation pipeline and are quantitatively compared to the experimentally acquired angiograms. In addition, a parametric study has been carried out to systematically investigate the influence of the input parameters associated with the current measuring techniques on the flow patterns. Results: Qualitative and quantitative evaluations demonstrate good agreement between the simulated and the real flow dynamics. Discrepancies of less than 15% are found for the relative root mean square errors of time intensity curve comparisons from each selected characteristic position. The investigated input parameters show different influences on the simulation results, indicating the desired accuracy in the measurements. Conclusions: This study provides a comprehensive validation method of CFD simulation for reproducing the real flow field in the cerebral aneurysm phantom under well controlled conditions. The reliability of the CFD is well confirmed. Through the parametric study, it is possible to assess the degree of validity of the associated CFD model based on the parameter values and their estimated accuracy range.

  20. [Alzheimer's disease cerebro-spinal fluid biomarkers: A clinical research tool sometimes useful in daily clinical practice of memory clinics for the diagnosis of complex cases].

    Magnin, E; Dumurgier, J; Bouaziz-Amar, E; Bombois, S; Wallon, D; Gabelle, A; Lehmann, S; Blanc, F; Bousiges, O; Hannequin, D; Jung, B; Miguet-Alfonsi, C; Quillard, M; Pasquier, F; Peoc'h, K; Laplanche, J-L; Hugon, J; Paquet, C

    2017-04-01

    The role of biomarkers in clinical research was recently highlighted in the new criteria for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers (total Tau protein, threonine 181 phosphorylated Tau protein and amyloid Aβ1-42 peptide) are associated with cerebral neuropathological lesions observed in Alzheimer's disease (neuronal death, neurofibrillary tangle with abnormal Tau deposits and amyloid plaque). Aβ1-40 amyloid peptide dosage helps to interpret Aβ1-42 results. As suggested in the latest international criteria and the French HAS (Haute Autorité de santé) recommendations, using theses CSF biomarkers should not be systematic but sometimes could be performed to improve confidence about the diagnostic of Alzheimer's disease in young subjects or in complex clinical situations. Future biomarkers actually in development will additionally help in diagnostic process (differential diagnosis) and in prognostic evaluation of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Relative changes in regional cerebral blood flow during spinal cord stimulation in patients with refractory angina pectoris

    Hautvast, RWM; TerHorst, GJ; DeJong, BM; DeJongste, MJL; Blanksma, PK; Paans, AMJ; Korf, J

    Spinal cord stimulation applied at thoracic level 1 (T1) has a neurally mediated anti-anginal effect based on antiischaemic action in the myocardium. Positron emission tomography was used to study which higher brain centres are influenced by spinal cord stimulation. Nine patients with a spinal cord

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid Metabolomics After Natural Product Treatment in an Experimental Model of Cerebral Ischemia.

    Huan, Tao; Xian, Jia Wen; Leung, Wing Nang; Li, Liang; Chan, Chun Wai

    2016-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an important biofluid for diagnosis of and research on neurological diseases. However, in-depth metabolomic profiling of CSF remains an analytical challenge due to the small volume of samples, particularly in small animal models. In this work, we report the application of a high-performance chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) workflow for CSF metabolomics in Gastrodia elata and Uncaria rhynchophylla water extract (GUW)-treated experimental cerebral ischemia model of rat. The GUW is a commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for hypertension and brain disease. This study investigated the amine- and phenol-containing biomarkers in the CSF metabolome. After GUW treatment for 7 days, the neurological deficit score was significantly improved with infarct volume reduction, while the integrity of brain histological structure was preserved. Over 1957 metabolites were quantified in CSF by dansylation LC-MS. The analysis of this comprehensive list of metabolites suggests that metabolites associated with oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and excitotoxicity change during GUW-induced alleviation of ischemic injury. This work is significant in that (1) it shows CIL LC-MS can be used for in-depth profiling of the CSF metabolome in experimental ischemic stroke and (2) identifies several potential molecular targets (that might mediate the central nervous system) and associate with pharmacodynamic effects of some frequently used TCMs.

  3. Cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis with cerebrospinal fluid circulation block after the first methotrexate administration by lumbar puncture

    Bienfait, H.P.; Gijtenbeek, J.M.M.; Bent, M.J. van; Bruin, H.G. de; Voogt, P.J.; Pillay, M.

    2002-01-01

    We report a patient treated for small lymphocytic lymphoma/leukemia with cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis (CVST) after lumbar puncture with intrathecal administration of methotrexate (MTX). He also developed a cerebrospinal fluid flow block. This is the first report of an association between lumbar puncture and intrathecally administered MTX and the development of CVST. Intrathecal treatment in this patient was discontinued and he was successfully treated with high-dose low-molecular-weight heparin subcutaneously. (orig.)

  4. A Multicenter, Randomnized Controlled Trial of Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage in Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    2016-10-01

    combination of CSFD and elevation of mean arterial pressure (MAP) in patients with acute spinal cord injury. This study is currently screening and...14 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Nicholas Theodore, MD 1. INTRODUCTION 4...SPECIAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS 13 9. APPENDICES 14 4 1. INTRODUCTION In the United States, even though the incidence rate of acute spinal

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum biomarkers of cerebral malaria mortality in Ghanaian children

    Wiredu Edwin K

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum can cause a diffuse encephalopathy known as cerebral malaria (CM, a major contributor to malaria associated mortality. Despite treatment, mortality due to CM can be as high as 30% while 10% of survivors of the disease may experience short- and long-term neurological complications. The pathogenesis of CM and other forms of severe malaria is multi-factorial and appear to involve cytokine and chemokine homeostasis, inflammation and vascular injury/repair. Identification of prognostic markers that can predict CM severity will enable development of better intervention. Methods Postmortem serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples were obtained within 2–4 hours of death in Ghanaian children dying of CM, severe malarial anemia (SMA, and non-malarial (NM causes. Serum and CSF levels of 36 different biomarkers (IL-1β, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IL-12 (p70, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, Eotaxin, FGF basic protein, CRP, G-CSF, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IP-10, MCP-1 (MCAF, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, SDF-1α, CXCL11 (I-TAC, Fas-ligand [Fas-L], soluble Fas [sFas], sTNF-R1 (p55, sTNF-R2 (p75, MMP-9, TGF-β1, PDGF bb and VEGF were measured and the results compared between the 3 groups. Results After Bonferroni adjustment for other biomarkers, IP-10 was the only serum biomarker independently associated with CM mortality when compared to SMA and NM deaths. Eight CSF biomarkers (IL-1ra, IL-8, IP-10, PDGFbb, MIP-1β, Fas-L, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2 were significantly elevated in CM mortality group when compared to SMA and NM deaths. Additionally, CSF IP-10/PDGFbb median ratio was statistically significantly higher in the CM group compared to SMA and NM groups. Conclusion The parasite-induced local cerebral dysregulation in the production of IP-10, 1L-8, MIP-1β, PDGFbb, IL-1ra, Fas-L, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2 may be involved in CM neuropathology, and their immunoassay may have potential utility in predicting

  6. Purine Metabolism in Acute Cerebral Ischemia

    Ye. V. Oreshnikov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of purine metabolism in clinically significant acute cerebral ischemia. Subjects and materials. Three hundred and fifty patients with the acutest cerebral ischemic stroke were examined. The parameters of gas and electrolyte composition, acid-base balance, the levels of malonic dialdehyde, adenine, guanine, hypox-anthine, xanthine, and uric acid, and the activity of xanthine oxidase were determined in arterial and venous bloods and spinal fluid. Results. In ischemic stroke, hyperuricemia reflects the severity of cerebral metabolic disturbances, hemodynamic instability, hypercoagulation susceptiility, and the extent of neurological deficit. In ischemic stroke, hyperuri-corachia is accompanied by the higher spinal fluid levels of adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine and it is an indirect indicator of respiratory disorders of central genesis, systemic acidosis, hypercoagulation susceptibility, free radical oxidation activation, the intensity of a stressor response to cerebral ischemia, cerebral metabolic disturbances, the depth of reduced consciousness, and the severity of neurological deficit. Conclusion. The high venous blood activity of xanthine oxidase in ischemic stroke is associated with the better neurological parameters in all follow-up periods, the better early functional outcome, and lower mortality rates. Key words: hyperuricemia, stroke, xanthine oxidase, uric acid, cerebral ischemia.

  7. Spinal meningeal cyst: analysis with low-field MRI

    Wu Hongzhou; Chen Yejia; Chen Ronghua; Chen Yanping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the characteristics of spinal meningeal cyst in low-field MRI and to discuss its classification, subtype, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis. Methods: Forty-two patients (20 male, 22 female) were examined with sagittal T 1 -and T 2 -, axial T 2 -weighted MR imaging. Twelve patients were also examined with contrast-enhanced MRI. Results: The cysts were classified using Nakors' classification as type Ia extradural meningeal cysts (4 patients), type Ib sacral meningeal cysts (32), type II extradural meningeal cysts with spinal nerve root fibers (4), and type III spinal intradural meningeal cysts (2). All 42 spinal meningeal cysts had well-defined boundaries with low T 1 and high T 2 signal intensities similar to cerebral spinal fluid. In type Ia, the lesions were often on the dorsum of mid-lower thoracic spinal cord compressing the spinal cord and displacing the extradural fat. In type Ib, the lesions were in the sacral canal with fat plane between the cyst and dural sac. In type II, the lesions contained nerve roots and were lateral to the dural sac. In type III, the lesions were often on the dorsum of spinal cord compressing and displacing the spinal cord anteriorly. Conclusion: Low-field MRI can clearly display the spinal meningeal cyst. Types Ia and Ib spinal meningeal cysts had typical features and can be easily diagnosed. Types II and III should be differentiated from cystic schwannomas and enterogenous cysts, respectively. (authors)

  8. Characterization of a cerebral palsy-like model in rats: Analysis of gait pattern and of brain and spinal cord motor areas.

    Dos Santos, Adriana Souza; de Almeida, Wellington; Popik, Bruno; Sbardelotto, Bruno Marques; Torrejais, Márcia Miranda; de Souza, Marcelo Alves; Centenaro, Lígia Aline

    2017-08-01

    In an attempt to propose an animal model that reproduces in rats the phenotype of cerebral palsy, this study evaluated the effects of maternal exposure to bacterial endotoxin associated with perinatal asphyxia and sensorimotor restriction on gait pattern, brain and spinal cord morphology. Two experimental groups were used: Control Group (CTG) - offspring of rats injected with saline during pregnancy and Cerebral Palsy Group (CPG) - offspring of rats injected with lipopolysaccharide during pregnancy, submitted to perinatal asphyxia and sensorimotor restriction for 30days. At 29days of age, the CPG exhibited coordination between limbs, weight-supported dorsal steps or weight-supported plantar steps with paw rotation. At 45days of age, CPG exhibited plantar stepping with the paw rotated in the balance phase. An increase in the number of glial cells in the primary somatosensory cortex and dorsal striatum were observed in the CPG, but the corpus callosum thickness and cross-sectional area of lateral ventricle were similar between studied groups. No changes were found in the number of motoneurons, glial cells and soma area of the motoneurons in the ventral horn of spinal cord. The combination of insults in the pre, peri and postnatal periods produced changes in hindlimbs gait pattern of animals similar to those observed in diplegic patients, but motor impairments were attenuated over time. Besides, the greater number of glial cells observed seems to be related to the formation of a glial scar in important sensorimotor brain areas. Copyright © 2017 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid volume depletion in chronic whiplash-associated disorders from motor vehicle-related spinal injuries

    Takeshita, Iwao; Ohta, Masaru; Samoto, Ken; Hamamura, Takeshi; Watanabe, Hideyuki

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume depletion in chronic cases of whiplash-associated disorders, 111 In radioisotope (RI) cisternography, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and lumbar MR myelography were consecutively conducted on 460 individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorders resulting from motor vehicle collision (Group A, n=225) and other traumatic injuries (Group B, n=57), spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndromes and other miscellaneous disorders (Group C, n=155), iatrogenic intracranial hypotension syndrome (Group D, n=11), and communicating hydrocephalus (Group E, n=12). Movement of intrathecally administered RI via a lumbar puncture was sequentially scanned at 1, 2 or 3, 5 and 24 hours. A whole body neuroaxis scanned figure showing high spinal parathecal activity at any time was considered to be a CSF leak, if small enough meningeal diverticula evidenced by MR myelography were present. Retention rate (%) of intrathecal RI for each scan was calculated using the formula: (whole body count-urinary bladder count)/whole body count (cpm) at 1 h x 100. All CSF leaks, although having single to multiple poles, were located in the spinal canal. CSF leakage was observed in 99/225 (44%), 24/57 (42%), 61/155 (39%), 9/11 (82%), and 4/12 (33%), in Groups A, B, C, D and E respectively. All CSF leakages was involved with the lumbar spine in Group A, although 20 cases extended to mid-thoracic levels. In Group A, spinal vertebrae were concomitantly injured in 7 cases (1 cervical spine dislocation, 1 cervical spine fracture, 2 thoracic and 1 lumbar compression fracture (s), and 2 lumbar disc hernia). CSF leakage for 2 cervical spine injuries was not at the injured site but at the lumbar spinal canal. CSF leakage limited to the lumbar spine involved 22 and 43 cases in groups B and C, respectively. Of all CSF leaks, 24 h retention rates less than 30% accounted for 90% of cases. In Group A, early CSF excretion and less than a 30% retention rate at 24

  10. Models of Cerebral System Mechanics.

    1986-07-20

    elements CBV and C,, are added between the brain tissue and the venous compartments, and between the cerebro - spinal fluid and the venous sinus...impact and whiplash in primates . J. Biomech., 4, 13-21. RYDER, H. W., ESPEY, F. F., KIMBELL, F. D., PENKA, E. J., ROSENAUER, A., PODOLSKY, B. and EVANS...Hirsch, A.E. (1971) Tolerances for cerebral concussion from head impact and whiplash in primates . J. Biomech. 4:13-21. Pamidi, M.R. and Advani, S.H. (1978

  11. Intrathecal pressure monitoring and cerebrospinal fluid drainage in acute spinal cord injury: a prospective randomized trial.

    Kwon, Brian K; Curt, Armin; Belanger, Lise M; Bernardo, Arlene; Chan, Donna; Markez, John A; Gorelik, Stephen; Slobogean, Gerard P; Umedaly, Hamed; Giffin, Mitch; Nikolakis, Michael A; Street, John; Boyd, Michael C; Paquette, Scott; Fisher, Charles G; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2009-03-01

    Ischemia is an important factor in the pathophysiology of secondary damage after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and, in the setting of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair, can be the primary cause of paralysis. Lowering the intrathecal pressure (ITP) by draining CSF is routinely done in thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm surgery but has not been evaluated in the setting of acute traumatic SCI. Additionally, while much attention is directed toward maintaining an adequate mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) in the acute postinjury phase, little is known about what is happening to the ITP during this period when spinal cord perfusion pressure (MABP - ITP) is important. The objectives of this study were to: 1) evaluate the safety and feasibility of draining CSF to lower ITP after acute traumatic SCI; 2) evaluate changes in ITP before and after surgical decompression; and 3) measure neurological recovery in relation to the drainage of CSF. Twenty-two patients seen within 48 hours of injury were prospectively randomized to a drainage or no-drainage treatment group. In all cases a lumbar intrathecal catheter was inserted for 72 hours. Acute complications of headache/nausea/vomiting, meningitis, or neurological deterioration were carefully monitored. Acute Spinal Cord Injury motor scores were documented at baseline and at 6 months postinjury. On insertion of the catheter, mean ITP was 13.8 +/- 1.3 mm Hg (+/- SD), and it increased to a mean peak of 21.7 +/- 1.5 mm Hg intraoperatively. The difference between the starting ITP on catheter insertion and the observed peak intrathecal pressure after decompression was, on average, an increase of 7.9 +/- 1.6 mm Hg (p drainage group was 30.6 +/- 2.3 mm Hg, which was significantly higher than the peak intraoperative ITP (p = 0.0098). During the same period, the peak recorded ITP in patients randomized to receive drainage was 28.1 +/- 2.8 mm Hg, which was not statistically higher than the peak intraoperative ITP (p = 0.15). The

  12. Spinal Cord Stimulation Alters Protein Levels in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Neuropathic Pain Patients: A Proteomic Mass Spectrometric Analysis.

    Lind, Anne-Li; Emami Khoonsari, Payam; Sjödin, Marcus; Katila, Lenka; Wetterhall, Magnus; Gordh, Torsten; Kultima, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Electrical neuromodulation by spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a well-established method for treatment of neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism behind the pain relieving effect in patients remains largely unknown. In this study, we target the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome, a little investigated aspect of SCS mechanism of action. Two different proteomic mass spectrometry protocols were used to analyze the CSF of 14 SCS responsive neuropathic pain patients. Each patient acted as his or her own control and protein content was compared when the stimulator was turned off for 48 hours, and after the stimulator had been used as normal for three weeks. Eighty-six proteins were statistically significantly altered in the CSF of neuropathic pain patients using SCS, when comparing the stimulator off condition to the stimulator on condition. The top 12 of the altered proteins are involved in neuroprotection (clusterin, gelsolin, mimecan, angiotensinogen, secretogranin-1, amyloid beta A4 protein), synaptic plasticity/learning/memory (gelsolin, apolipoprotein C1, apolipoprotein E, contactin-1, neural cell adhesion molecule L1-like protein), nociceptive signaling (neurosecretory protein VGF), and immune regulation (dickkopf-related protein 3). Previously unknown effects of SCS on levels of proteins involved in neuroprotection, nociceptive signaling, immune regulation, and synaptic plasticity are demonstrated. These findings, in the CSF of neuropathic pain patients, expand the picture of SCS effects on the neurochemical environment of the human spinal cord. An improved understanding of SCS mechanism may lead to new tracks of investigation and improved treatment strategies for neuropathic pain. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  13. Blood flow in cerebral aneurysms: comparison of phase contrast magnetic resonance and computational fluid dynamics - preliminary experience

    Karmonik, C.; Benndorf, G. [The Methodist Hospital Research Inst., Houston (United States). Radiology; Klucznik, R. [The Methodist Hospital, Houston (United States). Radiology

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are increasingly used to model cerebral aneurysm hemodynamics. We investigated the capability of phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (pcMRI), guided by specialized software for optimal slice definition (NOVA, Vassol Inc.) as a non-invasive method to measure intra-aneurysmal blood flow patterns in-vivo. In a novel approach, these blood flow patterns measured with pcMRI were qualitatively compared to the ones calculated with CFD. Materials end methods: the volumetric inflow rates into three unruptured cerebral aneurysms and the temporal variations of the intra-aneurysmal blood flow patterns were recorded with pcMRI. Transient CFD simulations were performed on geometric models of these aneurysms derived from 3D digital subtraction angiograms. Calculated intra-aneurysmal blood flow patterns were compared at the times of maximum and minimum arterial inflow to the ones measured with pcMRI and the temporal variations of these patterns during the cardiac cycle were investigated. Results: in all three aneurysms, the main features of intra-aneurysmal flow patterns obtained with pcMRI consisted of areas with positive velocities components and areas with negative velocities components. The measured velocities ranged from approx. {+-}60 to {+-}100 cm/sec. Comparison with calculated CFD simulations showed good correlation with regard to the spatial distribution of these areas, while differences in calculated magnitudes of velocities were found. (orig.)

  14. Blood flow in cerebral aneurysms: comparison of phase contrast magnetic resonance and computational fluid dynamics - preliminary experience

    Karmonik, C.; Benndorf, G.; Klucznik, R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are increasingly used to model cerebral aneurysm hemodynamics. We investigated the capability of phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (pcMRI), guided by specialized software for optimal slice definition (NOVA, Vassol Inc.) as a non-invasive method to measure intra-aneurysmal blood flow patterns in-vivo. In a novel approach, these blood flow patterns measured with pcMRI were qualitatively compared to the ones calculated with CFD. Materials end methods: the volumetric inflow rates into three unruptured cerebral aneurysms and the temporal variations of the intra-aneurysmal blood flow patterns were recorded with pcMRI. Transient CFD simulations were performed on geometric models of these aneurysms derived from 3D digital subtraction angiograms. Calculated intra-aneurysmal blood flow patterns were compared at the times of maximum and minimum arterial inflow to the ones measured with pcMRI and the temporal variations of these patterns during the cardiac cycle were investigated. Results: in all three aneurysms, the main features of intra-aneurysmal flow patterns obtained with pcMRI consisted of areas with positive velocities components and areas with negative velocities components. The measured velocities ranged from approx. ±60 to ±100 cm/sec. Comparison with calculated CFD simulations showed good correlation with regard to the spatial distribution of these areas, while differences in calculated magnitudes of velocities were found. (orig.)

  15. Quantitative comparison of hemodynamics in simulated and 3D angiography models of cerebral aneurysms by use of computational fluid dynamics.

    Saho, Tatsunori; Onishi, Hideo

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated hemodynamics using simulated models and determined how cerebral aneurysms develop in simulated and patient-specific models based on medical images. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was analyzed by use of OpenFOAM software. Flow velocity, stream line, and wall shear stress (WSS) were evaluated in a simulated model aneurysm with known geometry and in a three-dimensional angiographic model. The ratio of WSS at the aneurysm compared with that at the basilar artery was 1:10 in simulated model aneurysms with a diameter of 10 mm and 1:18 in the angiographic model, indicating similar tendencies. Vortex flow occurred in both model aneurysms, and the WSS decreased in larger model aneurysms. The angiographic model provided accurate CFD information, and the tendencies of simulated and angiographic models were similar. These findings indicate that hemodynamic effects are involved in the development of aneurysms.

  16. Characteristics of pediatric patients with enterovirus meningitis and no cerebral fluid pleocytosis

    de Crom, Stephanie C. M.; van Furth, Marceline A. M.; Peeters, Marcel F.; Rossen, John W. A.; Obihara, Charles C.

    UNLABELLED: Human non-polio enterovirus (EV) is the most important cause of aseptic meningitis in children. Only a few studies report the lack of cerobrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis in children with confirmed EV meningitis; however, the characteristics of these children have not been well defined.

  17. Evaluation of Mucorales DNA load in cerebrospinal fluid in a patient with possible cerebral mucormycosis treated with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B.

    Shigemura, Tomonari; Nakazawa, Yozo; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Saito, Shoji; Koike, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old male with possible cerebral mucormycosis following chemotherapy. We detected a Lichtheimia DNA load of 2.0×10(4) copies/ml in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), although a CSF culture showed no growth. After treatment with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B, the Lichtheimia DNA load fell below the detection limit, and at the same time the patient's headache and imaging findings improved. The quantification of Mucorales DNA in CSF may be useful for evaluating cerebral mucormycosis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of Mucorales DNA load in cerebrospinal fluid in a patient with possible cerebral mucormycosis treated with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B

    Tomonari Shigemura

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 19-year-old male with possible cerebral mucormycosis following chemotherapy. We detected a Lichtheimia DNA load of 2.0 × 104 copies/ml in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, although a CSF culture showed no growth. After treatment with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B, the Lichtheimia DNA load fell below the detection limit, and at the same time the patient's headache and imaging findings improved. The quantification of Mucorales DNA in CSF may be useful for evaluating cerebral mucormycosis.

  19. A comparison of static and dynamic cerebral autoregulation during mild whole-body cold stress in individuals with and without cervical spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    van der Scheer, Jan W; Kamijo, Yoshi-Ichiro; Leicht, Christof A; Millar, Philip J; Shibasaki, Manabu; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Tajima, Fumihiro

    2018-05-01

    Experimental study. To characterize static and dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) of individuals with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) compared to able-bodied controls in response to moderate increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) caused by mild whole-body cold stress. Japan METHODS: Five men with complete autonomic cervical SCI (sustained > 5 y) and six age-matched able-bodied men participated in hemodynamic, temperature, catecholamine and respiratory measurements for 60 min during three consecutive stages: baseline (10 min; 33 °C water through a thin-tubed whole-body suit), mild cold stress (20 min; 25 °C water), and post-cold recovery (30 min; 33 °C water). Static CA was determined as the ratio between mean changes in middle cerebral artery blood velocity and MAP, dynamic CA as transfer function coherence, gain, and phase between spontaneous changes in MAP to middle cerebral artery blood velocity. MAP increased in both groups during cold and post-cold recovery (mean differences: 5-10 mm Hg; main effect of time: p = 0.001). Static CA was not different between the able-bodied vs. the cervical SCI group (mean (95% confidence interval (CI)) of between-group difference: -4 (-11 to 3) and -2 (-5 to 1) cm/s/mm Hg for cold (p = 0.22) and post-cold (p = 0.24), respectively). At baseline, transfer function phase was shorter in the cervical SCI group (mean (95% CI) of between-group difference: 0.6 (0.2 to 1.0) rad; p = 0.006), while between-group differences in changes in phase were not different in response to the cold stress (interaction term: p = 0.06). This pilot study suggests that static CA is similar between individuals with cervical SCI and able-bodied controls in response to moderate increases in MAP, while dynamic CA may be impaired in cervical SCI because of disturbed sympathetic control.

  20. Real-time monitoring of spinal cord blood flow with a novel sensor mounted on a cerebrospinal fluid drainage catheter in an animal model.

    Hayatsu, Yukihiro; Kawamoto, Shunsuke; Matsunaga, Tadao; Haga, Yoichi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu

    2014-10-01

    The aim of our study was to develop a novel monitoring system for spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) to test the efficacy of the SCBF sensor in an animal model. The sensor system consisted of 2 optical fibers, a pedestal for fiber fixation, and a mirror for the laser reflection and was incorporated into a cerebrospinal fluid drainage catheter. In vivo studies were performed in a swine model (n=10) to measure SCBF during spinal cord ischemia induced by clamping the descending thoracic aorta and supra-aortic neck vessels, when necessary. A temporary low cardiac output model was also created by inflow clamping of the inferior vena cava to analyze the quantitative changes in SCBF during this maneuver. The developed SCBF monitoring catheter placed intrathecally could detect SCBF in all the swine. The SCBF after aortic crossclamping at the fourth intercostal level exhibited diverse changes reproducibly among the swine, with a >25% reduction in SCBF in 5 pigs, an increase in 3, and no significant changes in 2. Consistent reductions were recorded during inferior vena cava occlusion. The mean SCBF decreased by 32% after inferior vena cava occlusion when the cardiac output had decreased by 27%. We have developed a novel SCBF sensor that could detect real-time changes in spinal cord perfusion in a swine model. The device holds promise to detect imminent ischemia or ensure acceptable blood perfusion in the spinal cord and could further enhance our understanding of spinal cord circulation. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Core cerebrospinal fluid biomarker profile in cerebral amyloid angiopathy: A meta-analysis.

    Charidimou, Andreas; Friedrich, Jan O; Greenberg, Steven M; Viswanathan, Anand

    2018-02-27

    To perform a meta-analysis of 4 core CSF biomarkers (β-amyloid [Aβ]42, Aβ40, total tau [t-tau], and phosphorylated tau [p-tau]) to assess which of these are most altered in sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). We systematically searched PubMed for eligible studies reporting data on CSF biomarkers reflecting amyloid precursor protein metabolism (Aβ42, Aβ40), neurodegeneration (t-tau), and tangle pathology (p-tau) in symptomatic sporadic CAA cohorts vs controls and patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Biomarker performance was assessed in random-effects meta-analysis based on ratio of mean (RoM) biomarker concentrations: (1) in patients with CAA vs healthy controls and (2) in patients with CAA vs patients with AD. RoM >1 indicates higher biomarker concentration in patients with CAA vs comparison population and RoM <1 indicates higher concentration in comparison groups. Three studies met inclusion criteria. These comprised 5 CAA patient cohorts (n = 59 patients) vs healthy controls (n = 94 cases) and AD cohorts (n = 158). Three core biomarkers differentiated CAA from controls: CSF Aβ42 (RoM 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38-0.64, p < 0.003), Aβ40 (RoM 0.70, 95% CI 0.63-0.78, p < 0.0001), and t-tau (RoM 1.54, 95% CI 1.15-2.07, p = 0.004); p-tau was marginal (RoM 1.24, 95% CI 0.99-1.54, p = 0.062). Differentiation between CAA and AD was strong for CSF Aβ40 (RoM 0.76, 95% CI 0.69-0.83, p < 0.0001), but not Aβ42 (RoM 1.00; 95% CI 0.81-1.23, p = 0.970). For t-tau and p-tau, average CSF ratios in patients with CAA vs patients with AD were 0.63 (95% CI 0.54-0.74, p < 0.0001) and 0.60 (95% CI 0.50-0.71, p < 0.0001), respectively. Specific CSF patterns of Aβ42, Aβ40, t-tau, and p-tau might serve as molecular biomarkers of CAA, but analyses in larger CAA cohorts are needed. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Investigation of spinal cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons expressing PKD2L1: evidence for a conserved system from fish to primates

    Djenoune, Lydia; Khabou, Hanen; Joubert, Fanny; Quan, Feng B.; Nunes Figueiredo, Sophie; Bodineau, Laurence; Del Bene, Filippo; Burcklé, Céline; Tostivint, Hervé; Wyart, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Over 90 years ago, Kolmer and Agduhr identified spinal cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (CSF-cNs) based on their morphology and location within the spinal cord. In more than 200 vertebrate species, they observed ciliated neurons around the central canal that extended a brush of microvilli into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Although their morphology is suggestive of a primitive sensory cell, their function within the vertebrate spinal cord remains unknown. The identification of specific molecular markers for these neurons in vertebrates would benefit the investigation of their physiological roles. PKD2L1, a transient receptor potential channel that could play a role as a sensory receptor, has been found in cells contacting the central canal in mouse. In this study, we demonstrate that PKD2L1 is a specific marker for CSF-cNs in the spinal cord of mouse (Mus musculus), macaque (Macaca fascicularis) and zebrafish (Danio rerio). In these species, the somata of spinal PKD2L1+ CSF-cNs were located below or within the ependymal layer and extended an apical bulbous extension into the central canal. We found GABAergic PKD2L1-expressing CSF-cNs in all three species. We took advantage of the zebrafish embryo for its transparency and rapid development to identify the progenitor domains from which pkd2l1+ CSF-cNs originate. pkd2l1+ CSF-cNs were all GABAergic and organized in two rows—one ventral and one dorsal to the central canal. Their location and marker expression is consistent with previously described Kolmer–Agduhr cells. Accordingly, pkd2l1+ CSF-cNs were derived from the progenitor domains p3 and pMN defined by the expression of nkx2.2a and olig2 transcription factors, respectively. Altogether our results suggest that a system of CSF-cNs expressing the PKD2L1 channel is conserved in the spinal cord across bony vertebrate species. PMID:24834029

  3. Investigation of spinal cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons expressing PKD2L1: evidence for a conserved system from fish to primates

    Lydia eDjenoune

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Over ninety years ago, Kolmer and Agduhr identified spinal cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (CSF-cNs based on their morphology and location within the spinal cord. In more than two hundred vertebrate species, they observed ciliated neurons around the central canal that extended a brush of microvilli into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Although their morphology is suggestive of a primitive sensory cell, their function within the vertebrate spinal cord remains unknown. The identification of specific molecular markers for these neurons in vertebrates would benefit the investigation of their physiological roles. PKD2L1, a transient receptor potential channel that could play a role as a sensory receptor, has been found in cells contacting the central canal in mouse. In this study, we demonstrate that PKD2L1 is a specific marker for CSF-cNs in the spinal cord of mouse (Mus musculus, macaque (Macaca fascicularis and zebrafish (Danio rerio. In these species, the somata of spinal PKD2L1+ CSF-cNs were located below or within the ependymal layer and extended an apical bulbous extension into the central canal. We found GABAergic PKD2L1-expressing CSF-cNs in all three species. We took advantage of the zebrafish embryo for its transparency and rapid development to identify the progenitor domains from which pkd2l1+ CSF-cNs originate. pkd2l1+ CSF-cNs were all GABAergic and organized in two rows—one ventral and one dorsal to the central canal. Their location and marker expression is consistent with previously described Kolmer-Agduhr cells. Accordingly, pkd2l1+ CSF-cNs were derived from the progenitor domains p3 and pMN defined by the expression of nkx2.2a and olig2 transcription factors, respectively. Altogether our results suggest that a system of CSF-cNs expressing the PKD2L1 channel is conserved in the spinal cord across bony vertebrate species.

  4. Histopathologically verified cerebral CT findings in AIDS

    Tosch, U.; Witt, H.; Iglesias-Rozas, J.R.; Ruf, B.

    1990-01-01

    Computer tomographic and histopathological findings in 55 patients who died of the complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, were reviewed retrospectively. In 23 patients (42%) an increased space of the internal or external cerebral spinal fluid was diagnosed. 20 patients (36%) had focal lesions. We differentiated between single, multiple and ring-shaped lesions with contrast enhancement and hypodense lesions. In 12 cases (22%) no CT abnormalities were found. Focal lesions proved to be secondary to toxoplasmosis in 85%. Single lesions were never caused by toxoplasmosis. (orig.) [de

  5. Hydrocephalus: the role of cerebral aquaporin-4 channels and computational modeling considerations of cerebrospinal fluid.

    Desai, Bhargav; Hsu, Ying; Schneller, Benjamin; Hobbs, Jonathan G; Mehta, Ankit I; Linninger, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) channels play an important role in brain water homeostasis. Water transport across plasma membranes has a critical role in brain water exchange of the normal and the diseased brain. AQP4 channels are implicated in the pathophysiology of hydrocephalus, a disease of water imbalance that leads to CSF accumulation in the ventricular system. Many molecular aspects of fluid exchange during hydrocephalus have yet to be firmly elucidated, but review of the literature suggests that modulation of AQP4 channel activity is a potentially attractive future pharmaceutical therapy. Drug therapy targeting AQP channels may enable control over water exchange to remove excess CSF through a molecular intervention instead of by mechanical shunting. This article is a review of a vast body of literature on the current understanding of AQP4 channels in relation to hydrocephalus, details regarding molecular aspects of AQP4 channels, possible drug development strategies, and limitations. Advances in medical imaging and computational modeling of CSF dynamics in the setting of hydrocephalus are summarized. Algorithmic developments in computational modeling continue to deepen the understanding of the hydrocephalus disease process and display promising potential benefit as a tool for physicians to evaluate patients with hydrocephalus.

  6. Dandy-walker malformation and the contribution of radioisotopic studies of cerebral spinal fluid dynamics to its diagnosis

    Palma, A.; Nazar, N.; Castro, M.; Olea, E.; Guzmann, G.

    1982-01-01

    On case of Dandy-Walker malformation is described. The diagnosis was mainly reached by dynamic isotope studies of CSF, and was confirmed by axial computerized tomography. The importance of these examinations is discussed, not only as a means of understanding the aetiopathology, but especially because of the functional information they give and the therapeutic consequences they have. (Author)

  7. Notice of retraction: Role of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Spaceflight-induced Ocular Changes and Visual Impairment in Astronauts.

    Alperin, Noam; Bagci, Ahmet M; Oliu, Carlos J; Lee, Sang H; Lam, Byron L

    2017-10-16

    Notice of retraction: the article "Role of Cerebral Spinal Fluid in Space Flight Induced Ocular Changes and Visual Impairment in Astronauts" by Alperin et al This article has been retracted due to security concerns raised by NASA, the sponsoring agency. © RSNA, 2017.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid markers to distinguish bacterial meningitis from cerebral malaria in children [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    James M. Njunge

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Few hospitals in high malaria endemic countries in Africa have the diagnostic capacity for clinically distinguishing acute bacterial meningitis (ABM from cerebral malaria (CM. As a result, empirical use of antibiotics is necessary. A biochemical marker of ABM would facilitate precise clinical diagnosis and management of these infections and enable rational use of antibiotics. Methods. We used label-free protein quantification by mass spectrometry to identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF markers that distinguish ABM (n=37 from CM (n=22 in Kenyan children. Fold change (FC and false discovery rates (FDR were used to identify differentially expressed proteins. Subsequently, potential biomarkers were assessed for their ability to discriminate between ABM and CM using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves. Results. The host CSF proteome response to ABM (Haemophilus influenza and Streptococcus pneumoniae is significantly different to CM. Fifty two proteins were differentially expressed (FDR<0.01, Log FC≥2, of which 83% (43/52 were upregulated in ABM compared to CM. Myeloperoxidase and lactotransferrin were present in 37 (100% and 36 (97% of ABM cases, respectively, but absent in CM (n=22. Area under the ROC curve (AUC, sensitivity, and specificity were assessed for myeloperoxidase (1, 1, and 1; 95% CI, 1-1 and lactotransferrin (0.98, 0.97, and 1; 95% CI, 0.96-1. Conclusion. Myeloperoxidase and lactotransferrin have a high potential to distinguish ABM from CM and thereby improve clinical management. Their validation requires a larger cohort of samples that includes other bacterial aetiologies of ABM.

  9. Comparison of cutting and pencil-point spinal needle in spinal anesthesia regarding postdural puncture headache

    Xu, Hong; Liu, Yang; Song, WenYe; Kan, ShunLi; Liu, FeiFei; Zhang, Di; Ning, GuangZhi; Feng, ShiQing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Postdural puncture headache (PDPH), mainly resulting from the loss of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), is a well-known iatrogenic complication of spinal anesthesia and diagnostic lumbar puncture. Spinal needles have been modified to minimize complications. Modifiable risk factors of PDPH mainly included needle size and needle shape. However, whether the incidence of PDPH is significantly different between cutting-point and pencil-point needles was controversial. Then we did a meta-analysis to assess the incidence of PDPH of cutting spinal needle and pencil-point spinal needle. Methods: We included all randomly designed trials, assessing the clinical outcomes in patients given elective spinal anesthesia or diagnostic lumbar puncture with either cutting or pencil-point spinal needle as eligible studies. All selected studies and the risk of bias of them were assessed by 2 investigators. Clinical outcomes including success rates, frequency of PDPH, reported severe PDPH, and the use of epidural blood patch (EBP) were recorded as primary results. Results were evaluated using risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous variables. Rev Man software (version 5.3) was used to analyze all appropriate data. Results: Twenty-five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in our study. The analysis result revealed that pencil-point spinal needle would result in lower rate of PDPH (RR 2.50; 95% CI [1.96, 3.19]; P < 0.00001) and severe PDPH (RR 3.27; 95% CI [2.15, 4.96]; P < 0.00001). Furthermore, EBP was less used in pencil-point spine needle group (RR 3.69; 95% CI [1.96, 6.95]; P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Current evidences suggest that pencil-point spinal needle was significantly superior compared with cutting spinal needle regarding the frequency of PDPH, PDPH severity, and the use of EBP. In view of this, we recommend the use of pencil-point spinal needle in spinal anesthesia and lumbar puncture. PMID:28383416

  10. Effects on cerebral circulation of decimeter wave therapy and variable magnetic field in patients with hemiparesis of vascular and traumatic origin

    Strelkova, N.I.; Gavrilkov, A.T.; Dyuzhilova, N.F.; Strel' tsova, Ye.N.

    1981-08-01

    Both the artherosclerotic process in the case of cerebrovascular accident and cerebral trauma lead to impairment of cerebral hemodynamics, blood and spinal fluid circulation, macroscopic and microscopic disturbances. Electromagnetic waves in the decimeter range (decimeter waves - DMW) and a variable magnetic field (VMF) were used to treat these processes. Treatment was delivered directly to the region of the cerebral lesion, on the basis of the penetrating capacity of DMW and VMF to a relatively great depth (7 to 9 and 4 to 7 cm, respectively). Results of these treatments are discussed.

  11. Intrathecally enhanced spinal CT in the early diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid-borne metastasis in pediatric patients with primary brain tumors

    Wang, H.; Rosenbaum, A.E.; Ahn, H.S.; Zinreich, S.J.; Diffley, D.M.; Killmond, T.A.; Strauss, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of asymptomatic intraspinal cerebrospinal fluid-borne metastases can obviate serious sequelae in pediatric patients with known intracranial tumors. MR imaging is a superior imaging modality; however, in very young patients who need general anesthesia for immobilization and also for evaluation of small subarachnoid seedings, the authors found CT to be a valuable alternative. Twelve patients ranging in age from 3 months to 13 years underwent CT screening of the entire spine after intrathecal enhancement with 3-5 ml of metrizamide (100 mg iodine per milliliter) via a lumbar puncture. Intrathecal spinal metastases were found in 67% of the studied patients and even in a patient whose MR imaging examination failed to disclose the lesion

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor correlate with spinal cord stimulation frequency in patients with neuropathic pain: a preliminary report.

    McCarthy, K F; McCrory, C

    2014-08-01

    Case series. To evaluate relationships between spinal cord stimulation (SCS) parameters and levels of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Ambulatory pain clinic of St James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Nine patients with an implanted SCS and Failed Back Surgery Syndrome (FBSS) were administered the Brief Pain Inventory and Short Form (36) Health Survey. Following a lumbar puncture, levels of GDNF in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were assayed and correlated with stimulation parameters. Controls were patients with arthritic back pain who were matched for age, gender and SF-36 score. Concentrations of GDNF in CSF are higher in patients with FBSS than controls (P=0.002) and correlate with SCS frequency (P=0.029). Concentrations of GDNF in CSF are higher in neuropathic pain and appear to be related to stimulation frequency. Further work is needed to evaluate this potential relationship, both in neuropathic pain and in other contexts such as locomotor dysfunction.

  13. Regional distribution of TL-201 in the brain and spinal cord after injection into the cerebrospinal fluid: Imaging of brain tumors

    Woo, D.V.; Rubertone, J.; Vincent, S.; Brady, L.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Radiotracers are typically employed to evaluate the brain ventricular space; however, there are no agents designed to be taken up into specific neuronal regions after injection into the cerebrospinal fluids (CSF). The authors report studies in which T1-201 was stereotaxically administered into the lateral or fourth ventricles of Sprague-Dawley rats. Brains were removed (n = 42) 2-6 hours after injection and sectioned for apposition to autoradiographic film. Specific uptake was observed in active neurons of the diencephalon, mesencephalon, cerebellum, brain stem, and spinal gray matter. Astrocytoma cell implants into the caudate nucleus of Sprague-Dawley rats induced histologically confirmed brain tumors (n = 5). Significant localization of T1-201 was observed in the tumor 4 hours after injection into the lateral ventricle. These findings suggest that T1-201 may be useful for delineating specific neuronal function via CSF circulation and for imaging actively growing brain tumors

  14. Subdural fluid collection and hydrocephalus following cervical schwannoma resection: hydrocephalus resolution after spinal pseudomeningocele repair: case report.

    Benedetto, Nicola; Cagnazzo, Federico; Gambacciani, Carlo; Perrini, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    The authors report the case of a 31-year-old man who developed neck pain and headache 2 months after the uncomplicated resection of a cervical schwannoma. MR imaging revealed infratentorial subdural fluid collections and obstructive hydrocephalus associated with cervical pseudomeningocele. The clinical symptoms, subdural fluid collections, and ventricular dilation resolved after surgical correction of the pseudomeningocele. This report emphasizes that hydrocephalus may be related to disorders of cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics induced by cervical pseudomeningocele. In these rare cases, both the hydrocephalus and the symptoms are resolved by the simple correction of the pseudomeningocele.

  15. Associations Between Cerebral Small-Vessel Disease and Alzheimer Disease Pathology as Measured by Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers

    Kester, M.I.; Goos, J.D.C.; Teunissen, C.E.; Benedictus, M.R.; Bouwman, F.H.; Wattjes, M.P.; Barkhof, F.; Scheltens, P.; van der Flier, W.M.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: It remains unclear if and how associations between cerebral small-vessel disease and Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology lead to cognitive decline and dementia. OBJECTIVE: To determine associations between small-vessel disease and AD pathology. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

  16. Modulation of cerebral blood flow with transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) in patients with cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    ter Laan, Mark; van Dijk, J.M.C.; Stewart, Roy; Staal, Michiel J; Elting, Jan-Willem J.

    ObjectivesTranscutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) and spinal cord stimulation have been shown to increase peripheral and cerebral blood flow. We postulate that certain pathological conditions attenuate cerebral autoregulation, which may result in a relative increase of the importance of

  17. Modulation of cerebral blood flow with transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) in patients with cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Laan, M. ter; Dijk, J.M. van; Stewart, R.; Staal, M.J.; Elting, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) and spinal cord stimulation have been shown to increase peripheral and cerebral blood flow. We postulate that certain pathological conditions attenuate cerebral autoregulation, which may result in a relative increase of the importance of

  18. HTLV-I associated myelopathy with multiple spotty areas in cerebral white matter and brain stem by MRI

    Hara, Yasuo; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Yoshikawa, Hiroo; Yorifuji, Shirou; Tarui, Seiichiro

    1988-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman was admitted with complaints of urinary incontinence and gait disturbance, both of which had progressed slowly without any sign of remission. Family history was not contributory. Neurologically, extreme spasticity was recoginized in the lower limbs. Babinski sign was positive bilaterally. Flower-like atypical lymphocytes were seen in blood. Positive anti-HTLV-I antibody was confirmed in serum and spinal fluid by western blot. She was diagnosed as having HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM). CT reveald calcification in bilateral globus pallidus, and MRI revealed multiple spotty areas in cerebral white matter and brain stem, but no spinal cord lesion was detectable. Electrophysiologically, brain stem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) suggested the presence of bilateral brain stem lesions. Neither median nor posterior tibial nerve somatosensory evoked potentials were evoked, a finding suggesting the existence of spinal cord lesion. In this case, the lesion was not confined to spinal cord, it was also observed in brain stem and cerebral white matter. Such distinct lesions in cerebral white matter and brain stem have not been reported in patients with HAM. It is suggested that HTLV-I is probably associated with cerebral white matter and brain stem.

  19. Leukemic blasts are present at low levels in spinal fluid in one-third of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases

    Levinsen, Mette; Marquart, Hanne V; Groth-Pedersen, Line

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement is associated with relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and is a diagnostic challenge. PROCEDURE: In a Nordic/Baltic prospective study, we assessed centralized flow cytometry (FCM) of locally fixed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF......: 45 × 10(9) /l vs. 10 × 10(9) /l, P diagnosis remained so despite at least two doses...

  20. Distinct transthyretin oxidation isoform profile in spinal fluid from patients with Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment

    Poulsen, Keld; Bahl, Justyna Mc; Simonsen, Anja H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transthyretin (TTR), an abundant protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), contains a free, oxidation-prone cysteine residue that gives rise to TTR isoforms. These isoforms may reflect conditions in vivo. Since increased oxidative stress has been linked to neurodegenerative disorders such...

  1. Predictors of short-term outcome in patients with acute middle cerebral artery occlusion: unsuitability of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery vascular hyperintensity scores

    Chan-chan Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR vascular hyperintensity (FVH is used to assess leptomeningeal collateral circulation, but clinical outcomes of patients with FVH can be very different. The aim of the present study was to assess a FVH score and explore its relationship with clinical outcomes. Patients with acute ischemic stroke due to middle cerebral artery M1 occlusion underwent magnetic resonance imaging and were followed up at 10 days (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and 90 days (modified Rankin Scale to determine short-term clinical outcomes. Effective collateral circulation indirectly improved recovery of neurological function and short-term clinical outcome by extending the size of the pial penumbra and reducing infarct lesions. FVH score showed no correlation with 90-day functional clinical outcome and was not sufficient as an independent predictor of short-term clinical outcome.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid culture

    ... Alternative Names Culture - CSF; Spinal fluid culture; CSF culture Images Pneumococci organism References Karcher DS, McPherson RA. Cerebrospinal, synovial, serous body fluids, and alternative specimens. In: McPherson RA, Pincus ...

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid leak (image)

    ... brain and spinal cord by acting like a liquid cushion. The fluid allows the organs to be buoyant protecting them from blows or other trauma. Inside the skull the cerebrospinal fluid is contained by the dura which covers ...

  4. Radioimmunoassays for lg classes G, A, M, D, and E in spinal fluids: normal values of different age groups

    Nerenberg, S.T.; Prasad, R.

    1975-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay procedures of sufficient sensitivity (lgG, 0.5 μg per 100 μl; lgA, 25.0 ng. per 100 μl; lgM, 10.0 ng. per 100 μl; lgD, 0.5 U.* per 100 μl; and lgE, 1.0 U.* per 100 μl) were developed to detect and quantitate all 5 immunoglobulin classes in the cerebrospinal fluid on small aliquots (1 ml.) of unconcentrated cerebrospinal fluid. All 5 immunoglobulin classes were routinely detected in normal individuals for the first time, the levels varying with different age groups for lgG and A but not for the remaining immunoglobulin classes. Race and sex had no effect. Standardization of techniques and establishment of normal values for different age groups sets the stage for determination of immunoglobulin changes related to central nervous system disease

  5. pCO2 And pH regulation of cerebral blood flow

    SeongHun eYoon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CO2 Serves as one of the fundamental regulators of cerebral blood flow. It is widely considered that this regulation occurs through pCO2-driven changes in pH of the cerebral spinal fluid, with elevated and lowered pH causing direct relaxation and contraction of the smooth muscle, respectively. However, some findings also suggest that pCO2 acts independently of and/or in conjunction with altered pH. This action may be due to a direct effect of cerebral spinal fluid pCO2 on the smooth muscle as well as on the endothelium, nerves, and astrocytes. Findings may also point to an action of arterial pCO2 on the endothelium to regulate smooth muscle contractility. Thus, the effects of pH and pCO2 may be influenced by the absence/presence of different cell types in the various experimental preparations. Results may also be influenced by experimental parameters including myogenic tone as well as solutions containing significantly altered HCO3- concentrations, i.e., solutions routinely employed to differentiate the effects of pH from pCO2. In sum, it appears that pCO2, independently and in conjunction with pH, may regulate cerebral blood flow.

  6. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C.; Czech, T.; Diekmann, K.; Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A.; Prayer, D.

    2004-01-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  7. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C. [Clinical Div. of Oncology, Dept. of Medicine I, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Czech, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Diekmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Clinical Inst. for Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  8. The use of LiDCO based fluid management in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery under spinal anaesthesia: Neck of femur optimisation therapy - targeted stroke volume (NOTTS: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Moran Chris G

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 70,000 patients/year undergo surgery for repair of a fractured hip in the United Kingdom. This is associated with 30-day mortality of 9% and survivors have a considerable length of acute hospital stay postoperatively (median 26 days. Use of oesophageal Doppler monitoring to guide intra-operative fluid administration in hip fracture repair has previously been associated with a reduction in hospital stay of 4-5 days. Most hip fracture surgery is now performed under spinal anaesthesia. Oesophageal Doppler monitoring may be unreliable in the presence of spinal anaesthesia and most patients would not tolerate the probes. An alternative method of guiding fluid administration (minimally-invasive arterial pulse contour analysis has been shown to reduce length of stay in high-risk surgical patients but has never been studied in hip fracture surgery. Methods Single-centre randomised controlled parallel group trial. Randomisation by website using computer generated concealed tables. Setting: University hospital in UK. Participants: 128 patients with acute primary hip fracture listed for operative repair under spinal anaesthesia and aged > 65 years. Intervention: Stroke volume guided intra-operative fluid management. Continuous measurement of SV recorded by a calibrated cardiac output monitor (LiDCOplus. Maintenance fluid and 250 ml colloid boluses given to achieve sustained 10% increases in stroke volume. Control group: fluid administration at the responsible (blinded anaesthetist's discretion. The intervention terminates at the end of the surgical procedure and post-operative fluid management is at the responsible anaesthetist's discretion. Primary outcome: length of acute hospital stay is determined by a blinded team of clinicians. Secondary outcomes include number of complications and total cost of care. Funding NIHR/RfPB: PB-PG-0407-13073. Trial registration number Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN

  9. Analysis of L-serine-O-phosphate in cerebrospinal spinal fluid by derivatization-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    McNaney, Colleen A; Benitex, Yulia; Luchetti, David; Labasi, Jeffrey M; Olah, Timothy V; Morgan, Daniel G; Drexler, Dieter M

    2014-05-01

    L-serine-O-phosphate (L-SOP), the precursor of L-serine, is a potent agonist against the group III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and, thus, is of interest as a potential biomarker for monitoring modulation of neurotransmitter release. So far, no reports are available on the analysis of L-SOP in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Here a novel method is presented to determine L-SOP levels in CSF employing precolumn derivatization with (5-N-succinimidoxy-5-oxopentyl)triphenylphosphonium bromide (SPTPP) coupled to liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (derivatization-LC/MS, d-LC/MS). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neurotoxicity of cerebro-spinal fluid from patients with Parkinson's disease on mesencephalic primary cultures as an in vitro model of dopaminergic neurons.

    Kong, Ping; Zhang, Ben-Shu; Lei, Ping; Kong, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Shi-Shuang; Li, Dai; Zhang, Yun

    2015-08-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. In spite of extensive research, neither the cause nor the mechanisms have been firmly established thus far. One assumption is that certain toxic substances may exist in the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) of Parkinson's disease patients. To confirm the neurotoxicity of CSF and study the potential correlation between neurotoxicity and the severity of Parkinson's disease, CSF was added to cultured cells. By observation of cell morphology, changes in the levels of lactate dehydrogenase, the ratio of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells, and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein, the differences between the two groups were shown. The created in vitro model of dopaminergic neurons using primary culture of mouse embryonic mesencephalic tissue is suitable for the study of neurotoxicity. The observations of the present study indicated that CSF from Parkinson's disease patients contains factors that can cause specific injury to cultured dopaminergic neurons. However, no obvious correlation was found between the neurotoxicity of CSF and the severity of Parkinson's disease.

  11. Neuropeptide Kyotorphin (Tyrosyl-Arginine) has Decreased Levels in the Cerebro-Spinal Fluid of Alzheimer's Disease Patients: Potential Diagnostic and Pharmacological Implications.

    Santos, Sara Matos; Garcia-Nimo, Laura; Sá Santos, Sónia; Tavares, Isaura; Cocho, José A; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2013-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), besides the characteristic deterioration of memory, studies also point to a higher pain tolerance in spite of sensibility preservation. A change in the normal tau protein phosphorylation is also characteristic of AD, which contributes to the pathogenesis of the disease and is useful in early diagnosis. Kyotorphin (KTP) is an endogenous analgesic dipeptide (Tyr-Arg) for which there is evidence of eventual neuroprotective and neuromodulatory properties. The objective of this work was to study the possible correlation between KTP and phosphorylated tau protein (p-tau) levels in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) samples of AD patients. CSF samples were collected from 25 AD patients and 13 age-matched controls (N), where p-tau and KTP levels were measured. We found a statistically significant difference between p-tau/KTP values in AD and N groups with an inverse correlation between p-tau and KTP values in AD samples. These results suggest that in the future KTP may be a candidate biomarker for neurodegeneration and may be a lead compound to be used pharmacologically for neuroprotection.

  12. MRI in diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    Kobayashi, Naotoshi; Ono, Yuko; Kakinoki, Yoshio; Kimura, Humiko; Ebihara, Reiko; Nagayama, Takashi; Okada, Takaharu; Watanabe, Hiromi

    1985-01-01

    64 MRI studies of 57 cases of spinal cord diseases were reviewed, and following results were obtained. (1) MRI is usefull for screening method of spinal cord diseases, as CT in cerebral diseases. (2) MRI might replaces myelography in most of spinal cord disease, and more reliable informations might be obtained by MRI than in myelography in some cases, but (3) in detection of small organic changes, some technological problems are layed regarding to the image resolution of MRI. (author)

  13. Direct exposure of guinea pig CNS to human luteinizing hormone increases cerebrospinal fluid and cerebral beta amyloid levels.

    Wahjoepramono, Eka J; Wijaya, Linda K; Taddei, Kevin; Bates, Kristyn A; Howard, Matthew; Martins, Georgia; deRuyck, Karl; Matthews, Paul M; Verdile, Giuseppe; Martins, Ralph N

    2011-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) has been shown to alter the metabolism of beta amyloid (Aβ), a key protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. While LH and components required for LH receptor signalling are present in the brain, their role in the CNS remains unclear. In vitro, LH has been shown to facilitate neurosteroid production and alter Aβ metabolism. However, whether LH can directly modulate cerebral Aβ levels in vivo has not previously been studied. In this study, we investigated the effect of chronic administration of LH to the guinea pig CNS on cerebral Aβ levels. Gonadectomised male animals were administered, via cortical placement, either placebo or LH slow-release pellets. At 14 and 28 days after treatment, animals were sacrificed. Brain, plasma and CSF were collected and Aβ levels measured via ELISA. Levels of the Aβ precursor protein (APP) and the neurosteroidogenic enzyme cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) were also assayed. An increase in CSF Aβ40 levels was observed 28 days following treatment. These CSF data also reflected changes in Aβ40 levels observed in brain homogenates. No change was observed in plasma Aβ40 levels but APP and its C-terminal fragments (APP-CTF) were significantly increased in response to LH exposure. Protein expression of P450scc was increased after 28 days of LH exposure, suggesting activation of the LH receptor. These data indicate that direct exposure of guinea pig CNS to LH results in altered brain Aβ levels, perhaps due to altered APP expression/metabolism. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. UPLC-MS/MS assay of riluzole in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF): Application in samples from spinal cord injured patients.

    Sarkar, Mahua; Grossman, Robert G; Toups, Elizabeth G; Chow, Diana S-L

    2017-11-30

    In the present study, a sensitive and robust LC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated for the quantification of riluzole in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in clinical samples from patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Riluzole and its labeled internal standard (IS) were isolated from plasma and CSF by liquid-liquid extraction using ethyl acetate. Riluzole (m/z 235→166) and IS (m/z 238→169) were detected by electrospray ionization (ESI) using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in a positive mode. The assay was linear in the concentration range of 0.5 (LLOQ, signal/noise ratio>10)-800ng/ml in plasma, and 1.0 (LLOQ)-800ng/ml in CSF samples. The intra- and inter-day accuracy in plasma were 94.2-110.0% and 97.8-102.0%, respectively, and those in CSF were 87.6-105.1% and 91.9-98.8%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precision were 2.2-7.2% and 4.0-9.1%, respectively, in plasma, and 1.4-14.1% and 2.6-11.5%, respectively in CSF. Matrix effect was negligible from both matrices with signal percentages of 97.6-100.6% in plasma and 99.4-106.4% in CSF. The recoveries were >75% in plasma, >84% in CSF with low protein (53.9mg/dl), and >68% in CSF with high protein (348.2mg/dl). This method was successfully applied to quantify riluzole concentrations in plasma and CSF from patients with SCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Trans aqueductal, third ventricle - Cervical subarachnoid stenting: An adjuvant cerebro spinal fluid diversion procedure in midline posterior fossa tumors with hydrocephalus: The technical note and case series.

    Teegala, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Persistent or progressive hydrocephalus is one of the complex problems of posterior fossa tumors associated with hydrocephalus. The author evaluated the effectiveness of single-stage tumor decompression associated with a stent technique (trans aqueductal third ventricle - Cervical subarachnoid stenting) as an adjuvant cerebro spinal fluid (CSF) diversion procedure in controlling the midline posterior fossa tumors with hydrocephalus. Prospective clinical case series of 15 patients was evaluated from July 2006 to April 2012. Fifteen clinicoradiological diagnosed cases of midline posterior fossa tumors with hydrocephalus were included in this study. All the tumors were approached through the cerebello medullary (telo velo tonsilar) fissure technique. Following the excision of the posterior fossa tumor, a sizable stent was placed across the aqueduct from the third ventricle to the cervical subarachnoid space. There were nine male and six female patients with an average age of 23 years. Complete tumor excision could be achieved in 12 patients and subtotal excision with clearance of aqueduct in remaining three patients. Hydrocephalus was controlled effectively in all the patients. There were no stent-related complications. This study showed the reliability of single-stage tumor excision followed by placement of aqueductal stent. The success rate of this technique is comparable to those of conventional CSF diversion procedures. This is a simple, safe, and effective procedure for the management of persistent and or progressive hydrocephalus. This technique may be very useful in situations where the patient's follow-up is compromised and the patients who are from a poor economic background. Long-term results need further evaluation to assess the overall functioning of this stent technique.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid pulsation amplitude and its quantitative relationship to cerebral blood flow pulsations: a phase-contrast MR flow imaging study

    Bhadelia, R.A.; Bogdan, A.R.; Kaplan, R.F.; Wolpert, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose in this investigation was to explain the heterogeneity in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow pulsation amplitudes. To this end, we determined the contributions of the cerebral arterial and jugular venous flow pulsations to the amplitude of the CSF pulsation. We examined 21 healthy subjects by cine phase-contrast MRI at the C2-3 disc level to demonstrate the CSF and vascular flows as waveforms. Multiple regression analysis was performed to calculate the contributions of (a) the arterial and venous waveform amplitudes and (b) the delay between the maximum systolic slopes of the arterial and venous waveforms (AV delay), in order to predict the amplitude of the CSF waveform. The contribution of the arterial waveform amplitude was positive (r = 0.61; p 0.003) to the CSF waveform amplitude and that of the venous waveform amplitude was negative (r = -0.50; p = 0.006). Both in combination accounted for 56 % of the variance in predicting the CSF waveform amplitude (p < 0.0006). The contribution of AV delay was not significant. The results show that the variance in the CSF flow pulsation amplitudes can be explained by concurrent evaluation of the CSF and vascular flows. Improvement in the techniques, and controlled experiments, may allow use of CSF flow pulsation amplitudes for clinical applications in the non-invasive assessment of intracranial dynamics by MRI. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid flow. Pt. 3

    Schroth, G.; Klose, U.

    1992-01-01

    Cardiac- and respiration-related movements of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated by MRI in 71 patients. In most patients with arteriosclerotic occlusive vascular disease CSF pulsations are normal. Decreased pulsatile flow is detectable in those with arteriovenous malformations, intracranial air and following lumbar puncture and withdrawal of CSF. Increased pulsatile flow in the cerebral aqueduct was found in 2 patients with large aneurysms, idiopathic communicating syringomyelia and in most cases of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). CSF flow in the cervical spinal canal is, however, reduced or normal in NPH, indicating reduction of the unfolding ability of the surface of the brain and/or inhibition of rapid CSF movements in the subrachnoid space over its convexity. (orig.)

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  20. Regional diffusion changes of cerebral grey matter during normal aging-A fluid-inversion prepared diffusion imaging study

    Ni Jianming; Chen Shuang; Liu Jianjun; Huang Gang; Shen Tianzhen; Chen Xingrong

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Although diffusion characteristics of white matter (WM) and its aging effects have been well described in the literature, diffusion characteristics of grey matter (GM), especially the cortical GM, have not been fully evaluated. In the present study, we used the fluid-inversion prepared diffusion imaging (FLIPD) technique to determine if there are age-related water diffusivity changes in GM. Materials and methods: 120 healthy volunteers were recruited for our study. They were divided into three age groups: group one (20-39 years old), group two (40-59 years old) and group three (60 years or older). All patients were evaluated with MRI using FLIPD at 3.0 T. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the frontal GM, cingulate cortex and thalami were determined bilaterally by region-of-interest analysis. Results: Group three had significantly higher ADC values in both thalami and the left frontal GM compared to group two or group one. No ADC value difference was found among the three groups in the right frontal GM and bilateral cingulate cortex. There was a significant positive correlation between individual ADC values and age in both thalami and left frontal GM. For the cingulate cortex and the right frontal GM, ADC values did not correlate significantly with advancing age. Conclusion: Statistically significant age-related diffusion changes were observed in both thalami and the left frontal cortex. The data reported here may serve as a reference for future studies.

  1. Prognostic significance of the initial cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) involvement of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) treated without cranial irradiation: results of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Children Leukemia Group study 58881.

    Sirvent, Nicolas; Suciu, Stefan; Rialland, Xavier; Millot, Frédéric; Benoit, Yves; Plantaz, Dominique; Ferster, Alice; Robert, Alain; Lutz, Patrick; Nelken, Brigitte; Plouvier, Emmanuel; Norton, Lucilia; Bertrand, Yves; Otten, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of the initial cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) involvement of children with ALL enrolled from 1989 to 1996 in the EORTC 58881 trial. Patients (2025) were categorised according to initial central nervous system (CNS) status: CNS-1 (CNS negative, n=1866), CNS-2 (treatment were each related to a lower CNS relapse risk. The presence of initial CNS involvement has no prognostic significance in EORTC 58881. Intensification of CNS-directed chemotherapy, without CNS radiation, is an effective treatment of initial meningeal leukaemic involvement. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. MR imaging findings of spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a case report

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Park, Eui Dong; Kim, Hyung Jin; Ha, Choong Kun [College of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Chinju(Korea, Republic of)

    1994-03-15

    We report magnetic resonance imaging findings of massive spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) caused by repeated lumbar punctures during spinal anesthesia in a 36-year-old man. The signal intensities of spinal SAH were similar to those of the conus medullaris on both T1-and T2-weighted spin-echo images. Although spinal SAH is hardly recognized on MR, spinal SAH of sufficient amount may cause alteration of the cerebrospinal fluid signal.

  3. Postoperative Cerebral Vasospasm Following Transsphenoidal Pituitary Adenoma Surgery.

    Eseonu, Chikezie I; ReFaey, Karim; Geocadin, Romergryko G; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral vasospasm following a transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary adenoma is a devastating occurrence that can lead to delayed cerebral ischemia and poor neurologic outcome if not diagnosed and treated in a timely manner. The etiology of this condition is not well understood but can lead to significant arterial vasospasm that causes severe ischemic insults. In this paper, we identify common presenting symptoms and essential management strategies to treat this harmful disease. A retrospective case report and literature review of presentation, treatment, and outcome of cerebral vasospasm following transsphenoidal surgery. We present 1 case and review 12 known cases in the literature on vasospasm following transsphenoidal surgery. Mean age was 48 (±13.8) years. There were 46.2% male patients. Factors associated with vasospasm, such as cerebral spinal fluid leaks following surgery, were seen in 38.5% of cases, and postoperative subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was seen in 84.6% of cases. Hemiparesis was the presenting symptom of delayed cerebral ischemia in 61.5% of cases. For management, maintaining at least a euvolemic volume status was used in 76.9%, induced hypertension was used in 61.5%, and nimodipine was administered in 46.2% of cases. Patients returned to their neurologic baseline in 61.5% of cases, had new permanent deficits in 7.7% of cases, and died in 30.8% of cases. Cerebral vasospasm following transsphenoidal surgery is a dangerous disease that can lead to a high likelihood of mortality if not identified and treated. Early postoperative events, such as peritumoral subarachnoid hemorrhage and hemiparesis, may be factors associated with post-transsphenoidal surgery vasospasm. Effective treatment options used in patients that regained complete neurologic recovery were by inducing hypertension, maintaining euvolemia, and administering nimodipine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pedaleo de brazos en personas con lesión medular, parálisis cerebral o ataxia cerebelosa: Parámetros fisiológicos. [Armcrank pedaling in persons with spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy or cerebellar ataxia: Physiological parameters].

    Iris González-Carbonell

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Los desórdenes neurológicos generan afectación física y derivan en sedentarismo, enfermedades coronarias y obesidad o diabetes, reduciendo tanto la esperanza como la calidad de vida. La oferta de actividad física adaptada es escasa por falta de información específica sobre la forma de adecuarlo y dosificarlo a las personas que presentan estos desórdenes. Con el fin de comparar el efecto del ejercicio de pedaleo de brazos sobre la respuesta fisiológica y la percepción del esfuerzo, en 8 personas con lesión medular, 4 con parálisis cerebral y 4 con ataxia de Friedreich, se analizó su respuesta fisiológica, así como su percepción subjetiva al esfuerzo, frente a un grupo Control (16 participantes. Para ello realizó un ejercicio normalizado de pedaleo de brazos en un ergómetro y se midieron frecuencia cardíaca, frecuencia respiratoria, volumen corriente, volumen espirado, consumo de Oxígeno relativo, pulso de Oxígeno y percepción del esfuerzo y se realizó un ANOVA con estas variables. Para el grupo con lesión medular, el estrés y gasto energético resultaron los más bajos. El grupo con parálisis cerebral mostró los niveles de estrés más altos, además percibiéndolo como una carga moderada. El grupo con ataxia de Friedreich, mostró respuestas cardiorrespiratorias altas intermedias. Se puede concluir que diferentes desórdenes neurológicos muestran respuestas fisiológicas muy diferentes frente al ejercicio y es importante su control. Abstract Neurological disorders produce physical impairment that result in physical inactivity, heart disease and obesity or diabetes, reducing both life expectancy and quality of life. The supply of adapted physical activity is limited by lack of specific information on how to adapt and dosed to people who have these disorders. In order to compare the effect of armcrank pedaling exercise on their physiological response and perception of effort, 8 people with spinal cord injury, 4 with

  5. The concentration of CYFRA 21-1, NSE and CEA in cerebro-spinal fluid can be useful indicators for diagnosis of meningeal carcinomatosis of lung cancer.

    Wang, Peng; Piao, Yingzhe; Zhang, Xiaohui; Li, Wenliang; Hao, Xishan

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the concentration of CYFRA 21-1, NSE and CEA in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) and to explore their clinical value in the meningeal carcinomatosis (MC) of lung cancer. So that, sensitive and specificity of CSF examination can be improved in the initial diagnosis of MC. A total of 35 lung cancer patients and 35 patients with benign brain tumor in the same period enrolled in this study. The concentrations of tumor markers CEA, CYFRA 21-1 and NSE in CSF and peripheral blood were examined. The concentrations of three tumor markers of CYFRA 21-1, NSE and CEA in blood serum and CSF were obviously higher than that of benign disease group. In MC patients, the concentrations of three tumor markers of CYFRA 21-1, NSE and CEA in blood serum were significant lower than that in CSF. The maximum of Youden's index was identified as the cutoff value of indicator of MC in three tumor markers in CSF which were CEA > 4.7 μg/L, NSE > 14.6 μg/L and CYFRA21-1 > 5.5 μg/L respectively. Based on the cutoff values, the CEA had the highest sensitivity while the CYFRA21-1 had the highest specificitiy. Three tumor markers in the CSF had higher positive rate than those in blood serum. We combined the levels of CEA, NSE and CYFRA21-1 in CSF to diagnosis of MC. Positive of CEA or CYFRA21-1 had the greatest sensitivity of 100% while the specificity of 91.4%; the positive of both CEA and CYFRA21-1 had the highest specificity of 100% while the sensitivity of 74.3%. Both positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 100% when combination positive were confirmed when the all three markers were positive. The combination of CEA and CYFRA21-1 can be recommended in early screening of meningeal carcinoma. Especially, for the patient who was difficult to be diagnosed by CSF histology and MRI, it will be a useful auxiliary marker in diagnosis of MC. The combination of CEA, NSE and CYFRA21-1 can be an effective clinically confirmation and exclusively diagnose indictor of

  6. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in AIDS

    Carteret, M.; Petit, E.; Granat, O.; Marichez, M.; Gilquin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is the most common brain parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Spinal cord localizations are still rare (2 cases with cerebral involvement, 2 cases without). A case of both spinal cord and cerebral involvement is reported. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) was performed because of sensory level (L 1). A focal conus medullaris enlargement was seen, iso intense on T 1 weighted images. This lesion was hyperintense on T 2 weighted sequence, and was homogeneously enhanced after Gadolinium on T 1 weighted images. A medullary oedema was noted. A toxoplasmosis treatment was initiated, without cortico therapy. MR imaging performed one month later (D 30), while important clinical improvements were seen, pointed out normal thickness of conus medullaris, without enhancement after Gadolinium. Disease lesions in AIDS with focal spinal cord processes are reviewed, and diagnostic work-up is discussed. Spinal cord single lesion, associated or not with brain involvements should be treated as a toxoplasmic infection, with MR imaging follow up. This work up should avoid medullary biopsy, still required in case of treatment failure. Cerebral involvements, with multiples lesions can mask medullary localization. (authors). 8 refs., 2 figs

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid kynurenine and kynurenic acid concentrations are associated with coma duration and long-term neurocognitive impairment in Ugandan children with cerebral malaria.

    Holmberg, Dag; Franzén-Röhl, Elisabeth; Idro, Richard; Opoka, Robert O; Bangirana, Paul; Sellgren, Carl M; Wickström, Ronny; Färnert, Anna; Schwieler, Lilly; Engberg, Göran; John, Chandy C

    2017-07-28

    One-fourth of children with cerebral malaria (CM) retain cognitive sequelae up to 2 years after acute disease. The kynurenine pathway of the brain, forming neuroactive metabolites, e.g. the NMDA-receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (KYNA), has been implicated in long-term cognitive dysfunction in other CNS infections. In the present study, the association between the kynurenine pathway and neurologic/cognitive complications in children with CM was investigated. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of KYNA and its precursor kynurenine in 69 Ugandan children admitted for CM to Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda, between 2008 and 2013 were assessed. CSF kynurenine and KYNA were compared to CSF cytokine levels, acute and long-term neurologic complications, and long-term cognitive impairments. CSF kynurenine and KYNA from eight Swedish children without neurological or infectious disease admitted to Astrid Lindgren's Children's Hospital were quantified and used for comparison. Children with CM had significantly higher CSF concentration of kynurenine and KYNA than Swedish children (P coma duration in children of all ages (P = 0.003 and 0.04, respectively), and CSF kynurenine concentrations were associated with worse overall cognition (P = 0.056) and attention (P = 0.003) at 12-month follow-up in children ≥5 years old. CSF KYNA and kynurenine are elevated in children with CM, indicating an inhibition of glutamatergic and cholinergic signaling. This inhibition may lead acutely to prolonged coma and long-term to impairment of attention and cognition.

  8. Ultrafast dynamic computed tomography myelography for the precise identification of high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leaks caused by spiculated spinal osteophytes.

    Thielen, Kent R; Sillery, John C; Morris, Jonathan M; Hoxworth, Joseph M; Diehn, Felix E; Wald, John T; Rosebrock, Richard E; Yu, Lifeng; Luetmer, Patrick H

    2015-03-01

    Precise localization and understanding of the origin of spontaneous high-flow spinal CSF leaks is required prior to targeted treatment. This study demonstrates the utility of ultrafast dynamic CT myelography for the precise localization of high-flow CSF leaks caused by spiculated spinal osteophytes. This study reports a series of 14 patients with high-flow CSF leaks caused by spiculated spinal osteophytes who underwent ultrafast dynamic CT myelography between March 2009 and December 2010. There were 10 male and 4 female patients, with an average age of 49 years (range 37-74 years). The value of ultrafast dynamic CT myelography in depicting the CSF leak site was qualitatively assessed. In all 14 patients, ultrafast dynamic CT myelography was technically successful at precisely demonstrating the site of the CSF leak, the causative spiculated osteophyte piercing the dura, and the relationship of the implicated osteophyte to adjacent structures. Leak sites included 3 cervical, 11 thoracic, and 0 lumbar levels, with 86% of the leaks occurring from C-5 to T-7. Information obtained from the ultrafast dynamic CT myelogram was considered useful in all treated CSF leaks. Spinal osteophytes piercing the dura are a more frequent cause of high-flow CSF leaks than previously recognized. Ultrafast dynamic CT myelography adds value beyond standard dynamic myelography or digital subtraction myelography in the diagnosis and anatomical characterization of high-flow spinal CSF leaks caused by these osteophytes. This information allows for appropriate planning for percutaneous or surgical treatment.

  9. Combined Spinal-Epidural Analgesia for Laboring Parturient with Arnold-Chiari Type I Malformation: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

    Clark K. Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetic management of laboring parturients with Arnold-Chiari type I malformation poses a difficult challenge for the anesthesiologist. The increase in intracranial pressure during uterine contractions, coughing, valsalva maneuvers, and expulsion of the fetus can be detrimental to the mother during the process of labor and delivery. No concrete evidence has implicated high cerebral spinal fluid pressure on maternal and fetal complications. The literature on the use of neuraxial techniques for managing parturients with Arnold-Chiari is extremely scarce. While most anesthesiologists advocate epidural analgesia for management of labor pain and spinal anesthesia for cesarean section, we are the first to report the use of combined spinal-epidural analgesia for managing labor pain in a pregnant woman with Arnold-Chiari type I malformation. Also, we have reviewed the literature and presented information from case reports and case series to support the safe usage of neuraxial techniques in these patients.

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  11. Leakage detection on CT myelography for targeted epidural blood patch in spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks: calcified or ossified spinal lesions ventral to the thecal sac.

    Yoshida, Hiroki; Takai, Keisuke; Taniguchi, Makoto

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe significant CT myelography findings for determination of the leak site and outcome of targeted epidural blood patch (EBP) in patients with spontaneous CSF leaks. During 2005-2013, spontaneous CSF leaks were diagnosed for 12 patients with orthostatic headaches. The patients received targeted EBP on the basis of CT myelography assessments. Computed tomography myelograms revealed ventral extradural collection of contrast medium distributed over multiple spinal levels (average 16 levels). Intraforaminal contrast medium extravasations were observed at multiple spinal levels (average 8.2 levels). For 8 (67%) of 12 patients, spinal lesions were noted around the thecal sac and included calcified discs with osteophytes, an ossified posterior longitudinal ligament, and an ossified yellow ligament; lesions were mostly located ventral to the thecal sac and were in close contact with the dura mater. The levels of these spinal lesions were considered potential leak sites and were targeted for EBP. For the remaining 4 patients who did not have definite spinal lesions around the thecal sac, leak site determination was based primarily on the contrast gradient hypothesis. The authors hypothesized that the concentration of extradural contrast medium would be the greatest and the same as that of intradural contrast medium at the leak site but that it would decrease with increased distance from the leak site according to the contrast gradient. Epidural blood patch was placed at the level of spinal lesions and/or of the greatest and same concentration of contrast medium between the intradural and extradural spaces. For 10 of the 12 patients, the orthostatic headaches decreased significantly within a week of EBP and disappeared within a month. For the remaining 2 patients, headaches persisted and medical treatment was required for several months. For 3 patients, thick chronic subdural hematomas caused severe headaches and/or disturbed

  12. Post spinal meningitis and asepsis.

    Videira, Rogerio L R; Ruiz-Neto, P P; Brandao Neto, M

    2002-07-01

    Post spinal meningitis (PSM) is a complication still currently being reported. After two PSM cases in our hospital an epidemiological study was initiated, which included a survey of techniques for asepsis that are applied in our department. Cases defined as PSM comprised meningitis within a week after spinal anesthesia. Anesthesia records, anesthesia complication files and the records of the Hospital Commission for Infection Control from 1997 to 2000 were reviewed. Asepsis techniques applied were surveyed by a questionnaire answered by all our department's anesthesiologists. The equipment and procedures for spinal anesthesia were listed. Current anesthesia textbooks were reviewed for recommendations regarding asepsis techniques in conjunction with spinal anesthesia. Three cases of PSM were identified following 38,128 spinal anesthesias whereas none was observed in 12,822 patients subjected to other types of regional or general anesthesia (P>0.05). Culture of cerebrospinal fluid yielded Streptococcus in two patients and was negative in the other patient. The asepsis technique applied by the anesthesiologists varied considerably. The literature review showed that aspects on asepsis for spinal anesthesia are poorly covered. The incidence of meningitis was similar in patients subjected to spinal anesthesia and in those subjected to other anesthetic techniques. Asepsis techniques were found to differ considerably among our staff members, reflecting the lack of well-defined published standards for this procedure. We recommend that asepsis for spinal anesthesia should not be less rigorous than for surgical asepsis.

  13. Spinal cord involvement in tuberculous meningitis.

    Garg, R K; Malhotra, H S; Gupta, R

    2015-09-01

    To summarize the incidence and spectrum of spinal cord-related complications in patients of tuberculous meningitis. Reports from multiple countries were included. An extensive review of the literature, published in English, was carried out using Scopus, PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Tuberculous meningitis frequently affects the spinal cord and nerve roots. Initial evidence of spinal cord involvement came from post-mortem examination. Subsequent advancement in neuroimaging like conventional lumbar myelography, computed tomographic myelography and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance-myelography have contributed immensely. Spinal involvement manifests in several forms, like tuberculous radiculomyelitis, spinal tuberculoma, myelitis, syringomyelia, vertebral tuberculosis and very rarely spinal tuberculous abscess. Frequently, tuberculous spinal arachnoiditis develops paradoxically. Infrequently, spinal cord involvement may even be asymptomatic. Spinal cord and spinal nerve involvement is demonstrated by diffuse enhancement of cord parenchyma, nerve roots and meninges on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. High cerebrospinal fluid protein content is often a risk factor for arachnoiditis. The most important differential diagnosis of tuberculous arachnoiditis is meningeal carcinomatosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy is the main stay of treatment for tuberculous meningitis. Higher doses of corticosteroids have been found effective. Surgery should be considered only when pathological confirmation is needed or there is significant spinal cord compression. The outcome in these patients has been unpredictable. Some reports observed excellent recovery and some reported unfavorable outcomes after surgical decompression and debridement. Tuberculous meningitis is frequently associated with disabling spinal cord and radicular complications. Available treatment options are far from satisfactory.

  14. A recommended workflow methodology in the creation of an educational and training application incorporating a digital reconstruction of the cerebral ventricular system and cerebrospinal fluid circulation to aid anatomical understanding.

    Manson, Amy; Poyade, Matthieu; Rea, Paul

    2015-10-19

    The use of computer-aided learning in education can be advantageous, especially when interactive three-dimensional (3D) models are used to aid learning of complex 3D structures. The anatomy of the ventricular system of the brain is difficult to fully understand as it is seldom seen in 3D, as is the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This article outlines a workflow for the creation of an interactive training tool for the cerebral ventricular system, an educationally challenging area of anatomy. This outline is based on the use of widely available computer software packages. Using MR images of the cerebral ventricular system and several widely available commercial and free software packages, the techniques of 3D modelling, texturing, sculpting, image editing and animations were combined to create a workflow in the creation of an interactive educational and training tool. This was focussed on cerebral ventricular system anatomy, and the flow of cerebrospinal fluid. We have successfully created a robust methodology by using key software packages in the creation of an interactive education and training tool. This has resulted in an application being developed which details the anatomy of the ventricular system, and flow of cerebrospinal fluid using an anatomically accurate 3D model. In addition to this, our established workflow pattern presented here also shows how tutorials, animations and self-assessment tools can also be embedded into the training application. Through our creation of an established workflow in the generation of educational and training material for demonstrating cerebral ventricular anatomy and flow of cerebrospinal fluid, it has enormous potential to be adopted into student training in this field. With the digital age advancing rapidly, this has the potential to be used as an innovative tool alongside other methodologies for the training of future healthcare practitioners and scientists. This workflow could be used in the creation of other tools

  15. Spinal stenosis

    ... in the spine that was present from birth Narrow spinal canal that the person was born with Herniated or slipped disk, which ... when you sit down or lean forward. Most people with spinal stenosis cannot walk for a long ... During a physical exam, your health care provider will try to ...

  16. Cerebral Palsy

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  17. Spinal vascular malformations in non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Germans, M. R.; Pennings, F. A.; Sprengers, M. E. S.; Vandertop, W. P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In patients with non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and no evidence for a cerebral aneurysm on angiography, a frequent cause of the hemorrhage is perimesencephalic hemorrhage or other cerebral vascular pathology. In some patients no cause is found. The exact incidence of a spinal

  18. Malaria cerebral Cerebral malaria

    Carlos Hugo Zapata Zapata

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available La malaria Cerebral (MC es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1 citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2 formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3 producción de citoquinas y activación de segundos mensajeros y, 4 apertura de la barrera hematoencefálica. Sin embargo, queda un interrogante sin resolver aún: ¿qué proceso se lleva a cabo para que el parásito, desde el espacio microvascular, pueda interferir transitoriamente con la función cerebral? Recientemente se ha utilizado el precursor de la proteína b-Amiloide como un marcador de daño neuronal en MC; este precursor será de gran ayuda en futuras investigaciones realizadas en nuestro medio que aporten información para comprender la patogénesis de la MC. Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains to be answered; how the host-parasite interaction in the vascular space interferes transiently with cerebral function? Recently, the beta amyloid precursor peptide has been employed as marker of neural injury in CM. It is expected that the beta amyloid precursor peptide will help to understand the pathogenesis of CM in complicated patients of endemic areas of Colombia.

  19. Automatic segmentation of cerebral MR images using artificial neural networks

    Alirezaie, J.; Jernigan, M.E.; Nahmias, C.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we present an unsupervised clustering technique for multispectral segmentation of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the human brain. Our scheme utilizes the Self Organizing Feature Map (SOFM) artificial neural network for feature mapping and generates a set of codebook vectors. By extending the network with an additional layer the map will be classified and each tissue class will be labelled. An algorithm has been developed for extracting the cerebrum from the head scan prior to the segmentation. Extracting the cerebrum is performed by stripping away the skull pixels from the T2 image. Three tissue types of the brain: white matter, gray matter and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) are segmented accurately. To compare the results with other conventional approaches we applied the c-means algorithm to the problem

  20. The usefulness of the ivy sign on fluid-attenuated intensity recovery images in improved brain hemodynamic changes after superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis in adult patients with moyamoya disease.

    Lee, Jung Keun; Yoon, Byul Hee; Chung, Seung Young; Park, Moon Sun; Kim, Seong Min; Lee, Do Sung

    2013-10-01

    MR perfusion and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) are well known imaging studies to evaluate hemodynamic change between prior to and following superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis in moyamoya disease. But their side effects and invasiveness make discomfort to patients. We evaluated the ivy sign on MR fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in adult patients with moyamoya disease and compared it with result of SPECT and MR perfusion images. We enrolled twelve patients (thirteen cases) who were diagnosed with moyamoya disease and underwent STA-MCA anastomosis at our medical institution during a period ranging from September of 2010 to December of 2012. The presence of the ivy sign on MR FLAIR images was classified as Negative (0), Minimal (1), and Positive (2). Regions were classified into four territories: the anterior cerebral artery (ACA), the anterior MCA, the posterior MCA and the posterior cerebral artery. Ivy signs on preoperative and postoperative MR FLAIR were improved (8 and 4 in the ACA regions, 13 and 4 in the anterior MCA regions and 19 and 9 in the posterior MCA regions). Like this result, the cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) on SPECT was significantly increased in the sum of CVR in same regions after STA-MCA anastomosis. After STA-MCA anastomosis, ivy signs were decreased in the cerebral hemisphere. As compared with conventional diagnostic modalities such as SPECT and MR perfusion images, the ivy sign on MR FLAIR is considered as a useful indicator in detecting brain hemodynamic changes between preoperatively and postoperatively in adult moyamoya patients.

  1. Evidence of compromised blood-spinal cord barrier in early and late symptomatic SOD1 mice modeling ALS.

    Svitlana Garbuzova-Davis

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB, blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB, and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB control cerebral/spinal cord homeostasis by selective transport of molecules and cells from the systemic compartment. In the spinal cord and brain of both ALS patients and animal models, infiltration of T-cell lymphocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells, and IgG deposits have been observed that may have a critical role in motor neuron damage. Additionally, increased levels of albumin and IgG have been found in the cerebrospinal fluid in ALS patients. These findings suggest altered barrier permeability in ALS. Recently, we showed disruption of the BBB and BSCB in areas of motor neuron degeneration in the brain and spinal cord in G93A SOD1 mice modeling ALS at both early and late stages of disease using electron microscopy. Examination of capillary ultrastructure revealed endothelial cell degeneration, which, along with astrocyte alteration, compromised the BBB and BSCB. However, the effect of these alterations upon barrier function in ALS is still unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the functional competence of the BSCB in G93A mice at different stages of disease.Evans Blue (EB dye was intravenously injected into ALS mice at early or late stage disease. Vascular leakage and the condition of basement membranes, endothelial cells, and astrocytes were investigated in cervical and lumbar spinal cords using immunohistochemistry. Results showed EB leakage in spinal cord microvessels from all G93A mice, indicating dysfunction in endothelia and basement membranes and confirming our previous ultrastructural findings on BSCB disruption. Additionally, downregulation of Glut-1 and CD146 expressions in the endothelial cells of the BSCB were found which may relate to vascular leakage.Results suggest that the BSCB is compromised in areas of motor neuron degeneration in ALS mice at both early and late stages of the disease.

  2. Cerebral microangiopathies

    Linn, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral microangiopathies are a very heterogenous group of diseases characterized by pathological changes of the small cerebral vessels. They account for 20 - 30 % of all ischemic strokes. Degenerative microangiopathy and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiography represent the typical acquired cerebral microangiopathies, which are found in over 90 % of cases. Besides, a wide variety of rare, hereditary microangiopathy exists, as e.g. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), Fabrys disease and MELAS syndrome (Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes). (orig.)

  3. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Spinal stenosis, which has attracted increasing attention in recent years, represents an important group of clinical and radiologic entities. Recognition and ultimate surgical management of the many abnormalities found in this group require precise preoperative delineation of the morbid anatomy. Conventional axial tomography provided the first accurate picture of the sagittal dimension, but it was limited by poor contrast resolution. Computerized tomography and ultrasound have finally provided the means for accurate measurement of midsagittal diameter and surface area. It is now possible to provide a preoperative assessment of bony and soft-tissue canal compression and to guide surgical decompression by objective anatomic measurements. True spinal stenosis of the lumbar vertebral canal is a form of compression produced by the walls of the vertebral canal. It involves the whole of the vertebral canal by exerting compression at two of its opposite surfaces. There are two types of stenosis: (1) transport stenosis, wherein the clinical manifestations are due to impeded flow of fluid, which is dependent on the available cross-sectional area of the canal surface of the stenotic structure, and (2) compressive stenosis, which includes abnormal compression of opposing surfaces only. According to these definitions, indentation on the spinal canal by disc protrusion or localized tumor is not considered true spinal stenoses. In this chapter the authors discuss only those conditions that produce true canal stenosis

  4. Spinal cord involvement in Balo's concentric sclerosis

    Kreft, Karim L.; Mellema, S. Jouke; Hintzen, Rogier Q.

    2009-01-01

    We present a patient with a history of myelitis, who had a steroid refractory attack of CNS inflammatory demyelinating disease that developed into cerebral concentric sclerosis of Balo after plasma exchange. The acute inflammatory disease involved the spinal cord, a phenomenon rarely demonstrated.

  5. Spinal injury

    ... Dallas, TX: American Red Cross; 2016. Kaji AH, Newton EJ, Hockberger RS. Spinal injuries. In: Marx JA, ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  6. Spinal infections

    Tali, E. Turgut; Gueltekin, Serap

    2005-01-01

    Spinal infections have an increasing prevalence among the general population. Definitive diagnosis based solely on clinical grounds is usually not possible and radiological imaging is used in almost all patients. The primary aim of the authors is to present an overview of spinal infections located in epidural, intradural and intramedullary compartments and to provide diagnostic clues regarding different imaging modalities, particularly MRI, to the practicing physicians and radiologists. (orig.)

  7. Spinal cysticercosis

    Goedert, A.V.; Silva, S.H.F.

    1990-01-01

    Spinal cysticercosis is an extremely uncommon condition. We have examined four patients with complaints that resembled nervous root compression by disk herniation. Myelography was shown to be an efficient method to evaluate spinal involvement, that was characterized by findings of multiple filling defect images (cysts) plus signs of adhesive arachnoiditis. One cyst was found to be mobile. Because of the recent development of medical treatment, a quick and precise diagnosis is of high importance to determine the prognosis of this condition. (author)

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  10. Spinal tumors

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  11. Diffuse damage to central nervous system in progressive rheumatoid arthritis complicated by cerebral hermorrhage after radioisotope cisternography

    Tarnowska-Dziduszko, E.; Lazarowicz, J.

    1980-01-01

    Presented case reveals unusual reaction of central nervous system in the course of progressive rheumatoid arthritis and cerebral hemorrhage as a rare complication after radioisotope investigation of cerebro-spinal fluid spaces. Female, 58 years old which was treated for 22 years for progressive rheumatoid arthritis developed during last 3 years of life a psychoorganic syndrome with temporal epilepsy and slight left sided hemiparesis. After radioisotope cisternography appeared decerebration followed by death. On autopsy the hemorrhagic foci were found in left cerebral hemisphere and in the brain stem. Histological finding was generalized severe damage to interstitial vessels diagnosed as fibrinotic, necrotizing degeneration of capillary and arteriolar wall, significant proliferation of microglia in the white matter and brain stem. Chronic inflammatory infiltrates were present in leptomeninges. Pathogenesis of findings in connection with progressive rheumatoid arthritis and complications due to cisternography is discussed. (author)

  12. What is cerebral small vessel disease?

    Onodera, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    An accumulating amount of evidence suggests that the white matter hyperintensities on T 2 weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging predict an increased risk of dementia and gait disturbance. This state has been proposed as cerebral small vessel disease, including leukoaraiosis, Binswanger's disease, lacunar stroke and cerebral microbleeds. However, the concept of cerebral small vessel disease is still obscure. To understand the cerebral small vessel disease, the precise structure and function of cerebral small vessels must be clarified. Cerebral small vessels include several different arteries which have different anatomical structures and functions. Important functions of the cerebral small vessels are blood-brain barrier and perivasucular drainage of interstitial fluid from the brain parenchyma. Cerebral capillaries and glial endfeet, take an important role for these functions. However, the previous pathological investigations on cerebral small vessels have focused on larger arteries than capillaries. Therefore little is known about the pathology of capillaries in small vessel disease. The recent discoveries of genes which cause the cerebral small vessel disease indicate that the cerebral small vessel diseases are caused by a distinct molecular mechanism. One of the pathological findings in hereditary cerebral small vessel disease is the loss of smooth muscle cells, which is an also well-recognized finding in sporadic cerebral small vessel disease. Since pericytes have similar character with the smooth muscle cells, the pericytes should be investigated in these disorders. In addition, the loss of smooth muscle cells may result in dysfunction of drainage of interstitial fluid from capillaries. The precise correlation between the loss of smooth muscle cells and white matter disease is still unknown. However, the function that is specific to cerebral small vessel may be associated with the pathogenesis of cerebral small vessel disease. (author)

  13. Neonatal cerebral infarction

    Fujimoto, Shinji; Togari, Hajime; Sobajima, Hisanori; Suzuki, Shigesumi; Wada, Yoshiro; Yokochi, Kenji; Nishimura, Yutaka; Inukai, Kazuhisa; Futamura, Masahide.

    1992-01-01

    In a retrospective multi-center study, we investigated eighteen infants with unilateral cerebral infarctions confirmed by computed tomography (CT) scans. The initial symptoms were observed in all the patients between 0 and 3 days of age. Convulsions or apneic attacks were the initial symptoms in all but one. Only 4 patients had complicated obstetric histories and none showed polycythemia or electrolyte abnormalities. All of the initial CT scans revealed unilaterally localized hypodense areas. In 10, the initial CT scans were performed within 24 hours after the clinical onset. In 16, the lesions were within the territory of the middle cerebral artery, 9 of which also involved the cortico-spinal tract (CST). In the remaining 2 patients, the lesions were located whithin the territory of the posterior cerebral artery. None of the 9 patients without CST involvement developed hemiplegia, whereas 5 (56%) of the 9 with CST involvement had hemiplegia, which is a fairly low incidence compared with that in adult cases. This difference was thought to be related to neonatal brain plasticity. (author)

  14. Anatomy of the Spinal Meninges.

    Sakka, Laurent; Gabrillargues, Jean; Coll, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    The spinal meninges have received less attention than the cranial meninges in the literature, although several points remain debatable and poorly understood, like their phylogenesis, their development, and their interactions with the spinal cord. Their constancy among the chordates shows their crucial importance in central nervous system homeostasis and suggests a role far beyond mechanical protection of the neuraxis. This work provides an extensive study of the spinal meninges, from an overview of their phylogenesis and embryology to a descriptive and topographic anatomy with clinical implications. It examines their involvement in spinal cord development, functioning, and repair. This work is a review of the literature using PubMed as a search engine on Medline. The stages followed by the meninges along the phylogenesis could not be easily compared with their development in vertebrates for methodological aspects and convergence processes throughout evolution. The distinction between arachnoid and pia mater appeared controversial. Several points of descriptive anatomy remain debatable: the functional organization of the arterial network, and the venous and lymphatic drainages, considered differently by classical anatomic and neuroradiological approaches. Spinal meninges are involved in neurodevelopment and neurorepair producing neural stem cells and morphogens, in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and neuraxis functioning by the synthesis of active molecules, and the elimination of waste products of central nervous system metabolism. The spinal meninges should be considered as dynamic functional formations evolving over a lifetime, with ultrastructural features and functional interactions with the neuraxis remaining not fully understood.

  15. Features to validate cerebral toxoplasmosis

    Carolina da Cunha Correia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Neurotoxoplasmosis (NT sometimes manifests unusual characteristics. Methods We analyzed 85 patients with NT and AIDS according to clinical, cerebrospinal fluid, cranial magnetic resonance, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR characteristics. Results In 8.5%, focal neurological deficits were absent and 16.4% had single cerebral lesions. Increased sensitivity of PCR for Toxoplasma gondii DNA in the central nervous system was associated with pleocytosis and presence of >4 encephalic lesions. Conclusions Patients with NT may present without focal neurological deficit and NT may occur with presence of a single cerebral lesion. Greater numbers of lesions and greater cellularity in cerebrospinal fluid improve the sensitivity of PCR to T gondii.

  16. THE ANTI-TB DRUG SENSITIVITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS FROM CEREBROSPINAL FLUID AND BONE TISSUE BIOPSY SPECIMENS OF PATIENTS SUSPECTED TUBERCULOUS MENINGITIS AND SPINAL TB IN DR SOETOMO HOSPITAL INDONESIA

    Ni Made Mertaniasih

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous meningitis (TBM is an infection of meningens which potentially life threatening with significant morbidity and mortality. Spinal TB has the same problem with TBM, infection in bone and joint, the delayed diagnosis worsens the prognosis. The rapid and accurate diagnosis plus promt adequate treatment is essential for the good outcome. The aim of this research is to study the first line drug sensitivity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from specimens of cerebrospinal fluid from suspected tuberculous meningitis patients and bone tissue biopsy from suspected spinal TB patients. The method of this research is TB Laboratory examination in Department of Clinical Microbiology – Dr. Soetomo General Hospital, Indonesia, using the gold standard liquid culture method MGIT 960 System (Becton Dickinson and solid culture method with Lowenstein-Jensen medium. The specimens CSF from 50 TBM patients at January 2013 until May 2014. Positive isolate detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex were 11 isolates (22%, which sensitivity 100% (11/11 isolates to Rifampin (R, Pyrazinamide (Z, Ethambutol (E, and Streptomycin (S; one isolate resistant to Isoniazid, sensitivity to Isoniazid 90,90% (10/11; and received 21 specimens of bone tissue biopsy which positive 5 isolates (23%, all isolates sensitive 100% (5/5 isolates to Rifampin and Pyrazinamide, and 1 isolates resistant to Isoniazid, Ethambutol, and Streptomycin, in which sensitivity 80% (4/5 isolates to Isoniazid, Ethambutol, and Streptomycin. The conclusion of this research is positivity detection 22% of CSF specimens, and 23% of bone tissue biopsy were low. All isolates sensitive 100% to Rifampin and Pyrazinamide, and 80-90% sensitive to Isoniazid.

  17. Spinal tuberculosis.

    Dunn, R N; Ben Husien, M

    2018-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains endemic in many parts of the developing world and is increasingly seen in the developed world due to migration. A total of 1.3 million people die annually from the disease. Spinal TB is the most common musculoskeletal manifestation, affecting about 1 to 2% of all cases of TB. The coexistence of HIV, which is endemic in some regions, adds to the burden and the complexity of management. This review discusses the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, impact of HIV and both the medical and surgical options in the management of spinal TB. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:425-31.

  18. Cerebral vasculitis

    Greenan, T.J.; Grossman, R.I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews retrospectively MR, CT, and angiographic findings in patients with cerebral vasculitis in order to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the various imaging modalities, as well as the spectrum of imaging abnormalities in this disease entity. Studies were retrospectively reviewed in 12 patients with cerebral vasculitis proved by means of angiography and/or brain biopsy

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury ... Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  6. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  8. Numerical Cerebrospinal System Modeling in Fluid-Structure Interaction.

    Garnotel, Simon; Salmon, Stéphanie; Balédent, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stroke volume in the aqueduct is widely used to evaluate CSF dynamics disorders. In a healthy population, aqueduct stroke volume represents around 10% of the spinal stroke volume while intracranial subarachnoid space stroke volume represents 90%. The amplitude of the CSF oscillations through the different compartments of the cerebrospinal system is a function of the geometry and the compliances of each compartment, but we suspect that it could also be impacted be the cardiac cycle frequency. To study this CSF distribution, we have developed a numerical model of the cerebrospinal system taking into account cerebral ventricles, intracranial subarachnoid spaces, spinal canal and brain tissue in fluid-structure interactions. A numerical fluid-structure interaction model is implemented using a finite-element method library to model the cerebrospinal system and its interaction with the brain based on fluid mechanics equations and linear elasticity equations coupled in a monolithic formulation. The model geometry, simplified in a first approach, is designed in accordance with realistic volume ratios of the different compartments: a thin tube is used to mimic the high flow resistance of the aqueduct. CSF velocity and pressure and brain displacements are obtained as simulation results, and CSF flow and stroke volume are calculated from these results. Simulation results show a significant variability of aqueduct stroke volume and intracranial subarachnoid space stroke volume in the physiological range of cardiac frequencies. Fluid-structure interactions are numerous in the cerebrospinal system and difficult to understand in the rigid skull. The presented model highlights significant variations of stroke volumes under cardiac frequency variations only.

  9. Spinal cord contusion.

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  10. European multicentre double-blind placebo-controlled trial of Nilvadipine in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease-the substudy protocols: NILVAD frailty; NILVAD blood and genetic biomarkers; NILVAD cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers; NILVAD cerebral blood flow.

    Meulenbroek, Olga; O'Dwyer, Sarah; de Jong, Daan; van Spijker, Gerrita; Kennelly, Sean; Cregg, Fiona; Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Abdullah, Laila; Wallin, Anders; Walsh, Cathal; Coen, Robert; Kenny, Rose Anne; Daly, Leslie; Segurado, Ricardo; Borjesson-Hanson, Anne; Crawford, Fiona; Mullan, Michael; Lucca, Ugo; Banzi, Rita; Pasquier, Florence; Breuilh, Laetitia; Riepe, Matthias; Kalman, Janos; Molloy, William; Tsolaki, Magda; Howard, Robert; Adams, Jessica; Gaynor, Siobhan; Lawlor, Brian

    2016-07-19

    In conjunction with the NILVAD trial, a European Multicentre Double-Blind Placebo Controlled trial of Nilvadipine in Mild-to-Moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD), there are four NILVAD substudies in which eligible NILVAD patients are also invited to participate. The main NILVAD protocol was previously published in BMJ Open (2014). The objectives of the NILVAD substudies are to determine whether frailty, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), blood biomarker profile and Apolipoprotein E (APOE) status predict response to Nilvadipine, and to investigate the effect of Nilvadipine on cerebral blood flow and blood biomarkers. All participants who fulfil criteria for the main NILVAD study are eligible for participation in the NILVAD substudies. Participation is subject to informed consent and whether the substudy is available at a particular NILVAD study site. Each substudy entails extra measurements during the course of the main NILVAD study. For example, in the blood and genetic biomarkers substudy, extra blood (30 mL) will be collected at week 0, week 13, week 52 and week 78, while in the cerebral blood flow substudy, participants will receive an MRI and transcranial Doppler measurements at week 0, week 26 and week 78. In the CSF substudy, 10 mL CSF is collected at week 0 and week 78. All NILVAD substudies and all subsequent amendments have received ethical approval within each participating country, according to national regulations. Each participant provides written consent to participate. All participants remain anonymised throughout and the results of each substudy will be published in an international peer reviewed journal. EUDRACT 2012-002764-27; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. MRI of anterior spinal artery syndrome of the cervical spinal cord

    Takahashi, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Yamada, T. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Ishii, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Saito, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Tanji, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Kobayashi, T. (Inst. of Rehabilitation Medicine, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Miyagi (Japan)); Soma, Y. (Div. of Neurology, Takeda Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu (Japan)); Sakamoto, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    Cervical spinal cord lesions in the anterior spinal artery syndrome were delineated on magnetic resonance images (MRI) in four patients. The lesion was always seen anteriorly in the cervical cord. On T2-weighted images, the lesions appeared hyperintense relative to the normal spinal cord, while on T1-weighted images, two chronic lesions appeared hypointense, with local atrophy of the cord. In one case, repeated T1-weighted images showed no signal abnormality 4 days after the ictus, but the lesion became hypointense 18 days later, when contrast enhancement was also recognized after injection of Gd-DTPA; this sequence of intensity changes was similar to that of cerebral infarction. The extent of the lesion seen MRI correlated closely with neurological findings in all cases. Although the findings may not be specific, MRI is now the modality of choice for confirming the diagnosis in patients suspected of having an anterior spinal artery syndrome. (orig.)

  12. The influence of transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) on human cerebral blood flow velocities

    ter Laan, Mark; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Elting, Jan-Willem J.; Fidler, Vaclav; Staal, Michiel J.

    It has been shown that transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) reduces sympathetic tone. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has proven qualities to improve coronary, peripheral, and cerebral blood circulation. Therefore, we postulate that TENS and SCS affect the autonomic nervous system in

  13. Combined use of Kappa Free Light Chain Index and Isoelectrofocusing of Cerebro-Spinal Fluid in Diagnosing Multiple Sclerosis: Performances and Costs.

    Crespi, Ilaria; Sulas, Maria Giovanna; Mora, Riccardo; Naldi, Paola; Vecchio, Domizia; Comi, Cristoforo; Cantello, Roberto; Bellomo, Giorgio

    2017-03-01

    Isoelectrofocusing (IEF) to detect oligoclonal bands (OBCs) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is the gold standard approach for evaluating intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis in multiple sclerosis (MS) but the kappa free light chain index (KFLCi) is emerging as an alternative marker, and the combined/sequential uses of IEF and KFLCi have never been challenged. CSF and serum albumin, IgG, kFLC and lFLC were measured by nephelometry; albumin, IgG and kFLC quotients as well as Link and kFLC indexes were calculated; OCBs were evaluated by immunofixation. A total of 150 consecutive patients: 48 with MS, 32 with other neurological inflammatory diseases (NID), 62 with neurological non-inflammatory diseases (NNID), and 8 without any detectable neurological disease (NND) were investigated. Both IEF and KFLCi showed a similar accuracy as diagnostic tests for multiple sclerosis. The high sensitivity and specificity associated with the lower cost of KFLCi suggested to use this test first, followed by IEF as a confirmative procedure. The sequential use of IEF and KFLCi showed high diagnostic efficiency with cost reduction of 43 and 21%, if compared to the contemporary use of both tests, or the unique use of IEF in all patients. The "sequential testing" using KFLCi followed by IEF in MS represents an optimal procedure with accurate performance and lower costs.

  14. Chitotriosidase (CHIT1) is increased in microglia and macrophages in spinal cord of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and cerebrospinal fluid levels correlate with disease severity and progression.

    Steinacker, Petra; Verde, Federico; Fang, Lubin; Feneberg, Emily; Oeckl, Patrick; Roeber, Sigrun; Anderl-Straub, Sarah; Danek, Adrian; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Fassbender, Klaus; Fliessbach, Klaus; Foerstl, Hans; Giese, Armin; Jahn, Holger; Kassubek, Jan; Kornhuber, Johannes; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard; Lauer, Martin; Pinkhardt, Elmar Hans; Prudlo, Johannes; Rosenbohm, Angela; Schneider, Anja; Schroeter, Matthias L; Tumani, Hayrettin; von Arnim, Christine A F; Weishaupt, Jochen; Weydt, Patrick; Ludolph, Albert C; Yilmazer Hanke, Deniz; Otto, Markus

    2018-03-01

    Neurochemical markers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) that reflect underlying disease mechanisms might help in diagnosis, staging and prediction of outcome. We aimed at determining the origin and differential diagnostic and prognostic potential of the putative marker of microglial activation chitotriosidase (CHIT1). Altogether 316 patients were included, comprising patients with sporadic ALS, ALS mimics (disease controls (DCo)), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthy controls (Con). CHIT1 and neurofilament levels were determined in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood and analysed with regard to diagnostic sensitivity and specificity and prognostic performance. Additionally, postmortem tissue was analysed for CHIT1 expression. In ALS, CHIT1 CSF levels were higher compared with Con (pdifferential diagnosis and prediction of disease progression in ALS and, therefore, seems suitable as a supplemental marker for patient stratification in therapeutic trials. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Spinal MRI of vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Chang, Yun Woo; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Jae Min [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Centre, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Irwon-dong, Kangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea); Sung, Ki Woong [Department of Paediatrics, Samsung Medical Centre, Seoul 135-710 (Korea)

    2003-11-01

    A 4.3-year-old girl with acute leukaemia, who was being treated with chemotherapy (including vincristine), developed paraplegia. Spinal MRI showed diffusely enhancing nerve roots on contrast-enhanced images. Spinal fluid analysis showed a normal protein level. Vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome is thought to be the cause of the MRI abnormalities. (orig.)

  16. Spinal MRI of vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Chang, Yun Woo; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Jae Min; Sung, Ki Woong

    2003-01-01

    A 4.3-year-old girl with acute leukaemia, who was being treated with chemotherapy (including vincristine), developed paraplegia. Spinal MRI showed diffusely enhancing nerve roots on contrast-enhanced images. Spinal fluid analysis showed a normal protein level. Vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome is thought to be the cause of the MRI abnormalities. (orig.)

  17. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation

    Zizka, J.; Elias, P.; Michl, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Harrer, J. [Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Cesak, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Herman, A. [1. Dept. of Internal Medicine, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2001-07-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  18. Congenital Zika Virus Infection Induces Severe Spinal Cord Injury.

    Ramalho, Fernando S; Yamamoto, Aparecida Y; da Silva, Luis L; Figueiredo, Luiz T M; Rocha, Lenaldo B; Neder, Luciano; Teixeira, Sara R; Apolinário, Letícia A; Ramalho, Leandra N Z; Silva, Deisy M; Coutinho, Conrado M; Melli, Patrícia P; Augusto, Marlei J; Santoro, Ligia B; Duarte, Geraldo; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M

    2017-08-15

    We report 2 fatal cases of congenital Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. Brain anomalies, including atrophy of the cerebral cortex and brainstem, and cerebellar aplasia were observed. The spinal cord showed architectural distortion, severe neuronal loss, and microcalcifications. The ZIKV proteins and flavivirus-like particles were detected in cytoplasm of spinal neurons, and spinal cord samples were positive for ZIKV RNA. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation

    Zizka, J.; Elias, P.; Michl, A.; Harrer, J.; Cesak, T.; Herman, A.

    2001-01-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  20. Primary multifocal gliosarcoma of the spinal cord

    Ramesh M. Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gliosarcoma (GS is a rare and exceedingly malignant neoplasm of the central nervous system. It displays clinical features similar to glioblastoma, yet is histologically unique as it harbors both gliomatous and sarcomatous cellular components. Involvement of the neuroaxis is predominantly limited to the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. Primary GS of the spinal cord is rarely encountered. We report a case of a 54 year old male who presented with 2 months of progressive, bilateral lower extremity sensory deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging of the neuro-axis revealed multiple intradural lesions involving the cervical and thoracic spinal cord without evidence of intracranial involvement. Surgical resection of a dural based, extramedullary cervical lesion and two exophytic, intramedullary thoracic lesions revealed gliosarcoma, WHO grade IV. The patient died approximately 11 months after presentation. This report confirms that GS is not limited to supratentorial involvement and can primarily affect the spinal cord.

  1. [Cerebral protection].

    Cattaneo, A D

    1993-09-01

    Cerebral protection means prevention of cerebral neuronal damage. Severe brain damage extinguishes the very "human" functions such as speech, consciousness, intellectual capacity, and emotional integrity. Many pathologic conditions may inflict injuries to the brain, therefore the protection and salvage of cerebral neuronal function must be the top priorities in the care of critically ill patients. Brain tissue has unusually high energy requirements, its stores of energy metabolites are small and, as a result, the brain is totally dependent on a continuous supply of substrates and oxygen, via the circulation. In complete global ischemia (cardiac arrest) reperfusion is characterized by an immediate reactive hyperemia followed within 20-30 min by a delayed hypoperfusion state. It has been postulated that the latter contributes to the ultimate neurologic outcome. In focal ischemia (stroke) the primary focus of necrosis is encircled by an area (ischemic penumbra) that is underperfused and contains neurotoxic substances such as free radicals, prostaglandins, calcium, and excitatory neurotransmitters. The variety of therapeutic effort that have addressed the question of protecting the brain reflects their limited success. 1) Barbiturates. After an initial enthusiastic endorsement by many clinicians and years of vigorous controversy, it can now be unequivocally stated that there is no place for barbiturate therapy following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. One presumed explanation for this negative statement is that cerebral metabolic suppression by barbiturates (and other anesthetics) is impossible in the absence of an active EEG. Conversely, in the event of incomplete ischemia EEG activity in usually present (albeit altered) and metabolic suppression and hence possibly protection can be induced with barbiturates. Indeed, most of the animal studies led to a number of recommendations for barbiturate therapy in man for incomplete ischemia. 2) Isoflurane. From a cerebral

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... What is a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  3. Spinal pain

    Izzo, R.; Popolizio, T.; D’Aprile, P.; Muto, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  4. Spinal pain

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging features of brain and spinal cord injury in a fatal case of isopropanol intoxication

    Mahajan PS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Parag Suresh Mahajan,1 Joyal Jacob Mathew,2 Abhilash Pulincherry Jayaram,1 Vidya Chander Negi,1 Mohamed Milad Abu Hmaira21Department of Radiology, 2Department of Medicine, Al-Khor Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, QatarAbstract: A 60-year-old man presented with headache, dizziness, and disorientation one day after consumption of isopropanol along with ethanol. Computed tomography (CT of the brain performed immediately was unremarkable. The patient collapsed within the hospital 30 minutes after the CT scan was done, and remained comatose until death, showing no improvement with symptomatic treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spine done 6 days after admission revealed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities involving the cerebral and cerebellar cortex and white matter, basal ganglia, thalami, and brainstem on T2-weighted, fluid attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion weighted images; similar hyperintensities were seen involving the swollen and edematous cervical spinal cord and cerebellar tonsillar herniation compressing the proximal cervical cord. Petechial hemorrhages were also noted within the brainstem. These features are compatible with toxic injury to the brain and cervical spinal cord. To our knowledge, the magnetic resonance imaging features of brain and spinal cord injury and cerebellar tonsillar herniation, secondary to isopropanol intoxication have not been reported in the published literature before.Keywords: alcohol intoxication, computed tomography, isopropyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol, toxicity

  6. Spinal stenosis

    Beale, S.; Pathria, M.N.; Ross, J.S.; Masaryk, T.J.; Modic, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied 50 patients who had spinal stenosis by means of MR imaging. All patients had undergone myelography and CT. Thirty patients underwent surgery. MR imaging included T1-weighted spin echo sequences with repetition time = 600 msec, echo time = 20 (600/20) sagittal and axial sections 4 mm thick with 2 mm gap. T2-weighted 2,000/60 axial images were obtained on 14 patients. Examinations were retrospectively evaluated for central stenosis, lateral recess narrowing, and foraminal encroachment. Measurements of sagittal, interpedicular, interfacet, and recess dimensions were made at L3-5. On MR images, 20 patients had single-level and 30 had multiple-level stenosis. There was excellent agreement between modalities with central canal stenosis, but a discrepancy in six patients with bony foraminal stenosis. MR imaging was an accurate method for assessment of lumbar stenosis, but CT appears marginally better for detection of bony foraminal stenosis in certain cases

  7. Fluid intelligence and gross structural properties of the cerebral cortex in middle-aged and older adults: A multi-occasion longitudinal study.

    Yuan, Peng; Voelkle, Manuel C; Raz, Naftali

    2018-05-15

    According to Parieto-Frontal Integration Theory (P-FIT, Jung and Haier, 2007), individual differences in a circumscribed set of brain regions account for variations in general intelligence (g). The components of g, fluid (Gf) and crystallized (Gc) reasoning, exhibit distinct trajectories of age-related change. Because the brain also ages differentially, we hypothesized that age-related cognitive and neural changes would be coupled. In a sample of healthy middle-aged and older adults, we examined changes in Gf (operationalized by Cattell Culture Fair Test) and Gc (indexed by two vocabulary tests) as well as in structural properties of 19 brain regions. We fitted linear mixed models to the data collected on 73 healthy adults who participated in baseline assessment, with 43 returning for at least one follow-up, and 16 of them contributing four repeated assessments over seven years. We observed age differences as well as longitudinal decline in Gf, contrasted to a lack of age differences and stability in Gc. Cortical thickness and cortical volume exhibited significant age differences and longitudinal declines, which were accelerated in P-FIT regions. Gf (but not Gc) was associated with cortical thickness, but no such relationship was found for cortical volume. Uniformity of cognitive change (lack of reliable individual differences) precluded examination of the coupling between cognitive and brain changes. Cortical shrinkage was greater in high-Gc individuals, whereas in participants with higher Gf cortical volume slower volume shrinkage was observed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. What are the Causes of Spinal Cord Injury?

    ... in a New Light An Honest Wheelchair Love Story Seven Helpful Smart Home Devices for People With Disabilities Can’t Work Because of a Spinal Cord Injury? Tags accessibility accident ADA adaptive adaptive equipment Adaptive technology Americans with Disabilities Act Ben Mattlin caregiver Cerebral ...

  9. Posterior spinal decompression, stabilization and arthrodesis in ...

    There was a case each of superficial surgical site infection and transient cerebrospinal fluid leak but no case of implant failure was encountered. The outcome was significantly associated with the etiology (0.030) of the indication for surgery and preoperative power grade (0.000). Conclusion: Spinal trauma and degenerative ...

  10. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure

  11. United Cerebral Palsy

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  12. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  13. Birth Defects: Cerebral Palsy

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Cerebral palsy (also called CP) is a group of conditions ...

  14. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass.

  15. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik

    2014-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos ... Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS Occupational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  18. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What are the chances of regaining feeling and mobility after a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How long does it usually take for feeling and movement to return after a spinal cord ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  10. Spinal cord stimulation

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ... a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? ...

  12. Spinal segmental dysgenesis

    N Mahomed

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal segmental dysgenesis is a rare congenital spinal abnormality , seen in neonates and infants in which a segment of the spine and spinal cord fails to develop normally . The condition is segmental with normal vertebrae above and below the malformation. This condition is commonly associated with various abnormalities that affect the heart, genitourinary, gastrointestinal tract and skeletal system. We report two cases of spinal segmental dysgenesis and the associated abnormalities.

  13. Sonographic findings of normal newborn spinal cord

    Park, Chan Sup; Kim, Dong Gyu

    1988-01-01

    The authors performed spinal cord ultrasonography of 21 healthy newborn infants in Gyeongsang National University Hospital. Normal spinal cord revealed low echogenecity at that of cerebrospinal fluid and was demarcated by intense reflections from its dorsal and ventral surfaces. The central canal was routinely seen as a thin linear reflection in the center of the cord. The nerve roots making up the cauda equina formed a poorly defined collection of intense linear echoes extending from the conus. On real time image, the normal spinal cord exhibited rather slow and rhythmical anteroposterior movement within the subarachnoid fluid. A distinct and rapid vascular pulsation of the spinal cord was usually recognizable. The approximate level of vertebral bodies was determined as follows; most ventrally located vertebral body was thought to be L5 and S1 was seen slightly posterior to the L5 directed inferoposteriorly. According to the above criteria terminal portions of spinal cord were seen around the L2 body in 5 MHz and pointed termination of conus medullaris was clearly seen at L2-3 junction and in upper body of L3 by 7.5 MHz. So it would be better to examine by 5 MHz for spatial orientation and then by 7.5 MHz for more accurate examination. High-resolution, real-time ultrasonography was a safe, rapid screening technique for evaluation of the spinal cord in infants. Additional applications of spinal sonography may be possible in the evaluation of neonatal syringohydromyelia and meningocele as well as intraspinal cyst localization for possible percutaneous puncture by ultrasound guidance

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injuries

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  18. Cerebral palsy

    Truwit, C.L.; Barkovich, A.J.; Koch, T.; Ferreiro, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews cranial MR findings in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) to clarify and categorize this disorder. The MR images of 40 patients with clinical CP were retrospectively reviewed. All patients suffered either varying spastic plegias, hypotonicity, or choreoathetosis. Concomitantly, the patients suffered from static encephalopathy, developmental delay, and/or microcephaly. Twenty-four patients were born at or near term, 10 were premature, and incomplete birth histories were available in six. The MR images revealed mild to severe degrees of white matter damage in 24 patients (12 term, nine premature, three unknown)

  19. Fixed cord in spinal stenosis

    Levy, L.M.; Wang, H.; Francomano, C.; Hurko, O.; Carson, B.; Heffez, D.S.; DiChiro, G.; Bryan, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates patients with cervical spinal canal compromise due to congenital anomalies (achondroplasia, Chiari malformation) and degenerative diseases using MR cord motion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow studies. Pulsatile longitudinal motion of the cervical cord was determined by means of cardiac-gated velocity phase contrast methods, including cine. Pathology included dwarfism (n = 15), Chiari malformation (n = 10), spondylosis (n = 10), and acute cord compression (n = 9). Symptomatic cases of congenital cervical stenosis had decreased cord motion, although CSF flow was not always significantly compromised. Postoperative cases demonstrated good cord and CSF motion, unless compression or obstruction was present

  20. Fluid Shifts

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  1. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging in suspected multiple sclerosis

    Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J.; Bergers, E.; Castelijns, J.A.; Barkhof, F.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Polman, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the value of spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnostic work-up of multiple sclerosis (MS). Forty patients suspected of having MS were examined within 24 months after the start of symptoms. Disability was assessed, and symptoms were categorized as either brain or spinal cord. Work-up further included cerebrospinal fluid analysis and standard proton-density, T2-, and T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced brain and spinal cord MRI. Patients were categorized as either clinically definite MS (n = 13), laboratory-supported definite MS (n = 14), or clinically probable MS (n = 4); four patients had clinically probable MS, and in nine MS was suspected. Spinal cord abnormalities were found in 35 of 40 patients (87.5 %), consisting of focal lesions in 31, only diffuse abnormalities in two, and both in two. Asymptomatic spinal cord lesions occurred in six patients. All patients with diffuse spinal cord abnormality had clear spinal cord symptoms and a primary progressive disease course. In clinically definite MS, the inclusion of spinal imaging increased the sensitivity of MRI to 100 %. Seven patients without a definite diagnosis had clinically isolated syndromes involving the spinal cord. Brain MRI was inconclusive, while all had focal spinal cord lesions which explained symptoms and ruled out other causes. Two other patients had atypical brain abnormalities suggesting ischemic/vascular disease. No spinal cord abnormalities were found, and during follow-up MS was ruled out. Spinal cord abnormalities are common in suspected MS, and may occur asymptomatic. Although diagnostic classification is seldom changed, spinal cord imaging increases diagnostic sensitivity of MRI in patients with suspected MS. In addition, patients with primary progressive MS may possibly be earlier diagnosed. Finally, differentiation with atypical lesions may be improved. (orig.)

  2. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    Mahmut Edip Gürol

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid beta-peptides (Ab in the walls of leptomeningeal arteries, arterioles, and veins. Despite the fact that these pathological changes were first described in 1909, major advancement in our understanding of the clinicoradiological manifestations, neurobiology, and course of CAA has occurred only during the last 30 years. No significant associations have been shown between CAA and other systemic/visceral amyloidoses or vascular risk factors, including hypertension. CAA is well known as the most common cause of spontaneous and anticoagulant-related lobar parenchymal ICH in the elderly. It also causes lobar cerebral microbleeds (CMBs, small dot-like dark susceptibility artifacts visible with gradient recalled echo (GRE-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. CMBs are important markers of disease severity and predictors of CAA progression. Amyloid angiopathy is also a common cause of ischemic microvascular white matter disease (WMD and deep cerebral infarctions. Such WMD is defined as subcortical and periventricular white matter changes without obvious infarction, as well as a dark appearance on computerized tomography (CT and a bright appearance on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR-MRI. CAA-related vascular dysfunction, with its hemorrhagic and ischemic complications, is a recognized contributor to vascular cognitive impairment in the elderly, an independent effect that is synergistically increased by Alzheimer pathologies, such as plaques and tangles. A set of clinicoradiological criteria was established for the accurate diagnosis of CAA. According to the Boston Criteria, patients aged 55 years and older with multiple hemorrhages (on CT or GRE-MRI restricted to the lobar, cortical, or corticosubcortical regions (cerebellar hemorrhage allowed are diagnosed as probable CAA when no other etiology is found; a single hemorrhage in the same region is classified as possible

  3. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in AIDS

    Christ, F.; Steudel, H.; Klotz, D.; Bonn Univ.; Bonn Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Since 1982 (Hauser and co-workers), literature has reported focal cerebral tissue charges in AIDS patients whose diagnosis was unclear at first but which could be identified finally as florid toxoplasmosis encephalitis by biopsy and autopsy. It was found that the value of otherwise reliable serological tests (KBR, Sabin-Feldmann tests, etc.) is questionable in patients with severely impaired or incompetent immune systems, and, in particular, that a negative or uncharacteristic test result may not preclude any opportunistic infection process. Furthermore, isolation of Toxoplasma gondii or specific antibodies from the cerebrospinal fluid will be successful in exceptional cases only. In patients with AIDS or lymphadenopathy syndrome, the differential diagnosis will have to include - first and foremost - reactivated toxoplasma infection (not newly acquired, as a rule) if central neurological symptoms occur. (orig.) [de

  4. Trauma: Spinal Cord Injury.

    Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Injuries to the spinal column and spinal cord frequently occur after high-energy mechanisms of injury, or with lower-energy mechanisms, in select patient populations like the elderly. A focused yet complete neurologic examination during the initial evaluation will guide subsequent diagnostic procedures and early supportive measures to help prevent further injury. For patients with injury to bone and/or ligaments, the initial focus should be spinal immobilization and prevention of inducing injury to the spinal cord. Spinal cord injury is associated with numerous life-threatening complications during the acute and long-term phases of care that all acute care surgeons must recognize. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Human spinal motor control

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    Human studies in the past three decades have provided us with an emerging understanding of how cortical and spinal networks collaborate to ensure the vast repertoire of human behaviors. We differ from other animals in having direct cortical connections to spinal motoneurons, which bypass spinal...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...

  6. Estudo comparativo entre o pré-condicionamento isquêmico e a drenagem liquórica como métodos de proteção medular em cães Comparative study between ischemic preconditioning and cerebrospinal fluid drainage as methods of spinal cord protection in dogs

    Anderson Benício

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo compara os efeitos do pré-condicionamento isquêmico imediato, baseado na monitorização do potencial evocado somatossensitivo (PESS, com aqueles da drenagem do líquido cefalorraquidiano, em um modelo de oclusão da aorta torácica descendente em cães. MÉTODO: Dezoito cães foram submetidos à isquemia medular induzida pela oclusão da aorta torácica descendente por 60 minutos. O Grupo Controle foi submetido à oclusão da aorta (n=6, o Grupo Pré-Condicionamento Isquêmico (PCI, ao pré-condicionamento isquêmico (n=6 e o grupo drenagem, à drenagem do líquido cefalorraquidiano (n=6, imediatamente antes da oclusão da aorta. A condição neurológica foi acessada por um observador independente, de acordo com a escala de Tarlov. Os animais foram sacrificados e as medulas retiradas para exame histopatológico. RESULTADOS: Pressões da aorta proximal e distal à oclusão foram semelhantes nos três grupos. Sete dias após o procedimento, o índice de Tarlov foi significativamente maior em comparação ao Grupo Controle, somente no Grupo PCI (pOBJECTIVE: This study compares the effects of immediate ischemic preconditioning based on somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP monitoring with those of cerebrospinal fluid drainage in a model of descending thoracic aorta occlusion in dogs. METHOD: Eighteen dogs were submitted to spinal cord ischemia induced by descending thoracic aortic cross-clamping for 60 minutes. The Control Group underwent only aortic cross-clamping (n=6. The Ischemic Preconditioning Group (IPC underwent ischemic preconditioning (n=6 and the Drainage Group underwent cerebrospinal fluid drainage (n=6, immediately before aortic cross-clamping. An independent observer assessed neurological status according to the Tarlov score. The animals were sacrificed and spinal cord harvested for histopathologic study. RESULTS: Aortic pressure before and after the occluded segment was similar in the three groups. Seven days

  7. Spinal cord microstructure integrating phase-sensitive inversion recovery and diffusional kurtosis imaging

    Panara, V.; Navarra, R; Caulo, M. [University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , Department of Neuroscience, Imaging and Clinical Sciences, Chieti (Italy); University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , ITAB Institute of Advanced Biomedical Technologies, Chieti (Italy); Mattei, P.A. [University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , ITAB Institute of Advanced Biomedical Technologies, Chieti (Italy); University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , Department of Medicine and Science of Aging, Ophthalmology Clinic, Chieti (Italy); Piccirilli, E. [University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , ITAB Institute of Advanced Biomedical Technologies, Chieti (Italy); Cotroneo, A.R.; Uncini, A. [University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , Department of Neuroscience, Imaging and Clinical Sciences, Chieti (Italy); Papinutto, N.; Henry, R.G. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neurology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine the feasibility in terms of repeatability and reproducibility of diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) for microstructural assessment of the normal cervical spinal cord (cSC) using a phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) sequence as the anatomical reference for accurately defining white-matter (WM) and gray-matter (GM) regions of interests (ROIs). Thirteen young healthy subjects were enrolled to undergo DKI and PSIR sequences in the cSC. The repeatability and reproducibility of kurtosis metrics and fractional anisotropy (FA) were calculated in GM, WM, and cerebral-spinal-fluid (CSF) ROIs drawn by two independent readers on PSIR images of three different levels (C1-C4). The presence of statistically significant differences in DKI metrics for levels, ROIs (GM, WM, and CSF) repeatability, reproducibility, and inter-reader agreement was evaluated. Intra-class correlation coefficients between the two readers ranged from good to excellent (0.75 to 0.90). The inferior level consistently had the highest concordance. The lower values of scan-rescan variability for all DKI parameters were found for the inferior level. Statistically significant differences in kurtosis values were not found in the lateral white-matter bundles of the spinal cord. The integration of DKI and PSIR sequences in a clinical MR acquisition to explore the regional microstructure of the cSC in healthy subjects is feasible, and the results obtainable are reproducible. Further investigation will be required to verify the possibility to translate this method to a clinical setting to study patients with SC involvement especially in the absence of MRI abnormalities on standard sequences. (orig.)

  8. International Spinal Cord Injury

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS......: A committee of experts was established to select and define data elements. The data set was then disseminated to the appropriate committees and organizations for comments. All suggested revisions were considered and both the International Spinal Cord Society and the American Spinal Injury Association endorsed...... spinal intervention and procedure is coded (variables 1 through 7) and the spinal segment level is described (variables 8 and 9). Sample clinical cases were developed to illustrate how to complete it. CONCLUSION: The International SCI Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data Set...

  9. SPINAL DEFORMITIES AFTER SELECTIVE DORSAL RHIZOTOMY

    PATRICIO PABLO MANZONE

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR used for spasticity treatment could worsen or develop spinal deformities. Our goal is to describe spinal deformities seen in patients with cerebral palsy (CP after being treated by SDR. Methods: Retrospective study of patients operated on (SDR between January/1999 and June/2012. Inclusion criteria: spinal Rx before SDR surgery, spinography, and assessment at follow-up. We evaluated several factors emphasizing level and type of SDR approach, spinal deformity and its treatment, final Risser, and follow-up duration. Results: We found 7 patients (6 males: mean age at SDR 7.56 years (4.08-11.16. Mean follow-up: 6.64 years (2.16-13, final age: 14.32 years (7.5-19. No patient had previous deformity. GMFCS: 2 patients level IV, 2 level III, 3 level II. Initial walking status: 2 community walkers, 2 household walkers, 2 functional walkers, 1 not ambulant, at the follow-up, 3 patients improved, and 4 kept their status. We found 4 TL/L laminotomies, 2 L/LS laminectomies, and 1 thoracic laminectomy. Six spinal deformities were observed: 2 sagittal, 3 mixed, and 1 scoliosis. There was no association among the type of deformity, final gait status, topographic type, GMFCS, age, or SDR approach. Three patients had surgery indication for spinal deformity at skeletal maturity, while those patients with smaller deformities were still immature (Risser 0 to 2/3 although with progressive curves. Conclusions: After SDR, patients should be periodically evaluated until they reach Risser 5. The development of a deformity does not compromise functional results but adds morbidity because it may require surgical treatment.

  10. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Teens / Cerebral Palsy What's in this ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  11. Spinal epidural empyema in two dogs

    Dewey, C.W.; Kortz, G.D.; Bailey, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    Extensive, diffuse, epidural spinal cord compression was visualized myelographically in two dogs presented for rapid development of nonambulatory tetraparesis and paraplegia, respectively. Purulent fluid containing bacterial organisms was aspirated percutaneously under fluoroscopic guidance from the epidural space of each dog. One dog responded poorly to aggressive medical therapy, which included installation of an epidural lavage and drainage system. Both dogs were euthanized due to the severe nature of their disorder and the poor prognosis. Spinal epidural empyema (i.e., abscess) is a rare condition in humans and has not been reported previously in the veterinary literature. Spinal epidural empyema should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs presenting with painful myelopathies, especially when accompanied by fever

  12. Biomarkers in spinal cord compression Ethics and perspectives

    Iencean A.St.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The phosphorylated form of the high-molecular-weight neurofilament subunit NF-H (pNF-H in serum or in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF is a specific lesional biomarker for spinal cord injury. The lesional biomarkers and the reaction biomarkers are both presented after several hours post-injury. The specific predictive patterns of lesional biomarkers could be used to aid clinicians with making a diagnosis and establishing a prognosis, and evaluating therapeutic interventions. Diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment guidance based on biomarker used as a predictive indicator can determine ethical difficulties by differentiated therapies in patients with spinal cord compression. At this point based on studies until today we cannot take a decision based on biomarker limiting the treatment of neurological recovery in patients with complete spinal cord injury because we do not know the complexity of the biological response to spinal cord compression.

  13. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Complicated by Cerebral Hemorrhage during Acyclovir Therapy.

    Harada, Yukinori; Hara, Yuuta

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) can be complicated by adverse events in the acute phase. We herein present the case of a 71-year-old woman with HSE complicated by cerebral hemorrhage. She presented with acute deterioration of consciousness and fever and was diagnosed with HSE based on the detection of herpes simplex virus-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid by a polymerase chain reaction. The cerebral hemorrhage developed during acyclovir therapy; however, its diagnosis was delayed for 2 days. After the conservative treatment of the cerebral hemorrhage, the patient made a near-complete recovery. Cerebral hemorrhage should be considered as an acute-phase complication of HSE.

  14. Protein profiling of cerebrospinal fluid

    Simonsen, Anja H

    2012-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) perfuses the brain and spinal cord. CSF contains proteins and peptides important for brain physiology and potentially also relevant for brain pathology. Hence, CSF is the perfect source to search for new biomarkers to improve diagnosis of neurological diseases as well...

  15. Schistosomiasis of the spinal cord value of magnetic resonance imaging

    Masson, C.; Rey, A.; Ast, G.; Cambier, J.; Masson, M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report a case of spinal cord schistosomiasis presenting as myelitis, with rapidly developing deficit, signs of severe cerebrospinal fluid inflammation, normal myelography and computerized tomography. The patient's country of origin suggested schistosomiasis, and the diagnosis was confirmed by serology and rectal biopsy which showed eggs of Schistosoma mansoni. Magnetic resonance imaging was helpful as it confirmed the absence of spinal cord compression and showed a lesion of the conus medullaris, this region being the most frequent site of schistosomial myelitis [fr

  16. Pretreatment with AQP4 and NKCC1 Inhibitors Concurrently Attenuated Spinal Cord Edema and Tissue Damage after Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    Yan, Xiaodong; Liu, Juanfang; Wang, Xiji; Li, Wenhao; Chen, Jingyuan; Sun, Honghui

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects more than 2.5 million people worldwide. Spinal cord edema plays critical roles in the pathological progression of SCI. This study aimed to delineate the roles of aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and Na + -K + -Cl - cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) in acute phase edema and tissue destruction after SCI and to explore whether inhibiting both AQP4 and NKCC1 could improve SCI-induced spinal edema and damage. Rat SCI model was established by modified Allen's method. Spinal cord water content, cerebrospinal fluid lactose dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, AQP4 and NKCC1 expression, and spinal cord pathology from 30 min to 7 days after SCI were monitored. Additionally, aforementioned parameters in rats treated with AQP4 and/or NKCC1 inhibitors were assessed 2 days after SCI. Spinal cord water content was significantly increased 1 h after SCI while AQP4 and NKCC1 expression and spinal fluid LDH activity elevated 6 h after SCI. Spinal cord edema and spinal cord destruction peaked around 24 h after SCI and maintained at high levels thereafter. Treating rats with AQP4 inhibitor TGN-020 and NKCC1 antagonist bumetanide significantly reduced spinal cord edema, tissue destruction, and AQP4 and NKCC1 expression after SCI in an additive manner. These results demonstrated the benefits of simultaneously inhibiting both AQP4 and NKCC1 after SCI.

  17. Cerebral Vasculitis

    Fariborz Khorvash

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vasculitis is an inflammation systems may be involved of blood vessels due to various origins. Vessels of the peripheral and/or central nervous. Vasculitis of the CNS is rare and occurs in the context of systemic diseases or as primary angiitis of the CNS. Epidemiology: The overall incidence of primary vasculitis is about 40/1,000,000 persons [excluding giant cell (temporal arteritis, GCA]. Its incidence increases with age. The incidence of GCA is much higher (around 200/1,000,000 persons in the age group[50 years. Clinical Presentation: Clinical and pathological presentation in CNS vasculitis represents a wide spectrum. Among others, headache, cranial nerve affections, encephalopathy, seizures, psychosis, myelitis, stroke, intracranial haemorrhage and aseptic meningoencephalitis are described. Primary and secondary vasculitides leading more frequently to CNS manifestations are discussed. Primary and secondary Vasculitides: Including Giant Cell (Temporal Arteritis , Takayasu arteritis, Polyarteritis nodosa, Primary angiitis of the CNS, Wegener’s granulomatosis, and Connective tissue diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, mixed connective disease and Sjögren syndrome, are systemic immune-mediated diseases that lead to multiple organ affections. Cerebral Vasculitis: Imaging and Differential Diagnosis: Vasculitides represent a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases that affect blood vessel walls of varying calibers (inflammatory vasculopathy. Since the devastating symptoms of CNS vasculitis are at least partially reversible, early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are important. In order to establish a differential diagnosis clinical features, disease progression, age of onset, blood results, as well as CSF examinations have to be taken into consideration. Neuroimaging techniques, such as MRI and DSA, play a central role in the diagnosis and disease monitoring .The diagnostic

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About ... Your email address * This iframe contains the logic required to ...

  19. Spinal injury in sport

    Barile, Antonio [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)]. E-mail: antonio.barile@cc.univaq.it; Limbucci, Nicola [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Splendiani, Alessandra [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Gallucci, Massimo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding.

  20. Spinal CT scan, 1

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Methods of CT of the cervical and thoracic spines were explained, and normal CT pictures of them were described. Spinal CT was evaluated in comparison with other methods in various spinal diseases. Plain CT revealed stenosis due to spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament and hernia of intervertebral disc. CT took an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors with calcification and destruction of the bone. CT scan in combination with other methods was also useful for the diagnosis of spinal injuries, congenital anomalies and infections. (Ueda, J.)

  1. MULTIPLE SPINAL CANAL MENINGIOMAS

    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningiomas of the spinal canal are common tumours with the incidence of 25 percent of all spinal cord tumours. But multiple spinal canal meningiomas are rare in compare to solitary lesions and account for 2 to 3.5% of all spinal meningiomas. Most of the reported cases are both intra cranial and spinal. Exclusive involvement of the spinal canal by multiple meningiomas are very rare. We could find only sixteen cases in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for single lesion. We analysed the literature, with illustration of our case. MATERIALS AND METHODS In September 2016, we performed a literature search for multiple spinal canal meningiomas involving exclusively the spinal canal with no limitation for language and publication date. The search was conducted through http://pubmed.com, a wellknown worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, we could find only sixteen cases of multiple meningiomas exclusively confined to the spinal canal. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for solitary intradural extra medullary spinal canal meningioma at D4-D6 level, again presented with spastic quadriparesis of two years duration and MRI whole spine demonstrated multiple intradural extra medullary lesions, which were excised completely and the histopathological diagnosis was transitional meningioma. RESULTS Patient recovered from his weakness and sensory symptoms gradually and bladder and bowel symptoms improved gradually over a period of two to three weeks. CONCLUSION Multiple

  2. Spinal injury in sport

    Barile, Antonio; Limbucci, Nicola; Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding

  3. The negotiated equilibrium model of spinal cord function.

    Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2018-04-16

    The belief that the spinal cord is hardwired is no longer tenable. Like the rest of the CNS, the spinal cord changes during growth and aging, when new motor behaviours are acquired, and in response to trauma and disease. This paper describes a new model of spinal cord function that reconciles its recently appreciated plasticity with its long recognized reliability as the final common pathway for behaviour. According to this model, the substrate of each motor behaviour comprises brain and spinal plasticity: the plasticity in the brain induces and maintains the plasticity in the spinal cord. Each time a behaviour occurs, the spinal cord provides the brain with performance information that guides changes in the substrate of the behaviour. All the behaviours in the repertoire undergo this process concurrently; each repeatedly induces plasticity to preserve its key features despite the plasticity induced by other behaviours. The aggregate process is a negotiation among the behaviours: they negotiate the properties of the spinal neurons and synapses that they all use. The ongoing negotiation maintains the spinal cord in an equilibrium - a negotiated equilibrium - that serves all the behaviours. This new model of spinal cord function is supported by laboratory and clinical data, makes predictions borne out by experiment, and underlies a new approach to restoring function to people with neuromuscular disorders. Further studies are needed to test its generality, to determine whether it may apply to other CNS areas such as the cerebral cortex, and to develop its therapeutic implications. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Cerebral (18)FluoroDeoxy-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography in paediatric anti N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis: A case series.

    Lagarde, Stanislas; Lepine, Anne; Caietta, Emilie; Pelletier, Florence; Boucraut, José; Chabrol, Brigitte; Milh, Mathieu; Guedj, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a frequent and severe cause of encephalitis in children with potential efficient treatment (immunotherapy). Suggestive clinical features are behavioural troubles, seizures and movement disorders. Prompt diagnosis and treatment initiation are needed to guarantee favourable outcome. Nevertheless, diagnosis may be challenging because of the classical ancillary test (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electroencephalogram, standard cerebro-spinal fluid analysis) have limited sensitivity. Currently, immunological analyses are needed for the diagnostic confirmation. In adult patients, some studies suggested a potential role of cerebral (18)FluoroDeoxy-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) in the evaluation of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Nevertheless, almost no data exist in paediatric population. We report retrospectively clinical, ancillary tests and cerebral FDG-PET data in 6 young patients (median age=10.5 years, 4 girls) with immunologically confirmed anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Our patients presented classical clinical features of anti-NMDAR encephalitis with severe course (notably four patients had normal MRI). Our series shows the feasibility and the good sensitivity of cerebral FDG-PET (6/6 patients with brain metabolism alteration) in paediatric population. We report some particular features in this population: extensive, symmetric cortical hypometabolism especially in posterior areas; asymmetric anterior focus of hypermetabolism; and basal ganglia hypermetabolism. We found also a good correlation between the clinical severity and the cerebral metabolism changes. Moreover, serial cerebral FDG-PET showed parallel brain metabolism and clinical improvement. Our study reveals the existence of specific patterns of brain metabolism alteration in anti-NMDAR encephalitis in paediatric population. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Preliminary results after upper cervical chiropractic care in patients with chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency and multiple sclerosis.

    Mandolesi, Sandro; Marceca, Giuseppe; Moser, Jon; Niglio, Tarcisio; d'Alessandro, Aldo; Ciccone, Matteo Marco; Zito, Annapaola; Mandolesi, Dimitri; d'Alessandro, Alessandro; Fedele, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical and X-ray results of the Upper Cervical Chiropractic care through the specific adjustments (corrections) of C1-C2 on patients with chronic venous cerebral-spinal insufficiency (CCSVI) and multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied a sample of 77 patients before and after the Upper Cervical Chiropractic care, and we analyzed: A) The change of the X-ray parameters; B) The clinical results using a new set of questions. The protocol of the C1- C2 upper Cervical Chiropractic treatment, specific for these patients, lasts four months. From a haemodynamic point of view we divided the patients in 3 types: Type 1 - purely vascular with intravenous alterations; Type 2 - "mechanical" with of external venous compressions; Type 3 - mixed. We found an improvement in all kinds of subluxations after the treatment with respect to the pre-treatment X-ray evaluation, with a significant statistical difference. The differences between the clinical symptoms before and after the specific treatment of C1-C2 are statistically significant with pcerebro-spinal fluid.

  6. Imaging of thoracic and lumbar spinal extradural arachnoid cysts: report of two cases

    Rimmelin, A.; Clouet, P.L.; Salatino, S.; Kehrli, P.; Maitrot, D.; Stephan, M.; Dietemann, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Extradural arachnoid cysts are uncommon expanding lesions in the spinal canal which may communicate with the subarachnoid space. Usually in the lower thoracic spine, they may cause symptoms by compressing the spinal cord or nerve roots. We report cases of thoracic and lumbar arachnoid cysts studied by cystography, myelography, CT and MRI. These techniques showed extradural cystic lesions containing cerebrospinal fluid, with variable communication with the subarachnoid space, causing anterior displacement and flattening of the spinal cord. (orig.)

  7. Intra-cerebral ventricular infusion of 5-iodo-2-deoxyuridine (IUDR) as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of a rat glioma

    Deutsch, M.; Rewers, A.B.; Redgate, S.; Fisher, E.R.; Boggs, S.S.

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of 5-iodo-2-deoxyuridine (IUDR) as a radiosensitizer when administered by continuous infusion into the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) of the lateral cerebral ventricle was evaluated in a 9L gliosarcoma rat brain tumor model. Stereotactic implantation of a 5 x 10(4) tumor cell suspension into the left caudate nucleus was carried out in four groups of 10 rats each. Control animals had a median survival of 16.9 days (range 16-21 days). IUDR, 8.4 mg over 7 days administered by continuous infusion into the left lateral ventricle produced a slight survival advantage (median survival 21.5 days, range 12-56). Irradiation of the entire brain, 8 Gy on days 4, 6 and 7 after tumor cell implantation also produced a slight improvement in survival (median 19.5 days, range 17-34). The combination of radiation and IUDR infusion into the CSF produced a marked survival advantage (median 30.5, range 22-54) compared to the control and single modality treatment groups. This is the first demonstration of the effectiveness of IUDR as a radiosensitizer when administered into the lateral cerebral ventricle in the treatment of an intraparenchymal brain tumor

  8. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage due to Spinal Cord Schwannoma Presenting Findings Mimicking Meningitis.

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Yin-Xi; Zhang, Qing; Song, Shui-Jiang; Liu, Zhi-Rong

    2016-08-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) of spinal origin is uncommon in clinical practice, and spinal schwannomas associated with SAH are even more rarely reported. We report an unusual case of spinal SAH mimicking meningitis with normal brain computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and negative CT angiography. Cerebrospinal fluid examination results were consistent with the manifestation of SAH. Spinal MRI performed subsequently showed an intradural extramedullary mass. The patient received surgery and was finally diagnosed with spinal cord schwannoma. A retrospective chart review of the patient was performed. We describe a case of SAH due to spinal cord schwannoma. Our case highlights the importance of careful history taking and complete evaluation. We emphasize that spinal causes should always be ruled out in patients with angionegative SAH and that schwannoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of SAH etiologies even though rare. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Cerebral aspergillosis].

    Tattevin, P; Jauréguiberry, S; Gangneux, J-P

    2004-05-01

    The brain is almost always a localization of invasive aspergillosis, after hematogenous spread from pulmonary aspergillosis. Brain aspergilosis is not rare and is one of the worst prognosis factors of invasive aspergillosis. The incidence of this severe mycosis is currently on the rise due to the development of major immunosuppressive treatments. Brain aspergillosis is noteworthy for its vascular tropism, leading to infectious cerebral vasculitis, mainly involving thalamoperforating and lenticulostriate arteries, with a high frequency of thalamic or basal nuclei lesions. Extra-neurologic features that suggest this diagnosis are: i) risk factors for invasive aspergillosis (major or prolonged neutropenia, hematologic malignancies, prolonged corticosteroid treatment, bone marrow or solid organ transplant, AIDS); ii) persistent fever not responding to presumptive antibacterial treatment; iii) respiratory signs (brain aspergillosis is associated with pulmonary aspergillosis in 80 to 95 p. 100 of cases). Perspectives. Two recent major improvements in brain aspergillosis management must be outlined: i) for diagnostic purposes, the development of testing for Aspergillus antigenemia (a non-invasive procedure with good diagnostic value for invasive aspergillosis); ii) for therapeutic purposes, the demonstration that voriconazole is better than amphotericin B in terms of clinical response, tolerance and survival, for all types of invasive aspergillosis, the benefit being probably even greater in case of brain aspergillosis because of the good diffusion of voriconazole into the central nervous system. Brain aspergillosis is a severe emerging opportunistic infection for which diagnostic and therapeutic tools have recently improved. Thus, this diagnostic must be suspected early, especially in the immunocompromised patient, in the event of respiratory symptoms and when the brain lesions are localized in the central nuclei and the thalamus.

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, MD Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How ... arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  13. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    Lønne, Greger; Fritzell, Peter; Hägg, Olle

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Decompression surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is the most common spinal procedure in the elderly. To avoid persisting low back pain, adding arthrodesis has been recommended, especially if there is a coexisting degenerative spondylolisthesis. However, this strategy remains con...

  14. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T.

    2008-01-01

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [de

  15. Dynamic digitized cerebral parenchymography

    Theron, J.; Alachkar, F.; Nelson, M.; Mazia, D.

    1992-01-01

    Aortic arch injections centred on the head have been performed routinely in patients with cerebral ischaemia. Digital angiograms with modified windowing (low and narrow) have been used. This 'cerebral' arch injection allows much improved analysis of the cerebral parenchymal vascularization, giving better understanding of hemispheric ischaemia and making the decision about revascularization more rational. (orig.)

  16. IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis.

    Lu, Zhang; Tongxi, Liu; Jie, Luo; Yujuan, Jiao; Wei, Jiang; Xia, Liu; Yumin, Zheng; Xin, Lu

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to study the clinical, laboratory, imaging pathology, and prognosis features of IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis. We worked with a 55-year-old man suffering from IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis who had the most widespread lesion in his dura mater. We also review previous related studies and discuss the clinical characteristics of this rare disease. In total, eight IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis patients have been reported in the literature since 2009. They were mostly male patients, 51.7 ± 11.9 years old on average. Cervical and thoracic vertebrae were the most common sites for lesions. The most prominent symptom was varying numbness and weakness of the limbs and/or body associated with spinal cord compression. There was one patient (1/5) with elevated serum IgG4 levels and three patients (3/3) with increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IgG4 index. Positive histopathologic findings are the strongest basis for a diagnosis. All the patients with IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis responded well to glucocorticoid therapy. IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis is an orphan disease that mainly occurs in cervical and thoracic vertebrae. Older males are the most susceptible group. Serum IgG4 levels were consistently normal in these cases, so analysis of CSF for IgG4 production (IgG4 index) could become a useful tool. Pathological findings remain the gold standard for diagnosis. Most patients responded favorably to glucocorticoid treatment.

  17. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome: case report of fetal unilateral ventriculomegaly and hypoplastic left middle cerebral artery

    Piro, Ettore; Piccione, Maria; Marrone, Gianluca; Giuffr?, Mario; Corsello, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal ultrasonographic detection of unilateral cerebral ventriculomegaly arises suspicion of pathological condition related to cerebrospinal fluid flow obstruction or cerebral parenchimal pathology. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome is a rare condition characterized by cerebral hemiatrophy, calvarial thickening, skull and facial asymmetry, contralateral hemiparesis, cognitive impairment and seizures. Congenital and acquired types are recognized and have been described, mainly in late childhood...

  18. Effects of Milrinone continuous intravenous infusion on global cerebral oxygenation and cerebral vasospasm after cerebral aneurysm surgical clipping

    Mohamed A. Ghanem

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Milrinone improved significantly the global cerebral oxygenation and reduced the incidence of cerebral vasospasm during the dangerous period of cerebral spasm after cerebral aneurysm clipping.

  19. Nuclear magnetic imaging for MTRA. Spinal canal and spinal cord

    Fritzsch, Dominik; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus

    2011-01-01

    The booklet covers the following topics: (1) Clinical indications for NMR imaging of spinal cord and spinal canal; (2) Methodic requirements: magnets and coils, image processing, contrast media: (3) Examination technology: examination conditions, sequences, examination protocols; (4) Disease pattern and indications: diseases of the myelin, the spinal nerves and the spinal canal (infections, tumors, injuries, ischemia and bleedings, malformations); diseases of the spinal cord and the intervertebral disks (degenerative changes, infections, injuries, tumors, malformations).

  20. Cerebral microcirculation during experimental normovolaemic anaemia

    Judith eBellapart

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaemia is accepted amongst critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anaemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anaemia. Experimental studies suggest that anaemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion amongst critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anaemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anaesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anaemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anaemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anaemia does not result in short term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain.

  1. Microembolism after cerebral angiography

    Manaka, Hiroshi; Sakai, Hideki; Nagata, Izumi

    2000-01-01

    Acute microemboli are detected more precisely with the recently developed diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). We happened to obtain 24 DWIs after 350 diagnostic cerebral angiographies in 1999. DWIs after cerebral angiographies showed bright lesions in 7 patients (28%), of whom 6 had no neurological symptoms after cerebral angiography. Seven of the 24 patients had risk factors for arteriosclerosis. Only one patient had embolic events due to angiography. Microemboli related to cerebral angiographies are inevitable in some patients. Most are silent, however, we should investigate the cause of microemboli and should make cerebral angiography safer. (author)

  2. Disorders of spinal blood circulation

    Hevyak, O.M.; Kuzminskyy, A.P.

    2017-01-01

    Spinal strokes are rare. The most common causes of the haemorrhage are spinal cord trauma, vasculitis with signs of haemorrhagic diathesis, spinal vascular congenital anomalies (malformations) and haemangioma. By localization, haemorrhagic strokes are divided into three groups: haematomyelia, spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage, epidural hematoma. Most cavernous malformations are localized at the cervical level, fewer — at thoracic and lumbar levels of the spinal cord. The clinical case of diagno...

  3. Does a paresthesia during spinal needle insertion indicate intrathecal needle placement?

    Pong, Ryan P; Gmelch, Benjamin S; Bernards, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    Paresthesias are relatively common during spinal needle insertion, however, the clinical significance of the paresthesia is unknown. A paresthesia may result from needle-to-nerve contact with a spinal nerve in the epidural space, or, with far lateral needle placement, may result from contact with a spinal nerve within the intervertebral foramen. However, it is also possible and perhaps more likely, that paresthesias occur when the spinal needle contacts a spinal nerve root within the subarachnoid space. This study was designed to test this latter hypothesis. Patients (n = 104) scheduled for surgery under spinal anesthesia were observed during spinal needle insertion. If a paresthesia occurred, the needle was fixed in place and the stylet removed to observe whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flowed from the hub. The presence of CSF was considered proof that the needle had entered the subarachnoid space. Paresthesias occurred in 14/103 (13.6%) of patients; 1 patient experienced a paresthesia twice. All paresthesias were transient. Following a paresthesia, CSF was observed in the needle hub 86.7% (13/15) of the time. Our data suggest that the majority of transient paresthesias occur when the spinal needle enters the subarachnoid space and contacts a spinal nerve root. Therefore, when transient paresthesias occur during spinal needle placement it is appropriate to stop and assess for the presence of CSF in the needle hub, rather than withdraw and redirect the spinal needle away from the side of the paresthesia as some authors have suggested.

  4. Is it possible to predict hypotension during onset of spinal anesthesia in elderly patients?

    Meyhoff, Christian S; Haarmark, Christian; Kanters, Jørgen K

    2009-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of various predictors of hypotension during onset of spinal anesthesia in elderly patients. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: 32 ASA physical status I, II, and III patients, aged >or=60 years, scheduled for elective lower limb surgery...... with spinal anesthesia. INTERVENTIONS: Patients received spinal anesthesia with 10-17.5 mg of bupivacaine. No prophylactic ephedrine or fluid preloading was used. MEASUREMENTS: A 5-minute baseline was recorded and during onset of spinal anesthesia, hemodynamic changes were measured every 10 seconds from...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering ... Rogers, SW Marguerite David, MSW Kathy Hulse, MSW Physical Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Laura Wehrli, PT ...

  7. Spinal cord trauma

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 32. Kaji AH, Newton EJ, Hockberger RS. Spinal injuries. In: Marx JA, ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... com is an informational and support website for families facing spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ...

  11. Spinal pain in adolescents

    Aartun, Ellen; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The severity and course of spinal pain is poorly understood in adolescents. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and two-year incidence, as well as the course, frequency, and intensity of pain in the neck, mid back, and low back (spinal pain). METHODS: This study was a school......-based prospective cohort study. All 5th and 6th grade students (11-13 years) at 14 schools in the Region of Southern Denmark were invited to participate (N = 1,348). Data were collected in 2010 and again two years later, using an e-survey completed during school time. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalence of spinal pain...... reported their pain as relatively infrequent and of low intensity, whereas the participants with frequent pain also experienced pain of higher intensity. The two-year incidence of spinal pain varied between 40% and 60% across the physical locations. Progression of pain from one to more locations and from...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury ...

  15. Spinal Injury: First Aid

    ... EmergencyManual/WhatToDoInMedicalEmergency/Default.aspx?id=258&terms=spinal+injuries. Accessed Jan. 8, 2015. Marx JA, et al. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD ... Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer ... Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW ... Experiences By Topic Resources Blog Peer Counseling About Media Donate Contact Us Terms of Use Site Map ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer ... Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow ... recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close ... Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal ...

  8. Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts

    Abolfazl Rahimizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Extradural arachnoid cysts (EACs are rare causes of spinal cord compression and cauda equina. These benign lesions appear in the literature mainly as single case reports. In this article, we present the largest series found in literature, with four new cases of spinal extradural arachnoid cysts. The characteristic imaging features, details of surgical steps and strategies to prevent postoperative kyphosis in this cystic pathology will be discussed.

  9. Pediatric spinal infections

    Raj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The infections of the spinal axis in children are rare when compared with adults. They encompass a large spectrum of diseases ranging from relatively benign diskitis to spinal osteomyleitis and to the rapidly progressive, rare, and potentially devastating spinal epidural, subdural, and intramedullary spinal cord infections. We present a comprehensive review of the literature pertaining to these uncommon entities, in light of our experience from northern India. The most prevalent pediatric spinal infection in Indian scenario is tuberculosis, where an extradural involvement is more common than intradural. The craniovertebral junction is not an uncommon site of involvement in children of our milieu. The majority of pyogenic infections of pediatric spine are associated with congenital neuro-ectodermal defects such as congenital dermal sinus. The clinico-radiological findings of various spinal infections commonly overlap. Hence the endemicity of certain pathogens should be given due consideration, while considering the differential diagnosis. However, early suspicion, rapid diagnosis, and prompt treatment are the key factors in avoiding neurological morbidity and deformity in a growing child.

  10. MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma

    Kim, Sam Soo [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Hyun Beom [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2000-01-01

    To describe the MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. The MR and clinical findings in six patients (M:F=3D4:2;adult:child=3D3:3) with spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma were reviewed. Five patients without any predisposing factor which might cause the condition and one with acute myelogenous leukemia were included. Emergency surgery was performed in two patients, and the other four were managed conservatively. The epidural lesion involved between three and seven vertebrae (mean:4.5), and relative to the spinal cord was located in the posterior-lateral (n=3D4), anterior (n=3D1), or right lateral (n=3D1) area. The hematoma was isointense (n=3D1) or hyperintense (n=3D5) with spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and hypointense (n=3D2) or hyperintense (n=3D4) on T2-weighted images. It was completely absorbed in four of five patients who underwent follow-up MR imaging, but not changed in one. The clinical outcome of these patients was complete recovery (n=3D4), spastic cerebral palsy (n=3D1), or unknown (n=3D1). Because of the lesion's characteristic signal intensity; MR imaging is very useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. (author)

  11. Congenital spinal malformations; Kongenitale spinale Malformationen

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2001-12-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [German] Kongenitale spinale Malformationen stellen eine komplexe Gruppe an Stoerungen dar, deren Genese sich am einfachsten aus der Embryologie heraus erklaeren laesst. Bei der klinisch-radiologischen Begutachtung ist zunaechst ihre korrekte Klassifikation im Rahmen der Erstdiagnose wichtig. Im weiteren Verlauf ist es jedoch zudem entscheidend, moegliche Komplikationen wie beispielsweise eine Hydromyelie oder ein Wiederanheften des Myelons nach Operation einer Spina bifida aperta zu erkennen. Zudem sollte bei der Diagnosestellung einer kongenitalen spinalen Malformation immer auch auf assoziierte Fehlbildungen, wie z.B. die Diastematomyelie oder das intraspinale Lipom bei der Spina bifida aperta, sowie auf eine moegliche syndromale Einordnung wie beispielsweise beim OEIS-oder VACTERL-Syndrom geachtet werden. (orig.)

  12. A novel Bayesian approach to accounting for uncertainty in fMRI-derived estimates of cerebral oxygen metabolism fluctuations.

    Simon, Aaron B; Dubowitz, David J; Blockley, Nicholas P; Buxton, Richard B

    2016-04-01

    Calibrated blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging is a multimodal functional MRI technique designed to estimate changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism from measured changes in cerebral blood flow and the BOLD signal. This technique addresses fundamental ambiguities associated with quantitative BOLD signal analysis; however, its dependence on biophysical modeling creates uncertainty in the resulting oxygen metabolism estimates. In this work, we developed a Bayesian approach to estimating the oxygen metabolism response to a neural stimulus and used it to examine the uncertainty that arises in calibrated BOLD estimation due to the presence of unmeasured model parameters. We applied our approach to estimate the CMRO2 response to a visual task using the traditional hypercapnia calibration experiment as well as to estimate the metabolic response to both a visual task and hypercapnia using the measurement of baseline apparent R2' as a calibration technique. Further, in order to examine the effects of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) signal contamination on the measurement of apparent R2', we examined the effects of measuring this parameter with and without CSF-nulling. We found that the two calibration techniques provided consistent estimates of the metabolic response on average, with a median R2'-based estimate of the metabolic response to CO2 of 1.4%, and R2'- and hypercapnia-calibrated estimates of the visual response of 27% and 24%, respectively. However, these estimates were sensitive to different sources of estimation uncertainty. The R2'-calibrated estimate was highly sensitive to CSF contamination and to uncertainty in unmeasured model parameters describing flow-volume coupling, capillary bed characteristics, and the iso-susceptibility saturation of blood. The hypercapnia-calibrated estimate was relatively insensitive to these parameters but highly sensitive to the assumed metabolic response to CO2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel Bayesian approach to accounting for uncertainty in fMRI-derived estimates of cerebral oxygen metabolism fluctuations

    Simon, Aaron B.; Dubowitz, David J.; Blockley, Nicholas P.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Calibrated blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging is a multimodal functional MRI technique designed to estimate changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism from measured changes in cerebral blood flow and the BOLD signal. This technique addresses fundamental ambiguities associated with quantitative BOLD signal analysis; however, its dependence on biophysical modeling creates uncertainty in the resulting oxygen metabolism estimates. In this work, we developed a Bayesian approach to estimating the oxygen metabolism response to a neural stimulus and used it to examine the uncertainty that arises in calibrated BOLD estimation due to the presence of unmeasured model parameters. We applied our approach to estimate the CMRO2 response to a visual task using the traditional hypercapnia calibration experiment as well as to estimate the metabolic response to both a visual task and hypercapnia using the measurement of baseline apparent R2′ as a calibration technique. Further, in order to examine the effects of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) signal contamination on the measurement of apparent R2′, we examined the effects of measuring this parameter with and without CSF-nulling. We found that the two calibration techniques provided consistent estimates of the metabolic response on average, with a median R2′-based estimate of the metabolic response to CO2 of 1.4%, and R2′- and hypercapnia-calibrated estimates of the visual response of 27% and 24%, respectively. However, these estimates were sensitive to different sources of estimation uncertainty. The R2′-calibrated estimate was highly sensitive to CSF contamination and to uncertainty in unmeasured model parameters describing flow-volume coupling, capillary bed characteristics, and the iso-susceptibility saturation of blood. The hypercapnia-calibrated estimate was relatively insensitive to these parameters but highly sensitive to the assumed metabolic response to CO2. PMID:26790354

  14. Management of Penetrating Spinal Cord Injuries in a Non Spinal ...

    Management of Penetrating Spinal Cord Injuries in a Non Spinal Centre: Experience at Enugu, Nigeria. ... The thoracic spine{9(41%)}was most often involved. ... Five (23%) patients with injury at cervical level died from respiratory failure.

  15. Neuropeptide Y - an early biomarker for cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Schebesch, Karl-Michael; Brawanski, Alexander; Bele, Sylvia; Schödel, Petra; Herbst, Andreas; Bründl, Elisabeth; Kagerbauer, Simone Maria; Martin, Jan; Lohmeier, Anette; Stoerr, Eva-Maria; Proescholdt, Martin

    2013-12-01

    In the human brain, the potent vasoconstrictive neuropeptide Y (NPY) is abundantly expressed. Neuropeptide Y, which is stored in perivascular nerve fibers of the cerebral arteries, regulates the cerebral vascular diameter as well as cerebral blood flow. However, the role of NPY in the pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm (CV) related to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is unclear. We prospectively analyzed and compared the release of endogenous NPY in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 66 patients with SAH to NPY release in a control group. Additionally, we correlated the levels of NPY with CV and consecutive ischemic stroke. Sixty-six consecutive patients (40 women, 26 men; mean age 53·1 years) with aneurysmal SAH were included. In the SAH group, CSF was drawn daily from day 1 to day 10 after the onset of SAH. The CSF of 29 patients undergoing spinal anesthesia for orthopedic surgery served as control samples. The NPY levels were determined in duplicate CSF samples by means of a competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The levels of NPY in CSF were correlated with the development of CV over the 10-day period after the onset of SAH and to the occurrence of consecutive ischemic stroke. To evaluate CSF NPY levels as a predictive biomarker for vasospasm, we calculated the sensitivity and specificity as well as the positive and negative predictive values. The NPY levels were significantly higher in the SAH group than in the control group (p 0·05). Patients with CV showed significantly higher NPY levels than patients without CV during the entire observation period. The NPY levels of the non-CV group dissipated over time, whereas the CV group showed continuously increasing values. The NPY levels from day 4 to 10 were significantly higher in patients with CV-related stroke than in non-stroke patients. Using 0·3 ng/ml as a cut-off value, NPY levels on day 3 predicted the occurrence of CV with a sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 72%, respectively. High NPY levels, starting on

  16. Continuous spinal anesthesia.

    Moore, James M

    2009-01-01

    Continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Compared with other techniques of neuraxial anesthesia, CSA allows incremental dosing of an intrathecal local anesthetic for an indefinite duration, whereas traditional single-shot spinal anesthesia usually involves larger doses, a finite, unpredictable duration, and greater potential for detrimental hemodynamic effects including hypotension, and epidural anesthesia via a catheter may produce lesser motor block and suboptimal anesthesia in sacral nerve root distributions. This review compares CSA with other anesthetic techniques and also describes the history of CSA, its clinical applications, concerns regarding neurotoxicity, and other pharmacologic implications of its use. CSA has seen a waxing and waning of its popularity in clinical practice since its initial description in 1907. After case reports of cauda equina syndrome were reported with the use of spinal microcatheters for CSA, these microcatheters were withdrawn from clinical practice in the United States but continued to be used in Europe with no further neurologic sequelae. Because only large-bore catheters may be used in the United States, CSA is usually reserved for elderly patients out of concern for the risk of postdural puncture headache in younger patients. However, even in younger patients, sometimes the unique clinical benefits and hemodynamic stability involved in CSA outweigh concerns regarding postdural puncture headache. Clinical scenarios in which CSA may be of particular benefit include patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing lower extremity surgery and obstetric patients with complex heart disease. CSA is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Perhaps more accurately termed fractional spinal anesthesia, CSA involves intermittent dosing of local anesthetic solution via an intrathecal catheter. Where traditional spinal anesthesia involves a single injection with a

  17. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  18. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  19. MicroRNA Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Bache, Søren; Rasmussen, Rune; Rossing, Maria

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) accounts for a major part of the morbidity and mortality after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are pathophysiologically involved in acute cerebral ischemia. This study compared miRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid...

  20. Germinomas cerebrais (teratomas atípicos da pineal Cerebral germinomas (atipical teratomas of the pineal region

    Alexandre Alencar

    1981-12-01

    Full Text Available São estudados três casos de germinomas cerebrais, sendo um tópico, da região pineal, e dois ectópicos, chamados germinomas supra-selares ou quiasmáticos. Estes últimos parecem ser mais agressivos que os seus congeneres tópicos, pois alem de se disseminarem pelas cisternas basais, costumam infiltrar as paredes do III ventrículo, fórnix, hipotálamo, nervos e quiasma ópticos. Caracteristicamente produzem um enorme aumento das proteínas liquóricas, desacompanhado de uma pleocitose proporcional. As proteínas liquóricas aumentadas sao globulinas cujas reações mostram-se fortemente positivas, possivelmente produzidas pelas celulas de aspecto linfocitario que constituem parte desta neoplasia. O aumento das proteinas liquoricas e tao acentuado que em presenca de uma crianca ou adolescente com sindrome de hipertensão intracraniana, hiperproteinoraquia sem pleocitose e sinais clínicos ou radiológicos sugestivos de localização na base do crânio a possibilidade de um germinoma quiasmático deve ser seriamente considerada, pois o quadro e muito sugestivo.Three cases of Cerebral Germinomas, one of them situated in the pineal region (topical and two ectopical of the so called suprasellar or chiasmal Germinomas are studied. These last ones may be more aggressive than the congeneral topical ones, since besides it's dissemination throughout the basal cisternas they usually infilstrate into de walls of the III Ventricle, Fornix, Hypothalamus, Chiasma and Optic nervs. A high level of proteins in the spinal fluid without proportional increase of the cells is characteristic. Globulins are the predominant fraction of the increased spinal fluid proteins, as indicated by the highly positive laboratory test. These globulins are possibly produced by the lymphocytes which are part of this neoplasm. The high level of protein in the spinal fluid without proportional increase of the cells, in the presence of intracranial syndrome in a child or

  1. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  2. Potentialities of spinal liquor scanography

    Vlakhov, N.; Vylkanov, P.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that spinal liquor scanography is a harmless and informative method for the examination of patients, permitting to detect injury foci for spinal cord tumours in 90% cases, for acute injuries of the vertebral column and spinal cord in 89.5% cases, for herniation of nucleus pulposus in 81% cases. The method of spinal liquor scanography can be used in neurology and neurosurgery to select the method of treatment and to evaluate its efficiency

  3. Cerebral venous angioma

    Inagawa, Tetsuji; Taguchi, Haruyoshi; Kamiya, Kazuko; Yano, Takashi; Nakajima, Reiko

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a 27-year-old male patient who was diagnosed as having cerebral venous angioma in the postero-temporal area by CT scan and cerebral angiography. The patient improved by removing angioma with electrocoagulation of medullary veins. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Neuroradiology of the spinal canal

    Lehmann, R.; Molsen, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    Radiodiagnostics of the vertebral column and of the spinal cord under normal conditions and under different pathological alterations are elaborated. Especially cervical and thoracal myelography, lumbosacral myeloradiculography, spinal arteriography and phlebography as well as spinal computerized tomography are discussed in detail

  5. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-01-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was cauused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunsupporessed cancer patient. (orig.)

  6. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  7. Spinal CT scan, 2

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Plain CT described fairly accurately the anatomy and lesions of the lumbar and sacral spines on their transverse sections. Since hernia of the intervertebral disc could be directly diagnosed by CT, indications of myelography could be restricted. Spinal-canal stenosis of the lumbar spine occurs because of various factors, and CT not only demonstrated the accurate size and morphology of bony canals, but also elucidated thickening of the joints and yellow ligament. CT was also useful for the diagnosis of tumors in the lumbar and sacral spines, visualizing the images of bone changes and soft tissues on the trasverse sections. But the diagnosis of intradural tumors required myelography and metrizamide CT. CT has become important for the diagnosis of spinal and spinal-cord diseases and for selection of the route of surgical arrival. (Chiba, N.)

  8. Intramedullary spinal melanocytoma

    Meic H. Schmidt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal melanocytoma is a benign lesion arising from leptomeningeal melanocytes that at times can mimic its malignant counterpart, melanoma. Lesions of the spine usually occur in extramedullary locations and present with spinal cord compression symptoms. Because most reported spinal cases occur in the thoracic region, these symptoms usually include lower extremity weakness or numbness. The authors present a case of primary intrame­dullary spinal meningeal melanocytoma presenting with bilateral lower extremity symptoms in which the patient had no known supratentorial primary lesions. Gross total surgical resection allowed for full recovery, but early recurrence of tumor was detected on close follow-up monitoring, allowing for elective local radiation without loss of neurological function. Case reports of such tumors discuss different treatment strategies, but just as important is the close follow-up monitoring in these patients even after gross total surgical resection, since these tumors can recur.

  9. Modelling of the CSF flow in the spinal canal in cervical stenosis

    Kaczmarská, A.; Štěpáník, Z.; Vaněk, P.; Maršík, František; Převorovská, Světlana; Otáhal, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 40, - (2007), s. 477-477 ISSN 0021-9290 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : cerebrospinal fluid flow * spinal canal * cervical stenosis Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.897, year: 2007

  10. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  11. Congenital spinal malformations

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F.

    2001-01-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [de

  12. Spinal Neurocysticercosis: Case Report

    Amaya P, Melina; Roa, Jose L

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most frequent parasitic illness of the central nervous system caused by the larval form of Taenia solium and its considered to be endemic in Latin America. Its diagnosis is based on imaging findings and epidemiological data; although its diagnosis can be made through the detection of specific IgG antibodies, these tests have limited availability in our environment. Central nervous system involvement is generally observed in the brain parenchyma, and less commonly in the ventricular system and subarachnoid space; only infrequently is reported to involve the structures within the spinal canal, in this article we review a case of a patient with spinal cysticercal involvement.

  13. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI. Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. The mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain pathways in the spinal cord may emerge with certain patterns of activity, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after spinal cord injury. We review these basic phenomena, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and discuss implications of these findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after spinal cord injury.

  14. Atrophy and Primary Somatosensory Cortical Reorganization after Unilateral Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury: A Longitudinal Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Jia-Sheng Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI on the changes in the central nervous system (CNS over time may depend on the dynamic interaction between the structural integrity of the spinal cord and the capacity of the brain plasticity. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used in a longitudinal study on five rhesus monkeys to observe cerebral activation during upper limb somatosensory tasks in healthy animals and after unilateral thoracic SCI. The changes in the spinal cord diameters were measured, and the correlations among time after the lesion, structural changes in the spinal cord, and primary somatosensory cortex (S1 reorganization were also determined. After SCI, activation of the upper limb in S1 shifted to the region which generally dominates the lower limb, and the rostral spinal cord transverse diameter adjacent to the lesion exhibited obvious atrophy, which reflects the SCI-induced changes in the CNS. A significant correlation was found among the time after the lesion, the spinal cord atrophy, and the degree of contralateral S1 reorganization. The results indicate the structural changes in the spinal cord and the dynamic reorganization of the cerebral activation following early SCI stage, which may help to further understand the neural plasticity in the CNS.

  15. Nontraumatic spinal epidural hematomas. MR features

    Loevblad, K.O.; Baumgartner, R.W.; Zambaz, B.D.; Remonda, L.; Ozdoba, C.; Schroth, G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is a rare clinical entity with a bleak outcome. The aim of our study was to establish the value of MR findings in the diagnosis of nontraumatic SEH. Material and Methods: Seven patients with nontraumatic SEH were examined by MR at 1.5 T. Two patients were under anticoagulation therapy with heparin, and 2 others were taking salicylic acid. One patient had lupus erythematodes with a marked thrombocytopenia. One patient had a spinal arteriovenous malformation. Results: MR imaging permitted the accurate localization of extradural intraspinal expansive lesions which exhibited the characteristic signal intensities of blood. Five patients underwent laminectomy and evacuation of the hematoma. In the acute phase, the hematomas appeared isointense when compared with the spinal cord on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. Later the hematomas were hyperintense on T1-weighted images and showed signals identical to those of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on T2-weighted images. Conclusion: MR imaging established the exact diagnosis and localization of SEH in all cases. MR also can provide useful information about the age of the hematomas. (orig.)

  16. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    Hayakawa, Katsumi [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, 1-2 Higashi-Takada-cho, Mibu, Nakagyo-ku, 604-8845 Kyoto (Japan); Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko [Department of Pediatric Neurology, St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, 603-8323 Kyoto (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  17. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    Hayakawa, Katsumi; Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  18. Anterior spinal cord syndrome of unknown etiology

    Klakeel, Merrine; Thompson, Justin; Srinivasan, Rajashree; McDonald, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A spinal cord injury encompasses a physical insult to the spinal cord. In the case of anterior spinal cord syndrome, the insult is a vascular lesion at the anterior spinal artery. We present the cases of two 13-year-old boys with anterior spinal cord syndrome, along with a review of the anatomy and vasculature of the spinal cord and an explanation of how a lesion in the cord corresponds to anterior spinal cord syndrome.

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work ... cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After ... program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  3. Occult spinal dysraphism

    paediatricians, paediatric neurosurgeons, urologists, orthopaedic surgeons, occupational ... Occult spinal dysraphism refers to a diverse group of congenital abnormalities resulting from varying degrees of disordered neuro- embryogenesis. Several terms have .... can image the whole spine. T1-weighted sagittal and axial ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite David, ... injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  6. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID

  7. Cerebral hemodynamics and functional prognosis in hydrocephalus

    Hirai, Osamu; Nishikawa, Michio; Watanabe, Shu; Yamakawa, Hiroyasu; Kinoshita, Yoshimasa; Uno, Akira; Handa, Hajime (Hamamatsu Rosai Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    The functional outcome of cerebral hemodynamics in the chronic stage of juvenile hydrocephalus was determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Five patients including three with aqueductal stenosis, one with post-meningitic hydrocephalus, and one case with hydrocephalus having developed after repair of a huge occipital encephalocele. Early images of cerebral blood flow (CBF) were obtained 25 minutes after intravenous injection of 123-I-iodoamphetamine (IMP), and late images were scanned 3 hours later. Cerebral blood volume (CBV) was also measured using {sup 99m}Tc in three patients. Twenty cases with adult communicating hydrocephalus were also investigated from the point of view of shunt effectiveness. Although there was no remarkable change in the cerebrovascular bed in the juvenile cases, CBF of the remnant brain parenchyma was good irrespective of the degree of ventricular dilatation. There was a periventricular-related IMP uptake in each case; however, it somehow matched the ventricular span. Functional outcome one to 23 years after the initial shunt operation was good in every case, despite multiple shunt revisions. Redistribution on late images had no bearing on clinical states. In adult cases, 8 patients with effective shunting demonstrated a relatively localized periventricular low perfusion, with preoperative increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. On the contrary, 12 patients with no improvement with or without ventricular-reduced IMP uptake, despite low CSF pressure. The present study indicates that periventricular hemodynamics may play an important role in cerebral function compromised by hydrocephalus. (J.P.N.).

  8. Cerebral hemodynamics and functional prognosis in hydrocephalus

    Hirai, Osamu; Nishikawa, Michio; Watanabe, Shu; Yamakawa, Hiroyasu; Kinoshita, Yoshimasa; Uno, Akira; Handa, Hajime

    1989-01-01

    The functional outcome of cerebral hemodynamics in the chronic stage of juvenile hydrocephalus was determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Five patients including three with aqueductal stenosis, one with post-meningitic hydrocephalus, and one case with hydrocephalus having developed after repair of a huge occipital encephalocele. Early images of cerebral blood flow (CBF) were obtained 25 minutes after intravenous injection of 123-I-iodoamphetamine (IMP), and late images were scanned 3 hours later. Cerebral blood volume (CBV) was also measured using 99m Tc in three patients. Twenty cases with adult communicating hydrocephalus were also investigated from the point of view of shunt effectiveness. Although there was no remarkable change in the cerebrovascular bed in the juvenile cases, CBF of the remnant brain parenchyma was good irrespective of the degree of ventricular dilatation. There was a periventricular-related IMP uptake in each case; however, it somehow matched the ventricular span. Functional outcome one to 23 years after the initial shunt operation was good in every case, despite multiple shunt revisions. Redistribution on late images had no bearing on clinical states. In adult cases, 8 patients with effective shunting demonstrated a relatively localized periventricular low perfusion, with preoperative increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. On the contrary, 12 patients with no improvement with or without ventricular-reduced IMP uptake, despite low CSF pressure. The present study indicates that periventricular hemodynamics may play an important role in cerebral function compromised by hydrocephalus. (J.P.N.)

  9. Sudden onset odontoid fracture caused by cervical instability in hypotonic cerebral palsy.

    Shiohama, Tadashi; Fujii, Katsunori; Kitazawa, Katsuhiko; Takahashi, Akiko; Maemoto, Tatsuo; Honda, Akihito

    2013-11-01

    Fractures of the upper cervical spine rarely occur but carry a high rate of mortality and neurological disabilities in children. Although odontoid fractures are commonly caused by high-impact injuries, cerebral palsy children with cervical instability have a risk of developing spinal fractures even from mild trauma. We herein present the first case of an odontoid fracture in a 4-year-old boy with cerebral palsy. He exhibited prominent cervical instability due to hypotonic cerebral palsy from infancy. He suddenly developed acute respiratory failure, which subsequently required mechanical ventilation. Neuroimaging clearly revealed a type-III odontoid fracture accompanied by anterior displacement with compression of the cervical spinal cord. Bone mineral density was prominently decreased probably due to his long-term bedridden status and poor nutritional condition. We subsequently performed posterior internal fixation surgically using an onlay bone graft, resulting in a dramatic improvement in his respiratory failure. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an odontoid fracture caused by cervical instability in hypotonic cerebral palsy. Since cervical instability and decreased bone mineral density are frequently associated with cerebral palsy, odontoid fractures should be cautiously examined in cases of sudden onset respiratory failure and aggravated weakness, especially in hypotonic cerebral palsy patients. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Intraoperative contrast-enhanced ultrasonography for microcirculatory evaluation in rhesus monkey with spinal cord injury.

    Huang, Lin; Chen, Keng; Chen, Fu-Chao; Shen, Hui-Yong; Ye, Ji-Chao; Cai, Zhao-Peng; Lin, Xi

    2017-06-20

    This study tried to quantify spinal cord perfusion by using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in rhesus monkey models with acute spinal cord injury. Acute spinal cord perfusion after injury was detected by CEUS, coupling with conventional ultrasound (US) and Color Doppler US (CDFI). Time-intensity curves and perfusion parameters were obtained by autotracking contrast quantification (ACQ) software in the epicenter and adjacent regions of injury, respectively. Neurological and histological examinations were performed to confirm the severity of injury. US revealed spinal cords were hypoechoic and homogeneous, whereas dura maters, pia maters, and cerebral aqueducts were hyperechoic. After spinal cord contusion, the injured spinal cord was hyperechoic on US, and intramedullary vessels of adjacent region of injury were increased and dilated on CDFI. On CEUS hypoperfusion were found in the epicenter of injury, while hyperperfusion in its adjacent region. Quantitative analysis showed that peak intensity (PI) decreased in epicenters of injury but significantly increased in adjacent regions at all time points (p spinal cord injury in overall views and real-time.

  11. Spinal cord electrophysiology II: extracellular suction electrode fabrication.

    Garudadri, Suresh; Gallarda, Benjamin; Pfaff, Samuel; Alaynick, William

    2011-02-20

    Development of neural circuitries and locomotion can be studied using neonatal rodent spinal cord central pattern generator (CPG) behavior. We demonstrate a method to fabricate suction electrodes that are used to examine CPG activity, or fictive locomotion, in dissected rodent spinal cords. The rodent spinal cords are placed in artificial cerebrospinal fluid and the ventral roots are drawn into the suction electrode. The electrode is constructed by modifying a commercially available suction electrode. A heavier silver wire is used instead of the standard wire given by the commercially available electrode. The glass tip on the commercial electrode is replaced with a plastic tip for increased durability. We prepare hand drawn electrodes and electrodes made from specific sizes of tubing, allowing consistency and reproducibility. Data is collected using an amplifier and neurogram acquisition software. Recordings are performed on an air table within a Faraday cage to prevent mechanical and electrical interference, respectively.

  12. Fluid Mechanics.

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  13. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    ... Going to an Occupational Therapist Scoliosis In the Band: Jens' Story Cerebral ... KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- ...

  14. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    ... Contusions and Lacerations Concussion Diffuse Axonal Injury Intracranial Hematomas Skull Fracture Sports-Related Concussion Cerebral contusions are ... Contusions and Lacerations Concussion Diffuse Axonal Injury Intracranial Hematomas Skull Fracture Sports-Related Concussion NOTE: This is ...

  15. Spinal fMRI of Interoceptive Attention/Awareness in Experts and Novices

    Keyvan Kashkouli Nejad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many disciplines/traditions that promote interoceptive (inner sensation of body parts attention/awareness (IAA train practitioners to both attend to and be aware of interoceptive sensory experiences in body parts. The effect of such practices has been investigated in previous imaging studies but limited to cerebral neural activity. Here, for the first time, we studied the impact of these practices on the spinal neural activity of experts and novices. We also attempted to clarify the effect of constant and deep breathing, a paradigm utilized in concentration practices to avoid mind wandering, on IAA-related spinal neural activity. Subjects performed IAA tasks with and without a deep and constant breathing pattern in two sessions. Results showed that neural activity in the spinal segment innervating the attended-to body area increased in experts (P=0.04 when they performed IAA and that this increase was significantly larger for experts versus novices in each of the sessions (P=0.024. The significant effects of IAA and expertise on spinal neural activity are consistent with and elaborate on previous reports showing similar effects on cerebral neural activity. As the spinal cord directly innervates body parts, the results might indicate that IAA has an instantaneous (possibly beneficial effect on the physical body after extended training.

  16. Towards a miniaturized brain-machine-spinal cord interface (BMSI) for restoration of function after spinal cord injury.

    Shahdoost, Shahab; Frost, Shawn; Van Acker, Gustaf; DeJong, Stacey; Dunham, Caleb; Barbay, Scott; Nudo, Randolph; Mohseni, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 6 million people in the United States are currently living with paralysis in which 23% of the cases are related to spinal cord injury (SCI). Miniaturized closed-loop neural interfaces have the potential for restoring function and mobility lost to debilitating neural injuries such as SCI by leveraging recent advancements in bioelectronics and a better understanding of the processes that underlie functional and anatomical reorganization in an injured nervous system. This paper describes our current progress towards developing a miniaturized brain-machine-spinal cord interface (BMSI) that is envisioned to convert in real time the neural command signals recorded from the brain to electrical stimuli delivered to the spinal cord below the injury level. Specifically, the paper reports on a corticospinal interface integrated circuit (IC) as a core building block for such a BMSI that is capable of low-noise recording of extracellular neural spikes from the cerebral cortex as well as muscle activation using intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS) in a rat with contusion injury to the thoracic spinal cord. The paper further presents results from a neurobiological study conducted in both normal and SCI rats to investigate the effect of various ISMS parameters on movement thresholds in the rat hindlimb. Coupled with proper signal-processing algorithms in the future for the transformation between the cortically recorded data and ISMS parameters, such a BMSI has the potential to facilitate functional recovery after an SCI by re-establishing corticospinal communication channels lost due to the injury.

  17. The CT appearance of ''reversible'' cerebral pseudoatrophy in anorexia nervosa

    Boron, Z.; Kozlowska, R.; Grzegorzewski, M.; Nawrot, M.; Bulawska, I.

    1995-01-01

    The CT appearance of ''reversible'' cerebral pseudoatrophy resulting from anorexia nervosa was demonstrated. The CT studies were performed in 3 young women with typical clinical course of anorexia nervosa. In all of them computed tomography revealed dilatation of the subarachnoid fluid space. After 5 months of therapy the follow-up scans have reverted to normal in all cases. (author)

  18. Cerebral venous angiomas

    Agnoli, A.L.; Hildebrandt, G.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical symptoms and radiological signs in 15 patients with cerebral venous malformations are presented and the diagnostic problems discussed. The circulation time in combination with cerebral malformations and angiomas of the scalp are described. CT findings in cases of venous malformations of the brain stem are evaluated. Spot-like enhancement, as well as sharply demarcated round shaped enhancement are characteristic for venous angiomas. Cavernous angiomas usually present as homogenous or inhomogenous round shaped enhanced areas. (Author)

  19. Cerebral cartography and connectomics

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamic...

  20. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. PMID:24204146

  1. Differential diagnoses of spinal tumors; Differenzialdiagnose spinaler Tumoren

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    A wide variety of degenerative, inflammatory and vascular diseases can resemble the clinical presentation and imaging findings of spinal tumors. This article provides an overview of the most frequent diseases which are important to recognize for diagnostic imaging of the spine. (orig.) [German] Eine Vielzahl degenerativer, entzuendlicher und vaskulaerer Erkrankungen kann das klinische Bild und radiologische Befunde spinaler Tumoren imitieren. Dieser Artikel dient der Uebersicht ueber die haeufigsten dieser Erkrankungen, deren Kenntnis wichtig fuer die spinale Bildgebung ist. (orig.)

  2. Cerebral blood flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Mamo, H.L.; Meric, P.C.; Ponsin, J.C.; Rey, A.C.; Luft, A.G.; Seylaz, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    A xenon-133 method was used to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) before and after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) removal in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Preliminary results suggested that shunting should be performed on patients whose CBF increased after CSF removal. There was a significant increase in CBF in patients with NPH, which was confirmed by the favorable outcome of 88% of patients shunted. The majority of patients with senile and presenile dementia showed a decrease or no change in CBF after CSF removal. It is suggested that although changes in CBF and clinical symptoms of NPH may have the same cause, i.e., changes in the cerebral intraparenchymal pressure, there is no simple direct relation between these two events. The mechanism underlying the loss of autoregulation observed in NPH is also discussed

  3. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  4. Changes in spinal alignment.

    Veintemillas Aráiz, M T; Beltrán Salazar, V P; Rivera Valladares, L; Marín Aznar, A; Melloni Ribas, P; Valls Pascual, R

    2016-04-01

    Spinal misalignments are a common reason for consultation at primary care centers and specialized departments. Misalignment has diverse causes and is influenced by multiple factors: in adolescence, the most frequent misalignment is scoliosis, which is idiopathic in 80% of cases and normally asymptomatic. In adults, the most common cause is degenerative. It is important to know the natural history and to detect factors that might predict progression. The correct diagnosis of spinal deformities requires specific imaging studies. The degree of deformity determines the type of treatment. The aim is to prevent progression of the deformity and to recover the flexibility and balance of the body. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute spinal cord injuries

    Takahashi, M.; Izunaga, H.; Sato, R.; Shinzato, I.; Korogi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on sequential MR images and neurologic findings that were correlated in 40 acute spinal cord injuries. Within 1 week after injury, frequent initial MR changes appeared isointense on both T1- and T2-weighted images and isointense on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 2 months, hypointensity appeared on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity persisted or appeared on T2-weighted images. Clinical improvements were observed in patients with isointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images at the initial examination. A larger area of hyperintensity on subsequent T2-weighted images was correlated with no neurologic improvement. MR findings were good indicators of the spinal cord injury

  6. Spinal trauma in children

    Roche, C.; Carty, H.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of the child with suspected spinal injury can be a difficult task for the radiologist. Added to the problems posed by lack of familiarity with the normal appearances of the paediatric spine is anxiety about missing a potentially significant injury resulting in neurological damage. Due to differences in anatomy and function, the pattern of injury in the paediatric spine is different from that in the adolescent or adult. Lack of appreciation of these differences may lead to over investigation and inappropriate treatment. This review attempts to clarify some of the problems frequently encountered. It is based on a review of the literature as well as personal experience. The normal appearances and variants of the spine in children, the mechanisms and patterns of injury are reviewed highlighting the differences between children and adults. Specific fractures, a practical scheme for the assessment of spinal radiographs in children, and the role of cross sectional imaging are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Imaging of Spinal Metastatic Disease

    Lubdha M. Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the spine can involve the bone, epidural space, leptomeninges, and spinal cord. The spine is the third most common site for metastatic disease, following the lung and the liver. Approximately 60–70% of patients with systemic cancer will have spinal metastasis. Materials/Methods. This is a review of the imaging techniques and typical imaging appearances of spinal metastatic disease. Conclusions. Awareness of the different manifestations of spinal metastatic disease is essential as the spine is the most common site of osseous metastatic disease. Imaging modalities have complimentary roles in the evaluation of spinal metastatic disease. CT best delineates osseous integrity, while MRI is better at assessing soft tissue involvement. Physiologic properties, particularly in treated disease, can be evaluated with other imaging modalities such as FDG PET and advanced MRI sequences. Imaging plays a fundamental role in not only diagnosis but also treatment planning of spinal metastatic disease.

  8. Malignant Hemispheric Cerebral Infarction Associated with Idiopathic Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome

    Kei Miyata

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome (ISCLS is a rare condition that is characterized by unexplained episodic capillary hyperpermeability due to a shift of fluid and protein from the intravascular to the interstitial space. This results in diffuse general swelling, fetal hypovolemic shock, hypoalbuminemia, and hemoconcentration. Although ISCLS rarely induces cerebral infarction, we experienced a patient who deteriorated and was comatose as a result of massive cerebral infarction associated with ISCLS. In this case, severe hypotensive shock, general edema, hemiparesis, and aphasia appeared after serious antecedent gastrointestinal symptoms. Progressive life-threatening ischemic cerebral edema required decompressive hemicraniectomy. The patient experienced another episode of severe hypotension and limb edema that resulted in multiple extremity compartment syndrome. Treatment entailed forearm and calf fasciotomies. Cerebral edema in the ischemic brain progresses rapidly in patients suffering from ISCLS. Strict control of fluid volume resuscitation and aggressive diuretic therapy may be needed during the post-leak phase of fluid remobilization.

  9. Spinal brucellosis: a review

    Chelli Bouaziz, Mouna; Ladeb, Mohamed Fethi; Chakroun, Mohamed; Chaabane, Skander [Institut M T Kassab d' orthopedie, Department of Radiology, Ksar Said (Tunisia)

    2008-09-15

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, relatively frequent in Mediterranean countries and in the Middle East. It is a systemic infection, caused by facultative intra-cellular bacteria of the genus Brucella, that can involve many organs and tissues. The spine is the most common site of musculoskeletal involvement, followed by the sacroiliac joints. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical, biological and imaging features of spinal brucellosis. (orig.)

  10. Spinal brucellosis: a review

    Chelli Bouaziz, Mouna; Ladeb, Mohamed Fethi; Chakroun, Mohamed; Chaabane, Skander

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, relatively frequent in Mediterranean countries and in the Middle East. It is a systemic infection, caused by facultative intra-cellular bacteria of the genus Brucella, that can involve many organs and tissues. The spine is the most common site of musculoskeletal involvement, followed by the sacroiliac joints. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical, biological and imaging features of spinal brucellosis. (orig.)

  11. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    Ellanti, P

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  12. Histological changes in the rat brain and spinal cord following prolonged intracerebroventricular infusion of cerebrospinal fluid from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients are similar to those caused by the disease.

    Gómez-Pinedo, U; Galán, L; Yañez, M; Matias-Guiu, J; Valencia, C; Guerrero-Sola, A; Lopez-Sosa, F; Brin, J R; Benito-Martin, M S; Leon-Espinosa, G; Vela-Souto, A; Lendinez, C; Guillamon-Vivancos, T; Matias-Guiu, J A; Arranz-Tagarro, J A; Barcia, J A; Garcia, A G

    2018-05-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients induces cytotoxic effects in in vitro cultured motor neurons. We selected CSF with previously reported cytotoxic effects from 32 ALS patients. Twenty-eight adult male rats were intracerebroventricularly implanted with osmotic mini-pumps and divided into 3 groups: 9 rats injected with CSF from non-ALS patients, 15 rats injected with cytotoxic ALS-CSF, and 4 rats injected with a physiological saline solution. CSF was intracerebroventricularly and continuously infused for periods of 20 or 43days after implantation. We conducted clinical assessments and electromyographic examinations, and histological analyses were conducted in rats euthanised 20, 45, and 82days after surgery. Immunohistochemical studies revealed tissue damage with similar characteristics to those found in the sporadic forms of ALS, such as overexpression of cystatinC, transferrin, and TDP-43 protein in the cytoplasm. The earliest changes observed seemed to play a protective role due to the overexpression of peripherin, AKTpan, AKTphospho, and metallothioneins; this expression had diminished by the time we analysed rats euthanised on day 82, when an increase in apoptosis was observed. The first cellular changes identified were activated microglia followed by astrogliosis and overexpression of GFAP and S100B proteins. Our data suggest that ALS could spread through CSF and that intracerebroventricular administration of cytotoxic ALS-CSF provokes changes similar to those found in sporadic forms of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Spinal dermoid cyst

    Miyamoto, Yoshihisa; Makita, Yasumasa; Nabeshima, Sachio; Tei, Taikyoku; Keyaki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Jun; Kawamura, Junichiro

    1987-01-01

    A 25-year-old male complained of intermittent, sharp pains about the left eye and in the left side of the chest. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia and impaired perception of touch and pin-pricks in the dermatomes of Th8 and Th9 on the left side. In all four extremities, the muscle stretch reflexes were equal and slightly hyperactive, without weakness or sensory deficits. Metrizamide myelography showed defective filling at the level between the upper 8th and 9th thoracic vertebrae. The lesion was also demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) scan performed 1 hour later, appearing as an oval, radiolucent mass in the left dorsal spinal canal, which compressed the spinal cord forward and toward the right. Serial sections of the spinal canal revealed the lesion to be partly filled with contrast medium. Repeat CT scan 24 hours after metrizamide myelography showed more contrast medium in the periphery of the lesion, giving it a doughnut-shaped appearance. At surgery a smooth-surfaced cyst containing sebum and white hair was totally removed from the intradural extramedullary space. The histological diagnosis was dermoid cyst. There have been a few reported cases of intracranial epidermoid cyst in which filling of the cyst was suggested on metrizamide CT myelography. These findings may complicate the differential diagnosis of arachnoid cyst and dermoid or epidermoid cyst when only CT is used. (author)

  15. Magnetic Resonance Features of Cerebral Malaria

    Yadav, P.; Sharma, R.; Kumar, S.; Kumar, U. (Dept. of Radiodiagnosis and Dept. of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India))

    2008-06-15

    Background: Cerebral malaria is a major health hazard, with a high incidence of mortality. The disease is endemic in many developing countries, but with a greater increase in tourism, occasional cases may be detected in countries where the disease in not prevalent. Early diagnosis and evaluation of cerebral involvement in malaria utilizing modern imaging modalities have an impact on the treatment and clinical outcome. Purpose: To evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) features of patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. Material and Methods: We present the findings in three patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. MR imaging using a 1.5-Tesla unit was carried out. The sequences performed were 5-mm-thick T1-weighted, T2-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR), and T2-weighted gradient-echo axial sequences, and sagittal and coronal FLAIR. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with b values of 0 and 1000 s/mm2, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were obtained. Results: Focal hyperintensities in the bilateral periventricular white matter, corpus callosum, occipital subcortex, and bilateral thalami were noticed on T2-weighted and FLAIR sequences. The lesions were more marked in the splenium of the corpus callosum. No enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted MR images was observed. There was no evidence of restricted diffusion on the diffusion-weighted sequence and ADC map. Conclusion: MR is a sensitive imaging modality, with a role in the assessment of cerebral lesions in malaria. Focal white matter and corpus callosal lesions without any restricted diffusion were the key findings in our patients

  16. Magnetic Resonance Features of Cerebral Malaria

    Yadav, P.; Sharma, R.; Kumar, S.; Kumar, U.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cerebral malaria is a major health hazard, with a high incidence of mortality. The disease is endemic in many developing countries, but with a greater increase in tourism, occasional cases may be detected in countries where the disease in not prevalent. Early diagnosis and evaluation of cerebral involvement in malaria utilizing modern imaging modalities have an impact on the treatment and clinical outcome. Purpose: To evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) features of patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. Material and Methods: We present the findings in three patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. MR imaging using a 1.5-Tesla unit was carried out. The sequences performed were 5-mm-thick T1-weighted, T2-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR), and T2-weighted gradient-echo axial sequences, and sagittal and coronal FLAIR. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with b values of 0 and 1000 s/mm 2 , and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were obtained. Results: Focal hyperintensities in the bilateral periventricular white matter, corpus callosum, occipital subcortex, and bilateral thalami were noticed on T2-weighted and FLAIR sequences. The lesions were more marked in the splenium of the corpus callosum. No enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted MR images was observed. There was no evidence of restricted diffusion on the diffusion-weighted sequence and ADC map. Conclusion: MR is a sensitive imaging modality, with a role in the assessment of cerebral lesions in malaria. Focal white matter and corpus callosal lesions without any restricted diffusion were the key findings in our patients

  17. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Balakrishnan B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bindu Balakrishnan,1 Elizabeth Nance,1 Michael V Johnston,2 Rangaramanujam Kannan,3 Sujatha Kannan1 1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Department of Neurology and Pediatrics, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. Keywords: dendrimer, cerebral palsy, neuroinflammation, nanoparticle, neonatal brain injury, G4OH-PAMAM

  18. Treatment of os odontoideum in a patient with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy.

    Akpolat, Yusuf T; Fegale, Ben; Cheng, Wayne K

    2015-08-01

    Severe atlantoaxial instability due to os odontoideum in a patient with spastic cerebral palsy has not been well described. There is no consensus on treatment, particularly with regard to conservative or surgical options. Our patient was a 9-year-old girl with spastic cerebral palsy and unstable os odontoideum as an incidental finding. During the waiting period for elective surgical treatment, the patient developed respiratory compromise. Surgery was performed to reduce the subluxation and for C1-C2 arthrodesis and the girl regained baseline respiratory function. A CT scan was obtained 1 year after the initial surgery and revealed adequate maintenance of reduction and patency of the spinal canal. This patient highlights the fact that unstable os odontoideum can cause mortality due to respiratory distress in patients with spastic cerebral palsy. This is an important factor in deciding treatment options for cerebral palsy patients with low functional demand. We review the relevant literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluids engineering

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Fluids engineering has played an important role in many applications, from ancient flood control to the design of high-speed compact turbomachinery. New applications of fluids engineering, such as in high-technology materials processing, biotechnology, and advanced combustion systems, have kept up unwaining interest in the subject. More accurate and sophisticated computational and measurement techniques are also constantly being developed and refined. On a more fundamental level, nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior of fluid flow are no longer an intellectual curiosity and fluid engineers are increasingly interested in finding practical applications for these emerging sciences. Applications of fluid technology to new areas, as well as the need to improve the design and to enhance the flexibility and reliability of flow-related machines and devices will continue to spur interest in fluids engineering. The objectives of the present seminar were: to exchange current information on arts, science, and technology of fluids engineering; to promote scientific cooperation between the fluids engineering communities of both nations, and to provide an opportunity for the participants and their colleagues to explore possible joint research programs in topics of high priority and mutual interest to both countries. The Seminar provided an excellent forum for reviewing the current state and future needs of fluids engineering for the two nations. With the Seminar ear-marking the first formal scientific exchange between Korea and the United States in the area of fluids engineering, the scope was deliberately left broad and general

  20. Monitoring of cerebral haemodynamics in newborn infants

    Liem, K Djien; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    The most important cerebrovascular injuries in newborn infants, particularly in preterm infants, are cerebral haemorrhage and ischemic injury. The typical cerebral vascular anatomy and the disturbance of cerebral haemodynamics play important roles in the pathophysiology. The term 'cerebral haemod...

  1. Embolization of spinal arteriovenous malformations

    Son, Mi Young; Kim, Sun Yong; Park, Bok Hwan

    1990-01-01

    Recently, therapeutic embolization has been advocated as the treatment of choice for spinal AVM(arteriovenous malformations). The authors review our experience with two cases of spinal AVM treated by embolization using coaxial Tracker-18 microcatheter with Latvian. The patients included a 10 year old male with glomus type and a 14 year old female with juvenile type spinal AVM revealed recanalization 5 month later. Embolization provides curative or temporary treatment for spinal AVM. After embolic occlusion, delayed reassessment with arteriography is indicated, particularly if symptoms persist or recur

  2. Determination of the phosphorylated neurofilament subunit NF-H (pNF-H in cerebro-spinal fluid as biomarker in acute traumatic spinal cord injuries / Dozarea neurofilamentelor fosforilate (subunitatea pNF-H ȋn LCR ca biomarker ȋn traumatismul vertebro-medular acut

    Ungureanu Didona

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Obiectivul studiului. Obiectivul acestui studiu a fost dozarea neurofilamentelor fosforilate (subunitatea pNF-H în lichidul cefalorahidian al pacienţilor cu leziuni traumatice ale măduvei spinării şi stabilirea unei corelaţii intre valoarea pNF-H şi gravitatea leziunilor medulare. Material şi metode. Studiul a inclus 15 pacienţi cu leziuni traumatice acute medulare: opt pacienţi cu leziuni medulare complete şi şapte pacienţi cu leziuni medulare incomplete. Gravitatea leziunilor medulare a fost apreciată folosind scala ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association scale şi la toti pacientii s-a aplicat tratamentul chirurgical în primele 24 de ore (decompresiune medulară şi stabilizare vertebrală. S-a facut determinarea zilnică a pNF-H din LCR folosind testul ELISA specific şi am corelat aceste valori cu evoluţia clinică. Rezultate. Subunitatea pNF-H a fost evidenţiată în LCR la toţi pacienţii cu traumatisme acute vertebro-medulare şi valorile au fost diferite în cazurile leziunilor medulare complete faţa de leziunile incomplete. Nivelul pNF-H din LCR a fost de zece până la o sută de ori mai mare în leziunile medulare complete fata de cazurile cu leziuni incomplete, unde nivelul acestui biomarker a fost aproape normal. Pacienţii cu o evoluţie neurologică favorabilă după tratament au avut un model specific al valorilor zilnice de pNF-H: o creştere bruscă până la o valoare maximă apoi o scădere progresivă până la normal. Valorile maxime au fost diferite în fiecare caz, de 10 ori până la 170 de ori mai mari faţă de normal. Concluzii. Forma fosforilată a subunităţii neurofilamentelor cu greutate moleculară mare pNF-H din lichidul cefalorahidian poate fi un biomarker specific pentru leziunile acute traumatice ale măduvei spinării corelat cu severitatea leziunilor medulare. pNF-H pare a fi un biomarker predictiv deoarece modelul evolutiv al valorilor sale arată reducerea sau blocarea leziunilor

  3. Electrical modulation of the sympathetic nervous system in order to augment cerebral blood flow : a protocol for an experimental study

    Ter Laan, Mark; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Staal, Michiel J.; Elting, Jan-Willem J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated by several mechanisms. Neurogenic control has been a matter of debate, even though several publications reported the effects of changes in sympathetic tone on CBF. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and spinal-cord stimulation have been

  4. Imaging procedures in spinal infectious diseases

    Rodiek, S.O.

    2001-01-01

    A targeted successful treatment of spinal infectious diseases requires clinical and laboratory data that are completed by the contribution of imaging procedures. Neuroimaging only provides essential informations on the correct topography, localisation, acuity and differential diagnosis of spinal infectious lesions. MRI with its sensitivity concerning soft tissue lesions is a useful tool in detecting infectious alterations of spinal bone marrow, intervertebral disks, leptomeninges and the spinal cord itself. Crucial imaging patterns of typical spinal infections are displayed and illustrated by clinical case studies. We present pyogenic, granulomatous and postoperative variants of spondylodicitis, spinal epidural abscess, spinal meningitis and spinal cord infections. The importance of intravenous contrastmedia application is pointed out. (orig.) [de

  5. Contrast enhancement of the cerebrospinal fluid on MRI in two cases of spirochaetal meningitis

    Good, C.D.; Jaeger, H.R.

    2000-01-01

    We report two patients with meningitis due to spirochaetal infection, both of whom showed diffusely enhancing meninges around the brain and spinal cord. In addition, there was enhancement of the cerebrospinal fluid after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA. (orig.)

  6. Buffer fluid

    Mirzadzhanzade, A Kh; Dedusanko, G Ya; Dinaburg, L S; Markov, Yu M; Rasizade, Ya N; Rozov, V N; Sherstnev, N M

    1979-08-30

    A drilling fluid is suggested for separating the drilling and plugging fluids which contains as the base increased solution of polyacrylamide and additive. In order to increase the viscoelastic properties of the liquid with simultaneous decrease in the periods of its fabrication, the solution contains as an additive dry bentonite clay. In cases of the use of a buffer fluid under conditions of negative temperatures, it is necessary to add to it table salt or ethylene glycol.

  7. Computed tomography of the spinal canal for the cervical spine and spinal cord injury

    Kimura, Isao; Niimiya, Hikosuke; Nasu, Kichiro; Shioya, Akihide; Ohhama, Mitsuru

    1983-01-01

    The cervical spinal canal and cervical spinal cord were measured in normal cases and 34 cases of spinal or spinal cord injury. The anteroposterior diameter and area of the normal cervical spinal canal showed a high correlation. The area ratio of the normal cervical spinal canal to the cervical spinal cord showed that the proportion of the cervical spinal cord in the spinal canal was 1/3 - 1/5, Csub(4,5) showing a particularly large proportion. In acute and subacute spinal or spinal cord injury, CT visualized in more details of the spinal canal in cases that x-ray showed definite bone injuries. Computer assisted myelography visualized more clearly the condition of the spinal cord in cases without definite findings bone injuries on x-ray. Demonstrating the morphology of spinal injury in more details, CT is useful for selection of therapy for injured spines. (Chiba, N.)

  8. CLINICAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION OF CEREBRAL INTRAVENTRICULAR HEMORRHAGES

    V. V. Vlasyuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inconsistency of the current classification of cerebral intraventricular hemorrhages is discussed in the article. The author explains divergence of including of the subependymal (1st stage and intracerebral (4th stage hemorrhages into this classification. A new classification of cerebral intraventricular hemorrhages including their origin, phases and stages is offered. The most common origin of intraventricular hemorrhages is subependymal hemorrhage (82,2%. Two phases of hemorrhage were distinguished: bleeding phase and resorption phase. Stages of intraventricular hemorrhages reflecting the blood movement after the onset of bleeding are the following: 1 — infill of the up to ½ of the lateral ventricles without their enlargement; 2 — infill of more than ½ of the lateral ventricles with their enlargement; 3 — infill of the IV ventricle, of the cerebellomedullary cistern and its dislocation into the subarachnoid space of the cerebellum, pons varolii, medulla oblongata and spinal cord.

  9. Determination of wall tension in cerebral artery aneurysms by numerical simulation

    Isaksen, J.G.; Bazilevs, Y.; Kvamsdal, T.

    2008-01-01

    a computational model for simulation of fluid-structure interaction in cerebral aneurysms based on patient specific lesion geometry, with special emphasis on wall tension. METHODS: An advanced isogeometric fluid-structure analysis model incorporating flexible aneurysm wall based on patient specific computed...

  10. Neuroimaging of cerebral vasculitis

    Wengenroth, M.; Saam, T.; Haehnel, S.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vasculitis can have a variety of origins. Furthermore, there are no vasculitis-specific symptoms or imaging signs and vasculitis of the CNS can mimic many other neurological diseases, which require different treatment approaches. Thus, the clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis is challenging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR angiography (MRA) should be the radiological imaging methods of choice to assess the degree of parenchymal damage and to detect vessel wall changes. If the results are unclear digital subtraction angiography (DSA) should be pursued in order to also detect changes in medium sized vessels. Vasculitis of small vessels cannot be detected by vascular imaging and requires brain or leptomeningeal biopsy. In this review we present the current diagnostic approach and a variety of imaging findings in cerebral vasculitis and discuss the main radiological differential diagnoses. (orig.) [de

  11. Duplicated middle cerebral artery

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion. PMID:22140405

  12. Diaschisis with cerebral infarction

    Slater, R.; Reivich, M.; Goldberg, H.; Banka, R.; Greenberg, J.

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen patients admitted to Philadelphia General Hospital with acute strokes had repeated measurements of cerebral blood flow measured by the /sup 133/X inhalation method. A progressive decline in cerebral blood flow in both hemispheres was observed during the first week after infarction in twelve of these patients. This decline could be partially explained by loss of autoregulation, but could not be correlated with level of consciousness, clinical status of PCO2. This progressive decline in flow in the non-ischemic hemisphere indicates a process more complex than a simple destruction of axonal afferants to neurons as implied by the term diaschisis. The flow changes in the non-ischemic hemisphere are likely caused by a combination of the immediate effects of decreased neuronal stimulation modified by loss of autoregulation, release of vasoactive substances, cerebral edema, and other factors.

  13. Cerebral hemodynamics in migraine

    Hachinski, V C; Olesen, Jes; Norris, J W

    1977-01-01

    Clinical and angiographic findings in migraine are briefly reviewed in relation to cerebral hemodynamic changes shown by regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies. Three cases of migraine studied by the intracarotid xenon 133 method during attacks are reported. In classic migraine, with typical...... prodromal symptoms, a decrease in cerebral blood flow has been demonstrated during the aura. Occasionally, this flow decrease persists during the headache phase. In common migraine, where such prodromata are not seen, a flow decrease has not been demonstrated. During the headache phase of both types...... of migraine, rCBF has usually been found to be normal or in the high range of normal values. The high values may represent postischemic hyperemia, but are probably more frequently secondary to arousal caused by pain. Thus, during the headache phase rCBF may be subnormal, normal or high. These findings do...

  14. Cerebral fat embolism

    Sakamoto, Toshihisa; Sawada, Yusuke; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Nishide, Kazuyuki; Yoshioka, Toshiharu

    1982-01-01

    A case of cerebral fat embolism is reported. A 18-year-old patient with multiple bone fractures was in semiconma immediately after an injury. Brain CT showed no brain swelling or intracranial hematoma. Hypoxemia and alcoholemia were noted on admission, which returned to normal without improvement of consciousness level. In addition, respiratory symptoms with positive radiographic changes, tachycardia, pyrexia, sudden drop in hemoglobin level, and sudden thrombocytopenia developed. These symptoms were compatible with Gurd's criteria of systemic fat embolism. Eight days after injury, multiple low density areas appeared on CT and disappeared within the subsequent two weeks, and subdural effusion with cerebral atrophy developed. These CT findings were not considered due to cerebral trauma. Diagnosis of cerebral fat embolism was made. The subdural effusion was drained. Neurologic and pulmonary recoveries took place slowly and one month following the injury the patient became alert and exhibited fully coordinated limb movement. The CT scans of the present case well corresponded with hitherto reported pathological findings. Petechiae in the white matter must have developed on the day of injury, which could not be detected by CT examination. It is suggested that some petechial regions fused to purpuras and then gradually resolved when they were detected as multiple low density areas on CT. CT in the purpuras phase would have shown these lesions as high density areas. These lesions must have healed with formation of tiny scars and blood pigment which were demonstrated as the disappearance of multiple low density areas by CT examination. Cerebral atrophy and subsequent subdural effusion developed as a result of demyelination. The patient took the typical clinical course of cerebral fat embolism and serial CT scans served for its assessment. (author)

  15. Use of vacuum assisted closure in instrumented spinal deformities for children with postoperative deep infections

    Canavese Federico

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative deep infections are relatively common in children with instrumented spinal deformities, whose healing potential is somewhat compromised. Children with underlying diagnosis of cerebral palsy, spina bifida and other chronic debilitating conditions are particularly susceptible. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC is a newer technique to promote healing of wounds resistant to treatment by established methods. This article aims to review the efficacy of the VAC system in the treatment of deep spinal infections following spinal instrumentation and fusion in children and adolescents. Materials and Methods: We reviewed 33 patients with deep postoperative surgical site infection treated with wound VAC technique. We reviewed clinical and laboratory data, including the ability to retain the spinal hardware, loss of correction and recurrent infections. Results : All patients successfully completed their wound VAC treatment regime. None had significant loss of correction and one had persistent infection requiring partial hardware removal. The laboratory indices normalized in all but three patients. Conclusions: Wound VAC technique is a useful tool in the armamentarium of the spinal surgeon dealing with patients susceptible to wound infections, especially those with neuromuscular diseases. It allows for retention of the instrumentation and maintenance of the spinal correction. It is reliable and easy to use.

  16. Scintigraphy of the cerebrospinal fluid

    Touya, E.; Perillo, W.; Paez, A.; Osorio, A.; Ferrando, R.; Lago, G.; Garcia Guelfi, A.; Ferrari, M.

    1977-01-01

    Eight years of experience in scintigraphy of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with 113 Insup(m)-colloid is reported. Two hundred cases are discussed. On the basis of the clinical diagnosis, the cases are divided into five groups: (1) spinal cord compression; (2) hydrocephalus of the adult and child; (3) control of extracranial CSF shunts; (4) CSF fistula; and (5) brain tumour. It is concluded that the radiopharmaceutical used has no limitations except in the study of the hydrocephalus of the adult. For those services remote from the production centres, it is a convenient option for CSF scintigraphy. (author)

  17. Gammagraphy of cerebral perfusion

    Vazquez, Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Important aspects of the gammagraphy of cerebral perfusion and the diverse clinical applications in the neurological diseases are comment in this article. We focus in the usefulness of the photon emission cerebral tomography (SPECT) and its capacity to cross the hemato encephalic barrier through the use of radiopharmacons like 99 mTc-H M-PAO and 99mTc-EDC, thus managing to offer functional data on the captantes neurons of the radiopharmacon. The clinical applications of SPECT are studied; cerebrovascular disease, transient ischemic attacks, dementias, Alzheimer disease, as well as other neurological diseases are referred. (The author)

  18. Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    Christensen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia due to occlusion of a major cerebral artery is the cause of ischemic stroke which is a major reason of mortality, morbidity and disability in the populations of the developed countries. In the seven studies summarized in the thesis focal ischemia in rats induced by occlusion...... in the penumbra is recruited in the infarction process leading to a progressive growth of the infarct. The penumbra hence constitutes an important target for pharmacological treatment because of the existence of a therapeutic time window during which treatment with neuroprotective compounds may prevent...

  19. Intrapituitary fluid levels following haemorrhage: MRI appearances in 13 cases

    Lenthall, R.K.; Dean, J.R.; Jeffree, M.A.; Bartlett, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Demonstration of fluid levels on MRI is well recognised in cerebral haematomas, tumours and cysts. The occurrence of fluid levels within haemorrhagic pituitary tumours has not previously been described in detail. Evidence of haemorrhage was identified in 27 of 125 pituitary tumours. Fluid levels occurred in 13 of these haemorrhagic tumours. No association with histological type was identified. Recognised risk factors for haemorrhage were identified in half of the cases. (orig.) (orig.)

  20. Schroedinger fluid

    Kan, K.K.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of nuclear internal flow and collective inertia, the difference of this flow from that of a classical fluid, and the approach of this flow to rigid flow in independent-particle model rotation are elucidated by reviewing the theory of Schroedinger fluid and its implications for collective vibration and rotation. (author)

  1. Cerebral ammonia uptake and accumulation during prolonged exercise in humans

    Nybo, Lars; Dalsgaard, Mads K.; Steensberg, Adam

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated whether peripheral ammonia production during prolonged exercise enhances the uptake and subsequent accumulation of ammonia within the brain. Two studies determined the cerebral uptake of ammonia (arterial and jugular venous blood sampling combined with Kety-Schmidt-determined cerebral...... blood flow; n = 5) and the ammonia concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF; n = 8) at rest and immediately following prolonged exercise either with or without glucose supplementation. There was a net balance of ammonia across the brain at rest and at 30 min of exercise, whereas 3 h of exercise...... exercise with glucose, and further to 16.1 ± 3.3 µM after the placebo trial (P

  2. Choroid Plexus in the Central Canal of the Spinal Cord Causing Recurrent Syringomyelia.

    Shtaya, Anan; Sadek, Ahmed-Ramadan; Nicoll, James A R; Nader-Sepahi, Ali

    2018-03-01

    Syringomyelia is a fluid-filled cavitation within the substance of the spinal cord. This condition usually follows a primary pathology that disrupts the normal cerebrospinal fluid circulation or disturbs the microcirculation and cytoarchitecture of the spinal cord parenchyma. However, an etiology of recurrent syringomyelia resulting from an ectopic choroid plexus (CP) has not been discussed. Ectopic CP rests may be found within the central nervous system. Although there has been a single report, describing ectopic intramedullary spinal cord CP, to our knowledge, extra-cranial nonmalignant CP in the central canal of the spinal cord has not been reported. We report CP in the central canal of the spinal cord in a 23-year-old male patient who had developmental delay and diabetes mellitus type I who presented with dissociated sensory changes and muscle wastage predominantly on the right upper and lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a multiloculated spinal cord syringomyelia stretching from cervical (C3) to the conus medullaris causing recurrent neurologic deficits. A biopsy of the central canal spinal cord lesion revealed CP. Decompression and syringosubarachnoid shunt insertion stabilized the patient's neurology. Our illustrative case reveals the presence of CP in the central canal of the spinal cord that may suggest a role in the etiology of recurrent syringomyelia. Although management poses a challenge to neurosurgeons, prompt decompression and shunting of the syringomyelia remains a favorable approach with acceptable outcomes. Further investigation into the pathophysiology of central canal CP ectopic causing recurrent syringomyelia and its correlation with spinal cord development may help future treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst

    Choi, Seung Won; Seong, Han Yu; Roh, Sung Woo

    2013-01-01

    Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) is a rare disease and uncommon cause of compressive myelopathy. The etiology remains still unclear. We experienced 2 cases of SEACs and reviewed the cases and previous literatures. A 59-year-old man complained of both leg radiating pain and paresthesia for 4 years. His MRI showed an extradural cyst from T12 to L3 and we performed cyst fenestration and repaired the dural defect with tailored laminectomy. Another 51-year-old female patient visited our cli...

  4. Cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following various cerebral diseases, (1)

    Kino, Masao; Anno, Izumi; Yano, Yuhiko; Anno, Yasuro.

    1980-01-01

    Patients having cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following hypoglycemia, cerebral contusion, or cerebral hypoxia including cerebrovascular disorders were reported. Description was made as to cerebral changes visualized on CT images and clinical courses of a patient who revived 10 minutes after heart stoppage during neurosurgery, a newborn with asphyxia, a patient with hypoglycemia, a patient who suffered from asphyxia by an accident 10 years before, a patient with carbon monoxide poisoning at an acute stage, a patient who had carbon monoxide poisoning 10 years before, a patient with diffuse cerebral ischemic changes, a patient with cerebral edema around metastatic tumor, a patient with respiration brain, a patient with neurological sequelae after cerebral contusion, a patient who had an operation to excise right parietal lobe artery malformation, and a patient who was shooted by a machine gun and had a lead in the brain for 34 years. (Tsunoda, M.)

  5. Role of spinal ultrasound in diagnosis of meningitis in infants younger than 6 months

    Nepal, Pankaj; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Saxena, Akshay Kumar; Bhatia, Anmol; Singhi, Sunit; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •This was a prospective study to evaluate role of spinal ultrasound (US) in 60 infants (<6 months of age) with clinically suspected meningitis. •On ultrasound examination, we evaluated echogenicity and /or trabeculations in the posterior subarachnoid space and spinal cord pulsations. •Results of spinal US were evaluated in correlation with cerebrospinal fluid analysis. •Results of our study show presence of echogenicity/trabeculations in posterior subarachnoid space or abnormal pulsations of spinal cord and nerve roots are significantly associated with meningitis with a high specificity and positive predictive value in its diagnosis. •Spinal ultrasound can be used as a radiation free imaging modality to detect meningitis. -- Abstract: Background: Spinal ultrasound (US) can detect changes in CSF echogenicity and decreased cord pulsations which reflect the inflammatory changes in meningitis. Till date, there is no published data about the prospective accuracy of spinal US in meningitis. Objective: To assess accuracy of spinal US in diagnosis of meningitis in infants younger than 6 months. Methods: This was an institute ethics committee approved prospective study carried out in infants less than 6 months of age with clinical suspicion of meningitis who presented to pediatric emergency unit. 60 infants each in study and control group were enrolled. US of thoraco-lumbar spine were performed prior to lumbar puncture in all cases. We looked for the presence of echogenicity or trabeculations in posterior subarachnoid space and for presence or absence of spinal cord and nerve root pulsations on real time ultrasound. The results of spinal US were evaluated in correlation with cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Follow up ultrasounds were done in infants who showed abnormal findings after the initiation of treatment and findings compared with initial results. Results: The study group comprised of 40 boys and 20 girls with mean age of 47.85 days. The control

  6. Role of spinal ultrasound in diagnosis of meningitis in infants younger than 6 months

    Nepal, Pankaj, E-mail: pankaj-123@live.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh, E-mail: sodhiks@gmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Saxena, Akshay Kumar, E-mail: fatakshay@yahoo.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Bhatia, Anmol, E-mail: anmol_bhatia26@yahoo.co.in [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Singhi, Sunit, E-mail: sunit.singhi@gmail.com [Department of Pediatrics, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Khandelwal, Niranjan, E-mail: khandelwaln@hotmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •This was a prospective study to evaluate role of spinal ultrasound (US) in 60 infants (<6 months of age) with clinically suspected meningitis. •On ultrasound examination, we evaluated echogenicity and /or trabeculations in the posterior subarachnoid space and spinal cord pulsations. •Results of spinal US were evaluated in correlation with cerebrospinal fluid analysis. •Results of our study show presence of echogenicity/trabeculations in posterior subarachnoid space or abnormal pulsations of spinal cord and nerve roots are significantly associated with meningitis with a high specificity and positive predictive value in its diagnosis. •Spinal ultrasound can be used as a radiation free imaging modality to detect meningitis. -- Abstract: Background: Spinal ultrasound (US) can detect changes in CSF echogenicity and decreased cord pulsations which reflect the inflammatory changes in meningitis. Till date, there is no published data about the prospective accuracy of spinal US in meningitis. Objective: To assess accuracy of spinal US in diagnosis of meningitis in infants younger than 6 months. Methods: This was an institute ethics committee approved prospective study carried out in infants less than 6 months of age with clinical suspicion of meningitis who presented to pediatric emergency unit. 60 infants each in study and control group were enrolled. US of thoraco-lumbar spine were performed prior to lumbar puncture in all cases. We looked for the presence of echogenicity or trabeculations in posterior subarachnoid space and for presence or absence of spinal cord and nerve root pulsations on real time ultrasound. The results of spinal US were evaluated in correlation with cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Follow up ultrasounds were done in infants who showed abnormal findings after the initiation of treatment and findings compared with initial results. Results: The study group comprised of 40 boys and 20 girls with mean age of 47.85 days. The control

  7. Early and extensive spinal white matter involvement in neuromyelitis optica.

    Hayashida, Shotaro; Masaki, Katsuhisa; Yonekawa, Tomomi; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Hiwatashi, Akio; Matsushita, Takuya; Watanabe, Mitsuru; Yamasaki, Ryo; Suenaga, Toshihiko; Iwaki, Toru; Murai, Hiroyuki; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2017-05-01

    protein loss may emerge. Spinal white matter involvement may also appear in early NMO, similar to cerebral white matter lesions. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  8. Cerebral malaria: susceptibility weighted MRI

    Vinit Baliyan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria is one of the fatal complications of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Pathogenesis involves cerebral microangiopathy related to microvascular plugging by infected red blood cells. Conventional imaging with MRI and CT do not reveal anything specific in case of cerebral malaria. Susceptibility weighted imaging, a recent advance in the MRI, is very sensitive to microbleeds related to microangiopathy. Histopathological studies in cerebral malaria have revealed microbleeds in brain parenchyma secondary to microangiopathy. Susceptibility weighted imaging, being exquisitely sensitive to microbleeds may provide additional information and improve the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in cerebral malaria.

  9. High Altitude Cerebral Edema

    1986-03-01

    described neuropathological findings of cerebral edema and wi4espread petechial hemorrhages in two HAPE fatalities and later reported (52...lethargy, thirst, indigestion, hysterical outburst o: other behavior disturbances, decreased concentration, fever , couhh and peripheral edema (52...autopsy results from the two fatalities in their series. In both cases multiple, widespread petechial hemorrhages were noted throughout the brain. One

  10. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H

    2014-01-01

    dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) partial pressures so that hypercapnia/hypoxia increases and hypocapnia/hyperoxia reduces global cerebral blood flow. Cerebral hypoperfusion and TLOC have been associated with hypocapnia related to HV. Notwithstanding pronounced cerebrovascular effects of PaCO2...... the contribution of a low PaCO2 to the early postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is transient. HV together with postural stress does not reduce cerebral perfusion to such an extent that TLOC develops. However when HV is combined with cardiovascular stressors like cold immersion or reduced...... cardiac output brain perfusion becomes jeopardized. Whether, in patients with cardiovascular disease and/or defect, cerebral blood flow cerebral control HV-induced hypocapnia elicits cerebral hypoperfusion, leading to TLOC, remains to be established....

  11. Recurrent cerebral thrombosis

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Abe, Shin-e; Kubo, Hideki; Hanyu, Haruo; Takasaki, Masaru

    1992-01-01

    Neuroradiological techniques were used to elucidate pathophysiology of recurrent cerebral thrombosis. Twenty-two patients with cerebral thrombosis who suffered a second attack under stable conditions more than 22 days after the initial stroke were studied. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia were also seen in 20, 8, and 12 patients, respectively. The patients were divided into three groups according to their symptoms: (I) symptoms differed between the first and second strokes (n=12); (II) initial symptoms were suddenly deteriorated (n=6); and (III) symptoms occurring in groups I and II were seen (n=4). In group I, contralateral hemiparesis or suprabulbar palsy was often associated with the initial hemiparesis. The time of recurrent stroke varied from 4 months to 9 years. CT and MRI showed not only lacunae in both hemispheres, but also deep white-matter ischemia of the centrum semi-ovale. In group II, hemiparesis or visual field defect was deteriorated early after the initial stroke. In addition, neuroimaging revealed that infarction in the posterior cerebral artery was progressed on the contralateral side, or that white matter lesion in the middle artery was enlarged in spite of small lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere. All patients in group III had deterioration of right hemiparesis associated with aphasia. CT, MRI, SPECT, and angiography indicated deep white-matter ischemia caused by main trunk lesions in the left hemisphere. Group III seemed to be equivalent to group II, except for laterality of the lesion. Neuroradiological assessment of the initial stroke may help to predict the mode of recurrence, although pathophysiology of cerebral thrombosis is complicated and varies from patient to patient. (N.K.)

  12. Right-sided vagus nerve stimulation inhibits induced spinal cord seizures.

    Tubbs, R Shane; Salter, E George; Killingsworth, Cheryl; Rollins, Dennis L; Smith, William M; Ideker, Raymond E; Wellons, John C; Blount, Jeffrey P; Oakes, W Jerry

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that left-sided vagus nerve stimulation results in cessation of induced spinal cord seizures. To test our hypothesis that right-sided vagus nerve stimulation will also abort seizure activity, we have initiated seizures in the spinal cord and then performed right-sided vagus nerve stimulation in an animal model. Four pigs were anesthetized and placed in the lateral position and a small laminectomy performed in the lumbar region. Topical penicillin, a known epileptogenic drug to the cerebral cortex and spinal cord, was next applied to the dorsal surface of the exposed cord. With the exception of the control animal, once seizure activity was discernible via motor convulsion or increased electrical activity, the right vagus nerve previously isolated in the neck was stimulated. Following multiple stimulations of the vagus nerve and with seizure activity confirmed, the cord was transected in the midthoracic region and vagus nerve stimulation performed. Right-sided vagus nerve stimulation resulted in cessation of spinal cord seizure activity in all animals. Transection of the spinal cord superior to the site of seizure induction resulted in the ineffectiveness of vagus nerve stimulation in causing cessation of seizure activity in all study animals. As with left-sided vagus nerve stimulation, right-sided vagus nerve stimulation results in cessation of induced spinal cord seizures. Additionally, the effects of right-sided vagus nerve stimulation on induced spinal cord seizures involve descending spinal pathways. These data may aid in the development of alternative mechanisms for electrical stimulation for patients with medically intractable seizures and add to our knowledge regarding the mechanism for seizure cessation following peripheral nerve stimulation.

  13. Scissors stab wound to the cervical spinal cord at the craniocervical junction.

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Ying-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Stab wounds resulting in spinal cord injury of the craniocervical junction are rare. A scissors stab wound to the cervical spinal cord has been reported only once in the literature. This paper aimed to report a case of Brown-Séquard-plus syndrome in an 8-year-old boy secondary to a scissors stab wound at the craniocervical junction. Case report and review of the literature. Case report of an 8-year-old boy accidentally stabbed in the neck by scissors, which were thrown as a dart. The case study of an 8-year-old boy who was hospitalized because of a scissors stab wound at the craniocervical junction. The patient developed Brown-Séquard-plus syndrome on the left side of the body. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a laceration of the spinal cord at the craniocervical junction with cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Careful cleansing and interrupted sutures of the wounds were performed to prevent cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Rehabilitation therapy was performed 2 days later. A follow-up examination revealed complete recovery of the neurologic deficit 8 months post-injury. Treatment of scissors stab wounds to the cervical spinal cord, whether conservative management or thorough surgical exploration, should be individualized based on history, examination, and imaging. As shown in this case report, despite conservative management, complete recovery, which was unexpected, was attributed to the initial mild laceration of the spinal cord and ipsilateral spinal cord functional compensation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. MR imaging of spinal trauma

    Buchberger, W.; Springer, P.; Birbamer, G.; Judmaier, W.; Kathrein, A.; Daniaux, H.

    1995-01-01

    To assess the value of MR imaging in the acute and chronic stages of spinal trauma. 126 MR examinations of 120 patients were evaluated retrospectively. In 15 cases of acute spinal cord injury, correlation of MR findings with the degree of neurological deficit and eventual recovery was undertaken. Cord anomalies in the acute stage were seen in 16 patients. Intramedullary haemorrhage (n=6) and cord transection (n=2) were associated with complete injuries and poor prognosis, whereas patients with cord oedema (n=7) had incomplete injuries and recovered significant neurological function. In the chronic stage, MR findings included persistent cord compression in 8 patients, syringomyelia or post-traumatic cyst in 12, myelomalacia in 6, cord atrophy in 9, and cord transection in 7 patients. In acute spinal trauma, MR proved useful in assessing spinal cord compression and instability. In addition, direct visualisation and characterisation of posttraumatic changes within the spinal cord may offer new possibilities in establishing the prognosis for neurological recovery. In the later stages, potentially remediable causes of persistent or progressive symptoms, such as chronic spinal cord compression or syringomyelia can be distinguished from other sequelae of spinal trauma, such as myelomalacia, cord transection or atrophy. (orig.) [de

  15. Primary cerebral non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis: MRI and differential diagnosis

    Ernemann, U.; Skalej, M.; Voigt, K. [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Hermisson, M.; Platten, M. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Jaffe, R. [Pathology Department, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, 3705 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2002-09-01

    We report a young woman with primary cerebral non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the juvenile xanthogranuloma family. The clinical course was complicated by extensive infiltration of cranial nerves and meninges and epi- and intramedullary spinal dissemination. Whereas the cutaneous form of juvenile xanthogranuloma is usually benign and self-limited, central nervous system involvement is associated with high morbidity and mortality and might therefore be considered a separate clinical entity. (orig.)

  16. Fluid dynamics

    Bernard, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a focused, readable account of the principal physical and mathematical ideas at the heart of fluid dynamics. Graduate students in engineering, applied math, and physics who are taking their first graduate course in fluids will find this book invaluable in providing the background in physics and mathematics necessary to pursue advanced study. The book includes a detailed derivation of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations, followed by many examples of their use in studying the dynamics of fluid flows. Modern tensor analysis is used to simplify the mathematical derivations, thus allowing a clearer view of the physics. Peter Bernard also covers the motivation behind many fundamental concepts such as Bernoulli's equation and the stream function. Many exercises are designed with a view toward using MATLAB or its equivalent to simplify and extend the analysis of fluid motion including developing flow simulations based on techniques described in the book.

  17. Diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Doyon, D.; David, P.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nowadays plays a predominant role in the diagnosis and evaluation of spinal canal pathologies and has reduced the other exploratory methods, including computerized tomography (CT) and myelography, to an ancillary role. These pathologies are divided into three groups: those where MRI is the only imaging method (syringomyela, tumours in the spinal canal, phakomatoses, external pachimeningitis, spinal cord injuries, myelitis); those where MRI is the initial method and is completed by other examinations (vascular malformations, dysraphism, myelopathies due to cervical osteoarthritis) and those where MRI still play a lesser role than CT (degenerative lesions of the lumbar column) [fr

  18. Spinal dysraphism illustrated; Embroyology revisited

    Ullas V Acharya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord development occurs through three consecutive periods of gastrulation, primary nerulation and secondary neurulation. Aberration in these stages causes abnormalities of the spine and spinal cord, collectively referred as spinal dysraphism. They can be broadly classified as anomalies of gastrulation (disorders of notochord formation and of integration; anomalies of primary neurulation (premature dysjunction and nondysjunction; combined anomalies of gastrulation and primary neurulation and anomalies of secondary neurulation. Correlation with clinical and embryological data and common imaging findings provides an organized approach in their diagnosis.

  19. Modern spinal instrumentation. Part 1: Normal spinal implants

    Davis, W.; Allouni, A.K.; Mankad, K.; Prezzi, D.; Elias, T.; Rankine, J.; Davagnanam, I.

    2013-01-01

    The general radiologist frequently encounters studies demonstrating spinal instrumentation, either as part of the patient's postoperative evaluation or as incidental to a study performed for another purpose. There are various surgical approaches and devices used in spinal surgery with an increased understanding of spinal and spinal implant biomechanics drives development of modern fixation devices. It is, therefore, important that the radiologist can recognize commonly used devices and identify their potential complications demonstrated on imaging. The aim of part 1 of this review is to familiarize the reader with terms used to describe surgical approaches to the spine, review the function and normal appearances of commonly used instrumentations, and understand the importance of the different fixation techniques. The second part of this review will concentrate on the roles that the different imaging techniques play in assessing the instrumented spine and the recognition of complications that can potentially occur.

  20. Toward an understanding of the cerebral substrates of woman's orgasm.

    Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco; Ortigue, Stephanie

    2007-09-20

    The way women experience orgasm is of interest to scientists, clinicians, and laypeople. Whereas the origin and the function of a woman's orgasm remains controversial, the current models of sexual function acknowledge a combined role of central (spinal and cerebral) and peripheral processes during orgasm experience. At the central level, although it is accepted that the spinal cord drives orgasm, the cerebral involvement and cognitive representation of a woman's orgasm has not been extensively investigated. Important gaps in our knowledge remain. Recently, the astonishing advances of neuroimaging techniques applied in parallel with a neuropsychological approach allowed the unravelling of specific functional neuroanatomy of a woman's orgasm. Here, clinical and experimental findings on the cortico-subcortical pathway of a woman's orgasm are reviewed and compared with the neural basis of a man's orgasm. By defining the specific brain areas that sustain the assumed higher-order representation of a woman's orgasm, this review provides a foundation for future studies. The next challenge of functional imaging and neuropsychological studies is to understand the hierarchical interactions between these multiple cortical areas, not only with a correlation analysis but also with high spatio-temporal resolution techniques demonstrating the causal necessity, the temporal time course and the direction of the causality. Further studies using a multi-disciplinary approach are needed to identify the spatio-temporal dynamic of a woman's orgasm, its dysfunctions and possible new treatments.

  1. Survey of 800+ datasets from human tissue and body fluid reveals XenomiRs are likely artifacts

    Kang, Wenjing; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Holm, Anja

    2017-01-01

    the main bloodstream (such as brain and cerebro-spinal fluids). Interestingly, the majority (81%) of body fluid xenomiRs stem from rodents, which are rare human dietary contributions, but common laboratory animals. Body fluid samples from the same studies tend to group together when clustered by xenomi...

  2. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma; Spinales chronisches subdurales Haematom

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T. [Radiologengemeinschaft, Augsburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [German] Spinale subdurale Haematome sind im Vergleich zu epiduralen Haematomen selten, chronische Verlaufsformen noch seltener. Ursaechlich sind neben Lumbalpunktionen und traumatischen Verletzungen auch Blutgerinnungsstoerungen, Gefaessmalformationen und Tumoren. Aufgrund der Kompression von Myelon und Cauda equina kommt es zu zunehmenden Ruecken- oder radikulaeren Schmerzen mit anschliessender Paraparese sowie einer Darm- und Blasenstoerung, weshalb in den meisten Faellen eine operative Entlastung durchgefuehrt wird. Magnetresonanztomographisch stellen sich die Haematome meist als thorakale bzw. lumbale subdurale Raumforderungen dar, die Signalintensitaet variiert mit dem Blutungsalter. Wir berichten ueber den klinischen Verlauf und die bildgebende Diagnostik von 3 Patienten mit spinalen chronischen subduralen Haematomen. (orig.)

  3. Radioimmunoassay of calcitonin in plasma and cerebro-spinal fluid

    Cecchettin, M.; Comberti, E.; Quinzanini, M.; Albertini, A.; Tarquini, B.

    1985-01-01

    Some problems are discussed which, in analyzing the result of radioimmunoassay of calcitonin (CT), have to be taken into account regarding the standards used, the radioiodination, the antisere, if the assay was performed with or without extraction, the methode of extraction and the quality control. (H.W.). 11 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs

  4. Cerebral candidiasis in a 4-year-old boy after intestinal surgery.

    Zhang, Shu-Cheng

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral candidiasis is a devastating disease which contributes to a high mortality. Most of the cerebral candidiasis are never microbiologically or radiologically confirmed. In this case, a 4-year-old boy who developed cerebral candidiasis was successfully rescued and presented. The diagnosis of cerebral candidiasis was established based on both microbiologic and radiologic examinations. The pathogen was revealed to be Candida albicans by cerebrospinal fluid and central venous catheter cultures, and the cerebral involvement was recorded by series head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with an appearance of special encephalitis demonstrated. The imaging studies played a critical role throughout the diagnosis and treatment. Familiarity with the imaging findings in the appropriate clinical setting may result in a heightened level of awareness of this infection and, consequently, in earlier diagnosis and treatment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Cerebral localization in antiquity.

    Rose, F Clifford

    2009-07-01

    Fragments of neurology can be found in the oldest medical writings in antiquity. Recognizable cerebral localization is seen in Egyptian medical papyri. Most notably, the Edwin Smith papyrus describes hemiplegia after a head injury. Similar echoes can be seen in Homer, the Bible, and the pre-Hippocratic writer Alcmaeon of Croton. While Biblical writers thought that the heart was the seat of the soul, Hippocratic writers located it in the head. Alexandrian anatomists described the nerves, and Galen developed the ventricular theory of cognition whereby mental functions are classified and localized in one of the cerebral ventricles. Medieval scholars, including the early Church Fathers, modified Galenic ventricular theory so as to make it a dynamic model of cognition. Physicians in antiquity subdivided the brain into separate areas and attributed to them different functions, a phenomenon that connects them with modern neurologists.

  6. Cerebral venous thrombosis

    Soralova, T.; Sevcikova, H.; Petersky, D.

    2014-01-01

    We decided to process this theme due to its nonspecific clinical features as they often cause diagnostic problems not only to clinicians but also to diagnostic. It is important to think of this disease mainly in young women who administer hormonal contraception. Imaging methods play the crucial role in diagnostic of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The gold standard is a native CT of brain which shows the venous sinus thrombosis as a hyperdense lesion in the locus of the sinus (dense triangle sign), CT venography shows the sinus thrombosis as a defect in a contrast filling of the venous sinus (empty delta sign). Other investigative methods are magnetic resonance imaging or MRA. In short we also mention quite a rare but more serious thrombosis of profound cerebral veins v. cerebri magna-Galeni, vv. cerebri internae). The importance of early diagnostic and non specificity of symptoms is presented in 3 clinical cases that are the part of this work. (author)

  7. Applications of cerebral SPECT

    McArthur, C., E-mail: claire.mcarthur@nhs.net [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Jampana, R.; Patterson, J.; Hadley, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide three-dimensional functional images of the brain following the injection of one of a series of radiopharmaceuticals that crosses the blood-brain barrier and distributes according to cerebral perfusion, neurotransmitter, or cell density. Applications include differentiating between the dementias, evaluating cerebrovascular disease, preoperative localization of epileptogenic foci, diagnosing movement disorders, and evaluation of intracerebral tumours, while also proving a useful research tool. Unlike positronemission tomography (PET), SPECT imaging is widely available and can be performed in any department that has access to a rotating gamma camera. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the utility of cerebral SPECT and increase awareness of its role in the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  8. Pathogenesis of cerebral malformations in human fetuses with meningomyelocele

    Brouwer Oebele F

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fetal spina bifida aperta (SBA is characterized by a spinal meningomyelocele (MMC and associated with cerebral pathology, such as hydrocephalus and Chiari II malformation. In various animal models, it has been suggested that a loss of ventricular lining (neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation may trigger cerebral pathology. In fetuses with MMC, little is known about neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation and the initiating pathological events. The objective of this study was to investigate whether neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation occurs in human fetuses and neonates with MMC, and if so, whether it is associated with the onset of hydrocephalus. Methods Seven fetuses and 1 neonate (16–40 week gestational age, GA with MMC and 6 fetuses with normal cerebral development (22–41 week GA were included in the study. Identification of fetal MMC and clinical surveillance of fetal head circumference and ventricular width was performed by ultrasound (US. After birth, MMC was confirmed by histology. We characterized hydrocephalus by increased head circumference in association with ventriculomegaly. The median time interval between fetal cerebral ultrasound and fixing tissue for histology was four days. Results At 16 weeks GA, we observed neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation in the aqueduct and telencephalon together with sub-cortical heterotopias in absence of hydrocephalus and/or Chiari II malformation. At 21–34 weeks GA, we observed concurrence of aqueductal neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation and progenitor cell loss with the Chiari II malformation, whereas hydrocephalus was absent. At 37–40 weeks GA, neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation coincided with Chiari II malformation and hydrocephalus. Sub-arachnoidal fibrosis at the convexity was absent in all fetuses but present in the neonate. Conclusion In fetal SBA, neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation in the telencephalon and the aqueduct can occur before Chiari II malformation

  9. Spinal metastases of malignant gliomas

    Materlik, B.; Steidle-Katic, U.; Feyerabend, T.; Richter, E.; Wauschkuhn, B.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Extracranial metastases of malignant gliomas are rare. We report 2 cases with spinal metastases in patients suffering from glioma. Patients and Method: Two patients (33 and 57 years old) developed spinal canal metastases of a glioblastoma multiforme and anaplastic astrocytoma Grade III respectively 25 and 9 months after surgical resection and radiotherapy. Both metastases were confirmed pathohistologically. Results: Intraspinal metastases were irradiated with a total dose of 12.6 Gy and 50 Gy. Treatment withdrawal was necessary in one patient due to reduced clinical condition. Regression of neurological symptoms was observed in the second patient. Conclusions: Spinal spread of malignant glioma should be considered during care and follow-up in glioma patients with spinal symptoms. (orig.) [de

  10. Imaging of extradural spinal lesions

    Ahlhelm, F.; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G.; Naumann, N.; Reith, W.; Nabhan, A.

    2006-01-01

    There is a wide variety of spinal extradural tumors. In addition to real neoplasms, degenerative diseases, congenital abnormalities and inflammatory disorders can be causes of extradural masses. Due to the bony boundary of the spinal canal, both benign as well as malignant masses can cause progressive neurological deficits including paraplegia. Most of the spinal tumors are benign (hemangioma of the vertebral body, degenerative diseases). In younger patients congenital abnormalities and primary tumors of the spine have to be considered, whereas in adults the list of differential diagnoses should include secondary malignancies such as metastases and lymphomas as well as metabolic disorders such as osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture and Paget's disease. Cross-sectional imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) of the spine often help to make a specific diagnosis of extradural spinal lesions and represent important tools for tumor staging and preoperative evaluation. (orig.) [de

  11. Cerebral ketone body metabolism.

    Morris, A A M

    2005-01-01

    Ketone bodies (KBs) are an important source of energy for the brain. During the neonatal period, they are also precursors for the synthesis of lipids (especially cholesterol) and amino acids. The rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends primarily on the concentration in blood; high concentrations occur during fasting and on a high-fat diet. Cerebral KB metabolism is also regulated by the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which depends on the abundance of monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCT1). The BBB's permeability to KBs increases with fasting in humans. In rats, permeability increases during the suckling period, but human neonates have not been studied. Monocarboxylic acid transporters are also present in the plasma membranes of neurons and glia but their role in regulating KB metabolism is uncertain. Finally, the rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends on the activities of the relevant enzymes in brain. The activities vary with age in rats, but reliable results are not available for humans. Cerebral KB metabolism in humans differs from that in the rat in several respects. During fasting, for example, KBs supply more of the brain's energy in humans than in the rat. Conversely, KBs are probably used more extensively in the brain of suckling rats than in human neonates. These differences complicate the interpretation of rodent studies. Most patients with inborn errors of ketogenesis develop normally, suggesting that the only essential role for KBs is as an alternative fuel during illness or prolonged fasting. On the other hand, in HMG-CoA lyase deficiency, imaging generally shows asymptomatic white-matter abnormalities. The ability of KBs to act as an alternative fuel explains the effectiveness of the ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency, but its effectiveness in epilepsy remains unexplained.

  12. Radiopharmaceuticals for cerebral studies

    Leon Cabana, Alba

    1994-01-01

    For obtain good brain scintillation images in nuclear medicine must be used several radiopharmaceuticals. Cerebral studies give a tumors visual image as well as brain anomalities detection and are helpful in the diagnostic diseases . Are described in this work: a cerebrum radiopharmaceuticals classification,labelled compounds proceeding and Tc 99m good properties in for your fast caption, post administration and blood purification for renal way

  13. Spinal cord: motor neuron diseases.

    Rezania, Kourosh; Roos, Raymond P

    2013-02-01

    Spinal cord motor neuron diseases affect lower motor neurons in the ventral horn. This article focuses on the most common spinal cord motor neuron disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which also affects upper motor neurons. Also discussed are other motor neuron diseases that only affect the lower motor neurons. Despite the identification of several genes associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the pathogenesis of this complex disease remains elusive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiotherapy of presenile spinal osteoporosis

    Keim, H.M.; Schiebusch, M.

    1982-01-01

    Painfull conditions of presenile spinal osteoporosis may no longer respond to medication or physical therapy. Analgesic radiotherapy coupled with mild physical therapy and if necessary supported by orthopedic measures frequently results in pain relief and physical stability. Fifty-two cases of osteoporosis and osteoporotic spinal fractures illustrate how better longterm results are achieved by increasing the customary dosage and speeding up radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  15. Assessing attitudes toward spinal immobilization.

    Bouland, Andrew J; Jenkins, J Lee; Levy, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Prospective studies have improved knowledge of prehospital spinal immobilization. The opinion of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers regarding spinal immobilization is unknown, as is their knowledge of recent research advances. To examine the attitudes, knowledge, and comfort of prehospital and Emergency Department (ED) EMS providers regarding spinal immobilization performed under a non-selective protocol. An online survey was conducted from May to July of 2011. Participants were drawn from the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services and the Howard County General Hospital ED. The survey included multiple choice questions and responses on a modified Likert scale. Correlation analysis and descriptive data were used to analyze results. Comfort using the Kendrick Extrication Device was low among ED providers. Experienced providers were more likely to indicate comfort using this device. Respondents often believed that spinal immobilization is appropriate in the management of penetrating trauma to the chest and abdomen. Reported use of padding decreased along with the frequency with which providers practice and encounter immobilized patients. Respondents often indicated that they perform spinal immobilization due solely to mechanism of injury. Providers who feel as if spinal immobilization is often performed unnecessarily were more likely to agree that immobilization causes an unnecessary delay in patient care. The results demonstrate the need for improved EMS education in the use of the Kendrick Extrication Device, backboard padding, and spinal immobilization in the management of penetrating trauma. The attitudes highlighted in this study are relevant to the implementation of a selective spinal immobilization protocol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cerebral Oximetry in Cardiac Surgery

    A. N. Shepelyuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the data of numerous current references, the review describes different neuromonitoring methods during cardiac surgery under extracorporeal circulation. It shows that it is important and necessary to make neuromonitoring for the early diagnosis and prevention of neurological complications after cardiac surgery. Particular attention is given to cerebral oximetry; the possibilities and advantages of this technique are described. Correction of cerebral oximetric values is shown to improve survival rates and to reduce the incidence of postoperative complications. Lack of cerebral oximetry monitoring denudes a clinician of important information and possibilities to optimize patient status and to prevent potentially menacing complications, which allows one to conclude that it is necessary to use cerebral oximetry procedures within neu-romonitoring in cardiac surgery. Key words: extracorporeal circulation, cerebral oximetry, neurological dysfunction, cerebral oxygenation.

  17. Biomechanical implications of lumbar spinal ligament transection.

    Von Forell, Gregory A; Bowden, Anton E

    2014-11-01

    Many lumbar spine surgeries either intentionally or inadvertently damage or transect spinal ligaments. The purpose of this work was to quantify the previously unknown biomechanical consequences of isolated spinal ligament transection on the remaining spinal ligaments (stress transfer), vertebrae (bone remodelling stimulus) and intervertebral discs (disc pressure) of the lumbar spine. A finite element model of the full lumbar spine was developed and validated against experimental data and tested in the primary modes of spinal motion in the intact condition. Once a ligament was removed, stress increased in the remaining spinal ligaments and changes occurred in vertebral strain energy, but disc pressure remained similar. All major biomechanical changes occurred at the same spinal level as the transected ligament, with minor changes at adjacent levels. This work demonstrates that iatrogenic damage to spinal ligaments disturbs the load sharing within the spinal ligament network and may induce significant clinically relevant changes in the spinal motion segment.

  18. Cerebral malformations without antenatal diagnosis

    Girard, Nadine J. [Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Hopital Timone, Marseille (France)

    2010-06-15

    Cerebral malformations are usually described following the different steps in development. Disorders of neurulation (dysraphisms), or diverticulation (holoprosencephalies and posterior fossa cysts), and total commissural agenesis are usually diagnosed in utero. In contrast, disorders of histogenesis (proliferation-differentiation, migration, organization) are usually discovered in infants and children. The principal clinical symptoms that may be a clue to cerebral malformation include congenital hemiparesis, epilepsy and mental or psychomotor retardation. MRI is the imaging method of choice to assess cerebral malformations. (orig.)

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosus flare up as acute spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage with bilateral lower limb paralysis

    Xiang Yang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is an uncommon complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Solitary association of fatal spinal SAH as a complication of SLE, has not been encountered much in literature although coexisting acute cerebral and spinal SAH have been associated with SLE. We present a 39-year old female with initial diagnosis of SLE eight years ago who suddenly developed a productive cough, acute abdomen and paralysis of the lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed thoracic spinal SAH with varying degrees of thoracic spinal cord compression. The hemorrhage was total evacuated via surgery. She regained normal function of her lower limbers after the operation with no further neurological complications. One of the rare but fatal complications of SLE is solitary spinal SAH without cranial involvement. The best and most appropriate management of this kind of presentation is surgical decompression of the hematoma with total hemostasis. The cause of hemorrhage should be identified intra-operatively and treated appropriately.

  20. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  1. Chronic meningoencephalomyelitis with spastic spinal paralysis. Case report

    Mitsuyama, Y; Thompson, L R; Yuki, I; Tanemori, H

    1973-01-01

    A case of chronic meningoencephalomyelitis in a 48-year-old housewife is presented. The onset was characterized by spastic paralysis of the lower extremities. The course was progressive with repeated remissions and exacerbations, and the patient died approximately 7 years after the onset of disease. Laboratory tests showed slightly increased cell count in the spinal fluid, accelerated sedimentation rate, positive CRP and RA, and increased ASLO and gamma globulin levels. Neuropathologic examination revealed such changes as perivascular cellular infiltration, glial nodules, poorly demarcated demyelination, and recent necrosis in the spinal cord and basal ganglia. Only mild inflammatory findings were noted in the telencephalon and brain stem. The clinicopathologic findings in this case supported a diagnosis of chronic meningoencepalomyelitis which could not be classified as any known type of encephalomyelitis. (auth)

  2. Haemorrhagic necrosis of the grey matter of the spinal cord due to accidental injection of iopamidol in a patient with multiple neurofibromas; a clinico-pathological study

    Roos, R.A.C.; Wintzen, A.R.; Voormolen, J.H.C.; Vielvoye, G.J.; Bots, G.T.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Cervical laminectomy was performed in a 34-year old man with multiple spinal neurofibromas because of a slowly progressive medullary compression. Four weeks later a rapid deterioration necessitated iopamidol myelography by left lateral cervical puncture at C2 level. Despite the establishment of adequate spinal fluid contact, resulting in imaging of the subarachnoid space, part of the contrast medium entered the spinal cord, thus delineating a syrinx from the upper cervical extending to the upper thoracic level. After the puncture the patient developed triplegia, involving the left arm and both legs and a paresis of the right arm. He died from aspiration pneumonia. Autopsy revealed haemorrhagic necrosis of the spinal grey matter. This adverse effect of myelography is argued to have been conditioned by the extreme immobility and displacement of the spinal cord due to the presence of multiple neurofibromas. The deterioration four weeks after the operation was probably caused by a further compression of the spinal cord. (orig.)

  3. Massive Cerebral Gas Embolism under Discectomy due to Hydrogen Peroxide Irrigation

    Junjie Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive cerebral and spinal gas embolism occurs rarely as a complication of discectomy. We report a 54-year-old female who had undergone a discectomy (L3/4 and L4/5 under epidural anesthesia in a local hospital developed multiple massive gas embolisms. At closure, surgeons irrigated the incision wound with hydrogen peroxide. Soon after the irrigation, the patient suddenly developed tachycardia, hypotension, and rapid oxygen desaturation. Subsequently, patient progressed into unconsciousness and right hemianopsia quadriplegia. Computed tomography (CT scan showed multiple hypointensity spots around the brain due to cerebral gas embolism, which indicated the pneumoencephalos. The likely mechanism was the absorption of hydrogen peroxide into blood. When the amount of oxygen evolved exceeded its maximal blood solubility, venous embolization occurred. Though the patient was treated with supportive treatments and hyperbaric oxygen, she did not get full recovery and was left with severe long-term cerebral injury.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid loss at lumbar puncture for caesarean section ...

    Background Post dural puncture headache (PDPH) is an unpleasant complication of spinal anaesthesia. Several studies have attempted explanation of its pathophysiology. A widely held view is that it results from loss of cerebrospinal fluid volume resulting from leak following a hole left in the dura after the puncture.

  5. MR imaging and spinal cord injury

    Azar-Kia, B.; Fine, M.; Naheedy, M.; Elias, D.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging has significantly improved diagnostic capability of spinal cord injuries. Other available diagnostic modalities such as plain films, myelography, CT, and post-CT myelography have failed to consistently show the secific evidence of spinal cord injuries and their true extent. The authors are presenting our experiences with MR imaging in spinal column injury. They have found MR imaging to be the procedure of choice for prognostic evaluation of spinal cord trauma. They are showing examples of recent and old spinal cord injury such as hematomyelia, myelomalacia, transection, spinal cord edema, and cavitation

  6. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    Gemmel, Filip; Dumarey, Nicolas; Palestro, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor 99m Tc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and 67 Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [ 18 F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including radiolabelled

  7. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    Gemmel, Filip [Ghent Maria-Middelares, General Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Medical Center Leeuwarden (MCL), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Henri Dunantweg 2, Postbus 888, Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Dumarey, Nicolas [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Brussels (Belgium); Palestro, Christopher J. [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Long Island, NY (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor {sup 99m}Tc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and {sup 67}Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including

  8. Spinal radiological findings in nine patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    Chiapparini, L.; Farina, L.; D' Incerti, L.; Erbetta, A.; Savoiardo, M. [Department of Neuroradiology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Milan (Italy); Pareyson, D.; Carriero, M.R. [Department of Neurology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Milan (Italy)

    2002-02-01

    Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) are well known, while spinal studies have received less attention. Radiological spinal findings in nine patients with SIH are presented, looking for possible characteristic features. Five of the nine patients had histories of previous minor trauma, one of previous surgery; in three patients possible relevant preceding events were completely absent. All nine patients had cervical, seven thoracic, and four lumbar spine MRI studies; post-contrast studies were obtained in seven cases, MRI myelograms in five. Radioisotope myelocisternography was performed in four patients and myelo-CT in four. Epidural fluid collections were found in seven patients. In six cases the dural sac had collapsed, with a festooned appearance; intense epidural enhancement on post-contrast studies demonstrated marked dilatation of the epidural venous plexus. In three cases an irregular root sleeve suggested a possible point of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. Myelo-CT demonstrated the CSF fistula in two cases, radioisotope myelocisternography in three. The pattern of spinal abnormalities is different from that seen in cranial MRI for anatomical reasons: in the spinal canal the dura is not adherent to the bone; therefore, collapse of the dural sac and dilatation of epidural venous plexus occur, rather than subdural hematomas. In most cases the search for the dural tear is difficult. Radioisotope cisternography is probably the most sensitive examination for documenting the leakage of CSF out of the subarachnoid space; myelo-CT may precisely demonstrate the point of the CSF fistula, whereas MRI may only suggest it. (orig.)

  9. Neonatal cerebral infarction; Symptoms, CT findings and prognosis

    Fujimoto, Shinji; Togari, Hajime; Sobajima, Hisanori; Suzuki, Shigesumi; Wada, Yoshiro (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Yokochi, Kenji; Nishimura, Yutaka; Inukai, Kazuhisa; Futamura, Masahide

    1992-01-01

    In a retrospective multi-center study, we investigated eighteen infants with unilateral cerebral infarctions confirmed by computed tomography (CT) scans. The initial symptoms were observed in all the patients between 0 and 3 days of age. Convulsions or apneic attacks were the initial symptoms in all but one. Only 4 patients had complicated obstetric histories and none showed polycythemia or electrolyte abnormalities. All of the initial CT scans revealed unilaterally localized hypodense areas. In 10, the initial CT scans were performed within 24 hours after the clinical onset. In 16, the lesions were within the territory of the middle cerebral artery, 9 of which also involved the cortico-spinal tract (CST). In the remaining 2 patients, the lesions were located whithin the territory of the posterior cerebral artery. None of the 9 patients without CST involvement developed hemiplegia, whereas 5 (56%) of the 9 with CST involvement had hemiplegia, which is a fairly low incidence compared with that in adult cases. This difference was thought to be related to neonatal brain plasticity. (author).

  10. Fluid mechanics

    Granger, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This text offers the most comprehensive approach available to fluid mechanics. The author takes great care to insure a physical understanding of concepts grounded in applied mathematics. The presentation of theory is followed by engineering applications, helping students develop problem-solving skills from the perspective of a professional engineer. Extensive use of detailed examples reinforces the understanding of theoretical concepts

  11. Cerebral ischemia produced by four-vessel occlusion in the rat: a quantitative evaluation of cerebral blood flow

    Furlow, T.W. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia was produced in the rat by simultaneous occlusion of the vertebral and carotid arteries according to the method of Pulsinelli and Brierley (Stroke 10: 267, 1979). Local cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined by polarographic and autoradiographic techniques. Hydrogen-clearance measurements showed that mean CBF fell in four monitored regions of the hemispheres to between 0.11 and 0.18 ml/g/min, being least in deep rostal gray, intermediate in superficial gray, and greatest in deep caudal gray. However, individual animals had local CBF in excess of 0.20 and even 0.30 ml/g/min, and no animal showed zero CBF. When animals were rendered hypotensive (MABP of 50 Torr) during vascular occlusion, mean CBF ranged between 0.03 and 0.10 ml/g/min in the same regional order. With hypotension, total arrest of flow occurred. Autoradiographic data confirmed the above findings and indicated adequate CBF to the lower brainstem. During vascular occlusion, sufficient CBF may be present ot sustain cerebral tissue as in animals with a well developed spinal circulation or an inadvertently patent vertebral artery

  12. Interfaces para control cerebral

    Spinelli, Enrique Mario

    2000-01-01

    La función de una interfaz para control cerebral basada en señales de electroencefalograma (EEG), en forma general denominada BCI (Brain control Interface), es establecer un enlace directo entre el cerebro y una máquina, sin utilizar acciones motoras directas. Una BCI permite realizar operaciones simples a partir de la interpretación de las señales de EEG. Su desarrollo está principalmente orientado hacia la ayuda a personas con discapacidades motoras severas, que poseen deterioros en el sist...

  13. Techniques in cerebral protection.

    Fanelli, Fabrizio; Bezzi, Mario; Boatta, Emanuele; Passariello, Roberto

    2006-10-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting is a valid alternative option to conventional carotid endarterectomy in the treatment of carotid artery stenosis. During the stenting process, however, distal embolization can occur with neurological consequences. To avoid this, cerebral protection devices have been introduced. Three principal types of protection system have been developed: distal balloon occlusion, distal filters and proximal protection with or without reversal of flow. As protection devices became the focus of interest by manufactures and physicians, several trials are going on worldwide to analyze the characteristics of each of them and to evaluate their efficacy to reduce the rate of distal embolization.

  14. Cerebral aneurysms – an audit

    Enrique

    Abstract. We performed an audit to determine the profile of cerebral aneurysms at the Universitas Hospital Bloem- fontein, the only government hospital with a vascular suite in the Free State and Northern Cape area. Two hun- dred and twenty-three government patients, diagnosed with cerebral aneurysms during the period.

  15. Subdural Thoracolumbar Spine Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia: A Rare Occurrence and Literature Review of Spinal Hematomas after Spinal Anesthesia.

    Maddali, Prasanthi; Walker, Blake; Fisahn, Christian; Page, Jeni; Diaz, Vicki; Zwillman, Michael E; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane; Moisi, Marc

    2017-02-16

    Spinal hematomas are a rare but serious complication of spinal epidural anesthesia and are typically seen in the epidural space; however, they have been documented in the subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas likely exist within a traumatically induced space within the dural border cell layer, rather than an anatomical subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas present a dangerous clinical situation as they have the potential to cause significant compression of neural elements and can be easily mistaken for spinal epidural hematomas. Ultrasound can be an effective modality to diagnose subdural hematoma when no epidural blood is visualized. We have reviewed the literature and present a full literature review and a case presentation of an 82-year-old male who developed a thoracolumbar spinal subdural hematoma after spinal epidural anesthesia. Anticoagulant therapy is an important predisposing risk factor for spinal epidural hematomas and likely also predispose to spinal subdural hematomas. It is important to consider spinal subdural hematomas in addition to spinal epidural hematomas in patients who develop weakness after spinal epidural anesthesia, especially in patients who have received anticoagulation.

  16. Cerebral transplantation of encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells improves cellular pathology after experimental traumatic brain injury

    Heile, Anna M B; Wallrapp, Christine; Klinge, Petra M

    2009-01-01

    -protective substance glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). METHODS: Thirty two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to five groups: controls (no CCI), CCI-only, CCI+eMSC, CCI+GLP-1 eMSC, and CCI+empty capsules. On day 14, cisternal cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) was sampled for measurement of GLP-1 concentration. Brains were...

  17. Suicide in a spinal cord injured population

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M

    1998-01-01

    To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).......To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI)....

  18. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy

    ... difficulty breathing. Children with this type often have joint deformities (contractures) that impair movement. In severe cases, ... Proximal spinal muscular atrophy Washington University, St. Louis: Neuromuscular Disease Center: Spinal Muscular Atrophy Patient Support and ...

  19. Pericytes Make Spinal Cord Breathless after Injury.

    Almeida, Viviani M; Paiva, Ana E; Sena, Isadora F G; Mintz, Akiva; Magno, Luiz Alexandre V; Birbrair, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is a devastating condition that leads to significant neurological deficits and reduced quality of life. Therapeutic interventions after spinal cord lesions are designed to address multiple aspects of the secondary damage. However, the lack of detailed knowledge about the cellular and molecular changes that occur after spinal cord injury restricts the design of effective treatments. Li and colleagues using a rat model of spinal cord injury and in vivo microscopy reveal that pericytes play a key role in the regulation of capillary tone and blood flow in the spinal cord below the site of the lesion. Strikingly, inhibition of specific proteins expressed by pericytes after spinal cord injury diminished hypoxia and improved motor function and locomotion of the injured rats. This work highlights a novel central cellular population that might be pharmacologically targeted in patients with spinal cord trauma. The emerging knowledge from this research may provide new approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  20. Drug therapy in spinal tuberculosis.

    Rajasekaran, S; Khandelwal, Gaurav

    2013-06-01

    Although the discovery of effective anti-tuberculosis drugs has made uncomplicated spinal tuberculosis a medical disease, the advent of multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the co-infection of HIV with tuberculosis have led to a resurgence of the disease recently. The principles of drug treatment of spinal tuberculosis are derived from our experience in treating pulmonary tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis is classified to be a severe form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and hence is included in Category I of the WHO classification. The tuberculosis bacilli isolated from patients are of four different types with different growth kinetics and metabolic characteristics. Hence multiple drugs, which act on the different groups of the mycobacteria, are included in each anti-tuberculosis drug regimen. Prolonged and uninterrupted chemotherapy (which may be 'short course' and 'intermittent' but preferably 'directly observed') is effective in controlling the infection. Spinal Multi-drug-resistant TB and spinal TB in HIV-positive patients present unique problems in management and have much poorer prognosis. Failure of chemotherapy and emergence of drug resistance are frequent due to the failure of compliance hence all efforts must be made to improve patient compliance to the prescribed drug regimen.

  1. Fluid dynamics of dilatant fluid

    Nakanishi, Hiizu; Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Mitarai, Namiko

    2012-01-01

    of the state variable, we demonstrate that the model can describe basic features of the dilatant fluid such as the stress-shear rate curve that represents discontinuous severe shear thickening, hysteresis upon changing shear rate, and instantaneous hardening upon external impact. An analysis of the model...

  2. Therapeutic interventions in cerebral palsy.

    Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. Traditional physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely used interventions and have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Evidence in support of the effectiveness of the neurodevelopmental treatment is equivocal at best. There is evidence to support the use and effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in children with cerebral palsy. The effectiveness of many other interventions used in the treatment of cerebral palsy has not been clearly established based on well-controlled trials. These include: sensory integration, body-weight support treadmill training, conductive education, constraint-induced therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and the Vojta method. This article provides an overview of salient aspects of popular interventions used in the management of children with cerebral palsy.

  3. Spinal infection: Evaluation with MR imaging and intraoperative spinal US

    Donovan Post, M.J.; Montalvo, B.M.; Quencer, R.M.; Katz, B.H.; Green, B.A.; Elsmont, F.

    1987-01-01

    MR spine images and/or intraoperative US scans in 15 patients were reviewed retrospectively and correlated with clinical and pathologic data to determine the diagnostic value of these modalities in spinal infection. In osteomyelitis and retrospinal abscess MR imaging was definitive; in myelitis it was positive but nonspecific. In epidural abscess concomitant with meningitis, myelography with CT and intraoperative US were superior to MR imaging. Intraoperative US could be used to distinguish these processes and to monitor surgical decompression. The authors recommend that MR imaging be performed at the screening examination in cases of spinal infection, accompanied by intraoperative US in all surgical cases

  4. Unusual causes of spinal foraminal widening

    Zibis, A.H.; Markonis, A.; Karantanas, A.H. [Dept. of CT and MRI, Larissa General Hospital (Greece)

    2000-01-01

    Spinal neural foraminal widening is usually caused by benign lesions, most commonly neurofibromas. Rare lesions can also cause spinal neural foraminal widening. Computed tomography and/or MRI are the modalities of choice for studying the spinal foraminal widening. The present pictorial review describes six rare lesions, namely a lateral thoracic meningocele, a malignant fibrous histiocytoma, a tuberculous abscess, an osteoblastoma, a chondrosarcoma and a malignant tumour of the lung which caused spinal neural foraminal widening. (orig.)

  5. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    Gordon, I.

    1998-01-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics

  6. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    Gordon, I [London, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (United Kingdom)

    1998-06-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics.

  7. Cerebral cartography and connectomics.

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Cerebral Gluconeogenesis and Diseases

    Yip, James; Geng, Xiaokun; Shen, Jiamei; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-01-01

    The gluconeogenesis pathway, which has been known to normally present in the liver, kidney, intestine, or muscle, has four irreversible steps catalyzed by the enzymes: pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and glucose 6-phosphatase. Studies have also demonstrated evidence that gluconeogenesis exists in brain astrocytes but no convincing data have yet been found in neurons. Astrocytes exhibit significant 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 activity, a key mechanism for regulating glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Astrocytes are unique in that they use glycolysis to produce lactate, which is then shuttled into neurons and used as gluconeogenic precursors for reduction. This gluconeogenesis pathway found in astrocytes is becoming more recognized as an important alternative glucose source for neurons, specifically in ischemic stroke and brain tumor. Further studies are needed to discover how the gluconeogenesis pathway is controlled in the brain, which may lead to the development of therapeutic targets to control energy levels and cellular survival in ischemic stroke patients, or inhibit gluconeogenesis in brain tumors to promote malignant cell death and tumor regression. While there are extensive studies on the mechanisms of cerebral glycolysis in ischemic stroke and brain tumors, studies on cerebral gluconeogenesis are limited. Here, we review studies done to date regarding gluconeogenesis to evaluate whether this metabolic pathway is beneficial or detrimental to the brain under these pathological conditions. PMID:28101056

  9. Cerebral Gluconeogenesis and Diseases.

    Yip, James; Geng, Xiaokun; Shen, Jiamei; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    The gluconeogenesis pathway, which has been known to normally present in the liver, kidney, intestine, or muscle, has four irreversible steps catalyzed by the enzymes: pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and glucose 6-phosphatase. Studies have also demonstrated evidence that gluconeogenesis exists in brain astrocytes but no convincing data have yet been found in neurons. Astrocytes exhibit significant 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 activity, a key mechanism for regulating glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Astrocytes are unique in that they use glycolysis to produce lactate, which is then shuttled into neurons and used as gluconeogenic precursors for reduction. This gluconeogenesis pathway found in astrocytes is becoming more recognized as an important alternative glucose source for neurons, specifically in ischemic stroke and brain tumor. Further studies are needed to discover how the gluconeogenesis pathway is controlled in the brain, which may lead to the development of therapeutic targets to control energy levels and cellular survival in ischemic stroke patients, or inhibit gluconeogenesis in brain tumors to promote malignant cell death and tumor regression. While there are extensive studies on the mechanisms of cerebral glycolysis in ischemic stroke and brain tumors, studies on cerebral gluconeogenesis are limited. Here, we review studies done to date regarding gluconeogenesis to evaluate whether this metabolic pathway is beneficial or detrimental to the brain under these pathological conditions.

  10. Fluid dynamics

    Ruban, Anatoly I

    This is the first book in a four-part series designed to give a comprehensive and coherent description of Fluid Dynamics, starting with chapters on classical theory suitable for an introductory undergraduate lecture course, and then progressing through more advanced material up to the level of modern research in the field. The present Part 1 consists of four chapters. Chapter 1 begins with a discussion of Continuum Hypothesis, which is followed by an introduction to macroscopic functions, the velocity vector, pressure, density, and enthalpy. We then analyse the forces acting inside a fluid, and deduce the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible and compressible fluids in Cartesian and curvilinear coordinates. In Chapter 2 we study the properties of a number of flows that are presented by the so-called exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, including the Couette flow between two parallel plates, Hagen-Poiseuille flow through a pipe, and Karman flow above an infinite rotating disk. Chapter 3 is d...

  11. Radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms

    Smirnov, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    Results of radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms are presented. The results of combined (surgical and radiation) treatment of tumors are studied. On the whole it is noted that radiation treatment of initial spinal cord tumours is not practised on a large scale because of low radiostability of spinal cord

  12. Functional outcome after a spinal fracture

    Post, Richard Bernardus

    2008-01-01

    This thesis takes a closer look at the functional outcome after a spinal fracture. An introduction to different aspects regarding spinal fractures is presented in Chapter 1. The incidence of traumatic thoracolumbar spinal fractures without neurological deficit in the Netherlands is approximately 1.2

  13. ATYPICAL GOUT: SPINAL TOPHACEOUS INJURY

    Maksim Sergeevich Eliseev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal injury in gout occurs rarely at a young age. In the past 5 years, the Pubmed has published only 44 papers on this site of tophi mainly in gouty patients over 40 years of age. We report two such cases in patients with chronic tophaceous gout in a 28-year-old man with a 3-year history of gout and in a 30-year-old man with its 7-year history. In both cases, spinal injury with tophus masses gave rise to neurological symptomatology. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were of informative value in identifying the causes of pain. In one case, the patient underwent laminectomy; histological evidence confirmed the gouty genesis of spinal injury.

  14. Recurrent Primary Spinal Hydatid Cyst

    Okan Turk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary hydatid disease of spine is rare and spinal hydatitosis constitute only 1% of all hydatitosis. We report a case of recurrent primary intraspinal extradural hydatid cyst of the thoracic region causing progressive paraparesis. The patient was operated 16 years ago for primary spinal hydatid disease involvement and was instrumented dorsally for stabilization. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of thoracic spine showed a cystic lesion at T11-12 level and compressed spinal cord posterolaterally. Intraspinal cyst was excised through T11-12 laminectomy which made formerly. The early postoperative period showed a progressive improvement of his neurological deficit and he was discharged with antihelmintic treatment consisting of albendazole and amoxicillin-sulbactam combination. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 84-89

  15. MRI in Lyme disease of the spinal cord

    Mantienne, C.; Catalaa, I.; Sevely, A.; Cognard, C.; Manelfe, C. [Dept. of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Neuroradiology, Hopital Purpan, Toulouse (France); Albucher, J.F. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Purpan, Toulouse (France)

    2001-06-01

    We report a case of Lyme myelitis in a 31-year-old man, presenting with a conus medullaris syndrome. MRI demonstrated contrast enhancement on the pial surface of the lower thoracic cord and conus medullaris. Elevated blood immunoglobulins and IgM antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were found. Leptomeningitis may be the first stage of spinal infection in Lyme disease, preceding parenchymal infection leading to myelitis. Vasculitis is probably the major mechanism. MRI findings are nonspecific and the diagnosis is given by serum and CSF analyses. Early treatment with antibiotics and high doses steroids may result in complete recovery, as in this case. (orig.)

  16. MRI in Lyme disease of the spinal cord

    Mantienne, C.; Catalaa, I.; Sevely, A.; Cognard, C.; Manelfe, C.; Albucher, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of Lyme myelitis in a 31-year-old man, presenting with a conus medullaris syndrome. MRI demonstrated contrast enhancement on the pial surface of the lower thoracic cord and conus medullaris. Elevated blood immunoglobulins and IgM antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were found. Leptomeningitis may be the first stage of spinal infection in Lyme disease, preceding parenchymal infection leading to myelitis. Vasculitis is probably the major mechanism. MRI findings are nonspecific and the diagnosis is given by serum and CSF analyses. Early treatment with antibiotics and high doses steroids may result in complete recovery, as in this case. (orig.)

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Indications, technique and results of treatment with a blood patch

    Gottschalk, A.

    2015-01-01

    In most cases cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are iatrogenic and caused by medical interventions, such as lumbar puncture, peridural anesthesia and surgical interventions on the spine, However, spontaneous cerebral hypotension is currently detected more frequently due to improvements in diagnostic possibilities but often the cause cannot be clarified with certainty. There are various diagnostic tools for confirming the diagnosis and searching for the site of CSF leakage, such as postmyelography computed tomography (postmyelo-CT), indium 111 radioisotope cisternography and (myelo) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which show different sensitivities. In accordance with own experience native MRI with fat-saturated T2-weighted sequences is often sufficient for diagnosing CSF leakage and the site. For the remaining cases an additional postmyelo-CT or alternatively myelo-MRI is recommended. In some patients with spontaneous cranial hypotension multiple CSF leaks are found at different spinal levels. The main symptom in most cases is an orthostatic headache. While post-puncture syndrome is self-limiting in many cases, spontaneous CSF leakage usually requires blood patch therapy. A lumbar blood patch can be safely carried out under guidance by fluoroscopy. In the case of a cervical or dorsal blood patch, CT guidance is recommended, which ensures epidural application of the blood patch and minimizes the risk of damaging the spinal cord. Despite a high success rate at the first attempt with a blood patch of up to 85 %, some cases require repeating the blood patch. A targeted blood patch of a CSF leak should generally be favoured over a blindly placed blood patch; nevertheless, if a CSF leak cannot be localized by CT or MRI a therapeutic attempt with a lumbar blood patch can be carried out. After a successful blood patch intracranial hygromas and pachymeningeal enhancement in the head show fast regression; however, epidural hygromas of the spine can persist for a period of

  18. Contrast settling in cerebral aneurysm angiography

    Wang Zhijie; Hoffmann, Kenneth R; Guterman, Lee R; Wang Zhou; Rudin, Stephen; Meng Hui

    2005-01-01

    During angiography, blood flow is visualized with a radiopaque contrast agent, which is denser than blood. In complex vasculature, such as cerebral saccular aneurysms, the density difference may produce an appreciable gravity effect, where the contrast material separates from blood and settles along the gravity direction. Although contrast settling has been occasionally reported before, the fluid mechanics behind it have not been explored. Furthermore, the severity of contrast settling in cerebral aneurysms varies significantly from case to case. Therefore, a better understanding of the physical principles behind this phenomenon is needed to evaluate contrast settling in clinical angiography. In this study, flow in two identical groups of sidewall aneurysm models with varying parent-vessel curvature was examined by angiography. Intravascular stents were deployed into one group of the models. To detect contrast settling, we used lateral view angiography. Time-intensity curves were analysed from the angiographic data, and a computational fluid dynamic analysis was conducted. Results showed that contrast settling was strongly related to the local flow dynamics. We used the Froude number, a ratio of flow inertia to gravity force, to characterize the significance of gravity force. An aneurysm with a larger vessel curvature experienced higher flow, which resulted in a larger Froude number and, thus, less gravitational settling. Addition of a stent reduced the aneurysmal flow, thereby increasing the contrast settling. We found that contrast settling resulted in an elevated washout tail in the time-intensity curve. However, this signature is not unique to contrast settling. To determine whether contrast settling is present, a lateral view should be obtained in addition to the anteroposterior (AP) view routinely used clinically so as to rule out contrast settling and hence to enable a valid time-intensity curve analysis of blood flow in the aneurysm

  19. A 51-year-old man with intramedullary spinal cord abscess having a patent foramen ovale

    Higuchi, Kanako; Ishihara, Hiroyuki; Okuda, Shiho; Kanda, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 51-year-old man with intramedullary spinal cord abscess (ISCA) having a patent foramen ovale (PFO). He developed fever and tetraplegia after a recent dental treatment. MRI showed ISCA with longitudinal swelling from the upper cervical to the lumbar spinal cord. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis indicated bacterial meningitis, and the culture of CSF revealed Streptococcus viridans. Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed the existence of a PFO. We suspected another possibility other than systemic bacteraemia, that paradoxical bacteric embolisation through PFO after the dental treatment caused ISCA. While several reports of brain abscess with PFO are available, this is the first report of ISCA with PFO. PMID:22696715

  20. CT diagnosis of acute spinal injury

    Ohhama, Mitsuru; Niimiya, Hikosuke; Kimura, Ko; Yamazaki, Gyoji; Nasu, Yoshiro; Shioya, Akihide

    1982-01-01

    CT pictures of 22 acute spinal injuries with damage of the spinal cord were evaluated. In the cases of spinal cord damage with bone injury, changes in the vertebral canal were fully observed by CT. In some of spinal cord damages without bone injury, narrowing of the vertebral canal was demonstrated by CT combined with CT myelography and reconstruction. Evaluation of CT number showed a high density area in damaged spinal cord in some cases. CT was thus considered to be useful as an adjunct diagnostic aid. (Ueda, J.)

  1. Fluid mechanics

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Prud'homme, M.; Robillard, L.; Vasseur, P.

    2003-01-01

    This book constitutes at the same time theoretical and practical base relating to the phenomena associated with fluid mechanics. The concept of continuum is at the base of the approach developed in this work. The general advance proceeds of simple balances of forces as into hydrostatic to more complex situations or inertias, the internal stresses and the constraints of Reynolds are taken into account. This advance is not only theoretical but contains many applications in the form of solved problems, each chapter ending in a series of suggested problems. The major part of the applications relates to the incompressible flows

  2. Spinal anesthesia: a comparison of procaine and lidocaine.

    Le Truong, H H; Girard, M; Drolet, P; Grenier, Y; Boucher, C; Bergeron, L

    2001-05-01

    To compare spinal procaine to spinal lidocaine with regard to their main clinical characteristics and incidence of transient radicular irritation (TRI). In this randomized, double-blind, prospective study, patients (two groups, n=30 each) received either 100 mg of lidocaine 5% in 7.5% glucose (Group L) or 100 mg of procaine 10% diluted with 1 ml cerebrospinal fluid (Group P). After spinal anesthesia, segmental level of sensory block was assessed by pinprick. Blood pressure and the height of the block were noted each minute for the first ten minutes, then every three minutes for the next 35 min and finally every five minutes until regression of the block to L4. Motor blockade was evaluated using the Bromage scale. To evaluate the presence of TRI, each patient was questioned 48 hr after surgery. Time to highest sensory level and to maximum number of segments blocked showed no difference between groups. Mean time for sensory regression to T10 and for regression of the motor block were shorter in Group P. Eighty minutes following injection, sensory levels were lower in Group P. Five patients had inadequate surgical anesthesia in Group P and only one in Group L. No patient in Group P had TRI (95% CI 10-12%) while eight (27%) in Group L did (95% CI 12-46%). Procaine 10% was associated with a clinical failure rate of 14.2%. This characteristic must be balanced against an absence of TRI, which occurs more frequently with the use of lidocaine 5%.

  3. Dose distribution to spinal structures from intrathecally administered yttrium-90

    Mardirossian, George; Hall, Michael; Montebello, Joseph; Stevens, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Previous treatment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) malignancies by intrathecal administration of 131I-radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies has led to the assumption that more healthy tissue will be spared when a pure beta-emitter such as 90Y replaces 131I. The purpose of this study is to compare and quantitatively evaluate the dose distribution from 90Y to the CSF space and its surrounding spinal structures to 131I. A 3D digital phantom of a section of the T-spine was constructed from the visible human project series of images which included the spinal cord, central canal, subarachnoid space, pia mater, arachnoid, dura mater, vertebral bone marrow and intervertebral disc. Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP4C) was used to model the 90Y and 131I radiation distribution. Images of the CSF compartment were convolved with the radiation distribution to determine the dose within the subarachnoid space and surrounding tissues. 90Y appears to be a suitable radionuclide in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) malignancies when attached to mAb's and the dose distribution would be confined largely within the vertebral foramen. This choice may offer favourable dose improvement to the subarachnoid and surface of spinal cord over 131I in such an application.

  4. Neuroarthropathy of the hip following spinal cord injury

    Bibek Banskota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 33-year-old male who sustained a burst fracture D12 vertebrae with spinal cord injury (ASIA impairment scale A and a right mid-diaphysial femoral shaft fracture around 1.5 years back. The patient reported 1.5 years later with a swelling over the right buttock. Arthrotomy revealed serous fluid and fragmented bone debris. The biopsy showed a normal bony architecture with no evidence of infection and malignant cells. Hence, a diagnosis of Charcot′s hip was made. Charcot′s neuroarthropathy of the feet is a well-recognized entity in the setting of insensate feet resulting from causes such as diabetes or spina bifida. Although Charcot′s disease of the hips has been described, it is uncommon in association with spinal cord injury, syphilis and even with the use of epidural injection. The present case highlights the fact that neuroarthropathy of the hip can occur in isolation in the setting of a spinal cord injury, and this can lead to considerable morbidity.

  5. Cerebral white matter hypoplasia

    Dietrich, R.B.; Shields, W.D.; Sankar, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the MR imaging findings in children with cerebral white matter hypoplasia (CWMH). The MR studies of four children, aged 3-7 y (mean age, 2.3 y) with a diagnosis of CWMH were reviewed. In all cases multiplanar T1-weighted and T2-weighted spin-echo images were obtained. All children had similar histories of severe developmental delay and nonprogressive neurologic deficits despite normal gestational and birth histories. In two cases there was a history of maternal cocaine abuse. Autopsy correlation was available in one child. The MR images of all four children demonstrated diffuse lack of white matter and enlarged ventricles but normal-appearing gray matter. The corpus callosum, although completely formed, was severely thinned. There was no evidence of gliosis or porencephaly, and the distribution of myelin deposition was normal for age in all cases. Autopsy finding in one child correlated exactly with the MR finding

  6. Multiple cerebral hydatid cysts

    Banzo, J.; Pina, J.I.; Abos, M.D.; Rios, G.; Garcia, D.; Marin, F.; Diaz, F.J.

    1984-12-01

    A 39-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with headaches, vomiting, psychic impairment and diplopia. Three hydatid cysts of the lung had been previously removed. An avascular mass in the left hemisphere with left-to-right displacement of the anterior cerebral arteries was noted during a brain angioscintigraphy. A cerebralthrombosis (CT) brain scan showed two cystic lesions situated in the left-frontal and occipital regions. A CT abdominal scan showed multiple cysts in the liver, spleen and both kidneys. At operation, two brain cysts were totally extirpated without rupture. The definite pathological diagnosis was secondry hydatid cysts. The headaches, vomiting and diplopia were persistent in the post-operative period. Seven days after the operation, a CT brain scan showed an infratenrorial cyst. The patient rejected any surgical intervention.

  7. Use of Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL®) for a postoperative patient with cerebral palsy: a case report.

    Mataki, Yuki; Kamada, Hiroshi; Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Shimizu, Yukiyo; Takeuchi, Ryoko; Mizukami, Masafumi; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Takahashi, Kazushi; Matsuda, Mayumi; Iwasaki, Nobuaki; Kawamoto, Hiroaki; Wadano, Yasuyoshi; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2018-03-27

    The Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL ® ) is an exoskeleton wearable robot suit that assists in voluntary control of knee and hip joint motion. There have been several studies on HAL intervention effects in stroke, spinal cord injury, and cerebral palsy. However, no study has investigated HAL intervention for patients with cerebral palsy after surgery. We report a case of using HAL in a postoperative patient with cerebral palsy. A 15-year-old boy was diagnosed with spastic diplegia cerebral palsy Gross Motor Function Classification System level IV, with knee flection contracture, equinus foot, and paralysis of the right upper extremity with adduction contracture. He underwent tendon lengthening of the bilateral hamstrings and Achilles tendons. Although the flexion contractures of the bilateral knees and equinus foot improved, muscle strength decreased after the soft tissue surgery. HAL intervention was performed twice during postoperative months 10 and 11. Walking speed, stride, and cadence were increased after HAL intervention. Post HAL intervention, extension angles of the knee in stance phase and hip in the pre-swing phase were improved. In the gait cycle, the proportion of terminal stance in the stance and swing phase was increased. Hybrid Assistive Limb intervention for postoperative patients with cerebral palsy whose muscle strength decreases can enhance improvement in walking ability. Further studies are needed to examine the safety and potential application of HAL in this setting.

  8. Imaging in spine and spinal cord malformations

    Rossi, Andrea; Biancheri, Roberta; Cama, Armando; Piatelli, Gianluca; Ravegnani, Marcello; Tortori-Donati, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Spinal and spinal cord malformations are collectively named spinal dysraphisms. They arise from defects occurring in the early embryological stages of gastrulation (weeks 2-3), primary neurulation (weeks 3-4), and secondary neurulation (weeks 5-6). Spinal dysraphisms are categorized into open spinal dysraphisms (OSDs), in which there is exposure of abnormal nervous tissues through a skin defect, and closed spinal dysraphisms (CSD), in which there is a continuous skin coverage to the underlying malformation. Open spinal dysraphisms basically include myelomeningocele and other rare abnormalities such as myelocele and hemimyelo(meningo)cele. Closed spinal dysraphisms are further categorized based on the association with low-back subcutaneous masses. Closed spinal dysraphisms with mass are represented by lipomyelocele, lipomyelomeningocele, meningocele, and myelocystocele. Closed spinal dysraphisms without mass comprise simple dysraphic states (tight filum terminale, filar and intradural lipomas, persistent terminal ventricle, and dermal sinuses) and complex dysraphic states. The latter category further comprises defects of midline notochordal integration (basically represented by diastematomyelia) and defects of segmental notochordal formation (represented by caudal agenesis and spinal segmental dysgenesis). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the preferred modality for imaging these complex abnormalities. The use of the aforementioned classification scheme is greatly helpful to make the diagnosis

  9. Spinal cord injury arising in anaesthesia practice.

    Hewson, D W; Bedforth, N M; Hardman, J G

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury arising during anaesthetic practice is a rare event, but one that carries a significant burden in terms of morbidity and mortality. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury. We will then discuss injuries relating to patient position, spinal cord hypoperfusion and neuraxial techniques. The most serious causes of spinal cord injury - vertebral canal haematoma, spinal epidural abscess, meningitis and adhesive arachnoiditis - will be discussed in turn. For each condition, we draw attention to practical, evidence-based measures clinicians can undertake to reduce their incidence, or mitigate their severity. Finally, we will discuss transient neurological symptoms. Some cases of spinal cord injury during anaesthesia can be ascribed to anaesthesia itself, arising as a direct consequence of its conduct. The injury to a spinal nerve root by inaccurate and/or incautious needling during spinal anaesthesia is an obvious example. But in many cases, spinal cord injury during anaesthesia is not caused by, related to, or even associated with, the conduct of the anaesthetic. Surgical factors, whether direct (e.g. spinal nerve root damage due to incorrect pedicle screw placement) or indirect (e.g. cord ischaemia following aortic surgery) are responsible for a significant proportion of spinal cord injuries that occur concurrently with the delivery of regional or general anaesthesia. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Principles of fluid mechanics

    Kreider, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book is an introduction on fluid mechanics incorporating computer applications. Topics covered are as follows: brief history; what is a fluid; two classes of fluids: liquids and gases; the continuum model of a fluid; methods of analyzing fluid flows; important characteristics of fluids; fundamentals and equations of motion; fluid statics; dimensional analysis and the similarity principle; laminar internal flows; ideal flow; external laminar and channel flows; turbulent flow; compressible flow; fluid flow measurements

  11. Cerebral blood flow autoregulation during intracranial hypertension in hypoxic lambs

    Borel, C.O.; Backofen, J.E.; Koehler, R.C.; Jones, M.D. Jr.; Traystman, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that hypoxic hypoxia interferes with cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation when intracranial pressure (ICP) is elevated in pentobarbital-anesthetized lambs (3 to 9 days old). Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was lowered stepwise from 73 to 23 mmHg in eight normoxic lambs and from 65 to 31 mmHg in eight other hypoxic lambs by ventricular infusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid. In normoxic lambs, CBF measured by microspheres labeled with six different radioisotopes was not significantly changed over this range of CPP. In animals made hypoxic, base-line CBF was twice that of normoxic lambs. CBF was unchanged as CPP was reduced to 31 mmHg. Lower levels of CPP were not attained because a pressor response occurred with further elevations of ICP. No regional decrements in blood flow to cortical arterial watershed areas or to more caudal regions, such as cerebellum, brain stem, or thalamus, were detected with elevated ICP. Cerebral O 2 uptake was similar in both groups and did not decrease when CPP was reduced. These results demonstrate that normoxic lambs have a considerable capacity for effective autoregulation of CBF when ICP is elevated. Moreover, cerebral vasodilation in response to a level of hypoxia approximating that normally seen prenatally does not abolish CBF autoregulation when ICP is elevated during the first postnatal week

  12. Spinal trauma. An imaging approach

    Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.; Imhof, H.

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of trauma to the spine - where the slightest oversight may have catastrophic results - requires a thorough grasp of the spectrum of resultant pathology as well as the imaging modalities used in making an accurate diagnosis. In Spinal Trauma, the internationally renowned team of experts provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge exposition of the current vital role of imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the axial skeleton. Beginning with a valuable clinical perspective of spinal trauma, the book offers the reader a unique overview of the biomechanics underlying the pathology of cervical trauma. Acute trauma topics include: - Optimization of imaging modalities - Malalignment - signs and significance - Vertebral fractures - detection and implications - Classification of thoraco-lumbar fractures - rationale and relevance - Neurovascular injury. Distilling decades of clinical and teaching expertise, the contributors further discuss the current role of imaging in special focus topics, which include: - The pediatric spine - Sports injuries - The rigid spine - Trauma in the elderly - Vertebral collapse, benign and malignant - Spinal trauma therapy - Vertebral fractures and osteoporosis - Neuropathic spine. All throughout the book, the focus is on understanding the injury, and its implications and complications, through 'an imaging approach'. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of superb MR images and CT scans, and clear full-color drawings, the authors conclude with a look into the future, defining clinical trends and research directions. Spinal Trauma - with its broad scope, practical imaging approach, and current focus - is designed to enhance confidence and accuracy, making it essential reading for clinicians and radiologists at all levels. (orig.)

  13. Spinal cord injury at birth

    Fenger-Gron, Jesper; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Rasmus G

    2008-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A case of perinatally acquired spinal cord injury (SCI) is presented. The foetus was vigorous until birth, the breech presented and delivery was performed by a non-traumatic Caesarean section. The infant displayed symptoms of severe SCI but diagnosis was delayed due to severe co...

  14. Disappearing fluid?

    Graney, K.; Chu, J.; Lin, P.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A 78-year old male in end stage renal failure (ESRF) with a background of NIDDM retinopathy, nephropathy, and undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) presented with anorexia, clinically unwell, decreased mobility and right scrotal swelling. There was no difficulty during CAPD exchange except there was a positive fluid balance Peritoneal dialysates remained clear A CAPD peritoneal study was requested. 100Mbq 99mTc Sulphur Colloid was injected into a standard dialysate bag containing dialysate. Anterior dynamic images were acquired over the abdomen pelvis while the dialysate was infused Static images with anatomical markers were performed 20 mins post infusion, before and after patient ambulation and then after drainage. The study demonstrated communication between the peritoneal cavity and the right scrotal sac. Patient underwent right inguinal herniaplasty with a marlex mesh. A repeat CAPD flow study was performed as follow up and no abnormal connection between the peritoneal cavity and the right scrotal sac was demonstrated post operatively. This case study shows that CAPD flow studies can be undertaken as a simple, minimally invasive method to evaluate abnormal peritoneal fluid flow dynamics in patients undergoing CAPD, and have an impact on dialysis management. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  15. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome: case report of fetal unilateral ventriculomegaly and hypoplastic left middle cerebral artery.

    Piro, Ettore; Piccione, Maria; Marrone, Gianluca; Giuffrè, Mario; Corsello, Giovanni

    2013-05-14

    Prenatal ultrasonographic detection of unilateral cerebral ventriculomegaly arises suspicion of pathological condition related to cerebrospinal fluid flow obstruction or cerebral parenchimal pathology. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome is a rare condition characterized by cerebral hemiatrophy, calvarial thickening, skull and facial asymmetry, contralateral hemiparesis, cognitive impairment and seizures. Congenital and acquired types are recognized and have been described, mainly in late childhood, adolescence and adult ages. We describe a female infant with prenatal diagnosis of unilateral left ventriculomegaly in which early brain MRI and contrast enhanced-MRI angiography, showed cerebral left hemiatrophy associated with reduced caliber of the left middle cerebral artery revealing the characteristic findings of the Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome. Prenatal imaging, cerebral vascular anomaly responsible for the cerebral hemiatrophy and the early clinical evolution have never been described before in such a young child and complete the acquired clinical descriptions in older children. Differential diagnosis, genetic investigations, neurophysiologic assessments, short term clinical and developmental follow up are described. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome must be ruled out in differential diagnosis of fetal unilateral ventriculomegaly. Early clinical assessment, differential diagnosis and cerebral imaging including cerebral MRI angiography allow the clinicians to diagnose also in early infancy this rare condition.

  16. Auxillary Fluid Flowmeter

    RezaNejad Gatabi, Javad; Forouzbakhsh, Farshid; Ebrahimi Darkhaneh, Hadi

    2010-01-01

    The Auxiliary Fluid Flow meter is proposed to measure the fluid flow of any kind in both pipes and open channels. In this kind of flow measurement, the flow of an auxiliary fluid is measured Instead of direct measurement of the main fluid flow. The auxiliary fluid is injected into the main fluid ...

  17. SPINAL CORD- A CADAVERIC STUDY

    Vijayamma K. N

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal cord is situated within the vertebral canal extending from the lower end of the medulla oblongata at the upper border of first cervical vertebra. In early foetal life, it extends throughout the length of the vertebral canal, and at the time of birth, it reaches the level of third lumbar vertebra. In adult, it ends at the lower border of first lumbar vertebra and thereafter continued as filum terminale, which gets attached to tip of coccyx. Spinal cord is covered by three protective membranes called spinal meninges, diameter, arachnoid and pia mater. The diameter and arachnoid mater extent up to second sacral vertebra and the pia mater forms filum terminale and extend at the tip of coccyx. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty spinal cord cadaveric specimen were studied by dissection method after exposing the vertebral canal. The roots of spinal nerve were sectioned on both sides and the cord is released along with its coverings. The dura and arachnoid mater were incised longitudinally and the subarachnoid space, blood vessels, nerve roots, ligament denticulata, cervical and lumbar enlargements were observed. The blood vessels including radicular arteries were also studied photographed. RESULTS The spinal cord is a highly vascular structure situated within the vertebral canal, covered by diameter, arachnoid mater and pia mater. Spinal dura is thicker anteriorly than posteriorly. The pia mater forms linea splendens, which extend along the whole length of the cord in front of the anterior median fissure. The average length of the cord is 38 cm. The length and breadth of cervical enlargement was more compared to lumbar enlargement. The number of rootlets in both dorsal and ventral roots accounts more in cervical compared to other regions of the cord. The ligament denticulata is a thin transparent bands of pia mater attached on either sides of the cord between the dorsal and ventral roots of spinal nerves. The tooth like extensions are well

  18. Cerebral cysticercosis. A case report and review of the literature

    Tuch, P.S.; Saffer, D. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Neurology)

    1984-02-11

    Two cases of histologically proven cerebral cysticercosis are presented. In both cases subcutaneous tissue nodules, a rare feature, were present. Several disease patterns are apparent - meningeal, parenchymatous and ventricular, spinal cord lesions and mixed patterns. Epilepsy is by far the major presenting symptom of cysticercosis, which in turn plays a significant role in the causation of adult-onset epilepsy in Blacks. Despite its drawbacks, the haemag-glutination inhibition test remains the most satisfactory serological method at present available for the diagnosis of cysticercosis; it is positive in up to 85% of cases of proven cysticercosis. With the advent of computed tomography many cases of unsuspected cysticercosis (symptomatic or asymptomatic) are being discovered.

  19. Cerebral Taurine Levels are Associated with Brain Edema and Delayed Cerebral Infarction in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Kofler, Mario; Schiefecker, Alois; Ferger, Boris; Beer, Ronny; Sohm, Florian; Broessner, Gregor; Hackl, Werner; Rhomberg, Paul; Lackner, Peter; Pfausler, Bettina; Thomé, Claudius; Schmutzhard, Erich; Helbok, Raimund

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral edema and delayed cerebral infarction (DCI) are common complications after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and associated with poor functional outcome. Experimental data suggest that the amino acid taurine is released into the brain extracellular space secondary to cytotoxic edema and brain tissue hypoxia, and therefore may serve as a biomarker for secondary brain injury after aSAH. On the other hand, neuroprotective mechanisms of taurine treatment have been described in the experimental setting. We analyzed cerebral taurine levels using high-performance liquid chromatography in the brain extracellular fluid of 25 consecutive aSAH patients with multimodal neuromonitoring including cerebral microdialysis (CMD). Patient characteristics and clinical course were prospectively recorded. Associations with CMD-taurine levels were analyzed using generalized estimating equations with an autoregressive process to handle repeated observations within subjects. CMD-taurine levels were highest in the first days after aSAH (11.2 ± 3.2 µM/l) and significantly decreased over time (p taurine levels compared to those without (Wald = 7.3, df = 1, p taurine supplementation and brain extracellular taurine (p = 0.6). Moreover, a significant correlation with brain extracellular glutamate (r = 0.82, p taurine levels were found in patients with brain edema or DCI after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Its value as a potential biomarker deserves further investigation.

  20. Cerebral Laterality and Verbal Processes

    Sherman, Jay L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Research suggests that we process information by way of two distinct and functionally separate coding systems. Their location, somewhat dependent on cerebral laterality, varies in right- and left-handed persons. Tests this dual coding model. (Editor/RK)