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Sample records for cerebral malaria phenomenon

  1. Malaria cerebral Cerebral malaria

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    Carlos Hugo Zapata Zapata

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available La malaria Cerebral (MC es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1 citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2 formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3 producción de citoquinas y activación de segundos mensajeros y, 4 apertura de la barrera hematoencefálica. Sin embargo, queda un interrogante sin resolver aún: ¿qué proceso se lleva a cabo para que el parásito, desde el espacio microvascular, pueda interferir transitoriamente con la función cerebral? Recientemente se ha utilizado el precursor de la proteína b-Amiloide como un marcador de daño neuronal en MC; este precursor será de gran ayuda en futuras investigaciones realizadas en nuestro medio que aporten información para comprender la patogénesis de la MC. Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains to be answered; how the host-parasite interaction in the vascular space interferes transiently with cerebral function? Recently, the beta amyloid precursor peptide has been employed as marker of neural injury in CM. It is expected that the beta amyloid precursor peptide will help to understand the pathogenesis of CM in complicated patients of endemic areas of Colombia.

  2. Cerebral malaria.

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    Postels, Douglas G; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-01-01

    Malaria, the most significant parasitic disease of man, kills approximately one million people per year. Half of these deaths occur in those with cerebral malaria (CM). The World Health Organization (WHO) defines CM as an otherwise unexplained coma in a patient with malarial parasitemia. Worldwide, CM occurs primarily in African children and Asian adults, with the vast majority (greater than 90%) of cases occurring in children 5 years old or younger in sub-Saharan Africa. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex and involves infected erythrocyte sequestration, cerebral inflammation, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. A recently characterized malarial retinopathy is visual evidence of Plasmodium falciparum's pathophysiological processes occurring in the affected patient. Treatment consists of supportive care and antimalarial administration. Thus far, adjuvant therapies have not been shown to improve mortality rates or neurological outcomes in children with CM. For those who survive CM, residual neurological abnormalities are common. Epilepsy, cognitive impairment, behavioral disorders, and gross neurological deficits which include motor, sensory, and language impairments are frequent sequelae. Primary prevention strategies, including bed nets, vaccine development, and chemoprophylaxis, are in varied states of development and implementation. Continuing efforts to find successful primary prevention options and strategies to decrease neurological sequelae are needed. PMID:23829902

  3. Cerebral malaria: gamma-interferon redux

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    Nicholas H Hunt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available There are two theories that seek to explain the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria, the mechanical obstruction hypothesis and the immunopathology hypothesis. Evidence consistent with both ideas has accumulated from studies of the human disease and experimental models. Thus some combination of these concepts seems necessary to explain the very complex pattern of changes seen in cerebral malaria. The interactions between malaria parasites, erythrocytes, the cerebral microvascular endothelium, brain parenchymal cells, platelets and microparticles need to be considered. One factor that seems able to knit together much of this complexity is the cytokine interferon-gamma. In this review we consider findings from the clinical disease, in vitro models and the murine counterpart of human cerebral malaria in order to evaluate the roles played by interferon-gamma in the pathogenesis of this often fatal and debilitating condition.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Features of Cerebral Malaria

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    Yadav, P.; Sharma, R.; Kumar, S.; Kumar, U. (Dept. of Radiodiagnosis and Dept. of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India))

    2008-06-15

    Background: Cerebral malaria is a major health hazard, with a high incidence of mortality. The disease is endemic in many developing countries, but with a greater increase in tourism, occasional cases may be detected in countries where the disease in not prevalent. Early diagnosis and evaluation of cerebral involvement in malaria utilizing modern imaging modalities have an impact on the treatment and clinical outcome. Purpose: To evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) features of patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. Material and Methods: We present the findings in three patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. MR imaging using a 1.5-Tesla unit was carried out. The sequences performed were 5-mm-thick T1-weighted, T2-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR), and T2-weighted gradient-echo axial sequences, and sagittal and coronal FLAIR. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with b values of 0 and 1000 s/mm2, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were obtained. Results: Focal hyperintensities in the bilateral periventricular white matter, corpus callosum, occipital subcortex, and bilateral thalami were noticed on T2-weighted and FLAIR sequences. The lesions were more marked in the splenium of the corpus callosum. No enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted MR images was observed. There was no evidence of restricted diffusion on the diffusion-weighted sequence and ADC map. Conclusion: MR is a sensitive imaging modality, with a role in the assessment of cerebral lesions in malaria. Focal white matter and corpus callosal lesions without any restricted diffusion were the key findings in our patients

  5. Potential Serological Biomarkers of Cerebral Malaria

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    Naomi W. Lucchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers have been used to diagnose and prognosticate the progress and outcome of many chronic diseases such as neoplastic and non communicable diseases. However, only recently did the field of malaria research move in the direction of actively identifying biomarkers that can accurately discriminate the severe forms of malaria. Malaria continues to be a deadly disease, killing close to a million people (mostly children every year. One life-threatening complication of malaria is cerebral malaria (CM. Studies carried out in Africa have demonstrated that even with the best treatment, as high as 15–30% of CM patients die and about 10–24% of CM survivors suffer short-or long-term neurological impairment. The transition from mild malaria to CM can be sudden and requires immediate intervention. Currently, there is no biological test available to confirm the diagnosis of CM and its complications. It is hoped that development of biomarkers to identify CM patients and potential risk for adverse outcomes would greatly enhance better intervention and clinical management to improve the outcomes. We review here what is currently known regarding biomarkers for CM outcomes.

  6. A case of cerebral malaria and dengue concurrent infection

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    Anwar Alam; Md Dm

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral malaria and dengue are the common infections which cause higher mortality and morbidities in every part of the world especially in India. Concurrent infection of cerebral malaria and dengue is rare entity due to different habitat of vectors and it was reported rarely from Southeast Asia. In this case report, the authors reported a case of concurrent cerebral malaria and dengue which was recovered after eight days of admission with increase in morbidity.

  7. Stem cell therapy: a novel treatment option for cerebral malaria?

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    Wang, Wei; Qian, Hui; Cao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral malaria, a severe form of the disease, is one of the most severe complications of infection with Plasmodium parasites and a leading cause of malaria mortality. Currently available antimalarial therapy has proven insufficient to prevent neurological complications and death in all cases of cerebral malaria. Souza and colleagues observed that transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) increased survival, reduced parasitemia, decreased malaria pigment accumulation in the spleen, liver and kidney, elevated Kupffer cell count in liver, alleviated renal injury and lung inflammation, and improved lung mechanics in an experimental mouse model of cerebral malaria. Although plenty of challenges lie ahead, their findings show the promise of BM-MSC therapy for the treatment of cerebral malaria. PMID:26253514

  8. Retinopathy in severe malaria in Ghanaian children - overlap between fundus changes in cerebral and non-cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Essuman, Vera A; Ntim-Amponsah, Christine T; Astrup, Birgitte S;

    2010-01-01

    diagnostic tool. This study was designed to determine the diagnostic usefulness of retinopathy on ophthalmoscopy in severe malaria syndromes: Cerebral malaria (CM) and non-cerebral severe malaria (non-CM), i.e. malaria with respiratory distress (RD) and malaria with severe anaemia (SA), in Ghanaian children...... and engorged retinal veins, not previously described as a feature of CM, was the most common vascular abnormality(15/58 = 26%) and was detected even in the absence of papilloedema. CONCLUSION: Retinal whitening, a sign suggestive of retinal ischaemia, was significantly more common in CM than in non...

  9. Ophthalmologic identification of cerebral malaria in adults

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    Pedrosa, Catarina Areias

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the clinical presentation of malarial retinopathy in an adult, emphasizing the importance of this diagnosis for the clinical suspicion and prognosis of cerebral malaria. Methods: A 39-year-old caucasian man presented with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, acidemia and acute renal failure, developing severe encephalopathy. The diagnosis of malaria was done and after systemic stabilization, the patient noticed a central scotoma in the left eye. Ophthalmological examination revealed retinal features of malarial retinopathy. Results: At one-month follow-up, the patient had improved his systemic condition and the left eye scotoma had disappeared. Visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes and on examination almost all lesions had regressed. Conclusion: Malarial retinopathy is a diagnostic factor and a prognosis indicator of severe infection, usually with brain involvement. The knowledge of the ophthalmological features associated with severe malaria, which is more frequent in children but can also occur in adults, becomes imperative in order to reduce the risk of neurologic sequelae and associated mortality.

  10. Human cerebral malaria and Plasmodium falciparum genotypes in Malawi

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    Milner Danny A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral malaria, a severe form of Plasmodium falciparum infection, is an important cause of mortality in sub-Saharan African children. A Taqman 24 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP molecular barcode assay was developed for use in laboratory parasites which estimates genotype number and identifies the predominant genotype. Methods The 24 SNP assay was used to determine predominant genotypes in blood and tissues from autopsy and clinical patients with cerebral malaria. Results Single genotypes were shared between the peripheral blood, the brain, and other tissues of cerebral malaria patients, while malaria-infected patients who died of non-malarial causes had mixed genetic signatures in tissues examined. Children with retinopathy-positive cerebral malaria had significantly less complex infections than those without retinopathy (OR = 3.7, 95% CI [1.51-9.10].The complexity of infections significantly decreased over the malaria season in retinopathy-positive patients compared to retinopathy-negative patients. Conclusions Cerebral malaria patients harbour a single or small set of predominant parasites; patients with incidental parasitaemia sustain infections involving diverse genotypes. Limited diversity in the peripheral blood of cerebral malaria patients and correlation with tissues supports peripheral blood samples as appropriate for genome-wide association studies of parasite determinants of pathogenicity.

  11. Comparison of different diagnostic techniques in Plasmodium falciparum cerebral malaria

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    Fatima Shujatullah, Abida Malik, Haris M. Khan & Ashraf Malik

    2006-01-01

    Background & objectives: Plasmodium falciparum cerebral malaria remains a major health problemin India. The efficacy of treatment of cerebral malaria lies in its early diagnosis through rapid diagnosticmethods. ParaSights-F test detects HRP-2 antigen secreted by parasitised red blood cells andquantitative buffy coat assay (QBC) is examination of buffy coat for the presence of malarial parasitestained with acridine orange. This study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of ParaSight-F t...

  12. Absence of apolipoprotein E protects mice from cerebral malaria

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    Kassa, Fikregabrail Aberra; Van Den Ham, Kristin; Rainone, Anthony; Fournier, Sylvie; Boilard, Eric; Olivier, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria claims the life of millions of people each year, particularly those of children, and is a major global public health problem. Thus, the identification of novel malaria biomarkers that could be utilized as diagnostic or therapeutic targets is becoming increasingly important. Using a proteomic approach, we previously identified unique biomarkers in the sera of malaria-infected individuals, including apolipoprotein E (ApoE). ApoE is the dominant apolipoprotein in the brain and has been implicated in several neurological disorders; therefore, we were interested in the potential role of ApoE in cerebral malaria. Here we report the first demonstration that cerebral malaria is markedly attenuated in ApoE−/− mice. The protection provided by the absence of ApoE was associated with decreased sequestration of parasites and T cells within the brain, and was determined to be independent from the involvement of ApoE receptors and from the altered lipid metabolism associated with the knock-out mice. Importantly, we demonstrated that treatment of mice with the ApoE antagonist heparin octasaccharide significantly decreased the incidence of cerebral malaria. Overall, our study indicates that the reduction of ApoE could be utilized in the development of therapeutic treatments aimed at mitigating the neuropathology of cerebral malaria. PMID:27647324

  13. A study on the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria and cerebral babesiosis

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    Masamichi Aikawa

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral complications are important, but poorly understood pathological features of infections caused by some species of Plasmodium and Babesia. Patients dying from P. falciparum were classified as cerebral or non-cerebral cases according to the cerebral malaria coma scale. Light microscopy revealed that cerebral microvessels of cerebral malaria patients were field with a mixture of parazited and unparazited erythrocytes, with 94% of the vessels showing parasitized red blood cell (PRBC sequestration. Some degree of PRBC sequestration was also found in non-cerebral malaria patients, but the percentage of microvessls with sequestered PRBC was only 13% Electron microscopy demonstrated knobs on the membrane of PRBC that formed focal junctions with the capillary endothelium. A number of host cell molecules such as CD36, thrombospondim (TSP and intracellular adhesion molecule I (ICAM-1 may function as endothelial cell surfacereports for P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Affinity labeling of CD36 and TSP to the PRBC surface showed these molecules specifically bind to the knobs. Babesia bovis infected erythrocytes procedure projections of the erythrocyte membrane that are similar to knobs. When brain tissue from B. bovis-infected cattle was examined, cerebral capillaries were packed with PRBC. Infected erythrocytes formed focal attachments with cerebral endothelial cells at the site of these knob-like projections. These findings indicate that cerebral pathology caused by B. bovis is similar to human cerebral malaria. A search for cytoadherence proteins in the endothelial cells may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenisis of cerebral babesiosis.

  14. The Platelet Count in Cerebral Malaria, Is It Useful to the Clinician?

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    Chimalizeni, Yamikani; Kawaza, Kondwani; Taylor, Terrie; Molyneux, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    We conducted this study to determine the prognostic significance of the platelet count in children with cerebral malaria. We studied children with cerebral malaria admitted to the pediatric research ward at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Malawi. We analyzed 1,811 children with cerebral malaria and compared them with 521 children with bacterial meningitis. There was a significant difference in platelet counts between children with cerebral malaria and those with meningitis. Among children w...

  15. Comparison of different diagnostic techniques in Plasmodium falciparum cerebral malaria

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    Fatima Shujatullah, Abida Malik, Haris M. Khan & Ashraf Malik

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Plasmodium falciparum cerebral malaria remains a major health problemin India. The efficacy of treatment of cerebral malaria lies in its early diagnosis through rapid diagnosticmethods. ParaSights-F test detects HRP-2 antigen secreted by parasitised red blood cells andquantitative buffy coat assay (QBC is examination of buffy coat for the presence of malarial parasitestained with acridine orange. This study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of ParaSight-F test and QBC assay as diagnostic methods in the patients of cerebral malaria.Methods: Fifty clinically diagnosed patients of cerebral malaria were included in the study.ParaSight-F test, QBC and conventional blood smear examination was done. Patients who were incoma and there were no obvious features of bacterial or viral etiology were investigated for cerebralmalaria by these diagnostic methods.Results: ParaSight-F test, QBC and peripheral blood smears were examined. Patients were followedupfor signs of clinical recovery. ParaSight-F test was positive in 47 patients, QBC in 46 while bloodsmear examination was positive in 28 cases.Interpretation & conclusion: Sensitivity and specificity of ParaSight-F test were found to be 96.6 and94% while QBC showed 97.8 and 100% respectively. ParaSight-F test and QBC were found to be novelmethods for diagnosis of cerebral malaria especially in the cases where diagnosis can not be made byconventional blood smear examination due to low parasitaemia. These rapid diagnostic methods helpin early therapeutic intervention.

  16. Neuroimaging findings in children with retinopathy-confirmed cerebral malaria

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    Potchen, Michael J. [Michigan State University, Department of Radiology, 184 Radiology Building, East Lansing, MI 48824-1303 (United States)], E-mail: mjp@rad.msu.edu; Birbeck, Gretchen L. [Michigan State University, International Neurologic and Psychiatric Epidemiology Program, 324 West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)], E-mail: Gretchen.Birbeck@ht.msu.edu; DeMarco, J. Kevin [Michigan State University, Department of Radiology, 184 Radiology Building, East Lansing, MI 48824-1303 (United States)], E-mail: jkd@rad.msu.edu; Kampondeni, Sam D. [University of Malawi, Department of Radiology, Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre (Malawi)], E-mail: kamponde@msu.edu; Beare, Nicholas [St. Paul' s Eye Unit, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Prescot Street, Liverpool L7 8XP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: nbeare@btinternet.com; Molyneux, Malcolm E. [Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, College of Medicine (Malawi); School of Tropical Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mmolyneux999@google.com; Taylor, Terrie E. [Michigan State University, College of Osteopathic Medicine, B309-B West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); University of Malawi, College of Medicine, Blantyre Malaria Project, Blantyre (Malawi)], E-mail: taylort@msu.edu

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To describe brain CT findings in retinopathy-confirmed, paediatric cerebral malaria. Materials and methods: In this outcomes study of paediatric cerebral malaria, a subset of children with protracted coma during initial presentation was scanned acutely. Survivors experiencing adverse neurological outcomes also underwent a head CT. All children had ophthalmological examination to confirm the presence of the retinopathy specific for cerebral malaria. Independent interpretation of CT images was provided by two neuroradiologists. Results: Acute brain CT findings in three children included diffuse oedema with obstructive hydrocephalus (2), acute cerebral infarctions in multiple large vessel distributions with secondary oedema and herniation (1), and oedema of thalamic grey matter (1). One child who was reportedly normal prior to admission had parenchymal atrophy suggestive of pre-existing CNS injury. Among 56 survivors (9-84 months old), 15 had adverse neurologic outcomes-11/15 had a follow-up head CT, 3/15 died and 1/15 refused CT. Follow-up head CTs obtained 7-18 months after the acute infection revealed focal and multifocal lobar atrophy correlating to regions affected by focal seizures during the acute infection (5/11). Other findings were communicating hydrocephalus (2/11), vermian atrophy (1/11) and normal studies (3/11). Conclusions: The identification of pre-existing imaging abnormalities in acute cerebral malaria suggests that population-based studies are required to establish the rate and nature of incidental imaging abnormalities in Malawi. Children with focal seizures during acute cerebral malaria developed focal cortical atrophy in these regions at follow-up. Longitudinal studies are needed to further elucidate mechanisms of CNS injury and death in this common fatal disease.

  17. Lactate transport and receptor actions in cerebral malaria

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    Mariga, Shelton T; Kolko, Miriam; Gjedde, Albert;

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM), caused by Plasmodium falciparum infection, is a prevalent neurological disorder in the tropics. Most of the patients are children, typically with intractable seizures and high mortality. Current treatment is unsatisfactory. Understanding the pathogenesis of CM is required i...

  18. The systemic pathology of cerebral malaria in African children

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    Danny Arnold Milner

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cerebral malaria carries a high mortality rate in sub-Saharan Africa. We present our systematic analysis of the descriptive and quantitative histopathology of all organs sampled from a series of 103 autopsies performed between 1996 and 2010 in Blantyre, Malawi on pediatric cerebral malaria patients and control patients (without coma, or without malaria infection who were clinically well characterized prior to death. We found brain swelling in all cerebral malaria patients and the majority of controls. The histopathology in patients with sequestration of parasites in the brain demonstrated two patterns: a the classic appearance (i.e., ring hemorrhages, dense sequestration, and extra-erythrocytic pigment which was associated with evidence of systemic activation of coagulation and b the sequestration only appearance associated with shorter duration of illness and higher total burden of parasites in all organs including the spleen. Sequestration of parasites was most intense in the gastrointestinal tract in all parasitemic patients (those with cerebral malarial and those without.

  19. Brain Swelling and Death in Children with Cerebral Malaria

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    Seydel, Karl B.; Kampondeni, Samuel D.; Valim, Clarissa; Potchen, Michael J.; Milner, Danny A.; Muwalo, Francis W.; Birbeck, Gretchen L.; Bradley, William G.; Fox, Lindsay L.; Glover, Simon J.; Hammond, Colleen A.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Chilingulo, Cowles A.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Taylor, Terrie E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Case fatality rates among African children with cerebral malaria remain in the range of 15 to 25%. The key pathogenetic processes and causes of death are unknown, but a combination of clinical observations and pathological findings suggests that increased brain volume leading to raised intracranial pressure may play a role. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) became available in Malawi in 2009, and we used it to investigate the role of brain swelling in the pathogenesis of fatal cerebral malaria in African children. METHODS We enrolled children who met a stringent definition of cerebral malaria (one that included the presence of retinopathy), characterized them in detail clinically, and obtained MRI scans on admission and daily thereafter while coma persisted. RESULTS Of 348 children admitted with cerebral malaria (as defined by the World Health Organization), 168 met the inclusion criteria, underwent all investigations, and were included in the analysis. A total of 25 children (15%) died, 21 of whom (84%) had evidence of severe brain swelling on MRI at admission. In contrast, evidence of severe brain swelling was seen on MRI in 39 of 143 survivors (27%). Serial MRI scans showed evidence of decreasing brain volume in the survivors who had had brain swelling initially. CONCLUSIONS Increased brain volume was seen in children who died from cerebral malaria but was uncommon in those who did not die from the disease, a finding that suggests that raised intracranial pressure may contribute to a fatal outcome. The natural history indicates that increased intracranial pressure is transient in survivors. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and Wellcome Trust U.K.) PMID:25785970

  20. Whole blood angiopoietin-1 and -2 levels discriminate cerebral and severe (non-cerebral malaria from uncomplicated malaria

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    Tangpukdee Noppadon

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe and cerebral malaria are associated with endothelial activation. Angiopoietin-1 (ANG-1 and angiopoietin-2 (ANG-2 are major regulators of endothelial activation and integrity. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical utility of whole blood angiopoietin (ANG levels as biomarkers of disease severity in Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Methods The utility of whole blood ANG levels was examined in Thai patients to distinguish cerebral (CM; n = 87 and severe (non-cerebral malaria (SM; n = 36 from uncomplicated malaria (UM; n = 70. Comparative statistics are reported using a non-parametric univariate analysis (Kruskal-Wallis test or Chi-squared test, as appropriate. Multivariate binary logistic regression was used to examine differences in whole blood protein levels between groups (UM, SM, CM, adjusting for differences due to ethnicity, age, parasitaemia and sex. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the ANGs in their ability to distinguish between UM, SM and CM. Cumulative organ injury scores were obtained for patients with severe disease based on the presence of acute renal failure, jaundice, severe anaemia, circulatory collapse or coma. Results ANG-1 and ANG-2 were readily detectable in whole blood. Compared to UM there were significant decreases in ANG-1 (p Conclusions These results suggest that whole blood ANG-1/2 levels are promising clinically informative biomarkers of disease severity in malarial syndromes.

  1. Plasmodium coatneyi-infected rhesus monkeys: a primate modelfor human cerebral malaria

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    Masamichi Aikawa; Brown, Arthur E.; C. Dahlem Smith; Tatsuya Tegoshi; Russell J. Howard; Thomas H. Hasler; Yoshihiro Ito; William E. Colins; H. Kyle Webster

    1992-01-01

    Although several animal models for human cerebral malaria have been proposed in the past, name have shown pathological findings that are similar to those seen in humans. In order to develop an animal model for human cerebral malaria, we studied the pathology of brains of Plasmodium coatneyi (primate malaria parasite)-infected rhesus monkeys. Our study demonstrated parazitized erythrocyte (PRBC) sequestration and cytoadherence of knobs on PRBC to endothelial cells in cerebral microvessels of t...

  2. High Plasma Erythropoietin Levels are Associated With Prolonged Coma Duration and Increased Mortality in Children With Cerebral Malaria

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    Shabani, Estela; Opoka, Robert O.; Idro, Richard; Schmidt, Robert; Park, Gregory S.; Bangirana, Paul; Gregory M Vercellotti; Hodges, James S.; Widness, John A.; John, Chandy C.

    2014-01-01

    In children aged >18 months with cerebral malaria, elevated erythropoietin levels were associated with increased mortality, prolonged coma duration, and a lack of neuroprotection. Caution is warranted in the use of systemic erythropoietin as adjunctive therapy in cerebral malaria.

  3. Investigation of Hydrogen Sulfide Gas as a Treatment against P. falciparum, Murine Cerebral Malaria, and the Importance of Thiolation State in the Development of Cerebral Malaria

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    Dellavalle, Brian; Staalsoe, Trine; Kurtzhals, Jørgen Anders;

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a potentially fatal cerebrovascular disease of complex pathogenesis caused by Plasmodium falciparum. Hydrogen sulfide (HS) is a physiological gas, similar to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, involved in cellular metabolism, vascular tension, inflammation, and cell death...

  4. Advances in the management of cerebral malaria in adults

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    Mishra, Saroj K; Wiese, Lothar

    2009-01-01

    of cerebral malaria and the role of adjuvant therapy will be discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Artemisinin-based therapies have improved antiparasitic treatment, but in-hospital mortality still remains high, as do neurological sequelae. Several recent studies have given new insights in the pathophysiology...... into large clinical trials. SUMMARY: Advances have been made in terms of antiparasitic treatment, but the identification of a well tolerated and effective adjuvant treatment to increase survival and reduce brain damage is still pending. The search for new approaches is a major challenge, not least of which...

  5. Long-term cognitive sequelae of cerebral malaria in Vietnam veterans.

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    Richardson, E D; Varney, N R; Roberts, R J; Springer, J A; Wood, P S

    1997-01-01

    The brains of fatal cases of cerebral malaria exhibit capillary occlusion, punctiform hemorrhages, and focal necrosis in subcortical white matter. Some studies have suggested that the brain pathology of survivors is similar to that of fatal cases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that cerebral malaria survivors would exhibit neuropsychological impairment due to the residual cerebral damage sustained from the infection. Vietnam veterans reporting a history of cerebral malaria were compared with a group of veterans with a history of combat-related injuries on standard neuropsychological tasks and on dichotic listening (DL). The cerebral malaria group performed worse on memory tasks and exhibited greater clinical impairments on DL, consistent with presumed disruption of subcortical white matter tracts. PMID:16318473

  6. Endothelin-1 Mediates Brain Microvascular Dysfunction Leading to Long-Term Cognitive Impairment in a Model of Experimental Cerebral Malaria.

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    Brandi D Freeman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum infection causes a wide spectrum of diseases, including cerebral malaria, a potentially life-threatening encephalopathy. Vasculopathy is thought to contribute to cerebral malaria pathogenesis. The vasoactive compound endothelin-1, a key participant in many inflammatory processes, likely mediates vascular and cognitive dysfunctions in cerebral malaria. We previously demonstrated that C57BL6 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA, our fatal experimental cerebral malaria model, sustained memory loss. Herein, we demonstrate that an endothelin type A receptor (ETA antagonist prevented experimental cerebral malaria-induced neurocognitive impairments and improved survival. ETA antagonism prevented blood-brain barrier disruption and cerebral vasoconstriction during experimental cerebral malaria, and reduced brain endothelial activation, diminishing brain microvascular congestion. Furthermore, exogenous endothelin-1 administration to P. berghei NK65-infected mice, a model generally regarded as a non-cerebral malaria negative control for P. berghei ANKA infection, led to experimental cerebral malaria-like memory deficits. Our data indicate that endothelin-1 is critical in the development of cerebrovascular and cognitive impairments with experimental cerebral malaria. This vasoactive peptide may thus serve as a potential target for adjunctive therapy in the management of cerebral malaria.

  7. Proteomic Studies on Human and Experimental Cerebral Malaria

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    Moussa, Ehab

    2012-07-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe neurological complication of malaria infection that results from interrelated pathologies. Despite extensive research efforts, the mechanism of the disease is not completely understood. Clinical studies, postmortem analysis, and animal models have been the main research arenas in CM. In this thesis, shotgun proteomics approach was used to further understand the pathology of human and experimental CM. The mechanism by which CM turns fatal is yet to be identified. A clinical proteomics study was conducted on pooled plasma samples from children with reversible or fatal CM from the Gambia. The results show that depletion of coagulation factors and increased levels of circulating proteasomes are associated with fatal pediatric CM. This data suggests that the ongoing coagulation during CM might be a disseminated intravascular coagulation state that eventually causes depletion of the coagulation factors leading to petechial hemorrhages. In addition, the mechanism(s) by which blood transfusion benefits CM in children was investigated. To that end, the concentration and multimerization pattern of von-willebrand factor, and the concentration of haptoglobin in the plasma of children with CM who received blood transfusions were measured. In addition to clinical studies, experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in mice has been long used as a model for the disease. A shotgun proteomics workflow was optimized to identify the proteomic signature of the brain tissue of mice with ECM.Because of the utmost importance of membrane proteins in the pathology of the disease, sample fractionation and filter aided sample preparation were used to recover them. The proteomic signature of the brains of mice infected with P. berghei ANKA that developed neurological syndrome, mice infected with P. berghei NK56 that developed severe malaria but without neurological signs, and non-infected mice, were compared to identify CM specific proteins. Among the differentially

  8. Toll-like receptor polymorphisms and cerebral malaria: TLR2 Δ22 polymorphism is associated with protection from cerebral malaria in a case control study

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    Greene Jennifer A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In malaria endemic areas, host genetics influence whether a Plasmodium falciparum-infected child develops uncomplicated or severe malaria. TLR2 has been identified as a receptor for P. falciparum-derived glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI, and polymorphisms within the TLR2 gene may affect disease pathogenesis. There are two common polymorphisms in the 5' un-translated region (UTR of TLR2, a 22 base pair deletion in the first unstranslated exon (Δ22, and a GT dinucleotide repeat in the second intron (GTn. Methods These polymorphisms were examined in a Ugandan case control study on children with either cerebral malaria or uncomplicated malaria. Serum cytokine levels were analysed by ELISA, according to genotype and disease status. In vitro TLR2 expression was measured according to genotype. Results Both Δ22 and GTn polymorphisms were highly frequent, but only Δ22 heterozygosity was associated with protection from cerebral malaria (OR 0.34, 95% confidence intervals 0.16, 0.73. In vitro, heterozygosity for Δ22 was associated with reduced pam3cys inducible TLR2 expression in human monocyte derived macrophages. In uncomplicated malaria patients, Δ22 homozygosity was associated with elevated serum IL-6 (p = 0.04, and long GT repeat alleles were associated with elevated TNF (p = 0.007. Conclusion Reduced inducible TLR2 expression may lead to attenuated pro-inflammatory responses, a potential mechanism of protection from cerebral malaria present in individuals heterozygous for the TLR2 Δ22 polymorphism.

  9. Pathogenesis of Cerebral Malaria: New Diagnostic Tools, Biomarkers and Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kishore Sahu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria is a severe neuropathological complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. It results in high mortality and post-recovery neuro-cognitive disorders in children, even after appropriate treatment with effective anti-parasitic drugs. While the complete landscape of the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria still remains to be elucidated, numerous innovative approaches have been developed in the recent years in order to improve the early detection of this neurological syndrome, and subsequently, the clinical care of affected patients. In this review, we briefly summarize the current understanding of cerebral malaria pathogenesis, compile the array of new biomarkers and tools available for diagnosis and research and describe the emerging therapeutic approaches to tackle effectively cerebral malaria.

  10. From METS to malaria: RRx-001, a multi-faceted anticancer agent with activity in cerebral malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Yalçın, Özlem; Oronsky, Bryan; Carvalho, Leonardo J. M.; Kuypers, Frans A.; Scicinski, Jan; Cabrales, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    RESEARCH Open Access From METS to malaria: RRx-001, a multi-faceted anticancer agent with activity in cerebral malaria Ozlem Yalcin1,2, Bryan Oronsky3, Leonardo J. M. Carvalho4,5, Frans A. Kuypers6, Jan Scicinski3 and Pedro Cabrales1* Abstract Background: The survival of malaria parasites, under substantial haem-induced oxidative stress in the red blood cells (RBCs) is dependent on the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). The PPP is the only source of NADPH in the RBC, ess...

  11. Plasmodium vivax cerebral malaria complicated with venous sinus thrombosis in Colombia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miguel A Pinzn; Juan C Pineda; Fernando Rosso; Masaru Shinchi; Fabio Bonilla-Abada

    2013-01-01

    Complicated malaria is usually due to Plasmodium falciparum. Nevertheless, Plasmodium vivax is infrequently related with life-threatening complications. Few cases have been reported of severe Plasmodium vivax infection, and most of them from Southeast Asia and India. We report the first case of cerebral malaria due to Plasmodium vivax in Latin America, complicated with sagittal sinus thrombosis and confirmed by a molecular method.

  12. Scanning electron microscopy of the neuropathology of murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms leading to death and functional impairments due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Most of the knowledge about the pathomechanisms of CM originates from studies in animal models. Though extensive histopathological studies of the murine brain during CM are existing, alterations have not been visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM so far. The present study investigates the neuropathological features of murine CM by applying SEM. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. When typical symptoms of CM developed perfused brains were processed for SEM or light microscopy, respectively. Results Ultrastructural hallmarks were disruption of vessel walls, parenchymal haemorrhage, leukocyte sequestration to the endothelium, and diapedesis of macrophages and lymphocytes into the Virchow-Robin space. Villous appearance of observed lymphocytes were indicative of activated state. Cerebral oedema was evidenced by enlargement of perivascular spaces. Conclusion The results of the present study corroborate the current understanding of CM pathophysiology, further support the prominent role of the local immune system in the neuropathology of CM and might expose new perspectives for further interventional studies.

  13. Reliability of the Luganda version of the Child Behaviour Checklist in measuring behavioural problems after cerebral malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Opoka Robert O; Giordani Bruno; Nakasujja Noeline; Bangirana Paul; John Chandy C; Boivin Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background No measure of childhood behaviour has been validated in Uganda despite the documented risks to behaviour. Cerebral malaria in children poses a great risk to their behaviour, however behavioural outcomes after cerebral malaria have not been described in children. This study examined the reliability of the Luganda version of the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) and described the behavioural outcomes of cerebral malaria in Ugandan children. Methods The CBCL was administered t...

  14. Genetic susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus protects against cerebral malaria in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisberg, Michael; Tarasenko, Tatyana; Vickers, Brandi K; Scott, Bethany L; Willcocks, Lisa C; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Pierce, Matthew A; Huang, Chiung-yu; Torres-Velez, Fernando J; Smith, Kenneth G C; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Miller, Louis H; Pierce, Susan K; Bolland, Silvia

    2011-01-18

    Plasmodium falciparum has exerted tremendous selective pressure on genes that improve survival in severe malarial infections. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that is six to eight times more prevalent in women of African descent than in women of European descent. Here we provide evidence that a genetic susceptibility to SLE protects against cerebral malaria. Mice that are prone to SLE because of a deficiency in FcγRIIB or overexpression of Toll-like receptor 7 are protected from death caused by cerebral malaria. Protection appears to be by immune mechanisms that allow SLE-prone mice better to control their overall inflammatory responses to parasite infections. These findings suggest that the high prevalence of SLE in women of African descent living outside of Africa may result from the inheritance of genes that are beneficial in the immune control of cerebral malaria but that, in the absence of malaria, contribute to autoimmune disease. PMID:21187399

  15. Genetic susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus protects against cerebral malaria in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisberg, Michael; Tarasenko, Tatyana; Vickers, Brandi K.; Scott, Bethany L.; Willcocks, Lisa C.; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Pierce, Matthew A.; Huang, Chiung-yu; Torres-Velez, Fernando J.; Smith, Kenneth G. C.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Miller, Louis H.; Pierce, Susan K.; Bolland, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum has exerted tremendous selective pressure on genes that improve survival in severe malarial infections. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that is six to eight times more prevalent in women of African descent than in women of European descent. Here we provide evidence that a genetic susceptibility to SLE protects against cerebral malaria. Mice that are prone to SLE because of a deficiency in FcγRIIB or overexpression of Toll-like receptor 7 are protected from death caused by cerebral malaria. Protection appears to be by immune mechanisms that allow SLE-prone mice better to control their overall inflammatory responses to parasite infections. These findings suggest that the high prevalence of SLE in women of African descent living outside of Africa may result from the inheritance of genes that are beneficial in the immune control of cerebral malaria but that, in the absence of malaria, contribute to autoimmune disease. PMID:21187399

  16. CLINICO - HAEMATOLOGICAL PROFILE AND OUTCOME OF CEREBRAL MALARIA IN A TEACHING HOSPITAL OF SOUTH EAST RAJASTHAN

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    Gautam Lal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Evaluation of Clinico - hematological profile and outcome of cerebral malaria in semi urban hospital situated in endemic area. MATERIAL AND METHODS : A cross - sectional hospital - based study was conducted from August to November, 2014 at Department of Paediatrics SRG Zanana Hospital, Jhalawar Rajasthan. Every child, except who was previously abnormal neurologically, of the age of six month to 12 years, presented with a history of fever in the last 7 days, with o r without convulsion, and/or impaired consciousness, screened for malaria by peripheral blood smear examination and rapid diagnostic test for malaria parasite. On the basis of this screening examination, these children were classified definite cerebral mal aria where the peripheral smear was positive and probable cerebral malaria where the peripheral smear was negative. If the patients presented with fever, convulsion, and/or impaired level of consciousness, they were treated with Artesunate intravenously em pirically. Patients were followed - up regularly till they regained consciousness and when, they were able to swallow, treated with oral Artisunate and single dose of Sulphadoxine and Pyrimethamine combination is also given. RESULTS: Of the3332 admissions, 8 69 (26.08% were admitted for fever. Out of these 869 febrile patients 352 patients were having other obvious clinical diagnosis for fever. In remaining 517(59.49% cases were suspected to be suffering from malaria, but all of these children who were admit ted with the diagnosis of fever, were screened for malaria and 74(08.51%were found to be positive for malaria parasite either by peripheral blood smear or rapid diagnostic test or both. Cerebral malaria developed in 37 patients. Most cases were of age gro up of 2 - 5 years, 14children had definite cerebral malaria and 9 were labelled as suspected to have probable cerebral malaria. Neurological symptoms of altered sensorium, convulsion and abnormal behaviour ranged from 35

  17. Plant Hormone Salicylic Acid Produced by a Malaria Parasite Controls Host Immunity and Cerebral Malaria Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Ryuma; Aonuma, Hiroka; Kojima, Mikiko; Tahara, Michiru; Andrabi, Syed Bilal Ahmad; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Nagamune, Kisaburo

    2015-01-01

    The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii produces the plant hormone abscisic acid, but it is unclear if phytohormones are produced by the malaria parasite Plasmodium spp., the most important parasite of this phylum. Here, we report detection of salicylic acid, an immune-related phytohormone of land plants, in P. berghei ANKA and T. gondii cell lysates. However, addition of salicylic acid to P. falciparum and T. gondii culture had no effect. We transfected P. falciparum 3D7 with the nahG gene, which encodes a salicylic acid-degrading enzyme isolated from plant-infecting Pseudomonas sp., and established a salicylic acid-deficient mutant. The mutant had a significantly decreased concentration of parasite-synthesized prostaglandin E2, which potentially modulates host immunity as an adaptive evolution of Plasmodium spp. To investigate the function of salicylic acid and prostaglandin E2 on host immunity, we established P. berghei ANKA mutants expressing nahG. C57BL/6 mice infected with nahG transfectants developed enhanced cerebral malaria, as assessed by Evans blue leakage and brain histological observation. The nahG-transfectant also significantly increased the mortality rate of mice. Prostaglandin E2 reduced the brain symptoms by induction of T helper-2 cytokines. As expected, T helper-1 cytokines including interferon-γ and interleukin-2 were significantly elevated by infection with the nahG transfectant. Thus, salicylic acid of Plasmodium spp. may be a new pathogenic factor of this threatening parasite and may modulate immune function via parasite-produced prostaglandin E2.

  18. Plant Hormone Salicylic Acid Produced by a Malaria Parasite Controls Host Immunity and Cerebral Malaria Outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuma Matsubara

    Full Text Available The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii produces the plant hormone abscisic acid, but it is unclear if phytohormones are produced by the malaria parasite Plasmodium spp., the most important parasite of this phylum. Here, we report detection of salicylic acid, an immune-related phytohormone of land plants, in P. berghei ANKA and T. gondii cell lysates. However, addition of salicylic acid to P. falciparum and T. gondii culture had no effect. We transfected P. falciparum 3D7 with the nahG gene, which encodes a salicylic acid-degrading enzyme isolated from plant-infecting Pseudomonas sp., and established a salicylic acid-deficient mutant. The mutant had a significantly decreased concentration of parasite-synthesized prostaglandin E2, which potentially modulates host immunity as an adaptive evolution of Plasmodium spp. To investigate the function of salicylic acid and prostaglandin E2 on host immunity, we established P. berghei ANKA mutants expressing nahG. C57BL/6 mice infected with nahG transfectants developed enhanced cerebral malaria, as assessed by Evans blue leakage and brain histological observation. The nahG-transfectant also significantly increased the mortality rate of mice. Prostaglandin E2 reduced the brain symptoms by induction of T helper-2 cytokines. As expected, T helper-1 cytokines including interferon-γ and interleukin-2 were significantly elevated by infection with the nahG transfectant. Thus, salicylic acid of Plasmodium spp. may be a new pathogenic factor of this threatening parasite and may modulate immune function via parasite-produced prostaglandin E2.

  19. Low plasma concentrations of interleukin 10 in severe malarial anaemia compared with cerebral and uncomplicated malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtzhals, J A; Adabayeri, V; Goka, B Q;

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe anaemia is a major complication of malaria but little is known about its pathogenesis. Experimental models have implicated tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in induction of bone-marrow suppression and eythrophagocytosis. Conversely, interleukin 10 (IL-10), which mediates feed......-back regulation of TNF, stimulates bone-marrow function in vitro and counteracts anaemia in mice. We investigated the associations of these cytokines with malarial anaemia. METHODS: We enrolled 175 African children with malaria into two studies in 1995 and 1996. In the first study, children were classified...... as having severe anaemia (n=10), uncomplicated malaria (n=26), or cerebral anaemia (n=41). In the second study, patients were classified as having cerebral malaria (n=33) or being fully conscious (n=65), and the two groups were subdivided by measured haemoglobin as normal (>110 g/L), moderate anaemia (60...

  20. Significant association between TIM1 promoter polymorphisms and protection against cerebral malaria in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuchnoi, P; Ohashi, J; Kimura, R; Hananantachai, H; Naka, I; Krudsood, S; Looareesuwan, S; Tokunaga, K; Patarapotikul, J

    2008-05-01

    Although cerebral malaria is a major life-threatening complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection, its pathophysiology is not well understood. Prolonged activation of the T helper type 1 (Th1) response characterized by the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha has been suggested to be responsible for immunopathological process leading to cerebral malaria unless they are downregulated by the anti-inflamatory cytokines produced by the Th2 response. The T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) family of proteins are cell surface proteins involved in regulating Th1 and Th2 immune responses. In this study, the possible association between the polymorphisms of TIM1, TIM3, and TIMD4 genes and the severity of malaria was examined in 478 adult Thai patients infected with P. falciparum malaria. The TIM1 promoter haplotype comprising three derived alleles, -1637A (rs7702919), -1549C (rs41297577) and -1454A (rs41297579), which were in complete linkage disequilibrium, was significantly associated with protection against cerebral malaria (OR = 0.41; 95% CI = 0.24-0.71; P= 0.0009). Allele-specific transcription quantification analysis revealed that the level of mRNA transcribed from TIM1 was higher for the protective promoter haplotype than for the other promoter haplotype (P= 0.004). Engagement with TIM1 in combination with T cell receptor stimulation induces anti-inflammatory Th2 cytokine production, which can protect the development of cerebral malaria caused by overproduction of pro-inflammatory Th1 cytokines. The present results suggest that the higher TIM1 expression associated with the protective TIM1 promoter haplotype confers protection against cerebral malaria.

  1. Experimental Cerebral Malaria Develops Independently of Caspase Recruitment Domain-Containing Protein 9 Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Julius Clemence R Hafalla; Burgold, Jan; Dorhoi, Anca; Gross, Olaf; Ruland, Jürgen; Stefan H. E. Kaufmann; Matuschewski, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The outcome of infection depends on multiple layers of immune regulation, with innate immunity playing a decisive role in shaping protection or pathogenic sequelae of acquired immunity. The contribution of pattern recognition receptors and adaptor molecules in immunity to malaria remains poorly understood. Here, we interrogate the role of the caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) signaling pathway in the development of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) using the murine Pla...

  2. Malária cerebral e AIDS: relato de caso Cerebral malaria and AIDS: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Hinrichsen

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Embora não esteja definitivamente comprovada que a severidade da malária esteja associada com o vírus da imunodeficiência humana (HIV, sabe-se que a infecção pelo Plasmodium falciparum pode favorecer uma rápida evolução da infecção pelo HIV. Além disso a associação da malária com HIV/AIDS, do ponto de vista clínico, pode ser extremamente grave face a ocorrência de outros microorganismos e/ou neoplasias, o que piora a evolução e prognóstico dos pacientes. A concomitância do vírus HIV com o Plasmodium em zonas endêmicas de malária, é uma possibilidade que deve ser sempre pensada, visto que a sua transmissão está relacionada a fatores de risco ligados aos comportamentos das pessoas, que nem sempre são logo revelados e/ou identificados. Os autores descrevem um caso de malária cerebral por Plasmodium vivaxe Plasmodiumfalciparum em um paciente com AIDS. Descrevem sua evolução clínica e terapêutica.Although it has not been definitely proven that the severity of malaria is associated to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV we know that infection through Plasmodium falciparum can favor a rapid evolution of the HIV infection. Besides, association of malaria with HIV/AIDS from a clinical point of view can be clinically severe in the face of the occurrence of other microorganisms or neoplasias, which worsens the evolution and prognosis of the affected patients. The concurrence of HIV with Plasmodium in malaria endemic zones is a possibility which should always be taken into consideration, since transmission is related to risk factors caused by people's behavior which are not always promptly revealed and/or identified. The authors report one case of brain malaria infection by Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in a patient with AIDS. They describe the clinical evolution and therapy.

  3. Mannitol and other osmotic diuretics as adjuncts for treating cerebral malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoromah, Christy AN; Afolabi, Bosede B; Wall, Emma CB

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebral oedema occurs with cerebral malaria, and some clinicians think osmotic diuretics, such as mannitol or urea, may improve outcomes. Objectives To compare mannitol or urea to placebo or no diuretic for treating children or adults with cerebral malaria. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register (Issue 4, 2010), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library Issue 12, 2010), MEDLINE (1966 to November 2010), EMBASE (1974 to November 2010), LILACS (1982 to November 2010), and the reference lists of articles. We contacted relevant organizations and researchers. Selection criteria Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing mannitol or urea to placebo or no treatment in children and adults with cerebral malaria. Primary outcomes were death, life-threatenining sequelae and major neurological sequelae at six months. Data collection and analysis Two authors applied the inclusion criteria, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data independently. Main results One trial met the inclusion criteria, comparing mannitol 20% to saline placebo in 156 Ugandan children. Allocation was concealed. No difference in mortality, time to regain consciousness, or neurological sequelae were detected. Authors’ conclusions There are insufficient data to know what the effects of osmotic diuretics are in children with cerebral malaria. Larger, multicentre trials are needed. PMID:21491391

  4. IP-10-mediated T cell homing promotes cerebral inflammation over splenic immunity to malaria infection.

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    Catherine Q Nie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum malaria causes 660 million clinical cases with over 2 million deaths each year. Acquired host immunity limits the clinical impact of malaria infection and provides protection against parasite replication. Experimental evidence indicates that cell-mediated immune responses also result in detrimental inflammation and contribute to severe disease induction. In both humans and mice, the spleen is a crucial organ involved in blood stage malaria clearance, while organ-specific disease appears to be associated with sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes in vascular beds and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes. Using a rodent model of cerebral malaria, we have previously found that the majority of T lymphocytes in intravascular infiltrates of cerebral malaria-affected mice express the chemokine receptor CXCR3. Here we investigated the effect of IP-10 blockade in the development of experimental cerebral malaria and the induction of splenic anti-parasite immunity. We found that specific neutralization of IP-10 over the course of infection and genetic deletion of this chemokine in knockout mice reduces cerebral intravascular inflammation and is sufficient to protect P. berghei ANKA-infected mice from fatality. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that lack of IP-10 during infection significantly reduces peripheral parasitemia. The increased resistance to infection observed in the absence of IP-10-mediated cell trafficking was associated with retention and subsequent expansion of parasite-specific T cells in spleens of infected animals, which appears to be advantageous for the control of parasite burden. Thus, our results demonstrate that modulating homing of cellular immune responses to malaria is critical for reaching a balance between protective immunity and immunopathogenesis.

  5. Fatal cerebral malaria diagnosed after death in a French patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alunni-Perret, Veronique; Vandenbos, Fanny; Kechkekian, Aurore; Marty, Pierre; Legros, Fabrice; Michiels, Jean François; Cardot-Leccia, Nathalie; Fortineau, Nicolas; Durant, Jacques; Quatrehomme, Gérald

    2010-09-01

    We report on the case of a French citizen who was found dead in his home, 4 days after returning from Cameroon. The patient died of imported malaria, as revealed by the postmortem investigations. Few such cases have been reported throughout the world. This article reviews deaths due to malaria diagnosed at the time of autopsy in France between 1995 and 2005. We conclude that the nonspecific symptoms of malaria can lead to a misdiagnosis and the need for a forensic expert to intervene at the scene of death, which usually occurs in the home. We will remind forensic pathologists of the clinical, biologic, and forensic aspects of this infectious disease. In particular, the uses of microbiologic analyses, the QBC malaria test and the Core malaria Pan/Pv/pf test as well as brain tissue histology will be reviewed. PMID:20508488

  6. Cerebral Malaria Treated with Artemisinin in the Intensive Care Unit: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çizmeci, Elif Ayşe; Kelebek Girgin, Nermin; Ceylan, Ilkay; Tuncel, Tekin; Alver, Oktay; Akalin, Emin Halis

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a parasitic disease that is starting to be encountered in intensive care units (ICU) worldwide, owing to increasing globalisation. Severe malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum, is characterised by cerebral malaria, acute renal failure, hypoglycaemia, severe anaemia, splenomegaly and alveolar oedema. We present the case of a 25-yr old male patient who presented to the Emergency Department of Uludag University in Bursa, Turkey in the winter of 2014 with complaints of fever for three days. His medical history revealed a 14-month stay in Tanzania. Staining of blood smears revealed characteristic gametocytes in accordance with P. falciparum infection. The day after admission, he had an epileptic seizure after which his Glasgow Coma Scale was 6, so he was intubated and transferred to the ICU. A computerized tomography scan revealed findings of cerebral oedema. Intravenous mannitol was administered for 6 days. Intravenous artemisinin was continued for 10 days. Due to refractory fevers, anti-malarial treatment was switched to quinine and doxycycline on the 14th day and on the 16th day the fevers ceased. This case emphasizes that cerebral malaria should be suspected in cases of seizures accompanying malaria, and treatment should be initiated in the ICU. Furthermore, resistance of P. falciparum to artemisinin should be in mind when a response to therapy is lacking. PMID:27095978

  7. Cerebral Malaria Treated with Artemisinin in the Intensive Care Unit: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Ayşe ÇİZMECİ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a parasitic disease that is starting to be encountered in intensive care units (ICU worldwide, owing to increasing globalisation. Severe malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum, is characterised by cerebral malaria, acute renal failure, hypoglycaemia, severe anaemia, splenomegaly and alveolar oedema. We present the case of a 25-yr old male patient who presented to the Emergency Department of Uludag University in Bursa, Turkey in the winter of 2014 with complaints of fe­ver for three days. His medical history revealed a 14-month stay in Tanzania. Staining of blood smears revealed characteristic gametocytes in accordance with P. falciparum infection. The day after admission, he had an epileptic seizure after which his Glasgow Coma Scale was 6, so he was intubated and transferred to the ICU. A computerized tomography scan revealed findings of cerebral oedema. Intravenous mannitol was administered for 6 days. Intravenous artemisinin was continued for 10 days. Due to refractory fevers, anti-malarial treatment was switched to quinine and doxycycline on the 14th day and on the 16th day the fe­vers ceased. This case emphasizes that cerebral malaria should be suspected in cases of seizures accompanying malaria, and treatment should be initiated in the ICU. Furthermore, resistance of P. falciparum to artemisinin should be in mind when a response to therapy is lacking.

  8. Cerebral Malaria Treated with Artemisinin in the Intensive Care Unit: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çizmeci, Elif Ayşe; Kelebek Girgin, Nermin; Ceylan, Ilkay; Tuncel, Tekin; Alver, Oktay; Akalin, Emin Halis

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a parasitic disease that is starting to be encountered in intensive care units (ICU) worldwide, owing to increasing globalisation. Severe malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum, is characterised by cerebral malaria, acute renal failure, hypoglycaemia, severe anaemia, splenomegaly and alveolar oedema. We present the case of a 25-yr old male patient who presented to the Emergency Department of Uludag University in Bursa, Turkey in the winter of 2014 with complaints of fever for three days. His medical history revealed a 14-month stay in Tanzania. Staining of blood smears revealed characteristic gametocytes in accordance with P. falciparum infection. The day after admission, he had an epileptic seizure after which his Glasgow Coma Scale was 6, so he was intubated and transferred to the ICU. A computerized tomography scan revealed findings of cerebral oedema. Intravenous mannitol was administered for 6 days. Intravenous artemisinin was continued for 10 days. Due to refractory fevers, anti-malarial treatment was switched to quinine and doxycycline on the 14th day and on the 16th day the fevers ceased. This case emphasizes that cerebral malaria should be suspected in cases of seizures accompanying malaria, and treatment should be initiated in the ICU. Furthermore, resistance of P. falciparum to artemisinin should be in mind when a response to therapy is lacking.

  9. Differences in gene transcriptomic pattern of Plasmodium falciparum in children with cerebral malaria and asymptomatic carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almelli, Talleh; Nuel, Grégory; Bischoff, Emmanuel;

    2014-01-01

    , transcriptional factor proteins, proteins implicated in protein transport, as well as Plasmodium conserved and hypothetical proteins. Interestingly, UPs A1, A2, A3 and UPs B1 of var genes were predominantly found in cerebral malaria-associated isolates and those containing architectural domains of DC4, DC5, DC13...

  10. Polymorphisms in the RNASE3 gene are associated with susceptibility to cerebral malaria in Ghanaian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adu, Bright; Dodoo, Daniel; Adukpo, Selorme;

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most severe outcome of Plasmodium falciparum infection and a major cause of death in children from 2 to 4 years of age. A hospital based study in Ghana showed that P. falciparum induces eosinophilia and found a significantly higher serum level of eosinophil cationic...

  11. Multivariate modelling with 1H NMR of pleural effusion in murine cerebral malaria

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    Ghosh Soumita

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral malaria is a clinical manifestation of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Although brain damage is the predominant pathophysiological complication of cerebral malaria (CM, respiratory distress, acute lung injury, hydrothorax/pleural effusion are also observed in several cases. Immunological parameters have been assessed in pleural fluid in murine models; however there are no reports of characterization of metabolites present in pleural effusion. Methods 1H NMR of the sera and the pleural effusion of cerebral malaria infected mice were analyzed using principal component analysis, orthogonal partial least square analysis, multiway principal component analysis, and multivariate curve resolution. Results It has been observed that there was 100% occurrence of pleural effusion (PE in the mice affected with CM, as opposed to those are non-cerebral and succumbing to hyperparasitaemia (NCM/HP. An analysis of 1H NMR and SDS-PAGE profile of PE and serum samples of each of the CM mice exhibited a similar profile in terms of constituents. Multivariate analysis on these two classes of biofluids was performed and significant differences were detected in concentrations of metabolites. Glucose, creatine and glutamine contents were high in the PE and lipids being high in the sera. Multivariate curve resolution between sera and pleural effusion showed that changes in PE co-varied with that of serum in CM mice. The increase of glucose in PE is negatively correlated to the glucose in serum in CM as obtained from the result of multiway principal component analysis. Conclusions This study reports for the first time, the characterization of metabolites in pleural effusion formed during murine cerebral malaria. The study indicates that the origin of PE metabolites in murine CM may be the serum. The loss of the components like glucose, glutamine and creatine into the PE may worsen the situation of patients, in conjunction with the enhanced

  12. Pathogenesis of Cerebral Malaria: Recent Experimental Data and Possible Applications for Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jinning; Lucas, Ralf; Grau, Georges E.

    2001-01-01

    Malaria still is a major public health problem, partly because the pathogenesis of its major complication, cerebral malaria, remains incompletely understood. Experimental models represent useful tools to better understand the mechanisms of this syndrome. Here, data generated by several models are reviewed both in vivo and in vitro; we propose that some pathogenic mechanisms, drawn from data obtained from experiments in a mouse model, may be instrumental in humans. In particular, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 2 is involved in this syndrome, implying that the transmembrane form of TNF may be more important than the soluble form of the cytokine. It has also been shown that in addition to differences in immune responsiveness between genetically resistant and susceptible mice, there are marked differences at the level of the target cell of the lesion, namely, the brain endothelial cell. In murine cerebral malaria, a paradoxical role of platelets has been proposed. Indeed, platelets appear to be pathogenic rather than protective in inflammatory conditions because they can potentiate the deleterious effects of TNF. More recently, it has been shown that interactions among platelets, leukocytes, and endothelial cells have phenotypic and functional consequences for the endothelial cells. A better understanding of these complex interactions leading to vascular injury will help improve the outcome of cerebral malaria. PMID:11585786

  13. [Cerebral malaria with renal insufficiency in a 5 months pregnant woman. The use of prostaglandines for delivery (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonnier, C; Bruneu, A; Valmary, J; Capdevielle, P; Delprat, J

    1979-01-01

    Report of a typical case of cerebral malaria with coma during 3 days, pneumopathy and renal insufficiency with failure of concentration. The delivery of a dead foetus has been started by prostaglandines.

  14. Spectral reflectance of the ocular fundus as a diagnostic marker for cerebral malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xun; Rice, David A.; Khoobehi, Bahram

    2012-03-01

    The challenge of correctly identifying malaria infection continues to impede our efforts to control this disease. Recent studies report highly specific retinal changes in severe malaria patients; these retinal changes may represent a very useful diagnostic indicator for this disease. To further explore the ocular manifestations of malaria, we used hyperspectral imaging to study retinal changes caused by Plasmodium berghei ANKA parasitization in a mouse model. We collected the spectral reflectance of the ocular fundus from hyperspectral images of the mouse eye. The blood oxygen sensitive spectral region was normalized for variances in illumination, and used to calculate relative values that correspond to oxygenated hemoglobin levels. Oxygen hemoglobin levels are markedly lower in parasitized mice, indicating that hemoglobin digestion by P. berghei may be detected using spectral reflectance. Furthermore, the ocular reflectance of parasitized mice was abnormally elevated between 660nm and 750nm, suggesting fluorescence in this region. While the source of this fluorescence is not yet clear, its presence correlates strongly with P. Berghei parasitization, and may indicate the presence of hemozoin deposits in the retinal vasculature. The pathology of severe malaria still presents many questions for clinicians and scientists, and our understanding of cerebral malaria has been generally confined to clinical observation and postmortem examination. As the retina represents a portion of the central nervous system that can be easily examined noninvasively, our technique may provide the basis for an automated tool to detect and examine severe malaria via retinal changes.

  15. Cerebral Malaria: An Unusual Cause of Central Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premji, Resmi; Roopnarinesingh, Nira; Cohen, Joshua; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2016-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus is an uncommon feature of malaria. A previously healthy 72-year-old man presented with fever, rigors, and altered mental status after a recent trip to Liberia, a country known for endemic falciparum malaria. Investigations confirmed plasmodium falciparum parasitemia. Within one week after admission, the serum sodium rose to 166 mEq/L and the urine output increased to 7 liters/day. Other labs were notable for a high serum osmolality, low urine osmolality, and low urine specific gravity. The hypernatremia did not respond to hypotonic fluids. Diabetes insipidus was suspected and parenteral desmopressin was started with a prompt decrease in urinary output and improvement in mental status. Additional testing showed normal anterior pituitary hormones. The desmopressin was eventually tapered off with complete resolution of symptoms. Central diabetes insipidus occurred likely as a result of obstruction of the neurohypophyseal microvasculature. Other endocrinopathies that have been reported with malaria include hyponatremia, adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, hyper-, and hypoglycemia, but none manifested in our patient. Though diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of malaria, clinicians need to be aware of this manifestation, as failure to do so may lead to fatality particularly if the patient is dehydrated. PMID:27242936

  16. Cerebral Malaria: An Unusual Cause of Central Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premji, Resmi; Roopnarinesingh, Nira; Cohen, Joshua; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2016-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus is an uncommon feature of malaria. A previously healthy 72-year-old man presented with fever, rigors, and altered mental status after a recent trip to Liberia, a country known for endemic falciparum malaria. Investigations confirmed plasmodium falciparum parasitemia. Within one week after admission, the serum sodium rose to 166 mEq/L and the urine output increased to 7 liters/day. Other labs were notable for a high serum osmolality, low urine osmolality, and low urine specific gravity. The hypernatremia did not respond to hypotonic fluids. Diabetes insipidus was suspected and parenteral desmopressin was started with a prompt decrease in urinary output and improvement in mental status. Additional testing showed normal anterior pituitary hormones. The desmopressin was eventually tapered off with complete resolution of symptoms. Central diabetes insipidus occurred likely as a result of obstruction of the neurohypophyseal microvasculature. Other endocrinopathies that have been reported with malaria include hyponatremia, adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, hyper-, and hypoglycemia, but none manifested in our patient. Though diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of malaria, clinicians need to be aware of this manifestation, as failure to do so may lead to fatality particularly if the patient is dehydrated.

  17. Cerebral Malaria: An Unusual Cause of Central Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resmi Premji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central diabetes insipidus is an uncommon feature of malaria. A previously healthy 72-year-old man presented with fever, rigors, and altered mental status after a recent trip to Liberia, a country known for endemic falciparum malaria. Investigations confirmed plasmodium falciparum parasitemia. Within one week after admission, the serum sodium rose to 166 mEq/L and the urine output increased to 7 liters/day. Other labs were notable for a high serum osmolality, low urine osmolality, and low urine specific gravity. The hypernatremia did not respond to hypotonic fluids. Diabetes insipidus was suspected and parenteral desmopressin was started with a prompt decrease in urinary output and improvement in mental status. Additional testing showed normal anterior pituitary hormones. The desmopressin was eventually tapered off with complete resolution of symptoms. Central diabetes insipidus occurred likely as a result of obstruction of the neurohypophyseal microvasculature. Other endocrinopathies that have been reported with malaria include hyponatremia, adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, hyper-, and hypoglycemia, but none manifested in our patient. Though diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of malaria, clinicians need to be aware of this manifestation, as failure to do so may lead to fatality particularly if the patient is dehydrated.

  18. Neurocognitive sequelae of cerebral malaria in adults:A pilot study in Benguela Central Hospital, Angola

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bruno Peixoto; Isabel Kalei

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the neurocognitive sequelae of cerebral malaria (CM) in an adult sample of the city of Benguela, Angola. Methods:A neuropsychological assessment was carried out in 22 subjects with prior history of CM ranging from 6 to 12 months after the infection. The obtained results were compared to a control group with no previous history of cerebral malaria. The study was conducted in Benguela Central Hospital, Angola in 2011. Results: CM group obtained lower results on the two last trials of a verbal learning task and on an abstract reasoning test. Conclusions: CM is associated to a slower verbal learning rate and to difficulties in the ability to discriminate and perceive relations between new elements.

  19. Glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, liraglutide, in experimental cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DellaValle, Brian; Hempel, Casper; Staalsoe, Trine;

    2016-01-01

    . Parasite growth was not adversely affected by liraglutide in mice or in P. falciparum cultures indicating safety should not be a concern in type-II diabetics in endemic regions. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the breadth of models where GLP-1 is neuroprotective, ECM was not affected by liraglutide providing......BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria from Plasmodium falciparum infection is major cause of death in the tropics. The pathogenesis of the disease is complex and the contribution of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the brain is incompletely understood. Insulinotropic glucagon-like peptide-1....... Furthermore the role of oxidative stress on ECM pathogenesis is evaluated. METHODS: ECM was induced in Plasmodium berghei ANKA-infected C57Bl/6j mice. Infected Balb/c (non-cerebral malaria) and uninfected C57Bl/6j mice were included as controls. Mice were treated twice-daily with vehicle or liraglutide (200...

  20. Increased eosinophil activity in acute Plasmodium falciparum infection - association with cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtzhals, J A; Reimert, C M; Tette, E;

    1998-01-01

    To assess the eosinophil response to Plasmodium falciparum infection a cohort of initially parasite-free Ghanaian children was followed for 3 months. Seven of nine children who acquired an asymptomatic P. falciparum infection showed increase in eosinophil counts, while a decrease was found in seven...... of nine children with symptomatic malaria, and no change was observed in 14 children who remained parasite-free. In a hospital-based study, paediatric patients with cerebral malaria (CM), severe anaemia (SA), or uncomplicated malaria (UM) had uniformly low eosinophil counts during the acute illness...... followed by eosinophilia 30 days after cure. Plasma levels of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and eosinophil protein X (EPX) were measured as indicators of eosinophil activation. In spite of the low eosinophil counts, ECP levels were increased on day 0 and significantly higher in patients with CM...

  1. CLINICO - HAEMATOLOGICAL PROFILE AND OUTCOME OF CEREBRAL MALARIA IN A TEACHING HOSPITAL OF SOUTH EAST RAJASTHAN

    OpenAIRE

    Gautam Lal; Rajendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Evaluation of Clinico - hematological profile and outcome of cerebral malaria in semi urban hospital situated in endemic area. MATERIAL AND METHODS : A cross - sectional hospital - based study was conducted from August to November, 2014 at Department of Paediatrics SRG Zanana Hospital, Jhalawar Rajasthan. Every child, except who was previously abnormal neurologically, of the age of six month to 12 years, presented with a history of fever in...

  2. Glatiramer acetate reduces the risk for experimental cerebral malaria: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Helbok Raimund; Broessner Gregor; Dietmann Anelia; Burger Christoph; Part Andrea; Lackner Peter; Reindl Markus; Schmutzhard Erich; Beer Ronny

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Cerebral malaria (CM) is associated with high mortality and morbidity caused by a high rate of transient or persistent neurological sequelae. Studies on immunomodulatory and neuroprotective drugs as ancillary treatment in murine CM indicate promising potential. The current study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of glatiramer acetate (GA), an immunomodulatory drug approved for the treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis, in preventing the death of C57Bl/6J...

  3. Genetic susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus protects against cerebral malaria in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Waisberg, Michael; Tarasenko, Tatyana; Brandi K Vickers; Scott, Bethany L.; Willcocks, Lisa C.; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Pierce, Matthew A.; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Torres-Velez, Fernando J.; Smith, Kenneth G.C.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Miller, Louis H.; Pierce, Susan K.; Bolland, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum has exerted tremendous selective pressure on genes that improve survival in severe malarial infections. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that is six to eight times more prevalent in women of African descent than in women of European descent. Here we provide evidence that a genetic susceptibility to SLE protects against cerebral malaria. Mice that are prone to SLE because of a deficiency in FcγRIIB or overexpression of Toll-like receptor 7 are p...

  4. Protection against cerebral malaria by the low-molecular-weight thiol pantethine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Abou-Hamdan, Mhamad; Coltel, Nicolas; Cornille, Emilie; Grau, Georges E; de Reggi, Max; Gharib, Bouchra

    2008-01-29

    We report that administration of the low-molecular-weight thiol pantethine prevented the cerebral syndrome in Plasmodium berghei ANKA-infected mice. The protection was associated with an impairment of the host response to the infection, with in particular a decrease of circulating microparticles and preservation of the blood-brain barrier integrity. Parasite development was unaffected. Pantethine modulated one of the early steps of the inflammation-coagulation cascade, i.e., the transbilayer translocation of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface that we demonstrated on red blood cells and platelets. In this, pantethine mimicked the inactivation of the ATP-binding-cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), which also prevents the cerebral syndrome in this malaria model. However, pantethine acts through a different pathway, because ABCA1 activity was unaffected by the treatment. The mechanisms of pantethine action were investigated, using the intact molecule and its constituents. The disulfide group (oxidized form) is necessary to lower the platelet response to activation by thrombin and collagen. Thio-sensitive mechanisms are also involved in the impairment of microparticle release by TNF-activated endothelial cells. In isolated cells, the effects were obtained by cystamine that lacks the pantothenic moiety of the molecule; however, the complete molecule is necessary to protect against cerebral malaria. Pantethine is well tolerated, and it has already been administered in other contexts to man with limited side effects. Therefore, trials of pantethine treatment in adjunctive therapy for severe malaria are warranted. PMID:18195363

  5. Expression of the domain cassette 8 Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 is associated with cerebral malaria in Benin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwladys I Bertin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein-1 (PfEMP-1 is a highly polymorphic adherence receptor expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes. Based on sequence homology PfEMP-1 variants have been grouped into three major groups A-C, the highly conserved VAR2CSA variants, and semi-conserved types defined by tandem runs of specific domains ("domain cassettes" (DC. The PfEMP-1 type expressed determines the adherence phenotype, and is associated with clinical outcome of infection. METHODS: Parasite isolates from Beninese children or women presenting with, respectively, CM or PAM were collected along with samples from patients with uncomplicated malaria (UM. We assessed the transcript level of var genes by RT-qPCR and the expression of PfEMP-1 proteins by LC-MS/MS. RESULTS: Var genes encoding DC8 and Group A PfEMP-1 were transcribed more often and at higher levels in cerebral malaria vs. uncomplicated malaria patients. LC-MS/MS identified peptides from group A, DC8 PfEMP-1 more frequently in cerebral malaria than in uncomplicated malaria and pregnancy-associated malaria samples. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to show association between PfEMP-1 subtype and disease outcome by direct analysis of parasites proteome. The results corroborate that group A and specifically the PfEMP-1 types DC8 are universally associated with cerebral malaria. This is a crucial observation for promoting studies on malaria pathogenesis.

  6. Significant association of KIR2DL3-HLA-C1 combination with cerebral malaria and implications for co-evolution of KIR and HLA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouyuki Hirayasu

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria is a major, life-threatening complication of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, and has very high mortality rate. In murine malaria models, natural killer (NK cell responses have been shown to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria. To investigate the role of NK cells in the developmental process of human cerebral malaria, we conducted a case-control study examining genotypes for killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR and their human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I ligands in 477 malaria patients. We found that the combination of KIR2DL3 and its cognate HLA-C1 ligand was significantly associated with the development of cerebral malaria when compared with non-cerebral malaria (odds ratio 3.14, 95% confidence interval 1.52-6.48, P = 0.00079, corrected P = 0.02. In contrast, no other KIR-HLA pairs showed a significant association with cerebral malaria, suggesting that the NK cell repertoire shaped by the KIR2DL3-HLA-C1 interaction shows certain functional responses that facilitate development of cerebral malaria. Furthermore, the frequency of the KIR2DL3-HLA-C1 combination was found to be significantly lower in malaria high-endemic populations. These results suggest that natural selection has reduced the frequency of the KIR2DL3-HLA-C1 combination in malaria high-endemic populations because of the propensity of interaction between KIR2DL3 and C1 to favor development of cerebral malaria. Our findings provide one possible explanation for KIR-HLA co-evolution driven by a microbial pathogen, and its effect on the global distribution of malaria, KIR and HLA.

  7. Pathogenic roles of CD14, galectin-3, and OX40 during experimental cerebral malaria in mice.

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    Miranda S Oakley

    Full Text Available An in-depth knowledge of the host molecules and biological pathways that contribute towards the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria would help guide the development of novel prognostics and therapeutics. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of the brain tissue during experimental cerebral malaria (ECM caused by Plasmodium berghei ANKA parasites in mice, a well established surrogate of human cerebral malaria, has been useful in predicting the functional classes of genes involved and pathways altered during the course of disease. To further understand the contribution of individual genes to the pathogenesis of ECM, we examined the biological relevance of three molecules -- CD14, galectin-3, and OX40 that were previously shown to be overexpressed during ECM. We find that CD14 plays a predominant role in the induction of ECM and regulation of parasite density; deletion of the CD14 gene not only prevented the onset of disease in a majority of susceptible mice (only 21% of CD14-deficient compared to 80% of wildtype mice developed ECM, p<0.0004 but also had an ameliorating effect on parasitemia (a 2 fold reduction during the cerebral phase. Furthermore, deletion of the galectin-3 gene in susceptible C57BL/6 mice resulted in partial protection from ECM (47% of galectin-3-deficient versus 93% of wildtype mice developed ECM, p<0.0073. Subsequent adherence assays suggest that galectin-3 induced pathogenesis of ECM is not mediated by the recognition and binding of galectin-3 to P. berghei ANKA parasites. A previous study of ECM has demonstrated that brain infiltrating T cells are strongly activated and are CD44(+CD62L(- differentiated memory T cells [1]. We find that OX40, a marker of both T cell activation and memory, is selectively upregulated in the brain during ECM and its distribution among CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells accumulated in the brain vasculature is approximately equal.

  8. Marked Elevation in Plasma Osteoprotegerin Constitutes an Early and Consistent Feature of Cerebral Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Regan, Niamh; Moxon, Chris; Gegenbauer, Kristina; O’Sullivan, Jamie M.; Chion, Alain; Smith, Owen P.; Preston, Roger J. S.; Brophy, Teresa M.; Craig, Alister G.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Adherence of infected erythrocytes to vascular endothelium causes acute endothelial cell (EC) activation during Plasmodium falciparum infection. Consequently, proteins stored in Weibel-Palade (WP) bodies within EC are secreted into the plasma. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) binds to VWF and consequently is stored within WP bodies. Given the critical role of EC activation in the pathogenesis of severe malaria, we investigated plasma OPG levels in children with P. falciparum malaria. At presentation, plasma OPG levels were significantly elevated in children with cerebral malaria (CM) compared to healthy controls (means 16.0 vs 0.8 ng/ml; p<0.01). Importantly, OPG levels were also significantly higher in children with CM who had a fatal outcome, compared to children with CM who survived. Finally, in children with CM, plasma OPG levels correlated with other established prognostic indices (including plasma lactate levels and peripheral parasite density). To further investigate the relationship between severe malaria and OPG, we utilised a murine model of experimental CM in which C57BL/6J mice were infected with P. berghei ANKA. Interestingly, plasma OPG levels were increased 4.6 fold within 24 hours following P. berghei inoculation. This early marked elevation in OPG levels was observed before any objective clinical signs were apparent, and preceded the development of peripheral blood parasitaemia. As the mice became increasingly unwell, plasma OPG levels progressively increased. Collectively, these data suggest that OPG constitutes a novel biomarker with prognostic significance in patients with severe malaria. In addition, further studies are required to determine whether OPG plays a role in modulating malaria pathogenesis. PMID:26766771

  9. Increased susceptibility to pentylenetetrazol following survival of cerebral malaria in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauncke, Ana C B; Souza, Thaíze L; Ribeiro, Leandro R; Brant, Fátima; Machado, Fabiana S; Oliveira, Mauro S

    2016-07-01

    Malaria is considered a neglected disease and public health problem, affecting >200 million people worldwide. In the present study we used the Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) model of experimental cerebral malaria (CM) in C57BL/6 mice. After rescue from CM and parasite clearance, animals were submitted to a seizure susceptibility test (45 days after infection) using a low dose of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 30 mg/kg) and monitored with use of behavioral and electroencephalography (EEG) methods. Mice rescued from CM presented a reduced latency to myoclonic and tonic-clonic seizures and an increased duration of tonic-clonic seizures. In addition, quantitative analysis of EEG revealed a decrease in relative power at beta frequency band in PbA-infected animals after PTZ injection. Our results suggest that CM may lead to increased susceptibility to seizures in mice.

  10. Histamine H(3 receptor-mediated signaling protects mice from cerebral malaria.

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    Walid Beghdadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histamine is a biogenic amine that has been shown to contribute to several pathological conditions, such as allergic conditions, experimental encephalomyelitis, and malaria. In humans, as well as in murine models of malaria, increased plasma levels of histamine are associated with severity of infection. We reported recently that histamine plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of experimental cerebral malaria (CM in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Histamine exerts its biological effects through four different receptors designated H1R, H2R, H3R, and H4R. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present work, we explored the role of histamine signaling via the histamine H3 receptor (H3R in the pathogenesis of murine CM. We observed that the lack of H3R expression (H3R(-/- mice accelerates the onset of CM and this was correlated with enhanced brain pathology and earlier and more pronounced loss of blood brain barrier integrity than in wild type mice. Additionally tele-methylhistamine, the major histamine metabolite in the brain, that was initially present at a higher level in the brain of H3R(-/- mice was depleted more quickly post-infection in H3R(-/- mice as compared to wild-type counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that histamine regulation through the H3R in the brain suppresses the development of CM. Thus modulating histamine signaling in the central nervous system, in combination with standard therapies, may represent a novel strategy to reduce the risk of progression to cerebral malaria.

  11. Plasma IP-10, apoptotic and angiogenic factors associated with fatal cerebral malaria in India

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    Dash AP

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum in a subset of patients can lead to cerebral malaria (CM, a major contributor to malaria-associated mortality. Despite treatment, CM mortality can be as high as 30%, while 10% of survivors of the disease may experience short- and long-term neurological complications. The pathogenesis of CM is mediated by alterations in cytokine and chemokine homeostasis, inflammation as well as vascular injury and repair processes although their roles are not fully understood. The hypothesis for this study is that CM-induced changes in inflammatory, apoptotic and angiogenic factors mediate severity of CM and that their identification will enable development of new prognostic markers and adjunctive therapies for preventing CM mortalities. Methods Plasma samples (133 were obtained from healthy controls (HC, 25, mild malaria (MM, 48, cerebral malaria survivors (CMS, 48, and cerebral malaria non-survivors (CMNS, 12 at admission to the hospital in Jabalpur, India. Plasma levels of 30 biomarkers ((IL-1β, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IL-12 (p70, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, Eotaxin, FGF basic protein, G-CSF, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, IP-10, MCP-1 (MCAF, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, TNF-α, Fas-ligand (Fas-L, soluble Fas (sFas, soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNF-R1 and soluble TNF receptor 2 (sTNFR-2, PDGF bb and VEGF were simultaneously measured in an initial subset of ten samples from each group. Only those biomarkers which showed significant differences in the pilot analysis were chosen for testing on all remaining samples. The results were then compared between the four groups to determine their role in CM severity. Results IP-10, sTNF-R2 and sFas were independently associated with increased risk of CM associated mortality. CMNS patients had a significantly lower level of the neuroprotective factor VEGF when compared to other groups (P Conclusion The results suggest that plasma levels of IP-10, sTNF-R2 and sFas may be potential

  12. Neuronal apoptosis, metallothionein expression and proinflammatory responses during cerebral malaria in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiese, Lothar; Kurtzhals, Jørgen A L; Penkowa, Milena

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM) is an acute encephalopathy in humans due to the infection with Plasmodium falciparum. Neuro-cognitive impairment following CM occurs in about 10% of the treated survivors, while the precise pathophysiological mechanism remains unknown. Metallothionein I + II (MT...... show: (1) a localized CM-induced neuronal apoptosis (detected by TUNEL) indicating severe and irreversible pathology. (2) A significant increase in MT-I + II expression in reactive astrocytes, macrophages/microglia and vascular endothelium. INTERPRETATION: This is the first report showing apoptosis...

  13. Plasmodium berghei ANKA: erythropoietin activates neural stem cells in an experimental cerebral malaria model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Core, Andrew; Hempel, Casper; Kurtzhals, Jørgen A L;

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) causes substantial mortality and neurological sequelae in survivors, and no neuroprotective regimens are currently available for this condition. Erythropoietin (EPO) reduces neuropathology and improves survival in murine CM. Using the Plasmodium berghei model of CM, we...... investigated if EPO's neuroprotective effects include activation of endogenous neural stem cells (NSC). By using immunohistochemical markers of different NSC maturation stages, we show that EPO increased the number of nestin(+) cells in the dentate gyrus and in the sub-ventricular zone of the lateral...

  14. Activated Neutrophils Are Associated with Pediatric Cerebral Malaria Vasculopathy in Malawian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feintuch, Catherine Manix; Saidi, Alex; Seydel, Karl; Chen, Grace; Goldman-Yassen, Adam; Mita-Mendoza, Neida K.; Kim, Ryung S.; Frenette, Paul S.; Taylor, Terrie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most patients with cerebral malaria (CM) sustain cerebral microvascular sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs). Although many young children are infected with P. falciparum, CM remains a rare outcome; thus, we hypothesized that specific host conditions facilitate iRBC cerebral sequestration. To identify these host factors, we compared the peripheral whole-blood transcriptomes of Malawian children with iRBC cerebral sequestration, identified as malarial-retinopathy-positive CM (Ret+CM), to the transcriptomes of children with CM and no cerebral iRBC sequestration, defined as malarial-retinopathy-negative CM (Ret-CM). Ret+CM was associated with upregulation of 103 gene set pathways, including cytokine, blood coagulation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) pathways (P < 0.01; false-discovery rate [FDR] of <0.05). Neutrophil transcripts were the most highly upregulated individual transcripts in Ret+CM patients. Activated neutrophils can modulate diverse host processes, including the ECM, inflammation, and platelet biology to potentially facilitate parasite sequestration. Therefore, we compared plasma neutrophil proteins and neutrophil chemotaxis between Ret+CM and Ret-CM patients. Plasma levels of human neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, and proteinase 3, but not lactoferrin or lipocalin, were elevated in Ret+CM patients, and neutrophil chemotaxis was impaired, possibly related to increased plasma heme. Neutrophils were rarely seen in CM brain microvasculature autopsy samples, and no neutrophil extracellular traps were found, suggesting that a putative neutrophil effect on endothelial cell biology results from neutrophil soluble factors rather than direct neutrophil cellular tissue effects. Meanwhile, children with Ret-CM had lower levels of inflammation, higher levels of alpha interferon, and upregulation of Toll-like receptor pathways and other host transcriptional pathways, which may represent responses that do not favor

  15. Systemic and cerebral vascular endothelial growth factor levels increase in murine cerebral malaria along with increased calpain and caspase activity and can be reduced by erythropoietin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper eHempel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of cerebral malaria includes compromised microvascular perfusion, increased inflammation, cytoadhesion and endothelial activation. These events cause blood-brain barrier disruption and neuropathology and can be associated with the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF signalling pathway. We studied this pathway in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA causing murine cerebral malaria with or without the use of erythropoietin as adjunct therapy. ELISA and western blotting was used for quantification of VEGF and relevant proteins in brain and plasma. Cerebral malaria increased levels of VEGF in brain and plasma and decreased plasma levels of soluble VEGF receptor 2. Erythropoietin treatment normalised VEGF receptor 2 levels and reduced brain VEGF levels. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α was significantly upregulated whereas cerebral HIF-2α and erythropoietin levels remained unchanged. Furthermore, we noticed increased caspase-3 and calpain activity in terminally ill mice, as measured by protease-specific cleavage of α-spectrin and p35. In conclusion, we detected increased cerebral and systemic VEGF as well as HIF-1α, which in the brain were reduced to normal in erythropoietin-treated mice. Also caspase and calpain activity was reduced markedly in erythropoietin-treated mice.

  16. CXCL4 and CXCL10 Predict Risk of Fatal Cerebral Malaria

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    Nana O. Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum in a subset of patients can lead to a diffuse encephalopathy known as cerebral malaria (CM. Despite treatment, mortality caused by CM can be as high as 30% while 10% of survivors of the disease may experience short- and long-term neurological complications. The pathogenesis of CM involves alterations in cytokine and chemokine expression, local inflammation, vascular injury and repair processes. These diverse factors have limited the rate of discovery of prognostic predictors of fatal CM. Identification of reliable early predictors of CM severity will enable clinicians to adjust this risk with appropriate management of CM. Recent studies revealed that elevated levels of CXCL10 expression in cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood plasma independently predicted severe and fatal CM. CXCR3, a promiscuous receptor of CXCL10, plays an important role in pathogenesis of mouse model of CM. In this study the role of corresponding CXCR3 ligands (CXCL11, CXCL10, CXCL9 & CXCL4 in fatal or severe CM was evaluated by comparing their levels in 16 healthy control (HC, 26 mild malaria (MM, 26 cerebral malaria survivors (CMS and 12 non-survivors (CMNS using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Levels of CXCL4 and CXCL10 were significantly elevated in CMNS patients (p < 0.05 when compared with HC, MM and CMS. Elevated plasma levels of CXCL10 and CXCL4 were tightly associated with CM mortality. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve analysis revealed that CXCL4 and CXCL10 can discriminate CMNS from MM (p < 0.0001 and CMS (p < 0.0001 with an area under the curve (AUC = 1. These results suggest that CXCL4 and CXCL10 play a prominent role in pathogenesis of CM associated death and may be used as functional or surrogate biomarkers for predicting CM severity.

  17. Differential PfEMP1 Expression Is Associated with Cerebral Malaria Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembo, Dumizulu L.; Nyoni, Benjamin; Murikoli, Rekah V.; Mukaka, Mavuto; Milner, Danny A.; Berriman, Matthew; Rogerson, Stephen J.; Taylor, Terrie E.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Mandala, Wilson L.; Craig, Alister G.; Montgomery, Jacqui

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is unique among human malarias in its ability to sequester in post-capillary venules of host organs. The main variant antigens implicated are the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), which can be divided into three major groups (A–C). Our study was a unique examination of sequestered populations of parasites for genetic background and expression of PfEMP1 groups. We collected post-mortem tissue from twenty paediatric hosts with pathologically different forms of cerebral malaria (CM1 and CM2) and parasitaemic controls (PC) to directly examine sequestered populations of parasites in the brain, heart and gut. Use of two different techniques to investigate this question produced divergent results. By quantitative PCR, group A var genes were upregulated in all three organs of CM2 and PC cases. In contrast, in CM1 infections displaying high levels of sequestration but negligible vascular pathology, there was high expression of group B var. Cloning and sequencing of var transcript tags from the same samples indicated a uniformly low expression of group A-like var. Generally, within an organ sample, 1–2 sequences were expressed at dominant levels. 23% of var tags were detected in multiple patients despite the P. falciparum infections being genetically distinct, and two tags were observed in up to seven hosts each with high expression in the brains of 3–4 patients. This study is a novel examination of the sequestered parasites responsible for fatal cerebral malaria and describes expression patterns of the major cytoadherence ligand in three organ-derived populations and three pathological states. PMID:25473835

  18. Differential PfEMP1 expression is associated with cerebral malaria pathology.

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    Dumizulu L Tembo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum is unique among human malarias in its ability to sequester in post-capillary venules of host organs. The main variant antigens implicated are the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1, which can be divided into three major groups (A-C. Our study was a unique examination of sequestered populations of parasites for genetic background and expression of PfEMP1 groups. We collected post-mortem tissue from twenty paediatric hosts with pathologically different forms of cerebral malaria (CM1 and CM2 and parasitaemic controls (PC to directly examine sequestered populations of parasites in the brain, heart and gut. Use of two different techniques to investigate this question produced divergent results. By quantitative PCR, group A var genes were upregulated in all three organs of CM2 and PC cases. In contrast, in CM1 infections displaying high levels of sequestration but negligible vascular pathology, there was high expression of group B var. Cloning and sequencing of var transcript tags from the same samples indicated a uniformly low expression of group A-like var. Generally, within an organ sample, 1-2 sequences were expressed at dominant levels. 23% of var tags were detected in multiple patients despite the P. falciparum infections being genetically distinct, and two tags were observed in up to seven hosts each with high expression in the brains of 3-4 patients. This study is a novel examination of the sequestered parasites responsible for fatal cerebral malaria and describes expression patterns of the major cytoadherence ligand in three organ-derived populations and three pathological states.

  19. Perivascular Arrest of CD8+ T Cells Is a Signature of Experimental Cerebral Malaria.

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    Tovah N Shaw

    Full Text Available There is significant evidence that brain-infiltrating CD8+ T cells play a central role in the development of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM during Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection of C57BL/6 mice. However, the mechanisms through which they mediate their pathogenic activity during malaria infection remain poorly understood. Utilizing intravital two-photon microscopy combined with detailed ex vivo flow cytometric analysis, we show that brain-infiltrating T cells accumulate within the perivascular spaces of brains of mice infected with both ECM-inducing (P. berghei ANKA and non-inducing (P. berghei NK65 infections. However, perivascular T cells displayed an arrested behavior specifically during P. berghei ANKA infection, despite the brain-accumulating CD8+ T cells exhibiting comparable activation phenotypes during both infections. We observed T cells forming long-term cognate interactions with CX3CR1-bearing antigen presenting cells within the brains during P. berghei ANKA infection, but abrogation of this interaction by targeted depletion of the APC cells failed to prevent ECM development. Pathogenic CD8+ T cells were found to colocalize with rare apoptotic cells expressing CD31, a marker of endothelial cells, within the brain during ECM. However, cellular apoptosis was a rare event and did not result in loss of cerebral vasculature or correspond with the extensive disruption to its integrity observed during ECM. In summary, our data show that the arrest of T cells in the perivascular compartments of the brain is a unique signature of ECM-inducing malaria infection and implies an important role for this event in the development of the ECM-syndrome.

  20. Simultaneous administration of vitamin A and DTP vaccine modulates the immune response in a murine cerebral malaria model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein-Kristensen, L; Jørgensen, M J; Ravn, H;

    2010-01-01

    -tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine may increase mortality from non-targeted diseases. We investigated the non-targeted effect of pretreatment with VAS and DTP vaccine in a murine model of experimental cerebral malaria. Our a priori hypothesis was that VAS/DTP would aggravate the infection. We found that the effect of VAS...

  1. A functional polymorphism in the IL1B gene promoter, IL1B -31C>T, is not associated with cerebral malaria in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Tangpukdee Noppadon; Hananantachai Hathairad; Patarapotikul Jintana; Doi Akihiro; Naka Izumi; Ohashi Jun; Looareesuwan Sornchai; Tokunaga Katsushi

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background IL-1β and IL-1RA levels are higher in the serum of cerebral malaria patients than in patients with mild malaria. Recently, the level of IL1B expression was reported to be influenced by a polymorphism in the promoter of IL1, IL1B -31C>T. Methods To examine whether polymorphisms in IL1B and IL1RA influence the susceptibility to cerebral malaria, IL1B -31C>T, IL1B 3953C>T, and IL1RA variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) were analysed in 312 Thai patients with malaria (109 c...

  2. Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupasquier, Isabelle

    1989-01-01

    Malaria, the greatest pandemia in the world, claims an estimated one million lives each year in Africa alone. While it may still be said that for the most part malaria is found in what is known as the world's poverty belt, cases are now frequently diagnosed in western countries. Due to resistant strains of malaria which have developed because of…

  3. The contribution of natural killer complex loci to the development of experimental cerebral malaria.

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    Diana S Hansen

    Full Text Available The Natural Killer Complex (NKC is a genetic region of highly linked genes encoding several receptors involved in the control of NK cell function. The NKC is highly polymorphic and allelic variability of various NKC loci has been demonstrated in inbred mice, providing evidence for NKC haplotypes. Using BALB.B6-Cmv1r congenic mice, in which NKC genes from C57BL/6 mice were introduced into the BALB/c background, we have previously shown that the NKC is a genetic determinant of malarial pathogenesis. C57BL/6 alleles are associated with increased disease-susceptibility as BALB.B6-Cmv1r congenic mice had increased cerebral pathology and death rates during P. berghei ANKA infection than cerebral malaria-resistant BALB/c controls.To investigate which regions of the NKC are involved in susceptibility to experimental cerebral malaria (ECM, intra-NKC congenic mice generated by backcrossing recombinant F2 progeny from a (BALB/c x BALB.B6-Cmv1r F1 intercross to BALB/c mice were infected with P. berghei ANKA.Our results revealed that C57BL/6 alleles at two locations in the NKC contribute to the development of ECM. The increased severity to severe disease in intra-NKC congenic mice was not associated with higher parasite burdens but correlated with a significantly enhanced systemic IFN-γ response to infection and an increased recruitment of CD8+ T cells to the brain of infected animals.Polymorphisms within the NKC modulate malarial pathogenesis and acquired immune responses to infection.

  4. Reliability of the Luganda version of the Child Behaviour Checklist in measuring behavioural problems after cerebral malaria

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    Opoka Robert O

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No measure of childhood behaviour has been validated in Uganda despite the documented risks to behaviour. Cerebral malaria in children poses a great risk to their behaviour, however behavioural outcomes after cerebral malaria have not been described in children. This study examined the reliability of the Luganda version of the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL and described the behavioural outcomes of cerebral malaria in Ugandan children. Methods The CBCL was administered to parents of 64 children aged 7 to 16 years participating in a trial to improve cognitive functioning after cerebral malaria. These children were assigned to the treatment or control group. The CBCL parent ratings were completed for the children at baseline and nine weeks later. The CBCL was translated into Luganda, a local language, prior to its use. Baseline scores were used to calculate internal consistency using Cronbach Alpha. Correlations between the first and second scores of the control group were used to determine test-retest reliability. Multicultural norms for the CBCL were used to identify children with behavioural problems of clinical significance. Results The test-retest reliability and internal consistency of the Internalising scales were 0.64 and 0.66 respectively; 0.74 and 0.78 for the Externalising scale and 0.67 and 0.83 for Total Problems. Withdrawn/Depressed (15.6%, Thought Problems (12.5%, Aggressive Behaviour (9.4% and Oppositional Defiant Behaviour (9.4% were the commonly reported problems. Conclusion The Luganda version of the CBCL is a fairly reliable measure of behavioural problems in Ugandan children. Depressive and thought problems are likely behavioural outcomes of cerebral malaria in children. Further work in children with psychiatric diagnoses is required to test its validity in a clinical setting.

  5. A rapid murine coma and behavior scale for quantitative assessment of murine cerebral malaria.

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    Ryan W Carroll

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM is a neurological syndrome that includes coma and seizures following malaria parasite infection. The pathophysiology is not fully understood and cannot be accounted for by infection alone: patients still succumb to CM, even if the underlying parasite infection has resolved. To that effect, there is no known adjuvant therapy for CM. Current murine CM (MCM models do not allow for rapid clinical identification of affected animals following infection. An animal model that more closely mimics the clinical features of human CM would be helpful in elucidating potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and evaluating new adjuvant therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A quantitative, rapid murine coma and behavior scale (RMCBS comprised of 10 parameters was developed to assess MCM manifested in C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA. Using this method a single mouse can be completely assessed within 3 minutes. The RMCBS enables the operator to follow the evolution of the clinical syndrome, validated here by correlations with intracerebral hemorrhages. It provides a tool by which subjects can be identified as symptomatic prior to the initiation of trial treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Since the RMCBS enables an operator to rapidly follow the course of disease, label a subject as affected or not, and correlate the level of illness with neuropathologic injury, it can ultimately be used to guide the initiation of treatment after the onset of cerebral disease (thus emulating the situation in the field. The RMCBS is a tool by which an adjuvant therapy can be objectively assessed.

  6. Inhibition of endothelial activation: a new way to treat cerebral malaria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria is still a major public health problem, partly because the pathogenesis of its major complication, cerebral malaria (CM, remains incompletely understood. However tumor necrosis factor (TNF is thought to play a key role in the development of this neurological syndrome, as well as lymphotoxin alpha (LT. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using an in vitro model of CM based on human brain-derived endothelial cells (HBEC-5i, we demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of LMP-420, a 2-NH2-6-Cl-9-[(5-dihydroxyboryl-pentyl] purine that is a transcriptional inhibitor of TNF. When added before or concomitantly to TNF, LMP-420 inhibits endothelial cell (EC activation, i.e., the up-regulation of both ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 on HBEC-5i surfaces. Subsequently, LMP-420 abolishes the cytoadherence of ICAM-1-specific Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized red blood cells on these EC. Identical but weaker effects are observed when LMP-420 is added with LT. LMP-420 also causes a dramatic reduction of HBEC-5i vesiculation induced by TNF or LT stimulation, as assessed by microparticle release. CONCLUSION: These data provide evidence for a strong in vitro anti-inflammatory effect of LMP-420 and suggest that targeting host cell pathogenic mechanisms might provide a new therapeutic approach to improving the outcome of CM patients.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum biomarkers of cerebral malaria mortality in Ghanaian children

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    Wiredu Edwin K

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum can cause a diffuse encephalopathy known as cerebral malaria (CM, a major contributor to malaria associated mortality. Despite treatment, mortality due to CM can be as high as 30% while 10% of survivors of the disease may experience short- and long-term neurological complications. The pathogenesis of CM and other forms of severe malaria is multi-factorial and appear to involve cytokine and chemokine homeostasis, inflammation and vascular injury/repair. Identification of prognostic markers that can predict CM severity will enable development of better intervention. Methods Postmortem serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples were obtained within 2–4 hours of death in Ghanaian children dying of CM, severe malarial anemia (SMA, and non-malarial (NM causes. Serum and CSF levels of 36 different biomarkers (IL-1β, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IL-12 (p70, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, Eotaxin, FGF basic protein, CRP, G-CSF, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IP-10, MCP-1 (MCAF, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, SDF-1α, CXCL11 (I-TAC, Fas-ligand [Fas-L], soluble Fas [sFas], sTNF-R1 (p55, sTNF-R2 (p75, MMP-9, TGF-β1, PDGF bb and VEGF were measured and the results compared between the 3 groups. Results After Bonferroni adjustment for other biomarkers, IP-10 was the only serum biomarker independently associated with CM mortality when compared to SMA and NM deaths. Eight CSF biomarkers (IL-1ra, IL-8, IP-10, PDGFbb, MIP-1β, Fas-L, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2 were significantly elevated in CM mortality group when compared to SMA and NM deaths. Additionally, CSF IP-10/PDGFbb median ratio was statistically significantly higher in the CM group compared to SMA and NM groups. Conclusion The parasite-induced local cerebral dysregulation in the production of IP-10, 1L-8, MIP-1β, PDGFbb, IL-1ra, Fas-L, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2 may be involved in CM neuropathology, and their immunoassay may have potential utility in predicting

  8. Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Prevention (CDC) web site for information about travel health concerns for international locations before you go. Prevention ... in the evening, when mosquitoes are typically more active. Medicine is also ... malaria? If you plan to travel to a country where malaria is common, you' ...

  9. Production, fate and pathogenicity of plasma microparticles in murine cerebral malaria.

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    Fatima El-Assaad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In patients with cerebral malaria (CM, higher levels of cell-specific microparticles (MP correlate with the presence of neurological symptoms. MP are submicron plasma membrane-derived vesicles that express antigens of their cell of origin and phosphatidylserine (PS on their surface, facilitating their role in coagulation, inflammation and cell adhesion. In this study, the in vivo production, fate and pathogenicity of cell-specific MP during Plasmodium berghei infection of mice were evaluated. Using annexin V, a PS ligand, and flow cytometry, analysis of platelet-free plasma from infected mice with cerebral involvement showed a peak of MP levels at the time of the neurological onset. Phenotypic analyses showed that MP from infected mice were predominantly of platelet, endothelial and erythrocytic origins. To determine the in vivo fate of MP, we adoptively transferred fluorescently labelled MP from mice with CM into healthy or infected recipient mice. MP were quickly cleared following intravenous injection, but microscopic examination revealed arrested MP lining the endothelium of brain vessels of infected, but not healthy, recipient mice. To determine the pathogenicity of MP, we transferred MP from activated endothelial cells into healthy recipient mice and this induced CM-like brain and lung pathology. This study supports a pathogenic role for MP in the aggravation of the neurological lesion and suggests a causal relationship between MP and the development of CM.

  10. Self-reactivities to the non-erythroid alpha spectrin correlate with cerebral malaria in Gabonese children.

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    Vincent Guiyedi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypergammaglobulinemia and polyclonal B-cell activation commonly occur in Plasmodium sp. infections. Some of the antibodies produced recognize self-components and are correlated with disease severity in P. falciparum malaria. However, it is not known whether some self-reactive antibodies produced during P. falciparum infection contribute to the events leading to cerebral malaria (CM. We show here a correlation between self-antibody responses to a human brain protein and high levels of circulating TNF alpha (TNFalpha, with the manifestation of CM in Gabonese children. METHODOLOGY: To study the role of self-reactive antibodies associated to the development of P. falciparum cerebral malaria, we used a combination of quantitative immunoblotting and multivariate analysis to analyse correlation between the reactivity of circulating IgG with a human brain protein extract and TNFalpha concentrations in cohorts of uninfected controls (UI and P. falciparum-infected Gabonese children developing uncomplicated malaria (UM, severe non-cerebral malaria (SNCM, or CM. RESULTS/CONCLUSION: The repertoire of brain antigens recognized by plasma IgGs was more diverse in infected than in UI individuals. Anti-brain reactivity was significantly higher in the CM group than in the UM and SNCM groups. IgG self-reactivity to brain antigens was also correlated with plasma IgG levels and age. We found that 90% of CM patients displayed reactivity to a high-molecular mass band containing the spectrin non-erythroid alpha chain. Reactivity with this band was correlated with high TNFalpha concentrations in CM patients. These results strongly suggest that an antibody response to brain antigens induced by P. falciparum infection may be associated with pathogenic mechanisms in patients developing CM.

  11. Transdermal Glyceryl Trinitrate as an Effective Adjunctive Treatment with Artemether for Late-Stage Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Orjuela-Sánchez, Pamela; Ong, Peng Kai; Zanini, Graziela M.; Melchior, Benoît; Martins, Yuri C.; Meays, Diana; Frangos, John A.; Carvalho, Leonardo J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is associated with low nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, cerebrovascular constriction, occlusion, and hypoperfusion. Administration of exogenous NO partially prevents the neurological syndrome and associated vascular pathology in an experimental CM (ECM) mouse model. In this study, we evaluated the effects of transdermal glyceryl trinitrate in preventing ECM and, in combination with artemether, rescuing late-stage ECM mice from mortality. The glyceryl trinitrate and/or ...

  12. Establishment of a murine model of cerebral malaria in KunMing mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yan; Xu, Wenyue; Zhou, Taoli; Liu, Taiping; Zheng, Hong; Fu, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Malaria remains one of the most devastating diseases. Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection resulting in high mortality and morbidity worldwide. Analysis of precise mechanisms of CM in humans is difficult for ethical reasons and animal models of CM have been employed to study malaria pathogenesis. Here, we describe a new experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) model with Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection in KunMing (KM) mice. KM mice developed ECM after blood-stage or sporozoites infection, and the development of ECM in KM mice has a dose-dependent relationship with sporozoites inoculums. Histopathological findings revealed important features associated with ECM, including accumulation of mononuclear cells and red blood cells in brain microvascular, and brain parenchymal haemorrhages. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) examination showed that BBB disruption was present in infected KM mice when displaying clinical signs of CM. In vivo bioluminescent imaging experiment indicated that parasitized red blood cells accumulated in most vital organs including heart, lung, spleen, kidney, liver and brain. The levels of inflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-17, IL-12, IL-6 and IL-10 were all remarkably increased in KM mice infected with P. berghei ANKA. This study indicates that P. berghei ANKA infection in KM mice can be used as ECM model to extend further research on genetic, pharmacological and vaccine studies of CM. PMID:27574013

  13. Systemic and cerebral vascular endothelial growth factor levels increase in murine cerebral malaria along with increased Calpain and caspase activity and can be reduced by erythropoietin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hoyer, Nils; Kildemoes, Anna;

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cerebral malaria (CM) includes compromised microvascular perfusion, increased inflammation, cytoadhesion, and endothelial activation. These events cause blood-brain barrier disruption and neuropathology and associations with the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF...... increased levels of VEGF in brain and plasma and decreased plasma levels of soluble VEGF receptor 2. EPO treatment normalized VEGF receptor 2 levels and reduced brain VEGF levels. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was significantly upregulated whereas cerebral HIF-2α and EPO levels remained unchanged....... Furthermore, we noticed increased caspase-3 and calpain activity in terminally ill mice, as measured by protease-specific cleavage of α-spectrin and p35. In conclusion, we detected increased cerebral and systemic VEGF as well as HIF-1α, which in the brain were reduced to normal in EPO-treated mice. Also...

  14. Ten years experience with 497 cases of neuroinfections in tropic: in limited laboratory infrastructure initially treat both, cerebral malaria and meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benca, J; Ondrusova, A; Adamcova, J; Takacova, M; Polonova, J; Taziarova, M

    2007-06-01

    Review of 497 cases of neuroinfections in 7 tropical clinics in Ethiopia, Uganda, Burundi, Kenya, Sudan within 2000-2007 was performed. 97.5% of all cases was cerebral malaria (40.1%) and bacterial meningitis (56.4%). TB meningitis, cerebral cryptococcosis and sleeping sickness were very rare.

  15. Reduction of Experimental Cerebral Malaria and Its Related Proinflammatory Responses by the Novel Liposome-Based β-Methasone Nanodrug

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    Jintao Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria (CM is a severe complication of and a leading cause of death due to Plasmodium falciparum infection. CM is likely the result of interrelated events, including mechanical obstruction due to parasite sequestration in the microvasculature, and upregulation of Th1 immune responses. In parallel, blood-brain-barrier (BBB breakdown and damage or death of microglia, astrocytes, and neurons occurs. We found that a novel formulation of a liposome-encapsulated glucocorticosteroid, β-methasone hemisuccinate (nSSL-BMS, prevents experimental cerebral malaria (ECM in a murine model and creates a survival time-window, enabling administration of an antiplasmodial drug before severe anemia develops. nSSL-BMS treatment leads to lower levels of cerebral inflammation, expressed by altered levels of corresponding cytokines and chemokines. The results indicate the role of integrated immune responses in ECM induction and show that the new steroidal nanodrug nSSL-BMS reverses the balance between the Th1 and Th2 responses in malaria-infected mice so that the proinflammatory processes leading to ECM are prevented. Overall, because of the immunopathological nature of CM, combined immunomodulator/antiplasmodial treatment should be considered for prevention/treatment of human CM and long-term cognitive damage.

  16. Differential kinetics of plasma procalcitonin levels in cerebral malaria in urban Senegalese patients according to disease outcome

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    Babacar Mbengue

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available P. falciparum malaria continues as the serial killer of over a million lives yearly, mainly for children in sub-Saharan Africa. For severe malaria, we are still on the quest for a prognostic marker of fatal outcome. We analysed the association between serum levels of Procalcitonin (PCT, a marker of septic inflammation, and clinical outcome in Senegalese patients admitted with confirmed cerebral malaria in the intensive care facility of Hopital Principal. A total of 98 patients living in the hypoendemic urban area of Dakar, Senegal, were enrolled during transmission seasons. Levels of PCT were compared between surviving vs the 26.5 % fatal cases in blood samples of the 3 days following hospitalisation. Mean PCT levels were elevated in patients with active infection, with a large range of values (0.1 to 280 nanog per mL, significantly higher on day 0 in fatal cases than in surviving (53.6 vs 27.3; P=0.01. No exact individual threshold level could indicate occurrence of fatality, however mortality could be most accurately predicted by PCT level above 69 nanog per ML and there was a very clear different profile of evolution of PCT levels on the 3 days of observation decreasing early from day 1 in surviving patients (P<10–3, contrary to fatal cases. These results indicate that PCT kinetic rather than intrinsic level could be of use to predict a reduced risk of fatality in patient with cerebral malaria and could serve as potential predicting marker for severe malaria.

  17. Recombinant human erythropoietin increases survival and reduces neuronal apoptosis in a murine model of cerebral malaria

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    Hempel Casper

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral malaria (CM is an acute encephalopathy with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines, sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes and localized ischaemia. In children CM induces cognitive impairment in about 10% of the survivors. Erythropoietin (Epo has – besides of its well known haematopoietic properties – significant anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects in various brain disorders. The neurobiological responses to exogenously injected Epo during murine CM were examined. Methods Female C57BL/6j mice (4–6 weeks, infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA, were treated with recombinant human Epo (rhEpo; 50–5000 U/kg/OD, i.p. at different time points. The effect on survival was measured. Brain pathology was investigated by TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labelling, as a marker of apoptosis. Gene expression in brain tissue was measured by real time PCR. Results Treatment with rhEpo increased survival in mice with CM in a dose- and time-dependent manner and reduced apoptotic cell death of neurons as well as the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the brain. This neuroprotective effect appeared to be independent of the haematopoietic effect. Conclusion These results and its excellent safety profile in humans makes rhEpo a potential candidate for adjunct treatment of CM.

  18. Real-time imaging reveals the dynamics of leukocyte behaviour during experimental cerebral malaria pathogenesis.

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    Saparna Pai

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available During experimental cerebral malaria (ECM mice develop a lethal neuropathological syndrome associated with microcirculatory dysfunction and intravascular leukocyte sequestration. The precise spatio-temporal context in which the intravascular immune response unfolds is incompletely understood. We developed a 2-photon intravital microscopy (2P-IVM-based brain-imaging model to monitor the real-time behaviour of leukocytes directly within the brain vasculature during ECM. Ly6C(hi monocytes, but not neutrophils, started to accumulate in the blood vessels of Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA-infected MacGreen mice, in which myeloid cells express GFP, one to two days prior to the onset of the neurological signs (NS. A decrease in the rolling speed of monocytes, a measure of endothelial cell activation, was associated with progressive worsening of clinical symptoms. Adoptive transfer experiments with defined immune cell subsets in recombinase activating gene (RAG-1-deficient mice showed that these changes were mediated by Plasmodium-specific CD8(+ T lymphocytes. A critical number of CD8(+ T effectors was required to induce disease and monocyte adherence to the vasculature. Depletion of monocytes at the onset of disease symptoms resulted in decreased lymphocyte accumulation, suggesting reciprocal effects of monocytes and T cells on their recruitment within the brain. Together, our studies define the real-time kinetics of leukocyte behaviour in the central nervous system during ECM, and reveal a significant role for Plasmodium-specific CD8(+ T lymphocytes in regulating vascular pathology in this disease.

  19. Caring for children with cerebral malaria: insights gleaned from 20 years on a research ward in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Terrie E

    2009-04-01

    Clinicians treating patients with severe malaria in endemic areas confront a variety of challenges inherent to resource-poor settings, but it is possible to provide excellent care. The basic requirements, in addition to a thorough clinical examination of the patient, include assessing parasitaemia; determining anaemia (via haematocrit or haemoglobin); estimating blood glucose and lactate concentrations; establishing and maintaining i.v. access; measuring oxygen saturation and providing supplemental oxygen when necessary; grouping, cross-matching and transfusing blood. This paper provides practical information on determining the Blantyre Coma Score, collecting cerebrospinal fluid and measuring the opening pressure, and administering controlled volumes of i.v. fluids. Included is a narrative protocol describing the approach to patients with cerebral malaria used on the research ward at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi. PMID:19128813

  20. Artemether and Artesunate Show the Highest Efficacies in Rescuing Mice with Late-Stage Cerebral Malaria and Rapidly Decrease Leukocyte Accumulation in the Brain▿

    OpenAIRE

    Clemmer, L.; Martins, Y. C.; Zanini, G. M.; Frangos, J. A.; Carvalho, L. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The murine model of cerebral malaria (ECM) caused by Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infection in susceptible mice has been extensively used for studies of pathogenesis and identification of potential targets for human CM therapeutics. However, the model has been seldom explored to evaluate adjunctive therapies for this malaria complication. A first step toward this goal is to define a treatment protocol with an effective antimalarial drug able to rescue mice presenting late-stage ECM. We evalu...

  1. Specific depletion of Ly6C(hi inflammatory monocytes prevents immunopathology in experimental cerebral malaria.

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    Beatrix Schumak

    Full Text Available Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA infection of C57BL/6 mice leads to experimental cerebral malaria (ECM that is commonly associated with serious T cell mediated damage. In other parasitic infection models, inflammatory monocytes have been shown to regulate Th1 responses but their role in ECM remains poorly defined, whereas neutrophils are reported to contribute to ECM immune pathology. Making use of the recent development of specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb, we depleted in vivo Ly6C(hi inflammatory monocytes (by anti-CCR2, Ly6G+ neutrophils (by anti-Ly6G or both cell types (by anti-Gr1 during infection with Ovalbumin-transgenic PbA parasites (PbTg. Notably, the application of anti-Gr1 or anti-CCR2 but not anti-Ly6G antibodies into PbTg-infected mice prevented ECM development. In addition, depletion of Ly6C(hi inflammatory monocytes but not neutrophils led to decreased IFNγ levels and IFNγ+CD8+ T effector cells in the brain. Importantly, anti-CCR2 mAb injection did not prevent the generation of PbTg-specific T cell responses in the periphery, whereas anti-Gr1 mAb injection strongly diminished T cell frequencies and CTL responses. In conclusion, the specific depletion of Ly6C(hi inflammatory monocytes attenuated brain inflammation and immune cell recruitment to the CNS, which prevented ECM following Plasmodium infection, pointing out a substantial role of Ly6C+ monocytes in ECM inflammatory processes.

  2. From METS to malaria: RRx-001, a multi-faceted anticancer agent with activity in cerebral malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Yalçın, Özlem; Oronsky, Bryan; Carvalho, Leonardo J. M.; Kuypers, Frans A.; Scicinski, Jan; Cabrales, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background: The survival of malaria parasites, under substantial haem-induced oxidative stress in the red blood cells (RBCs) is dependent on the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). The PPP is the only source of NADPH in the RBC, essential for the production of reduced glutathione (GSH) and for protection from oxidative stress. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, therefore, increases the vulnerability of erythrocytes to oxidative stress. In Plasmodium, G6PD is combined with the s...

  3. The plant-based immunomodulator curcumin as a potential candidate for the development of an adjunctive therapy for cerebral malaria

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    Taramelli Donatella

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The clinical manifestations of cerebral malaria (CM are well correlated with underlying major pathophysiological events occurring during an acute malaria infection, the most important of which, is the adherence of parasitized erythrocytes to endothelial cells ultimately leading to sequestration and obstruction of brain capillaries. The consequent reduction in blood flow, leads to cerebral hypoxia, localized inflammation and release of neurotoxic molecules and inflammatory cytokines by the endothelium. The pharmacological regulation of these immunopathological processes by immunomodulatory molecules may potentially benefit the management of this severe complication. Adjunctive therapy of CM patients with an appropriate immunomodulatory compound possessing even moderate anti-malarial activity with the capacity to down regulate excess production of proinflammatory cytokines and expression of adhesion molecules, could potentially reverse cytoadherence, improve survival and prevent neurological sequelae. Current major drug discovery programmes are mainly focused on novel parasite targets and mechanisms of action. However, the discovery of compounds targeting the host remains a largely unexplored but attractive area of drug discovery research for the treatment of CM. This review discusses the properties of the plant immune-modifier curcumin and its potential as an adjunctive therapy for the management of this complication.

  4. Erythropoietin Levels Increase during Cerebral Malaria and Correlate with Heme, Interleukin-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalko, Esther; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Pays, Laurent; Herbert, Fabien; Cazenave, Pierre-André; Ravindran, Balachandran; Sharma, Shobhona; Nataf, Serge; Das, Bidyut; Pied, Sylviane

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) caused by Plasmodium falciparum parasites often leads to the death of infected patients or to persisting neurological sequelae despite anti-parasitic treatments. Erythropoietin (EPO) was recently suggested as a potential adjunctive treatment for CM. However diverging results were obtained in patients from Sub-Saharan countries infected with P. falciparum. In this study, we measured EPO levels in the plasma of well-defined groups of P. falciparum-infected patients, from the state of Odisha in India, with mild malaria (MM), CM, or severe non-CM (NCM). EPO levels were then correlated with biological parameters, including parasite biomass, heme, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-10, interferon gamma-induced protein (IP)-10, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 plasma concentrations by Spearman’s rank and multiple correlation analyses. We found a significant increase in EPO levels with malaria severity degree, and more specifically during fatal CM. In addition, EPO levels were also found correlated positively with heme, TNF-α, IL-10, IP-10 and MCP-1 during CM. We also found a significant multivariate correlation between EPO, TNF-α, IL-10, IP-10 MCP-1 and heme, suggesting an association of EPO with a network of immune factors in CM patients. The contradictory levels of circulating EPO reported in CM patients in India when compared to Africa highlights the need for the optimization of adjunctive treatments according to the targeted population. PMID:27441662

  5. Endothelium-based biomarkers are associated with cerebral malaria in Malawian children: a retrospective case-control study.

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    Andrea L Conroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Differentiating cerebral malaria (CM from other causes of serious illness in African children is problematic, owing to the non-specific nature of the clinical presentation and the high prevalence of incidental parasitaemia. CM is associated with endothelial activation. In this study we tested the hypothesis that endothelium-derived biomarkers are associated with the pathophysiology of severe malaria and may help identify children with CM. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Plasma samples were tested from children recruited with uncomplicated malaria (UM; n = 32, cerebral malaria with retinopathy (CM-R; n = 38, clinically defined CM without retinopathy (CM-N; n = 29, or non-malaria febrile illness with decreased consciousness (CNS; n = 24. Admission levels of angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2, Ang-1, soluble Tie-2 (sTie-2, von Willebrand factor (VWF, its propeptide (VWFpp, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1 and interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10 were measured by ELISA. Children with CM-R had significantly higher median levels of Ang-2, Ang-2:Ang-1, sTie-2, VWFpp and sICAM-1 compared to children with CM-N. Children with CM-R had significantly lower median levels of Ang-1 and higher median concentrations of Ang-2:Ang-1, sTie-2, VWF, VWFpp, VEGF and sICAM-1 compared to UM, and significantly lower median levels of Ang-1 and higher median levels of Ang-2, Ang-2:Ang-1, VWF and VWFpp compared to children with fever and altered consciousness due to other causes. Ang-1 was the best discriminator between UM and CM-R and between CNS and CM-R (areas under the ROC curve of 0.96 and 0.93, respectively. A comparison of biomarker levels in CM-R between admission and recovery showed uniform increases in Ang-1 levels, suggesting this biomarker may have utility in monitoring clinical response. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that endothelial proteins are informative biomarkers of malarial disease severity. These results

  6. Cognitive dysfunction is sustained after rescue therapy in experimental cerebral malaria, and is reduced by additive antioxidant therapy.

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    Patricia A Reis

    Full Text Available Neurological impairments are frequently detected in children surviving cerebral malaria (CM, the most severe neurological complication of infection with Plasmodium falciparum. The pathophysiology and therapy of long lasting cognitive deficits in malaria patients after treatment of the parasitic disease is a critical area of investigation. In the present study we used several models of experimental malaria with differential features to investigate persistent cognitive damage after rescue treatment. Infection of C57BL/6 and Swiss (SW mice with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA or a lethal strain of Plasmodium yoelii XL (PyXL, respectively, resulted in documented CM and sustained persistent cognitive damage detected by a battery of behavioral tests after cure of the acute parasitic disease with chloroquine therapy. Strikingly, cognitive impairment was still present 30 days after the initial infection. In contrast, BALB/c mice infected with PbA, C57BL6 infected with Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi and SW infected with non lethal Plasmodium yoelii NXL (PyNXL did not develop signs of CM, were cured of the acute parasitic infection by chloroquine, and showed no persistent cognitive impairment. Reactive oxygen species have been reported to mediate neurological injury in CM. Increased production of malondialdehyde (MDA and conjugated dienes was detected in the brains of PbA-infected C57BL/6 mice with CM, indicating high oxidative stress. Treatment of PbA-infected C57BL/6 mice with additive antioxidants together with chloroquine at the first signs of CM prevented the development of persistent cognitive damage. These studies provide new insights into the natural history of cognitive dysfunction after rescue therapy for CM that may have clinical relevance, and may also be relevant to cerebral sequelae of sepsis and other disorders.

  7. Apoptosis of the fibrocytes type 1 in the spiral ligament and blood labyrinth barrier disturbance cause hearing impairment in murine cerebral malaria

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    Schmutzhard Joachim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental murine malaria has been shown to result in significant hearing impairment. Microscopic evaluation of the temporal bones of these animals has revealed regular morphology of the cochlea duct. Furthermore, the known vascular pathologic changes being associated with malaria could not be found. Immunohistochemistry for ICAM1 showed a strong marking in the stria vascularis, indicating a disturbance of the endocochlear potential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of apoptosis and the disturbance of the blood labyrinth barrier in the murine malaria associated hearing impairment. Methods The temporal bones of seven mice with cerebral malaria-four with hearing impairment, three without hearing impairment-were evaluated with immunohistochemistry for cleaved caspase 3 to detect apoptosis and connexin 26, a gap junction protein being a cornerstone in the endocochlear potassium recirculation. Furthermore five animals with cerebral malaria were treated with Evans blue prior to sacrification to detect disturbances of the blood labyrinth barrier. Results Cleaved caspase 3 could clearly be detected by immunohistochemistry in the fibrocytes of the spiral ligament, more intensively in animals with hearing impairment, less intensively in those without. Apoptosis signal was equally distributed in the spiral ligament as was the connexin 26 gap junction protein. The Evans blue testing revealed a strong signal in the malaria animals and no signal in the healthy control animals. Conclusion Malfunction of the fibrocytes type 1 in the spiral ligament and disruption of the blood labyrinth barrier, resulting in a breakdown of the endocochlear potential, are major causes for hearing impairment in murine cerebral malaria.

  8. Complement factors C1q, C3 and C5 in brain and serum of mice with cerebral malaria

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    Helbok Raimund

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The patho-mechanisms leading to brain damage due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Immune-mediated and ischaemic mechanisms have been implicated. The role of complement factors C1q, C3 and C5 for the pathogenesis of CM were investigated in this study. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. The clinical severity of the disease was assessed by a battery of 40 standardized tests for evaluating neurological functions in mice. Brain homogenates and sera of mice with CM, infected animals without CM and non-infected control animals were analyzed for C1q, C3 and C5 up-regulation by Western blotting. Results Densitometric analysis of Western blots of brain homogenates yielded statistically significant differences in the levels of C1q and C5 in the analyzed groups. Correlation analysis showed a statistically significant association of C1q and C5 levels with the clinical severity of the disease. More severely affected animals showed higher levels of C1q and C5. No differences in complement levels were observed between frontal and caudal parts of the brain. Densitometric analysis of Western blot of sera yielded statistically lower levels of C1q in infected animals without CM compared to animals of the control group. Conclusion The current study provides direct evidence for up-regulation of complement factors C1q and C5 in the brains of animals with CM. Local complement up-regulation is a possible mechanism for brain damage in experimental cerebral malaria.

  9. Atorvastatin treatment is effective when used in combination with mefloquine in an experimental cerebral malaria murine model

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    Souraud Jean-Baptiste

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the major complications of Plasmodium falciparum infection is cerebral malaria (CM, which causes one million deaths worldwide each year, results in long-term neurological sequelae and the treatment for which is only partially effective. Statins are recognized to have an immunomodulatory action, attenuate sepsis and have a neuroprotective effect. Atorvastatin (AVA has shown in vitro anti-malarial activity and has improved the activity of mefloquine (MQ and quinine. Methods The efficiency of 40 mg/kg intraperitoneal AVA, alone or in association with MQ, was assessed in an experimental Plasmodium berghei ANKA rodent parasite model of CM and performed according to different therapeutic schemes. The effects on experimental CM were assessed through the evaluation of brain histopathological changes and neuronal apoptosis by TUNEL staining. Results AVA alone in the therapeutic scheme show no effect on survival, but the prophylactic scheme employing AVA associated with MQ, rather than MQ alone, led to a significant delay in mouse death and had an effect on the onset of CM symptoms and on the level of parasitaemia. Histopathological findings show a correlation between brain lesions and CM onset. A neuronal anti-apoptotic effect of AVA in the AVA + MQ combination was not shown. Conclusions The combination of AVA and MQ therapy led to a significant delay in mouse mortality. There were differences in the incidence, time to cerebral malaria and the level of parasitaemia when the drug combination was administered to mice. When used in combination with MQ, AVA had a relevant effect on the in vivo growth inhibition and clinical outcome of P. berghei ANKA-infected mice.

  10. Both functional LTbeta receptor and TNF receptor 2 are required for the development of experimental cerebral malaria.

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    Dieudonnée Togbe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TNF-related lymphotoxin alpha (LTalpha is essential for the development of Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA-induced experimental cerebral malaria (ECM. The pathway involved has been attributed to TNFR2. Here we show a second arm of LTalpha-signaling essential for ECM development through LTbeta-R, receptor of LTalpha1beta2 heterotrimer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: LTbetaR deficient mice did not develop the neurological signs seen in PbA induced ECM but died at three weeks with high parasitaemia and severe anemia like LTalphabeta deficient mice. Resistance of LTalphabeta or LTbetaR deficient mice correlated with unaltered cerebral microcirculation and absence of ischemia, as documented by magnetic resonance imaging and angiography, associated with lack of microvascular obstruction, while wild-type mice developed distinct microvascular pathology. Recruitment and activation of perforin(+ CD8(+ T cells, and their ICAM-1 expression were clearly attenuated in the brain of resistant mice. An essential contribution of LIGHT, another LTbetaR ligand, could be excluded, as LIGHT deficient mice rapidly succumbed to ECM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: LTbetaR expressed on radioresistant resident stromal, probably endothelial cells, rather than hematopoietic cells, are essential for the development of ECM, as assessed by hematopoietic reconstitution experiment. Therefore, the data suggest that both functional LTbetaR and TNFR2 signaling are required and non-redundant for the development of microvascular pathology resulting in fatal ECM.

  11. Modelos animales para la malaria cerebral y su aplicabilidad para la investigación de nuevos fármacos

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    Bárbara Judith Mendiola

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available La malaria cerebral es una de las complicaciones más importantes de la infección con Plasmodium falciparum. El 40% de la población mundial vive en áreas afectadas por la malaria, lo que ha resultado en aproximadamente 243 millones de casos clínicos y 863000 muertes en el 2008, la mayoría en niños menores de 5 años del África subsahariana. La malaria cerebral presenta un gran desafío en el esclarecimiento de su fisiopatología. Aunque no existe un modelo experimental que reproduzca todos los aspectos de la enfermedad en humanos, los modelos murinos han sido el instrumento más provechoso, entre ellos la infección de hospederos susceptibles con la cepa ANKA de Plasmodium berghei es el más generalizado. Los estudios de patogenia de la malaria cerebral experimental están fundamentados por más de 20 años de investigación. Este trabajo revisa los hallazgos recientes y selecciona los elementos cardinales que sustentan la relevancia y operatividad de estos modelos. Concluye que la caracterización conductual precisa y la descripción de los cambios histológicos, metabólicos e inmunológicos concomitantes en los modelos actuales pueden ser herramientas útiles para investigar las dianas y la efectividad de futuras intervenciones terapéuticas.

  12. The Effect of Annona Muricata Leaves Towards Blood Levels of Cxcl9 and Lymphoblast (Study in Cerebral Malaria Phase of Swiss Mice

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    Mohamed M.Y. Gadalla

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria (CM forms part of the spectrum of severe malaria, with a case fatality rate ranging from 15% in adults in southeast Asia to 8.5% in children in Africa. A.Muricata was used to cure Malaria in traditional medicine. The research will examine the effect of it in the chemokine (C-X-C motif receptor 3 (CXCR3 binding chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 4 (CXCL4, CXCL9. The intervented mice group were infected then the it’s spleen were cultured , incubation 72 hours and then analyzed the result. The CXCL9 level of PbA-infected mice treated with A. muricata are lower than group of infected mice without treatment. Lymphoblast level of PbA-infected mice treated with A. Muricata are higher than group of infected mice without treatment. A. Muricata treatment cure in the CM in the mice and may be a potential treatment in human CM.Cerebral malaria (CM adalah keadaan infeksi malaria yang berat dengan tingkat kefatalan dari 15% di Asia tenggara dan 8% di Afrika. A. Muricata secara tradisional dipakai mengobati CM. Riset ini meneliti pengaruh A. Muricata pada ikatan chemokine (C-X-C motif reseptor 3 (CXCR3termasuk chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 4 (CXCL4 dan CXCL9. Kelompok mice intervensi diinfeksi dan limfanya di culture dalam inkubator 72 jam untuk dianalisis. Kadar PbA CXCL9 pada mencit intervensi yang diberi A. Muricata lebih rendah dari pada kontrol. Kadar PbA limfoblast intervensi lebihtinggi dari pada kontrol. A. Muricata memperbaiki CM pada mencit dan berpotensi sebagai pengobat pada CM manusia.

  13. Protection against cerebral malaria by the low-molecular-weight thiol pantethine

    OpenAIRE

    Penet, Marie-France; Abou-Hamdan, Mhamad; Coltel, Nicolas; Cornille, Emilie; Grau, Georges E.; de Reggi, Max; Gharib, Bouchra

    2008-01-01

    We report that administration of the low-molecular-weight thiol pantethine prevented the cerebral syndrome in Plasmodium berghei ANKA-infected mice. The protection was associated with an impairment of the host response to the infection, with in particular a decrease of circulating microparticles and preservation of the blood–brain barrier integrity. Parasite development was unaffected. Pantethine modulated one of the early steps of the inflammation–coagulation cascade, i.e., the transbilayer ...

  14. Platelets alter gene expression profile in human brain endothelial cells in an in vitro model of cerebral malaria.

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    Mathieu Barbier

    Full Text Available Platelet adhesion to the brain microvasculature has been associated with cerebral malaria (CM in humans, suggesting that platelets play a role in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. In vitro co-cultures have shown that platelets can act as a bridge between Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBC and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBEC and potentiate HBEC apoptosis. Using cDNA microarray technology, we analyzed transcriptional changes of HBEC in response to platelets in the presence or the absence of tumor necrosis factor (TNF and pRBC, which have been reported to alter gene expression in endothelial cells. Using a rigorous statistical approach with multiple test corrections, we showed a significant effect of platelets on gene expression in HBEC. We also detected a strong effect of TNF, whereas there was no transcriptional change induced specifically by pRBC. Nevertheless, a global ANOVA and a two-way ANOVA suggested that pRBC acted in interaction with platelets and TNF to alter gene expression in HBEC. The expression of selected genes was validated by RT-qPCR. The analysis of gene functional annotation indicated that platelets induce the expression of genes involved in inflammation and apoptosis, such as genes involved in chemokine-, TREM1-, cytokine-, IL10-, TGFβ-, death-receptor-, and apoptosis-signaling. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that platelets play a pathogenic role in CM.

  15. IgE- and IgG mediated severe anaphylactic platelet transfusion reaction in a known case of cerebral malaria

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    B Shanthi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergic reactions occur commonly in transfusion practice. However, severe anaphylactic reactions are rare; anti-IgA (IgA: Immunoglobulin A in IgA-deficient patients is one of the well-illustrated and reported causes for such reactions. However, IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reaction through blood component transfusion may be caused in parasitic hyperimmunization for IgG and IgE antibodies. Case Report: We have evaluated here a severe anaphylactic transfusion reaction retrospectively in an 18year-old male, a known case of cerebral malaria, developed after platelet transfusions. The examination and investigations revealed classical signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis along with a significant rise in the serum IgE antibody level and IgG by hemagglutination method. Initial mild allergic reaction was followed by severe anaphylactic reaction after the second transfusion of platelets. Conclusion: Based on these results, screening of patients and donors with mild allergic reactions to IgE antibodies may help in understanding the pathogenesis as well as in planning for preventive desensitization and measures for safe transfusion.

  16. IL-33-mediated protection against experimental cerebral malaria is linked to induction of type 2 innate lymphoid cells, M2 macrophages and regulatory T cells.

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    Anne-Gaelle Besnard

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria (CM is a complex parasitic disease caused by Plasmodium sp. Failure to establish an appropriate balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses is believed to contribute to the development of cerebral pathology. Using the blood-stage PbA (Plasmodium berghei ANKA model of infection, we show here that administration of the pro-Th2 cytokine, IL-33, prevents the development of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM in C57BL/6 mice and reduces the production of inflammatory mediators IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α. IL-33 drives the expansion of type-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2 that produce Type-2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, leading to the polarization of the anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, which in turn expand Foxp3 regulatory T cells (Tregs. PbA-infected mice adoptively transferred with ILC2 have elevated frequency of M2 and Tregs and are protected from ECM. Importantly, IL-33-treated mice deleted of Tregs (DEREG mice are no longer able to resist ECM. Our data therefore provide evidence that IL-33 can prevent the development of ECM by orchestrating a protective immune response via ILC2, M2 macrophages and Tregs.

  17. Erythropoietin treatment alleviates ultrastructural myelin changes induced by murine cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hyttel, Poul; Staalsø, Trine;

    2012-01-01

    , adjunctive therapy, which is not available at present. Previously, erythropoietin (EPO) was reported to significantly improve the survival and outcome in a murine CM model. The study objectives were to assess myelin thickness and ultrastructural morphology in the corpus callosum in murine CM and to adress...... for electron microscopy. Myelin sheaths in the corpus callosum were analysed with transmission electron microscopy and stereology. RESULTS: The infection caused clinical CM, which was counteracted by EPO. The total number of myelinated axons was identical in the four groups and mice with CM did not......, perivascular oedemas and intracerebral haemorrhages. CONCLUSIONS: EPO treatment reduced clinical signs of CM and reduced cerebral pathology. Murine CM does not reduce the general thickness of myelin sheaths in the corpus callosum....

  18. Study of the asymmetry phenomenon of cerebral medullary in MRI%脑回的不对称性MRI研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾彤彤

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨脑结构MRI扫描图像的不对称性及其意义.方法 采用1.5T MRI仪对47名志愿者进行脑组织冠状面断层扫描,对各脑回的面积进行测量,比较左右侧各结构面积差异,并比较不同优势半球脑回结构的面积差异.结果 冠状面MRI扫描图像上,左右侧大脑额上回、额中回、额下回面积无明显差异,右侧颞上回面积大于左侧颞上回面积(P<0.05),不同优势半球额上回、额中回、额下回面积无明显差异,优势半球颞上回面积大于非优势半球颞上回面积(P<0.05).结论 大脑脑回在冠状面上结构存在着不对称现象,可能与其功能或某些脑部疾病的解剖学基础有关,揭示大脑空间结构的不均匀性.%Objective To Investigate the asymmetry of cerebral medullary substance In MRI scanlng image. Methods 47 volunteer were selected and taken scanning with 1.5T MRI in coronal plane, ihe area of cerebral convolution were measured, and were contrasted between left side and right side, between dominant hemisphere and no dominant hemisphere. Results In MRI Image of coronal plane, area of gyms frontalis superior, gyms frontalis medius, gyrus frontalis inferior was Identical between left side and right side, area of gyrus temporalis superior In right side was bigger than In left side (P < 0.05), area of gyrus frontalis superior, gyrus frontalis medius, gyrus frontalis Inferior was Identical between dominant hemisphere and no dominant hemisphere, area of gyrus temporalis superior In right was bigger In dominant hemisphere than In no dominant hemisphere (P < 0.05). Conclusion Image of cerebral convolution is asymmetry In coronal plane, which maybe Is anatomical foundation of function and disease In para encephalica .

  19. Simultaneous host and parasite expression profiling identifies tissue-specific transcriptional programs associated with susceptibility or resistance to experimental cerebral malaria

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    Liles W Conrad

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development and outcome of cerebral malaria (CM reflects a complex interplay between parasite-expressed virulence factors and host response to infection. The murine CM model, Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA, which simulates many of the features of human CM, provides an excellent system to study this host/parasite interface. We designed "combination" microarrays that concurrently detect genome-wide transcripts of both PbA and mouse, and examined parasite and host transcriptional programs during infection of CM-susceptible (C57BL/6 and CM-resistant (BALB/c mice. Results Analysis of expression data from brain, lung, liver, and spleen of PbA infected mice showed that both host and parasite gene expression can be examined using a single microarray, and parasite transcripts can be detected within whole organs at a time when peripheral blood parasitemia is low. Parasites display a unique transcriptional signature in each tissue, and lung appears to be a large reservoir for metabolically active parasites. In comparisons of susceptible versus resistant animals, both host and parasite display distinct, organ-specific transcriptional profiles. Differentially expressed mouse genes were related to humoral immune response, complement activation, or cell-cell interactions. PbA displayed differential expression of genes related to biosynthetic activities. Conclusion These data show that host and parasite gene expression profiles can be simultaneously analysed using a single "combination" microarray, and that both the mouse and malaria parasite display distinct tissue- and strain-specific responses during infection. This technology facilitates the dissection of host-pathogen interactions in experimental cerebral malaria and could be extended to other disease models.

  20. Pharmacologic inhibition of CXCL10 in combination with anti-malarial therapy eliminates mortality associated with murine model of cerebral malaria.

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    Nana O Wilson

    Full Text Available Despite appropriate anti-malarial treatment, cerebral malaria (CM-associated mortalities remain as high as 30%. Thus, adjunctive therapies are urgently needed to prevent or reduce such mortalities. Overproduction of CXCL10 in a subset of CM patients has been shown to be tightly associated with fatal human CM. Mice with deleted CXCL10 gene are partially protected against experimental cerebral malaria (ECM mortality indicating the importance of CXCL10 in the pathogenesis of CM. However, the direct effect of increased CXCL10 production on brain cells is unknown. We assessed apoptotic effects of CXCL10 on human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBVECs and neuroglia cells in vitro. We tested the hypothesis that reducing overexpression of CXCL10 with a synthetic drug during CM pathogenesis will increase survival and reduce mortality. We utilized atorvastatin, a widely used synthetic blood cholesterol-lowering drug that specifically targets and reduces plasma CXCL10 levels in humans, to determine the effects of atorvastatin and artemether combination therapy on murine ECM outcome. We assessed effects of atorvastatin treatment on immune determinants of severity, survival, and parasitemia in ECM mice receiving a combination therapy from onset of ECM (day 6 through 9 post-infection and compared results with controls. The results indicate that CXCL10 induces apoptosis in HBVECs and neuroglia cells in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that increased levels of CXCL10 in CM patients may play a role in vasculopathy, neuropathogenesis, and brain injury during CM pathogenesis. Treatment of ECM in mice with atorvastatin significantly reduced systemic and brain inflammation by reducing the levels of the anti-angiogenic and apoptotic factor (CXCL10 and increasing angiogenic factor (VEGF production. Treatment with a combination of atorvastatin and artemether improved survival (100% when compared with artemether monotherapy (70%, p<0.05. Thus, adjunctively

  1. CD4+ natural regulatory T cells prevent experimental cerebral malaria via CTLA-4 when expanded in vivo.

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    Ashraful Haque

    Full Text Available Studies in malaria patients indicate that higher frequencies of peripheral blood CD4(+ Foxp3(+ CD25(+ regulatory T (Treg cells correlate with increased blood parasitemia. This observation implies that Treg cells impair pathogen clearance and thus may be detrimental to the host during infection. In C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA, depletion of Foxp3(+ cells did not improve parasite control or disease outcome. In contrast, elevating frequencies of natural Treg cells in vivo using IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes resulted in complete protection against severe disease. This protection was entirely dependent upon Foxp3(+ cells and resulted in lower parasite biomass, impaired antigen-specific CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses that would normally promote parasite tissue sequestration in this model, and reduced recruitment of conventional T cells to the brain. Furthermore, Foxp3(+ cell-mediated protection was dependent upon CTLA-4 but not IL-10. These data show that T cell-mediated parasite tissue sequestration can be reduced by regulatory T cells in a mouse model of malaria, thereby limiting malaria-induced immune pathology.

  2. Lymphocyte Perturbations in Malawian Children with Severe and Uncomplicated Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, Wilson L; Msefula, Chisomo L; Gondwe, Esther N; Gilchrist, James J; Graham, Stephen M; Pensulo, Paul; Mwimaniwa, Grace; Banda, Meraby; Taylor, Terrie E; Molyneux, Elizabeth E; Drayson, Mark T; Ward, Steven A; Molyneux, Malcolm E; MacLennan, Calman A

    2015-11-18

    Lymphocytes are implicated in immunity and pathogenesis of severe malaria. Since lymphocyte subsets vary with age, assessment of their contribution to different etiologies can be difficult. We immunophenotyped peripheral blood from Malawian children presenting with cerebral malaria, severe malarial anemia, and uncomplicated malaria (n = 113) and healthy aparasitemic children (n = 42) in Blantyre, Malawi, and investigated lymphocyte subset counts, activation, and memory status. Children with cerebral malaria were older than those with severe malarial anemia. We found panlymphopenia in children presenting with cerebral malaria (median lymphocyte count, 2,100/μl) and uncomplicated malaria (3,700/μl), which was corrected in convalescence and was absent in severe malarial anemia (5,950/μl). Median percentages of activated CD69(+) NK (73%) and γδ T (60%) cells were higher in cerebral malaria than in other malaria types. Median ratios of memory to naive CD4(+) lymphocytes were higher in cerebral malaria than in uncomplicated malaria and low in severe malarial anemia. The polarized lymphocyte subset profiles of different forms of severe malaria are independent of age. In conclusion, among Malawian children cerebral malaria is characterized by lymphocyte activation and increased memory cells, consistent with immune priming. In contrast, there are reduced memory cells and less activation in severe malaria anemia. Further studies are required to understand whether these immunological profiles indicate predisposition of some children to one or another form of severe malaria.

  3. Raynaud phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud's phenomenon ... Raynaud phenomenon is called "primary" when it is not linked to another disorder. It most often begins in women younger than age 30. Secondary Raynaud phenomenon is linked to other conditions and usually occurs ...

  4. Altered regulation of Akt signaling with murine cerebral malaria, effects on long-term neuro-cognitive function, restoration with lithium treatment.

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    Minxian Dai

    Full Text Available Neurological and cognitive impairment persist in more than 20% of cerebral malaria (CM patients long after successful anti-parasitic treatment. We recently reported that long term memory and motor coordination deficits are also present in our experimental cerebral malaria model (ECM. We also documented, in a murine model, a lack of obvious pathology or inflammation after parasite elimination, suggesting that the long-term negative neurological outcomes result from potentially reversible biochemical and physiological changes in brains of ECM mice, subsequent to acute ischemic and inflammatory processes. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that acute ECM results in significantly reduced activation of protein kinase B (PKB or Akt leading to decreased Akt phosphorylation and inhibition of the glycogen kinase synthase (GSK3β in the brains of mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA compared to uninfected controls and to mice infected with the non-neurotrophic P. berghei NK65 (PbN. Though Akt activation improved to control levels after chloroquine treatment in PbA-infected mice, the addition of lithium chloride, a compound which inhibits GSK3β activity and stimulates Akt activation, induced a modest, but significant activation of Akt in the brains of infected mice when compared to uninfected controls treated with chloroquine with and without lithium. In addition, lithium significantly reversed the long-term spatial and visual memory impairment as well as the motor coordination deficits which persisted after successful anti-parasitic treatment. GSK3β inhibition was significantly increased after chloroquine treatment, both in lithium and non-lithium treated PbA-infected mice. These data indicate that acute ECM is associated with abnormalities in cell survival pathways that result in neuronal damage. Regulation of Akt/GSK3β with lithium reduces neuronal degeneration and may have neuroprotective effects in ECM. Aberrant regulation of Akt

  5. Malaria Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Malaria Research NIAID Role in Malaria Research Basic Biology Prevention ... Labs​ Malaria Research Program Services for Researchers Featured Research Ancient Immune Mechanism Identified That Controls Malaria in ...

  6. Relapsing malaria infection acquired in Kenya.

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, J E; Bia, F. J.; Miller, K.; McPhedran, P.

    1987-01-01

    An American physician-traveler to East Africa presented with manifestations of cerebral malaria and was treated with intravenous quinidine for chloroquine-resistant falciparum malaria. He later relapsed with Plasmodium ovale infection, despite previous primaquine therapy. Treatment of chloroquine-resistant malaria is discussed. The difficulty in diagnosing P. ovale infections and the predominance of this malaria species over P. vivax in East Africa are reviewed. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3

  7. [Raynaud's phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E; Hermanns-Lê, T

    2012-12-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a vascular acrosyndrome caused by a variety of diseases. There is a distinction between the idiopathic Raynaud's disease, the secondary types and the suspicious idiopathic Raynaud's phenomenon.

  8. Autopsy findings in severe malaria – a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Dedi Afandi; Budi Sampurna; Inge Sutanto; J. W. Marwoto; Nurjati Chairani; Sutisna Himawan; Rawina W; Ivan Riyanto

    2008-01-01

    Severe malaria, caused by Plasmodium falciparum infection, has a high mortality rate and is the main cause of death in malaria. Since clinical autopsy is unpopular in Indonesia, autopsy examination in malaria cases is rarely done. We reported a forty three year old woman from non endemic area that was dead because of severe malaria. Diagnosis was concluded from autopsy, histopathology, and toxicology. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 210-5)Keywords: Plasmodium falciparum, cerebral malaria, black wate...

  9. Clinical pattern of severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Sudan in an area characterized by seasonal and unstable malaria transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giha, H A; Elghazali, G; A-Elgadir, T M E;

    2005-01-01

    A hospital-based study was carried out in Gedarif town, eastern Sudan, an area of markedly unstable malaria transmission. Among the 2488 diagnosed malaria patients, 4.4% fulfilled the WHO criteria for severe malaria, and seven died of cerebral malaria. The predominant complication was severe mala...

  10. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in malaria: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laltanpuii Sailo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC is seen in <5% of patients with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria and is more common in cerebral malaria. Here, we report the diagnosis and management of a case of severe P. falciparum malaria with DIC.

  11. High-Throughput Testing of Antibody-Dependent Binding Inhibition of Placental Malaria Parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten A; Salanti, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The particular virulence of Plasmodium falciparum manifests in diverse severe malaria syndromes as cerebral malaria, severe anemia and placental malaria. The cause of both the severity and the diversity of infection outcome, is the ability of the infected erythrocyte (IE) to bind a range of diffe......The particular virulence of Plasmodium falciparum manifests in diverse severe malaria syndromes as cerebral malaria, severe anemia and placental malaria. The cause of both the severity and the diversity of infection outcome, is the ability of the infected erythrocyte (IE) to bind a range......-throughput assay used in the preclinical and clinical development of a VAR2CSA based vaccine against placental malaria....

  12. Malaria and stroke: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEOPOLDINO JOSÉ FÁBIO SANTOS

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a parasitic disease with high prevalence in several regions of the world. Infestation by Plasmodium faciparum can, in some cases, affect the central nervous system producing encephalitis resulting in death or neurological sequelae. The mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of the cerebral lesion are not totally clear and there are currently two theories (mechanical and humoral concerning this. We report a case of malaria with an atypical evolution, with a stroke lesion in the territory of the middle cerebral artery, with no association with encephalitis. We conclude that the mechanical theory is the one applicable to this patient.

  13. Malaria: toxins, cytokines and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Bate, C A; Taverne, J;

    1995-01-01

    In this review the old concept of severe malaria as a toxic disease is re-examined in the light of recent discoveries in the field of cytokines. Animal studies suggest that the induction of TNF by parasite-derived molecules may be partly responsible for cerebral malaria and anemia, while...... hypoglycaemia may be due to direct effects of similar molecules on glucose metabolism. These molecules appear to be phospholipids and we suggest that when fully characterized they might form the basis of antitoxic therapy for malaria....

  14. Raynaud's phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Christensen, N J; Olsen, N;

    1980-01-01

    The reaction to body and finger cooling was recorded in seven patients with relapse of primary Raynaud's phenomenon after sufficiently performed bilateral upper thoracic sympathectomy and for comparison in eight young women with primary Raynaud's phenomenon as well as in seven normal women......,05). There was no significant correlation between the vasoconstrictor response to cooling of a finger and the noradrenaline concentration probably due to the fact that skin vasoconstriction impeded release of noradrenaline from the skin. The relapse of Raynaud's phenomenon after surgically sufficient sympathectomy could....... The forearm venous concentration of noradrenaline was lower and adrenaline concentration higher in the sympathectomized patients than in the other groups (p less than 0,05). Noradrenaline showed a significant increase during body cooling in normals and primary Raynaud's (p less than 0...

  15. Plasmodium vivax hospitalizations in a monoendemic malaria region: severe vivax malaria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispe, Antonio M; Pozo, Edwar; Guerrero, Edith; Durand, Salomón; Baldeviano, G Christian; Edgel, Kimberly A; Graf, Paul C F; Lescano, Andres G

    2014-07-01

    Severe malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax is no longer considered rare. To describe its clinical features, we performed a retrospective case control study in the subregion of Luciano Castillo Colonna, Piura, Peru, an area with nearly exclusive vivax malaria transmission. Severe cases and the subset of critically ill cases were compared with a random set of uncomplicated malaria cases (1:4). Between 2008 and 2009, 6,502 malaria cases were reported, including 106 hospitalized cases, 81 of which fit the World Health Organization definition for severe malaria. Of these 81 individuals, 28 individuals were critically ill (0.4%, 95% confidence interval = 0.2-0.6%) with severe anemia (57%), shock (25%), lung injury (21%), acute renal failure (14%), or cerebral malaria (11%). Two potentially malaria-related deaths occurred. Compared with uncomplicated cases, individuals critically ill were older (38 versus 26 years old, P malaria monoinfection with critical illness is more common than previously thought.

  16. Vacuum phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Ohsaka, Hiromichi; Jitsuiki, Kei; Yoshizawa, Toshihiko; Takeuchi, Ikuto; Omori, Kazuhiko; Oode, Yasumasa; Ishikawa, Kouhei

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the theory of the formation of the vacuum phenomenon (VP), the detection of the VP, the different medical causes, the different locations of the presentation of the VP, and the differential diagnoses. In the human body, the cavitation effect is recognized on radiological studies; it is called the VP. The mechanism responsible for the formation of the VP is as follows: if an enclosed tissue space is allowed to expand as a rebound phenomenon after an external impact, the volume within the enclosed space will increase. In the setting of expanding volume, the pressure within the space will decrease. The solubility of the gas in the enclosed space will decrease as the pressure of the space decreases. Decreased solubility allows a gas to leave a solution. Clinically, the pathologies associated with the VP have been reported to mainly include the normal joint motion, degeneration of the intervertebral discs or joints, and trauma. The frequent use of CT for trauma patients and the high spatial resolution of CT images might produce the greatest number of chances to detect the VP in trauma patients. The VP is observed at locations that experience a traumatic impact; thus, an analysis of the VP may be useful for elucidating the mechanism of an injury. When the VP is located in the abdomen, it is important to include perforation of the digestive tract in the differential diagnosis. The presence of the VP in trauma patients does not itself influence the final outcome. PMID:27147527

  17. Analysis about treatment of children cerebral malaria with artemether unitied Quinimax%蒿甲醚联合Quinimax治疗小儿脑型疟疾33例分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈智; 欧维琳

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨蒿甲醚联合Quinimax治疗小儿脑型疟疾的临床疗效.方法 将65例小儿脑型疟疾患儿随机分成治疗组和对照组,治疗组33例给予蒿甲醚联合Quinimax,对照组32例单用Quinimax治疗.结果 治疗组退热时间24h,对照组48h,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);治疗组治愈率93.9%,对照组71.8%,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);治疗组无1例发生不良反应,对照组不良反应发生率为31.25%;两组病死率和并发症差异无统计学意义.结论 蒿甲醚联合Quinimax治疗小儿脑型疟疾退热效果快,治愈率高,不良反应少.%Objective To evaluate the therapeutic effect of Artemether unitied Quinimax in 33 children cerebral malaria treatment. Methods 65 children cerebral malaria are divided into 2 random groups, one is treatment group, another is control group. The patients in treatment group is cured by artemether unitied Quinimax, another is cured by Quinimax. Results The antithermic time in treatment group is 24 hours, in control group is 48 hours. Their difference is statistics significance(P<0.01);The cure rate is 93.9% in treatment group, in control is 71.8%, their difference is statistics significance(P<0.05). In treatment group without patient occurred untoward effect,in control group the rate of untoward effect is 31.25%. The difference isn't statis-tics significance of mofiality and complication for 2 groups. Conclusion The antithermic time is fast in treating children cerebral maralia with artemether unitied Quinimax,and the cure rate is better,and untoward effect is lack.

  18. Malaria (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Malaria KidsHealth > For Parents > Malaria Print A A A ... Prevention Diagnosis and Treatment en español Malaria About Malaria Malaria is a common infection in hot, tropical ...

  19. Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael; Herrick, Ariane L

    2016-02-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is a major cause of pain and disability in patients with autoimmune connective tissue diseases (CTDs), particularly systemic sclerosis (SSc). The clinician must perform a comprehensive clinical assessment in patients with RP to differentiate between primary (idiopathic) and secondary RP, in particular (for rheumatologists), secondary to an autoimmune CTD, as both the prognosis and treatment may differ significantly. Key investigations are nailfold capillaroscopy and testing for autoantibodies (in particular, those associated with SSc). Patients with RP and either abnormal nailfold capillaroscopy or an SSc-specific antibody (and especially with both) have a high risk of transitioning to an autoimmune CTD. Both nailfold capillaroscopy and autoantibody specificity may help the clinician in predicting organ-based complications. The management of CTD-associated RP requires a multifaceted approach to treatment, including patient education and conservative ('non-drug') measures. Patients with CTD-associated RP often require pharmacological treatment, which in the first instance is usually a calcium channel blocker, although other agents can be used. There is an increasing tendency to use phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors early in the treatment of CTD-associated RP. Oral therapies are commonly associated with side effects (often due to systemic vasodilation) that may result in failure of dose escalation and/or permanent discontinuation. Intravenous prostanoid therapy and surgery (e.g., botulinum toxin injection and digital sympathectomy) can be considered in severe RP. Patients with CTD-associated RP can develop a number of ischaemic digital complications (primarily ulcers and critical ischaemia), which may be associated with significant tissue loss. Future research is required to increase the understanding of the pathogenesis and natural history of RP (to drive therapeutic advances), and to explore/develop drug therapies, including those that

  20. Malaria Matters

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-04-18

    This podcast gives an overview of malaria, including prevention and treatment, and what CDC is doing to help control and prevent malaria globally.  Created: 4/18/2008 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 4/18/2008.

  1. Malaria Treatment (United States)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov Malaria Treatment (United States) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Treatment of Malaria: Guidelines For Clinicians (United States) Download PDF version of Parts 1-3 ...

  2. Malaria and Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov Malaria and Travelers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... may be at risk for infection. Determine if malaria transmission occurs at the destinations Obtain a detailed ...

  3. Transient alien limb phenomenon in right frontoparietal infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Panda Samhita

    2010-01-01

    Alien limb phenomenon is associated with different neurological disorders, such as stroke and corticobasal degeneration. It is usually caused by involvement of the corpus callosum, with or without the frontal regions. Rarely, it can result from insult in the posterior cerebral artery territory. Alien limb phenomenon is generally persistent. Here, an unusual case of transient alien hand phenomenon is reported.

  4. STUDY OF RENAL FAILURE IN MALARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Pamappa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is a serious complication of malaria, with a mortality of 14 to 33%. In view of the significant morbidity and mortality due to acute renal failure in malaria, there is need to identify patients at an early stage and to intensify care given to reduce morbidity and mortality. AIMS  To evaluate the clinical profile of Acute Renal Failure (ARF in malaria.  To evaluate the factors associated with adverse outcome, relation of severity of renal impairment on final outcome in patients with ARF due to malaria. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital over a period of 12 months. STUDY DESIGN  Type of study: Prospective Analytical, Observational Study.  Sample Size: 50 patients admitted to ICU, Kidney Unit, and the Medicine Wards with Malaria and ARF. Inclusion Criteria Clinically screened patients with evidence of malarial parasites in the blood smears or by antigen detection with clinical features or biochemical evidence of acute renal failure. Exclusion Criteria  Presence of any disease or condition leading to ARF or affecting the outcome of malarial ARF.  Other causes of Fever, Jaundice and Oliguria, like Leptospirosis, Dengue. METHODOLOGY Fifty patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were interrogated with regards to the complaints, clinical signs. Blood tests were sent on admission. Details were recorded as per the clinical proforma. The patients were followed until their discharge/death. RESULTS Oliguria was present in only 30% of patients. 30% of patients received haemodialysis. The mortality was 12% for severe renal failure. On Univariate analysis, Acidosis and Cerebral malaria were highly significant predictors of mortality. Other significant predictors were Renal failure, Oliguria, Shock, DIC, Hyperparasitemia, Leukocytosis (TLC. On Multivariate analysis, Oliguria, Cerebral malaria, Acidosis, Shock and two or more complications were the independent predictors of mortality

  5. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaukimath, S P; Patil, P S

    2015-01-01

    A variety of stimuli can cause reflex seizures, Some triggers include light, music and cognitive phenomenon. There are case reports however where the phenomenon of sexual activity has been a trigger for epileptic seizures. Most of these cases reported are in women so far, and were found to be localized to right cerebral hemisphere. We report a case of a 36-year-old male with orgasm-induced seizures, with other atypical features compared to majority of previous reports. PMID:27057393

  6. Malaria vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Some have argued that the vaccine against malaria developed by Manuel Pattaroyo, a Colombian scientist, is being tested prematurely in humans and that it is unlikely to be successful. While the Pattaroyo vaccine has been shown to confer protection against the relatively mild malaria found in Colombia, doubts exist over whether it will be effective in Africa. Encouraging first results, however, are emerging from field tests in Tanzania. The vaccine triggered a strong new immune response, even in individuals previously exposed to malaria. Additional steps must be taken to establish its impact upon mortality and morbidity. Five major trials are underway around the world. The creator estimates that the first ever effective malaria vaccine could be available for widespread use within five years and he has no intention of securing a patent for the discovery. In another development, malaria specialists from 35 African countries convened at an international workshop in Zimbabwe to compare notes. Participants disparaged financial outlays for the fight against malaria equivalent to 2% of total AIDS funding as insufficient; noted intercountry differences in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment; and found information exchange between anglophone and francophone doctors to be generally poor. PMID:12287671

  7. What Is Raynaud's Phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Phenomenon PDF Version Size: 59 KB November 2014 What Is Raynaud’s Phenomenon? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... use tools that vibrate, such as a jackhammer. What Are the Symptoms of Raynaud’s Phenomenon? The body ...

  8. Studying Different Clinical Syndromes Of Paediatric Severe Malaria Using Plasma Proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Ramaprasad, Abhinay

    2012-08-01

    Background- Severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains one of the major causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in Africa. Severe malaria manifests itself as three main clinical syndromes-impaired consciousness (cerebral malaria), respiratory distress and severe malarial anaemia. Cerebral malaria and respiratory distress are major contributors to malaria mortality but their pathophysiology remains unclear. Motivation/Objectives- Most children with severe malaria die within the first 24 hours of admission to a hospital because of their pathophysiological conditions. Thus, along with anti-malarial drugs, various adjuvant therapies such as fluid bolus (for hypovolaemia) and anticonvulsants (for seizures) are given to alleviate the sick child’s condition. But these therapies can sometimes have adverse effects. Hence, a clear understanding of severe malaria pathophysiology is essential for making an informed decision regarding adjuvant therapies. Methodology- We used mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics to study plasma samples from Gambian children with severe malaria. We compared the proteomic profiles of different severe malaria syndromes and generated hypotheses regarding the underlying disease mechanisms. Results/Conclusions- The main challenges of studying the severe malaria syndromes using proteomics were the high complexity and variability among the samples. We hypothesized that hepatic injury and nitric oxide play roles in the pathophysiology of cerebral malaria and respiratory distress.

  9. Profile of acute severe malaria with hepatopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminul Khan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The single most dreaded complication in severe malaria is cerebral malaria, but extracerebral serious complications are becoming frequent in endemic areas, which include hepatic dysfunctions with jaundice. Materials and Methods: This prospective case series study was undertaken to observe the clinical profile in 81cases of complicated malaria presenting with jaundice out of 344 hospitalized patients diagnosed with acute severe malaria. Liver function tests were assessed and the patients were followed up to 4 weeks. Results: 85% cases with jaundice had Plasmodium falciparum (Pf infection. Significant findings included a predominantly hemolytic jaundice (mean bilirubin 7.6 mg%, unconjugated 4.83 mg%, conjugated 2.79 mg%, raised ALT > AST (mean 101.2 vs.74.7 iu and a mean prothrombin time of 3 sec > control. Acute renal failure was common (77%. No residual hepatic dysfunctions were detected in survivors on follow-up. Mortality was 10%, mostly due to delayed diagnosis and associated serious co-morbid conditions. Conclusion: Differentiating fulminant viral hepatitis with multi-organ failure and early treatment of associated complications are crucial to reduce mortality in malaria presenting with jaundice. Hemolytic jaundice with mild and relatively early reversibility of hepatocellular dysfunction usually points towards complicated Pf malaria. Histologically, there is mild hepatic derangement. Acute renal failure is commonly associated. Vivax malaria can also cause hepatic dysfunctions. Mere presence of jaundice does not increase mortality compared to those without jaundice

  10. Determinants of variant surface antigen antibody response in severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria in an area of low and unstable malaria transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A-Elgadir, T M E; Theander, T G; Elghazali, G;

    2006-01-01

    The variant surface antigens (VSA) of infected erythrocytes are important pathogenic markers, a set of variants (VSA(SM)), were assumed to be associated with severe malaria (SM), while SM constitutes clinically diverse forms, such as, severe malarial anemia (SMA) and cerebral malaria (CM). This s...

  11. [Current malaria situation in Turkmenistan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amangel'diev, K A

    2001-01-01

    from tertian malaria, which is the most dangerous from the epidemiological point of view since the main vectors in Turkmenistan, are highly susceptible to P. vivax infection. The particular dangerous phenomenon is the higher incidence of imported tertian malaria in rural areas where sick people and those who carry the parasite come into close contact with highly susceptible vectors. Thus, the risk that new malaria outbreaks will occur and the disease will become reestablished in the country is very high. It is also influenced by major changes in water use in the country, which have aggravated the mosquito situation. In the area around the Karakum canal and river basins, 17 large reservoirs have been constructed, with very extensive filtration ponds around them, which have become breeding ground's for malaria mosquitoes. There are 1219 water areas without any economic significance in the country, covering a total area of 1054 ha, which require regular treatment with insecticides. With assistance from the WHO European Regional Office, Dr. Guido Sabatinelli in particular, Turkmenistan has developed a plan for preventive malaria control measures for 1999-2001, which has been approved in a decree issued by the Ministry of Health and Medical Industry. The material support received has made it possible to provide large-scale prophylaxis for people who suffered from malaria in 1997-1999, seasonal treatment for people living near the active foci of the disease and interseasonal prophylaxis for people visiting these areas. Seasonal treatment with Dellaguil was made in 4,590 people living in the active foci of malaria infection, and 2,281 fixed-term military personnel belonging to the units stationed in the active foci of malaria infection. In all foci of infection, every person with malaria or carrying the parasite underwent epidemiological investigation and all cases were entered in health clinic records. In 1999, four seminars were held to train 75 specialists from all

  12. Acute cerebellar ataxia: A neurological manifestation in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peddametla Shravan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the bite of an infected female anopheles mosquito presents with varied clinical manifestations. Neurological manifestations include headaches, confusion, convulsions, hemiplegia, ataxia, cerebral palsy, cortical blindness, and Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. We are presenting a case report of acute cerebellar ataxia in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with fever and positive for Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria antibodies.

  13. Nanotechnology applied to the treatment of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado

    2010-03-18

    Despite the fact that we live in an era of advanced technology and innovation, infectious diseases, like malaria, continue to be one of the greatest health challenges worldwide. The main drawbacks of conventional malaria chemotherapy are the development of multiple drug resistance and the non-specific targeting to intracellular parasites, resulting in high dose requirements and subsequent intolerable toxicity. Nanosized carriers have been receiving special attention with the aim of minimizing the side effects of drug therapy, such as poor bioavailability and the selectivity of drugs. Several nanosized delivery systems have already proved their effectiveness in animal models for the treatment and prophylaxis of malaria. A number of strategies to deliver antimalarials using nanocarriers and the mechanisms that facilitate their targeting to Plasmodium spp.-infected cells are discussed in this review. Taking into account the peculiarities of malaria parasites, the focus is placed particularly on lipid-based (e.g., liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles and nano and microemulsions) and polymer-based nanocarriers (nanocapsules and nanospheres). This review emphasizes the main requirements for developing new nanotechnology-based carriers as a promising choice in malaria treatment, especially in the case of severe cerebral malaria. PMID:19914313

  14. Cerebral Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...

  15. Rapid reemergence of T cells into peripheral circulation following treatment of severe and uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Kurtzhals, J A; Goka, B Q;

    1997-01-01

    Frequencies and absolute numbers of peripheral T-cell subsets were monitored closely following acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria in 22 Ghanaian children from an area of hyperendemicity for seasonal malaria transmission. The children presented with cerebral or uncomplicated malaria (CM or UM, re...

  16. The Impact of Genetic Susceptibility to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus on Placental Malaria in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Waisberg, Michael; Lin, Christina K.; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Pena, Mirna; Orandle, Marlene; Bolland, Silvia; Pierce, Susan K.

    2013-01-01

    Severe malaria, including cerebral malaria (CM) and placental malaria (PM), have been recognized to have many of the features of uncontrolled inflammation. We recently showed that in mice genetic susceptibility to the lethal inflammatory autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), conferred resistance to CM. Protection appeared to be mediated by immune mechanisms that allowed SLE-prone mice, prior to the onset of overt SLE symptoms, to better control their inflammatory response to...

  17. Fatal complications of Plasmodium vivax malaria: A series of three case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Sundriyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium vivax malaria once thought to be benign, is now being seen increasingly as complicated disease in various manifestations. These complications include cerebral malaria, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute pancreatitis, hepatic dysfunction, coagulopathy-associated hemorrhages, and others. Even if at the onset, disease appears benign, clinicians should be careful to watch for the complications and timely management.

  18. Kompliceret malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, A M; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Jacobsen, E

    1989-01-01

    An increasing number of cases of malaria, imported to Denmark, are caused by Plasmodium falciparum and severe and complicated cases are more often seen. In the Department of Infectious Diseases, Rigshospitalet, 23 out of 32 cases, hospitalized from 1.1-30.6.1988, i.e. 72%, were caused by P. falci....... falciparum; of these, seven (30%) were complicated, according to the definition by WHO. The importance of prompt diagnosis and treatment with intravenous quinine is stressed, and more recent supporting therapies including blood exchange transfusion are reviewed....

  19. Tuberculoma cerebral Cerebral tuberculoma

    OpenAIRE

    ELIZABETH CLARA BARROSO; TÂNIA REGINA BRÍGIDO DE OLIVEIRA; ANA MARIA DANTAS DO AMARAL; VALÉRIA GÓES FERREIRA PINHEIRO; ANA LÚCIA DE OLIVEIRA SOUSA

    2002-01-01

    Relata-se o caso de paciente com crises convulsivas de início recente. A tomografia computadorizada cerebral evidenciou imagem sugestiva de lesão expansiva metastática frontoparietal direita. A investigação de tumor primário ou outra doença foi negativa e o exame histopatológico do tecido cerebral diagnosticou tuberculoma. As convulsões foram controladas com a associação de hidantoína 300mg/dia ao esquema específico, utilizado por 18 meses. A tuberculose do sistema nervoso central representa ...

  20. Treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carrasco, Mario; Jiménez-Hernández, Mario; Escárcega, Ricardo O; Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; Pardo-Santos, Rodrigo; Levy, Roger; Maldonado, Claudio Galarza; Chávez, Gonzalo Pérez; Cervera, Ricard

    2008-10-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is an episodic vasospasm of the peripheral arteries, causing pallor followed by cyanosis and redness with pain and sometimes paraesthesia, and, rarely, ulceration of the fingers and toes. Primary or idiopathic Raynaud's phenomenon (Raynaud's disease) occurs without an underlying disease. Secondary Raynaud's phenomenon (Raynaud's syndrome) occurs in association with an underlying disease. Initially conservative, non-pharmacologic approach is important for these patients, although pharmacologic therapy may ultimately be necessary. Advances in vascular physiology have showed the role of the endothelium as well as endothelium-independent mechanisms in the altered vasoregulation of Raynaud's phenomenon. This has opened promising therapeutic avenues, and it is likely that therapies targeted towards specific pathophysiologic steps become available in the near future.

  1. Concurrent dengue and malaria in an area in Kolkata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amiya Kumar Hati; Indranil Bhattacharjee; Hiranmoy Mukherjee; Bhaswati Bandyopadhayay; Deban Bandyopadhyay; Rajyasree De; Goutam Chandra

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective:To establish the nature and extent of dual dengue and malaria infections in an endemic area through a longitudinal study.Methods: A prospective study was conducted from August2005to December2010to document the nature and extent of concurrent dengue and malaria infections in an area in central Kolkata, endemic both for dengue and malaria.Results:Of2 971 suspected cases of dengue fever, in605 (20.36%)persons dengue infection was detected, of whom46 (7.60%, 46/605)patients (40 and6suffered from secondary and primary dengue fever respectively) were simultaneously suffering from malaria (28 and18 were infected with Plasmodium vivax (P.vivax) andPlasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) respectively, such dual infections of dengue and malaria were detected in all the years of the study period, except 2007, indicating intense transmission of both dengue and malaria in the study area, and the phenomenon was not an isolated one, the rate of concomitant infections ranged from25% in2009 to4.9% in 2005. Out of total population surveyed,1.54% (46/2 971)had concurrent dengue and malaria infection.Conclusions: These findings added a new dimension in diagnosis, treatment, epidemiology and control of dengue and malaria. The possible risk of concurrent dengue and malaria infections should always be kept in mind in endemic areas for early diagnosis employing modern technology and prompt and effective treatment to avoid serious complications.

  2. The Lazarus phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Vaibhav

    2016-08-01

    The Lazarus phenomenon or the unassisted return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest is a grossly underreported phenomenon in medical literature which essentially implies the 'resurrection' of an individual after cardiac arrest. Although there have been a handful of such cases reported, the clinical incidence and significance may be underestimated. Because of the presumed infrequency of this condition, there are no studies specifically researching Lazarus phenomenon in scientific literature. This review intends to systematically present current and past knowledge on this rare but definitive phenomenon. Research databases namely Google Scholar, Science Direct, Medline and PubMed were utilized. Only articles which identified cases where the return of spontaneous circulation occurred after cessation of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), and review articles on the entity were included. The mentioned databases were searched using the terms 'Lazarus phenomenon', 'cardiopulmonary resuscitation' and 'return of spontaneous circulation'. A literature review was synthesised based on articles meeting the eligibility criteria to better understand the phenomenon of return of spontaneous circulation. PMID:27540490

  3. The Lazarus phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Vaibhav

    2016-08-01

    The Lazarus phenomenon or the unassisted return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest is a grossly underreported phenomenon in medical literature which essentially implies the 'resurrection' of an individual after cardiac arrest. Although there have been a handful of such cases reported, the clinical incidence and significance may be underestimated. Because of the presumed infrequency of this condition, there are no studies specifically researching Lazarus phenomenon in scientific literature. This review intends to systematically present current and past knowledge on this rare but definitive phenomenon. Research databases namely Google Scholar, Science Direct, Medline and PubMed were utilized. Only articles which identified cases where the return of spontaneous circulation occurred after cessation of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), and review articles on the entity were included. The mentioned databases were searched using the terms 'Lazarus phenomenon', 'cardiopulmonary resuscitation' and 'return of spontaneous circulation'. A literature review was synthesised based on articles meeting the eligibility criteria to better understand the phenomenon of return of spontaneous circulation.

  4. Sri Lanka Malaria Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Hoek Wim; Gunawardena Dissanayake M; Briët Olivier JT; Amerasinghe Felix P

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite a relatively good national case reporting system in Sri Lanka, detailed maps of malaria distribution have not been publicly available. Methods In this study, monthly records over the period 1995 – 2000 of microscopically confirmed malaria parasite positive blood film readings, at sub-district spatial resolution, were used to produce maps of malaria distribution across the island. Also, annual malaria trends at district resolution were displayed for the period 1995 ...

  5. A subset of group A-like var genes encodes the malaria parasite ligands for binding to human brain endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claessens, Antoine; Adams, Yvonne; Ghumra, Ashfaq;

    2012-01-01

    .029) but not by antibodies from controls with uncomplicated malaria (Mann-Whitney test, P = 0.58). This work describes a binding phenotype for virulence-associated group A P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variants and identifies targets for interventions to treat or prevent cerebral malaria.......Cerebral malaria is the most deadly manifestation of infection with Plasmodium falciparum. The pathology of cerebral malaria is characterized by the accumulation of infected erythrocytes (IEs) in the microvasculature of the brain caused by parasite adhesins on the surface of IEs binding to human...... of these variants. The clinical in vivo relevance of the HBEC-selected parasites was supported by significantly higher surface recognition of HBEC-selected parasites compared with unselected parasites by antibodies from young African children suffering cerebral malaria (Mann-Whitney test, P = 0...

  6. Haptoglobin 1-1 is associated with susceptibility to severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaye, I K; Ekuban, F A; Goka, B Q;

    2000-01-01

    The haptoglobin (Hp) phenotypes were determined by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in plasma samples obtained in 1997 from 113 Plasmodium falciparum malaria patients (aged 1-12 years) with strictly defined cerebral malaria, severe malarial anaemia, or uncomplicated malaria and 42 age......). No significant difference in frequency of Hp0 was observed between patients and controls. Among the malaria patients, the Hp1-1 phenotype was significantly more prevalent among patients with the complications of cerebral malaria and severe anaemia compared to patients with uncomplicated disease......, whereas the reverse was seen with respect to Hp2-1 and Hp2-2. Our data suggest that the Hp1-1 phenotype is associated with susceptibility to P. falciparum malaria in general, and to the development of severe disease in particular....

  7. Cerebral hemodynamics in moyamoya disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebuild-up phenomenon, an electroencephalographic pathological finding in moyamoya disease, was evaluated in the context of dynamic changes in cerebral circulation after hyperventilation. Sequential functional angiography after hyperventilation, measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by the outflow method, and Kr-81m single photon emission tomography were employed for clarification of the sequential dynamic changes in cerebral circulation after hyperventilation. In most cases there was a persistent decrease in CBF even after arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) had been normalized, which suggests that the response of the cerebral circulation to the changes in PaCO2 is delayed. Moreover, this feature was most prominent in the superficial layer of the cerebrum. For the most part, coincidence and synchronization were documented between rebuild-up and the delayed response of the cerebral circulation. These findings indicate that the delayed CBF response to hyperventilation contributes pathogenetically to rebuild-up in moyamoya disease. (author)

  8. The Lazarus phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Lazarus phenomenon or the unassisted return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest is a grossly underreported phenomenon in medical literature which essentially implies the ‘resurrection’ of an individual after cardiac arrest. Although there have been a handful of such cases reported, the clinical incidence and significance may be underestimated. Because of the presumed infrequency of this condition, there are no studies specifically researching Lazarus phenomenon in scientific literature. This review intends to systematically present current and past knowledge on this rare but definitive phenomenon. Research databases namely Google Scholar, Science Direct, Medline and PubMed were utilized. Only articles which identified cases where the return of spontaneous circulation occurred after cessation of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), and review articles on the entity were included. The mentioned databases were searched using the terms ‘Lazarus phenomenon’, ‘cardiopulmonary resuscitation’ and ‘return of spontaneous circulation’. A literature review was synthesised based on articles meeting the eligibility criteria to better understand the phenomenon of return of spontaneous circulation. PMID:27540490

  9. The Lazarus phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Lazarus phenomenon or the unassisted return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest is a grossly underreported phenomenon in medical literature which essentially implies the ‘resurrection’ of an individual after cardiac arrest. Although there have been a handful of such cases reported, the clinical incidence and significance may be underestimated. Because of the presumed infrequency of this condition, there are no studies specifically researching Lazarus phenomenon in scientific literature. This review intends to systematically present current and past knowledge on this rare but definitive phenomenon. Research databases namely Google Scholar, Science Direct, Medline and PubMed were utilized. Only articles which identified cases where the return of spontaneous circulation occurred after cessation of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), and review articles on the entity were included. The mentioned databases were searched using the terms ‘Lazarus phenomenon’, ‘cardiopulmonary resuscitation’ and ‘return of spontaneous circulation’. A literature review was synthesised based on articles meeting the eligibility criteria to better understand the phenomenon of return of spontaneous circulation.

  10. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  11. Short report: Role of viruses in Kenyan children presenting with acute encephalopathy in a malaria-endemic area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.D. Schubart; N. Mturi; M.G.H.M. Beld; P.M. Wertheim; C.R.J.C. Newton

    2006-01-01

    In malaria-endemic areas, it is difficult to differentiate between cerebral malaria (CM), bacterial meningitis, and viral encephalitis. We examined the cerebrospinal fluid of 49 children who fulfilled the World Health Organization's (WHO) definition of CM and in 47 encephalopathic children, without

  12. Distinct patterns of cytokine regulation in discrete clinical forms of Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akanmori, B D; Kurtzhals, J A; Goka, B Q;

    2000-01-01

    The pathogenesis of two of the most severe complications of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, cerebral malaria (CM) and severe malarial anaemia (SA) both appear to involve dysregulation of the immune system. We have measured plasma levels of TNF and its two receptors in Ghanaian children with strict...

  13. Mask Phenomenon in Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郎丽璇

    2013-01-01

    People sometimes wear masks. Abusive expression may be used to convey love while polite words can be exchanged among enemies. This essay describes and discusses this special phenomenon in communication and analyzes the elements that con-tribute to the success of a mask communication.

  14. Severe childhood malaria syndromes defined by plasma proteome profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Burté

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM and severe malarial anemia (SMA are the most serious life-threatening clinical syndromes of Plasmodium falciparum infection in childhood. Therefore it is important to understand the pathology underlying the development of CM and SMA, as opposed to uncomplicated malaria (UM. Different host responses to infection are likely to be reflected in plasma proteome-patterns that associate with clinical status and therefore provide indicators of the pathogenesis of these syndromes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Plasma and comprehensive clinical data for discovery and validation cohorts were obtained as part of a prospective case-control study of severe childhood malaria at the main tertiary hospital of the city of Ibadan, an urban and densely populated holoendemic malaria area in Nigeria. A total of 946 children participated in this study. Plasma was subjected to high-throughput proteomic profiling. Statistical pattern-recognition methods were used to find proteome-patterns that defined disease groups. Plasma proteome-patterns accurately distinguished children with CM and with SMA from those with UM, and from healthy or severely ill malaria-negative children. CONCLUSIONS: We report that an accurate definition of the major childhood malaria syndromes can be achieved using plasma proteome-patterns. Our proteomic data can be exploited to understand the pathogenesis of the different childhood severe malaria syndromes.

  15. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Where Malaria Occurs Eradication The Disease What is malaria? Malaria is a serious and sometimes fatal disease ... and poverty. Top of Page How People Get Malaria (Transmission) How is malaria transmitted? Usually, people get ...

  16. Sri Lanka Malaria Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Hoek Wim

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a relatively good national case reporting system in Sri Lanka, detailed maps of malaria distribution have not been publicly available. Methods In this study, monthly records over the period 1995 – 2000 of microscopically confirmed malaria parasite positive blood film readings, at sub-district spatial resolution, were used to produce maps of malaria distribution across the island. Also, annual malaria trends at district resolution were displayed for the period 1995 – 2002. Results The maps show that Plasmodium vivax malaria incidence has a marked variation in distribution over the island. The incidence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria follows a similar spatial pattern but is generally much lower than that of P. vivax. In the north, malaria shows one seasonal peak in the beginning of the year, whereas towards the south a second peak around June is more pronounced. Conclusion This paper provides the first publicly available maps of both P. vivax and P. falciparum malaria incidence distribution on the island of Sri Lanka at sub-district resolution, which may be useful to health professionals, travellers and travel medicine professionals in their assessment of malaria risk in Sri Lanka. As incidence of malaria changes over time, regular updates of these maps are necessary.

  17. Malaria and Tropical Travel

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-05-15

    Malaria is a serious mosquito-borne disease that can lead to death. This podcast discusses malaria risk when traveling to tropical areas, as well as how to protect yourself and your family from malaria infection.  Created: 5/15/2008 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 5/29/2008.

  18. The Void Phenomenon Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    The Void Phenomenon consists in the apparent discrepancy between the number of observed dwarf halos in cosmic voids and that expected from CDM simulations. We approach the problem considering the challenging prospects of detecting field dwarf systems with halo masses < 10^9 solar, via their possible HI emission. A brief review of recent work is followed by preliminary results from the ALFALFA survey, which suggest the possibility, but not yet the proof, that such objects may have been already detected towards the outskirts of the Local Group.

  19. Tuberculoma cerebral Cerebral tuberculoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELIZABETH CLARA BARROSO

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se o caso de paciente com crises convulsivas de início recente. A tomografia computadorizada cerebral evidenciou imagem sugestiva de lesão expansiva metastática frontoparietal direita. A investigação de tumor primário ou outra doença foi negativa e o exame histopatológico do tecido cerebral diagnosticou tuberculoma. As convulsões foram controladas com a associação de hidantoína 300mg/dia ao esquema específico, utilizado por 18 meses. A tuberculose do sistema nervoso central representa 5-15% das formas extrapulmonares e é reconhecida como de alta letalidade. Apresentação tumoral como a relatada é rara, particularmente em imunocompetentes. Quando tratada, pode ter bom prognóstico e deve entrar sempre no diagnóstico diferencial de massas cerebrais.It is reported a case of a previously healthy man with seizures of sudden onset. A contrast head computerized tomogram (CT showed a right frontoparietal expanding lesion suggesting to be metastatic. No prior disease was found on investigation. The histologic exam of the brain revealed tuberculoma. The seizures were controlled with Hidantoin 300 mg/day and antituberculosis chemotherapy for 18 months. Central nervous system tuberculosis (5-15% of the extrapulmonary forms is highly lethal. The case reported herein is specially rare in immunocompetent patients. It may have good prognosis and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of brain tumours.

  20. Cerebral localization in antiquity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, F Clifford

    2009-07-01

    Fragments of neurology can be found in the oldest medical writings in antiquity. Recognizable cerebral localization is seen in Egyptian medical papyri. Most notably, the Edwin Smith papyrus describes hemiplegia after a head injury. Similar echoes can be seen in Homer, the Bible, and the pre-Hippocratic writer Alcmaeon of Croton. While Biblical writers thought that the heart was the seat of the soul, Hippocratic writers located it in the head. Alexandrian anatomists described the nerves, and Galen developed the ventricular theory of cognition whereby mental functions are classified and localized in one of the cerebral ventricles. Medieval scholars, including the early Church Fathers, modified Galenic ventricular theory so as to make it a dynamic model of cognition. Physicians in antiquity subdivided the brain into separate areas and attributed to them different functions, a phenomenon that connects them with modern neurologists. PMID:20183203

  1. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 • 2 • 3 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Cerebral Palsy: Keith's Story Physical Therapy I Have Cerebral Palsy. Can I Babysit? Body Image and Self-Esteem Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  2. The Oklo phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1972, research workers of the French Commissariat a I'Energie Atomique made an astonishing discovery: fission chain reactions had been triggered spontaneously in the very remote past within a uranium deposit in Gabon and parts of the deposit had behaved like a modern nuclear reactor for hundreds of thousands of years. Subsequent investigations showed that the reaction sites had remained in a remarkable state of preservation, so that detailed study was possible. he IAEA felt that the Oklo phenomenon would be an excellent subject for international co-operation in fundamental research and agreed to the suggestion of the Gabon Government and the French Commissariat a I'Energie Atomique that a jointly organized symposium be held. The symposium will take place at Franceville, Gabon, from 23 to 27 June 1975. (author)

  3. The neutron channeling phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanouchi, A; Sabir, A; Boulkheir, M; Ichaoui, R; Ghassoun, J; Jehouani, A

    1997-01-01

    Shields, used for protection against radiation, are often pierced with vacuum channels for passing cables and other instruments for measurements. The neutron transmission through these shields is an unavoidable phenomenon. In this work we study and discuss the effect of channels on neutron transmission through shields. We consider an infinite homogeneous slab, with a fixed thickness (20 lambda, with lambda the mean free path of the neutron in the slab), which contains a vacuum channel. This slab is irradiated with an infinite source of neutrons on the left side and on the other side (right side) many detectors with windows equal to 2 lambda are placed in order to evaluate the neutron transmission probabilities (Khanouchi, A., Aboubekr, A., Ghassoun, J. and Jehouani, A. (1994) Rencontre Nationale des Jeunes Chercheurs en Physique. Casa Blanca Maroc; Khanouchi, A., Sabir, A., Ghassoun, J. and Jehouani, A. (1995) Premier Congré International des Intéractions Rayonnements Matière. Eljadida Maroc). The neutron history within the slab is simulated by the Monte Carlo method (Booth, T. E. and Hendricks, J. S. (1994) Nuclear Technology 5) and using the exponential biasing technique in order to improve the Monte Carlo calculation (Levitt, L. B. (1968) Nuclear Science and Engineering 31, 500-504; Jehouani, A., Ghassoun, J. and Aboubker, A. (1994) In Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Radiation Physics, Rabat, Morocco). Then different geometries of the vacuum channel have been studied. For each geometry we have determined the detector response and calculated the neutron transmission probability for different detector positions. This neutron transmission probability presents a peak for the detectors placed in front of the vacuum channel. This study allowed us to clearly identify the neutron channeling phenomenon. One application of our study is to detect vacuum defects in materials. PMID:9463884

  4. Periodic paralysis complicating malaria.

    OpenAIRE

    Senanayake, N; Wimalawansa, S J

    1981-01-01

    Episodic muscular weakness, commonly associated with alterations of serum potassium, is the cardinal feature of periodic paralysis. The combination of transient hyperkalaemia and rigors occurring during febrile episodes of malaria is suggested as the underlying cause which precipitated the muscular paralysis. Three patients with malaria who developed a similar paralysis during the paroxysms of fever are described to illustrate this.

  5. Bioinformatics approaches to malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Daniel Aaen

    Malaria is a life threatening disease found in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Each year it kills 781 000 individuals; most of them are children under the age of five in sub-Saharan Africa. The most severe form of malaria in humans is caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum, w...

  6. Malaria og graviditet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, A L; Rønn, A M; Langhoff-Roos, J;

    1992-01-01

    the first trimester. Severe cases should be treated with infusion of quinine. During pregnancy, benign malaria may run a violent course and pregnant women with malaria should be monitored in maternity departments and should be treated in cooperation with specialists in tropical medicine....

  7. Rapid Diagnosis of Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clinton K. Murray

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria's global impact is expansive and includes the extremes of the healthcare system ranging from international travelers returning to nonendemic regions with tertiary referral medical care to residents in hyperendemic regions without access to medical care. Implementation of prompt and accurate diagnosis is needed to curb the expanding global impact of malaria associated with ever-increasing antimalarial drug resistance. Traditionally, malaria is diagnosed using clinical criteria and/or light microscopy even though both strategies are clearly inadequate in many healthcare settings. Hand held immunochromatographic rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs have been recognized as an ideal alternative method for diagnosing malaria. Numerous malaria RDTs have been developed and are widely available; however, an assortment of issues related to these products have become apparent. This review provides a summary of RDT including effectiveness and strategies to select the ideal RDT in varying healthcare settings.

  8. [Malaria in Iraq].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamo, F J

    2001-01-01

    Malaria control campaign started in Iraq in 1957. This made the country largely free of the disease. Since 1991, following the recent war, Iraq has been affected by serious epidemic of P. vivax malaria that started in 3 autonomous governorates and soon involved other parts of the country. There were 49,840 malaria cases in the country in 1995. The national malaria programme personnel did their best to contain and control the epidemic. Active and passive case detection and treatment were introduced. Free of charge drugs are provided at all levels in the endemic area. Vector control includes environmental management, distribution of Gambusia fish, larviciding, indoor residual spraying with pyrithroids. A total of 4134 malaria cases were recorded in the country in 1999. PMID:11548316

  9. Ellagitannins of the fruit rind of pomegranate (Punica granatutm) antagonize in vitro the host inflammatory response mechanisms involved in the onset of malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya Deepak; Romeo Sergio; Basilico Nicoletta; Bulgari Michela; Galli Germana V; Dell'Agli Mario; Taramelli Donatella; Bosisio Enrica

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The sun-dried rind of the immature fruit of pomegranate (Punica granatum) is presently used as a herbal formulation (OMARIA, Orissa Malaria Research Indigenous Attempt) in Orissa, India, for the therapy and prophylaxis of malaria. The pathogenesis of cerebral malaria, a complication of the infection by Plasmodium falciparum, is an inflammatory cytokine-driven disease associated to an up-regulation and activity of metalloproteinase-9 and to the increase of TNF production. T...

  10. Audit of imported and domestic malaria cases at Kuala Lumpur Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C S; Cheong, I

    1995-01-01

    The clinical, haematological and biochemical profiles of all domestic and imported malaria cases admitted to the Hospital Kuala Lumpur were analysed. The most common malaria types were Plasmodium falciparum (39.5%) and Plasmodium vivax (42%). The most common patient type was men aged 29-40 years (reflecting the high mobility of this group, many of whom were illegal immigrants). Misdiagnosis on admission was frequently due to the variable clinical presentation of the disease and the difficulties of obtaining an accurate history. Associated haematological abnormalities were common. Chloroquine resistance was diagnosed in four P. falciparum patients and in one P. falciparum/vivax patient. Overall, imported malaria did not seem more severe than domestic. The three patients with cerebral malaria survived. One patient died of acute liver failure. The large influx of illegal immigrants to Malaysia has resulted in a surge in malaria infection; illegal immigrants remain a source of chloroquine resistance.

  11. Cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging. PMID:27188686

  12. The Offshoring Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mery Patricia Tamayo Plata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains some definitions which are necessary in order to understand the offshoring concept, going through the most relevant works about the development of the offshoring phenomenon and its impact on the demand for labor and on the most skilled workers' income. It is evidenced that the offshoring processes not only deal with the purchase and sale of goods anymore, but that the service sector has an increasingly important role, and that the lower cost is not the only aspect that matters when offshoring, but aspects such as the language and culture are also considered. It is also found that technology and research related services flow not only from the parent companies towards its subsidiaries, but from firms in less developed countries to other companies in advanced countries. It concludes with a review of the works that explores the relationship between offshoring, employment and wages, from both, a macro and microeconomic outlook. In the latter case, special consideration is given to the work carried out by Amity and Wei (2006, Crinó (2010, and Geishecker and Görg (2013.

  13. Migration and malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitthai, Nigoon

    2013-01-01

    Migration is an important global issue as poorly managed migration can result in a diversity of problems, including an increase in the transmission of diseases such as malaria. There is evidence to suggest that malaria is no longer a forest-dependent disease and may largely be affected by population movements, mostly to agricultural areas. While internal and transnational migration has different legal implications in most countries, both types of migration occur for the same reasons; economic and/ or safety. Although migration in itself is not a definitive risk for malaria, several factors can put, migrants and local communities alike, in vulnerable situations. In particular, infrastructure and rural development, deforestation for logging and economic farming, political movements, and natural disasters are some of the major factors that push and pull people in and out of malaria-endemic areas. Therefore, understanding the changing socio-environmental situation as well as population movements and their associated risks for malaria infection, is critical for malaria control, containment, and elimination. Efforts to address these issues should include advocacy, mapping exercises and expanded/ strengthened surveillance to also include migrant health information systems. Malaria related information, prevention measures, and early diagnosis and appropriate treatment should be made easily accessible for migrants regardless of their migration status; not only to ensure that they are equipped with appropriate knowledge and devices to protect themselves, but also to ensure that they are properly diagnosed and treated, to prevent further transmission, and to ensure that they are captured by the surveillance system. PMID:24159832

  14. MALARIA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard-Fabian Schumacher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    This review is focused on childhood specific aspects of malaria, especially in resource-poor settings. We summarise the actual knowledge in the field of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention.

    These aspects are important as malaria is responsible for almost a quarter of all child death in sub-Saharan Africa. Malaria control is thus one key intervention to reduce childhood mortality, especially as malaria is also an important risk factor for other severe infections, namely bacteraemia.

    In children symptoms are more varied and often mimic other common childhood illness, particularly gastroenteritis, meningitis/encephalitis, or pneumonia. Fever is the key symptom, but the characteristic regular tertian and quartan patterns are rarely observed. There are no pathognomonic features for severe malaria in this age group. The well known clinical (fever, impaired consciousness, seizures, vomiting, respiratory distress and laboratory (severe anaemia, thrombocytopenia, hypoglycaemia, metabolic acidosis, and hyperlactataemia features of severe falciparum malaria in children, are equally typical for severe sepsis.

    Appropriate therapy (considering species, resistance patterns and individual patient factors – possibly a drug combination of an artemisinin derivative with a long-acting antimalarial drug - reduces treatment duration to only three days and should be urgently started.

    While waiting for the results of ongoing vaccine trials, all effort should be made to better implement other malaria-control measures like the use of treated bed-nets and new chemoprophylaxis regimens.

  15. MALARIA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard-Fabian Schumacher

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on childhood specific aspects of malaria, especially in resource-poor settings. We summarise the actual knowledge in the field of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention. These aspects are important as malaria is responsible for almost a quarter of all child death in sub-Saharan Africa. Malaria control is thus one key intervention to reduce childhood mortality, especially as malaria is also an important risk factor for other severe infections, namely bacteraemia. In children symptoms are more varied and often mimic other common childhood illness, particularly gastroenteritis, meningitis/encephalitis, or pneumonia. Fever is the key symptom, but the characteristic regular tertian and quartan patterns are rarely observed. There are no pathognomonic features for severe malaria in this age group. The well known clinical (fever, impaired consciousness, seizures, vomiting, respiratory distress and laboratory (severe anaemia, thrombocytopenia, hypoglycaemia, metabolic acidosis, and hyperlactataemia features of severe falciparum malaria in children, are equally typical for severe sepsis. Appropriate therapy (considering species, resistance patterns and individual patient factors – possibly a drug combination of an artemisinin derivative with a long-acting antimalarial drug - reduces treatment duration to only three days and should be urgently started. While waiting for the results of ongoing vaccine trials, all effort should be made to better implement other malaria-control measures like the use of treated bed-nets and new chemoprophylaxis regimens.

  16. Raynaud’s phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ingegnoli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP is a vasospastic disorder characterized by episodic color changes of blanching, cyanosis, and hyperemia in response to cold and/or emotional stress. Although most typically noted in the fingers, the circulation of the toes, ears, nose and tongue is also frequently affected. Population studies have shown that RP in adults is more common in women than men, with prevalence estimates ranging from 4% to 30%. Geographic variations in the prevalence reflect differences in climate. RP may be a primary or a secondary process. LeRoy and Medsger suggested criteria for primary RP: symmetric attacks, the absence of tissue necrosis, ulceration or gangrene, the absence of a secondary cause, negative antinuclear antibodies, normal nailfold capillaroscopy and a normal erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Secondary RP is characterized by an age of onset of more than 30 years, painful and asymmetric attacks, ischemic skin lesions, positive autoautoantibodies, capillaroscopic abnormalities and/or clinical features suggestive of connective tissue diseases (CTDs. Among the CTDs, systemic sclerosis has the highest frequency of RP. Finding a cause for RP requires a knowledge of the patient’s occupational, smoking, drug history, physical examination, nailfold capillaroscopy, routine laboratory tests and autoantibodies. Furthermore, RP should be distinguished from acrocyanosis, a condition characterized by continuous cyanosis of the hands or feet that is aggravated by cold temperature. The most important instruction to the patient is abstinence from any smoking, offending drugs should be discontinued, and abrupt changes in temperature. If these measures are inadequate, calcium-channel blockers are the most widely used (nifedipine 30 mg up to 90 mg daily. Alternatively, sympatholytic agent (prazosin, angiotensin II -receptor type I antagonist (losartan, selective sertonin-reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine may be useful. In the severe cases the role of

  17. Cerebral hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the veins ( deep vein thrombosis ) Lung infections (pneumonia) Malnutrition When to Contact a Medical Professional Cerebral hypoxia ... References Bernat JL. Coma, vegetative state, and brain death. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  18. Malaria prevention in travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valérie

    2012-09-01

    A common approach to malaria prevention is to follow the "A, B, C, D" rule: Awareness of risk, Bite avoidance, Compliance with chemoprophylaxis, and prompt Diagnosis in case of fever. The risk of acquiring malaria depends on the length and intensity of exposure; the risk of developing severe disease is primarily determined by the health status of the traveler. These parameters need to be assessed before recommending chemoprophylaxis and/or stand-by emergency treatment. This review discusses the different strategies and drug options available for the prevention of malaria during and post travel.

  19. Malaria and Vascular Endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alencar, Aristóteles Comte Filho de, E-mail: aristoteles.caf@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães de [Fundação de Medicina Tropical Dr. Heitor Vieira Dourado (FMT-HVD), Manaus, AM (Brazil); Okoshi, Katashi; Okoshi, Marina Politi [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu (Unesp), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Involvement of the cardiovascular system in patients with infectious and parasitic diseases can result from both intrinsic mechanisms of the disease and drug intervention. Malaria is an example, considering that the endothelial injury by Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes can cause circulatory disorders. This is a literature review aimed at discussing the relationship between malaria and endothelial impairment, especially its effects on the cardiovascular system. We discuss the implications of endothelial aggression and the interdisciplinarity that should guide the malaria patient care, whose acute infection can contribute to precipitate or aggravate a preexisting heart disease.

  20. Malaria and Vascular Endothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Involvement of the cardiovascular system in patients with infectious and parasitic diseases can result from both intrinsic mechanisms of the disease and drug intervention. Malaria is an example, considering that the endothelial injury by Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes can cause circulatory disorders. This is a literature review aimed at discussing the relationship between malaria and endothelial impairment, especially its effects on the cardiovascular system. We discuss the implications of endothelial aggression and the interdisciplinarity that should guide the malaria patient care, whose acute infection can contribute to precipitate or aggravate a preexisting heart disease

  1. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan.

  2. Crossed cerebral - cerebellar diaschisis : MRI evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty A

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available MRI, done later in life, in two patients with infantile hemiplegia syndrome showed significant volume loss in the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the side of the affected cerebrum. The cerebellar volume loss seemed to correlate with the degree of volume loss in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. These observations provide morphological evidence of the phenomenon of crossed cerebral-cerebellar diaschisis (CCD. Functional neuroimaging studies in support of the concept of CCD has been critically reviewed.

  3. Cerebral palsy - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  4. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  5. Malaria in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus R. Alvarez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a resurgence of malaria in densely populated areas of the United States secondary to human migration from endemic areas where factors such as cessation of vector control, vector resistance to insecticides, disease resistance to drugs, environmental changes, political instability, and indifference, have played a role for malaria becoming an overwhelming infection of these tropical underdeveloped countries. It is important for health care providers of gravida to be alert of the disease and its effects on pregnancy.

  6. [Raynaud's phenomenon: pathogenesis and prevalence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulska, Danuta

    2010-01-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is defined as occasional ischemia of the distal parts of the extremities. Ischemia may be idiopathic as in primary Raynaud's disease or instigated by a comorbidity as in Raynaud's syndrome. Opinions on the etiopathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon have changed during recent years. Research has shown that enhanced vascular reactivity is attributable more to local factors and less to abnormalities in the central nervous system. Local factors are classified as vascular, nervous, and intravascular. Changes in our understanding of the etiopathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon have resulted in modified therapeutic guidelines. The present work reviews current opinions on the etiopathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon.

  7. Complement receptor 1 and the molecular pathogenesis of malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi Monika

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a pathogenic infection caused by protozoa of the genus plasmodium. It is mainly confined to sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and South America. This disease claims the life of over 1.5 to 2.7 million people per year. Owing to such a high incidence of malarial infections, there is an urgent need for the development of suitable vaccines. For the development of ideal vaccines, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of malarial pathogenesis and the factors that lead to malaria infection. Genetic factors have been proposed to play an important role in malarial pathogenesis. Complement receptor 1 (CR1 is an important host red blood cell protein involved in interaction with malarial parasite. Various polymorphic forms of CR1 have been found to be involved in conferring protection or increasing susceptibility to malaria infections. Low-density allele (L of CR1 gave contradictory results in different set of studies. In addition, Knops polymorphic forms Sl (a + and McC (a have been found to contribute more towards the occurrence of cerebral malaria in malaria endemic regions compared to individuals with Sl (a - / McC (a/b genotype. This article reviews the research currently going on in this area and throws light on as yet unresolved mysteries of the role of CR1 in malarial pathogenesis.

  8. To report a case of unilateral proliferative retinopathy following noncerebral malaria with Plasmodium falciparum in Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The retinopathy in association with malaria fever described so far includes retinal hemorrhages, vessel changes, retinal discoloration/whitening and papilledema. Malaria retinopathy has been mostly described in severe cases, associated with Plasmodium falciparum, correlating the patho-physiology of retinal and cerebral manifestations. We report an unusual case of proliferative retinopathy as a manifestation of malaria fever, caused by P. falciparum with no cerebral involvement. The patient had features of unilateral retinal vascular occlusion with proliferative changes and vitreous hemorrhage. To the best of our knowledge, such a case has never been reported so far in the literature. This report highlights the possible occurrence of severe proliferative changes associated with malaria fever, which if diagnosed early can prevent possible blindness.

  9. Ringing phenomenon in silica microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunhua Dong; Changling Zou; Jinming Cui; Yong Yang; Zhengfu Han; Guangcan Guo

    2009-01-01

    Whispering gallery modes in silica microspheres are excited by a tunable continuous-wave laser through the fiber taper. Ringing phenomenon can be observed with high frequency sweeping speed. The thermal nonlinearity in the microsphere can enhance this phenomenon. Our measurement results agree very well with the theoretical predictions by the dynamic equation.

  10. Tuberculoma cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    BARROSO ELIZABETH CLARA; OLIVEIRA TÂNIA REGINA BRÍGIDO DE; AMARAL ANA MARIA DANTAS DO; PINHEIRO VALÉRIA GÓES FERREIRA; SOUSA ANA LÚCIA DE OLIVEIRA

    2002-01-01

    Relata-se o caso de paciente com crises convulsivas de início recente. A tomografia computadorizada cerebral evidenciou imagem sugestiva de lesão expansiva metastática frontoparietal direita. A investigação de tumor primário ou outra doença foi negativa e o exame histopatológico do tecido cerebral diagnosticou tuberculoma. As convulsões foram controladas com a associação de hidantoína 300mg/dia ao esquema específico, utilizado por 18 meses. A tuberculose do sistema nervoso central representa ...

  11. Raynaud's phenomenon: pathogenesis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakst, Richard; Merola, Joseph F; Franks, Andrew G; Sanchez, Miguel

    2008-10-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a common clinical disorder for which patients frequently seek the expertise and care of dermatologists. It is manifested by recurrent vasospasm of the fingers and toes, often associated with exposure to cold temperature or emotional stress. The phenomenon is named after Maurice Raynaud, who, as a medical student, defined the first case in 1862 as episodic, symmetric, acral vasospasm characterized by pallor, cyanosis, suffusion, and a sense of fullness or tautness, which may be painful. Despite more than 140 years of research, the pathophysiology of Raynaud's phenomenon continues to elude investigators. Accordingly, although many pharmacologic treatments have been reported, there is still no cure or gold standard therapy. Further, response to treatment varies and is difficult to predict. Recently, there has been renewed interest in finding the pathogenetic mechanisms of Raynaud's phenomenon, an effort that has led to more potential targeted therapeutics. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent breakthroughs in the pathogenesis and treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon.

  12. Unstable vivax malaria in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Ree, Han-Il

    2000-01-01

    Korean vivax malaria had been prevalent for longtime throughout the country with low endemicity. As a result of the Korean war (1950-1953), malaria became epidemic. In 1959-1969 when the National Malaria Eradication Service (NMES) was implemented, malaria rates declined, with low endemicity in the south-west and south plain areas and high endemic foci in north Kyongsangbuk-do (province) and north and east Kyonggi-do. NMES activities greatly contributed in accelerating the control and later er...

  13. Monkey malaria kills four humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinski, Mary R; Barnwell, John W

    2009-05-01

    Four human deaths caused by Plasmodium knowlesi, a simian malaria species, are stimulating a surge of public health interest and clinical vigilance in vulnerable areas of Southeast Asia. We, and other colleagues, emphasize that these cases, identified in Malaysia, are a clear warning that health facilities and clinicians must rethink the diagnosis and treatment of malaria cases presumed to be caused by a less virulent human malaria species, Plasmodium malariae.

  14. [Plasma osmolarity and cerebral volume].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulard, G

    2001-02-01

    Under normal physiological conditions, the osmolarity of extracellular fluids (ECFs) and natremia are controlled by two regulatory mechanisms modulating the water balance and sodium outflow from information collected by the osmoreceptors and baroreceptors, respectively. As well, under normal physiological conditions, water and electrolytes of brain ECFs are secreted by the endothelial cells of brain capillaries. Furthermore, isotonicity is present on both sides of the blood-brain barrier. In the event of systemic osmolarity disorders, water transport subject to osmosis laws occurs at the level of the blood-brain barrier. In the case of plasmatic hyperosmolarity cerebral dehydration is observed, while cerebral edema occurs in the contrary case. However, plasmatic osmolarity disorders have less effect on the cerebral volume when their introduction is slow. Experimentation in acute conditions shows that measured variations of the cerebral water content are lower than calculated variations, thus suggesting the existence of an adaptive mechanism, that is, the cerebral osmoregulation which limits the variation of the volume of brain cells by modulating their osmoactive molecule content. These osmoactive molecules are, on the one hand, the electrolytes, which are early and rapidly mobilized, and, on the other hand, the organic osmoles (amino acids, etc.), whose secretion is slower and delayed. This phenomenon should be taken into account in the treatment of osmolarity disorders. Thus, the related-risk of treatment for natremia disorders is therapeutic reversal of the osmotic gradient at the level of the blood-brain barrier. This reversal, which corresponds to a second osmotic stress, requires the implementation of a new procedure of cerebral osmoregulation in the opposite direction of the preceding one. As successive osmotic stresses decrease the effectiveness of brain osmoregulation, the risk for cerebral dehydration and pontine myelinolysis increases when the treatment

  15. Cerebral Arteriosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain can cause a hemorrhagic stroke. Both types of stroke can be fatal. Cerebral arteriosclerosis is also related to a condition known as vascular dementia, in which small, symptom-free strokes cause cumulative damage and death to neurons (nerve cells) in the brain. Personality changes in ...

  16. Aloneness and the Isakower phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, C A

    1992-01-01

    Under the sway of the oedipal imperative, the Isakower phenomenon has long been regarded as a regressive perceptual defense against castration anxiety accompanying incestuous wishes, often stimulated by primal scene exposure-fantasy. Clinical material from the psychoanalytic psychotherapy of a borderline patient with object constancy deficits is offered to support a reconceptualization of the Isakower phenomenon: Following annihilatory rage and the destruction of extant inner objects, resulting in a regression to the "drive organization of memory," the face-breast imagery within the Isakower phenomenon arrives as a hallucinatory alternative to unbearable aloneness. PMID:1607306

  17. [Raynaud's phenomenon, disease or syndrome?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiessinger, Jean-Noël

    2011-09-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a common symptom. More often it is usually an idiopathic and benign condition. But it can be an early manifestation of a connective tissue disease especially scleroderma and primary Sjogren's syndrom. Thus it is necessary to develop reasonable screening model. If the vasomotor symptoms are localized, a diagnosis of secondary Raynaud's phenomenon is highly probable and the main etiology is an arterial disease. Occupational arterial lesions are a particularly aspect of secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. Calcium channel blockers are the reference for the symptomatic treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon. In severe secondary forms, intravenous iloprost infusion is effective. New drugs as endothelin antagonist and phospodiesterase type 5 inhibitors are still to be evaluated.

  18. [Methylphenidate and secondary Raynaud's phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias Otero, M; Portela Romero, M; Bugarín González, R; Ventura Victoria, M A

    2013-09-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a clinical disease characterized by episodic attacks of vasoconstriction of the arteries and arterioles of the extremities such as fingers and toes, sometimes the ears and nose, in response to cold or emotional stimuli. A classic attack is the pallor of the distal extremity, followed by cyanosis and redness, accompanied by paresthesia, usually as heat. When it occurs without apparent cause is called primary Raynaud's phenomenon. When associated with other disease, is called secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. The secondary table is associated with increased frequency of rheumatic diseases of collagen. They can also present certain drugs that cause vasoconstriction, such as ergotamine, beta-adrenergic antagonists, contraception and sympathomimetic drugs. Regarding the latter, we present a case of Raynaud's phenomenon secondary to methylphenidate in a 14 years.

  19. [Methylphenidate and secondary Raynaud's phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias Otero, M; Portela Romero, M; Bugarín González, R; Ventura Victoria, M A

    2013-09-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a clinical disease characterized by episodic attacks of vasoconstriction of the arteries and arterioles of the extremities such as fingers and toes, sometimes the ears and nose, in response to cold or emotional stimuli. A classic attack is the pallor of the distal extremity, followed by cyanosis and redness, accompanied by paresthesia, usually as heat. When it occurs without apparent cause is called primary Raynaud's phenomenon. When associated with other disease, is called secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. The secondary table is associated with increased frequency of rheumatic diseases of collagen. They can also present certain drugs that cause vasoconstriction, such as ergotamine, beta-adrenergic antagonists, contraception and sympathomimetic drugs. Regarding the latter, we present a case of Raynaud's phenomenon secondary to methylphenidate in a 14 years. PMID:24034762

  20. Research toward Malaria Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Louis H.; Howard, Russell J.; Carter, Richard; Good, Michael F.; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1986-12-01

    Malaria exacts a toll of disease to people in the Tropics that seems incomprehensible to those only familiar with medicine and human health in the developed world. The methods of molecular biology, immunology, and cell biology are now being used to develop an antimalarial vaccine. The Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria have many stages in their life cycle. Each stage is antigenically distinct and potentially could be interrupted by different vaccines. However, achieving complete protection by vaccination may require a better understanding of the complexities of B- and T-cell priming in natural infections and the development of an appropriate adjuvant for use in humans.

  1. MIGRATION AND MALARIA IN EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Monge-Maillo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The proportion of imported malaria cases due to immigrants in Europe has increased during the lasts decades, being the higher rates for those settled immigrants who travel to visit friends and relatives (VFRs at their country of origin. Cases are mainly due to P. falciparum and Sub-Saharan Africa is the most common origin. Clinically, malaria in immigrants is characterized by a mild clinical presentation with even asymptomatic o delayed malaria cases and low parasitemic level. These characteristics may be explained by a semi-immunity acquired after long periods of time exposed to stable transmission of malaria. Malaria cases among immigrants, even those asymptomatic patients with sub-microscopic parasitemia, could increase the risk of transmission and reintroduction of malaria in certain areas with the adequate vectors and climate conditions. Moreover imported malaria cases by immigrants can also play an important role in the non-vectorial transmission out of endemic area, by blood transfusions, organ transplantation or congenital or occupational exposures. Probably, out of endemic areas, screening of malaria among recent arrived immigrants coming from malaria endemic countries should be performed. These aim to reduce the risk of clinical malaria in the individual as well as to prevent autochthonous transmission of malaria in areas where it had been eradicated.

  2. An integrated malaria control program with community participation on the Pacific Coast of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Rojas

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on integrated malaria control in 23 communities on the Pacific Coast of Colombia, with several elements of an ecosystem approach to human health, including malaria-related sociopolitical, ecological, and economic factors. The program fostered community participation. The program presented here had 2 components: implementation and research. The first was conducted in 23 communities, 21 of which lacked adequate health services in terms of education, community participation, prompt diagnosis and complete treatment, and vector control. Research focused on specific vector control measures and the current national health services decentralization process. The project: 1 created a malaria prevention culture in the community; 2 avoided deaths from malaria (no fatal cases in the 3-year period, compared to 5-8 deaths a year previously; 3 avoided cases of cerebral malaria (no cases, as compared to 90-110 per year previously; 4 reduced malaria incidence by 45.36%; 5 decreased length of sick leave from 7.52 to 3.7 days; 6 established a permanent network of microscope technicians and 2-way radio communications; 7 integrated work by local, regional, and outside institutions; 8 demonstrated efficacy of insecticide-impregnated bednets to reduce malaria transmission.

  3. Severe imported malaria in an intensive care unit: a review of 59 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Lurdes C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In view of the close relationship of Portugal with African countries, particularly former Portuguese colonies, the diagnosis of malaria is not a rare thing. When a traveller returns ill from endemic areas, malaria should be the number one suspect. World Health Organization treatment guidelines recommend that adults with severe malaria should be admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU. Methods Severe cases of malaria in patients admitted to an ICU were reviewed retrospectively (1990-2011 and identification of variables associated with in-ICU mortality performed. Malaria prediction score (MPS, malaria score for adults (MSA, simplified acute physiology score (SAPSII and a score based on WHO's malaria severe criteria were applied. Statistical analysis was performed using StataV12. Results Fifty nine patients were included in the study, all but three were adults; 47 (79,6% were male; parasitaemia on admission, quantified in 48/59 (81.3% patients, was equal or greater than 2% in 47 of them (97.9%; the most common complications were thrombocytopaenia in 54 (91.5% patients, associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC in seven (11.8%, renal failure in 31 (52.5% patients, 18 of which (30.5% oliguric, shock in 29 (49.1% patients, liver dysfunction in 27 (45.7% patients, acidaemia in 23 (38.9% patients, cerebral dysfunction in 22 (37.2% patients, 11 of whom with unrousable coma, pulmonary oedema/ARDS in 22 (37.2% patients, hypoglycaemia in 18 (30.5% patients; 29 (49.1% patients presented five or more dysfunctions. The case fatality rate was 15.2%. Comparing the four scores, the SAPS II and the WHO score were the most sensitive to death prediction. In the univariate analysis, death was associated with the SAPS II score, cerebral malaria, acute renal and respiratory failure, DIC, spontaneous bleeding, acidosis and hypoglycaemia. Age, partial immunity to malaria, delay in malaria diagnosis and the level of parasitaemia were

  4. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Raphael Alvis-Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment.

  5. Malaria and gold fever.

    OpenAIRE

    Veeken, H

    1993-01-01

    The mineral rich territory of the Yanomami Indians of northern Brazil has been invaded by miners--who have destroyed the environment and introduced disease. Médecins Sans Frontières agreed to help combat the malaria epidemic. Conditions in the rainforest and villages and the health care facilities are described. Mere medical aid cannot prevent the Yanomami from being decimated.

  6. The dynamics of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, G; Cuellar, C B; Foll, C V

    1968-01-01

    Previous studies on dynamic systems of transmission of malaria, and of eradication of infection following the interruption of transmission, have now been adapted for advanced techniques using the facilities offered by computers.The computer programmes have been designed for a deterministic model suitable for a large community and also for a stochastic model relevant to small populations in which infections reach very low finite numbers. In this model, new infections and recoveries are assessed by the daily inoculation rate and are subject to laws of chance. Such a representation is closer than previous models to natural happenings in the process of malaria eradication. Further refinements of the new approach include the seasonal transmission and simulation of mass chemotherapy aimed at a cure of P. falciparum infections.These programmes present models on which the actual or expected results of changes due to various factors can be studied by the analysis of specific malaria situations recorded in the field. The value of control methods can also be tested by the study of such hypothetical epidemiological models and by trying out various procedures.Two specific malaria situations (in a pilot project in Northern Nigeria and in an outbreak in Syria) were studied by this method and provided some interesting results of operational value. The attack measures in the pilot project in Northern Nigeria were carried out according to the theoretical model derived from the basic data obtained in the field. PMID:5303328

  7. Immunodiagnosis of malaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for improved diagnostic tests for malaria over conventional methods based on indirect immunofluorescence for the measure of antimalarial antibodies, and for identification of malaria parasites on stained blood films for antigen detection (diagnostic of ongoing infection) has led to the development of several solid phase assays. These assays have been used in limited trials for both antibody and antigen detection. Solid phase assays for antimalarial antibodies are relatively easy to perform but the currently available assays for antigen detection which are based on solid phase antibody binding inhibition are still complicated, poorly standardised and time consuming. They can not be used on a large scale in endemic areas. Several new developments including the availability of monoclonal antimalarial antibodies of known specifications, the cloning of several malarial antigens and the synthesis of malaria specific nucleotides and polypeptides may allow in the near future the development of simple and reliable assays for malarial antigens detection or the identification of genomic malaria DNA by hybridisation on infected blood samples. Moreover the measure of antimalarial antibodies of known specificities would be easily achievable. (author)

  8. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  9. Use of integrated malaria management reduces malaria in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard A Okech

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During an entomological survey in preparation for malaria control interventions in Mwea division, the number of malaria cases at the Kimbimbi sub-district hospital was in a steady decline. The underlying factors for this reduction were unknown and needed to be identified before any malaria intervention tools were deployed in the area. We therefore set out to investigate the potential factors that could have contributed to the decline of malaria cases in the hospital by analyzing the malaria control knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP that the residents in Mwea applied in an integrated fashion, also known as integrated malaria management (IMM. METHODS: Integrated Malaria Management was assessed among community members of Mwea division, central Kenya using KAP survey. The KAP study evaluated community members' malaria disease management practices at the home and hospitals, personal protection measures used at the household level and malaria transmission prevention methods relating to vector control. Concurrently, we also passively examined the prevalence of malaria parasite infection via outpatient admission records at the major referral hospital in the area. In addition we studied the mosquito vector population dynamics, the malaria sporozoite infection status and entomological inoculation rates (EIR over an 8 month period in 6 villages to determine the risk of malaria transmission in the entire division. RESULTS: A total of 389 households in Mwea division were interviewed in the KAP study while 90 houses were surveyed in the entomological study. Ninety eight percent of the households knew about malaria disease while approximately 70% of households knew its symptoms and methods to manage it. Ninety seven percent of the interviewed households went to a health center for malaria diagnosis and treatment. Similarly a higher proportion (81% used anti-malarial medicines bought from local pharmacies. Almost 90% of households reported

  10. Koebner Phenomenon and Mycosis Fungoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebas, Eve; Libon, Florence; Nikkels, Arjen F

    2015-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most frequent type of primary cutaneous T-cell/NK-cell lymphoma. The Koebner phenomenon is defined as the appearance of cutaneous lesions on previously noninvolved skin following trauma and is observed in a series of cutaneous diseases including psoriasis, lichen planus, viral warts, molluscum contagiosum, etc. In this case report, 3 patients with longstanding MF are presented, the 1st with the appearance of a circumscribed early-stage type MF lesion rapidly following a surgical excision of an infundibular cyst, the 2nd with the appearance of a unique unilateral palmar tumoral MF lesion at the pressure site of a crutch, and the 3rd presented localized MF early stage lesions at the friction site of a belt. This report suggests that some MF patients may experience Koebner phenomenon-induced MF lesions and that MF should be added to the long list of skin diseases potentially exhibiting the Koebner phenomenon. PMID:26557075

  11. Koebner Phenomenon and Mycosis Fungoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Lebas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycosis fungoides (MF is the most frequent type of primary cutaneous T-cell/NK-cell lymphoma. The Koebner phenomenon is defined as the appearance of cutaneous lesions on previously noninvolved skin following trauma and is observed in a series of cutaneous diseases including psoriasis, lichen planus, viral warts, molluscum contagiosum, etc. In this case report, 3 patients with longstanding MF are presented, the 1st with the appearance of a circumscribed early-stage type MF lesion rapidly following a surgical excision of an infundibular cyst, the 2nd with the appearance of a unique unilateral palmar tumoral MF lesion at the pressure site of a crutch, and the 3rd presented localized MF early stage lesions at the friction site of a belt. This report suggests that some MF patients may experience Koebner phenomenon-induced MF lesions and that MF should be added to the long list of skin diseases potentially exhibiting the Koebner phenomenon.

  12. Resurrecting Dead-water Phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Mercier, Matthieu; Dauxois, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    We revisit experimental studies performed by Ekman on dead-water using modern techniques in order to present new insights on this peculiar phenomenon. We extend its description to more general situations such as a three-layer fluid or a linearly stratified fluid in presence of a pycnocline, showing the robustness of dead-water phenomenon. We observe large amplitude nonlinear internal waves which are coupled to the boat dynamics, and we emphasize that the modeling of the wave-induced drag requires more analysis, taking into account nonlinear effects.

  13. Family bio-social variables associated with severe malaria disease among under-five children in resource-poor setting of a rural hospital in Eastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Uche Pascal Iloh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria threatens the lives of under-five in rural Nigerian families. Although factors that influence malaria in under-five are manifold, family bio-social factors may contribute to the variability of the clinical picture. Aim: To determine family bio-social variables associated with severe malaria among under-five children in a resource-poor setting of a rural hospital in Eastern Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out on the families of under-five managed for malaria. Data extracted included family bio-social variables and diagnosis. An under-five child was defined to have malaria if the mother gave complaints of fever, vomiting and other symptoms suggestive of malaria, had body temperature exceeding 37.5΀C with the asexual forms of Plasmodium falciparum detected on the peripheral blood film. Severe malaria is the malaria that presents with life-threatening features like severe anemia and cerebral malaria. Results: The prevalence of severe malaria was 31.8%. The family bio-social variables significantly associated with severe malaria were maternal low level of education (P = 0.031, family size >4 (P = 0.044, low social class of the family (P = 0.025, non-living together of parents (P = 0.011, and poor access to health facilities (P = 0.038. The most significant predictor of severe malaria was non-living together of parents (P = 0.000, OR = 3.08, CI = 1.64-5.10. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that some family bio-social variables are associated with severe malaria. These families should constitute at risk families that could be targeted for malaria interventional programs.

  14. PRESENTASI KLINIK, KOMPLIKASI DAN MORTALITI MALARIA SEREBRAL DI RS BETHESDA, MINAHASA

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    P. N. Harianto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of cerebral malaria was performed in the Department of Internal Medicine, Bethesda Hospital - Tomohon, North Sulawesi, from January 1983 until October 1989. Among 2261 cases of malaria admitted in this hospital, there were 72 cases of cerebral malaria. The proportion of cerebral malaria cases increased from 0.8 % in 1983 to 6.4% in 1989. The mortality increased in the last 2 years, in spite of the same protocol-therapy in Bethesda Hospital. The total mortality was 30.5 %. There were 37 men and 35 women with an age distribution of 13-79 years. Parasitemia of more than 2 % occurs in 18 % and less than 2 % in 82 %. Complications were anemia 34%; hypoglycemia 9 %; creatinine 2 mg % in 36 %; hyponatremia 92 % and hyperbilirubenemia in 50 %. Several factors influencing the mortality were : Hypoglycemia less than 50 mg %Decreased conciousness level to sopor and comaCreatinine more than 2 mg %Total bilirubine more than 2 mg %More than one organ involvement for complications.Delayed and insufficient treatment.Probable resistence to treatment (quinine or chloroquine It is not certain which factors have a dominant role in mortality but in a condition with more than one  factor the mortality was very high.

  15. The changing spectrum of severe falciparum malaria: a clinical study from Bikaner (northwest India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.K. Kochar, S.K. Kochar, R.P. Agrawal, M. Sabir, K.C. Nayak, T.D. Agrawal, V.P. Purohit , R.P. Gupta

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Recently there were reports from all over India about changing spectrumof clinical presentation of severe malaria. The present study was planned to study the same in thenorthwest India.Methods: This prospective study was conducted on patients of severe malaria admitted in a classifiedmalaria ward of a tertiary care hospital in Bikaner, Rajasthan (northwest India during 1994 and 2001.It included adult patients of both sexes belonging to all age groups. The diagnosis of Plasmodiumfalciparum was confirmed by demonstrating asexual form of parasites in peripheral blood smear. Allpatients were treated with i.v./oral quinine. The specific complications were treated by standard WHOprotocol. The data for individual complications for both the years were analysed by applying chisquaretest.Results: In a prospective study in 1994 the spectrum of complication was dominated by cerebralmalaria (25.75% followed by jaundice (11.47%, bleeding tendencies (9.59%, severe anaemia(5.83%, shock (5.26%, Acute respiratory distress syndrome—ARDS (3.01%, renal failure (2.07%and hypoglycemia (2.07% whereas in 2001 it was dominated by jaundice (58.85% followed bysevere anaemia (26.04%, bleeding tendencies (25.52%, shock (10.94%, cerebral malaria (10.94%,renal failure (6.25%, ARDS (2.08% and hypoglycemia (1.56%. The sharp difference for presence ofjaundice and severe anaemia in 2001 and cerebral malaria in 1994 was statistically significant. Similarly,the important cause of mortality in 2001 was multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (71.10% withpredominant presentation of jaundice and renal failure, whereas in 1994, it was cerebral malaria (77.96%.Interpretation & conclusion: The observation of changing spectrum of severe malaria in this studyand a significant increase in presentation with jaundice as an important manifestation is highly essentialfor primary, secondary and tertiary level health care providers for proper diagnosis and management.

  16. Cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews cranial MR findings in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) to clarify and categorize this disorder. The MR images of 40 patients with clinical CP were retrospectively reviewed. All patients suffered either varying spastic plegias, hypotonicity, or choreoathetosis. Concomitantly, the patients suffered from static encephalopathy, developmental delay, and/or microcephaly. Twenty-four patients were born at or near term, 10 were premature, and incomplete birth histories were available in six. The MR images revealed mild to severe degrees of white matter damage in 24 patients (12 term, nine premature, three unknown)

  17. Investiments in Poland. Outsourcing phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Salvat Massoni, Romà

    2008-01-01

    - Introduction, focused in world outsourcing phenomenon, analysing causes and consequences of relocation. - Investment in Poland, business opportunities for foreign investment. Forms of carrying out business activity available to foreign entities in Poland. - Particular case. Analysis and viability of the part machining in large and middle sized series. Study of the investment.

  18. Is consciousness a nonspatial phenomenon?.

    OpenAIRE

    Gundersen, Ståle

    2011-01-01

    Colin McGinn has argued that consciousness is a nonspatial phenomenon. McGinn’s arguments for the nonspatiality of consciousness are presented and then criticized. It is concluded that consciousness may be as spatial as electric charge and different kinds of abilities.

  19. Translation as a Psycholinguistic Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasyekin, Serhiy

    2010-01-01

    The article sketches the outlines of a theoretical framework for the analysis of translation of literary texts, viewed as psycho-semiotic phenomenon and based on evaluation of earlier attempts in this direction, and on the results of a psycholinguistic empirical study of translations. Central to this framework is the recent insight that the human…

  20. A rare phenomenon: oculonasal synkinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciloglu, N Sinem; Duran, Alpay; Buyukdogan, Hasan

    2014-10-01

    Oculonasal synkinesis is the simultaneous contraction of the orbicularis oculi and the compressor narium minor muscles. The etiology of this phenomenon is still unclear; congenital and traumatic reasons are considered to be responsible. Here we report a case of oculonasal synkinesis. PMID:25015551

  1. Malaria in Kenya's Western Highlands

    OpenAIRE

    Shanks, G. Dennis; Simon I. Hay; Omumbo, Judy A.; Robert W Snow

    2005-01-01

    Records from tea estates in the Kericho district in Kenya show that malaria reemerged in the 1980s. Renewed epidemic activity coincided with the emergence of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria and may have been triggered by the failure of antimalarial drugs. Meteorologic changes, population movements, degradation of health services, and changes in Anopheles vector populations are possible contributing factors. The highland malaria epidemics of the 1940s were stopped largely b...

  2. The efficiency of malaria chemoprophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Vasiliki Pappa; Maria Saridi

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Malaria is a highly contagious disease. According to WHO, malaria cases are expected to increase due to climate changes. Despite the eradication efforts, malaria still remains one of the most significant causes of morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical regions. Many different antimalarial regimens are used , however resistance is emerging to many of themPurpose: This critical review was conducted, in order to respond to the following questions. A) Which antimalaria...

  3. Malaria during pregnancy in Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Rulisa, S.

    2014-01-01

    It appears that malaria in Rwanda is not a major contributor to adverse outcomes of pregnancy anymore from a public health perspective but it can still give problems in individual patients, also in areas of low malaria transmission. This thesis shows that for individual cases the current treatment options are safe and sufficient but it remains of utmost important to closely follow pregnant women. Although most of malaria infected women will develop symptoms and seek help, active monitoring du...

  4. The use of activated protein C in severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, L G; Austin, D L H

    2007-06-01

    A 56-year-old man presented to a peripheral hospital in New Zealand with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria with cerebral involvement and subsequently developed multi-system organ failure. Activated protein C was used in an attempt to stop the cascade of events into multi-organ failure. Severe infection with P. falciparum is life-threatening and appears to activate a hypercoagulable state similar to that of severe sepsis. Activated protein C is currently used in the treatment of severe sepsis and may provide a new adjuvant therapy for severe P. falciparum malaria.

  5. Oxidative Stress in Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Dolabela, Maria F; Vilhena, Thyago C; Laurindo, Paula S. O. C.; Gonçalves, Ana Carolina M.; Ferreira, Michelli E. S.; Gomes, Bruno A. Q.; Danilo R. Moreira; Sandro Percário; Green, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is a significant public health problem in more than 100 countries and causes an estimated 200 million new infections every year. Despite the significant effort to eradicate this dangerous disease, lack of complete knowledge of its physiopathology compromises the success in this enterprise. In this paper we review oxidative stress mechanisms involved in the disease and discuss the potential benefits of antioxidant supplementation as an adjuvant antimalarial strategy.

  6. Ungulate malaria parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas J. Templeton; Masahito Asada; Montakan Jiratanh; Ishikawa, Sohta A.; Sonthaya Tiawsirisup; Thillaiampalam Sivakumar; Boniface Namangala; Mika Takeda; Kingdao Mohkaew; Supawan Ngamjituea; Noboru Inoue; Chihiro Sugimoto; Yuji Inagaki; Yasuhiko Suzuki; Naoaki Yokoyama

    2016-01-01

    Haemosporida parasites of even-toed ungulates are diverse and globally distributed, but since their discovery in 1913 their characterization has relied exclusively on microscopy-based descriptions. In order to bring molecular approaches to bear on the identity and evolutionary relationships of ungulate malaria parasites, we conducted Plasmodium cytb-specific nested PCR surveys using blood from water buffalo in Vietnam and Thailand, and goats in Zambia. We found that Plasmodium is readily dete...

  7. Artemether for severe malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Esu, Ekpereonne; Effa, Emmanuel E; Opie, Oko N; Uwaoma, Amirahobu; Meremikwu, Martin M

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2011 the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended parenteral artesunate in preference to quinine as first-line treatment for people with severe malaria. Prior to this recommendation, many countries, particularly in Africa, had begun to use artemether, an alternative artemisinin derivative. This review evaluates intramuscular artemether compared with both quinine and artesunate. Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of intramuscular artemether versus any other parentera...

  8. Potential impact of host immunity on malaria treatment outcome in Tanzanian children infected with Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevold, Anders; Nkya, Watoky M M M; Theisen, Michael;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In malaria endemic areas children may recover from malaria after chemotherapy in spite of harbouring genotypically drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. This phenomenon suggests that there is a synergy between drug treatment and acquired immunity. This hypothesis was examined in an area...... of moderately intense transmission of P. falciparum in Tanzania during a drug trail with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) or amodiaquine (AQ). METHODS: One hundred children with uncomplicated malaria were treated with either SP or AQ and followed for 28 days. Mutations in parasite genes related to SP and AQ-resistance...... resistant haplotypes, while the IgG responses to none of the other 11 malaria antigens were not significantly associated with ACPR. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that GLURP-specific IgG antibodies in this setting contribute to clearance of drug-resistant infections and support the hypothesis...

  9. Entropy-driven cutoff phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Lancia, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    In this article we present a theorem relating the cutoff phenomenon for finite Markov chains to suitably chosen random times. We have in mind the generalization to systems with uniform stationary measure of the link between hitting times and cutoff. Such link has been already proved in literature only for systems with stationary measure concentrated in a finite region. We show some examples of application of our result.

  10. TERRORISM AS A COMMUNICATION PHENOMENON

    OpenAIRE

    Atanesian, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Some of the contemporary theories of the mass media and political communications teach their audiences and mold public ideas about events or phenomena which political forces exploit for their own ends. The media do not merely cover events or describe phenomena-they cover them with "outgrowths" that disfigure them to the extent that the public gradually shifts from discussing the real phenomenon to its virtual likeness, which might well be a product of media skills. This explains why from time...

  11. PHENOMENON OF CARVED DRIVING WHEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xianghua; ZHANG Jianwu

    2007-01-01

    A newly found phenomenon of carved driving wheels of a rea-wheel-drive tractor used in an airport is discussed. The circum of every driving wheel is damaged at three regions, which distribute regularly and uniformly. Everyday, the tractor tows a trailer which are times heavier than the tractor, and moves on the same road in the airport. The phenomenon is explained by the torsional self-excited vibration system of the powertrain. The simplified torsional vibration system is discribed by a 2-order ordinary differential equation, which has a limit circle. Experiments and numerical simulations show the followings: Because of the heavy trailer, the slip ratio of the tractor's driving wheels is very large. Therefore, there is severe torsional self-excited vibration in the tractor's drivetrain, and the self-excited vibration results in severe and regular fluctuations of the rear wheel's velocity. The severe fluctuations in velocity fastens the damage of the driving wheels. At the same time, the time interval in which an arbitrary point in the circum of the driving wheel contacts with the road twice is two times more than the period of the torsional self-excited vibration, and this times explained the existence of three damaged regions. At last, it points out that the phenomenon can be avoided when the torsional damping is large enough.

  12. RIFINs are adhesins implicated in severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goel, Suchi; Palmkvist, Mia; Moll, Kirsten;

    2015-01-01

    Rosetting is a virulent Plasmodium falciparum phenomenon associated with severe malaria. Here we demonstrate that P. falciparum–encoded repetitive interspersed families of polypeptides (RIFINs) are expressed on the surface of infected red blood cells (iRBCs), where they bind to RBCs—preferentiall......Rosetting is a virulent Plasmodium falciparum phenomenon associated with severe malaria. Here we demonstrate that P. falciparum–encoded repetitive interspersed families of polypeptides (RIFINs) are expressed on the surface of infected red blood cells (iRBCs), where they bind to RBCs......—preferentially of blood group A—to form large rosettes and mediate microvascular binding of iRBCs. We suggest that RIFINs have a fundamental role in the development of severe malaria and thereby contribute to the varying global distribution of ABO blood groups in the human population....

  13. Cerebral cysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of histologically proven cerebral cysticercosis are presented. In both cases subcutaneous tissue nodules, a rare feature, were present. Several disease patterns are apparent - meningeal, parenchymatous and ventricular, spinal cord lesions and mixed patterns. Epilepsy is by far the major presenting symptom of cysticercosis, which in turn plays a significant role in the causation of adult-onset epilepsy in Blacks. Despite its drawbacks, the haemag-glutination inhibition test remains the most satisfactory serological method at present available for the diagnosis of cysticercosis; it is positive in up to 85% of cases of proven cysticercosis. With the advent of computed tomography many cases of unsuspected cysticercosis (symptomatic or asymptomatic) are being discovered

  14. Malaria early warning in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Simon I. Hay; Rogers, David J.; Shanks, G. Dennis; Monica F. Myers; Robert W Snow

    2001-01-01

    Kenya displays large spatiotemporal diversity in its climate and ecology. It follows that malaria transmission will reflect this environmental heterogeneity in both space and time. In this article, we discuss how such heterogeneity, and its epidemiological consequences, should be considered in the development of early warning systems for malaria epidemics.

  15. Malaria vaccine: a current perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobhona Sharma

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The observation that inactivated Plasmodium sporozoites could protect against malaria is about a hundred years old. However, systematic demonstration of protection using irradiated sporozoites occurred in the nineteen-sixties, providing the impetus for the development of a malaria vaccine. In 1983, the circumsporozoite protein (CSP, a major sporozoite surface antigen, became the first Plasmodium gene to be cloned, and a CSP-based vaccine appeared imminent. Today, 25 years later, we are still without an effective malaria vaccine, despite considerable information regarding the genomics and proteomics of the malaria parasites. Although clinical immunity to malaria has been well-documented in adults living in malaria endemic areas, our understanding of the host-immune responses operating in such malaria immune persons remains poor, and limits the development of immune control of the disease. Currently, several antigen and adjuvant combinations have entered clinical trials, in which efficacy against experimental sporozoite challenge and/or exposure to natural infection is evaluated. This review collates information on the recent status of the field. Unresolved challenges facing the development of a malaria vaccine are also discussed.

  16. Newer approaches to malaria control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Se; Pradhan, Prita; Pradhan, Suresh Chandra

    2011-07-01

    Malaria is the third leading cause of death due to infectious diseases affecting around 243 million people, causing 863,000 deaths each year, and is a major public health problem. Most of the malarial deaths occur in children below 5 years and is a major contributor of under-five mortality. As a result of environmental and climatic changes, there is a change in vector population and distribution, leading to resurgence of malaria at numerous foci. Resistance to antimalarials is a major challenge to malaria control and there are new drug developments, new approaches to treatment strategies, combination therapy to overcome resistance and progress in vaccine development. Now, artemisinin-based combination therapy is the first-line therapy as the malarial parasite has developed resistance to other antimalarials. Reports of artemisinin resistance are appearing and identification of new drug targets gains utmost importance. As there is a shift from malaria control to malaria eradication, more research is focused on malaria vaccine development. A malaria vaccine, RTS,S, is in phase III of development and may become the first successful one. Due to resistance to insecticides and lack of environmental sanitation, the conventional methods of vector control are turning out to be futile. To overcome this, novel strategies like sterile insect technique and transgenic mosquitoes are pursued for effective vector control. As a result of the global organizations stepping up their efforts with continued research, eradication of malaria can turn out to be a reality. PMID:23508211

  17. Malaria during pregnancy in Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Rulisa

    2014-01-01

    It appears that malaria in Rwanda is not a major contributor to adverse outcomes of pregnancy anymore from a public health perspective but it can still give problems in individual patients, also in areas of low malaria transmission. This thesis shows that for individual cases the current treatment o

  18. Candidate human genetic polymorphisms and severe malaria in a Tanzanian population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alphaxard Manjurano

    Full Text Available Human genetic background strongly influences susceptibility to malaria infection and progression to severe disease and death. Classical genetic studies identified haemoglobinopathies and erythrocyte-associated polymorphisms, as protective against severe disease. High throughput genotyping by mass spectrometry allows multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs to be examined simultaneously. We compared the prevalence of 65 human SNP's, previously associated with altered risk of malaria, between Tanzanian children with and without severe malaria. Five hundred children, aged 1-10 years, with severe malaria were recruited from those admitted to hospital in Muheza, Tanzania and compared with matched controls. Genotyping was performed by Sequenom MassArray, and conventional PCR was used to detect deletions in the alpha-thalassaemia gene. SNPs in two X-linked genes were associated with altered risk of severe malaria in females but not in males: heterozygosity for one or other of two SNPs in the G6PD gene was associated with protection from all forms of severe disease whilst two SNPs in the gene encoding CD40L were associated with respiratory distress. A SNP in the adenyl cyclase 9 (ADCY9 gene was associated with protection from acidosis whilst a polymorphism in the IL-1α gene (IL1A was associated with an increased risk of acidosis. SNPs in the genes encoding IL-13 and reticulon-3 (RTN3 were associated with increased risk of cerebral malaria. This study confirms previously known genetic associations with protection from severe malaria (HbS, G6PD. It identifies two X-linked genes associated with altered risk of severe malaria in females, identifies mutations in ADCY9, IL1A and CD40L as being associated with altered risk of severe respiratory distress and acidosis, both of which are characterised by high serum lactate levels, and also identifies novel genetic associations with severe malaria (TRIM5 and cerebral malaria(IL-13 and RTN3. Further studies

  19. Combined measurement of soluble and cellular ICAM-1 among children with Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cserti-Gazdewich Christine M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 is a cytoadhesion molecule implicated in the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Elevated levels of soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1 have previously been reported with increased malaria disease severity. However, studies have not yet examined both sICAM-1 concentrations and monocyte ICAM-1 expression in the same cohort of patients. To better understand the relationship of soluble and cellular ICAM-1 measurements in malaria, both monocyte ICAM-1 expression and sICAM-1 concentration were measured in children with P. falciparum infection exhibiting a spectrum of clinical severity. Methods Samples were analysed from 160 children, aged 0.5 to 10.8 years, with documented P. falciparum malaria in Kampala, Uganda. The patients belonged to one of three pre-study defined groups: uncomplicated malaria (UM, severe non-fatal malaria (SM-s, and fatal malaria (SM-f. Subset analysis was done on those with cerebral malaria (CM or severe malaria anaemia (SMA. Monocyte ICAM-1 was measured by flow cytometry. sICAM-1 was measured by enzyme immunoassay. Results Both sICAM-1 and monocyte cell-surface ICAM-1 followed a log-normal distribution. Median sICAM-1 concentrations increased with greater severity-of-illness: 279 ng/mL (UM, 462 ng/mL (SM-s, and 586 ng/mL (SM-f, p Conclusion In this cohort of children with P. falciparum malaria, sICAM-1 levels were associated with severity-of-illness. Patients with UM had higher monocyte ICAM-1 expression consistent with a role for monocyte ICAM-1 in immune clearance during non-severe malaria. Among the subsets of patients with either SMA or CM, monocyte ICAM-1 levels were higher in CM, consistent with the role of ICAM-1 as a marker of cytoadhesion. Categories of disease in pediatric malaria may exhibit specific combinations of soluble and cellular ICAM-1 expression.

  20. A case of Plasmodium vivax related cerebral malaria Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Bayraktar, Süleyman; Bayrak, Seher Tabanlı; Emir, H. Haldun; Elevli, Murat

    2005-01-01

    Sıtmalı hastada ağrının yerinin belirlenememesi ve ensefalopatinin başka herhangi bir nedenle açıklanamaması durumu serebral malarya olarak tanımlanır Sıklığı kesin olarak bilinmemektedir Plasmodium vivax a bağlı serebral malarya Plasmodium falciparum a göre çok daha nadirdir Nadir rastlanması dolayısıyla Plasmodium vivax a bağlı 7 yaşında bir çocuk serebral malarya olgusu sunulmuştur Anahtar Kelimeler: serebral malarya plasmodium vivax

  1. AIDS as a social phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, F J

    1987-01-01

    AIDS as a new lethal and at present incurable sexually transmitted disease is already having remarkable social repercussions not yet fully explicit and hence it can be termed a social phenomenon. Political, behavioural, economic and legal reactions and social responses such as stigmatization, changes in the sick role and the growth of voluntary organizations and international collaboration are described. Communication, education and information aspects of AIDS are considered using material from the press and it is clear that a massive educational approach to modify behaviour must be the basis for a control programme. PMID:3317877

  2. Effective adjunctive therapy by an innate defense regulatory peptide in a preclinical model of severe malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achtman, Ariel H; Pilat, Sandra; Law, Charity W; Lynn, David J; Janot, Laure; Mayer, Matt L; Ma, Shuhua; Kindrachuk, Jason; Finlay, B Brett; Brinkman, Fiona S L; Smyth, Gordon K; Hancock, Robert E W; Schofield, Louis

    2012-05-23

    Case fatality rates for severe malaria remain high even in the best clinical settings because antimalarial drugs act against the parasite without alleviating life-threatening inflammation. We assessed the potential for host-directed therapy of severe malaria of a new class of anti-inflammatory drugs, the innate defense regulator (IDR) peptides, based on host defense peptides. The Plasmodium berghei ANKA model of experimental cerebral malaria was adapted to use as a preclinical screen by combining late-stage intervention in established infections with advanced bioinformatic analysis of early transcriptional changes in co-regulated gene sets. Coadministration of IDR-1018 with standard first-line antimalarials increased survival of infected mice while down-regulating key inflammatory networks associated with fatality. Thus, IDR peptides provided host-directed adjunctive therapy for severe disease in combination with antimalarial treatment.

  3. Ungulate malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Thomas J; Asada, Masahito; Jiratanh, Montakan; Ishikawa, Sohta A; Tiawsirisup, Sonthaya; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Namangala, Boniface; Takeda, Mika; Mohkaew, Kingdao; Ngamjituea, Supawan; Inoue, Noboru; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Inagaki, Yuji; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Kaewthamasorn, Morakot; Kaneko, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Haemosporida parasites of even-toed ungulates are diverse and globally distributed, but since their discovery in 1913 their characterization has relied exclusively on microscopy-based descriptions. In order to bring molecular approaches to bear on the identity and evolutionary relationships of ungulate malaria parasites, we conducted Plasmodium cytb-specific nested PCR surveys using blood from water buffalo in Vietnam and Thailand, and goats in Zambia. We found that Plasmodium is readily detectable from water buffalo in these countries, indicating that buffalo Plasmodium is distributed in a wider region than India, which is the only area in which buffalo Plasmodium has been reported. Two types (I and II) of Plasmodium sequences were identified from water buffalo and a third type (III) was isolated from goat. Morphology of the parasite was confirmed in Giemsa-reagent stained blood smears for the Type I sample. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequences were isolated and used to infer a phylogeny in which ungulate malaria parasites form a monophyletic clade within the Haemosporida, and branch prior to the clade containing bird, lizard and other mammalian Plasmodium. Thus it is likely that host switching of Plasmodium from birds to mammals occurred multiple times, with a switch to ungulates independently from other mammalian Plasmodium. PMID:26996979

  4. Drug resistance in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S C Parija

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimalarial chemotherapy is an important component of all malaria control programmes throughout the world. This is especially so in light of the fact that there are no antimalarial vaccines which are available for clinical use at present. Emergence and spread of malaria parasites which are resistant to many of the available antimalarials today is, therefore, a major cause for concern. Till date, resistance to all groups of antimalarials excluding artemisinin has been reported. In recent years, in vitro resistance to even artemisinin has been described. While resistance to antibacterial agents has come to prominence as a clinical problem in recent years, antiparasitic resistance in general and antimalarial resistance in particular has not received much attention, especially in the Indian scenario. The present review deals with commonly used antimalarial drugs and the mechanisms of resistance to them. Various methods of detecting antimalarial resistance and avoiding the same have also been dealt with. Newer parasite targets which can be used in developing newer antimalarial agents and antimalarials obtained from plants have also been mentioned.

  5. Control of Disease Tolerance to Malaria by Nitric Oxide and Carbon Monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktória Jeney

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO are gasotransmitters that suppress the development of severe forms of malaria associated with Plasmodium infection. Here, we addressed the mechanism underlying their protective effect against experimental cerebral malaria (ECM, a severe form of malaria that develops in Plasmodium-infected mice, which resembles, in many aspects, human cerebral malaria (CM. NO suppresses the pathogenesis of ECM via a mechanism involving (1 the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF-2, (2 induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, and (3 CO production via heme catabolism by HO-1. The protection afforded by NO is associated with inhibition of CD4+ T helper (TH and CD8+ cytotoxic (TC T cell activation in response to Plasmodium infection via a mechanism involving HO-1 and CO. The protective effect of NO and CO is not associated with modulation of host pathogen load, suggesting that these gasotransmitters establish a crosstalk-conferring disease tolerance to Plasmodium infection.

  6. New Phenomenon of Commercial Corruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Nowakowski

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is about increase corruption in private sector as commercial corruption. This establishes a wide understanding of that phenomenon in social science and law. Corruption and bribery are types of fraud and are linked with the private sector too. Although certain types of corruption will decline as the private sector grows and consolidates, other new types involving private sector firms may increase. The commercial corruption can be described as relation inside of an organization and as relation between firms. Corruption in private sector in Poland is connected with social distrust and specific organizational culture, too. Commercial corruption is a familiar feature of their societies and has been the focus of law enforcement and institutional reform. Many others problems do not change the fact that such corruption is a new important problem and causes lost of competitiveness and creates a substitute for fair market and competition in Polish economy and abroad.

  7. The Phenomenon of Dental Fear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    Odontophobia is a rather unique phobia with special psychosomatic components that impact on the dental health of odontophobic persons. It also has psychosocial components largely as a result of destruction of the teeth and subsequent embarrassment that can affect a person and cause a vicious cycle...... of dental fear (see fig. 1). The phenomenon is facilitated by misunderstandings and myths generated by both patients and dentists (see table 1 for examples). The most common reasons given in the literature for such strong fears of dental treatment are: 1) bad experiences in childhood for 85% of cases, 2......) feeling of powerlessness and lack of control over personal emotional reactions and over the social situation in the dental chair, 3) social learning processes in which the image of the dentist is cast in a negative light by the mass media or by the person's relatives or friends and 4) that the person has...

  8. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be sure to follow us on Twitter . United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  9. Cerebral palsy and epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Knežević-Pogančev Marija

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in early childhood. Epilepsy is known to have a high association with cerebral palsy. All types of epileptic seizures can be seen in patients with cerebral palsy. Complex partial and secondary generalized ones are the most frequent seizure types. In persons with cerebral palsy and mental retardation, the diagnosis of epilepsy presents unique difficulties. Generally they are not able to describe the epileptic ev...

  10. A potential role for plasma uric acid in the endothelial pathology of Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neida K Mita-Mendoza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammatory cytokinemia and systemic activation of the microvascular endothelium are central to the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Recently, 'parasite-derived' uric acid (UA was shown to activate human immune cells in vitro, and plasma UA levels were associated with inflammatory cytokine levels and disease severity in Malian children with malaria. Since UA is associated with endothelial inflammation in non-malaria diseases, we hypothesized that elevated UA levels contribute to the endothelial pathology of P. falciparum malaria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured levels of UA and soluble forms of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1, E-selectin (sE-Selectin, thrombomodulin (sTM, tissue factor (sTF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in the plasma of Malian children aged 0.5-17 years with uncomplicated malaria (UM, n = 487 and non-cerebral severe malaria (NCSM, n = 68. In 69 of these children, we measured these same factors once when they experienced a malaria episode and twice when they were healthy (i.e., before and after the malaria transmission season. We found that levels of UA, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-Selectin and sTM increase during a malaria episode and return to basal levels at the end of the transmission season (p<0.0001. Plasma levels of UA and these four endothelial biomarkers correlate with parasite density and disease severity. In children with UM, UA levels correlate with parasite density (r = 0.092, p = 0.043, sICAM-1 (r = 0.255, p<0.0001 and sTM (r = 0.175, p = 0.0001 levels. After adjusting for parasite density, UA levels predict sTM levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Elevated UA levels may contribute to malaria pathogenesis by damaging endothelium and promoting a procoagulant state. The correlation between UA levels and parasite densities suggests that parasitized erythrocytes are one possible source of excess UA. UA-induced shedding of

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FOR MALARIA CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Rafatjah

    1976-09-01

    Full Text Available Environmental management for malaria control is defined as any planned physical activities that through transformation of land, water and vegetation will result in the prevention, reduction or elimination of malaria. In planning and implementing these activities, full consideration must be given to their long-term effects and benefits and to the preservation of the quality of environment and they need to be fully and closely coordinated with water, land and agricultural development projects. Environmental management activities for malaria control can be classified as source reduction, dealing mainly with physical alteration of the environment; environmental manipulation, introducing temporary environmental changes and the reduction, and prevention of man-vector contact by site selection, mosquito proofing of dwellings and personal protection. For anti-malaria programs to employ these activities they need to re-train the staff, re-orient the services and set up pilot operations for feasibility studies.

  12. Malaria ecology and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, G. C.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the costs that climate change will exact on society is crucial to devising an appropriate policy response. One of the channels through while climate change will affect human society is through vector-borne diseases whose epidemiology is conditioned by ambient ecology. This paper introduces the literature on malaria, its cost on society, and the consequences of climate change to the physics community in hopes of inspiring synergistic research in the area of climate change and health. It then demonstrates the use of one ecological indicator of malaria suitability to provide an order-of-magnitude assessment of how climate change might affect the malaria burden. The average of Global Circulation Model end-of-century predictions implies a 47% average increase in the basic reproduction number of the disease in today's malarious areas, significantly complicating malaria elimination efforts.

  13. Malaria Prophylaxis: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Russo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The flow of international travellers to and from malaria-endemic areas, especially Africa, has increased in recent years. Apart from the very high morbidity and mortality burden imposed on malaria-endemic areas, imported malaria is the main cause of fever possibly causing severe disease and death in travellers coming from tropical and subtropical areas, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa. The importance of behavioural preventive measures (bed nets, repellents, etc., adequate chemoprophylaxis and, in selected circumstances, stand-by emergency treatment may not be overemphasized. However, no prophylactic regimen may offer complete protection. Expert advice is needed to tailor prophylactic advice according to traveller (age, baseline clinical conditions, etc. and travel (destination, season, etc. characteristics in order to reduce malaria risk.

  14. Resurgence of malaria in Bombay (Mumbai) in the 1990s: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, V

    2000-06-01

    Bombay has achieved extraordinary success in controlling its malaria problem for nearly six decades by relying primarily on legislative measures and non-insecticidal methods of mosquito abatement. In 1992, however, malaria reemerged in Bombay with a vengeance. During 1992-1997, the city witnessed a manifold increase in the number of malaria cases diagnosed and treated by the public health system. The large number of malaria patients treated by private practitioners was not recorded by the municipal malaria surveillance system during this period. In 1995, at the peak of the resurgence, public health officials of the Municipal Corporation of Greater Bombay (MCGB) confirmed that 170 persons in the city had died due to malaria. The crisis was unprecedented in Bombay's modern public health history. In response to intense criticism from the media, the city's public health officials attributed the resurgence to the global phenomenon of mosquito-vector resistance to insecticides, and Plasmodium resistance to antimalarial chemoprophylaxis and treatment. Local scientists who investigated the problem offered no support to this explanation. So what might explain the resurgence? What factors led the problem to reach an epidemic level in a matter of two or three years? In addressing the above principal questions, this paper adopts a historical perspective and argues that in the resurgence of malaria in Bombay in the 1990s, there is an element of the 'presence of the past'. In many ways the present public health crisis in Bombay resembles the health scenario that characterized the city at the turn of the 19th century. It is possible to draw parallels between the early public health history of malaria control in Bombay, which was punctuated by events that followed the bubonic plague epidemic of 1896, and the present-day malaria epidemic punctuated by the threat of a plague epidemic in 1994. As such, the paper covers a long period, of almost 100 years. This time-depth is used to

  15. The March Toward Malaria Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stephen L.; Vekemans, Johan; Richie, Thomas L.; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    In 2013 there were an estimated 584,000 deaths and 198 million clinical illnesses due to malaria, the majority in sub-Saharan Africa. Vaccines would be the ideal addition to the existing armamentarium of anti-malaria tools. However, malaria is caused by parasites, and parasites are much more complex in terms of their biology than the viruses and bacteria for which we have vaccines, passing through multiple stages of development in the human host, each stage expressing hundreds of unique antigens. This complexity makes it more difficult to develop a vaccine for parasites than for viruses and bacteria, since an immune response targeting one stage may not offer protection against a later stage, because different antigens are the targets of protective immunity at different stages. Furthermore, depending on the life cycle stage and whether the parasite is extra- or intra-cellular, antibody and/or cellular immune responses provide protection. It is thus not surprising that there is no vaccine on the market for prevention of malaria, or any human parasitic infection. In fact, no vaccine for any disease with this breadth of targets and immune responses exists. In this limited review, we focus on four approaches to malaria vaccines, (1) a recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccine aimed at Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) pre-erythrocytic stages of the parasite cycle (RTS,S/AS01), (2) whole sporozoite vaccines aimed at Pf pre-erythrocytic stages (PfSPZ Vaccine and PfSPZ-CVac), (3) prime boost vaccines that include recombinant DNA, viruses and bacteria, and protein with adjuvant aimed primarily at Pf pre-erythrocytic, but also asexual erythrocytic stages, and (4) recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccines aimed at Pf and Plasmodium vivax sexual erythrocytic and mosquito stages. We recognize that we are not covering all approaches to malaria vaccine development, or most of the critically important work on development of vaccines against P. vivax, the second most important cause of

  16. The march toward malaria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stephen L; Vekemans, Johan; Richie, Thomas L; Duffy, Patrick E

    2015-11-27

    In 2013 there were an estimated 584,000 deaths and 198 million clinical illnesses due to malaria, the majority in sub-Saharan Africa. Vaccines would be the ideal addition to the existing armamentarium of anti-malaria tools. However, malaria is caused by parasites, and parasites are much more complex in terms of their biology than the viruses and bacteria for which we have vaccines, passing through multiple stages of development in the human host, each stage expressing hundreds of unique antigens. This complexity makes it more difficult to develop a vaccine for parasites than for viruses and bacteria, since an immune response targeting one stage may not offer protection against a later stage, because different antigens are the targets of protective immunity at different stages. Furthermore, depending on the life cycle stage and whether the parasite is extra- or intra-cellular, antibody and/or cellular immune responses provide protection. It is thus not surprising that there is no vaccine on the market for prevention of malaria, or any human parasitic infection. In fact, no vaccine for any disease with this breadth of targets and immune responses exists. In this limited review, we focus on four approaches to malaria vaccines, (1) a recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccine aimed at Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) pre-erythrocytic stages of the parasite cycle (RTS,S/AS01), (2) whole sporozoite vaccines aimed at Pf pre-erythrocytic stages (PfSPZ Vaccine and PfSPZ-CVac), (3) prime boost vaccines that include recombinant DNA, viruses and bacteria, and protein with adjuvant aimed primarily at Pf pre-erythrocytic, but also asexual erythrocytic stages, and (4) recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccines aimed at Pf and Plasmodium vivax sexual erythrocytic and mosquito stages. We recognize that we are not covering all approaches to malaria vaccine development, or most of the critically important work on development of vaccines against P. vivax, the second most important cause of

  17. Suicidal Erythrocyte Death in Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Koka, Sai Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most devastating diseases with lethal outcome in more than 1 million humans per year. The course of the disease is not only a function of the pathogen but is heavily influenced by properties of the host. Mechanisms possibly conferring protection against a severe course of malaria include suicidal death of the infected cell. A particular form of suicidal erythrocyte death is eryptosis, which is characterized by Ca2+-entry with subsequent activation of Ca2+-sensitive K+ ch...

  18. DNA Sensors for Malaria Diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Marianne Smedegaard; Fjelstrup, Søren; Knudsen, Birgitta R.

    2015-01-01

    In the field of malaria diagnosis much effort is put into the development of faster and easier alternatives to the gold standard, blood smear microscopy. Nucleic acid amplification based techniques pose some of the most promising upcoming diagnostic tools due to their potential for high sensitivi......, robustness and user-friendliness. In the current review, we will discuss some of the different DNA-based sensor systems under development for the diagnosis of malaria....

  19. Malaria's deadly grip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Joseph D; Rowe, J Alexandra; Higgins, Matthew K;

    2013-01-01

    Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to host microvasculature is a key virulence determinant. Parasite binding is mediated by a large family of clonally variant adhesion proteins, termed P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), encoded by var genes and expressed...... at the infected erythrocyte surface. Although PfEMP1 proteins have extensively diverged under opposing selection pressure to maintain ligand binding while avoiding antibody-mediated detection, recent work has revealed they can be classified into different groups based on chromosome location and domain composition....... This grouping reflects functional specialization of PfEMP1 proteins for different human host and microvascular binding niches and appears to be maintained by gene recombination hierarchies. Inone extreme, a specific PfEMP1 variant is associated with placental binding and malaria during pregnancy, while other PfEMP...

  20. Leidenfrost phenomenon on conical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Caballero, S.; Escobar-Ortega, Y.; Pacheco-Vázquez, F.

    2016-09-01

    The Leidenfrost state is typically studied by placing droplets on flat or slightly curved surfaces. Here this phenomenon is investigated by depositing water in hot conical bowls. We found that this phase exists even for large amounts of liquid in very narrow cones without considerable effect of the confinement on the Leidenfrost transition temperature TL. At a fixed temperature, T >TL , the total evaporation time τ has a nonmonotonic dependence on the angle of confinement θ : for large volumes (˜20 ml) on flat surfaces (θ ˜0∘ ), vapor chimneys appear and accelerate the evaporation rate, their frequency diminishes as θ augments and becomes zero at a certain angle θc, at which τ reaches its maximum value; then, τ decreases again at larger angles because the vapor layer holding up the water becomes thinner due to the increase of hydrostatic pressure and because the geometry facilitates the vapor expulsion along the conical wall. For small volumes (˜1 ml), surface tension mainly determines the drop curvature and the lifetime is practically independent of θ . Different chimney regimes and oscillation patterns were observed and summarized in a phase diagram. Finally, we developed a simple model to decipher the shape adopted by the liquid volume and its evolution as a function of time, and the predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. The phenomenon of Soviet science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojevnikov, Alexei

    2008-01-01

    The grand "Soviet experiment" constituted an attempt to greatly accelerate and even shortcut the gradual course of historical development on the assumption of presumed knowledge of the general laws of history. This paper discusses the parts of that experiment that directly concerned scientific research and, in fact, anticipated or helped define important global changes in the functioning of science as a profession and an institution during the twentieth century. The phenomenon of Soviet, or socialist, science is analyzed here from the comparative international perspective, with attention to similarities and reciprocal influences, rather than to the contrasts and dichotomies that have traditionally interested cold war-type historiography. The problem is considered at several levels: philosophical (Soviet thought on the relationship between science and society and the social construction of scientific knowledge); institutional (the state recognition of research as a separate profession, the rise of big science and scientific research institutes); demographic (science becoming a mass profession, with ethnic and gender diversity among scientists); and political (Soviet-inspired influences on the practice of science in Europe and the United States through the social relations of science movement of the 1930s and the Sputnik shock of the 1950s). PMID:18831319

  2. Cerebral microangiopathies; Zerebrale Mikroangiopathien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linn, Jennifer [Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2011-03-15

    Cerebral microangiopathies are a very heterogenous group of diseases characterized by pathological changes of the small cerebral vessels. They account for 20 - 30 % of all ischemic strokes. Degenerative microangiopathy and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiography represent the typical acquired cerebral microangiopathies, which are found in over 90 % of cases. Besides, a wide variety of rare, hereditary microangiopathy exists, as e.g. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), Fabrys disease and MELAS syndrome (Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes). (orig.)

  3. Plasmodium falciparum var genes expressed in children with severe malaria encode CIDRα1 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Jakob S; Wang, Christian W; Mkumbaye, Sixbert I; Minja, Daniel Tr; Petersen, Bent; Turner, Louise; Petersen, Jens Ev; Lusingu, John Pa; Theander, Thor G; Lavstsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Most severe Plasmodium falciparum infections are experienced by young children. Severe symptoms are precipitated by vascular sequestration of parasites expressing a particular subset of the polymorphic P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) adhesion molecules. Parasites binding human endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) through the CIDRα1 domain of certain PfEMP1 were recently associated with severe malaria in children. However, it has remained unclear to which extend the EPCR-binding CIDRα1 domains epitomize PfEMP1 expressed in severe malaria. Here, we characterized the near full-length transcripts dominating the var transcriptome in children with severe malaria and found that the only common feature of the encoded PfEMP1 was CIDRα1 domains. Such genes were highly and dominantly expressed in both children with severe malarial anaemia and cerebral malaria. These observations support the hypothesis that the CIDRα1-EPCR interaction is key to the pathogenesis of severe malaria and strengthen the rationale for pursuing a vaccine or adjunctive treatment aiming at inhibiting or reducing the damaging effects of this interaction. PMID:27354391

  4. [Current malaria situation in Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gockchinar, T; Kalipsi, S

    2001-01-01

    Geographically, Turkey is situated in an area where malaria is very risky. The climatic conditions in the region are suitable for the malaria vector to proliferate. Due to agricultural infrastructural changes, GAP and other similar projects, insufficient environmental conditions, urbanization, national and international population moves, are a key to manage malaria control activities. It is estimated that malaria will be a potential danger for Turkey in the forthcoming years. The disease is located largely in south-eastern Anatolia. The Diyarbakir, Batman, Sanliurfa, Siirt, and Mardin districts are the most affected areas. In western districts, like Aydin and Manisa, an increase in the number of indigenous cases can be observed from time to time. This is due to workers moving from malaria districts to western parts to final work. Since these workers cannot be controlled, the population living in these regions get infected from indigenous cases. There were 84,345 malaria cases in 1994 and 82,096 in 1995, they decreased to 60,884 in 1996 and numbered 35,456 in 1997. They accounted for 36,842 and 20,963 in 1998 and 1999, respectively. In Turkey there are almost all cases of P. vivax malaria. There are also P. vivax and P. falciparum malaria cases coming from other countries: There were 321 P. vivax cases, including 2 P. falciparum ones, arriving to Turkey from Iraq in 1995. The P. vivax malaria cases accounted for 229 in 1996, and 67, cases P. vivax including 12 P. falciparum cases, in 1997, and 4 P. vivax cases in 1998 that came from that country. One P. vivax case entered Turkey from Georgia in 1998. The cause of higher incidence of P. vivax cases in 1995, it decreasing in 1999, is the lack of border controls over workers coming to Turkey. The other internationally imported cases are from Syria, Sudan, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Nigeria, India, Azerbaijan, Malaysia, Ghana, Indonesia, Yemen. Our examinations have shown that none of these internationally imported cases

  5. Features and outcomes of malaria infection in glucose-6-phosphatedehydrogenase normal and deficient Nigerian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebola Emmanuel Orimadegun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Malaria and G6PD deficiency-related haemolyses are known causes of hospital admissions in Nigeria and pose great danger to child survival but data on interactions of these two pathologies are scarce. This study was carried out to determine the association between features of Plasmodium falciparum infection and G6PD status. Methods: G6PD and haemoglobin were typed by fluorescent spot test and electrophoresis respectively, in 1120 children with microscopically-proven falciparum malaria. Clinical features of malaria were compared between G6PD normal and deficient children. Results: There were 558 males and 562 females with median age of 35 months (range, 6 months-12 yr. In males, prevalence of G6PD-deficiency in patients with uncomplicated malaria (UM, severe malarial anaemia (SMA and cerebral malaria (CM was 23.4, 7 and 16.7%, respectively compared with 11.1, 7.3 and 4.4%, respectively among females. In both males and females, convulsion and rectal temperature above 38°C were less likely presentations among G6PD-deficient compared with G6PD-normal children (p <0.05. The proportions of children with pallor, convulsion and impaired consciousness were significantly lower among G6PD-deficient than normal males (p <0.05 but these features were not different between deficient and normal females (p >0.05. Interpretation & conclusion: Convulsions, pallor and elevated temperature were more frequent features of malaria in G6PD normal than deficient children. G6PD-deficient male children are protected against impaired consciousness. These differences may offer useful hints in malaria treatment and researches in endemic regions.

  6. Exonuclease-mediated degradation of nascent RNA silences genes linked to severe malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Siegel, T Nicolai; Martins, Rafael M; Wang, Fei; Cao, Jun; Gao, Qi; Cheng, Xiu; Jiang, Lubin; Hon, Chung-Chau; Scheidig-Benatar, Christine; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Turner, Louise; Jensen, Anja T R; Claes, Aurelie; Guizetti, Julien; Malmquist, Nicholas A; Scherf, Artur

    2014-09-18

    Antigenic variation of the Plasmodium falciparum multicopy var gene family enables parasite evasion of immune destruction by host antibodies. Expression of a particular var subgroup, termed upsA, is linked to the obstruction of blood vessels in the brain and to the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria. The mechanism determining upsA activation remains unknown. Here we show that an entirely new type of gene silencing mechanism involving an exonuclease-mediated degradation of nascent RNA controls the silencing of genes linked to severe malaria. We identify a novel chromatin-associated exoribonuclease, termed PfRNase II, that controls the silencing of upsA var genes by marking their transcription start site and intron-promoter regions leading to short-lived cryptic RNA. Parasites carrying a deficient PfRNase II gene produce full-length upsA var transcripts and intron-derived antisense long non-coding RNA. The presence of stable upsA var transcripts overcomes monoallelic expression, resulting in the simultaneous expression of both upsA and upsC type PfEMP1 proteins on the surface of individual infected red blood cells. In addition, we observe an inverse relationship between transcript levels of PfRNase II and upsA-type var genes in parasites from severe malaria patients, implying a crucial role of PfRNase II in severe malaria. Our results uncover a previously unknown type of post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism in malaria parasites with repercussions for other organisms. Additionally, the identification of RNase II as a parasite protein controlling the expression of virulence genes involved in pathogenesis in patients with severe malaria may provide new strategies for reducing malaria mortality. PMID:25043062

  7. Activation-induced resetting of cerebral oxygen and glucose uptake in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Linde, R; Hasselbalch, S G;

    1998-01-01

    In the clinical setting it has been shown that activation will increase cerebral glucose uptake in excess of cerebral oxygen uptake. To study this phenomenon further, this study presents an experimental setup that enables precise determination of the ratio between cerebral uptake of glucose and...... oxygen in the awake rat. Global CBF was measured by the Kety-Schmidt technique, and the ratio between cerebral uptake rates for oxygen, glucose, and lactate was calculated from cerebral arterial-venous differences. During baseline conditions, rats were kept in a closed box designed to minimize...... interference. During baseline conditions CBF was 1.08 +/- 0.25 mL x g(-1) x minute(-1), and the cerebral oxygen to glucose uptake ratio was 5.5. Activation was induced by opening the sheltering box for 6 minutes. Activation increased CBF to 1.81 mL x g(-1) x minute(-1). During activation cerebral glucose...

  8. The antibody response to well-defined malaria antigens after acute malaria in individuals living under continuous malaria transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, E; Høgh, B; Dziegiel, M;

    1992-01-01

    a synthetic peptide (EENV)6 representing the C-terminal repeats from Pf155/RESA, were investigated longitudinally in 13 children and 7 adults living under conditions of continuous, intense malaria transmission. Some subjects did not recognize the antigens after malaria infection, and in subjects...... not uniformly elicited by natural malaria infection in previously primed donors....

  9. Hemozoin Inhibition and Control of Clinical Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chibueze Peter Ihekwereme

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria has a negative impact on health and social and economic life of residents of endemic countries. The ultimate goals of designing new treatment for malaria are to prevent clinical infection, reduce morbidity, and decrease mortality. There are great advances in the understanding of the parasite-host interaction through studies by various scientists. In some of these studies, attempts were made to evaluate the roles of malaria pigment or toxins in the pathogenesis of malaria. Hemozoin is a key metabolite associated with severe malaria anemia (SMA, immunosuppression, and cytokine dysfunction. Targeting of this pigment may be necessary in the design of new therapeutic products against malaria. In this review, the roles of hemozoin in the morbidity and mortality of malaria are highlighted as an essential target in the quest for effective control of clinical malaria.

  10. Managing Malaria ; an evolutionary modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen MA; Martens WJM; MNV

    1996-01-01

    Door toenemende resistentie-ontwikkeling van de malariaparasiet voor antimalaria medicijnen, en van de malariamuskiet voor insecticiden, wordt een effectief beleid voor malaria in veel tropische landen bemoeilijkt. Tezamen met een mogelijke klimaatverandering zou dit de incidentie van malaria in

  11. Complement activation in experimental human malaria infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roestenberg, M.; McCall, M.B.B.; Mollnes, T.E.; Deuren, M. van; Sprong, T.; Klasen, I.S.; Hermsen, C.C.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate complement activation in uncomplicated, early phases of human malaria. Fifteen healthy volunteers were experimentally infected with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Parasitemia and complement activation products were assessed. During blood stage parasitem

  12. Understanding Malaria: Fighting an Ancient Scourge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Malaria Fighting an Ancient Scourge U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Understanding Malaria Fighting an Ancient Scourge U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH ...

  13. Mapping residual transmission for malaria elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Robert C; Le Menach, Arnaud; Kunene, Simon; Ntshalintshali, Nyasatu; Hsiang, Michelle S; Perkins, T Alex; Greenhouse, Bryan; Tatem, Andrew J; Cohen, Justin M; Smith, David L

    2015-01-01

    Eliminating malaria from a defined region involves draining the endemic parasite reservoir and minimizing local malaria transmission around imported malaria infections . In the last phases of malaria elimination, as universal interventions reap diminishing marginal returns, national resources must become increasingly devoted to identifying where residual transmission is occurring. The needs for accurate measures of progress and practical advice about how to allocate scarce resources require new analytical methods to quantify fine-grained heterogeneity in malaria risk. Using routine national surveillance data from Swaziland (a sub-Saharan country on the verge of elimination), we estimated individual reproductive numbers. Fine-grained maps of reproductive numbers and local malaria importation rates were combined to show 'malariogenic potential', a first for malaria elimination. As countries approach elimination, these individual-based measures of transmission risk provide meaningful metrics for planning programmatic responses and prioritizing areas where interventions will contribute most to malaria elimination. PMID:26714110

  14. EU grid computing effort takes on malaria

    CERN Multimedia

    Lawrence, Stacy

    2006-01-01

    Malaria is the world's most common parasitic infection, affecting more thatn 500 million people annually and killing more than 1 million. In order to help combat malaria, CERN has launched a grid computing effort (1 page)

  15. Plasmodium vivax malaria: An unusual presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Kasliwal, Prasad; Rao, Manimala S.; Kujur, Rash

    2009-01-01

    Acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), hypoglycemia, coma, or epileptic seizures are manifestations of severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria. On the other hand, Plasmodium vivax malaria seldom results in pulmonary damage, and pulmonary complications are exceedingly rare. We report the case of a 42-year-old male living in a malaria-endemic area who presented with ARDS and was diagnosed as having Plasmodium vivax malaria. A ...

  16. Ethical aspects of malaria control and research

    OpenAIRE

    Jamrozik, Euzebiusz; de la Fuente-Núñez, Vânia; Reis, Andreas; Ringwald, Pascal; Selgelid, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Malaria currently causes more harm to human beings than any other parasitic disease, and disproportionally affects low-income populations. The ethical issues raised by efforts to control or eliminate malaria have received little explicit analysis, in comparison with other major diseases of poverty. While some ethical issues associated with malaria are similar to those that have been the subject of debate in the context of other infectious diseases, malaria also raises distinct ethical issues ...

  17. Risk as a social phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Wesley V

    2003-01-01

    What do nuclear power, smoking, and eating beef have in common? The answer is multifaceted. They all share aspects of mass production and consumption, and therefore consumer confidence comes into play in evaluating each of the products' merits. They all produce some level of anxiety--be it in response to adverse media coverage, or the successes of adversarial interest groups in publicizing those products' weaknesses--among consumers who wonder what if any level of the product should be consumed. Finally, nuclear power, smoking, and eating beef all share risk; that is, the perceived and real detriments of producing and consuming those products. Whether or not the associated risks--from increased cancer to increased heart disease--are real is beside the point. When talking about risk, scientific education must deal with the perception of risk as much as its reality. Risk is a socially defined phenomenon, and as such, the successful scientists/communicator must understand the social evaluations of it. While many scientists take a rational view of risk evaluation and consumers often make rational decisions about technological and scientific risk based upon the costs and benefits of that technology, this approach is problematic for three reasons. First, the nature of modern risks has changed in that risk is complex, incomprehensible and uncontrollable to the average person. Second, the rational approach assumes that all costs and benefits of a technology, both real and potential, both current and future, can be known and therefore rationally evaluated. This is not the case. Third, evidence from Europe indicates that trust in information sources about risk has fallen, and thus classic scientific education campaigns that rely upon increasing public knowledge and acceptance of technological and scientific risk are problematic. Because of these factors we argue that effective scientific response must begin to understand the social components of risk if campaigns to shape

  18. UK malaria treatment guidelines 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, David G; Shingadia, Delane; Bell, David J; Beeching, Nicholas J; Whitty, Christopher J M; Chiodini, Peter L

    2016-06-01

    1.Malaria is the tropical disease most commonly imported into the UK, with 1300-1800 cases reported each year, and 2-11 deaths. 2. Approximately three quarters of reported malaria cases in the UK are caused by Plasmodium falciparum, which is capable of invading a high proportion of red blood cells and rapidly leading to severe or life-threatening multi-organ disease. 3. Most non-falciparum malaria cases are caused by Plasmodium vivax; a few cases are caused by the other species of plasmodium: Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae or Plasmodium knowlesi. 4. Mixed infections with more than one species of parasite can occur; they commonly involve P. falciparum with the attendant risks of severe malaria. 5. There are no typical clinical features of malaria; even fever is not invariably present. Malaria in children (and sometimes in adults) may present with misleading symptoms such as gastrointestinal features, sore throat or lower respiratory complaints. 6. A diagnosis of malaria must always be sought in a feverish or sick child or adult who has visited malaria-endemic areas. Specific country information on malaria can be found at http://travelhealthpro.org.uk/. P. falciparum infection rarely presents more than six months after exposure but presentation of other species can occur more than a year after exposure. 7. Management of malaria depends on awareness of the diagnosis and on performing the correct diagnostic tests: the diagnosis cannot be excluded until more than one blood specimen has been examined. Other travel related infections, especially viral haemorrhagic fevers, should also be considered. 8. The optimum diagnostic procedure is examination of thick and thin blood films by an expert to detect and speciate the malarial parasites. P. falciparum and P. vivax (depending upon the product) malaria can be diagnosed almost as accurately using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) which detect plasmodial antigens. RDTs for other Plasmodium species are not as reliable. 9

  19. Malaria in India: Challenges and opportunities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A P Dash; Neena Valecha; A R Anvikar; A Kumar

    2008-11-01

    India contributes about 70% of malaria in the South East Asian Region of WHO. Although annually India reports about two million cases and 1000 deaths attributable to malaria, there is an increasing trend in the proportion of Plasmodium falciparum as the agent. There exists heterogeneity and variability in the risk of malaria transmission between and within the states of the country as many ecotypes/paradigms of malaria have been recognized. The pattern of clinical presentation of severe malaria has also changed and while multi-organ failure is more frequently observed in falciparum malaria, there are reports of vivax malaria presenting with severe manifestations. The high burden populations are ethnic tribes living in the forested pockets of the states like Orissa, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and the North Eastern states which contribute bulk of morbidity and mortality due to malaria in the country. Drug resistance, insecticide resistance, lack of knowledge of actual disease burden along with new paradigms of malaria pose a challenge for malaria control in the country. Considering the existing gaps in reported and estimated morbidity and mortality, need for estimation of true burden of malaria has been stressed. Administrative, financial, technical and operational challenges faced by the national programme have been elucidated. Approaches and priorities that may be helpful in tackling serious issues confronting malaria programme have been outlined.

  20. Malaria transmission rates estimated from serological data.

    OpenAIRE

    M.N. Burattini; Massad, E.; Coutinho, F. A.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model was used to estimate malaria transmission rates based on serological data. The model is minimally stochastic and assumes an age-dependent force of infection for malaria. The transmission rates estimated were applied to a simple compartmental model in order to mimic the malaria transmission. The model has shown a good retrieving capacity for serological and parasite prevalence data.

  1. Gene-therapy for malaria prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Mauricio M; Soares, Irene S

    2014-11-01

    The limited number of tools for malaria prevention and the inability to eradicate the disease have required large investments in vaccine development, as vaccines have been the only foreseeable type of immunoprophylaxis against malaria. An alternative strategy named vectored immunoprophylaxis (VIP) now would allow genetically transduced host cells to assemble and secrete antibodies that neutralize the infectivity of the malaria parasite and prevent disease.

  2. Changing malaria transmission and implications in China towards National Malaria Elimination Programme between 2010 and 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-hai Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Towards the implementation of national malaria elimination programme in China since 2010, the epidemiology of malaria has changed dramatically, and the lowest malaria burden was achieved yearly. It is time to analyze the changes of malaria situation based on surveillance data from 2010 to 2012 to reconsider the strategies for malaria elimination. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Malaria epidemiological data was extracted from the provincial annual reports in China between 2010 and 2012. The trends of the general, autochthonous and imported malaria were analyzed, and epidemic areas were reclassified according to Action Plan of China Malaria Elimination (2010-2020. As a result, there reported 2743 malaria cases with a continued decline in 2012, and around 7% autochthonous malaria cases accounted. Three hundred and fifty-three individual counties from 19 provincial regions had autochthonous malaria between 2010 and 2012, and only one county was reclassified into Type I (local infections detected in 3 consecutive years and the annual incidences ≥ 1/10,000 again. However, the imported malaria cases reported of each year were widespread, and 598 counties in 29 provinces were suffered in 2012. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Malaria was reduced significantly from 2010 to 2012 in China, and malaria importation became an increasing challenge. It is necessary to adjust or update the interventions for subsequent malaria elimination planning and resource allocation.

  3. Averting a malaria disaster: will insecticide resistance derail malaria control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Magill, Alan; Kolaczinski, Jan; Fornadel, Christen; Gimnig, John; Coetzee, Maureen; Simard, Frederic; Roch, Dabiré K; Hinzoumbe, Clément Kerah; Pickett, John; Schellenberg, David; Gething, Peter; Hoppé, Mark; Hamon, Nicholas

    2016-04-23

    World Malaria Day 2015 highlighted the progress made in the development of new methods of prevention (vaccines and insecticides) and treatment (single dose drugs) of the disease. However, increasing drug and insecticide resistance threatens the successes made with existing methods. Insecticide resistance has decreased the efficacy of the most commonly used insecticide class of pyrethroids. This decreased efficacy has increased mosquito survival, which is a prelude to rising incidence of malaria and fatalities. Despite intensive research efforts, new insecticides will not reach the market for at least 5 years. Elimination of malaria is not possible without effective mosquito control. Therefore, to combat the threat of resistance, key stakeholders need to rapidly embrace a multifaceted approach including a reduction in the cost of bringing new resistance management methods to market and the streamlining of associated development, policy, and implementation pathways to counter this looming public health catastrophe. PMID:26880124

  4. Averting a malaria disaster: will insecticide resistance derail malaria control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Magill, Alan; Kolaczinski, Jan; Fornadel, Christen; Gimnig, John; Coetzee, Maureen; Simard, Frederic; Roch, Dabiré K; Hinzoumbe, Clément Kerah; Pickett, John; Schellenberg, David; Gething, Peter; Hoppé, Mark; Hamon, Nicholas

    2016-04-23

    World Malaria Day 2015 highlighted the progress made in the development of new methods of prevention (vaccines and insecticides) and treatment (single dose drugs) of the disease. However, increasing drug and insecticide resistance threatens the successes made with existing methods. Insecticide resistance has decreased the efficacy of the most commonly used insecticide class of pyrethroids. This decreased efficacy has increased mosquito survival, which is a prelude to rising incidence of malaria and fatalities. Despite intensive research efforts, new insecticides will not reach the market for at least 5 years. Elimination of malaria is not possible without effective mosquito control. Therefore, to combat the threat of resistance, key stakeholders need to rapidly embrace a multifaceted approach including a reduction in the cost of bringing new resistance management methods to market and the streamlining of associated development, policy, and implementation pathways to counter this looming public health catastrophe.

  5. Cerebral angiography in leptomeningitis and cerebritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a report of the cerebral angiographic findings in cases of meningitis and cerebritis. Fifty-nine patients, 38 of whom were under 1 year of age, underwent cerebral angiography by means of femoral catheterization. All the patients had signs of increased intracranial pressure, seizures, focal cerebral signs, positive transillumination of the head, and or abnormal brain scan findings. A few patients who did not respond to systemic antibiotics as was expected were also evaluated by means of cerebral angiography. The following characteristic angiographic findings were observed in 18 cases of active meningitis: (1) A hasy appearance around the arteries (halo formation) between the late arterial and capillary phases. (2) Narrowing of the arteries in the basal cistern. This sometimes extended to the peripheral arteries. (3) Irregular caliber following the narrowing of arteries (in few cases). (4) Circulation time so slow that veins could be seen in the late arterial phase. (5) Halo formation around the anterior chroidal artery and the clear appearance of the choroid plexus in the venous phase (when the infectious process reached the choroid plexus). Cerebritis could be identified on the angiograms by two signs: (1) local swelling of the brain (mainly the temporal lobe) and (2) staining around the veins without any abnormal signs in the arterial phase (laminar staining). In conclusion, angiography is a meaningful test by which to determine the phase of meningitis and cerebritis. These two conditions should be treated based on valid information obtained by means of CSF examinations and neuroradiological tests, especially CT scan and cerebral angiography. (author)

  6. Particularities of the Romanian Money Laundering Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Condrea Elena

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the components of the underground economy matrix, we can say that its financial support is "money laundering" a comprehensive, dynamic phenomenon which lies in the desire of criminals to hide practiced illegal activities behind their sources of income, in order to allow a normal development in society. In this study we tried to highlight some of the features of the phenomenon of money laundering, as well as some preoccupations concerning combating this phenomenon in Romania, memb...

  7. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia with Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K V S Hari; Aravinda, K; Narayanan, K

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign bone disorder characterized by alteration in bone morphology. Monostotic FD is the commonest variant and affects the craniofacial bones. Raynaud's phenomenon is recurrent vasospasm of the fingers and toes due to cold exposure. The disease is usually idiopathic or secondary to connective tissue disorders. Raynaud's phenomenon is not described previously with FD. We recently encountered two interesting patients of craniofacial monostotic FD with Raynaud's phenomenon and report the same in this report.

  8. Statins and cerebral hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are associated with improved stroke outcome. This observation has been attributed in part to the palliative effect of statins on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebral autoregulation (CA), which are mediated mainly through the upregulation of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Several animal studies indicate that statin pretreatment enhances cerebral blood flow after ischemic stroke, although this finding is not further supported in clinical settings. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, however, is significantly improved after long-term statin administration in most patients with severe small vessel disease, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, or impaired baseline CA. PMID:22929438

  9. Cutaneous findings in five cases of malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jignesh B Vaishnani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is an infectious disease caused by protozoa of the genus Plasmodium. Cutaneous lesions in malaria are rarely reported and include urticaria, angioedema, petechiae, purpura, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC. Here, five malaria cases associated with cutaneous lesions have been described. Out of the five cases of malaria, two were associated with urticaria and angioedema, one case was associated with urticaria, and other two were associated with reticulated blotchy erythema with petechiae. Most of the cutaneous lesions in malaria were nonspecific and reflected the different immunopathological mechanism in malarial infection.

  10. Protein C system defects inflicted by the malaria parasite protein PfEMP1 can be overcome by a soluble EPCR variant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens E V; Bouwens, Eveline A M; Tamayo, Ibai;

    2015-01-01

    The Endothelial Protein C receptor (EPCR) is essential for the anticoagulant and cytoprotective functions of the Protein C (PC) system. Selected variants of the malaria parasite protein, Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) associated with severe malaria, including cerebral...... malaria, specifically target EPCR on vascular endothelial cells. Here, we examine the cellular response to PfEMP1 engagement to elucidate its role in malaria pathogenesis. Binding of the CIDRα1.1 domain of PfEMP1 to EPCR obstructed activated PC (APC) binding to EPCR and induced a loss of cellular EPCR...... not interfere with (A)PC binding to cellular EPCR. E86A-sEPCR used as a decoy to capture PfEMP1, permitted normal PC activation on endothelial cells, normal barrier protective effects of APC, and greatly reduced cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes to brain endothelial cells. These data imply important...

  11. Maternal manifestations of malaria in pregnancy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, N; Joshi, M; Hazra, M

    1993-01-01

    Malaria is a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, and this risk is highest in the areas of unstable malaria transmission. In 1990 and 1991 the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Sir Sayajirao General Hospital in central Gujarat, India, has cared for a total of 445 urban as well as rural patients with malaria in pregnancy: 232 were labor ward admissions and 213 were antenatal ward admissions. Plasmodium falciparum infection affected 97.27% of patients, both primigravidae and multigravidae. Heavy parasitemia was observed in 27.14% of primigravidae and 48.57% in secundigravidae, however, this was not statistically significant. Out of the 260 (58.42.) cases who had various degrees of anaemia, 59 (22.69) had severe anaemia with haemoglobin of less than 6.0 gm O/dl. Within this group, 71.16% women were primigravidae or secundigravidae, the rest were multigravidae. Out of the 6 patients in first trimester, the miscarriage rate was 100%. In the second trimester, out of 52 patients 74.99 pregnancies were discontinued, whereas in the third trimester, the miscarriage rate was 18.17%. This observation was statistically significant (p 0.05). 178 patients who were admitted antenatally were discharged, their pregnancy outcome was not known, and accordingly they were excluded. There were 11 patients in the first trimester, 139 in the second trimester, and 295 in the third trimester. The known pregnancy losses were 54.54% in the first trimester. 28.05% in the second trimester, and 12.88% in the third trimester. 75.59% of those with minor parasitemia and 47.36% with heavy parasitemia had a normal pregnancy outcome. The overall fetal loss was 31.08%, which was almost twice that of the miscarriage rates among the general population. Maternal deaths attributed to malaria in pregnancy were 15, with cerebral malaria accounting for 5 deaths. 46.66% of the deaths occurred in primigravidae and secundigravidae. The other causes of mortality were postpartum

  12. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF UNCOMPLICATED AND SEVERE MALARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Bartoloni

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The first symptoms of malaria, common to all the different malaria species, are nonspecific and mimic a flu-like syndrome. Although fever represents the cardinal feature, clinical findings in malaria are extremely diverse and may range in severity from mild headache to serious complications leading to death, particularly in falciparum malaria. As the progression to these complications can be rapid, any malaria patient must be assessed and treated rapidly, and frequent observations are needed to look for early signs of systemic complications. In fact, severe malaria is a life threatening but treatable disease.  The protean and nonspecific clinical findings occurring in malaria (fever, malaise, headache, myalgias, jaundice and sometimes gastrointestinal symptoms of nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea may lead physicians who see malaria infrequently to a wrong diagnosis, such as influenza (particularly during the seasonal epidemic flu, dengue, gastroenteritis, typhoid fever, viral hepatitis, encephalitis. Physicians should be aware that malaria is not a clinical diagnosis but must be diagnosed, or excluded, by performing microscopic examination of blood films. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment are then crucial to prevent morbidity and fatal outcomes. Although Plasmodium falciparum malaria is the major cause of severe malaria and death, increasing evidence has recently emerged that Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi can also be severe and even fatal.

  13. Severe malaria - a case of fatal Plasmodium knowlesi infection with post-mortem findings: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zoonotic malaria caused by Plasmodium knowlesi is an important, but newly recognized, human pathogen. For the first time, post-mortem findings from a fatal case of knowlesi malaria are reported here. Case presentation A formerly healthy 40 year-old male became symptomatic 10 days after spending time in the jungle of North Borneo. Four days later, he presented to hospital in a state of collapse and died within two hours. He was hyponatraemic and had elevated blood urea, potassium, lactate dehydrogenase and amino transferase values; he was also thrombocytopenic and eosinophilic. Dengue haemorrhagic shock was suspected and a post-mortem examination performed. Investigations for dengue virus were negative. Blood for malaria parasites indicated hyperparasitaemia and single species P. knowlesi infection was confirmed by nested-PCR. Macroscopic pathology of the brain and endocardium showed multiple petechial haemorrhages, the liver and spleen were enlarged and lungs had features consistent with ARDS. Microscopic pathology showed sequestration of pigmented parasitized red blood cells in the vessels of the cerebrum, cerebellum, heart and kidney without evidence of chronic inflammatory reaction in the brain or any other organ examined. Brain sections were negative for intracellular adhesion molecule-1. The spleen and liver had abundant pigment containing macrophages and parasitized red blood cells. The kidney had evidence of acute tubular necrosis and endothelial cells in heart sections were prominent. Conclusions The overall picture in this case was one of systemic malaria infection that fit the WHO classification for severe malaria. Post-mortem findings in this case were unexpectedly similar to those that define fatal falciparum malaria, including cerebral pathology. There were important differences including the absence of coma despite petechial haemorrhages and parasite sequestration in the brain. These results suggest that further

  14. Parasite burden and CD36-mediated sequestration are determinants of acute lung injury in an experimental malaria model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona E Lovegrove

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Although acute lung injury (ALI is a common complication of severe malaria, little is known about the underlying molecular basis of lung dysfunction. Animal models have provided powerful insights into the pathogenesis of severe malaria syndromes such as cerebral malaria (CM; however, no model of malaria-induced lung injury has been definitively established. This study used bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, histopathology and gene expression analysis to examine the development of ALI in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA. BAL fluid of PbA-infected C57BL/6 mice revealed a significant increase in IgM and total protein prior to the development of CM, indicating disruption of the alveolar-capillary membrane barrier-the physiological hallmark of ALI. In contrast to sepsis-induced ALI, BAL fluid cell counts remained constant with no infiltration of neutrophils. Histopathology showed septal inflammation without cellular transmigration into the alveolar spaces. Microarray analysis of lung tissue from PbA-infected mice identified a significant up-regulation of expressed genes associated with the gene ontology categories of defense and immune response. Severity of malaria-induced ALI varied in a panel of inbred mouse strains, and development of ALI correlated with peripheral parasite burden but not CM susceptibility. Cd36(-/- mice, which have decreased parasite lung sequestration, were relatively protected from ALI. In summary, parasite burden and CD36-mediated sequestration in the lung are primary determinants of ALI in experimental murine malaria. Furthermore, differential susceptibility of mouse strains to malaria-induced ALI and CM suggests that distinct genetic determinants may regulate susceptibility to these two important causes of malaria-associated morbidity and mortality.

  15. Plasmodium vivax malaria: An unusual presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasliwal Prasad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, hypoglycemia, coma, or epileptic seizures are manifestations of severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria. On the other hand, Plasmodium vivax malaria seldom results in pulmonary damage, and pulmonary complications are exceedingly rare. We report the case of a 42-year-old male living in a malaria-endemic area who presented with ARDS and was diagnosed as having Plasmodium vivax malaria. A diagnosis of Plasmodium vivax malaria was established by a positive Plasmodium LDH immunochromatographic assay while a negative PfHRP2 based assay ruled out P. falciparum malaria. After specific anti-plasmodial therapy and intensive supportive care, the patient recovered and was discharged from hospital. The use of NIPPV in vivax-malaria related ARDS was associated with a good outcome.

  16. Mathematical analysis of an age-structured model for malaria transmission dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forouzannia, Farinaz; Gumel, Abba B

    2014-01-01

    A new deterministic model for assessing the role of age-structure on the transmission dynamics of malaria in a community is designed. Rigorous qualitative analysis of the model reveals that it undergoes the phenomenon of backward bifurcation, where the stable disease-free equilibrium of the model co-exists with a stable endemic equilibrium when the associated reproduction number (denoted by R0) is less than unity. It is shown that the backward bifurcation phenomenon is caused by the malaria-induced mortality in humans. A special case of the model is shown to have a unique endemic equilibrium whenever the associated reproduction threshold exceeds unity. Further analyses reveal that adding age-structure to a basic model for malaria transmission in a community does not alter the qualitative dynamics of the basic model, with respect to the existence and asymptotic stability of the associated equilibria and the backward bifurcation property of the model. Numerical simulations of the model show that the cumulative number of new cases of infection and malaria-induced mortality increase with increasing average lifespan and birth rate of mosquitoes.

  17. Induction of HO-1 in tissue macrophages and monocytes in fatal falciparum malaria and sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liomba N

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As well as being inducible by haem, haemoxygenase -1 (HO-1 is also induced by interleukin-10 and an anti-inflammatory prostaglandin, 15d PGJ2, the carbon monoxide thus produced mediating the anti-inflammatory effects of these molecules. The cellular distribution of HO-1, by immunohistochemistry, in brain, lung and liver in fatal falciparum malaria, and in sepsis, is reported. Methods Wax sections were stained, at a 1:1000 dilution of primary antibody, for HO-1 in tissues collected during paediatric autopsies in Blantyre, Malawi. These comprised 37 acutely ill comatose patients, 32 of whom were diagnosed clinically as cerebral malaria and the other 5 as bacterial diseases with coma. Another 3 died unexpectedly from an alert state. Other control tissues were from Australian adults. Results Apart from its presence in splenic red pulp macrophages and microhaemorrhages, staining for HO-1 was confined to intravascular monocytes and certain tissue macrophages. Of the 32 clinically diagnosed cerebral malaria cases, 11 (category A cases had negligible histological change in the brain and absence of or scanty intravascular sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes. Of these 11 cases, eight proved at autopsy to have other pathological changes as well, and none of these eight showed HO-1 staining within the brain apart from isolated moderate staining in one case. Two of the three without another pathological diagnosis showed moderate staining of scattered monocytes in brain vessels. Six of these 11 (category A cases exhibited strong lung staining, and the Kupffer cells of nine of them were intensely stained. Of the seven (category B cases with no histological changes in the brain, but appreciable sequestered parasitised erythrocytes present, one was without staining, and the other six showed strongly staining, rare or scattered monocytes in cerebral vessels. All six lung sections not obscured by neutrophils showed strong staining of

  18. The malaria cauldron of Southeast Asia: conflicting strategies of contiguous nation states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidson, C; Indaratna, K; Looareesuwan, S

    2000-06-01

    The past half-century or so has witnessed dramatic failures but also some successes in control of malaria in the world at large. South and Southeast Asia have had their share of both outcomes, a scenario that reflects many variables in control programs: technology, management strategy, human and financial resources. However, at least equally culpable have been major wars and minor conflicts, economic growth and stagnation, inequity of opportunity, urbanisation, deforestation, changing transport and communications. The history of malaria is thus an integral part of the broader political and economic evolution of the region, as well as the story of the wisdom and unwisdom of malaria specialists. In positive reflection on the latter, systematic organisational effort using standard tools of trade has seen the gradual elimination of major malaria foci from central plain regions of a number of nations in this large region, with residual foci at forested border areas. In many cases there is good evidence of sustainability of elimination in defined areas but the differing success stories reflect in part conflicting strategies in neighboring nation states. On the other hand, physical conflicts, population migration, inequitable economic change, border instability and many other socio-economic variables can be clearly seen to undermine the most ingenuous strategies. Undoubtedly the single most important negative ingredient is the rise and spread of multi-drug resistant falciparum malaria that has its epicenter in Southeast Asia, from which it threatens the world in insidious fashion. Containment of this phenomenon has been the focus of attention for 30 years, more particularly the past decade, and represents the greatest challenge at this time in predicting the continuing impact of malaria globally on human history. So too does the compelling necessity to link malaria control with macro and micro economic planning. This challenge impinges on the sovereignty of individual

  19. An open source business model for malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Årdal

    Full Text Available Greater investment is required in developing new drugs and vaccines against malaria in order to eradicate malaria. These precious funds must be carefully managed to achieve the greatest impact. We evaluate existing efforts to discover and develop new drugs and vaccines for malaria to determine how best malaria R&D can benefit from an enhanced open source approach and how such a business model may operate. We assess research articles, patents, clinical trials and conducted a smaller survey among malaria researchers. Our results demonstrate that the public and philanthropic sectors are financing and performing the majority of malaria drug/vaccine discovery and development, but are then restricting access through patents, 'closed' publications and hidden away physical specimens. This makes little sense since it is also the public and philanthropic sector that purchases the drugs and vaccines. We recommend that a more "open source" approach is taken by making the entire value chain more efficient through greater transparency which may lead to more extensive collaborations. This can, for example, be achieved by empowering an existing organization like the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV to act as a clearing house for malaria-related data. The malaria researchers that we surveyed indicated that they would utilize such registry data to increase collaboration. Finally, we question the utility of publicly or philanthropically funded patents for malaria medicines, where little to no profits are available. Malaria R&D benefits from a publicly and philanthropically funded architecture, which starts with academic research institutions, product development partnerships, commercialization assistance through UNITAID and finally procurement through mechanisms like The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the U.S.' President's Malaria Initiative. We believe that a fresh look should be taken at the cost/benefit of patents particularly related

  20. Diversity of malaria in rice growing areas of the Afrotropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, P; Guillet, P; Robert, V; Fontenille, D; Doannio, J; Coosemans, M; Mouchet, J

    1999-09-01

    It is well known that 'in many instances the rice agrosystem perfectly fits the ecological requirements of pathogens or vectors' and in fact 'malaria, schistosomiasis and Japanese encephalitis are important vector-borne diseases associated with rice production in developing countries' (IRRI, 1987). In spite of these fears, rice cultivation has been on the increase in the African region in response to demographic and economic pressures. However, although rice fields provide suitable breeding places for Anopheles mosquitoes and rice cultivation leads to an increase in the biting rates, the species which are adapted to these sites are not the same in all parts of Africa. Several examples illustrate this phenomenon: An. funestus in the rice fields of Madagascar, An. pharoensis in saline water rice fields in the delta of the Senegal river, An. arabiensis in northern Cameroon and Burundi, An. gambiae Mopti form in the Kou Valley (Burkina Faso) and An. gambiae Savanna form in the rice fields of Kafine near Bouaké (Côte d'Ivoire). The vectorial capacities of these species are not the same and malaria inoculation rates are not necessarily increased in the riceland agroecosystem. The consequences for malaria of introducing rice cultivation depend on the situation before its introduction: it could be worsened in unstable malaria areas but not in stable malaria areas. Therefore, sound epidemiological and entomological knowledge are needed before causing any environmental modifications for agricultural purposes and there should be regular monitoring to avoid any outbreak.

  1. Is Global Warming likely to cause an increased incidence of Malaria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Sa; Qader, Ss

    2009-03-01

    The rise in the average temperature of earth has been described as global warming which is mainly attributed to the increasing phenomenon of the greenhouse effect. It is believed that global warming can have several harmful effects on human health, both directly and indirectly. Since malaria is greatly influenced by climatic conditions because of its direct relationship with the mosquito population, it is widely assumed that its incidence is likely to increase in a future warmer world.This review article discusses the two contradictory views regarding the association of global warming with an increased incidence of malaria. On one hand, there are many who believe that there is a strong association between the recent increase in malaria incidence and global warming. They predict that as global warming continues, malaria is set to spread in locations where previously it was limited, due to cooler climate. On the other hand, several theories have been put forward which are quite contrary to this prediction. There are multiple other factors which are accountable for the recent upsurge of malaria: for example drug resistance, mosquito control programs, public health facilities, and living standards.

  2. Epidemiologia de la malaria falciparum complicada: estudio de casos y controles en Tumaco y Turbo, Colombia, 2003 The epidemiology of complicated falciparum malaria: case and controls study in Tumaco and Turbo, Colombia, 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Tobón C.

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Identificar aspectos del hospedero, del parásito y del ambiente asociados con ocurrencia de malaria por Plasmodium falciparum complicada. MÉTODOS: Estudio de casos y controles en pacientes de Tumaco y Turbo (Colombia aplicando los criterios de complicación de la Organización Mundial de la Salud. RESULTADOS: Entre noviembre 2002 y julio 2003 se captaron 64 casos (malaria complicada y 135 controles (malaria no complicada. Las complicaciones fueron: hiperparasitemia (40%, falla hepática (36%, síndrome dificultad respiratoria aguda (7%, falla renal (4%, trombocitopenia grave (3%, anemia grave (2%, malaria cerebral (2% e hipoglicemia grave (1%. Se encontraron como factores de riesgo para malaria falciparum complicada: a Los antecedentes de malaria falciparum durante el último año fueron menores en los casos (OR= 7.0 (1.2-43.6 P=0.019; b Mayor uso previo de antimaláricos en los casos (OR=2.2 (1.1-4.4 P=0.031 y c mayor uso de cloroquina en los casos (OR=7.4 (1.1-7.8 P=0.017. Se hallaron los alelos MAD-20 y K1 del gen msp1 y FC-27 e IC-1 del gen msp2, cuya distribución de frecuencias fue similar entre casos y controles, aunque el alelo K1 mostró una variación importante entre grupos (casos: 9.4%, controles: 3.5%. La frecuencia de "signos de peligro" fue significativamente mayor en los casos (OR= 3.3, (1.5-7.4 P=0.001. Los criterios de complicación malárica de la Organización Mundial de la Salud se comparan con otros y se discuten algunas implicaciones. CONCLUSIÓN: Se identificaron como factores de riesgo para malaria falciparum complicada, la ausencia de antecedentes de malaria falciparum en el último año y el uso de antimaláricos antes de llegar al hospital.OBJECTIVES: Aimed at identifying host and parasite aspects associated to the presence of Plasmodium falciparum complicated malaria. METHODS: Case and controls study in patients from Tumaco and Turbo (Colombia. We used the World Health Organization criteria to assess the

  3. Lack of association of interferon regulatory factor 1 with severe malaria in affected child-parental trio studies across three African populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina D Mangano

    Full Text Available Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF-1 is a member of the IRF family of transcription factors, which have key and diverse roles in the gene-regulatory networks of the immune system. IRF-1 has been described as a critical mediator of IFN-gamma signalling and as the major player in driving TH1 type responses. It is therefore likely to be crucial in both innate and adaptive responses against intracellular pathogens such as Plasmodium falciparum. Polymorphisms at the human IRF1 locus have been previously found to be associated with the ability to control P. falciparum infection in populations naturally exposed to malaria. In order to test whether genetic variation at the IRF1 locus also affects the risk of developing severe malaria, we performed a family-based test of association for 18 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs across the gene in three African populations, using genotype data from 961 trios consisting of one affected child and his/her two parents (555 from The Gambia, 204 from Kenya and 202 from Malawi. No significant association with severe malaria or severe malaria subphenotypes (cerebral malaria and severe malaria anaemia was observed for any of the SNPs/haplotypes tested in any of the study populations. Our results offer no evidence that the molecular pathways regulated by the transcription factor IRF-1 are involved in the immune-based pathogenesis of severe malaria.

  4. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  5. Emerging new trends of malaria in children: A study from a tertiary care centre in northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medha Mittal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Vivax malaria has long been considered a benign entity. However, an increasing number of reports are highlighting that it may no longer be so. An investigation was carried out to study the profile of malarial admissions in a tertiary care pediatric hospital and to analyse the burden of vivax-related complications. Methods: It is a retrospective observational study. The medical case records of all the patients admitted in the year 2011 with the clinical diagnosis of malaria and laboratory evidence in the form of positive peripheral smear and/or rapid malarial antigen test were retrieved and retrospectively analysed. Results: Overall, 198 cases were included, 128 (64.6% were due to Plasmodium vivax, 66 (33.3% due to P. falciparum and 4 (2% had evidence of mixed infection of Pv + Pf. The clinical features on admission were similar in all the groups. In total, 64/128 (50% patients with vivax infection had one or more complications with severe anemia in 33 (26% and cerebral malaria in 16 (12.5%. Six deaths were reported in P. vivax cases. In the falciparum group, 52 (78.8% had one or more complications with severe anemia in 37 (56.1% and cerebral malaria in 24 (36.4%. Four deaths were reported in P. falciparum cases. Interpretation & conclusion: Overall because of their larger numbers, vivax patients outnumbered other groups, with regards to severe complications and deaths. It was concluded that vivax malaria is emerging as an important cause of malaria-related complications in children.

  6. Is Global Warming likely to cause an increased incidence of Malaria?

    OpenAIRE

    Nabi SA; SS Qader

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: The rise in the average temperature of earth has been described as global warming which is mainly attributed to the increasing phenomenon of the greenhouse effect. It is believed that global warming can have several harmful effects on human health, both directly and indirectly. Since malaria is greatly influenced by climatic conditions because of its direct relationship with the mosquito population, it is widely assumed that its incidence is likely to increase in a future warmer wor...

  7. Malaria-induced immune thrombocytopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P G; Mickley, H; Schmidt, K G

    1984-01-01

    On return from Liberia, a previously healthy 36-year-old man showed signs of malaria accompanied by severe haemolysis and slight thrombocytopenia. We found evidence of a platelet-associated IgG being responsible for the thrombocytopenia, inasmuch as the direct platelet suspension immunofluorescen...

  8. [Malaria in Poland in 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosińska, Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    In Poland in 2007 there were 11 malaria cases confirmed according to the European Union cases definition reported through the routine surveillance system. All of them were imported, 82% from Africa, including 2 cases of relapse. Invasion with Plasmodium falciparum was diagnosed in 7 cases, mixed invasion in 2 cases and P. vivax- in one case. The majority of cases were in the age group 35-45 (8 cases) and were males (10 cases). Common reasons for travel to endemic countries were work-related (5 cases) and tourism or family visits (4 cases). Approximately half of the cases for whom the information was available used malaria chemoprophylaxis during their travel. Clinical course was severe in one case of P. falciparum malaria and the person died of the disease. The decreasing trend in malaria incidence in Poland is likely related to incomplete reporting as tourist and professional travel to endemic areas has not decreased and there is no indication of wider use ofchemoprophylaxis. PMID:19799261

  9. Chemical biology: Knockout for malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Joanna; Sieber, Stephan A.

    2014-02-01

    Discovering and validating new targets is urgently required to tackle the rise in resistance to antimalarial drugs. Now, inhibition of the enzyme N-myristoyltransferase has been shown to prevent the formation of a critical subcellular organelle in the parasite that causes malaria, leading to death of the parasite.

  10. The impact of genetic susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus on placental malaria in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Waisberg

    Full Text Available Severe malaria, including cerebral malaria (CM and placental malaria (PM, have been recognized to have many of the features of uncontrolled inflammation. We recently showed that in mice genetic susceptibility to the lethal inflammatory autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, conferred resistance to CM. Protection appeared to be mediated by immune mechanisms that allowed SLE-prone mice, prior to the onset of overt SLE symptoms, to better control their inflammatory response to Plasmodium infection. Here we extend these findings to ask does SLE susceptibility have 1 a cost to reproductive fitness and/or 2 an effect on PM in mice? The rates of conception for WT and SLE susceptible (SLE(s mice were similar as were the number and viability of fetuses in pregnant WT and SLE(s mice indicating that SLE susceptibility does not have a reproductive cost. We found that Plasmodium chabaudi AS (Pc infection disrupted early stages of pregnancy before the placenta was completely formed resulting in massive decidual necrosis 8 days after conception. Pc-infected pregnant SLE(s mice had significantly more fetuses (∼1.8 fold but SLE did not significantly affect fetal viability in infected animals. This was despite the fact that Pc-infected pregnant SLE(s mice had more severe symptoms of malaria as compared to Pc-infected pregnant WT mice. Thus, although SLE susceptibility was not protective in PM in mice it also did not have a negative impact on reproductive fitness.

  11. Laboratory diagnosis of malaria -- overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, K M

    1994-01-01

    Features of the laboratory diagnosis of malaria are described. Microscope equipment is absolutely essential. Clinical symptoms are inadequate for the proper diagnosis of malaria. Screening for malaria involves identification of all cases where high fever is present in endemic areas. Diagnosis is complicated because many people take antimalarial drugs which reduce the chances of detecting malarial parasites. Confirmation should be made before treatment is administered. A thick blood slide can be quickly and cheaply taken without much training of health personnel. The disadvantage of thick stains is the difficulty in identifying "plasmodium" strains. When a thin smear with Giemsa and Leishmanin stain is used, a light infection may be missed. Thin smears require trained personnel and time, which in peak seasons may be impractical. Urinary tract and viral infections may be confused with malaria. Evidence of parasites can be discerned from thick stains. Modern assay techniques are also available. There are enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and immunofluorescent assay techniques (IFAT), which are frequently used in large scale seroepidemiological studies. DNA probes have the limitation of radioisotope handling problems. Acridine orange fluorescent microscopy with capillary centrifuged blood is a technique which improves the viability of Giemsa stain procedures. This technique is desirable because of the sensitivity and speed of diagnosis. The quantitative buddy coat (GBC) technique is superior to Giemsa stained thick blood film in identifying malaria, but it is not reliable with mixed infections. Advanced techniques are not readily available in local settings. The recommendation is to continue use of thick or thin blood film and trained health personnel. Laboratory results must be interpreted in the context of when the flood film was prepared, prior drug administration, and clinical manifestations.

  12. Mathematical Analysis of a Malaria Model with Partial Immunity to Reinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ming Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A deterministic model with variable human population for the transmission dynamics of malaria disease, which allows transmission by the recovered humans, is first developed and rigorously analyzed. The model reveals the presence of the phenomenon of backward bifurcation, where a stable disease-free equilibrium coexists with one or more stable endemic equilibria when the associated reproduction number is less than unity. This phenomenon may arise due to the reinfection of host individuals who recovered from the disease. The model in an asymptotical constant population is also investigated. This results in a model with mass action incidence. A complete global analysis of the model with mass action incidence is given, which reveals that the global dynamics of malaria disease with reinfection is completely determined by the associated reproduction number. Moreover, it is shown that the phenomenon of backward bifurcation can be removed by replacing the standard incidence function with a mass action incidence. Graphical representations are provided to study the effect of reinfection rate and to qualitatively support the analytical results on the transmission dynamics of malaria.

  13. Flip-flop phenomenon: observations and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Elstner, D

    2005-01-01

    In many active stars the spots concentrate on two permanent active longitudes which are 180 degrees apart. In some of these stars the dominant part of the spot activity changes the longitude every few years. This so-called flip-flop phenomenon has up to now been reported in 11 stars, both single and binary alike, and including also the Sun. To explain this phenomenon, a non-axisymmetric dynamo mode, giving rise to two permanent active longitudes at opposite stellar hemispheres, is needed together with an oscillating axisymmetric magnetic field. Here we discuss the observed characteristics of the flip-flop phenomenon and present a dynamo solution to explain them.

  14. Using Malaria Medication for Leg Cramps Is Risky

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol Using Malaria Medication for Leg Cramps is Risky Printer-friendly ... approved only to treat a certain type of malaria (uncomplicated malaria) caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum. ...

  15. From "forest malaria" to "bromeliad malaria": a case-study of scientific controversy and malaria control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelha, P

    1994-08-01

    The article analyses the evolution of knowledge and rationale of control of a special case of malaria transmission based on Bromelia-Kerteszia complex. Since bromeliaceae function as a 'host of the carrier' and were previously associated with natural forests, the elucidation of bromeliad malaria historically elicited controversies concerning the imputation of Kertesziae as transmitters as well as over control strategies directed to bromelia eradication (manual removal, herbicides and deforestation), use of insecticides and chemoprophylaxis. Established authority, disciplinary traditions, conceptual premises and contemporary criteria for validating knowledge in the field partly explain the long time gap since Adolpho Lutz announced at the beginning of the century the existence of a new mosquito and breeding site as responsible for a 'forest malaria' epidemic occurring at a high altitude. The article brings attention to how economic, political and institutional determinants played an important role in redefining studies that led both in Trinidad and Brazil to the recognition of the importance of kerteszia transmission, including urban areas, and establishing new approaches to its study, most relevant of all the concurrence of broad ecological research. The article then describes the Brazilian campaign strategies which showed significant short-term results but had to wait four decades to achieve the goal of eradication due to the peculiar characteristics of this pathogenic complex. Finally, it brings attention to the importance of encompassing social values and discourses, in this case, environmental preservation, to understanding historical trends of malaria control programs.

  16. Plasmodium vivax Hospitalizations in a Monoendemic Malaria Region: Severe Vivax Malaria?

    OpenAIRE

    Quispe, Antonio M.; Pozo, Edwar; Guerrero, Edith; Durand, Salomón; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Edgel, Kimberly A.; Graf, Paul C. F.; Lescano, Andres G.

    2014-01-01

    Severe malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax is no longer considered rare. To describe its clinical features, we performed a retrospective case control study in the subregion of Luciano Castillo Colonna, Piura, Peru, an area with nearly exclusive vivax malaria transmission. Severe cases and the subset of critically ill cases were compared with a random set of uncomplicated malaria cases (1:4). Between 2008 and 2009, 6,502 malaria cases were reported, including 106 hospitalized cases, 81 of which...

  17. Review of the malaria epidemiology and trends in Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Masaninga, Freddie; Chanda, Emmanuel; Chanda-Kapata, Pascalina; Hamainza, Busiku; Masendu, Hieronymo T; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Kapelwa, Wambinji; Chimumbwa, John; Govere, John; Otten, Mac; Fall, Ibrahima Soce; Babaniyi, Olusegun

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive desk review of malaria trends was conducted between 2000-2010 in Zambia to study malaria epidemiology and trends to guide strategies and approaches for effective malaria control. This review considered data from the National Health Information Management System, Malaria Surveys and Programme Review reports and analyzed malaria in-patient cases and deaths in relation to intervention coverage for all ages. Data showed three distinct epidemiological strata after a notable malaria...

  18. Ecology, economics and political will: the vicissitudes of malaria strategies in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidson, C; Indaratna, K

    1998-06-01

    The documented history of malaria in parts of Asia goes back more than 2,000 years, during which the disease has been a major player on the socioeconomic stage in many nation states as they waxed and waned in power and prosperity. On a much shorter time scale, the last half century has seen in microcosm a history of large fluctuations in endemicity and impact of malaria across the spectrum of rice fields and rain forests, mountains and plains that reflect the vast ecological diversity inhabited by this majority aggregation of mankind. That period has seen some of the most dramatic changes in social and economic structure, in population size, density and mobility, and in political structure in history: all have played a part in the changing face of malaria in this extensive region of the world. While the majority of global malaria cases currently reside in Africa, greater numbers inhabited Asia earlier this century before malaria programs savored significant success, and now Asia harbors a global threat in the form of the epicenter of multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum which is gradually encompassing the tropical world. The latter reflects directly the vicissitudes of economic change over recent decades, particularly the mobility of populations in search of commerce, trade and personal fortunes, or caught in the misfortunes of physical conflicts. The period from the 1950s to the 1990s has witnessed near "eradication" followed by resurgence of malaria in Sri Lanka, control and resurgence in India, the influence of war and postwar instability on drug resistance in Cambodia, increase in severe and cerebral malaria in Myanmar during prolonged political turmoil, the essential disappearance of the disease from all but forested border areas of Thailand where it remains for the moment intractable, the basic elimination of vivax malaria from many provinces of central China. Both positive and negative experiences have lessons to teach in the debate between eradication

  19. Ecology, economics and political will: the vicissitudes of malaria strategies in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidson, C; Indaratna, K

    1998-06-01

    The documented history of malaria in parts of Asia goes back more than 2,000 years, during which the disease has been a major player on the socioeconomic stage in many nation states as they waxed and waned in power and prosperity. On a much shorter time scale, the last half century has seen in microcosm a history of large fluctuations in endemicity and impact of malaria across the spectrum of rice fields and rain forests, mountains and plains that reflect the vast ecological diversity inhabited by this majority aggregation of mankind. That period has seen some of the most dramatic changes in social and economic structure, in population size, density and mobility, and in political structure in history: all have played a part in the changing face of malaria in this extensive region of the world. While the majority of global malaria cases currently reside in Africa, greater numbers inhabited Asia earlier this century before malaria programs savored significant success, and now Asia harbors a global threat in the form of the epicenter of multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum which is gradually encompassing the tropical world. The latter reflects directly the vicissitudes of economic change over recent decades, particularly the mobility of populations in search of commerce, trade and personal fortunes, or caught in the misfortunes of physical conflicts. The period from the 1950s to the 1990s has witnessed near "eradication" followed by resurgence of malaria in Sri Lanka, control and resurgence in India, the influence of war and postwar instability on drug resistance in Cambodia, increase in severe and cerebral malaria in Myanmar during prolonged political turmoil, the essential disappearance of the disease from all but forested border areas of Thailand where it remains for the moment intractable, the basic elimination of vivax malaria from many provinces of central China. Both positive and negative experiences have lessons to teach in the debate between eradication

  20. Acoustojet: acoustic analogue of photonic jet phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Minin, Igor V

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated for the first time that an existence of acoustic analogue of photonic jet phenomenon, called acoustojet, providing for subwavelength localization of acoustic field in the shadow area of arbitrary 3D penetrable mesoscale particle, is possible.

  1. Professor Nambu, String Theory and Moonshine Phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Eguchi, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    I first recall the last occasion of meeting the late Professor Yoichiro Nambu in a hospital in Osaka. I then present a brief introduction to the moonshine phenomenon in string theory which is under recent investigations.

  2. Methods to Minimize Zero-Missing Phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria; Bak, Claus Leth; Gudmundsdottir, Unnur Stella;

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing use of high-voltage AC cables at transmission levels, phenomena such as current zero-missing start to appear more often in transmission systems. Zero-missing phenomenon can occur when energizing cable lines with shunt reactors. This may considerably delay the opening...... of the circuit breaker, leaving the system unprotected and vulnerable to failures. Methods to prevent zero-missing phenomenon are still being studied and compared in order to identify effective countermeasures. This paper contributes to these efforts, by presenting several countermeasures that can be applied...... to reduce the hazards of zero-missing phenomenon. The authors discovered that this phenomenon can be eliminated, merely by using an extra circuit breaker or a pre-insertion resistor....

  3. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  4. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Katsumi [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, 1-2 Higashi-Takada-cho, Mibu, Nakagyo-ku, 604-8845 Kyoto (Japan); Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko [Department of Pediatric Neurology, St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, 603-8323 Kyoto (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  5. [The epidemiology of malaria in Kocaeli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez Tamer, Gülden

    2008-01-01

    Malaria is a very important disease both for the world and Turkey. In this retrospective study, malaria cases detected by the Malaria Control Unit Division of the Bursa Health Directorship from 1997-2007 have been evaluated. During this ten-year period, a total of 46,959 blood specimens were examined and 64 (0.14%) malaria cases were detected. Out of the 64 cases of malaria, 63 (98.44%) were caused by Plasmodium vivax and 1 (1.56%) by Plasmodium falciparum. Of the 64 cases, 45 (70.3%) were male and (29.7%), female. Positivity rates were found to be highest in 1997 and 1998. In this study, we have reviewed the malaria cases according to age, gender, locality and source of infection. PMID:19156602

  6. The role of vitamin D in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lương, Khanh Vinh Quốc; Nguyễn, Lan Thi Hoàng

    2015-01-15

    An abnormal calcium-parathyroid hormone (PTH)-vitamin D axis has been reported in patients with malaria infection. A role for vitamin D in malaria has been suggested by many studies. Genetic studies have identified numerous factors that link vitamin D to malaria, including human leukocyte antigen genes, toll-like receptors, heme oxygenase-1, angiopoietin-2, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors, and Bcl-2. Vitamin D has also been implicated in malaria via its effects on the Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine, matrix metalloproteinases, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, prostaglandins, reactive oxidative species, and nitric oxide synthase. Vitamin D may be important in malaria; therefore, additional research on its role in malaria is needed.

  7. Spatially discontinuous ionization phenomenon in inhomogeneous soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    By using X-ray film imaging technology,a phenomenon of discontinuous ionization was observed in the inhomogeneous soil around the grounding electrode on which a surge voltage was applied.A simplified two-phase solid-gas model was built to study the electric field distribution in the soil to explain the discontinuous ionization phenomenon.Analysis showed the differences of the dielectric properties,the shapes and sizes of soil particles can cause discontinuous ionization in the soil.

  8. PROSTITUTION PHENOMENON - LEGAL AND SOCIAL ASPECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ilinca Alexandra TÃLNAR; Camelia Augusta HIMCINSCHI

    2012-01-01

    The prostitution phenomenon is a global, complex, controversial, and problematic phenomenon which remains one of the current subjects debated at national and international level. From a judicial point of view, despite of the numerous legal measures and sporadic actions realized by the police, prostitution continues to be present in Romania, partially due to the low efficiency of legal controls and laws’ implementation. In this respect, we have focused on the distinction between offence and co...

  9. Koebner phenomenon of the ear canal skin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, O

    2009-02-01

    The Koebner phenomenon originally described the appearance of psoriatic lesions in the uninvolved skin of patients with psoriasis as a consequence of trauma. We describe a case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the auditory canal, which represents an unusual manifestation of the Koebner phenomenon. This is the first case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the head and neck region and highlights the need for biopsy to allow accurate histopathological diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Koebner phenomenon of the ear canal skin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, O

    2012-02-01

    The Koebner phenomenon originally described the appearance of psoriatic lesions in the uninvolved skin of patients with psoriasis as a consequence of trauma. We describe a case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the auditory canal, which represents an unusual manifestation of the Koebner phenomenon. This is the first case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the head and neck region and highlights the need for biopsy to allow accurate histopathological diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Open source innovation phenomenon, participant behaviour, impact

    CERN Document Server

    Herstatt, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    Open Source Innovation (OSI) has gained considerable momentum within the last years. Academic and management practice interest grows as more and more end-users consider and even participate in Open Source product development like Linux, Android, or Wikipedia. Open Source Innovation: Phenomenon, Participant Behaviour, Impact brings together rigorous academic research and business importance in scrutinizing OCI from three perspectives: The Phenomenon, Participants' Behavior, and Business Implications. The first section introduces OCI artefacts, including who is participating and why, and provide

  12. Validation of the Impostor Phenomenon Among Managers

    OpenAIRE

    Sonja eRohrmann; Myriam eBechtoldt; Mona eLeonhardt

    2016-01-01

    Following up on earlier investigations, the present research aims to validate the construct impostor phenomenon by taking personality correlates into account and to examine whether the impostor phenomenon is a construct in its own right. In addition, gender effects as well as effects on working style and stress or strain are examined. In an online study we surveyed a sample of N = 242 individuals occupying leadership positions in different sectors. Confirmatory factor analyses provide empiric...

  13. Validation of the Impostor Phenomenon among Managers

    OpenAIRE

    Rohrmann, Sonja; Bechtoldt, Myriam N.; Leonhardt, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Following up on earlier investigations, the present research aims at validating the construct impostor phenomenon by taking other personality correlates into account and to examine whether the impostor phenomenon is a construct in its own right. In addition, gender effects as well as associations with dispositional working styles and strain are examined. In an online study we surveyed a sample of N = 242 individuals occupying leadership positions in different sectors. Confirmatory factor anal...

  14. Progress towards malaria control targets in relation to national malaria programme funding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L. Korenromp (Eline); M. Hosseini (Mehran); R.D. Newman (Robert D); R.E. Cibulskis (Richard E)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Malaria control has been dramatically scaled up the past decade, mainly thanks to increasing international donor financing since 2003. This study assessed progress up to 2010 towards global malaria impact targets, in relation to Global Fund, other donor and domestic malaria p

  15. Validation of the Impostor Phenomenon Among Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja eRohrmann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Following up on earlier investigations, the present research aims to validate the construct impostor phenomenon by taking personality correlates into account and to examine whether the impostor phenomenon is a construct in its own right. In addition, gender effects as well as effects on working style and stress or strain are examined. In an online study we surveyed a sample of N = 242 individuals occupying leadership positions in different sectors. Confirmatory factor analyses provide empirical evidence for the discriminant validity of the impostor phenomenon. In accord with earlier studies we show that the impostor phenomenon is accompanied by higher levels of anxiety, dysphoric moods, emotional instability and a generally negative self-evaluation. The study does not reveal any gender differences concerning the impostor phenomenon. With respect to working styles, persons with an impostor self-concept tend to show perfectionist as well as procrastinating behaviors. Moreover, they report being more stressed and strained by their work. In sum, the findings show that the impostor phenomenon constitutes a dysfunctional personality style. Practical implications are discussed.

  16. Validation of the Impostor Phenomenon among Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, Sonja; Bechtoldt, Myriam N.; Leonhardt, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Following up on earlier investigations, the present research aims at validating the construct impostor phenomenon by taking other personality correlates into account and to examine whether the impostor phenomenon is a construct in its own right. In addition, gender effects as well as associations with dispositional working styles and strain are examined. In an online study we surveyed a sample of N = 242 individuals occupying leadership positions in different sectors. Confirmatory factor analyses provide empirical evidence for the discriminant validity of the impostor phenomenon. In accord with earlier studies we show that the impostor phenomenon is accompanied by higher levels of anxiety, dysphoric moods, emotional instability, a generally negative self-evaluation, and perfectionism. The study does not reveal any gender differences concerning the impostor phenomenon. With respect to working styles, persons with an impostor self-concept tend to show perfectionist as well as procrastinating behaviors. Moreover, they report being more stressed and strained by their work. In sum, the findings show that the impostor phenomenon constitutes a dysfunctional personality style. Practical implications are discussed. PMID:27313554

  17. Validation of the Impostor Phenomenon among Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, Sonja; Bechtoldt, Myriam N; Leonhardt, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Following up on earlier investigations, the present research aims at validating the construct impostor phenomenon by taking other personality correlates into account and to examine whether the impostor phenomenon is a construct in its own right. In addition, gender effects as well as associations with dispositional working styles and strain are examined. In an online study we surveyed a sample of N = 242 individuals occupying leadership positions in different sectors. Confirmatory factor analyses provide empirical evidence for the discriminant validity of the impostor phenomenon. In accord with earlier studies we show that the impostor phenomenon is accompanied by higher levels of anxiety, dysphoric moods, emotional instability, a generally negative self-evaluation, and perfectionism. The study does not reveal any gender differences concerning the impostor phenomenon. With respect to working styles, persons with an impostor self-concept tend to show perfectionist as well as procrastinating behaviors. Moreover, they report being more stressed and strained by their work. In sum, the findings show that the impostor phenomenon constitutes a dysfunctional personality style. Practical implications are discussed.

  18. Validation of the Impostor Phenomenon among Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, Sonja; Bechtoldt, Myriam N; Leonhardt, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Following up on earlier investigations, the present research aims at validating the construct impostor phenomenon by taking other personality correlates into account and to examine whether the impostor phenomenon is a construct in its own right. In addition, gender effects as well as associations with dispositional working styles and strain are examined. In an online study we surveyed a sample of N = 242 individuals occupying leadership positions in different sectors. Confirmatory factor analyses provide empirical evidence for the discriminant validity of the impostor phenomenon. In accord with earlier studies we show that the impostor phenomenon is accompanied by higher levels of anxiety, dysphoric moods, emotional instability, a generally negative self-evaluation, and perfectionism. The study does not reveal any gender differences concerning the impostor phenomenon. With respect to working styles, persons with an impostor self-concept tend to show perfectionist as well as procrastinating behaviors. Moreover, they report being more stressed and strained by their work. In sum, the findings show that the impostor phenomenon constitutes a dysfunctional personality style. Practical implications are discussed. PMID:27313554

  19. HIPOGLIKEMIA PADA SEORANG PENDERITA MALARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Harianto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemia is a serious and often fatal complication of severe malaria. This condition has been reported in many parts of the world including from Thailand (1983 and from Indonesia by Hoffman (1988 and Harianto (1990. Two main causes that can lead to development of this condition are quinine administration and the severity of the malaria condition itself. A case study is presented about development of prolonged hypoglycemia after quinine administration. A 41 years old male was hospitalized with 4 days history of fever, headache vomiting and icterus. On examination he was found to be in good mental status, had a normal blood pressure, and a body temperature of 40°C. He also had icterus and hepatomegaly. Laboratory examination on admission showed malaria slide positive forRfalciparum ring 30-40, with parasite count of 3% (+ on day I. CBC showed: WBC of 21,700/mm3 and platelet count of 40,000/mm3. Blood chemistry showed glucose level of 77 mm %, serum bilirubin of 29.34 mg % (direct 21.87 mg % SGOT 31 u/l, SGPT 20 u/l, serum ureum 167 mg %, creatinine of 3.36 mg %, serum Na 123 m Eq/L and K 3.99 Eq/L. Urinalysis was normal except for specific gravity of 1.07. After diagnosis of bilious malaria was confirmed, the patient was given i.v. quinine 500 mg diluted in 500 ml 5% dextrose, infused over 4 hours and repeated every 8 hours. On day IVi.v. quinine was switched to oral preparation of 600 mg given bid and the next day quinine was changed to oral chloroquine. The day after admission (30 hours after quinine administration, blood glucose dropped to 21 mg %, 16-46 mg % on day III, and to less than 10 mg % on day IV. It gradulty returned to normal afterwards. Administration of 10% dextrose and boluses of 40% glucose were able to keep the patient in good clinical condition and prevent death. Malaria slide improved on day III, became negative by day IV and serum bilirubin also decreased on follow up. Hypoglycemia should be expected in severe malaria

  20. A Research Agenda for Malaria Eradication: Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    ,

    2011-01-01

    Malaria modeling can inform policy and guide research for malaria elimination and eradication from local implementation to global policy. A research and development agenda for malaria modeling is proposed, to support operations and to enhance the broader eradication research agenda. Models are envisioned as an integral part of research, planning, and evaluation, and modelers should ideally be integrated into multidisciplinary teams to update the models iteratively, communicate their appropria...

  1. Malaria in Africa Can Be Eliminated

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Carlos C.; Richard W Steketee

    2011-01-01

    A concerted effort to control malaria in Africa has produced dramatic reductions in childhood death in the past decade. This early success has prompted the global community to commit to eradication of malaria deaths and eventually all transmission. Evidence suggests that this is a feasible goal using currently available interventions, augmented with newer tools such as vaccines, which are in development. Malaria deaths are entirely preventable now, and our sustained political and financial co...

  2. DIAGNOSIS OF MALARIA BY MAGNETIC DEPOSITION MICROSCOPY

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerman, Peter A.; Thomson, Jodi M.; Fujioka, Hisashi; Collins, William E.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    Although malaria contributes to a significant public health burden, malaria diagnosis relies heavily on either non-specific clinical symptoms or blood smear microscopy methods developed in the 1930s. These approaches severely misrepresent the number of infected individuals and the reservoir of parasites in malaria-endemic communities and undermine efforts to control disease. Limitations of conventional microscopy-based diagnosis center on time required to examine slides, time required to atta...

  3. [Current management of imported severe malaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venanzi, E; López-Vélez, R

    2016-09-01

    Severe malaria is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency with great impact worldwide for incidence and mortality. The clinical presentation of severe malaria can be very polymorphic and rapidly progressing. Therefore a correct diagnosis and an early and adequate antiparasitic and support therapy are essential. This paper attempts to outline the diagnosis frame and the treatment of severe malaria for adults, paediatric patients and for pregnant. PMID:27608318

  4. A simple method for defining malaria seasonality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Lucy

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently no standard way of defining malaria seasonality, resulting in a wide range of definitions reported in the literature. Malaria cases show seasonal peaks in most endemic settings, and the choice and timing for optimal malaria control may vary by seasonality. A simple approach is presented to describe the seasonality of malaria, to aid localized policymaking and targeting of interventions. Methods A series of systematic literature reviews were undertaken to identify studies reporting on monthly data for full calendar years on clinical malaria, hospital admission with malaria and entomological inoculation rates (EIR. Sites were defined as having 'marked seasonality' if 75% or more of all episodes occurred in six or less months of the year. A 'concentrated period of malaria' was defined as the six consecutive months with the highest cumulative proportion of cases. A sensitivity analysis was performed based on a variety of cut-offs. Results Monthly data for full calendar years on clinical malaria, all hospital admissions with malaria, and entomological inoculation rates were available for 13, 18, and 11 sites respectively. Most sites showed year-round transmission with seasonal peaks for both clinical malaria and hospital admissions with malaria, with a few sites fitting the definition of 'marked seasonality'. For these sites, consistent results were observed when more than one outcome or more than one calendar year was available from the same site. The use of monthly EIR data was found to be of limited value when looking at seasonal variations of malaria transmission, particularly at low and medium intensity levels. Conclusion The proposed definition discriminated well between studies with 'marked seasonality' and those with less seasonality. However, a poor fit was observed in sites with two seasonal peaks. Further work is needed to explore the applicability of this definition on a wide-scale, using routine

  5. Konfirmasi Pemeriksaan Mikroskopik terhadap Diagnosis Klinis Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Arsin, Arsunan; paeruran, Heri; Syatriani, Sri

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Malaria is one of health problems in the world. In Indonesia morbidity of malaria is still high, mainly in Java and Bali island outside. In special at Bunta Public Health Center Banggai Regency in 2008, The AMI still high was 109,9???. The objective of research was to compare clinical malaria diagnosis result to microscophic examination and to find out the correlations between clinical sign and symptoms to microscophic examination. The methods used in research were observa...

  6. The evolution of drug-resistant malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Plowe, Christopher V.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular epidemiological investigations have uncovered the patterns of emergence and global spread of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. Malaria parasites highly resistant to chloroquine and pyrimethamine spread from Asian origins to Africa, at great cost to human health and life. If artemisinin-resistant falciparum malaria follows the same pattern, renewed efforts to eliminate and eradicate malaria will be gravely threatened. This paper, adapted f...

  7. Maintenance of phenotypic diversity within a set of virulence encoding genes of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holding, Thomas; Recker, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Infection by the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum results in a broad spectrum of clinical outcomes, ranging from severe and potentially life-threatening malaria to asymptomatic carriage. In a process of naturally acquired immunity, individuals living in malaria-endemic regions build up a level of clinical protection, which attenuates infection severity in an exposure-dependent manner. Underlying this shift in the immunoepidemiology as well as the observed range in malaria pathogenesis is the var multigene family and the phenotypic diversity embedded within. The var gene-encoded surface proteins Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 mediate variant-specific binding of infected red blood cells to a diverse set of host receptors that has been linked to specific disease manifestations, including cerebral and pregnancy-associated malaria. Here, we show that cross-reactive immune responses, which minimize the within-host benefit of each additionally expressed gene during infection, can cause selection for maximum phenotypic diversity at the genome level. We further show that differential functional constraints on protein diversification stably maintain uneven ratios between phenotypic groups, in line with empirical observation. Our results thus suggest that the maintenance of phenotypic diversity within P. falciparum is driven by an evolutionary trade-off that optimizes between within-host parasite fitness and between-host selection pressure. PMID:26674193

  8. Malaria treatment services in Nigeria: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin SC Uzochukwu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria remains a major Public Health problem in Nigeria and causes death and illness in children and adults, especially pregnant women. Malaria case management remains a vital component of the malaria control strategies. This entails early diagnosis and prompt treatment with effective antimalarial medicines. The objectives of this review is to enable health professionals to understand the magnitude of malaria treatment services in Nigeria, to improve knowledge for rational malaria management within different health system contexts with a view to improving access to malaria treatment. The review therefore looks at the following areas: clinical disease and epidemiology; the burden of malaria in Nigeria; objectives of treatment; antimalarial treatment policy; malaria diagnosis, treatment strategies/ National responses; treatment sources. The review concludes that for improved malaria treatment services in Nigeria, there is an urgent need to develop adequate strategies that will ensure better access to medicines by getting evidence-based and effective medicines to the people who need them, whether by reducing their costs, promoting equity in access, improving their distribution, increasing their efficacy and acceptability, or slowing down the development of antimicrobial resistance.

  9. T-cell responses in malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Jakobsen, P H; Abu-Zeid, Y A;

    1992-01-01

    Malaria is caused by infection with protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. It remains one of the most severe health problems in tropical regions of the world, and the rapid spread of resistance to drugs and insecticides has stimulated intensive research aimed at the development of a malaria...... vaccine. Despite this, no efficient operative vaccine is currently available. A large amount of information on T-cell responses to malaria antigens has been accumulated, concerning antigens derived from all stages of the parasite life cycle. The present review summarizes some of that information, and...... discusses factors affecting the responses of T cells to malaria antigens....

  10. Malaria in penguins - current perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, M L; Vanstreels, R E T; Wallace, R; García-Párraga, D; Braga, É M; Chitty, J; Catão-Dias, J L; Madeira de Carvalho, L M

    2016-08-01

    Avian malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by protozoans of the genus Plasmodium, and it is considered one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in captive penguins, both in zoological gardens and rehabilitation centres. Penguins are known to be highly susceptible to this disease, and outbreaks have been associated with mortality as high as 50-80% of affected captive populations within a few weeks. The disease has also been reported in wild penguin populations, however, its impacts on the health and fitness of penguins in the wild is not clear. This review provides an overview of the aetiology, life cycle and epidemiology of avian malaria, and provides details on the strategies that can be employed for the diagnostic, treatment and prevention of this disease in captive penguins, discussing possible directions for future research.

  11. PENENTUAN VEKTOR MALARIA DI FLORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harijani A. Marwoto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A field study on entomology has been conducted in 6 villages which were located in coastal and in-land areas of Sikka Regency of Central Flores since April 1990 - October 1991. The results of this study showed that the suspected malaria vectors in those areas were An. sundaicus, An. subpictus, An. barbirostris, An. aconitus and An. maculatus. Only 3 species were confirmed as vector using ELISA test, i.e. An. sundaicus, An. barbirostris and An. subpictus with sporosoite rates of 4.2%, 2.1% and 0.1% respectively. An. aconitus, a potential malaria vector in Java and in some onther places was not confirmed as vector in Flores yet. The 3 confirmed vectors were also found positive with sporozoites in West Flores and also found predominant in East Flores.

  12. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cerebral aneurysm from forming. People with a diagnosed brain aneurysm should carefully control high blood pressure, stop smoking, and avoid cocaine use or other stimulant drugs. They should also ...

  13. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... al. Course of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation. Neurology. 2007;68:1411-1416. PMID: 17452586 www.ncbi. ...

  14. The Malaria Problem: short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Ebikeme

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is the world's most prevalent infectious disease, a major cause of mortality, and a barrier to social and economic development and growth in many countries throughout the world. Antimalarials represent an important part of strategy to curbing this debilitating disease. The spread of drug resistance is becoming increasingly important. To date, parasite resistance to all but one case of antimalarials exists in most endemic countries. Meaning, new drug to combat the disease are a priority.

  15. [Postmortem diagnosis of tropical malaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, S; Schröter, A; Bratzke, H; Brade, V

    1995-01-01

    Thirteen days after returning from a four week holiday in Kenya a 35-year-old man consulted his doctor complaining of feeling unwell. The doctor diagnosed influenza and gave him a sickness certificate for three days. Because the patient did not reappear at his workplace a search was made and he was found dead in his flat seven days after seeing his doctor. A medicolegal autopsy was performed two days after the estimated time of death. There was marked swelling of liver and spleen together with jaundice and "dirty grey" colouration of the viscera. Samples of heart blood and spleen puncture material were taken. Giemsa stained preparations (ordinary and thick blood smears) revealed numerous objects 1.2 to 1.5 microns in size with indistinct reddish blue staining, some of them arranged in rosettes reminiscent of schizonts. A few of them contained pigment. In material from the spleen there were masses of blackish-brown pigment. The malaria immunofluorescence test performed on serum gave a weakly positive titre of 1:40. The findings were considered enough to support a diagnosis of fulminant falciparum malaria, and this was confirmed by histological changes in various organs, notably the typical capillary blockages in the brain. Because of the popularity of long-haul tourism, cases of imported malaria are increasingly frequent and, in view of the insidiously progressive course of the disease, it should always be considered in the differential diagnosis. In cases of unexplained death, if there is any suspicion of malaria, blood should always be taken for appropriate investigations, in addition to blocks for histological examination. PMID:7821199

  16. PENGOBATAN MALARIA DENGAN KOMBINASI ARTEMISININ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilianan Tjitra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous approaches in malaria treatment fail to reduce the morbidity and mortality of malaria. Widespread overuse of antimalarial treatment of clinical malaria may have contributed to increase drug resistance. Moreover, poor compliance or inadequate dosage also selects for parasite resistance. The paradigm of radical treatment using drug combinations may improve the cure rate and compliance, thereby preventing or delaying the emergence of parasites resistant to antimalarial drugs. The ideal combined antimalarial regimen in Indonesia should be safe and tolerated by all age groups, effective and rapidly acting for both P.falciparum and P.vivax malaria, short course, good compliance and acceptable, without resistance and/or cross-resistance or , not widely spread use, cost-effective and affordable. Artemisinin derivatives are the best partner drug for combination, with advantages that include: well absorbed, safe and well tolerated, rapidly converted to active metabolite, having very short half-life, broad specificity of action, and extremely potent. Current artemisinin-based combinations which are suitable for Indonesia include: amodiaquine plus artesunate given as single daily dose for 3 days (AQ3+ATS3, mefloquine plus artesunate given as single daily dose for 3 days (MQ3+ATS3, lumefantrine/benflumetol plus artemether given as twice daily dose for 3 days (COARTEMETHER, piperaquine plus dihydroartemisinin given as single daily dose for 2-3 days (PPQ2-3+DHA2-3, and piperaquine plus artemisinin given as single daily dose for 2 days (PPQ2+ATM2. Given the imbalance between rapid development of parasite resistance and slow availability of new effective antimalarial drugs, research and development of antimalarial drugs must be encouraged.

  17. Acute ischemic cerebral attack

    OpenAIRE

    Franco-Garcia Samir; Barreiro-Pinto Belis

    2010-01-01

    The decrease of the cerebral blood flow below the threshold of autoregulation led to changes of cerebral ischemia and necrosis that traduce in signs and symtoms of focal neurologic dysfunction called acute cerebrovascular symdrome (ACS) or stroke. Two big groups according to its etiology are included in this category the hemorragic that constitue a 20% and the ischemic a 80% of cases. Great interest has wom the ischemic ACS because of its high social burden, being the third cause of no violen...

  18. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    OpenAIRE

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.; Johnston, James C.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothe...

  19. Rehabilitation in cerebral palsy.

    OpenAIRE

    Molnar, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most frequent physical disability of childhood onset. Over the past four decades, prevalence has remained remarkably constant at 2 to 3 per 1,000 live births in industrialized countries. In this article I concentrate on the rehabilitation and outcome of patients with cerebral palsy. The epidemiologic, pathogenetic, and diagnostic aspects are highlighted briefly as they pertain to the planning and implementation of the rehabilitation process.

  20. Epidemiology of malaria in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, K M

    1982-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem in Malaysia, particularly in peninsular Malaysia and the state of Sabah. An eradication program started in the states of Sabah and Sarawak in 1961 initially was remarkably successful. A similar but staged program was started in peninsular Malaysia in 1967 and was also quite successful. However, a marked upsurge in incidence in Sabah in 1975-1978 showed that malaria is still a major hazard. The disease leads to great economic losses in terms of the productivity of the labor force and the learning capacity of schoolchildren. The topography, the climate, and the migrations of the people due to increased economic activity are similar in peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, and Sarawak. However, the epidemiologic picture differs strikingly from area to area in terms of species of vectors, distribution of parasitic species, and resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine. Likewise, the problems faced by the eradication or control programs in the three regions are dissimilar. Because solutions to only some of these problems are possible, the eradication of malaria in Malaysia is not likely in the near future. However, the situation offers an excellent opportunity for further studies of antimalaria measures. PMID:6755616

  1. The efficiency of malaria chemoprophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki Pappa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malaria is a highly contagious disease. According to WHO, malaria cases are expected to increase due to climate changes. Despite the eradication efforts, malaria still remains one of the most significant causes of morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical regions. Many different antimalarial regimens are used , however resistance is emerging to many of themPurpose: This critical review was conducted, in order to respond to the following questions. A Which antimalarial regimen is most effective? B Which regimen is the safest for travelers in endemic regions? C Which regimen is best tolerated?Methodology: The literature research was conducted through the Internet. The Medline and Cinahl databases were used, as well as the search engines google, altavista and lycos. The research included articles that described clinical trials. The material was selected based on the aforementioned research questions and the chronological time limits.Results: Atovaquone/proguanil, tafenoquine, primaquine were the most effective regimens. Tafenoquine, as well as, primaquine have been related to hemolytic events in individuals with G6PD deficiency, gastrointestinal disorders, backache and flue-like syndrome. Doxycycline and mefloquine were related to gastrointestinal and neurological disorders. Those were the less tolerated regimens.Conclusions: Atovaquone/proguanil, tafenoquine, primaquine were the most effective regimens. As far as safety is concerned, tafenoquine and primaquine should not be prescribed to individuals with G6PD deficiency. All the regimens were considered well tolerated, however, in doxycycline and mefloquine trials were the most withdrawals due to adverse effects.

  2. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge;

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  3. Automated detection of malaria pigment: feasibility for malaria diagnosing in an area with seasonal malaria in northern Namibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. de Langen; J. van Dillen; P. Witte; S. Mucheto; N. Nagelkerke; P. Kager

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the feasibility of automated malaria detection with the Cell-Dyn (R) 3700 (Abbott Diagnostics, Santa Clara, CA, USA) haematology analyser for diagnosing malaria in northern Namibia. METHODS From April to June 2003, all patients with a positive blood smear result and a subset of

  4. Climate, environment and transmission of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossati, Antonella; Bargiacchi, Olivia; Kroumova, Vesselina; Zaramella, Marco; Caputo, Annamaria; Garavelli, Pietro Luigi

    2016-06-01

    Malaria, the most common parasitic disease in the world, is transmitted to the human host by mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles. The transmission of malaria requires the interaction between the host, the vector and the parasite.The four species of parasites responsible for human malaria are Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium vivax. Occasionally humans can be infected by several simian species, like Plasmodium knowlesi, recognised as a major cause of human malaria in South-East Asia since 2004. While P. falciparum is responsible for most malaria cases, about 8% of estimated cases globally are caused by P. vivax. The different Plasmodia are not uniformly distributed although there are areas of species overlap. The life cycle of all species of human malaria parasites is characterised by an exogenous sexual phase in which multiplication occurs in several species of Anopheles mosquitoes, and an endogenous asexual phase in the vertebrate host. The time span required for mature oocyst development in the salivary glands is quite variable (7-30 days), characteristic of each species and influenced by ambient temperature. The vector Anopheles includes 465 formally recognised species. Approximately 70 of these species have the capacity to transmit Plasmodium spp. to humans and 41 are considered as dominant vector capable of transmitting malaria. The intensity of transmission is dependent on the vectorial capacity and competence of local mosquitoes. An efficient system for malaria transmission needs strong interaction between humans, the ecosystem and infected vectors. Global warming induced by human activities has increased the risk of vector-borne diseases such as malaria. Recent decades have witnessed changes in the ecosystem and climate without precedent in human history although the emphasis in the role of temperature on the epidemiology of malaria has given way to predisposing conditions such as ecosystem changes, political

  5. Climate, environment and transmission of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossati, Antonella; Bargiacchi, Olivia; Kroumova, Vesselina; Zaramella, Marco; Caputo, Annamaria; Garavelli, Pietro Luigi

    2016-06-01

    Malaria, the most common parasitic disease in the world, is transmitted to the human host by mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles. The transmission of malaria requires the interaction between the host, the vector and the parasite.The four species of parasites responsible for human malaria are Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium vivax. Occasionally humans can be infected by several simian species, like Plasmodium knowlesi, recognised as a major cause of human malaria in South-East Asia since 2004. While P. falciparum is responsible for most malaria cases, about 8% of estimated cases globally are caused by P. vivax. The different Plasmodia are not uniformly distributed although there are areas of species overlap. The life cycle of all species of human malaria parasites is characterised by an exogenous sexual phase in which multiplication occurs in several species of Anopheles mosquitoes, and an endogenous asexual phase in the vertebrate host. The time span required for mature oocyst development in the salivary glands is quite variable (7-30 days), characteristic of each species and influenced by ambient temperature. The vector Anopheles includes 465 formally recognised species. Approximately 70 of these species have the capacity to transmit Plasmodium spp. to humans and 41 are considered as dominant vector capable of transmitting malaria. The intensity of transmission is dependent on the vectorial capacity and competence of local mosquitoes. An efficient system for malaria transmission needs strong interaction between humans, the ecosystem and infected vectors. Global warming induced by human activities has increased the risk of vector-borne diseases such as malaria. Recent decades have witnessed changes in the ecosystem and climate without precedent in human history although the emphasis in the role of temperature on the epidemiology of malaria has given way to predisposing conditions such as ecosystem changes, political

  6. Impaired everyday memory associated with encephalopathy of severe malaria: the role of seizures and hippocampal damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fegan Greg W

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seizures are common in children admitted with severe falciparum malaria and are associated with neuro-cognitive impairments. Prolonged febrile seizures are associated with hippocampal damage and impaired memory. It was hypothesized that severe malaria causes impaired everyday memory which may be associated with hippocampal damage. Methods An everyday memory battery was administered on 152 children with cerebral malaria (CM (mean age, 7 y 4 months [SD 13 months]; 77 males 156 children (mean age, 7 y 4 months [SD, 14 months]; 72 males with malaria plus complex seizures (MS and 179 children (mean age, 7 y 6 months [SD, 13 months]; 93 males unexposed to either condition. Results CM was associated with poorer everyday memory [95% CI, -2.46 to -0.36, p = 0.004] but not MS [95% CI, -0.91 to 1.16, p = 1.00] compared to unexposed children. Children with exposure to CM performed more poorly in recall [95% CI, -0.79 to -0.04, p = 0.024] and recognition subtests [95% CI, -0.90 to -0.17, p = 0.001] but not in prospective memory tests compared to controls. The health factors that predicted impaired everyday memory outcome in children with exposure to CM was profound coma [95% CI, 0.02 to 0.88, p = 0.037] and multiple episodes of hypoglycaemia [95% CI, 0.05 to 0.78, p = 0.020], but not seizures. Discussion The findings show that exposure to CM was associated with a specific impairment of everyday memory. Seizures commonly observed in severe malaria may not have a causal relationship with poor outcome, but rather be associated with profound coma and repeated metabolic insults (multi-hypoglycaemia that are strongly associated with impaired everyday memory.

  7. Historical Aspects in Tolerance Phenomenon Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janat A. Karmanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the historical aspect of the tolerance phenomenon research, particularly the study of tolerance in the age of Antiquity, Middle Ages, New Times, Enlightenment. It is remarkable that the problem of tolerance, emerged in Western civilization on religious grounds, laid the foundation for all other freedoms, attained in many countries. Besides, the article attaches special attention to the researchers of the East, such as Abu Nasr al-Farabi, Khoja Ahmed Yasawi, studies the historical aspect of works by Kazakhstan thinkers A. Kunanbayev, C. Valikhanova, K.B. Zharikbayev, S.K. Kaliyev, A.N. Nysanbayev, A.I. Artemev and others. The analysis of historical research of the tolerance phenomenon brings the author to the conclusion that religious freedom was the starting point for the emergence of new areas of tolerance display. The content of this phenomenon changed according to the historical peculiarities of the societies’ development

  8. Cerebral Ischemic Preconditioning: the Road So Far….

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thushara Vijayakumar, N; Sangwan, Amit; Sharma, Bhargy; Majid, Arshad; Rajanikant, G K

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral preconditioning constitutes the brain's adaptation to lethal ischemia when first exposed to mild doses of a subtoxic stressor. The phenomenon of preconditioning has been largely studied in the heart, and data from in vivo and in vitro models from past 2-3 decades have provided sufficient evidence that similar machinery exists in the brain as well. Since preconditioning results in a transient protective phenotype labeled as ischemic tolerance, it can open many doors in the medical warfare against stroke, a debilitating cerebrovascular disorder that kills or cripples thousands of people worldwide every year. Preconditioning can be induced by a variety of stimuli from hypoxia to pharmacological anesthetics, and each, in turn, induces tolerance by activating a multitude of proteins, enzymes, receptors, transcription factors, and other biomolecules eventually leading to genomic reprogramming. The intracellular signaling pathways and molecular cascades behind preconditioning are extensively being investigated, and several first-rate papers have come out in the last few years centered on the topic of cerebral ischemic tolerance. However, translating the experimental knowledge into the clinical scaffold still evades practicality and faces several challenges. Of the various preconditioning strategies, remote ischemic preconditioning and pharmacological preconditioning appears to be more clinically relevant for the management of ischemic stroke. In this review, we discuss current developments in the field of cerebral preconditioning and then examine the potential of various preconditioning agents to confer neuroprotection in the brain. PMID:26081149

  9. Severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria is associated with circulating ultra-large von Willebrand multimers and ADAMTS13 inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre Larkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum infection results in adhesion of infected erythrocytes to blood vessel endothelium, and acute endothelial cell activation, together with sequestration of platelets and leucocytes. We have previously shown that patients with severe infection or fulminant cerebral malaria have significantly increased circulatory levels of the adhesive glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF and its propeptide, both of which are indices of endothelial cell activation. In this prospective study of patients from Ghana with severe (n = 20 and cerebral (n = 13 P. falciparum malaria, we demonstrate that increased plasma VWF antigen (VWF:Ag level is associated with disproportionately increased VWF function. VWF collagen binding (VWF:CB was significantly increased in patients with cerebral malaria and severe malaria (medians 7.6 and 7.0 IU/ml versus 1.9 IU/ml; p<0.005. This increased VWF:CB correlated with the presence of abnormal ultra-large VWF multimers in patient rather than control plasmas. Concomitant with the increase in VWF:Ag and VWF:CB was a significant persistent reduction in the activity of the VWF-specific cleaving protease ADAMTS13 (approximately 55% of normal; p<0.005. Mixing studies were performed using P. falciparum patient plasma and normal pooled plasma, in the presence or absence of exogenous recombinant ADAMTS13. These studies demonstrated that in malarial plasma, ADAMTS13 function was persistently inhibited in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect was not associated with the presence of known inhibitors of ADAMTS13 enzymatic function (interleukin-6, free haemoglobin, factor VIII or thrombospondin-1. These novel findings suggest that severe P. falciparum infection is associated with acute endothelial cell activation, abnormal circulating ULVWF multimers, and a significant reduction in plasma ADAMTS13 function which is mediated at least in part by an unidentified inhibitor.

  10. Severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria is associated with circulating ultra-large von Willebrand multimers and ADAMTS13 inhibition.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Larkin, Deirdre

    2009-03-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infection results in adhesion of infected erythrocytes to blood vessel endothelium, and acute endothelial cell activation, together with sequestration of platelets and leucocytes. We have previously shown that patients with severe infection or fulminant cerebral malaria have significantly increased circulatory levels of the adhesive glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF) and its propeptide, both of which are indices of endothelial cell activation. In this prospective study of patients from Ghana with severe (n = 20) and cerebral (n = 13) P. falciparum malaria, we demonstrate that increased plasma VWF antigen (VWF:Ag) level is associated with disproportionately increased VWF function. VWF collagen binding (VWF:CB) was significantly increased in patients with cerebral malaria and severe malaria (medians 7.6 and 7.0 IU\\/ml versus 1.9 IU\\/ml; p<0.005). This increased VWF:CB correlated with the presence of abnormal ultra-large VWF multimers in patient rather than control plasmas. Concomitant with the increase in VWF:Ag and VWF:CB was a significant persistent reduction in the activity of the VWF-specific cleaving protease ADAMTS13 (approximately 55% of normal; p<0.005). Mixing studies were performed using P. falciparum patient plasma and normal pooled plasma, in the presence or absence of exogenous recombinant ADAMTS13. These studies demonstrated that in malarial plasma, ADAMTS13 function was persistently inhibited in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect was not associated with the presence of known inhibitors of ADAMTS13 enzymatic function (interleukin-6, free haemoglobin, factor VIII or thrombospondin-1). These novel findings suggest that severe P. falciparum infection is associated with acute endothelial cell activation, abnormal circulating ULVWF multimers, and a significant reduction in plasma ADAMTS13 function which is mediated at least in part by an unidentified inhibitor.

  11. Estimating individual exposure to malaria using local prevalence of malaria infection in the field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ally Olotu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heterogeneity in malaria exposure complicates survival analyses of vaccine efficacy trials and confounds the association between immune correlates of protection and malaria infection in longitudinal studies. Analysis may be facilitated by taking into account the variability in individual exposure levels, but it is unclear how exposure can be estimated at an individual level. METHOD AND FINDINGS: We studied three cohorts (Chonyi, Junju and Ngerenya in Kilifi District, Kenya to assess measures of malaria exposure. Prospective data were available on malaria episodes, geospatial coordinates, proximity to infected and uninfected individuals and residence in predefined malaria hotspots for 2,425 individuals. Antibody levels to the malaria antigens AMA1 and MSP1(142 were available for 291 children from Junju. We calculated distance-weighted local prevalence of malaria infection within 1 km radius as a marker of individual's malaria exposure. We used multivariable modified Poisson regression model to assess the discriminatory power of these markers for malaria infection (i.e. asymptomatic parasitaemia or clinical malaria. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to assess the discriminatory power of the models. Local malaria prevalence within 1 km radius and AMA1 and MSP1(142 antibodies levels were independently associated with malaria infection. Weighted local malaria prevalence had an area under ROC curve of 0.72 (95%CI: 0.66-0.73, 0.71 (95%CI: 0.69-0.73 and 0.82 (95%CI: 0.80-0.83 among cohorts in Chonyi, Junju and Ngerenya respectively. In a small subset of children from Junju, a model incorporating weighted local malaria prevalence with AMA1 and MSP1(142 antibody levels provided an AUC of 0.83 (95%CI: 0.79-0.88. CONCLUSION: We have proposed an approach to estimating the intensity of an individual's malaria exposure in the field. The weighted local malaria prevalence can be used as individual marker of

  12. Non-genetic phenomenons of radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transcription factors are activated by radiation induced DNA damage. This is followed by cell cycle regulation (cell cycle blocks and DNA repair), which influence radiosensitivity. This phenomenon is seen as a genetic effect. Proteins as transcription factors (e.g. NF-κB) are directly activated by ionizing radiation, genes coding for cytokines and growth factors are expressed and influence the radiosensitivity. Damage of the cell membrane also induces signal transduction cascades and activates genes via transcription factors, which influence radiosensitivity. The latter two phenomenons are described as non genetics and will get more and more importance in He radiobiology. (orig.)

  13. Flip-flop phenomenon: observations and theory

    OpenAIRE

    Elstner, D.; Korhonen, H.

    2005-01-01

    In many active stars the spots concentrate on two permanent active longitudes which are 180 degrees apart. In some of these stars the dominant part of the spot activity changes the longitude every few years. This so-called flip-flop phenomenon has up to now been reported in 11 stars, both single and binary alike, and including also the Sun. To explain this phenomenon, a non-axisymmetric dynamo mode, giving rise to two permanent active longitudes at opposite stellar hemispheres, is needed toge...

  14. Social Media: A Phenomenon to be Analyzed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    danah boyd

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of “social media” has more to do with its cultural positioning than its technological affordances. Rooted in the broader “Web 2.0” landscape, social media helped engineers, entrepreneurs, and everyday people reimagine the role that technology could play in information dissemination, community development, and communication. While the technologies invoked by the phrase social media have a long history, what unfolded in the 2000s reconfigured socio-technical practices in significant ways. Reflecting on the brief history of social media, this essay argues for the need to better understand this phenomenon.

  15. Insecticide Resistance Reducing Effectiveness of Malaria Control

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-01-24

    Malaria prevention is increasingly insecticide based. Dr. John Gimnig, an entomologist with the Division of Parasitic Diseases, CDC, discusses evidence that mosquito resistance to insecticides, which is measured in the laboratory, could compromise malaria prevention in the field.  Created: 1/24/2007 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 3/13/2007.

  16. EPIDEMIC MALARIA AMONG TRANSMIGRANTS IN IRIAN JAYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Baird

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Malaria merupakan masalah kesehatan yang penting untuk masyarakat transmigrasi di daerah endemisitas malaria tinggi seperti Irian Jaya. Di Arso, epidemi malaria timbul setelah dua sampai enam bulan sesudah tibanya transmigran baru. Dalam tiga bulan angka parasitemia bisa mencapai 70% dan hampir 10% dari transmigran mendapat malaria berat yang membutuhkan rujukan ke rumah sakit dalam enam bulan p< rtama. Usaha penanggulangan malaria di daerah seperti Arso menghadapi berbagai tantangan dan hambatan karena tingginya derajat resistensi parasit terhadap klorokuin, fasilitas dan kemampuan untuk diagnostik yang terbatas, sulitnya pengendalian vektor (An. punctulatus group dan tidak adanya strategi untuk menghilangkan sumber infeksi yang asimptomatik. Berbagai usaha yang dapat mengurangi risiko epidemi malaria di daerah transmigrasi Irian Jaya ialah antara lain pemberian profilaksis selama tiga bulan (selain klorokuin perlu dipertimbangkan pemberian primakuin bagi transmigran yang tidak hamil dan tidak menderita defisiensi G-6-PD, peningkatan fasilitas diagnostik dan pengobatan/termasuk rujukan untuk kasus malaria berat, pemakaian kelambu; penemuan kasus aktif untuk menghilangkan gametocytemia yang asimptomatik (selama enam bulan serta penyuluhan dan partisipasi masyarakat dalam pemberantasan malaria (termasuk pembinaan kader kesehatan. Untuk melaksanakan kegiatan tersebut di atas perlu disediakan tenaga dan sumber dana yang khusus.

  17. Rodent malaria parasites : genome organization & comparative genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Taco W.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the genome organization of rodent malaria parasites (RMPs) and compare the organization and gene content of the genomes of RMPs and the human malaria parasite P. falciparum. The release of the complete genome sequence of P. falciparu

  18. Malaria vector control: current and future strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, W.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    The recently announced call for malaria eradication represents a new page in the history of this disease. This has been triggered by remarkable reductions in malaria resulting from combined application of effective drugs and vector control. However, this strategy is threatened by development of inse

  19. Malaria vaccines: immunity, models and monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars; Barfod, Lea

    2008-01-01

    Although experts in the field have agreed on the malaria vaccine technology roadmap that should be followed (http://www.malariavaccineroadmap.net/), the path towards an effective malaria vaccine remains littered with intellectual and practical pot-holes. The animal models that are currently...

  20. Combining malaria control with rural electrification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oria, Prisca A.

    2016-01-01

    Chapter 1 presents the background information relevant to the subject matter and methods of this thesis. These include the application of social and behavioural sciences in malaria control, the SolarMal project and malaria in Kenya. It also presents the research objective, question and design that i

  1. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bindu Balakrishnan,1 Elizabeth Nance,1 Michael V Johnston,2 Rangaramanujam Kannan,3 Sujatha Kannan1 1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Department of Neurology and Pediatrics, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. Keywords: dendrimer, cerebral palsy, neuroinflammation, nanoparticle, neonatal brain injury, G4OH-PAMAM

  2. Clinical Neuroimaging of cerebral ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawara, Jyoji [Nakamura Memorial Hospital, Sapporo (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Notice points in clinical imaging of cerebral ischemia are reviewed. When cerebral blood flow is determined in acute stage of cerebral embolism (cerebral blood flow SPECT), it is important to find area of ischemic core and ischemic penumbra. When large cortex area is assigned to ischemic penumbra, thrombolytic therapy is positively adapted, but cautious correspondence is necessary when ischemic core is recognized. DWI is superior in the detection of area equivalent to ischemic core of early stage, but, in imaging of area equivalent to ischemic penumbra, perfusion image or distribution image of cerebral blood volume (CBV) by MRI need to be combined. Luxury perfusion detected by cerebral blood flow SPECT in the cases of acute cerebral embolism suggests vascular recanalization, but a comparison with CT/MRI and continuous assessment of cerebral circulation dynamics were necessary in order to predict brain tissue disease (metabolic abnormality). In hemodynamic cerebral ischemia, it is important to find stage 2 equivalent to misery perfusion by quantification of cerebral blood flow SPECT. Degree of diaschisis can indicate seriousness of brain dysfunction for lacuna infarct. Because cerebral circulation reserve ability (perfusion pressure) is normal in all areas of the low cerebral blood flow by diaschisis mechanism, their areas are easily distinguished from those of hemodynamic cerebral ischemia. (K.H.)

  3. PLASMODIUM MALARIAE INFECTION BOOSTS PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM GAMETOCYTE PRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    McKenzie, F. Ellis; Jeffery, Geoffrey M.; Collins, William E.

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed records of malariotherapy patients sequentially or simultaneously inoculated with Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium malariae. Gametocyte production was enhanced in P. falciparum by prior or concurrent P. malariae infection but diminished or unaffected in P. malariae by P. falciparum. Conversely, asexual-form production was diminished in P. malariae but unaffected in P. falciparum.

  4. Prevalence of malaria parasites among blood donors in Kaduna, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas D. Garba

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The prevalence of malaria parasites among blood donors was 7.5% Blood donors should be routinely screened for malaria parasites and the blood marked negative or positive as the case may be. Recipients of malaria parasites positive blood should be given prophylactic treatment to prevent transfusion related malaria (TRM. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2112-2119

  5. Hitting Hotspots: Spatial Targeting of Malaria for Control and Elimination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousema, T.; Griffin, J.T.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Smith, D.L.; Churcher, T.S.; Takken, W.; Ghani, A.; Drakeley, C.; Gosling, R.

    2012-01-01

    Current malaria elimination guidelines are based on the concept that malaria transmission becomes heterogeneous in the later phases of malaria elimination [1]. In the pre-elimination and elimination phases, interventions have to be targeted to entire villages or towns with higher malaria incidence u

  6. SIT for African malaria vectors: Epilogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Townson Harold

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As a result of increased support and the diligent application of new and conventional anti-malaria tools, significant reductions in malaria transmission are being accomplished. Historical and current evolutionary responses of vectors and parasites to malaria interventions demonstrate that it is unwise to assume that a limited suite of tools will remain effective indefinitely, thus efforts to develop new interventions should continue. This collection of manuscripts surveys the prospects and technical challenges for applying a novel tool, the sterile insect technique (SIT, against mosquitoes that transmit malaria. The method has been very successful against many agricultural pest insects in area-wide programs, but demonstrations against malaria vectors have not been sufficient to determine its potential relative to current alternatives, much of which will hinge ultimately upon cost. These manuscripts provide an overview of current efforts to develop SIT and identify key research issues that remain.

  7. Malaria parasite interactions with the human host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouniotis D

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between the malaria parasite and the human host involves a number of interactions that result in the parasite evading the human immune system. Since the stages of the malaria lifecycle are complex, this allows the use of various immune evasion strategies by the malaria parasite and has major implications in the development of a vaccine for malaria endemic areas. The present review highlights key host:parasite interactions. Plasmodia puts selection pressure on human gene frequencies, and studies into host genetic factors such as the Duffy blood group and sickle cell anaemia offer insight into the host- parasite relationship. In addition, parasite interactions with the different effector arms of the immune system can result in altered peptide ligand (APL antagonism which alters the immune response from a pro- to an anti-inflammatory T cell response. Recent insights into the interaction between professional antigen presenting cells, dendritic cells (DCs, and malaria parasites is discussed in detail.

  8. Mesoscale Phenomenon Revealed by an Acoustic Sounder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Jensen, Niels Otto

    1976-01-01

    A particular phenomenon observed on an acoustic sounder record is analyzed, and is interpreted as being associated with the passing of a land breeze front. A simple physical explanation of the frontal movements is suggested. The actual existence of the land breeze is demonstrated by examination...

  9. Abnormal Raman spectral phenomenon of silicon nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The Raman spectra of two one-dimensional silicon nanowire samples with different excitation wavelengths were measured and an abnormal phenomenon was discovered that the Raman spectral features change with the wavelengths of excitation. Closer analysis of the crystalline structure of samples and the changes in Raman spectral features showed that the abnormal behavior is the result of resonance Raman scattering selection effect.

  10. EDUCATION AS A SOCIO-CULTURAL PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor A. SHTURBA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article author analyze the socio-cultural phenomenon of education through the prism of its values and target components. Understanding of the role and place of education in society is not possible out of the human essence context. In living nature man appears as a phenomenon - this thesis is recognized the absolute majoriy of scientific and philosophical theories, concepts and doctrines, including non-humanistic oriented. It is known that man is a social being - society is environment for its full life. As Aristotle said, only the gods and the animals can live outside society. However, human nature does not imply a simple social existence in the form of an intensive exchange of information with similar entities and, based on this, building complex collective actions. The man has a mind that is capable of abstract thought, speech, language, complex psyche, important component of which is imagination. These features formed the basis of theoretical and methodological basis of the analysis of education as a phenomenon. The author indicated value and target measurement of socio-cultural phenomenon of education, which led to the conclusion about the need to rely on a properly organized philosophical and pedagogical knowledge, the importance of implementation in the educational process of program-target approach and the relevance of the audit of modern educational models for nonborrowed trainings, upbringing and socialization. doi: 10.17748/2075-9908-2016-8-2/1-124-126. [en

  11. Homocysteine and Raynaud's phenomenon: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzerini, Pietro Enea; Capecchi, Pier Leopoldo; Bisogno, Stefania; Cozzalupi, Mauro; Rossi, Pier Carlo; Pasini, Franco Laghi

    2010-01-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon, categorized as primary and secondary when occurring isolated or in association with an underlying disease, respectively, is a paroxysmal and recurrent acral ischemia resulting from an abnormal arterial vasospastic response to cold or emotional stress. The key issue in the pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon is presumed to be a dysregulation in the mechanisms of vascular motility resulting in an imbalance between vasodilatation and vasoconstriction. Homocysteine, a non-protein forming sulphured amino acid proposed as an independent risk factor for atherothrombosis in the general population, clearly demonstrated to produce vascular damage through mechanisms also including endothelial injury and modifications in circulating mediators of vasomotion. The rationale for homocysteine involvement in the pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon led some authors to investigate the possible association between mild hyperhomocysteinemia and such a vascular disturbance, particularly in the course of connective tissue disease. Here we review data regarding this putative association and the supposed mechanisms involved, also discussing the emblematic case of a patient with new-onset severe Raynaud's phenomenon and markedly elevated homocysteinemia.

  12. Important advances in malaria vaccine research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Jadhav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is one of the most widespread parasitic infection in Asian countries affecting the poor of the poor. In an effort to develop an effective vaccine for the treatment of malaria, various attempts are being made worldwide. If successful, such a vaccine can be effective for treatment of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. This would also be able to avoid complications such as drug resistance, resistance to insecticides, nonadherence to the treatment schedule, and eventually high cost of treatment in the resource-limited settings. In the current compilation, the details from the literature were collected by using PubMed and Medline as search engines and searched for terms such as malaria, vaccine, and malaria treatment. This review collates and provides glimpses of the information on the recent malaria vaccine development. The reader will be taken through the historical perspective followed by the approaches to the malaria vaccine development from pre-erythrocytic stage vaccines, asexual stage vaccines, transmission blocking vaccines, etc. Looking at the current scenario of the malaria and treatment strategies, it is an absolute need of an hour that an effective malaria vaccine should be developed. This would bring a revolutionary breakthrough in the treatment modalities especially when there is increasing emergence of resistance to existing drug therapy. It would be of great purpose to serve those living in malaria endemic region and also for travelers which are nonimmune and coming to malaria endemic region. As infection by P. vivax is more prevalent in India and other Asian subcontinent and is often prominent in areas where elimination is being attempted, special consideration is required of the role of vaccines in blocking transmission, regardless of the stages being targeted. Development of vaccines is feasible but with the support of private sector and government organization in terms of regulatory and most importantly

  13. Challenges for malaria elimination in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Marcelo U; Castro, Marcia C

    2016-01-01

    Brazil currently contributes 42 % of all malaria cases reported in the Latin America and the Caribbean, a region where major progress towards malaria elimination has been achieved in recent years. In 2014, malaria burden in Brazil (143,910 microscopically confirmed cases and 41 malaria-related deaths) has reached its lowest levels in 35 years, Plasmodium falciparum is highly focal, and the geographic boundary of transmission has considerably shrunk. Transmission in Brazil remains entrenched in the Amazon Basin, which accounts for 99.5 % of the country's malaria burden. This paper reviews major lessons learned from past and current malaria control policies in Brazil. A comprehensive discussion of the scientific and logistic challenges that may impact malaria elimination efforts in the country is presented in light of the launching of the Plan for Elimination of Malaria in Brazil in November 2015. Challenges for malaria elimination addressed include the high prevalence of symptomless and submicroscopic infections, emerging anti-malarial drug resistance in P. falciparum and Plasmodium vivax and the lack of safe anti-relapse drugs, the largely neglected burden of malaria in pregnancy, the need for better vector control strategies where Anopheles mosquitoes present a highly variable biting behaviour, human movement, the need for effective surveillance and tools to identify foci of infection in areas with low transmission, and the effects of environmental changes and climatic variability in transmission. Control actions launched in Brazil and results to come are likely to influence control programs in other countries in the Americas. PMID:27206924

  14. Clínica de la malaria complicada debida a P. falciparum Estudio de casos y controles en Tumaco y Turbo (Colombia Clinical presentation of severe malaria due plasmodiun falciparum. casecontrol study in Tumaco and Turbo (Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes y problema: son muy pocos los estudios latinoamericanos sobre malaria por Plasmodium falciparum (P falciparum complicada y se requiere estudiarla para identificar un patrón propio. OBJETIVOS. Identificar las complicaciones presentes en pacientes de Tumaco (Nariño y Turbo (Antioquia en Colombia, con malaria por P falciparum. MÉTODOS. Diseño de casos y controles. Se aplicaron los criterios diagnósticos de complicación OMS-2000 (Organización Mundial de la Salud. RESULTADOS. Se captaron 64 casos (con malaria por P. falciparum complicada y 135 controles (con malaria por P. falciparum no complicada. El tiempo de evolución de la enfermedad (promedio 5,6 días en los casos y 5,9 en los controles y la frecuencia de síntomas fueron similares en ambos grupos (p>0,05, pero ladificultad respiratoria y la ictericia fueron más frecuentes en los casos que en los controles (p<0,05. Los valores promedio de glicemia y creatinina fueron similares en ambos grupos, pero los casos tuvieron hemoglobina y recuento de plaquetas menores que los controles (p<0,05 y mayores niveles de nitrógeno ureico, aspartatoaminotransferasa y bilirrubinas total y directa (p<0,05. Las complicaciones encontradas fueron hiperparasitemia en 48%, disfunción hepática en 44%, síndrome de dificultad respiratoria aguda en 9%, falla renal en 6%, trombocitopenia grave en 5%, anemia grave en 3%, malaria cerebral en 3% e hipoglicemia grave en 2%. Los criterios de complicación malárica de OMS se comparan con otros y se discuten las implicaciones. Background: Latin American studies on severe falciparum malaria are scarce, therefore, the pattern of complications of the region is uknown. Objectives. To identify characterize severe malaria in patients from Tumaco (Nariño and Turbo (Antioquia in Colombia. Methods. The 2000 World Health Organization criteria for complicated malaria were applied in a cases and controls study. Results. 64 cases (P falciparum complicated malaria

  15. How well are malaria maps used to design and finance malaria control in Africa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy A Omumbo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rational decision making on malaria control depends on an understanding of the epidemiological risks and control measures. National Malaria Control Programmes across Africa have access to a range of state-of-the-art malaria risk mapping products that might serve their decision-making needs. The use of cartography in planning malaria control has never been methodically reviewed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An audit of the risk maps used by NMCPs in 47 malaria endemic countries in Africa was undertaken by examining the most recent national malaria strategies, monitoring and evaluation plans, malaria programme reviews and applications submitted to the Global Fund. The types of maps presented and how they have been used to define priorities for investment and control was investigated. RESULTS: 91% of endemic countries in Africa have defined malaria risk at sub-national levels using at least one risk map. The range of risk maps varies from maps based on suitability of climate for transmission; predicted malaria seasons and temperature/altitude limitations, to representations of clinical data and modelled parasite prevalence. The choice of maps is influenced by the source of the information. Maps developed using national data through in-country research partnerships have greater utility than more readily accessible web-based options developed without inputs from national control programmes. Although almost all countries have stratification maps, only a few use them to guide decisions on the selection of interventions allocation of resources for malaria control. CONCLUSION: The way information on the epidemiology of malaria is presented and used needs to be addressed to ensure evidence-based added value in planning control. The science on modelled impact of interventions must be integrated into new mapping products to allow a translation of risk into rational decision making for malaria control. As overseas and domestic funding diminishes

  16. Acceptability by community health workers in Senegal of combining community case management of malaria and seasonal malaria chemoprevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tine, Roger Ck; Ndiaye, Pascal; Ndour, Cheikh T;

    2013-01-01

    Community case management of malaria (CCMm) and seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) are anti-malarial interventions that can lead to substantial reduction in malaria burden acting in synergy. However, little is known about the social acceptability of these interventions. A study was undertaken...... to assess whether combining the interventions would be an acceptable approach to malaria control for community health workers (CHWs)....

  17. Effective Program Management: A Cornerstone of Malaria Elimination

    OpenAIRE

    Gosling, J; Case, P; Tulloch, J; Chandramohan, D.; Wegbreit, J; Newby, G; Gueye, CS; Koita, K; Gosling, R.

    2015-01-01

    Effective program management is essential for successful elimination of malaria. In this perspective article, evidence surrounding malaria program management is reviewed by management science and malaria experts through a literature search of published and unpublished gray documents and key informant interviews. Program management in a malaria elimination setting differs from that in a malaria control setting in a number of ways, although knowledge and understanding of these distinctions are ...

  18. [The ABCD of malaria prevention in pediatric travelers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberian, Griselda; Rosanova, M Teresa; Torroija, Cecilia; Praino, M Laura

    2014-10-01

    The development and spread of drug resistant malaria parasites, population and travelers movements to malaria zones have led to the resurgence of malaria as a global health problem. Estimates suggest that 660,000 deaths occur annually, mainly in infants, children and pregnant woman. Disease knowledge and protection against mosquito bites are the first line of defense against malaria. Malaria chemoprophylaxis adds to these measures, it must be evaluated based on the individual risk.

  19. Spatial Patterns of Malaria Reported Deaths in Yunnan Province, China

    OpenAIRE

    Bi, Yan; Hu, Wenbiao; Yang, Henling; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Yu, Weiwei; Guo, Yuming; Tong, Shilu

    2013-01-01

    Malaria has been a heavy social and health burden in the remote and poor areas in southern China. Analyses of malaria epidemic patterns can uncover important features of malaria transmission. This study identified spatial clusters, seasonal patterns, and geographic variations of malaria deaths at a county level in Yunnan, China, during 1991–2010. A discrete Poisson model was used to identify purely spatial clusters of malaria deaths. Logistic regression analysis was performed to detect change...

  20. Cerebral abscess in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cerebral abscess (CA) is a focal, infectious process only or multiple, located in the cerebral parenchyma that produces tisular lysis and it behaves like a lesion of space occupative, being a suppurative illness, who origin is a distant infection, or for continuity that studies initially as an area of focal cerebritis and it is developed to a collection surrounded purulent. At the moment they are perfecting technical and protocols diagnoses and therapeutic and measures for allow to control the natural history of the illness, making from the confrontation to this pathology a necessarily interdisciplinary complicated art, stiller in the infantile population, due to their difficulty in the diagnosis and the relevance of the same one. The paper includes epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, localization, pathology, clinic, diagnoses, treatment and diagnostic images

  1. Cerebral hemodynamics in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hachinski, V C; Olesen, Jes; Norris, J W;

    1977-01-01

    Clinical and angiographic findings in migraine are briefly reviewed in relation to cerebral hemodynamic changes shown by regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies. Three cases of migraine studied by the intracarotid xenon 133 method during attacks are reported. In classic migraine, with typical...... prodromal symptoms, a decrease in cerebral blood flow has been demonstrated during the aura. Occasionally, this flow decrease persists during the headache phase. In common migraine, where such prodromata are not seen, a flow decrease has not been demonstrated. During the headache phase of both types...... of migraine, rCBF has usually been found to be normal or in the high range of normal values. The high values may represent postischemic hyperemia, but are probably more frequently secondary to arousal caused by pain. Thus, during the headache phase rCBF may be subnormal, normal or high. These findings do...

  2. Control of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Mohammed Baba; Hasan, Yahya Abu; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2015-10-01

    The most significant and efficient measures against Plasmodium knowlesi outbreaks are efficient anti malaria drug, biological control in form of predatory mosquitoes and culling control strategies. In this paper optimal control theory is applied to a system of ordinary differential equation. It describes the disease transmission and Pontryagin's Maximum Principle is applied for analysis of the control. To this end, three control strategies representing biological control, culling and treatment were incorporated into the disease transmission model. The simulation results show that the implementation of the combination strategy during the epidemic is the most cost-effective strategy for disease transmission.

  3. Cerebral fat embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of cerebral fat embolism is reported. A 18-year-old patient with multiple bone fractures was in semiconma immediately after an injury. Brain CT showed no brain swelling or intracranial hematoma. Hypoxemia and alcoholemia were noted on admission, which returned to normal without improvement of consciousness level. In addition, respiratory symptoms with positive radiographic changes, tachycardia, pyrexia, sudden drop in hemoglobin level, and sudden thrombocytopenia developed. These symptoms were compatible with Gurd's criteria of systemic fat embolism. Eight days after injury, multiple low density areas appeared on CT and disappeared within the subsequent two weeks, and subdural effusion with cerebral atrophy developed. These CT findings were not considered due to cerebral trauma. Diagnosis of cerebral fat embolism was made. The subdural effusion was drained. Neurologic and pulmonary recoveries took place slowly and one month following the injury the patient became alert and exhibited fully coordinated limb movement. The CT scans of the present case well corresponded with hitherto reported pathological findings. Petechiae in the white matter must have developed on the day of injury, which could not be detected by CT examination. It is suggested that some petechial regions fused to purpuras and then gradually resolved when they were detected as multiple low density areas on CT. CT in the purpuras phase would have shown these lesions as high density areas. These lesions must have healed with formation of tiny scars and blood pigment which were demonstrated as the disappearance of multiple low density areas by CT examination. Cerebral atrophy and subsequent subdural effusion developed as a result of demyelination. The patient took the typical clinical course of cerebral fat embolism and serial CT scans served for its assessment. (author)

  4. Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia due to occlusion of a major cerebral artery is the cause of ischemic stroke which is a major reason of mortality, morbidity and disability in the populations of the developed countries. In the seven studies summarized in the thesis focal ischemia in rats induced by occlusion......-PBN on the periinfarct depolarizations and infarct volume was investigated. In study number six, the activity of the mitochondrial electron transport complexes I, II and IV was evaluated histochemically during reperfusion after MCAO in order to assess the possible role of mitochondrial dysfunction in focal ischemic...

  5. Evaluation of Diagnos Malaria Stix test (antigen detection assay) for diagnosis of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Haris M; Shujatullah, Fatima; Shahid, M; Raza, Adil; Malik, Ritu

    2010-06-01

    Malaria is one of the most common parasitic infection in India. The diagnosis largely depends on peripheral blood smear examination. Newer diagnostic methods like various antigen detection assays are now in use for prompt diagnosis and treatment. This study was done to determine the effectiveness of Diagnos Malaria Stix (antigen detection) assay in diagnosis of malaria. This involves detection of PfHRP-2 antigen and P.V. specific pLDH antigen. 162 patients with signs and symptoms of malaria included in the study. Leishman stained blood smear examination was done for all patients. Commercially available Diagnos Malaria Stix assay was used. Diagnos Malaria Stix showed sensitivity, specificity positive and negative predictive values of 100% each while Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of Leishman stained blood smear examination were 45.45%, 100%, 100% and 92% respectively. PMID:22471175

  6. Hydrological and geomorphological controls of malaria transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. W.; Macklin, M. G.; Thomas, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria risk is linked inextricably to the hydrological and geomorphological processes that form vector breeding sites. Yet environmental controls of malaria transmission are often represented by temperature and rainfall amounts, ignoring hydrological and geomorphological influences altogether. Continental-scale studies incorporate hydrology implicitly through simple minimum rainfall thresholds, while community-scale coupled hydrological and entomological models do not represent the actual diversity of the mosquito vector breeding sites. The greatest range of malaria transmission responses to environmental factors is observed at the catchment scale where seemingly contradictory associations between rainfall and malaria risk can be explained by hydrological and geomorphological processes that govern surface water body formation and persistence. This paper extends recent efforts to incorporate ecological factors into malaria-risk models, proposing that the same detailed representation be afforded to hydrological and, at longer timescales relevant for predictions of climate change impacts, geomorphological processes. We review existing representations of environmental controls of malaria and identify a range of hydrologically distinct vector breeding sites from existing literature. We illustrate the potential complexity of interactions among hydrology, geomorphology and vector breeding sites by classifying a range of water bodies observed in a catchment in East Africa. Crucially, the mechanisms driving surface water body formation and destruction must be considered explicitly if we are to produce dynamic spatial models of malaria risk at catchment scales.

  7. [Malaria in the Republic of Tajikistan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, S P

    2000-01-01

    There were 200-300 malaria cases registered annually in the republic up to 1992. Due to civil war, interruption of antimalarial control measures and mass returning of refugees from Afghanistan epidemiological situation deteriorated since 1994. In 1997, 29,794 malaria cases were officially registered. Estimated number of cases were 200,000-500,000. There were local transmission of falciparum malaria. Since 1998, Tadjikistan receives financial support from Japan, Italy, Norway, and technical support from WHO. National Programme of malaria control has been designed and adopted by the Government in 1997. Laboratory diagnostics of malaria was implemented. Network of special antimalarial centres were established on central, regional and district levels. Mass treatment of population with primaquine and indoor residual spaying with piretroid have been performed in 1998 and 1999. In 1998, there were 19,351 malaria cases of which 10,268 were microscopically confirmed. During 6 months of 1999 2531 malaria cases were registered, 2246 among them were microscopically confirmed. PMID:10900917

  8. Cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following various cerebral diseases, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients having cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following hypoglycemia, cerebral contusion, or cerebral hypoxia including cerebrovascular disorders were reported. Description was made as to cerebral changes visualized on CT images and clinical courses of a patient who revived 10 minutes after heart stoppage during neurosurgery, a newborn with asphyxia, a patient with hypoglycemia, a patient who suffered from asphyxia by an accident 10 years before, a patient with carbon monoxide poisoning at an acute stage, a patient who had carbon monoxide poisoning 10 years before, a patient with diffuse cerebral ischemic changes, a patient with cerebral edema around metastatic tumor, a patient with respiration brain, a patient with neurological sequelae after cerebral contusion, a patient who had an operation to excise right parietal lobe artery malformation, and a patient who was shooted by a machine gun and had a lead in the brain for 34 years. (Tsunoda, M.)

  9. Extensive introgression in a malaria vector species complex revealed by phylogenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Michael C.; Pease, James B.; Steele, Aaron; Waterhouse, Robert M.; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Sharakhov, Igor V.; Jiang, Xiaofang; Hall, Andrew B.; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Kakani, Evdoxia; Mitchell, Sara N.; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Smith, Hilary A.; Love, R. Rebecca; Lawniczak, Mara K.; Slotman, Michel A.; Emrich, Scott J.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Besansky, Nora J.

    2015-01-01

    Introgressive hybridization is now recognized as a widespread phenomenon, but its role in evolution remains contested. Here we use newly available reference genome assemblies to investigate phylogenetic relationships and introgression in a medically important group of Afrotropical mosquito sibling species. We have identified the correct species branching order to resolve a contentious phylogeny, and show that lineages leading to the principal vectors of human malaria were among the first to split. Pervasive autosomal introgression between these malaria vectors means that only a small fraction of the genome, mainly on the X chromosome, has not crossed species boundaries. Our results suggest that traits enhancing vectorial capacity may be gained through interspecific gene flow, including between non-sister species. PMID:25431491

  10. When does lasing become a condensation phenomenon?

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Baruch

    2012-01-01

    We present a generic classical light condensation (LC) phenomenon in linear photonic mode systems, such as cw laser cavities, in a noisy environment (spontaneous emission, etc.), based on weighting the modes in a loss-gain scale rather than in photon energy. It is characterized by a sharp transition from multi- to single-mode oscillation. The study uses a linear multivariate Langevin formulation which gives a mode occupation hierarchy that functions like Bose-Einstein statistics. We find that condensation occurs when the spectral filtering has near the lowest loss mode a power law dependence with exponent smaller than 1. We then discuss how and when condensation occurs in photon systems, how it relates to lasing, and the difficulties to observe regular photon Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in laser cavities. We raise the possibility that recent experiments on photon condensation in optical cavities fall in a classical LC or lasing category rather than being a thermal-quantum BEC phenomenon.

  11. Dissymmetric flow phenomenon in a multistrand tundish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The dissymmetric flow phenomenon exists in a symmetric multistrand tundish. It was studied by the physical simulation experiment. The fundamental flow characteristic of dissymmetry was analyzed. The asymmetry of the flow field, the temperature field, and the inclusions distribution without flow-control devices (FCDs) were compared with those with FCDs. It is proved that the asymmetry of the flow and temperature field along the outlets at the long range is more obvious. The symmetric FCDs installation has a slight effect on the dissymmetric temperature field, simultaneously, the symmetry of the average residence time and the fluid flow pattern has improved, and the fluid flow in the tundish has been more reasonable. In case of a symmetric multistrand tundish having a large volume, the influence of the dissymmetric phenomenon should be considered and the flow behaviors in the whole tundish should be studied completely.

  12. The phenomenon of fluorescence in immunosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłos-Witkowska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of fluorescence in immunosensors is described in this paper. Both structure and characteristics of biosensors and immunosensors are presented. Types of immunosensors and the response of bioreceptor layers to the reaction with analytes as well as measurements of electrochemical, piezoelectric and optical parameters in immunosensors are also presented. In addition, detection techniques used in studies of optical immunosensors based on light-matter interactions (absorbance, reflectance, dispersion, emission) such as: UV/VIS spectroscopy, reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfs), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), optical waveguide light-mode spectroscopy (OWLS), fluorescence spectroscopy. The phenomenon of fluorescence in immunosensors and standard configurations of immunoreactions between an antigen and an antibody (direct, competitive, sandwich, displacement) is described. Fluorescence parameters taken into account in analyses and fluorescence detection techniques used in research of immunosensors are presented. Examples of immunosensor applications are given. PMID:27192088

  13. Multiple steady state phenomenon in martensitic transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the basic facts that the martensitic transformation is a physical phenomenon which occurs in non-equilibrium conditions and there exists the feedback mechanism in the martensitic transformation, the dynamical processes of the isothermal and athermal martensitic transformations were analyzed by using nonlinear theory and a bifurcation theory model was established. It is shown that a multiple steady state phenomenon can take place as austenite is cooled, and the transitions of the steady state temperature between the branches of stable steady states can be considered the transformation from austenite to martensite. This model can estimate the starting temperature of the martensitic transformation and explain some experimental features of the martensitic transformation such as the effects of cooling rate, fluctuation and austenitic grain size on the martensitic transformation.

  14. Diffusion phenomenon for linear dissipative wave equations

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we prove the diffusion phenomenon for the linear wave equation. To derive the diffusion phenomenon, a new method is used. In fact, for initial data in some weighted spaces, we prove that for {equation presented} decays with the rate {equation presented} [0,1] faster than that of either u or v, where u is the solution of the linear wave equation with initial data {equation presented} [0,1], and v is the solution of the related heat equation with initial data v 0 = u 0 + u 1. This result improves the result in H. Yang and A. Milani [Bull. Sci. Math. 124 (2000), 415-433] in the sense that, under the above restriction on the initial data, the decay rate given in that paper can be improved by t -γ/2. © European Mathematical Society.

  15. Prevalence of Malaria Plasmodium in Abeokuta, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okonko, I. O.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the prevalence of malaria caused by plasmodium between genders in Abeokuta, the capital city of Ogun State located in the forest zone of southwestern Nigeria between January 2002 and December 2004. Blood film examination for malaria parasites in 708 patients; 366 males and 342 females. Microscopic examination of thick films techniques was employed for this study. Of the 708 (100% patients examined, 577 (81.5% were Plasmodium-positive. A high malaria parasite prevalence rate of 81.5% was noted in this study. Female subjects were more infected (42.4% than males (41.9% however, there was no significant difference in the sex of the subjects studied (p=0.05. A high malaria parasite prevalence rate of 86.9% was noted in samples collected in year 2003 than in other years studied. There was significant difference in the years under study (p=0.05. This study shows that a good percentage of people were infested by malaria Plasmodium. This could be attributed to lack of adequate accommodation and poor sanitary conditions in the area under study. Although several efforts have been made to effectively control the high incidence of malaria in Nigeria, these have been largely unsuccessful due to a number of reasons such as irrigated urban agriculture which can be the malaria vector’s breeding ground in the city, stagnant gutters and swamps in our environment where mosquitoes breed in millions, and lack of political will and commitment of the government in its disease management program, low awareness of the magnitude of malaria problem, poor health practices by individuals and communities and resistance to drugs. Therefore, future interventions in Nigeria should be directed toward controlling malaria in the context of a moderate transmission setting; thus, large-scale distribution of insecticide-treated nets or widespread use of indoor residual spraying may be less cost-effective than enhanced surveillance with effective case management or

  16. Phenomenon, noumenon, and mind in Kant

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Rosas

    1996-01-01

    The Cartesian substantial dualism and the mind-body problem provoked in the Modern Times a monist reaction that eliminated the ontological dualist interaction and conceived the problem as a conflict between explanatory discourses. Kant introduces the distinction between phenomenon and noumenon as one of perspective, with the intention of solving the conflict between materialist and mentalist explanations. However, he does not consistently place the mind in the noumenic perspective and thus bl...

  17. Earnings Management: Obvious Phenomenon in Albanian Market

    OpenAIRE

    Teuta Llukani; Vjollca Karapici

    2013-01-01

    Fiscal earnings, measures the performance of the company during the financial year. Motivated by different factors such as those related to the capital market, contractual motives etc, managers can manipulate earnings, increasing or reducing them and this phenomenon is recognized as “earnings management”. If we accept that the initiatives of “earnings management” lead to distortion of the financial results, it means that financial reports can be considered as poor quality reports, and financi...

  18. THE PHENOMENON OF MIGRATION. OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen BOGHEAN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Migration is not a new phenomenon, neither for Europe, nor for the entire world and it exists since the beginning of mankind. Over time, this kind of international mobility generated many opportunities, but many challenges as well. Being an extremely important and complex phenomenon, both in economic terms and mostly from the social perspective, mass emigration has never been more intense as nowadays. Together with this particular complexity, the intensity of the migration phenomenon reveals each individual’s profound freedom desire, but also the acute need to ensure a better future for himself and especially for his family. Currently, an ever increasing number of individuals migrate in search of a better place, changing regions, countries or even continents. Witnessing the events that transcend the people all around the world, we consider that migration generates economic, social and cultural, but also political profound changes. These major changes require the involvement of the political actors, namely the governments, in creating a favorable and reliable framework so as the society and decision makers to understand that immigrants represent an opportunity for the emerging economies and not a phenomenon that should be criticized. In this paper we aim to follow the theories regarding the migration process, as well as the changes it generates, taking into consideration that of the 507 million current inhabitants of the EU, approximately 20 million are from countries outside the EU. We consider this research to be underlain, taking into consideration that regardless of the form it takes, in Europe immigration is and will remain a difficult to manage reality.

  19. 2. The Central American gang phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Does, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    2.1. Differentiating between pandillas and maras Youth gangs have existed since the 1960s and 1970s in Central America. However, there are different types of Central American gangs and thus one has to distinguish between pandillas and maras. The former are localized, homegrown gangs, which are “direct inheritors” (Jütersonke, Rodgers & Muggah 2009: 379) of the gangs that have historically characterized Central American societies, while the latter are a more recent phenomenon with transnationa...

  20. Prebiotic homochirality as a critical phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Thorarinson, Joel

    2006-12-01

    The development of prebiotic homochirality on early-Earth or another planetary platform may be viewed as a critical phenomenon. It is shown, in the context of spatio-temporal polymerization reaction networks, that environmental effects--be they temperature surges or other external disruptions--may destroy any net chirality previously produced. In order to understand the emergence of prebiotic homochirality it is important to model the coupling of polymerization reaction networks to different planetary environments. PMID:17120129

  1. Prebiotic Homochirality as a Critical Phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Gleiser, M; Gleiser, Marcelo; Thorarinson, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The development of prebiotic homochirality on early-Earth or another planetary platform may be viewed as a critical phenomenon. It is shown, in the context of spatio-temporal polymerization reaction networks, that environmental effects -- be them temperature surges or other external disruptions -- may destroy any net chirality previously produced. In order to understand the emergence of prebiotic homochirality it is important to model the coupling of polymerization reaction networks to different planetary environments.

  2. Tax Culture as Tax Administration Staff Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Viktor Synchak

    2013-01-01

    The concept of the tax culture has been grounded. Various approaches to the tax culture have been highlighted. The ambiguous aspects of the tax culture approaches and interpretation have been pointed out. The authors have also given the definition of the tax body officials' culture. The tax culture has been defined as a special kind of tax service employee's culture. The necessity of the tax culture phenomenon to be familiarized with by every tax official prior to their employment has been pr...

  3. Multiplayer computer games as youth's leisure phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    HADERKOVÁ, Barbora

    2016-01-01

    The thesis is dedicated to multiplayer computer games as youth's leisure phenomenon of this time. The theoretical part is focused on computer games history, multiplayer computer games and their types, gaming platforms, community of multiplayer games players and potential negatives and positives, which follows from playing this type of games. The practical part contains a qualitative survey using interviews with multiplayer computer games players aged from 15 to 26 years from city of České Bud...

  4. Animal Rights as a Mainstream Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Rollin, Bernard E.

    2011-01-01

    Simple Summary The twentieth century has witnessed a bewildering array of ethical revolutions, from civil rights to environmentalism to feminism. Often ignored is the rise of massive societal concern across the world regarding animal treatment. Regulation of animal research exists in virtually all western countries, and reform of “factory farming” is regnant in Europe and rapidly emerging in the United States. Opponents of concern for animals often dismiss the phenomenon as rooted in emotion ...

  5. Cyberbullying as a modern phenomenon of ICT

    OpenAIRE

    Vlk, Jan

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor work summarizes the problem known as cyberbullying. It is a problem about last two decades, coupled with the rapid development of communication technology and the rapprochement of communications equipment to children and youth. Cyberbullying is the phenomenon of limiting user rights through the Internet. Typically it is the ridicule, humiliation and reducing of user dignity. The work monitors cyberbullying from the perspective of the aggressor (producer) and victims. The proces...

  6. Prebiotic Homochirality as a Critical Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Thorarinson, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The development of prebiotic homochirality on early-Earth or another planetary platform may be viewed as a critical phenomenon. It is shown, in the context of spatio-temporal polymerization reaction networks, that environmental effects -- be them temperature surges or other external disruptions -- may destroy any net chirality previously produced. In order to understand the emergence of prebiotic homochirality it is important to model the coupling of polymerization reaction networks to differ...

  7. Glomus Tumor Presenting as Raynaud's Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Abdelrahman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomus tumors are rare tumors that often include hands and feet; they present characteristically with paroxysmal pain, exquisite point tenderness, and cold sensitivity. Such diagnosis needs to be confirmed by imaging like ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for glomus tumors. There are only few case reports of glomus tumors in association with Raynaud’s phenomenon; this is considered to be the 4th case.

  8. THE LUXURY PHENOMENON - THE GLOBALIZATION OF VARIETY

    OpenAIRE

    Murali Murti

    2010-01-01

    Our contemporary understanding of globalization is an increasing interlinking and interdependence of national economies within a global economy. This view of globalization has become associated with large corporations driven by their own immediate self-interests. This process is seen as leading to an increasingly homogenous global culture. This can be described as the globalization of uniformity. The globalization of uniformity is most often identified with the phenomenon of outsourcing, and ...

  9. Reappraisal of known malaria resistance loci in a large multi-centre study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockett, Kirk A.; Clarke, Geraldine M.; Fitzpatrick, Kathryn; Hubbart, Christina; Jeffreys, Anna E.; Rowlands, Kate; Craik, Rachel; Jallow, Muminatou; Conway, David J.; Bojang, Kalifa A.; Pinder, Margaret; Usen, Stanley; Sisay-Joof, Fatoumatta; Sirugo, Giorgio; Toure, Ousmane; Thera, Mahamadou A.; Konate, Salimata; Sissoko, Sibiry; Niangaly, Amadou; Poudiougou, Belco; Mangano, Valentina D.; Bougouma, Edith C.; Sirima, Sodiomon B.; Modiano, David; Amenga-Etego, Lucas N.; Ghansah, Anita; Koram, Kwadwo A.; Wilson, Michael D.; Enimil, Anthony; Evans, Jennifer; Amodu, Olukemi; Olaniyan, Subulade; Apinjoh, Tobias; Mugri, Regina; Ndi, Andre; Ndila, Carolyne M.; Uyoga, Sophie; Macharia, Alexander; Peshu, Norbert; Williams, Thomas N.; Manjurano, Alphaxard; Riley, Eleanor; Drakeley, Chris; Reyburn, Hugh; Nyirongo, Vysaul; Kachala, David; Molyneux, Malcolm; Dunstan, Sarah J.; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Ngoc Quyen, Nguyen Thi; Thai, Cao Quang; Hien, Tran Tinh; Manning, Laurens; Laman, Moses; Siba, Peter; Karunajeewa, Harin; Allen, Steve; Allen, Angela; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Michon, Pascal; Mueller, Ivo; Green, Angie; Molloy, Sile; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Kerasidou, Angeliki; Cornelius, Victoria; Hart, Lee; Vanderwal, Aaron; SanJoaquin, Miguel; Band, Gavin; Le, Si Quang; Pirinen, Matti; Sepúlveda, Nuno; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Clark, Taane G.; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Achidi, Eric; Doumbo, Ogobara; Farrar, Jeremy; Marsh, Kevin; Taylor, Terrie; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.

    2015-01-01

    Many human genetic associations with resistance to malaria have been reported but few have been reliably replicated. We collected data on 11,890 cases of severe malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum and 17,441 controls from 12 locations in Africa, Asia and Oceania. There was strong evidence of association with the HBB, ABO, ATP2B4, G6PD and CD40LG loci but previously reported associations at 22 other loci did not replicate in the multi-centre analysis. The large sample size made it possible to identify authentic genetic effects that are heterogeneous across populations or phenotypes, a striking example being the main African form of G6PD deficiency, which reduced the risk of cerebral malaria but increased the risk of severe malarial anaemia. The finding that G6PD deficiency has opposing effects on different fatal complications of P. falciparum infection indicates that the evolutionary origins of this common human genetic disorder are more complex than previously supposed. PMID:25261933

  10. Deletion of a malaria invasion gene reduces death and anemia, in model hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noé D Gómez

    Full Text Available Malaria parasites induce complex cellular and clinical phenotypes, including anemia, cerebral malaria and death in a wide range of mammalian hosts. Host genes and parasite 'toxins' have been implicated in malarial disease, but the contribution of parasite genes remains to be fully defined. Here we assess disease in BALB/c mice and Wistar rats infected by the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei with a gene knock out for merozoite surface protein (MSP 7. MSP7 is not essential for infection but in P. falciparum, it enhances erythrocyte invasion by 20%. In vivo, as compared to wild type, the P. berghei Δmsp7 mutant is associated with an abrogation of death and a decrease from 3% to 2% in peak, circulating parasitemia. The Δmsp7 mutant is also associated with less anemia and modest increase in the size of follicles in the spleen. Together these data show that deletion of a single parasite invasion ligand modulates blood stage disease, as measured by death and anemia. This work is the first to assess the contribution of a gene present in all plasmodial species in severe disease.

  11. Malaria infection has spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal heterogeneity in unstable malaria transmission areas in northwest Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassahun Alemu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria elimination requires successful nationwide control efforts. Detecting the spatiotemporal distribution and mapping high-risk areas are useful to effectively target pockets of malaria endemic regions for interventions. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to identify patterns of malaria distribution by space and time in unstable malaria transmission areas in northwest Ethiopia. METHODS: Data were retrieved from the monthly reports stored in the district malaria offices for the period between 2003 and 2012. Eighteen districts in the highland and fringe malaria areas were included and geo-coded for the purpose of this study. The spatial data were created in ArcGIS10 for each district. The Poisson model was used by applying Kulldorff methods using the SaTScan™ software to analyze the purely temporal, spatial and space-time clusters of malaria at a district levels. RESULTS: The study revealed that malaria case distribution has spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal heterogeneity in unstable transmission areas. Most likely spatial malaria clusters were detected at Dera, Fogera, Farta, Libokemkem and Misrak Este districts (LLR =197764.1, p<0.001. Significant spatiotemporal malaria clusters were detected at Dera, Fogera, Farta, Libokemkem and Misrak Este districts (LLR=197764.1, p<0.001 between 2003/1/1 and 2012/12/31. A temporal scan statistics identified two high risk periods from 2009/1/1 to 2010/12/31 (LLR=72490.5, p<0.001 and from 2003/1/1 to 2005/12/31 (LLR=26988.7, p<0.001. CONCLUSION: In unstable malaria transmission areas, detecting and considering the spatiotemporal heterogeneity would be useful to strengthen malaria control efforts and ultimately achieve elimination.

  12. Modeling the risk of malaria for travelers to areas with stable malaria transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Burattini Marcelo N.; Behrens Ronald H; Massad Eduardo; Coutinho Francisco AB

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Malaria is an important threat to travelers visiting endemic regions. The risk of acquiring malaria is complex and a number of factors including transmission intensity, duration of exposure, season of the year and use of chemoprophylaxis have to be taken into account estimating risk. Materials and methods A mathematical model was developed to estimate the risk of non-immune individual acquiring falciparum malaria when traveling to the Amazon region of Brazil. The risk of m...

  13. Doxycycline for Malaria Chemoprophylaxis and Treatment: Report from the CDC Expert Meeting on Malaria Chemoprophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Kathrine R.; Magill, Alan J; Parise, Monica E.; Arguin, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    Doxycycline, a synthetically derived tetracycline, is a partially efficacious causal prophylactic (liver stage of Plasmodium) drug and a slow acting blood schizontocidal agent highly effective for the prevention of malaria. When used in conjunction with a fast acting schizontocidal agent, it is also highly effective for malaria treatment. Doxycycline is especially useful as a prophylaxis in areas with chloroquine and multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Although not recommended ...

  14. High proportion of knowlesi malaria in recent malaria cases in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Yusof, Ruhani; Lau, Yee Ling; Mahmud, Rohela; Fong, Mun Yik; Jelip, Jenarun; Ngian, Hie Ung; Mustakim, Sahlawati; Mat Hussin, Hani; Marzuki, Noradilah; Mohd Ali, Marlindawati

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasmodium knowlesi is a simian parasite that has been recognized as the fifth species causing human malaria. Naturally-acquired P. knowlesi infection is widespread among human populations in Southeast Asia. The aim of this epidemiological study was to determine the incidence and distribution of malaria parasites, with a particular focus on human P. knowlesi infection in Malaysia. Methods A total of 457 microscopically confirmed, malaria-positive blood samples were collected from 2...

  15. Malaria vaccine-is it still required? Are vaccine alternatives enough to achieve malaria control?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fsadni Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Despite ongoing continuous research towards developing a malaria vaccine, we have still not achieved this target and the malaria parasite continues to kill thousands, especially children in developing countries. However, current control methods have had good results in some countries. Can these control methods be enough or should people still keep hoping for a vaccine? Would eradication of malaria be a possibility if no vaccine remains available?

  16. RISK FOR MALARIA IN UNITED STATES DONORS DEFERRED FOR TRAVEL TO MALARIA-ENDEMIC AREAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Bryan; Steele, Whitney; Custer, Brian; Kleinman, Steven; Cable, Ritchard; Wilkinson, Susan; Wright, David

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Deferral for travel to malaria-endemic areas excludes many blood donors in the United States. Most transfusion-transmitted malaria is associated with lengthy residence in malaria-endemic areas rather than routine travel. This study compares the impact of existing deferral requirements to the risk that a presenting donor with malaria travel history harbors malaria parasites under current and hypothetical alternate regulations. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Deferred donors from six blood centers were sampled to estimate a national cohort of donors deferred annually for malaria travel to different geographic regions. Risk for malaria infection following travel to each region, and distribution of incubation periods for each malaria species were estimated for U.S. travelers. Region-specific travel risks were used to estimate the risk that a presenting blood donor with malaria travel might asymptomatically harbor malaria parasites at different intervals following return to the United States. RESULTS Travel to Africa presents risk for malaria infection >1000 times that of travel to malaria-endemic parts of Mexico, yet Mexico accounts for >10 times as many deferred donors. Shortening the deferral period from 12 to 3 months for travelers to Mexico increases the risk of collecting a contaminated unit by only 1 unit per 57 years (sensitivity analysis, 1 every 29 - 114 years), at annual gain of >56,000 donations. CONCLUSION This study provides the first systematic appraisal of the U.S. requirements for donor qualification regarding travel to malarial areas. Consideration should be given to relaxing the guidelines for travel to very low-risk areas such as Mexico. PMID:19903290

  17. Characterizing the phenomenon of radiation recall dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation recall represents the 'recalling' of an effect similar in appearance to that of an acute radiation reaction in a previously irradiated field. The recall is triggered by the administration of certain drugs days to years after the exposure to ionizing radiation. This review focuses almost exclusively on the skin manifestations of radiation recall to assemble the largest data base upon which to discuss this rare phenomenon. No absolute radiation dose threshold is apparent, but rather an interplay between dose and time before drug exposure seems to affect both the risk and speed of onset of recall. Recall usually occurs on first exposure to a particular recall-triggering drug. The skin reaction develops within minutes to days. The time to develop the reaction may be slightly longer for oral than intravenously administered drugs reflecting their bioavailability. Most drugs associated with recall are cytotoxics, but several other drugs may elicit the phenomenon. Individuals exposed to a number of potentially recall-triggering drugs reveal the marked drug specificity characteristic of the phenomenon. Skin reactions usually settle within a few days of stopping the triggering drug. The role of steroids or anti-histamines in affecting resolution is unclear. Drug rechallenge tends to produce either only a mild recurrence or no recurrence of recall. Steroids or dose reduction may favour uneventful rechallenge. A number of aetiological hypotheses on radiation recall exist. Using the available evidence these hypotheses are critically reviewed and a novel hypothesis based on radiation affecting local cutaneous immunological responses proposed

  18. Management of imported malaria in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askling Helena H

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this position paper, the European Society for Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Study Group on Clinical Parasitology, summarizes main issues regarding the management of imported malaria cases. Malaria is a rare diagnosis in Europe, but it is a medical emergency. A travel history is the key to suspecting malaria and is mandatory in patients with fever. There are no specific clinical signs or symptoms of malaria although fever is seen in almost all non-immune patients. Migrants from malaria endemic areas may have few symptoms. Malaria diagnostics should be performed immediately on suspicion of malaria and the gold- standard is microscopy of Giemsa-stained thick and thin blood films. A Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT may be used as an initial screening tool, but does not replace urgent microscopy which should be done in parallel. Delays in microscopy, however, should not lead to delayed initiation of appropriate treatment. Patients diagnosed with malaria should usually be hospitalized. If outpatient management is preferred, as is the practice in some European centres, patients must usually be followed closely (at least daily until clinical and parasitological cure. Treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria is either with oral artemisinin combination therapy (ACT or with the combination atovaquone/proguanil. Two forms of ACT are available in Europe: artemether/lumefantrine and dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine. ACT is also effective against Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium knowlesi, but these species can be treated with chloroquine. Treatment of persistent liver forms in P. vivax and P. ovale with primaquine is indicated after excluding glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. There are modified schedules and drug options for the treatment of malaria in special patient groups, such as children and pregnant women. The potential for drug interactions and the role of food in the

  19. Automated haematology analysis to diagnose malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grobusch Martin P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For more than a decade, flow cytometry-based automated haematology analysers have been studied for malaria diagnosis. Although current haematology analysers are not specifically designed to detect malaria-related abnormalities, most studies have found sensitivities that comply with WHO malaria-diagnostic guidelines, i.e. ≥ 95% in samples with > 100 parasites/μl. Establishing a correct and early malaria diagnosis is a prerequisite for an adequate treatment and to minimizing adverse outcomes. Expert light microscopy remains the 'gold standard' for malaria diagnosis in most clinical settings. However, it requires an explicit request from clinicians and has variable accuracy. Malaria diagnosis with flow cytometry-based haematology analysers could become an important adjuvant diagnostic tool in the routine laboratory work-up of febrile patients in or returning from malaria-endemic regions. Haematology analysers so far studied for malaria diagnosis are the Cell-Dyn®, Coulter® GEN·S and LH 750, and the Sysmex XE-2100® analysers. For Cell-Dyn analysers, abnormal depolarization events mainly in the lobularity/granularity and other scatter-plots, and various reticulocyte abnormalities have shown overall sensitivities and specificities of 49% to 97% and 61% to 100%, respectively. For the Coulter analysers, a 'malaria factor' using the monocyte and lymphocyte size standard deviations obtained by impedance detection has shown overall sensitivities and specificities of 82% to 98% and 72% to 94%, respectively. For the XE-2100, abnormal patterns in the DIFF, WBC/BASO, and RET-EXT scatter-plots, and pseudoeosinophilia and other abnormal haematological variables have been described, and multivariate diagnostic models have been designed with overall sensitivities and specificities of 86% to 97% and 81% to 98%, respectively. The accuracy for malaria diagnosis may vary according to species, parasite load, immunity and clinical context where the

  20. Malaria Pascabencana Alam di Kabupaten Nias Selatan

    OpenAIRE

    Siahaan, Lambok

    2010-01-01

    South of Nias regency is an endemic malaria in North Sumatera, that Monthly Malaria Incidence (MoMI) was 124,24% in 2005. The rise of MoMI was depend on alteration of several factors as the result of tectonic quake followed by tsunami, in December 26th 2004 and continuation earth quake in March 2005. The alteration made better natural environment for growth and development of vectors, included malaria vectors. Live as refugee in evacuation area and decrease of purchasing power, influenced imm...

  1. Clinical malaria in African pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aponte John

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a widespread notion, based on limited information, that in areas of stable malaria transmission most pregnant women with Plasmodium falciparum infection are asymptomatic. This study aim to characterize the clinical presentation of malaria in African pregnant women and to evaluate the adequacy of case management based on clinical complaints. Methods A hospital-based descriptive study between August 2003 and November 2005 was conducted at the maternity clinic of a rural hospital in Mozambique. All women attending the maternity clinic were invited to participate. A total of 2,330 women made 3,437 eligible visits, 3129 were analysed, the remainder were excluded because diagnostic results were unavailable or they were repeat visits. Women gave a standardized clinical history and had a medical exam. Malaria parasitaemia and haematocrit in capillary blood was determined for all women with signs or symptoms compatible with malaria including: presence and history of fever, arthromyalgias, headache, history of convulsions and pallor. Outcome measure was association of malaria symptoms or signs with positive blood slide for malaria parasitaemia. Results In 77.4% of visits pregnant women had symptoms suggestive of malaria; 23% (708/3129 were in the first trimester. Malaria parasitaemia was confirmed in 26.9% (842/3129 of visits. Headache, arthromyalgias and history of fever were the most common symptoms (86.5%, 74.8% and 65.4% presented, but their positive predictive values for malaria parasitaemia were low [28% (27–30, 29% (28–31, and 33% (31–35, respectively]. Conclusion Symptoms suggestive of malaria were very frequent among pregnant women attending a rural maternity clinic in an area of stable malaria transmission. However, less than a third of them were parasitaemic. In the absence of microscopy or rapid diagnostic tests, a large proportion of women, including those in the first trimester of gestation, would be

  2. Associations between maternal helminth and malaria infections in pregnancy, and clinical malaria in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndibazza, Juliet; Webb, Emily L; Lule, Swaib;

    2013-01-01

    %), Schistosoma mansoni (18%), and Plasmodium falciparum (11%). At age 5 years, 69% of the children were still under follow-up. The incidence of malaria was 34 episodes per 100 child-years, and the mean prevalence of asymptomatic malaria at annual visits was 5.4%. Maternal hookworm and M. perstans infections were...... associated with an increased rate of childhood clinical malaria (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.24 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10-1.41] and 1.20 [95% CI, 1.05-1.38], respectively). S. mansoni infection had no consistent association with childhood malaria.Conclusion. This is the first report...

  3. Knowledge of malaria and its association with malaria-related behaviors--results from the Malaria Indicator Survey, Ethiopia, 2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimee Hwang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2005, the Ministry of Health in Ethiopia launched a major effort to distribute over 20 million long-lasting insecticidal nets, provide universal access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACTs, and train 30,000 village-based health extension workers. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cross-sectional, nationally representative Malaria Indicator Survey was conducted during the malaria transmission season in 2007. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the effect of women's malaria knowledge on household ITN ownership and women's ITN use. In addition, we investigated the effect of mothers' malaria knowledge on their children under 5 years of age's (U5 ITN use and their access to fever treatment on behalf of their child U5. Malaria knowledge was based on a composite index about the causes, symptoms, danger signs and prevention of malaria. Approximately 67% of women (n=5,949 and mothers of children U5 (n=3,447 reported some knowledge of malaria. Women's knowledge of malaria was significantly associated with household ITN ownership (adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR]=2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-2.7 and with increased ITN use for themselves (aOR=1.8; 95% CI 1.3-2.5. Knowledge of malaria amongst mothers of children U5 was associated with ITN use for their children U5 (aOR=1.6; 95% CI 1.1-2.4, but not significantly associated with their children U5 seeking care for a fever. School attendance was a significant factor in women's ITN use (aOR=2.0; 95% CI 1.1-3.9, their children U5's ITN use (aOR=4.4; 95% CI 1.6-12.1, and their children U5 having sought treatment for a fever (aOR=6.5; 95% CI 1.9-22.9. CONCLUSIONS: Along with mass free distribution of ITNs and universal access to ACTs, delivery of targeted malaria educational information to women could improve ITN ownership and use. Efforts to control malaria could be influenced by progress towards broader goals of improving access to education, especially for women.

  4. A study of the TNF/LTA/LTB locus and susceptibility to severe malaria in highland papuan children and adults

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    Granger Donald L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe malaria (SM syndromes caused by Plasmodium falciparum infection result in major morbidity and mortality each year. However, only a fraction of P. falciparum infections develop into SM, implicating host genetic factors as important determinants of disease outcome. Previous studies indicate that tumour necrosis factor (TNF and lymphotoxin alpha (LTα may be important for the development of cerebral malaria (CM and other SM syndromes. Methods An extensive analysis was conducted of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the TNF, LTA and LTB genes in highland Papuan children and adults, a population historically unexposed to malaria that has migrated to a malaria endemic region. Generated P-values for SNPs spanning the LTA/TNF/LTB locus were corrected for multiple testing of all the SNPs and haplotype blocks within the region tested through 10,000 permutations. A global P-value of Results No associations between SNPs in the TNF/LTA/LTB locus and susceptibility to SM in highland Papuan children and adults were found. Conclusions These results support the notion that unique selective pressure on the TNF/LTA/LTB locus in different populations has influenced the contribution of the gene products from this region to SM susceptibility.

  5. The history of 20th century malaria control in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffing, Sean M; Gamboa, Dionicia; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2013-08-30

    Malaria has been part of Peruvian life since at least the 1500s. While Peru gave the world quinine, one of the first treatments for malaria, its history is pockmarked with endemic malaria and occasional epidemics. In this review, major increases in Peruvian malaria incidence over the past hundred years are described, as well as the human factors that have facilitated these events, and concerted private and governmental efforts to control malaria. Political support for malaria control has varied and unexpected events like vector and parasite resistance have adversely impacted morbidity and mortality. Though the ready availability of novel insecticides like DDT and efficacious medications reduced malaria to very low levels for a decade after the post eradication era, malaria reemerged as an important modern day challenge to Peruvian public health. Its reemergence sparked collaboration between domestic and international partners towards the elimination of malaria in Peru.

  6. Changing pattern of malaria in Bissau, Guinea Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Amabelia; Schellenberg, Joanna Armstrong; Kofoed, Poul-Erik;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiology of malaria in Guinea-Bissau, in view of the fact that more funds are available now for malaria control in the country. METHODS: From May 2003 to May 2004, surveillance for malaria was conducted among children less than 5 years of age at three health centres...... covering the study area of the Bandim Health Project (BHP) and at the outpatient clinic of the national hospital in Bissau. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted in the community in different malaria seasons. RESULTS: Malaria was overdiagnosed in both health centres and hospital. Sixty-four per cent of...... the children who presented at a health centre were clinically diagnosed with malaria, but only 13% of outpatient children who tested for malaria had malaria parasitaemia. Only 44% (963/2193) of children admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of malaria had parasitaemia. The proportion of positive cases...

  7. Placental Malaria in Colombia: Histopathologic Findings in Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Carmona-Fonseca, Jaime; Arango, Eliana; Maestre, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Studies on gestational malaria and placental malaria have been scarce in malaria-endemic areas of the Western Hemisphere. To describe the histopathology of placental malaria in Colombia, a longitudinal descriptive study was conducted. In this study, 179 placentas were studied by histologic analysis (112 with gestational malaria and 67 negative for malaria). Placental malaria was confirmed in 22.35%, 50.0% had previous infections, and 47.5% had acute infections. Typical malaria-associated chan...

  8. Recurrent cerebral thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuroradiological techniques were used to elucidate pathophysiology of recurrent cerebral thrombosis. Twenty-two patients with cerebral thrombosis who suffered a second attack under stable conditions more than 22 days after the initial stroke were studied. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia were also seen in 20, 8, and 12 patients, respectively. The patients were divided into three groups according to their symptoms: (I) symptoms differed between the first and second strokes (n=12); (II) initial symptoms were suddenly deteriorated (n=6); and (III) symptoms occurring in groups I and II were seen (n=4). In group I, contralateral hemiparesis or suprabulbar palsy was often associated with the initial hemiparesis. The time of recurrent stroke varied from 4 months to 9 years. CT and MRI showed not only lacunae in both hemispheres, but also deep white-matter ischemia of the centrum semi-ovale. In group II, hemiparesis or visual field defect was deteriorated early after the initial stroke. In addition, neuroimaging revealed that infarction in the posterior cerebral artery was progressed on the contralateral side, or that white matter lesion in the middle artery was enlarged in spite of small lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere. All patients in group III had deterioration of right hemiparesis associated with aphasia. CT, MRI, SPECT, and angiography indicated deep white-matter ischemia caused by main trunk lesions in the left hemisphere. Group III seemed to be equivalent to group II, except for laterality of the lesion. Neuroradiological assessment of the initial stroke may help to predict the mode of recurrence, although pathophysiology of cerebral thrombosis is complicated and varies from patient to patient. (N.K.)

  9. Evaluación del estres oxidativo en pacientes con malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Zuleta

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available

    El estrés oxidativo se define como un imbalance entre la generación de especies reactivas del oxígeno y la cantidad de enzimas y compuestos antioxidantes.

    En malaria, el estrés oxidativo se presenta con la generación aumentada de especies reactivas del oxígeno como anión superóxido, peróxido de hidrógeno, radical hidroxilo y peroxinitrito; éstas son producidas por el sistema inmune del hospedero con el objetivo de controlar la parasitemia y directamente por el parásito intraeritrocítico, cuando en la vacuola digestiva transforman la hemoglobina en metahemoglobina. La producción de especies reactivas del oxígeno en malaria se ha demostrado por la peroxidación lipídica en eritrocitos infectados con plasmodium durante la fase aguda de la infección, determinada por métodos indirectos como el incremento en los niveles del ácido tiobarbitúrico en eritrocitos infectados o por el incremento en los niveles de malondialdehido en pacientes con malaria cerebral y por la disminución en la cadena de ácidos grasos poliinsaturados en los eritrocitos infectados.

    El estrés oxidativo en malaria también se presenta con la disminución de enzimas y sustancias antioxidantes como la albúmina, el tocoferol plasmático, los niveles de enzimas como catalasa, glutatión peroxidasa y superóxido dismutasa en pacientes con malaria tanto causado por P. vivax como por P. falciparum. El estrés oxidativo en malaria se ha asociado con complicaciones como la malaria cerebral, porque las especies reactivas del oxígeno están involucradas en el daño del endotelio vascular del hospedero y con altas parasitemias en pacientes infectados con P. falciparum.

    Malaria and the Millennium Development Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Malaria, as a key disease of poverty, was singled out for special attention in the Millennium Project of 2000. Recent data suggest that malaria incidence and mortality are now declining all over the world. While these figures are cause for celebration, they must be interpreted carefully and with caution, particularly in relation to Africa. There are daunting challenges ahead for those working to achieve malaria eradication, not least of which is the poor quality of the data on which the work is based. In the absence of an affordable and fully effective vaccine, international funding for malaria control needs to be escalated still further. The money is essential to pay for universal access to a set of simple and proven interventions which would save the lives of millions of children over the next 15 years. PMID:25613970

  10. PATHOGENESIS OF MALARIA IN TISSUES AND BLOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Autino

    2012-10-01

    In the following pages, some of the pathogenetic aspects will be briefly reviewed and then data on selected and less frequent manifestation of severe malaria, such as liver or renal failure or ARDS will be discussed

  11. Spatial outline of malaria transmission in Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Barati; Hossein Keshavarz-valian; Majid Habibi-nokhandan; Ahmad Raeisi; Leyla Faraji; Abdoreza Salahi-moghaddam

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To conduct for modeling spatial distribution of malaria transmission in Iran. Methods: Records of all malaria cases from the period 2008-2010 in Iran were retrieved for malaria control department, MOH&ME. Metrological data including annual rainfall, maximum and minimum temperature, relative humidity, altitude, demographic, districts border shapefiles, and NDVI images received from Iranian Climatologic Research Center. Data arranged in ArcGIS. Results:Results: 99.65%of malaria transmission cases were focused in southeast part of Iran. These transmissions had statistically correlation with altitude (650 m), maximum (30℃), minimum (20℃) and average temperature (25.3℃). Statistical correlation and overall relationship between NDVI (118.81), relative humidity (≥45%) and rainfall in southeast area was defined and explained in this study. Conclusions: According to ecological condition and mentioned cut-off points, predictive map was generated using cokriging method.

  12. The Biological Control of the Malaria Vector

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    Layla Kamareddine

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The call for malaria control, over the last century, marked a new epoch in the history of this disease. Many control strategies targeting either the Plasmodium parasite or the Anopheles vector were shown to be effective. Yet, the emergence of drug resistant parasites and insecticide resistant mosquito strains, along with numerous health, environmental, and ecological side effects of many chemical agents, highlighted the need to develop alternative tools that either complement or substitute conventional malaria control approaches. The use of biological means is considered a fundamental part of the recently launched malaria eradication program and has so far shown promising results, although this approach is still in its infancy. This review presents an overview of the most promising biological control tools for malaria eradication, namely fungi, bacteria, larvivorous fish, parasites, viruses and nematodes.

  13. Malaria in pregnancy: pathogenesis and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogerson, Stephen J; Hviid, Lars; Duffy, Patrick E;

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of the biological basis for susceptibility to malaria in pregnancy was recently advanced by the discovery that erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum accumulate in the placenta through adhesion to molecules such as chondroitin sulphate A. Antibody recognition of placental...... infected erythrocytes is dependent on sex and gravidity, and could protect from malaria complications. Moreover, a conserved parasite gene-var2csa-has been associated with placental malaria, suggesting that its product might be an appropriate vaccine candidate. By contrast, our understanding of placental...... immunopathology and how this contributes to anaemia and low birthweight remains restricted, although inflammatory cytokines produced by T cells, macrophages, and other cells are clearly important. Studies that unravel the role of host response to malaria in pathology and protection in the placenta...

  14. Parálisis cerebral Cerebral palsy

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    Jorge Malagon Valdez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El término parálisis cerebral (PC engloba a un gran número de síndromes neurológicos clínicos, de etiología diversa. Estos síndromes se caracterizan por tener una sintomatología común: los trastornos motores. Algunos autores prefieren manejar términos como "encefalopatía fija", "encefalopatías no evolutivas". Se mencionan la utilidad de programas de intervención temprana y métodos especiales de rehabilitación, así como el manejo de las deficiencias asociadas como la epilepsia, deficiencia mental, trastornos del lenguaje, audición, visión, déficit de la atención que mejoran el pronóstico de manera significativa. El pronóstico también depende de la gravedad del padecimiento y de las manifestaciones asociadas.The term cerebral palsy (CP, is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the nonevolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations.

  15. Relationship between Antibody Levels, IgG Binding to Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes, and Disease Outcome in Hospitalized Urban Malaria Patients from Dakar, Sénégal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbengue, Babacar; Fall, Mouhamadou Mansour; Sylla Niang, Maguette; Niang, Birahim; Varela, Marie Louise; Diatta, Antoine Marie; Mbow, Moustapha; Ndiaye, Kantome; Ndiaye Diallo, Rokhaya; Dieye, Alioune; Perraut, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Background. Management of clinical malaria requires the development of reliable diagnostic methods and efficient biomarkers for follow-up of patients. Protection is partly based on IgG responses to parasite antigens exposed at the surface of infected erythrocytes (iRBCs). These IgG responses appeared low during clinical infection, particularly in severe disease. Methods. We analyzed the IgG binding capacity to the surface of live erythrocytes infected by knob positive FCR3 strain. Sera from 69 cerebral malaria (CM) and 72 mild malaria (MM) cases were analyzed by ELISA for IgG responses to five antigens from iRBC and by flow cytometry for IgG binding as expressed in labeling index ratio (LIR). The relationship between IgG levels, LIR, parasitemia, age, and the clinical outcomes was evaluated. Results. We found a significant decrease of LIR in adult CM fatal cases compared to surviving patients (p = 0.019). In MM, LIRs were correlated to IgG anti-iRBC and anti-PfEMP3/5 levels. In CM, no correlation was found between LIR, IgG levels, and parasitemia. Conclusion. The IgG binding assay was able to discriminate outcome of cerebral malaria cases and it deserves further development as a potential functional-associated assay for symptomatic malaria analysis. PMID:27563669

  16. Malaria Parasites Produce Volatile Mosquito Attractants

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Megan; Su, Chih-Ying; Schaber, Chad; Crowley, Jan R.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Carlson, John R.; Odom, Audrey R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains a nonphotosynthetic plastid organelle that possesses plant-like metabolic pathways. Plants use the plastidial isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway to produce volatile odorants, known as terpenes. In this work, we describe the volatile chemical profile of cultured malaria parasites. Among the identified compounds are several plant-like terpenes and terpene derivatives, including known mosquito attractants. We establish the molecular ident...

  17. Malaria in South Asia: prevalence and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashwani; Chery, Laura; Biswas, Chinmoy; Dubhashi, Nagesh; Dutta, Prafulla; Dua, Virendra Kumar; Kacchap, Mridula; Kakati, Sanjeeb; Khandeparkar, Anar; Kour, Dalip; Mahajan, Satish N; Maji, Ardhendu; Majumder, Partha; Mohanta, Jagadish; Mohapatra, Pradyumna K; Narayanasamy, Krishnamoorthy; Roy, Krishnangshu; Shastri, Jayanthi; Valecha, Neena; Vikash, Rana; Wani, Reena; White, John; Rathod, Pradipsinh K

    2012-03-01

    The "Malaria Evolution in South Asia" (MESA) program project is an International Center of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMR) sponsored by the US National Institutes of Health. This US-India collaborative program will study the origin of genetic diversity of malaria parasites and their selection on the Indian subcontinent. This knowledge should contribute to a better understanding of unexpected disease outbreaks and unpredictable disease presentations from Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax infections. In this first of two reviews, we highlight malaria prevalence in India. In particular, we draw attention to variations in distribution of different human-parasites and different vectors, variation in drug resistance traits, and multiple forms of clinical presentations. Uneven malaria severity in India is often attributed to large discrepancies in health care accessibility as well as human migrations within the country and across neighboring borders. Poor access to health care goes hand in hand with poor reporting from some of the same areas, combining to possibly distort disease prevalence and death from malaria in some parts of India. Corrections are underway in the form of increased resources for disease control, greater engagement of village-level health workers for early diagnosis and treatment, and possibly new public-private partnerships activities accompanying traditional national malaria control programs in the most severely affected areas. A second accompanying review raises the possibility that, beyond uneven health care, evolutionary pressures may alter malaria parasites in ways that contribute to severe disease in India, particularly in the NE corridor of India bordering Myanmar Narayanasamy et al., 2012.

  18. Fatal falciparum malaria in Canadian travellers

    OpenAIRE

    Humar, A.; Sharma, S.; Zoutman, D; Kain, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    The authors report 2 cases of severe falciparum malaria in Canadians that had fatal outcomes. In the first case a man presented to a local hospital shortly after returning from Africa, but a diagnosis of malaria was not considered. He was transferred to a secondary and then to a tertiary care facility, where he subsequently died. Intravenous quinidine therapy, the treatment of choice, was unavailable at all 3 hospitals. In the second case, a woman taking chloroquine prophylaxis while visiting...

  19. Relationship between ABO blood groups and malaria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Madhu; Chowdhuri, A. N. Rai

    1980-01-01

    A total of 736 patients with fever was tested for malaria and classified according to ABO blood group. Of these, 476 cases had patent parasitaemia at the time of investigation. The distribution of blood groups in this group was significantly different from that in 1300 controls from the same area. While group A was found to be more common in malaria cases than in normals, the reverse situation was found for group O. Possible explanations for this are discussed. PMID:6971187

  1. Plasma glutamine levels and falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, G; Planche, T; Agbenyega, T; Bedu-Addo, G; Owusu-Ofori, A; Adebe-Appiah, J; Agranoff, D; Woodrow, C; Castell, L; Elford, B; Krishna, S

    1999-01-01

    Glutamine deficiency is associated with increased rates of sepsis and mortality, which can be prevented by glutamine supplementation. Changes in glutamine concentration were examined in Ghanaian children with acute falciparum malaria and control cases. The mean (SD) plasma glutamine concentration was lower in patients with acute malaria (401 (82) mumol/L, n = 50) than in control patients (623 (67) mumol/L, n = 7; P sepsis and dyserythropoeisis.

  2. [Gestational malaria: HELLP syndrome mistaken diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Medina, Nayra Marizol; Velázquez Fonseca, Julián; Hernández Pacheco, José Antonio; Acevedo Tacuba, José Luis

    2008-05-01

    Malaria is one of the most important parasitic infections in Mexico and Latin America. Here we report a case of a 21 year-old female with 38.4 weeks of pregnancy and previous hospitalization due to malaria. Showing a thick drop negative test she was referred to Mexico City Hospital de la Mujer with presumptive diagnosis of preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. During her stay in ICU she developed malarial paroxysm and Plasmodium vivax was identified, conducting to specific therapy.

  3. Virulence in malaria: an evolutionary viewpoint.

    OpenAIRE

    Margaret J Mackinnon; Andrew F Read

    2004-01-01

    Malaria parasites cause much morbidity and mortality to their human hosts. From our evolutionary perspective, this is because virulence is positively associated with parasite transmission rate. Natural selection therefore drives virulence upwards, but only to the point where the cost to transmission caused by host death begins to outweigh the transmission benefits. In this review, we summarize data from the laboratory rodent malaria model, Plasmodium chabaudi, and field data on the human mala...

  4. Psychological differentiation and the phenomenon of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, H R

    1984-01-01

    This article deals with a theory of psychological differentiation, research supporting this theory and identified indicators of differentiation, and studies that connect several of these indicators with the phenomenon of pain. Problems for investigation are posed concerning the relationships between differentiation indicators and pain threshold, pain tolerance, relief measures, attention to pain, control, and counterirritation An understanding of the kinds of variables affecting the pain experience can lead to a clearer perception and more astute evaluation of that experience and a more organized approach to the implementation of nursing care.

  5. Phenomenon, noumenon, and mind in Kant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Rosas

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The Cartesian substantial dualism and the mind-body problem provoked in the Modern Times a monist reaction that eliminated the ontological dualist interaction and conceived the problem as a conflict between explanatory discourses. Kant introduces the distinction between phenomenon and noumenon as one of perspective, with the intention of solving the conflict between materialist and mentalist explanations. However, he does not consistently place the mind in the noumenic perspective and thus blurs his perspectivist solution and ontological commitments to the idealist mentalism. The A. intends to show the plausibility of this hypothetical interpretation.

  6. Tacit Knowledge as a Cognitive Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman G. Bolbakov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the implicit knowledge as a cognitive phenomenon. The article reveals the content of tacit knowledge. The article reveals the contents of the transformation of tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge. This article describes an inductive approach as a cognitive approach. The article introduces the concept of an information structure for communication and information between cognitive processes. The article substantiates the proposition that cognitive methods and procedures for implementing the process of "socialization". The article proves that the process is a prerequisite for the subsequent externalization, that is, the conversion of tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge.

  7. A cutoff phenomenon for quantum Markov chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We derive upper and lower bounds on the convergence behavior of certain classes of one-parameter quantum dynamical semigroups. The classes we consider, consist of tensor product channels and of channels with commuting Liouvillians. We introduce the notion of cutoff phenomenon in the setting of quantum information theory, and show how it exemplifies the fact that the convergence of (quantum) stochastic processes is not solely governed by the spectral gap of the transition map. We apply the new methods to show that graph states can be prepared efficiently, albeit not in constant time, by dissipation, and give the exact scaling behavior of the time to stationarity. (paper)

  8. Gravity as an emergent phenomenon: experimental signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Consoli, M.; Pluchino, A.

    2013-01-01

    According to some authors, gravity might be an emergent phenomenon in a fundamentally flat space-time. In this case the speed of light in the vacuum would not coincide exactly with the basic parameter "c" entering Lorentz transformations and, for an apparatus placed on the Earth's surface, light should exhibit a tiny fractional anisotropy at the level 10^{-15}. We argue that, most probably, this effect is now observed in many room-temperature ether-drift experiments and, in particular, in a v...

  9. Clinical features and outcome in children with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens Manning

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although global malaria mortality is declining, estimates may not reflect better inpatient management of severe malaria (SM where reported case fatality rates (CFRs vary from 1-25%. METHODS: A meta-analysis of prospective studies of SM was conducted to examine i whether hypothesized differences between clinical features and outcome in Melanesian compared with African or Asian children really exist, and ii to explore temporal changes in overall and complication-specific CFRs. The proportions of different SM complications and, overall and complication-specific CFRs were incorporated into the meta-analysis. Adjustments were made for study-level covariates including geographic region, SM definition, artemisinin treatment, median age of participants and time period. FINDINGS: Sixty-five studies were included. Substantial heterogeneity (I(2>80% was demonstrated for most outcomes. SM definition contributed to between-study heterogeneity in proportions of cerebral malaria (CM, metabolic acidosis (MA, severe anemia and overall CFR, whilst geographic region was a significant moderator in for CM and hypoglycemia (HG rates. Compared with their African counterparts, Melanesian children had lower rates of HG (10% [CI95 7-13%] versus 1% [0-3%], P<0.05, lower overall CFR (2% [0-4%] versus 7% [6-9%], P<0.05 and lower CM-specific CFR (8% [0-17%] versus 19% [16-21%], P<0.05. There was no temporal trend for overall CFR and CM-specific CFR but declining HG- and MA- specific CFRs were observed. INTERPRETATION: These data highlight that recent estimates of declining global malaria mortality are not replicated by improved outcomes for children hospitalized with SM. Significant geographic differences in the complication rates and subsequent CFRs exist and provide the first robust confirmation of lower CFRs in Melanesian children, perhaps due to less frequent HG.

  10. Malaria drives T cells to exhaustion

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    Michelle N Wykes

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a significant global burden but after >30 years of effort there is no vaccine on the market. While the complex life cycle of the parasite presents several challenges, many years of research have also identified several mechanisms of immune evasion by Plasmodium spp.. Recent research on malaria, has investigated the Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 pathway which mediates exhaustion of T cells, characterized by poor effector functions and recall responses and in some cases loss of the cells by apoptosis. Such studies have shown exhaustion of CD4+ T cells and an unappreciated role for CD8+ T cells in promoting sterile immunity against blood stage malaria. This is because PD-1 mediates up to a 95% reduction in numbers and functional capacity of parasite-specific CD8+ T cells, thus masking their role in protection. The role of T cell exhaustion during malaria provides an explanation for the absence of sterile immunity following the clearance of acute disease which will be relevant to future malaria-vaccine design and suggests the need for novel therapeutic solutions. This review will thus examine the role of PD-1-mediated T cell exhaustion in preventing lasting immunity against malaria.

  11. ANALISIS PEMERIKSAAN LABORATORIUM PADA PENDERITA MALARIA

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    I GEDE Wempi Permadi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTMalaria is the disease initially in the area of the Marsh called the disease of freshwater marshes.Scientific research on malaria make progress in their important first in 1880, when a French army doctor workingin the military hospital of Constantine in Algeria named Charles Louis Alphonse Laveran observed parasites forthe first time, inside the red blood cells of people suffering from malaria. This paper outlines some of thediagnostic screening for malaria. Examination of the diagnosis of malaria as gold standard still not satisfactoryas found parasitic blood through thin blood test. Examination of malaria in outline there are three, namely formicroscopic examination examination serologis and examination of dna. 1. Microscopic examination is still astandard gold for enforcement the diagnosis of diseases malaria. 2. Examination serologis detection using anantibody; detection techniques antibody can not tell that infection ' s going on but could have an antibody thatdetected is notching reaction immunologi of infection in the past. Meanwhile, with the technique of a spesificantigen can't portray degrees parasitemia patients. 3. DNA (PCR , more sensitive to a plasmodium but theweakness this technique is clear to financing costs and not all laboratory can do checking this.

  12. Strategies For Malaria Control In Mangalore City

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    Kiran Udaya .N

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Research questions: What different strategies should be used to effectively control problem of malaria? Objectives: 1 To study the problem of malaria. 2 To study different strategies for effective control of malaria. Study design: Observational and record based. The problem of malaria was studied for three years from 1996-1998 Participants: Individuals having fever. Setting: Community based in Mangalore City. Study variables: Fever cases, blood slides prepared, slides found positive, agency-wise, species-wise and year-wise positivity. Statistical methods: Simple proportions. Results: The yield of cases has been shown to highest in passive surveillance, as reflected in high slide positivity rates. A total of 95,898 slides were prepared, out of which 19,169 were positive for malaria parasite. Thus, the overall side positivity was 20%. The SPR in passive surveillance was 34.5%. Month-wise distribution of positive cases showed high SPR and low Pv/Pf ratios during non-malaria seasons. It is suggested to improve passive surveillance to achieve high SPR thereby leading to substantial saving on slides, laboratory services and transport expenditure.

  13. The age patterns of severe malaria syndromes in sub-Saharan Africa across a range of transmission intensities and seasonality settings

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    Greenwood Brian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A greater understanding of the relationship between transmission intensity, seasonality and the age-pattern of malaria is needed to guide appropriate targeting of malaria interventions in different epidemiological settings. Methods A systematic literature review identified studies which reported the age of paediatric hospital admissions with cerebral malaria (CM, severe malarial anaemia (SMA, or respiratory distress (RD. Study sites were categorized into a 3 × 2 matrix of Plasmodium falciparum transmission intensity and seasonality. Probability distributions were fitted by maximum likelihood methods, and best fitting models were used to estimate median ages and to represent graphically the age-pattern of each outcome for each transmission category in the matrix. Results A shift in the burden of CM towards younger age groups was seen with increasing intensity of transmission, but this was not the case for SMA or RD. Sites with 'no marked seasonality' showed more evidence of skewed age-patterns compared to areas of 'marked seasonality' for all three severe malaria syndromes. Conclusions Although the peak age of CM will increase as transmission intensity decreases in Africa, more than 75% of all paediatric hospital admissions of severe malaria are likely to remain in under five year olds in most epidemiological settings.

  14. Kierkegaard and the Sheer Phenomenon of Love

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søltoft, Pia

    2013-01-01

    In this article we will argue that Kierkegaard has a positive view of love as a sheer natural and universal phenomenon. This sheer phenomenon of love is rooted in God’s love and is implanted in human nature by its Creator. Therefore this natural urge to love, that manifests itself both as a lack...... and a surplus, should not be juxtaposed to Christian neighbor love. For Kierkegaard there is one love, but this one love, hidden in the ground in every person, puts on different shapes and lets itself be known through these different forms. In this article we are interested in the dreaming and searching desire...... as described in “The Immediate Erotic Stages or The Musical-Erotic” in the first part of Either/Or, as these first and unconscious forms of love are the presupposition for falling in love, another form of love that is investigated in the article. We will argue the original form of love is preferential love...

  15. The happy victimizer phenomenon: Not found here

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    Jevtić Ana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Children’s attribution of emotions to a moral transgressor is an important research topic in the psychology of moral and emotional development. This is especially because of the so-called Happy Victimizer Phenomenon (HVP where younger children attribute positive emotions to a moral transgressor described in a story. In the two studies that we have conducted (children aged 5, 7 and 9, 20 of each age; 10 of each age in the second study we have tested the possible influence of the fear of sanctions and the type of transgression (stealing and inflicting body injuries on the attribution of emotions. Children were presented with stories that described transgressions and they were asked to answer how the transgressor felt. The fear of sanctions did not make a significant difference in attribution but the type of transgression did - more negative emotions were attributed for inflicting body injuries than for stealing. Positive emotions were explained with situational-instrumental explanations in 84% of cases while negative emotions were explained with moral explanations in 63,5%. Girls attributed more positive emotions (61% than boys (39%. However, our main finding was that, for the aforementioned age groups, we did not find the HVP effect although it has regularly been registered in foreign studies. This finding denies the generalizability of the phenomenon and points to the significance of disciplining styles and, even more so, culture for children’s attribution of emotions to moral transgressors.

  16. Turnpike phenomenon and infinite horizon optimal control

    CERN Document Server

    Zaslavski, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    This book is devoted to the study of the turnpike phenomenon and describes the existence of solutions for a large variety of infinite horizon optimal control classes of problems.  Chapter 1 provides introductory material on turnpike properties. Chapter 2 studies the turnpike phenomenon for discrete-time optimal control problems. The turnpike properties of autonomous problems with extended-value intergrands are studied in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 focuses on large classes of infinite horizon optimal control problems without convexity (concavity) assumptions. In Chapter 5, the turnpike results for a class of dynamic discrete-time two-player zero-sum game are proven. This thorough exposition will be very useful  for mathematicians working in the fields of optimal control, the calculus of variations, applied functional analysis, and infinite horizon optimization. It may also be used as a primary text in a graduate course in optimal control or as supplementary text for a variety of courses in other disciplines. Resea...

  17. Acoustical phenomenon in ancient Totonac's monument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Dehesa, José; Ha˚Kansson, Andreas; Cervera, Francisco; Meseguer, Francisco; Manzanares-Martínez, Betsabé; Ramos-Mendieta, Felipe

    2001-05-01

    The circle of gladiators is a monument built by Totonac Indians in the ceremonial site of Cempoala, which is located near Veracruz (Mexico). The city is believed to date to around 1200 A.D. The monument is a round structure with crenellated wall tops, and it has a diameter of 13.4 m. Though the deterioration of this monument is noticeable, it presents a singular acoustical phenomenon whose strength had to be probably extraordinary on the date of its construction. In brief, along any diameter in the circle, one can find two focal points such that if one person speaks on one focus, another person located on the other hears the sound reinforced. In other words, this circular place acoustically behaves as if it were elliptical. Here, we report the experimental characterization of the phenomenon and present a theoretical explanation. Also, the intentionality of the Totonacs is speculated since these people are associated with the Mayan culture, which is known by its realizations of environments with astonishing sonic properties. [Work supported by CEAL-UAM of Spain.

  18. Bedside diagnosis of imported malaria using the Binax Now malaria antigen detection test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiese, Lothar; Bruun, Brita; Baek, Leif;

    2006-01-01

    Malaria may be misdiagnosed in non-endemic countries when the necessary experience for rapid expert microscopy is lacking. Rapid diagnostic tests may improve the diagnosis and may play a role as a bedside diagnostic tool. In a multicentre study we recruited patients suspected of malaria over a pe......, including mixed infections....

  19. Sources of Malaria Information among Pregnant Women in Ebonyi State and Implications for Malaria Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari-Omaka, Lois Nnenna; Obande-Ogbuinya, Nkiru Edith

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine sources of malaria information among pregnant women in Ebonyi state and implications for malaria education. The cross sectional research design was adopted and stratified sampling technique was used to select a total of five hundred and four (504) pregnant women from 12 hospitals in the state. A self…

  20. Music and cerebral hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinoni, M; Grassi, E; Latorraca, S; Caruso, A; Sorbi, S

    2000-09-01

    Previous studies performed by positron emission tomography and Transcranial Doppler (TCD) found a different cerebral activation during musical stimuli in musicians compared to non-musicians. The aim of our study is to evaluate by means of TCD, possible different pattern of cerebral activation during the performance of different musical tasks in musicians, non-musicians and lyrical singers. Our findings show a left hemispheric activation in musicians and a right one in non-musicians. Preliminary data on lyrical singers' activation patterns need further confirmation with a larger population. These data could be related to a different approach to music listening in musicians (analytical) and non-musicians who are supposed to have an emotional approach to music. PMID:10942664