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Sample records for cerebral asymmetries complementary

  1. Handedness and cerebral anatomical asymmetries in young adult males.

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    Hervé, Pierre-Yves; Crivello, Fabrice; Perchey, Guy; Mazoyer, Bernard; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie

    2006-02-15

    Using voxel-based morphometry, we measured the cerebral anatomical asymmetries in a sample of 56 young right-handed males and then compared voxelwise asymmetry indices of these subjects to those of 56 young left-handed males. In the right-handed, the clusters of grey matter asymmetry corresponding to the leftward occipital petalia and planum temporale asymmetries were retrieved. Strong rightward temporo-parietal asymmetries were also observed, but the rightward grey matter asymmetry in the frontal lobe was less massive than previously described. Group comparisons of left- and right-handed subjects' asymmetry maps, performed at a statistical threshold not corrected for multiple comparisons, revealed significant effects of handedness on this pattern of anatomical asymmetry in frontal regions, notably in the lower central and precentral sulci, and also in the planum temporale, with right-handed subjects being more leftward asymmetric. Concerning white matter, although almost no focal differences between left- and right-handed subjects were detected, volumetric analyses at the hemispheric level revealed a leftward asymmetry, which happened to be significantly less marked in the left-handed. This latter result, together with the pattern of leftward white matter asymmetries, suggested that anatomical correlates of the left hemispheric specialization for language would exist in white matter. In the population we studied, differences in anatomical asymmetry between left- and right-handed subjects provided structural arguments for a greater functional ambilaterality in left-handed subjects.

  2. Asymmetry in children with cerebral palsy and oral structure.

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    Haberfellner, H; Richter, M

    1980-12-01

    Twenty-six children with cerebral palsy were examined with respect to structural asymmetry of the mouth. In 19 children there were clear cut correlations between symmetry/asymmetry of voluntary function and the oral findings. Patients with symmetrical patterns of movements had symmetrical dentition, while in those with asymmetrical function the favoured side corresponded to the side with structural changes. Apparent exceptions to this rule in 7 children could be resolved in 6 by analysis of their complex case histories. Fifty normal controls showed oral asymmetries of nearly identical frequency and magnitude. In this respect there is no difference between the normal and handicapped group.

  3. Cerebral asymmetry in twins: predictions of the right shift theory.

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    Annett, Marian

    2003-01-01

    A study of the heritability of lobar brain volumes in twins has introduced a new approach to questions about the genetics of cerebral asymmetry. In addition to the classic comparison between monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins, a contrast was made between pairs of two right-handers (RR pairs) and pairs including one or more non-right-hander (non-RR pairs), in the light of the right shift (RS) theory of handedness. This paper explains the predictions of the RS model for pair concordance for genotype, cerebral asymmetry and handedness in healthy MZ and DZ twins. It shows how predictions for cerebral asymmetry vary between RR and non-RR pairs over a range of incidences of left-handedness. Although MZ twins are always concordant for genotype and DZ twins may be discordant, differences for handedness and cerebral asymmetry are expected to be small, consistent with the scarcity of significant effects in the literature. Marked differences between RR and non-RR pairs are predicted at all levels of incidence, the differences slightly larger in MZ than DZ pairs.

  4. Cerebral asymmetry and language development: cause, correlate, or consequence?

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    Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2013-06-14

    In most people, language is processed predominantly by the left hemisphere of the brain, but we do not know how or why. A popular view is that developmental language disorders result from a poorly lateralized brain, but until recently, evidence has been weak and indirect. Modern neuroimaging methods have made it possible to study normal and abnormal development of lateralized function in the developing brain and have confirmed links with language and literacy impairments. However, there is little evidence that weak cerebral lateralization has common genetic origins with language and literacy impairments. Our understanding of the association between atypical language lateralization and developmental disorders may benefit if we reconceptualize the nature of cerebral asymmetry to recognize its multidimensionality and consider variation in lateralization over developmental time. Contrary to popular belief, cerebral lateralization may not be a highly heritable, stable characteristic of individuals; rather, weak lateralization may be a consequence of impaired language learning.

  5. Locus of control and cerebral asymmetry.

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    De Brabander, B; Boone, C; Gerits, P

    1992-08-01

    Data about the lack of synchronism of flexor carpi ulnaris peak EMG values of bimanual reactions during a semantic and during a visuospatial discrimination reaction time task are reported. The effects of type of task as well as the presence or absence of an unexpected stimulus preceding the reaction stimulus on lack of synchronism clearly depend upon the locus of control of the subjects, as measured on Rotter's I-E scale. On the basis of several arguments it is proposed that the measure of lack of synchronism reflects in an opposite sense the amount of dopaminergic activation or motor readiness in the sense in which Pribram and McGuinness in 1975 and Tucker and Williamson in 1984 have defined these concepts. The results for 15 women and 18 men show that more internally oriented subjects are more activated by a semantic task and by an unexpected preparatory stimulus in this type of task than more externally oriented subjects. The opposite appears to hold on the visuospatial task and unexpected preparatory stimuli therein. Together with earlier findings about reaction times and a number of relevant findings in the literature, the results are interpreted as indicative of basic differences in asymmetric tonic activation of the cerebral hemispheres between more internally and more externally oriented subjects. A model is proposed to explain phasic activating effects which ensue when tonically more left- or right-activated subjects perform left- or right-hemisphere tasks and when supplementary irrelevant stimuli are received.

  6. Cerebral asymmetry: a quantitative, multifactorial, and plastic brain phenotype.

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    Rentería, Miguel E

    2012-06-01

    The longitudinal fissure separates the human brain into two hemispheres that remain connected through the corpus callosum. The left and the right halves of the brain resemble each other, and almost every structure present in one side has an equivalent structure in the other. Despite this exceptional correspondence, the two hemispheres also display important anatomical differences and there is marked lateralization of certain cognitive and motor functions such as language and handedness. However, the mechanisms that underlie the establishment of these hemispheric specializations, as well as their physiological and behavioral implications, remain largely unknown. Thanks to recent advances in neuroimaging, a series of studies documenting variation in symmetry and asymmetry as a function of age, gender, brain region, and pathological state, have been published in the past decade. Here, we review evidence of normal and atypical cerebral asymmetry, and the factors that influence it at the macrostructural level. Given the prominent role that cerebral asymmetry plays in the organization of the brain, and its possible implication in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions, further research in this area is anticipated.

  7. Complementary Hemispheric Asymmetries in Object Naming and Recognition: A Voxel-Based Correlational Study

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    Acres, K.; Taylor, K. I.; Moss, H. E.; Stamatakis, E. A.; Tyler, L. K.

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscientific research proposes complementary hemispheric asymmetries in naming and recognising visual objects, with a left temporal lobe advantage for object naming and a right temporal lobe advantage for object recognition. Specifically, it has been proposed that the left inferior temporal lobe plays a mediational role linking…

  8. Music-induced changes in functional cerebral asymmetries.

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    Hausmann, Markus; Hodgetts, Sophie; Eerola, Tuomas

    2016-04-01

    After decades of research, it remains unclear whether emotion lateralization occurs because one hemisphere is dominant for processing the emotional content of the stimuli, or whether emotional stimuli activate lateralised networks associated with the subjective emotional experience. By using emotion-induction procedures, we investigated the effect of listening to happy and sad music on three well-established lateralization tasks. In a prestudy, Mozart's piano sonata (K. 448) and Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata were rated as the most happy and sad excerpts, respectively. Participants listened to either one emotional excerpt, or sat in silence before completing an emotional chimeric faces task (Experiment 1), visual line bisection task (Experiment 2) and a dichotic listening task (Experiment 3 and 4). Listening to happy music resulted in a reduced right hemispheric bias in facial emotion recognition (Experiment 1) and visuospatial attention (Experiment 2) and increased left hemispheric bias in language lateralization (Experiments 3 and 4). Although Experiments 1-3 revealed an increased positive emotional state after listening to happy music, mediation analyses revealed that the effect on hemispheric asymmetries was not mediated by music-induced emotional changes. The direct effect of music listening on lateralization was investigated in Experiment 4 in which tempo of the happy excerpt was manipulated by controlling for other acoustic features. However, the results of Experiment 4 made it rather unlikely that tempo is the critical cue accounting for the effects. We conclude that listening to music can affect functional cerebral asymmetries in well-established emotional and cognitive laterality tasks, independent of music-induced changes in the emotion state.

  9. The effect of caffeine on cerebral asymmetry in rats.

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    Voiculescu, M; Segarceanu, A; Negutu, M; Ghita, I; Fulga, I; Coman, O A

    2015-01-01

    the frequency range of 0.5-4 Hz. The higher dose of caffeine modified the percentage of alpha 1, alpha2, beta, delta and theta2 waves compared to the control group. The group that received 150 mg caffeine/ kg.b.w. recorded a reversal in the cerebral asymmetry of rats in the 1.7-13.9 Hz, 15-19 Hz and 21-25 Hz frequency ranges.

  10. Complementary acupuncture treatment increases cerebral metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease.

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    Huang, Yong; Jiang, Xuemei; Zhuo, Ying; Tang, Anwu; Wik, Gustav

    2009-01-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) and the 18-flourodeoxyglucose tracer to study cerebral effects of complementary acupuncture in Parkinson's disease. Five patients received scalp-acupuncture and Madopa, while the other five had Madopa only. PET scans before and after 5 weeks of complementary acupuncture treatment show increased glucose metabolisms in parietal, temporal, occipital lobes, the thalamus, and the cerebellum in the light-diseased hemisphere, and in parietal and occipital lobes of the severe-diseased hemisphere. No changes were observed in the Madopa-only group. Acupuncture in combination with Madopa may improve cerebral glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease.

  11. The Influence of Sex Hormones on Functional Cerebral Asymmetries in Postmenopausal Women

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    Bayer, Ulrike; Erdmann, Gisela

    2008-01-01

    Studies investigating changes in functional cerebral asymmetries (FCAs) with hormonal fluctuations during the menstrual cycle in young women have led to controversial hypotheses about an influence of estrogen (E) and/or progesterone (P) on FCAs. Based on methodical, but also on principal problems in deriving conclusions about hormone effects from…

  12. Menstrual Cycle-Related Changes of Functional Cerebral Asymmetries in Fine Motor Coordination

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    Bayer, Ulrike; Hausmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuating sex hormone levels during the menstrual cycle have been shown to affect functional cerebral asymmetries in cognitive domains. These effects seem to result from the neuromodulatory properties of sex hormones and their metabolites on interhemispheric processing. The present study was carried out to investigate whether functional cerebral…

  13. Interest of the supplementary analysis of inter hemisphere asymmetry in the study with S.P.M. of cerebral PET-F.D.G. of patients suffering of temporal epilepsy; Interet de l'analyse supplementaire d'asymetrie interhemispherique dans l'etude avec SPM des TEP-FDG cerebrales de patients avec epilepsie temporale

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    Person, C.; Wolf, D. [CRAN-INPL, universite de Nancy, 54 (France); Gillet, N.; Marie, P.Y.; Laurens, M.H.; Djaballah, W.; Karcher, G. [CHU de Nancy, service de medecine nucleaire, 54 (France); Maillard, L.; Vespignani, H. [CHU de Nancy, service de neurologie, 54 (France); Guedj, E. [Hopital de la Timone, service de medecine nucleaire, AP-HM13 - Marseille (France)

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the supplementary information provided by the asymmetry analysis in the study by S.P.M. (statistical parametric mapping) of cerebral PET-F.D.G. images got for patients suffering of a drug resistant temporal epilepsy. It appears that the supplementary analysis of inter hemisphere asymmetry allow to improve the detection rate of the involved temporal lobe and bring complementary information concerning the delimitation of the hypo metabolic temporal area. (N.C.)

  14. Asymmetry of cerebral grey and white matter and structural volumes in relation to sex hormones and chromosomes

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    Ivanka eSavic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Whilst many studies show sex differences in cerebral asymmetry, their mechanisms are still unknown. This report describes the potential impact of sex hormones and sex chromosomes by comparing MR data from 39 male and 47 female controls and 33 men with an extra X-chromosome (47,XXY Methods: Regional asymmetry in grey and white matter volumes (GMV and WMV was calculated using voxel based moprhometry (SPM5, by contrasting the unflipped and flipped individual GMV and WMV images. In addition, structural volumes were calculated for the thalamus, caudate, putamen, amygdala, and hippocampus, using the FreeSurfer software. Effects of plasma testosterone and estrogen on the GMV and WMV, as well on the right/left ratios of the subcortical volumes were tested by multi-regression analysis.Results: All three groups showed a leftward asymmetry in the motor cortex and the planum temporale, and a rightward asymmetry of the middle occipital cortex. Both asymmetries were more pronounced in 46,XY males than 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and were positively correlated with testosterone levels. There was also a rightward asymmetry of the vermis and leftward asymmetry in the cerebellar hemispheres in all groups. Notably, cerebellar asymmetries were larger in 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, but were not related to sex hormone levels. No asymmetry differences between 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and no overall effects of brain size were detected.Conclusion: The asymmetry in the planum temporale area and the occipital cortex seem related to processes associated with testosterone, whereas the observed cerebellar asymmetries suggest a link with X-chromosome escapee genes. Sex differences in cerebral asymmetry are moderated by sex hormones and X-chromosome genes, in a regionally differentiated manner.

  15. Atypically rightward cerebral asymmetry in male adults with autism stratifies individuals with and without language delay.

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    Floris, Dorothea L; Lai, Meng-Chuan; Auer, Tibor; Lombardo, Michael V; Ecker, Christine; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Wheelwright, Sally J; Bullmore, Edward T; Murphy, Declan G M; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Suckling, John

    2016-01-01

    In humans, both language and fine motor skills are associated with left-hemisphere specialization, whereas visuospatial skills are associated with right-hemisphere specialization. Individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) show a profile of deficits and strengths that involves these lateralized cognitive functions. Here we test the hypothesis that regions implicated in these functions are atypically rightward lateralized in individuals with ASC and, that such atypicality is associated with functional performance. Participants included 67 male, right-handed adults with ASC and 69 age- and IQ-matched neurotypical males. We assessed group differences in structural asymmetries in cortical regions of interest with voxel-based analysis of grey matter volumes, followed by correlational analyses with measures of language, motor and visuospatial skills. We found stronger rightward lateralization within the inferior parietal lobule and reduced leftward lateralization extending along the auditory cortex comprising the planum temporale, Heschl's gyrus, posterior supramarginal gyrus, and parietal operculum, which was more pronounced in ASC individuals with delayed language onset compared to those without. Planned correlational analyses showed that for individuals with ASC, reduced leftward asymmetry in the auditory region was associated with more childhood social reciprocity difficulties. We conclude that atypical cerebral structural asymmetry is a potential candidate neurophenotype of ASC.

  16. Evidence for linkage to psychosis and cerebral asymmetry (relative hand skill) on the X chromosome.

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    Laval, S H; Dann, J C; Butler, R J; Loftus, J; Rue, J; Leask, S J; Bass, N; Comazzi, M; Vita, A; Nanko, S; Shaw, S; Peterson, P; Shields, G; Smith, A B; Stewart, J; DeLisi, L E; Crow, T J

    1998-09-01

    The hypothesis that psychosis arises as a part of the genetic diversity associated with the evolution of language generates the prediction that illness will be linked to a gene determining cerebral asymmetry, which, from the evidence of sex chromosome aneuploidies, is present in homologous form on the X and Y chromosomes. We investigated evidence of linkage to markers on the X chromosome in 1) 178 families multiply affected with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder with a series of 16 markers spanning the centromere (study 1), and 2) 180 pairs of left-handed brothers with 14 markers spanning the whole chromosome (study 2). In study 1, excess allele-sharing was observed in brother-brother pairs (but not brother-sister or a small sample of sister-sister pairs) over a region of approximately 20 cM, with a maximum LOD score of 1.5 at DXS991. In study 2, an association between allele-sharing and degree of left-handedness was observed extending over approximately 60 cM, with a maximum lod score of 2.8 at DXS990 (approximately 20 cM from DXS991). Within the overlap of allele-sharing is located a block in Xq21 that transposed to the Y chromosome in recent hominid evolution and is now represented as two segments on Yp. In one of two XX males with psychosis we found that the breakpoint on the Y is located within the distal region of homology to the block in Xq21. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that an X-Y homologous determinant of cerebral asymmetry carries the variation that contributes to the predisposition to psychotic illness.

  17. Cerebral Asymmetry of fMRI-BOLD Responses to Visual Stimulation.

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    Anders Hougaard

    Full Text Available Hemispheric asymmetry of a wide range of functions is a hallmark of the human brain. The visual system has traditionally been thought of as symmetrically distributed in the brain, but a growing body of evidence has challenged this view. Some highly specific visual tasks have been shown to depend on hemispheric specialization. However, the possible lateralization of cerebral responses to a simple checkerboard visual stimulation has not been a focus of previous studies. To investigate this, we performed two sessions of blood-oxygenation level dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in 54 healthy subjects during stimulation with a black and white checkerboard visual stimulus. While carefully excluding possible non-physiological causes of left-to-right bias, we compared the activation of the left and the right cerebral hemispheres and related this to grey matter volume, handedness, age, gender, ocular dominance, interocular difference in visual acuity, as well as line-bisection performance. We found a general lateralization of cerebral activation towards the right hemisphere of early visual cortical areas and areas of higher-level visual processing, involved in visuospatial attention, especially in top-down (i.e., goal-oriented attentional processing. This right hemisphere lateralization was partly, but not completely, explained by an increased grey matter volume in the right hemisphere of the early visual areas. Difference in activation of the superior parietal lobule was correlated with subject age, suggesting a shift towards the left hemisphere with increasing age. Our findings suggest a right-hemispheric dominance of these areas, which could lend support to the generally observed leftward visual attentional bias and to the left hemifield advantage for some visual perception tasks.

  18. Differences in lateral hemispheric asymmetries of cerebral blood flow measured by SPECT in dementia of Alzheimer type

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    Yoshimura, Nahoko (Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-12-01

    We studied 21 right-handed patients clinically diagnosed as dementia of Alzheimer type (8 men, 13 women; aged 53-85, mean 71.1 years). The average duration of symptoms was 2.7 years. Dementia ranged from mild to moderately severe. None had clinical or laboratory evidence of cerebro-vascular disease (Hachinski ischemic scores for all patients were 4 or below). All received the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS), Mini-mental State Test (MMS) and Western Aphasia Battery (WAB, First Japanese edition, 1986). Regional cerebral blood flow was evaluated by single photon emission CT (SPECT) with [sup 123]I-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine ([sup 123]I-IMP), using the Matsuda's quantitative method. The subjects were divided into three groups on the basis of right-left hemispheric asymmetry of cerebral blood flow (leftasymmetry of cerebral blood flow. Verbal IQ in patients with predominant hypoperfusion of left temporal and parietal lobe were significantly lower than in other groups, while performance IQ and WAB constructive scores were lower in those with right hemispheric hypoperfusion (p<0.05). We concluded that cerebral blood flow asymmetry detected by SPECT was related significantly to the deficit of language and constructive function in patients with dementia of Alzheimer type. (author).

  19. Main effects and interactions of cerebral hemispheres, gender, and age in the calculation of volumes and asymmetries of selected structures of episodic memory

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    Ramirez-Carmona, Rocio; Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Dominguez-Corrales, Brenda; Aguilar-Castañeda, Erika; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of anatomical (cerebral hemisphere) and demographic (age and gender) variables on the gray matter (GM) volumes and volumetric asymmetry indices (VAIs) of selected structures involved in episodic memory.

  20. Asymmetry of cerebral blood flow in patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type by SPECT using I-123 IMP

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    Arai, Hisayuki; Hanyu, Haruo; Kobayashi, Yasutaka; Hatano, Nobuyoshi; Katsunuma, Hideyo; Suzuki, Takanari; Amino, Saburo (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1990-12-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined by single photon emission CT (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I)iodoamphetamine in 22 patients with clinically diagnosed senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) and in 18 age matched controls. We calculated asymmetry indices (AIs) of rCBF for matched right-left regions of interest. rCBF of parietal lobe in SDAT patients was significantly most laterally asymmetrycal, but the least in occipital lobe. Lateral asymmetry of rCBF in SDAT patients correlated with asymmetry of language and visuospatial functions; decreased rCBF in the left parietal lobe was associated with language dysfunction, and that in the right parietal lobe, with viduospatial dysfunction. Furthermore cerebellar AIs correlated negatively with those of the cerebral hemisphere and lower frontal region in SDAT patients. The results demonstrate that rCBF measurement by {sup 123}I-IMP SPECT is useful to detect lateral asymmetry in reduction of rCBF in SDAT. (author).

  1. Relations between neuropsychological findings and lateral asymmetries of cerebral blood flow measured by SPECT in dementia of Alzheimer type

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    Yoshimura, Nahoko; Soma, Yoshiaki; Ootsuki, Mika [Takeda General Hospital, Aizu-Wakamatsu, Fukushima (Japan)

    1993-10-01

    We studied 16 right-handed patients clinically diagnosed as dementia of Alzheimer type (6 men, 10 women; aged 63-85, mean 72.8 years). The average duration of symptoms was 2.7 years. Dementia ranged from mild to moderately severe. None had clinical or laboratory evidence of cerebrovascular disease (Hachinski ischemic scores for all patients were 4 or below 4). All received the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS), Mini-mental State Test (MMS) and Western Aphasia Battery (WAB, First Japanese edition, 1986). Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was evaluated by single photon emission CT (SPECT) with {sup 123}I-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine ({sup 123}I-IMP), using the Matsuda`s quantitative method. Regional tracer uptake was measured in regions of interests (ROIs) over right and left frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cortical regions; basal ganglia; and cerebellar hemispheres. The subjects were divided into three groups on the basis of lateral asymmetries in the temporal and parietal cortexes of rCBF (leftasymmetry was present when rCBF for each ROI between left and right sides differs by more than 10%. General score (MMS, T-IQ) was not correlated with asymmetry of cerebral blood flow. Verbal IQ in patients with predominant hypoperfusion of left temporal and parietal lobe was significantly lower than other group, while performance IQ and WAB constructive scores were lower in those with right hemispheric hypoperfusion (p<0.05). We concluded that cerebral blood flow asymmetry by SPECT was related significantly to the deficit of language and constructive function in patients with dementia of Alzheimer type. Decreased rCBF in the left temporoparietal lobe was associated with language dysfunction, and that in the right hemisphere, with constructive dysfunction. (author).

  2. A theory of the origin of cerebral asymmetry: epigenetic variation superimposed on a fixed right-shift.

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    Crow, T J

    2010-05-01

    A theory of the genetic basis of cerebral asymmetry is outlined according to which (1) a single right-shift factor in all human individuals interacts with (2) epigenetic variation that is apparently random, transmissible between parent and child, but with a half-life extending over a small number of generations. The right-shift factor arose late (150 to 200 thousand years ago [KYA]) in hominid evolution as a mutation in the X copy of a gene pair (Protocadherin 11XY) in a region of homology between the X and Y chromosomes created by a duplication 6MYA at the chimpanzee hominid separation. The epigenetic imprint originates in the process now known as "meiotic suppression of unpaired chromosomes" (MSUC); it reflects random pairing of partly homologous X and Y chromosome regions in male meiosis, and confers species-specific diversity of cerebral structure on the human population.

  3. Magnitude of Cerebral Asymmetry at Rest: Covariation with Baseline Cardiovascular Activity

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    Foster, Paul S.; Harrison, David W.

    2006-01-01

    The cerebral regulation of cardiovascular functioning varies along both a lateral and a longitudinal axis. The parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems are lateralized to the left and right cerebral hemispheres, respectively. Further, the frontal lobes are known to be inhibitory in nature, whereas the temporal lobes are excitatory. However,…

  4. Significant proteins affecting cerebral vasospasm using complementary ICPMS and MALDI-MS.

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    Easter, Renee N; Barry, Colin G; Pyne-Geithman, Gail; Caruso, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) following subarachnoid hemorrhagic stroke affects more than one million people each year. The etiology and prevention of CV is currently of great interest to researchers in various fields of medical science. More recently, the idea that selenium could be playing a major role in the onset of cerebral vasospasm has come into the spotlight. This study focused on using newly established metallomics techniques in order to explore the proteome associated with CV and if selenium might affect the discovered proteins. Size exclusion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, along with LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF were both essential in determining protein identifications in three different sample types; a control (normal, healthy patient, CSF control), SAH stroke patients (no vasospasm, CSF C) and SAH CV patients (CSF V). The results of this study, although preliminary, indicate the current methods are applicable and warrant further application to these clinically important targets.

  5. Sexual orientation differences in cerebral asymmetry and in the performance of sexually dimorphic cognitive and motor tasks.

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    Sanders, G; Wright, M

    1997-10-01

    With each of the tasks in the present studies we expected to find the reported sex difference between heterosexual women and heterosexual men and we predicted a sexual orientation effect with the performance of homosexual men being similar to that of heterosexual women and different from that of heterosexual men. Study 1 aimed to replicate earlier findings by recording the performance of a group of homosexual men on a visuospatial task, the Vincent Mechanical Diagrams Test (VMDT), a dot detection divided visual field measure of functional cerebral asymmetry, and on five subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS). For each task the profile of scores obtained for the homosexual men was similar to that of heterosexual women in that they scored lower than heterosexual men on the VMDT, they showed less asymmetry, and they recorded a higher Verbal than Performance IQ on the WAIS. In Study 2, a male-biased targeted throwing task favored heterosexual men while, in contrast, on the female-biased Purdue Pegboard single peg condition heterosexual men were outperformed by heterosexual women and homosexual men. On neither of these two tasks did the performances of homosexual men and heterosexual women differ. One task, manual speed, yielded neither sex nor sexual orientation differences. Another, the Purdue Pegboard assemblies condition, revealed a sex difference but no sexual orientation difference. Failure to obtain a sexual orientation difference in the presence of a sex difference suggests that the sexual orientation effect may be restricted to a subset of sexually dimorphic tasks.

  6. Asymmetry in the brain influenced the neurological deficits and infarction volume following the middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats

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    Zhang Meizeng

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paw preference in rats is similar to human handedness, which may result from dominant hemisphere of rat brain. However, given that lateralization is the uniqueness of the humans, many researchers neglect the differences between the left and right hemispheres when selecting the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in rats. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ischemia in the dominant hemisphere on neurobehavioral function and on the cerebral infarction volume following MCAO in rats. Methods The right-handed male Sprague-Dawley rats asserted by the quadrupedal food-reaching test were subjected to 2 hours MCA occlusion and then reperfusion. Results The neurological scores were significantly worse in the left MCAO group than that in the right MCAO group at 1 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h (p 0.05 respectively. There was a trend toward better neurobehavioral function recovery in the right MCAO group than in the left MCAO group. The total infarct volume in left MCAO was significantly larger than that in the right (p Conclusion The neurobehavioral function result and the pathological result were consistent with the hypothesis that paw preference in rats is similar to human handedness, and suggested that ischemia in dominant hemisphere caused more significant neurobehavioral consequence than in another hemisphere following MCAO in adult rats. Asymmetry in rat brain should be considered other than being neglected in choice of rat MCAO model.

  7. Main effects and interactions of cerebral hemispheres, gender, and age in the calculation of volumes and asymmetries of selected structures of episodic memory.

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    Ramirez-Carmona, Rocio; Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Dominguez-Corrales, Brenda; Aguilar-Castañeda, Erika; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of anatomical (cerebral hemisphere) and demographic (age and gender) variables on the gray matter (GM) volumes and volumetric asymmetry indices (VAIs) of selected structures involved in episodic memory. A cross-sectional study was performed in 47 healthy volunteers. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed similar IQs across the sample. Using SPM-based software, brain segmentation, labeling and volume measurements of the hippocampus, amygdala, middle temporal gyrus and parahippocampal gyrus were performed in each cerebral hemisphere. A two-way between-groups multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was applied to GM volumes and VAIs. The main effects of gender and cerebral hemisphere on GM volumes were significant (p gender and cerebral hemisphere. VAI measurements showed a nonsignificant effect of gender, but a significant influence of age (p = .015). The linear model of interactions and main effects explained 33% of the variance influencing the GM volume quantification. While cerebral hemisphere and gender were found to affect the volumes of brain structures involved in episodic memory, the calculation of VAIs was affected only by age. A comprehensive understanding of the main effects and interaction effects of cerebral hemisphere, gender and age on the volumes and asymmetries of structures related to episodic memory might help neurologists, psychiatrists, geriatricians and other neuroscientists in the study of degenerative brain diseases.

  8. Main effects and interactions of cerebral hemispheres, gender, and age in the calculation of volumes and asymmetries of selected structures of episodic memory

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    Ramirez-Carmona, Rocio; Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Dominguez-Corrales, Brenda; Aguilar-Castañeda, Erika; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of anatomical (cerebral hemisphere) and demographic (age and gender) variables on the gray matter (GM) volumes and volumetric asymmetry indices (VAIs) of selected structures involved in episodic memory. A cross-sectional study was performed in 47 healthy volunteers. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed similar IQs across the sample. Using SPM-based software, brain segmentation, labeling and volume measurements of the hippocampus, amygdala, middle temporal gyrus and parahippocampal gyrus were performed in each cerebral hemisphere. A two-way between-groups multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was applied to GM volumes and VAIs. The main effects of gender and cerebral hemisphere on GM volumes were significant (p < .001), while there was no significant interaction effect between gender and cerebral hemisphere. VAI measurements showed a non-significant effect of gender, but a significant influence of age (p = .015). The linear model of interactions and main effects explained 33% of the variance influencing the GM volume quantification. While cerebral hemisphere and gender were found to affect the volumes of brain structures involved in episodic memory, the calculation of VAIs was affected only by age. A comprehensive understanding of the main effects and interaction effects of cerebral hemisphere, gender and age on the volumes and asymmetries of structures related to episodic memory might help neurologists, psychiatrists, geriatricians and other neuroscientists in the study of degenerative brain diseases. PMID:28072386

  9. Pseudo-asymmetry of cerebral blood flow in arterial spin labeling caused by unilateral fetal-type circle of Willis: Technical limitation or a way to better understanding physiological variations of cerebral perfusion and improving arterial spin labeling acquisition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law-Ye, B; Geerts, B; Galanaud, D; Dormont, D; Pyatigorskaya, N

    2016-09-01

    In the recently published article, "Unilateral fetal-type circle of Willis anatomy causes right-left asymmetry in cerebral blood flow with pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling: A limitation of arterial spin labeling-based cerebral blood flow measurements?", it was shown by the method of arterial spin labeling (ASL) that unilateral fetal-type circle of Willis could induce variation of blood flow in cerebellar and posterior cerebral artery territory. We believe that the reported observation, rather than being a limitation, gives several interesting cues for understanding the ASL sequence. In this commentary, we formulate some suggestions regarding the use of ASL in clinical practice, discuss the potential causes of the above-mentioned pseudo-asymmetry and consider future improvements of the ASL technique.

  10. Cerebral Asymmetry of fMRI-BOLD Responses to Visual Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Jensen, Bettina Hagström; Amin, Faisal Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    MRI) in 54 healthy subjects during stimulation with a black and white checkerboard visual stimulus. While carefully excluding possible non-physiological causes of left-to-right bias, we compared the activation of the left and the right cerebral hemispheres and related this to grey matter volume, handedness...... attention, especially in top-down (i.e., goal-oriented) attentional processing. This right hemisphere lateralization was partly, but not completely, explained by an increased grey matter volume in the right hemisphere of the early visual areas. Difference in activation of the superior parietal lobule...

  11. Left-right cortical asymmetries of regional cerebral blood flow during listening to words

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nishizawa, Y; Olsen, T S; Larsen, B;

    1982-01-01

    1. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured during rest and during listening to simple words. The xenon-133 intracarotid technique was used and results were obtained from 254 regions of seven right hemispheres and seven left hemispheres. The measurements were performed just after carotid...... angiography, carried out to exclude space occupying lesions. In all subjects the angiogram was normal. All were right handed. 2. Mean hemispheric blood flow of both left and right hemispheres increased 10% from the resting measurement during the listening task. This increase was due in part to activation...... widespread and intense increase, averaging 29% as compared to 18% on the right side. This left-sided dominance during verbal stimulation should be compared to the right-sided dominance of rCBF during nonverbal sound discrimination reported by Roland et al. (25, 26), who used precisely the same technique...

  12. The protocadherin 11X/Y (PCDH11X/Y) gene pair as determinant of cerebral asymmetry in modern Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priddle, Thomas H; Crow, Timothy J

    2013-06-01

    Annett's right-shift theory proposes that human cerebral dominance (the functional and anatomical asymmetry or torque along the antero-posterior axis) and handedness are determined by a single "right-shift" gene. Familial transmission of handedness and specific deviations of cerebral dominance in sex chromosome aneuploidies implicate a locus within an X-Y homologous region of the sex chromosomes. The Xq21.3/Yp11.2 human-specific region of homology includes the protocadherin 11X/Y (PCDH11X/Y) gene pair, which encode cell adhesion molecules subject to accelerated evolution following the separation of the human and chimpanzee lineages six million years ago. PCDH11X and PCDH11Y, differentially regulated by retinoic acid, are highly expressed in the ventricular zone, subplate, and cortical plate of the developing cerebral cortex. Both proteins interact with β-catenin, a protein that plays a role in determining axis formation and regulating cortical size. In this way, the PCDH11X/Y gene pair determines cerebral asymmetry by initiating the right shift in Homo sapiens.

  13. Quantifying cerebral asymmetries for language in dextrals and adextrals with random-effects meta analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Peter Carey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Speech and language-related functions tend to depend on the left hemisphere more than the right in most right-handed (dextral participants. This relationship is less clear in non-right handed (adextral people, resulting in surprisingly polarised opinion on whether or not they are as lateralised as right handers. The present analysis investigates this issue by largely ignoring methodological differences between the different neuroscientific approaches to language lateralization, as well as discrepancies in how dextral and adextral participants were recruited or defined. Here we evaluate the tendency for dextrals to be more left hemisphere dominant than adextrals, using random effects meta analyses. In spite of several limitations, including sample size (in the adextrals in particular, missing details on proportions of groups who show directional effects in many experiments, and so on, the different paradigms all point to proportionally increased left hemispheric dominance in the dextrals. These results are analysed in light of the theoretical importance of these subtle differences for understanding the cognitive neuroscience of language, as well as the unusual asymmetry in most adextrals.

  14. Body posture asymmetry differences between children with mild scoliosis and children with unilateral cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalska-Szopa, Małgorzata; Szopa, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Patients with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) often have impaired movement coordination, reduced between-limb synchronization, and less weight bearing on the affected side, which can affect the maintenance of an upright weight-bearing position and gait. This study evaluated whether the different postural patterns of children with unilateral CP could be statistically recognized using cluster analysis. Forty-five outpatients with unilateral CP (mean age, 9 years and 5 months) and 51 able-bodied children with mild scoliosis (mean age, 9 years and 2 months) were included. One observer performed moiré topography (MT) examinations using a CQ Electronic System (Poland) device. A weight distribution analysis on the base of support (BOS) between the body sides was performed simultaneously. A force plate dynamographic platform (PDM), ZEBRIS (Germany), with FootPrint software was used for these measurements. Cluster analysis revealed three groups: Cluster 1 (n = 71, 73.96%), Cluster 2 (n = 8, 8.33%), and Cluster 3 (n = 17, 17.71%). Based on the MT parameters (extracted using a data reduction technique), three typical asymmetrical postural patterns were described: (1) the postural pattern of children with mild scoliosis (SCOL), (2) the progravitational postural pattern (PGPP), and (3) the antigravitational pattern. Patterns two and three were identified in children with unilateral CP.

  15. Body Posture Asymmetry Differences between Children with Mild Scoliosis and Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Domagalska-Szopa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP often have impaired movement coordination, reduced between-limb synchronization, and less weight bearing on the affected side, which can affect the maintenance of an upright weight-bearing position and gait. This study evaluated whether the different postural patterns of children with unilateral CP could be statistically recognized using cluster analysis. Forty-five outpatients with unilateral CP (mean age, 9 years and 5 months and 51 able-bodied children with mild scoliosis (mean age, 9 years and 2 months were included. One observer performed moiré topography (MT examinations using a CQ Electronic System (Poland device. A weight distribution analysis on the base of support (BOS between the body sides was performed simultaneously. A force plate dynamographic platform (PDM, ZEBRIS (Germany, with FootPrint software was used for these measurements. Cluster analysis revealed three groups: Cluster 1 (, 73.96%, Cluster 2 (, 8.33%, and Cluster 3 (, 17.71%. Based on the MT parameters (extracted using a data reduction technique, three typical asymmetrical postural patterns were described: (1 the postural pattern of children with mild scoliosis (SCOL, (2 the progravitational postural pattern (PGPP, and (3 the antigravitational pattern. Patterns two and three were identified in children with unilateral CP.

  16. Schizophrenia as an anomaly of development of cerebral asymmetry. A postmortem study and a proposal concerning the genetic basis of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, T J; Ball, J; Bloom, S R; Brown, R; Bruton, C J; Colter, N; Frith, C D; Johnstone, E C; Owens, D G; Roberts, G W

    1989-12-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with structural changes (eg, a mild degree of ventricular enlargement) in the brain, although whether these precede onset of illness or progress with episodes is not established. In a postmortem study, we find that ventricular enlargement affects the posterior and particularly the temporal horn of the lateral cerebral ventricle. By comparison with controls and with patients suffering from Alzheimer-type dementia (in which there is also temporal horn enlargement), the change is highly significantly selective to the left hemisphere. This deviation was not accompanied by an increase in glial cell number (examined chemically by assay of diazepam-binding inhibitor immunoreactivity and microscopically by density of staining with the Holzer technique). The findings are consistent with the view that schizophrenia is a disorder of the genetic mechanisms that control the development of cerebral asymmetry.

  17. Cerebral Asymmetry in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Corballis, Michael C.

    This paper describes two experiments conducted to replicate the reported findings (Entus, 1975) that infants demonstrate a right ear advantage in the perception of dichotically presented syllables. Using the non-nutritive sucking paradigm, 48 infants 1-3 months of age were presented with verbal stimuli contingent upon criterion level sucking.…

  18. Usefulness of R2* maps generated by iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation quantitation sequence for cerebral artery dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Ayumi; Shinohara, Yuki; Fujii, Shinya; Miyoshi, Fuminori; Kuya, Keita; Ogawa, Toshihide [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological, and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago (Japan); Yamashita, Eijiro [Tottori University Hospital, Division of Clinical Radiology, Yonago (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Acute intramural hematoma resulting from cerebral artery dissection is usually visualized as a region of intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images (WI). This often causes problems with distinguishing acute atheromatous lesions from surrounding parenchyma and dissection. The present study aimed to determine whether or not R2* maps generated by the iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation quantitation sequence (IDEAL IQ) can distinguish cerebral artery dissection more effectively than three-dimensional variable refocusing flip angle TSE T1WI (T1-CUBE) and T2*WI. We reviewed data from nine patients with arterial dissection who were assessed by MR images including R2* maps, T2*WI, T1-CUBE, and 3D time-of-flight (TOF)-MRA. We visually assessed intramural hematomas in each patient as positive (clearly visible susceptibility effect reflecting intramural hematoma as hyperintensity on R2* map and hypointensity on T2*WI), negative (absent intramural hematoma), equivocal (difficult to distinguish between intramural hematoma and other paramagnetic substances such as veins, vessel wall calcification, or hemorrhage) and not evaluable (difficult to determine intramural hematoma due to susceptibility artifacts arising from skull base). Eight of nine patients were assessed during the acute phase. Lesions in all eight patients were positive for intramural hematoma corresponding to dissection sites on R2* maps, while two lesions were positive on T2*WI and three lesions showed high-intensity on T1-CUBE reflected intramural hematoma during the acute phase. R2* maps generated using IDEAL IQ can detect acute intramural hematoma associated with cerebral artery dissection more effectively than T2*WI and earlier than T1-CUBE. (orig.)

  19. Structural asymmetry of the human cerebral cortex: Regional and between-subject variability of surface area, cortical thickness, and local gyrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, Christine; Vazquez, David; Felton, Adam; McDowell, Alessandra

    2016-12-01

    Structural asymmetry varies across individuals, brain regions, and metrics of cortical organization. The current study investigated regional differences in asymmetry of cortical surface area, thickness, and local gyrification, and the extent of between-subject variability in these metrics, in a sample of healthy young adults (N=200). Between-subject variability in cortical structure may provide a means to assess the extent of biological flexibility or constraint of brain regions, and we explored the potential influence of this variability on the phenotypic expression of structural asymmetry. The findings demonstrate that structural asymmetries are nearly ubiquitous across the cortex, with differing regional organization for the three cortical metrics. This implies that there are multiple, only partially overlapping, maps of structural asymmetry. The results further indicate that the degree of asymmetry of a brain region can be predicted by the extent of the region's between-subject variability. These findings provide evidence that reduced biological constraint promotes the expression of strong structural asymmetry.

  20. Complementary Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa eSartori

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person. Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i to simulate another person’s movements, (ii to predict another person’s future action/s, (iii to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one’s own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception–action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions.

  1. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  2. Complementary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, H.

    2009-02-01

    In this lecture, it is emphasized that sufficient resolution of scientific issues for a fusion energy reactor can be given by complementary studies. Key scientific issues for a fusion energy reactor and ITER addressed by a complementary study in the Large Helical Device (LHD) are discussed. It should be noted that ITER is definitely a necessary condition but not a sufficient condition. Helical systems including stellarators and heliotrons are defined as alternative concepts. These approaches also aim at a fusion energy reactor based on their own concept and simultaneously benefit progress in tokamaks, more specifically ITER itself. The exact science to manage a 3-D geometry has been being developed in helical systems. A physical model with much accuracy and breadth will demonstrate its applicability to ITER. Topics to validate "complementary" approaches such as 3-D equilibrium, interchange MHD mode, control of radial electric field & structure formation, dynamics of a magnetic island, density limit and edge plasmas are discussed. Complementary is not Supplementary. ITER is complementary to development of a helical fusion energy reactor as well. Complementary approaches transcend existing disciplinary horizons and enable big challenges.

  3. Unilateral fetal-type circle of Willis anatomy causes right-left asymmetry in cerebral blood flow with pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling: A limitation of arterial spin labeling-based cerebral blood flow measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkeij Wolf, Jurriaan Jh; Foster-Dingley, Jessica C; Moonen, Justine Ef; van Osch, Matthias Jp; de Craen, Anton Jm; de Ruijter, Wouter; van der Mast, Roos C; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    The accuracy of cerebral blood flow measurements using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling can be affected by vascular factors other than cerebral blood flow, such as flow velocity and arterial transit time. We aimed to elucidate the effects of common variations in vascular anatomy of the circle of Willis on pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling signal. In addition, we investigated whether possible differences in pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling signal could be mediated by differences in flow velocities. Two hundred and three elderly participants underwent magnetic resonance angiography of the circle of Willis and pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling scans. Mean pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling-cerebral blood flow signal was calculated for the gray matter of the main cerebral flow territories. Mean cerebellar gray matter pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling-cerebral blood flow was significantly lower in subjects having a posterior fetal circle of Willis variant with an absent P1 segment. The posterior fetal circle of Willis variants also showed a significantly higher pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling-cerebral blood flow signal in the ipsilateral flow territory of the posterior cerebral artery. Flow velocity in the basilar artery was significantly lower in these posterior fetal circle of Willis variants. This study indicates that pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling measurements underestimate cerebral blood flow in the posterior flow territories and cerebellum of subjects with a highly prevalent variation in circle of Willis morphology. Additionally, our data suggest that this effect is mediated by concomitant differences in flow velocity between the supplying arteries.

  4. Spiral computed tomography angiography (SCTA) and color coded duplex ultrasound (CCDUS): two complementary diagnostic techniques for assessment of extracranial cerebral artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaroni, Reana; Cardaioli, Gabriela; Pelliccioli, Gian Piero; Gallai, Virgilio

    2002-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions of the extracranial cerebral arteries account for ischemic stroke in over half of all cases. The risk of stroke associated with symptomatic carotid artery disease is related to the severity of the stenosis. Results of the two major clinical trials, North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET) and European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST), showed that patients with symptomatic carotid artery disease may benefit from carotid endarterectomy. Therefore, detection and quantification of stenosis are essential. Discrepancies in the angiographic criteria used in both NASCET and ECST trials resulted in continued controversy about the most accurate method of measuring carotid artery stenosis. Moreover, to avoid complications related to the angiography procedure, a good evaluation of vessel wall and plaque composition need to be considered. Both SCTA and CCDUS are non invasive techniques that could overcome angiographic complications and give detailed information on stenosis grading and plaque characteristics. They have been used to evaluate carotid stenosis as a single or combined methods.

  5. Lateral Asymmetries in Human Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    John L. Bradshaw; Nettleton, Norman C.

    1989-01-01

    Lateral asymmetries are not confined to humans. Palaeozoic trilobites and calcichordates are now known to have been asymmetrical; song control in passerines is vested in the left cerebral hemisphere; learning which is lateralized to the left forebrain of chicks includes imprinting, visual discrimination learning and auditory habituation, while responses to novelty, attack and copulation are activated by the right; in rats the right hemisphere is involved in emotional behavior and spatial disc...

  6. Hemispheric asymmetry of visual scene processing in the human brain: evidence from repetition priming and intrinsic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, W Dale; Kahn, Itamar; Wig, Gagan S; Schacter, Daniel L

    2012-08-01

    Asymmetrical specialization of cognitive processes across the cerebral hemispheres is a hallmark of healthy brain development and an important evolutionary trait underlying higher cognition in humans. While previous research, including studies of priming, divided visual field presentation, and split-brain patients, demonstrates a general pattern of right/left asymmetry of form-specific versus form-abstract visual processing, little is known about brain organization underlying this dissociation. Here, using repetition priming of complex visual scenes and high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we demonstrate asymmetrical form specificity of visual processing between the right and left hemispheres within a region known to be critical for processing of visual spatial scenes (parahippocampal place area [PPA]). Next, we use resting-state functional connectivity MRI analyses to demonstrate that this functional asymmetry is associated with differential intrinsic activity correlations of the right versus left PPA with regions critically involved in perceptual versus conceptual processing, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the PPA comprises lateralized subregions across the cerebral hemispheres that are engaged in functionally dissociable yet complementary components of visual scene analysis. Furthermore, this functional asymmetry is associated with differential intrinsic functional connectivity of the PPA with distinct brain areas known to mediate dissociable cognitive processes.

  7. Stochastic left-right neuronal asymmetry in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqadah, Amel; Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Xiong, Rui; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-12-19

    Left-right asymmetry in the nervous system is observed across species. Defects in left-right cerebral asymmetry are linked to several neurological diseases, but the molecular mechanisms underlying brain asymmetry in vertebrates are still not very well understood. The Caenorhabditis elegans left and right amphid wing 'C' (AWC) olfactory neurons communicate through intercellular calcium signalling in a transient embryonic gap junction neural network to specify two asymmetric subtypes, AWC(OFF) (default) and AWC(ON) (induced), in a stochastic manner. Here, we highlight the molecular mechanisms that establish and maintain stochastic AWC asymmetry. As the components of the AWC asymmetry pathway are highly conserved, insights from the model organism C. elegans may provide a window onto how brain asymmetry develops in humans.This article is part of the themed issue 'Provocative questions in left-right asymmetry'.

  8. Abnormal asymmetry of brain connectivity in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribolsi, Michele; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Siracusano, Alberto; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a growing body of data has revealed that beyond a dysfunction of connectivity among different brain areas in schizophrenia patients (SCZ), there is also an abnormal asymmetry of functional connectivity compared with healthy subjects. The loss of the cerebral torque and the abnormalities of gyrification, with an increased or more complex cortical folding in the right hemisphere may provide an anatomical basis for such aberrant connectivity in SCZ. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown a significant reduction of leftward asymmetry in some key white-matter tracts in SCZ. In this paper, we review the studies that investigated both structural brain asymmetry and asymmetry of functional connectivity in healthy subjects and SCZ. From an analysis of the existing literature on this topic, we can hypothesize an overall generally attenuated asymmetry of functional connectivity in SCZ compared to healthy controls. Such attenuated asymmetry increases with the duration of the disease and correlates with psychotic symptoms. Finally, we hypothesize that structural deficits across the corpus callosum may contribute to the abnormal asymmetry of intra-hemispheric connectivity in schizophrenia.

  9. Puzzling asymmetries

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    In a recently published paper, the LHCb Collaboration has reported on a possible deviation from the Standard Model. Theorists are now working to calculate precisely this effect and to evaluate the implications that such unexpected result could have on the established theory.   The Standard Model is able to predict the decay rates of particles with high precision. In most cases, experimentalists confirm the value predicted by theory and the figure is added to the official publications. However, this time, things seem to have taken a different route. Studying data collected in 2011, the LHCb Collaboration found that in a specific decay – a B particle transforming into a K particle plus two charged muons (B -> Kμ-μ+) – the branching ratio of the neutral B in the corresponding decay (i.e. B0 -> K0μ-μ+) is different from that of the positively charged B (i.e. B+ -> K+μ-μ+). Such an “isospin asymmetry&rdquo...

  10. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  11. Abnormal Asymmetry of Brain Connectivity in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Ribolsi, Michele; Zafiris J Daskalakis; Siracusano, Alberto; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a growing body of data has revealed that beyond a dysfunction of connectivity among different brain areas in schizophrenia patients (SCZ), there is also an abnormal asymmetry of functional connectivity compared with healthy subjects. The loss of the cerebral torque and the abnormalities of gyrification, with an increased or more complex cortical folding in the right hemisphere may provide an anatomical basis for such aberrant connectivity in SCZ. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imagin...

  12. Assimetria cerebral e lateralização da linguagem: déficits nucleares na esquizofrenia como indicadores da predisposição genética Asimetría cerebral y lateralización del lenguaje: déficits nucleares en la esquizofrenia como indicadores de predisposición genética Cerebral asymmetry and the lateralization of language: core deficits in schizophrenia as pointers to the genetic predisposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Crow

    2004-08-01

    anatómicos, funcionales y genéticos. HALLAZGOS RECIENTES: Estudios de imagen, post mortem y anatómicos, demuestran evidencias de una reducción o reversión de aspectos de asimetría, particularmente en la corteza de asociación occipito-temporo-parietal. En algunos estudios, hay interacción con el sexo. Hay evidencias de que una alteración en el lóbulo temporal izquierdo es, a veces, progresiva. Estudios funcionales agregan credibilidad al concepto de que la lateralización del lenguaje es reducida y, en algunos casos, revertida. RESUMEN: La dimensión de la asimetría se destaca como la variable que puede dar significación a las observaciones entre campos de investigación y que proporciona una solución para la base genética de la psicosis. Estudios de gemelos monocigóticos discordantes vienen presentando fuertes indicaciones de que la variación relevante es epigenética; ello es consistente con la posibilidad de que la variación esté relacionada a alteraciones estructurales recientes (la trasposición replicativa Xq21.3/Yp de los cromosomas sexuales.PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cerebral asymmetry (the torque from right frontal to left occipital is the defining feature of the human brain, and as Broca proposed, the putative neural correlate of language. If as has been suggested schizophrenia is the price that Homo sapiens pays for language, the torque together with its functional correlates is of central significance. Recent evidence from anatomical, functional and genetic studies is reviewed. RECENT FINDINGS: Both post-mortem and anatomical imaging studies show evidence of a reduction or reversal of aspects of asymmetry particularly in the occipito-temporo-parietal association cortex. In some studies there is an interaction with sex. There is evidence that change in the left temporal lobe is sometimes progressive. Functional studies add substance to the concept that the lateralization of language is reduced and in some aspects reversed. SUMMARY: The dimension of

  13. The heritability of chimpanzee and human brain asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Robles, Aida; Hopkins, William D; Schapiro, Steven J; Sherwood, Chet C

    2016-12-28

    Human brains are markedly asymmetric in structure and lateralized in function, which suggests a relationship between these two properties. The brains of other closely related primates, such as chimpanzees, show similar patterns of asymmetry, but to a lesser degree, indicating an increase in anatomical and functional asymmetry during hominin evolution. We analysed the heritability of cerebral asymmetry in chimpanzees and humans using classic morphometrics, geometric morphometrics, and quantitative genetic techniques. In our analyses, we separated directional asymmetry and fluctuating asymmetry (FA), which is indicative of environmental influences during development. We show that directional patterns of asymmetry, those that are consistently present in most individuals in a population, do not have significant heritability when measured through simple linear metrics, but they have marginally significant heritability in humans when assessed through three-dimensional configurations of landmarks that reflect variation in the size, position, and orientation of different cortical regions with respect to each other. Furthermore, genetic correlations between left and right hemispheres are substantially lower in humans than in chimpanzees, which points to a relatively stronger environmental influence on left-right differences in humans. We also show that the level of FA has significant heritability in both species in some regions of the cerebral cortex. This suggests that brain responsiveness to environmental influences, which may reflect neural plasticity, has genetic bases in both species. These results have implications for the evolvability of brain asymmetry and plasticity among humans and our close relatives.

  14. Hemispheric Asymmetries and Cognitive Flexibility: An ERP and sLORETA Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Gunturkun, Onur; Beste, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Although functional cerebral asymmetries (FCAs) affect all cognitive domains, their modulation of the efficacy of specific executive functions is largely unexplored. In the present study, we used a lateralized version of the task switching paradigm to investigate the relevance of hemispheric asymmetries for cognitive control processes. Words were…

  15. The EPIC model of functional asymmetries: implications for research on laterality in the auditory and other systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauter, Judith L

    2007-05-01

    More than a century after it was first suggested that behaviors such as speech production and perception might be lateralized in the human brain, many basic questions still remain regarding the nature and basis of right-left functional asymmetries (FAs). The lack of answers to what seem to be a straightforward set of questions may be due to two methodological aspects of laterality research which have hampered work in brain and behavior in general and lateralities in particular. The first is the absence of a biologically based, psychophysically-defined taxonomy of stimulus/gesture features for use in tests of laterality. As a result, many researchers resort to cognitive constructs for describing the bases of asymmetries, a decision which has created a gulf separating experimental as well as theoretical work on asymmetries from the biological realities of sensory and motor processing, within the brain as well as at the body periphery. The second obstacle is the lack of a valid taxonomy for individuals. Individual differences are ubiquitous in human subjects as well as non-human animals, yet are typically averaged away as noise rather than respected as possible sources of information. Studies of asymmetry often reveal dramatic individual differences in both the direction and magnitude of asymmetries, yet, when subjected to averaging and group statistics, these often result in insignificant results. This paper reviews two taxonomies which may address some of these problems: the EPIC Model of Functional Asymmetries, and the related Trimodal Model of Brain Organization. The EPIC model classifies functional asymmetries according to four domains (Extrapersonal space, Peripersonal space, Intrapersonal space, and Coordination) and assigns responsibility for these four domains differentially to the two cerebral hemispheres--the right side is seen as "polypotent," responsible for processing in three of the domains, while the left side focuses on processing in peripersonal

  16. Preschoolers' Mental Rotation: Sex Differences in Hemispheric Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Nicola; Jansen, Petra; Heil, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Mental rotation performance has been found to produce one of the largest sex differences in cognition accompanied by sex differences in functional cerebral asymmetry. Although sex differences in mental rotation performance can be reliably demonstrated as early as age 5 years old, that is, long before puberty, no data exist as to whether…

  17. Age-Related Differences in Bilateral Asymmetry in Cycling Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Jensen, Jody L.

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral asymmetry, a form of limb laterality in the context of moving two limbs, emerges in childhood. Children and adults show lateral preference in tasks that involve the upper and lower limbs. The importance of research in limb laterality is the insight it could provide about lateralized functions of the cerebral hemispheres. Analyzing…

  18. Asymmetries at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartos, Pavol [Comenius U.

    2014-10-28

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark pair production asymmetry and present the new result of bottom-quark pair production asymmetry. By looking at the results obtained by the CDF experiment, one can see a discrepancy in both $t\\bar{t}$ inclusive and lepton-based measurements. The D0 results of the $t\\bar{t}$ production asymmetry are compatible with the standard-model predictions as well as with the CDF results. The CDF measurement of $b\\bar{b}$ production asymmetry presents consistency with both zero and with the standard-model predictions.

  19. Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on some complementary approaches, such as acupuncture and yoga, but there have been fewer studies on other approaches, so much less is known about them. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is sponsoring research to learn more about ...

  20. Fluctuating Asymmetry and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    The general factor of mental ability ("g") may reflect general biological fitness. If so, "g"-loaded measures such as Raven's progressive matrices should be related to morphological measures of fitness such as fluctuating asymmetry (FA: left-right asymmetry of a set of typically left-right symmetrical body traits such as finger…

  1. Ataque cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi Tan, Yuri; Fundación Valle de Lili

    1998-01-01

    ¿Qué es un ataque cerebral?/¿Qué tipos de ataque cerebral existen?/¿Cuáles son los síntomas de un ataque cerebral?/Factores de riesgo para un ataque cerebral/Tratamiento médico del ataque cerebral/¿por qué es importante acudir temprano cuando se presentan las señales de alarma?/ Manejo preventivo del ataque cerebral isquémico/Tratamiento quirúrgico del ataque cerebral/Enfermedad vascular cerebral hemorrágica/¿Cómo está constituido el grupo de ataque cerebral de la fundación Clínica Valle d...

  2. Structural asymmetry of cortical visual areas is related to ocular dominance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina H; Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal M

    2015-01-01

    The grey matter of the human brain is asymmetrically distributed between the cerebral hemispheres. This asymmetry includes visual areas, but its relevance to visual function is not understood. Voxel-based morphometry is a well-established technique for localization and quantification of cerebral...... grey matter on the basis of MR images. This method has been used previously for interhemispheric comparison, but without examining the functional implications of the identified anatomical asymmetries of the visual system. The aim of the present study was to relate anatomical interhemispheric...... asymmetries to asymmetries of visual function. We examined grey matter asymmetries of visual areas in a large population (n=56) of ophthalmologically and neurologically healthy individuals. We used state-of-the-art 3 T MRI and voxel-based morphometry to relate the visual parameters, (a) ocular dominance, (b...

  3. Evidence from intrinsic activity that asymmetry of the human brain is controlled by multiple factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hesheng; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Sepulcre, Jorge; Hedden, Trey; Buckner, Randy L

    2009-12-01

    Cerebral lateralization is a fundamental property of the human brain and a marker of successful development. Here we provide evidence that multiple mechanisms control asymmetry for distinct brain systems. Using intrinsic activity to measure asymmetry in 300 adults, we mapped the most strongly lateralized brain regions. Both men and women showed strong asymmetries with a significant, but small, group difference. Factor analysis on the asymmetric regions revealed 4 separate factors that each accounted for significant variation across subjects. The factors were associated with brain systems involved in vision, internal thought (the default network), attention, and language. An independent sample of right- and left-handed individuals showed that hand dominance affects brain asymmetry but differentially across the 4 factors supporting their independence. These findings show the feasibility of measuring brain asymmetry using intrinsic activity fluctuations and suggest that multiple genetic or environmental mechanisms control cerebral lateralization.

  4. Cerebral hyperperfusion following carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Sørensen, O;

    1987-01-01

    , occurred in the low pressure ratio group, while the hemispheric asymmetry on average was unchanged in the high pressure ratio group. This relative hyperemia was most pronounced 2 to 4 days following reconstruction. The marked hyperemia, absolute as well as relative, in patients with a low ICA/CCA pressure...... ratio suggests a temporary impairment of autoregulation. Special care should be taken to avoid postoperative hypertension in such patients, who typically have preoperative hypoperfusion, to avoid the occurrence of cerebral edema or hemorrhage....

  5. Lowering of Asymmetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. K. Pandey; K. M. Hiremath; G. Yellaiah

    2017-03-01

    Asymmetry, a well established fact, can be extracted from various solar atmospheric activity indices. Although asymmetry is being localized within short time scale, it also persists at different time scales. In the present study we examine the character and nature of asymmetry at various time scales by optimizing the data set, in units of Carrington Rotations (CRs), for Sunspot Area (SA) and soft X-ray flare index (FISXR). We find from three solar cycles (21-23) that at a small time scale (viz., daily, CRs and monthly) activity appears to be asymmetric with less significance. At larger time scales (≥01 CRs) strength of asymmetry enhances. Number of significant asymmetry points probably depends upon the solar heights. For different combination of data, asymmetry strength appears to be lowered at certain periods ∼06, ∼12, ∼18 CRs (164, 327 and 492 days i.e., harmonics of ∼1.3 years. Owing to similar behavior of emergence of magnetic flux, it is conjectured that emergence of flux on the surface probably contributes to the asymmetry of the solar activity.

  6. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  7. Trunk asymmetry and handedness in 8245 school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivas, Theodoros B; Vasiliadis, Elias S; Polyzois, Vasilios D; Mouzakis, Vasilios

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this report is the appraisal of a possible correlation of trunk asymmetry assessed with a scoliometer and lateralization of the brain as expressed by handedness in a school aged population. Many (8245) students (4173 girls and 4072 boys), 6-18 years of age were examined. A checklist was completed for each student including handedness and trunk asymmetry. The standing forward bending test was performed using the Pruijs scoliometer and the examined children were divided into three groups for each of the three examined regions (mid-thoracic, thoracolumbar and lumbar) according to the recorded asymmetry (no asymmetry, 2-7 degrees and > or =7 degrees ). Ninety-one per cent of children were right-handed, while 9% were left-handed. A significant statistical correlation of trunk asymmetry and handedness was found both in boys and girls in the group of asymmetry 2-7 degrees at mid-thoracic (p < 0.038) but not at thoracolumbar and at lumbar region. These findings show that there is significant correlation of mild mid-thoracic asymmetry and the dominant brain hemisphere in terms of handedness, in children who are entitled at risk of developing scoliosis. These findings are implicating the possible aetiopathogenic role of cerebral cortex function in the determination of the thoracic surface morphology of the trunk.

  8. Complementary Coffee Cups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchoff, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    What may have been the birth of a new calculus problem took place when the author noticed that two coffee cups, one convex and one concave, fit nicely together, and he wondered which held more coffee. The fact that their volumes were about equal led to the topic of this article: complementary surfaces of revolution with equal volumes.

  9. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the practitioner to ask about the risks and benefits of treatment — the same kinds of things you'd do if you were interviewing a new doctor. You may have already used a complementary or alternative practice, like yoga or massage, and not even thought about it! ...

  10. Cerebral malaria Malaria cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blair Trujillo

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains to be answered; how the host-parasite interaction in the vascular space interferes transiently with cerebral function? Recently, the beta amyloid precursor peptide has been employed as marker of neural injury in CM. It is expected that the beta amyloid precursor peptide will help to understand the pathogenesis of CM in complicated patients of endemic areas of Colombia. La malaria Cerebral (MC es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1 citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2 formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3 producción de citoquinas y activación de segundos mensajeros y, 4 apertura de la barrera hematoencefálica. Sin embargo, queda un interrogante sin resolver aún: ¿qué proceso se lleva a cabo para que el parásito, desde el espacio microvascular, pueda interferir transitoriamente con la función cerebral? Recientemente se ha utilizado el precursor de la proteína b-Amiloide como un marcador de daño neuronal en MC; este precursor será de gran ayuda en futuras investigaciones realizadas en nuestro medio que aporten información para comprender la patogénesis de la MC.

  11. Auditory Evoked Potentials and Hand Preference in 6-Month-Old Infants: Possible Gender-Related Differences in Cerebral Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shucard, Janet L.; Shucard, David W.

    1990-01-01

    Verbal and musical stimuli were presented to infants in a study of the relations of evoked potential left-right amplitude asymmetries to gender and hand preference. There was a relation between asymmetry and hand preference, and for girls, between asymmetry and stimulus condition. Results suggest a gender difference in cerebral hemisphere…

  12. Structural connectivity asymmetry in the neonatal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Meaney, Michael J; Qiu, Anqi

    2013-07-15

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy.

  13. The influence of sex chromosome aneuploidy on brain asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie, Roozbeh; Daly, Eileen M; Cutter, William J; Murphy, Declan G M; Robertson, Dene M W; DeLisi, Lynn E; Mackay, Clare E; Barrick, Thomas R; Crow, Timothy J; Roberts, Neil

    2009-01-05

    The cognitive deficits present in individuals with sex chromosome aneuploidies suggest that hemispheric differentiation of function is determined by an X-Y homologous gene [Crow (1993); Lancet 342:594-598]. In particular, females with Turner's syndrome (TS) who have only one X-chromosome exhibit deficits of spatial ability whereas males with Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) who possess a supernumerary X-chromosome are delayed in acquiring words. Since spatial and verbal abilities are generally associated with right and left hemispheric function, such deficits may relate to anomalies of cerebral asymmetry. We therefore applied a novel image analysis technique to investigate the relationship between sex chromosome dosage and structural brain asymmetry. Specifically, we tested Crow's prediction that the magnitude of the brain torque (i.e., a combination of rightward frontal and leftward occipital asymmetry) would, as a function of sex chromosome dosage, be respectively decreased in TS women and increased in KS men, relative to genotypically normal controls. We found that brain torque was not significantly different in TS women and KS men, in comparison to controls. However, TS women exhibited significantly increased leftward brain asymmetry, restricted to the posterior of the brain and focused on the superior temporal and parietal-occipital association cortex, while KS men showed a trend for decreased brain asymmetry throughout the frontal lobes. The findings suggest that the number of sex chromosomes influences the development of brain asymmetry not simply to modify the torque but in a complex pattern along the antero-posterior axis.

  14. TRANSVERSITY SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOER,D.

    2001-04-27

    The theoretical aspects of two leading twist transversity single spin asymmetries, one arising from the Collins effect and one from the interference fragmentation functions, are reviewed. Issues of factorization, evolution and Sudakov factors for the relevant observables are discussed. These theoretical considerations pinpoint the most realistic scenarios towards measurements of transversity.

  15. Early signs of brain asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corballis, Michael C

    2013-11-01

    A new study shows a leftward asymmetry of the choroid plexus in two-thirds of first-trimester human fetuses. This is the earliest brain asymmetry so far identified and may be a precursor to other asymmetries, including that of the temporal planum, which is evident from the 31st week of gestation.

  16. [MRI of the semicircular canals in cranio-facial asymmetries and craniomandibular syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudrillard, J C; Rousié, D; Foucart, H; Defache, C; Hache, J C; Van Tichelen, P; Lerais, J M

    1995-09-01

    The cranio-mandibular syndrome (CMS) is often secondary to an cranio-facial asymmetry (CFA); it associate a painful masticatory dysfunction syndrome with functional and aching clinical signs in relation with a functional torticollis required for oculo-labyrinthal equilibration maintenance. Our anatomical and functional MRI protocol uses tridimensional study of semi-circular canals (SCC) up relation to the medial cerebral axis (MCA), and permit to measure precisely these CFA and propose, with a multispecialist approach, an adapted treatment of the SCM. Application of MRI to SCC asymmetry looks to its future use for spatial intracranial referencial of cerebral structures.

  17. Complementary acupuncture in Parkinson's disease: a spect study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Jiang, Xuemei; Zhuo, Ying; Wik, Gustav

    2010-02-01

    We studied cerebral effects of complementary acupuncture in Parkinson's disease using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) measures of 99mTc-ECD and 99mTc-TRODAT-4, before and after five weeks of treatment. Ten patients were randomly assigned to receive levodopa alone (controls) or levodopa and complementary scalp electro-acupuncture. Before treatment, no hemispheric regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) differences were found, whereas striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) activity was lower in the most affected hemisphere. Treatment with levodopa alone did not change rCBF, whereas it increased basal ganglion DAT activity in the most affected hemisphere. Patients who received levodopa and complementary acupuncture had increased rCBF in the frontal lobe, the occipital lobe, the basal ganglion, and the cerebellum in the most affected hemisphere as compared to baseline, but there were no changes in basal ganglia DAT levels. Thus, complementary acupuncture treatment in Parkinson's disease may affect rCBF but not basal ganglion DAT.

  18. Prevalence of lateral ventricle asymmetry in brain MRI studies of neurologically normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetta, Mauro; De Risio, Luisa; Newton, Richard; Dennis, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetry of the cerebral lateral ventricles is a common finding in cross-sectional imaging of otherwise normal canine brains and has been assumed to be incidental. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the prevalence of ventricular asymmetry in brain MRI studies of normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Brain MRI archives were searched for 100 neurologically normal dogs (Group 1) and 100 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (Group 2). For each dog, asymmetry of the lateral ventricles was subjectively classified as absent, mild, moderate, and severe based on a consensus of two observers who were unaware of group status. Ventricular areas were measured from transverse T1W images at the level of the interthalamic adhesion. An asymmetry ratio was calculated as the ratio of the larger to smaller ventricular transverse area. There was excellent agreement between subjective assessments of ventricular asymmetry and quantitative assessments using asymmetry ratios (k = 0.995). The prevalence of asymmetry was 38% in Group 1 dogs and 44% in Group 2 dogs. Assymmetry was scored as mild in the majority of Group 2 dogs. There was no significant association between presence/absence and degree of ventricular asymmetry vs. dog group, age, gender, or skull conformation. Findings from the current study supported previously published assumptions that asymmetry of the lateral cerebral ventricles is an incidental finding in MRI studies of the canine brain.

  19. Bessel Weighted Asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakian, Harut [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Gamberg, Leonard [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rossi, Patrizia [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Prokudin, Alexei [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    We review the concept of Bessel weighted asymmetries for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and focus on the cross section in Fourier space, conjugate to the outgoing hadron’s transverse momentum, where convolutions of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions and fragmentation functions become simple products. Individual asymmetric terms in the cross section can be projected out by means of a generalized set of weights involving Bessel functions. The procedure is applied to studies of the double longitudinal spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering using a new dedicated Monte Carlo generator which includes quark intrinsic transverse momentum within the generalized parton model. We observe a few percent systematic offset of the Bessel-weighted asymmetry obtained from Monte Carlo extraction compared to input model calculations, which is due to the limitations imposed by the energy and momentum conservation at the given energy and hard scale Q2. We find that the Bessel weighting technique provides a powerful and reliable tool to study the Fourier transform of TMDs with controlled systematics due to experimental acceptances and resolutions with different TMD model inputs.

  20. Vasoespasmo cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio A. F. de Salles

    1987-09-01

    Full Text Available Vasoespasmo cerebral ocorre em patologias como enxaqueca, hemorragia subaracnóidea, trauma de crânio, após isquemia e/ou hipoxia. A fisiopatologia do vasoespasmo cerebral nestas patologias não está completamente desvendada. Neste artigo são analisados os fatores neuroquímicos e morfológicos responsáveis pelo controle circulatório cerebral. As alterações circulatórias que seguem a hemorragia subaracnóidea são utilizadas como exemplo. Conclui-se que fatores bioquímicos, fisiológicos e morfológicos são responsáveis pelas manifestações vasculares que ocorrem após a hemorragia subaracnóidea. Alternativas de tratamento do vasoespasmo cerebral são discutidas.

  1. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan.

  2. Detection of misery perfusion in the cerebral hemisphere with chronic unilateral major cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease using crossed cerebellar hypoperfusion: comparison of brain SPECT and PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Yoshiyasu; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Saito, Hideo; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Ogasawara, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Ogawa, Akira [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan); Iwate Medical University, Cyclotron Research Center, Morioka (Japan); Terasaki, Kazunori [Iwate Medical University, Cyclotron Research Center, Morioka (Japan); Yoshida, Kenji; Beppu, Takaaki; Kubo, Yoshitaka; Fujiwara, Shunrou [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan); Tsushima, Eiki [Hirosaki University, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hirosaki (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    In patients with unilateral internal carotid or middle cerebral artery (ICA or MCA) occlusive disease, the degree of crossed cerebellar hypoperfusion that is evident within a few months after the onset of stroke may reflect cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen in the affected cerebral hemisphere relative to that in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the ratio of blood flow asymmetry in the cerebellar hemisphere to blood flow asymmetry in the cerebral hemisphere on positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) correlates with oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) asymmetry in the cerebral hemisphere on PET in patients with chronic unilateral ICA or MCA occlusive disease and whether this blood flow ratio on SPECT detects misery perfusion in the affected cerebral hemisphere in such patients. Brain blood flow and OEF were assessed using {sup 15}O-PET and N-isopropyl-p-[{sup 123}I]iodoamphetamine ({sup 123}I-IMP) SPECT, respectively. All images were anatomically standardized using SPM2. A region of interest (ROI) was automatically placed in the bilateral MCA territories and in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres using a three-dimensional stereotaxic ROI template, and affected-to-contralateral asymmetry in the MCA territory or contralateral-to-affected asymmetry in the cerebellar hemisphere was calculated. Sixty-three patients with reduced blood flow in the affected cerebral hemisphere on {sup 123}I-IMP SPECT were enrolled in this study. A significant correlation was observed between MCA ROI asymmetry of PET OEF and the ratio of cerebellar hemisphere asymmetry of blood flow to MCA ROI asymmetry of blood flow on PET (r = 0.381, p = 0.0019) or SPECT (r = 0.459, p = 0.0001). The correlation coefficient was higher when reanalyzed in a subgroup of 43 patients undergoing a PET study within 3 months after the last ischemic event (r = 0.541, p = 0.0001 for PET; r = 0.609, p < 0

  3. Amygdala kindling modifies interhemispheric dopaminergic asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, M; Tomer, R; Houpt, S; Herberg, L J

    1987-04-01

    Brain dopamine is known to retard the development of kindled seizures, but it is uncertain whether kindling affects dopamine function. In the present study, rats were screened for cerebral dominance by recording their preferred direction of rotation when injected with d-amphetamine. Bipolar stimulating electrodes were then implanted in the amygdaloid complex of either the dominant or nondominant hemisphere (i.e., respectively, contra- and ipsilateral to the preferred direction of rotation; the dominant hemisphere identified in this way has been shown to contain higher concentrations of dopamine than the nondominant hemisphere). Kindling stimulation (or sham-kindling, in control rats) was applied through the electrodes two or three times daily for 21 days, and the rats were reassessed for amphetamine- and apomorphine-induced rotation, during and after the course of treatment. Kindling of the originally dominant hemisphere caused a diminution of rotational asymmetry as measured in tests 2 to 3 h after stimulation sessions, and in some rats led to a reversal in the preferred direction of amphetamine-induced rotation. Kindling of the nondominant hemisphere tended to accentuate the original amphetamine-induced asymmetry. The direction of rotation induced by a direct postsynaptic DA-receptor agonist (apomorphine) was not significantly affected by kindling of either hemisphere. It appears that kindling stimulation brings about a relatively inferior level of DA function on the stimulated vs. the nonstimulated side of the brain, and that this process depends mainly on changes occurring at a presynaptic level.

  4. Atypical Cerebral Lateralisation in Adults with Compensated Developmental Dyslexia Demonstrated Using Functional Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Sarah; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2009-01-01

    Functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound (fTCD) is a relatively new and non-invasive technique that assesses cerebral lateralisation through measurements of blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries. In this study fTCD was used to compare functional asymmetry during a word generation task between a group of 30 dyslexic adults and a…

  5. Facial Asymmetry and Emotional Expression

    CERN Document Server

    Pickin, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This report is about facial asymmetry, its connection to emotional expression, and methods of measuring facial asymmetry in videos of faces. The research was motivated by two factors: firstly, there was a real opportunity to develop a novel measure of asymmetry that required minimal human involvement and that improved on earlier measures in the literature; and secondly, the study of the relationship between facial asymmetry and emotional expression is both interesting in its own right, and important because it can inform neuropsychological theory and answer open questions concerning emotional processing in the brain. The two aims of the research were: first, to develop an automatic frame-by-frame measure of facial asymmetry in videos of faces that improved on previous measures; and second, to use the measure to analyse the relationship between facial asymmetry and emotional expression, and connect our findings with previous research of the relationship.

  6. White matter microstructure asymmetry: effects of volume asymmetry on fractional anisotropy asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, H; Hayashi, N; Ohtomo, K

    2013-02-12

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides information regarding white matter microstructure; however, macroscopic fiber architectures can affect DTI measures. A larger brain (fiber tract) has a 'relatively' smaller voxel size, and the voxels are less likely to contain more than one fiber orientation and more likely to have higher fractional anisotropy (FA). Previous DTI studies report left-to-right differences in the white matter; however, these may reflect true microscopic differences or be caused purely by volume differences. Using tract-based spatial statistics, we investigated left-to-right differences in white matter microstructure across the whole brain. Voxel-wise analysis revealed a large number of white matter volume asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. In many white matter regions, FA asymmetry was positively correlated with volume asymmetry. Voxel-wise analysis with adjustment for volume asymmetry revealed many white matter FA asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. The voxel-wise analysis showed a reduced number of regions with significant FA asymmetry compared with analysis performed without adjustment for volume asymmetry; however, the overall trend of the results was unchanged. The results of the present study suggest that these FA asymmetries are not caused by volume differences and reflect microscopic differences in the white matter.

  7. Assimetria cerebral e lateralização da linguagem: déficits nucleares na esquizofrenia como indicadores da predisposição genética Asimetría cerebral y lateralización del lenguaje: déficits nucleares en la esquizofrenia como indicadores de predisposición genética Cerebral asymmetry and the lateralization of language: core deficits in schizophrenia as pointers to the genetic predisposition

    OpenAIRE

    Crow, Timothy J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Assimetria cerebral (o torque do frontal direito em relação ao occipital esquerdo) é a característica definidora do cérebro humano e, conforme proposto por Broca, o correlato neural putativo da linguagem. Se, conforme sugerido, a esquizofrenia é o preço que Homo sapiens precisa pagar pela linguagem, o torque, juntamente com seus correlatos funcionais, é de fundamental importância. São revisadas recentes evidências obtidas a partir de estudos anatômicos, funcionais e genéticos. ACHAD...

  8. Psychological Correlates of Handedness and Corpus Callosum Asymmetry in Autism: The Left Hemisphere Dysfunction Theory Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Dorothea L.; Chura, Lindsay R.; Holt, Rosemary J.; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward T.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Spencer, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Rightward cerebral lateralization has been suggested to be involved in the neuropathology of autism spectrum conditions. We investigated functional and neuroanatomical asymmetry, in terms of handedness and corpus callosum measurements in male adolescents with autism, their unaffected siblings and controls, and their associations with executive…

  9. Vasoespasmo cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Vasoespasmo cerebral ocorre em patologias como enxaqueca, hemorragia subaracnóidea, trauma de crânio, após isquemia e/ou hipoxia. A fisiopatologia do vasoespasmo cerebral nestas patologias não está completamente desvendada. Neste artigo são analisados os fatores neuroquímicos e morfológicos responsáveis pelo controle circulatório cerebral. As alterações circulatórias que seguem a hemorragia subaracnóidea são utilizadas como exemplo. Conclui-se que fatores bioquímicos, fisiológicos e morfológi...

  10. Matter-antimatter asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The Conference is devoted to a multidisciplinary study of matter-antimatter asymmetry and, in particular, from the point of view of particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. A number of topics, such as the practical applications of antimatter in medical imaging, of particular interest to non-specialists, will also be briefly covered. More than thirty years after the discovery of CP violation in the kaon system, precision experiments with kaons at CERN and Fermilab have demonstrated the existence of direct CP violation, opening a window on a hitherto poorly explored part of particle physics. On the one hand, two experiments devoted mainly to CP violation in B mesons, BABAR and Belle, are beginning to test CP violation in the Standard Model in a decisive way. On the other hand, balloon experiments and the space-based AMS project are circumscribing precise limits on the cosmological abundance of antimatter. Finally, the fundamental problem of cosmological matter-antimatter asymmetry at a Grand Unification scale or at the Electroweak phase transition has been the object of intense theoretical activity in recent years. This document gathers most of the slides that have been presented in the plenary and parallel sessions.

  11. Believing in paranormal phenomena: relations to asymmetry of body and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulter, Günter; Papousek, Ilona

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the possible relationship between established measures of body and brain asymmetries and individual differences in paranormal beliefs. In addition to behavioural measures of cerebral laterality, measures of facial features and finger length were taken to calculate body asymmetry scores and indicators of fluctuating asymmetry (average absolute differences between left and right body features). Both the direction and degree of laterality measures were used. In addition to that, quantitative measures of inconsistency of cerebral lateralization were obtained. Results indicated that a stronger belief in paranormal phenomena was associated with fluctuating asymmetry of finger length, and that this aspect of body asymmetry may be related to greater intraindividual variability in the degree of 'atypical' functional lateralization. This intraindividual variability index, in turn, significantly predicted strength of belief in the paranormal. Belief in the paranormal was also higher in women than men and it was negatively correlated with the education level. In sum, these findings suggest that a part of the variance of strength of belief in paranormal phenomena can be explained by patterns of functional hemispheric asymmetry that may be related to perturbations during fetal development.

  12. A Note on Complementary Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn Javascript on. Photo: iStock Herbal supplements, meditation, chiropractic manipulation, and acupuncture are types of complementary ... with standard care. Chiropractic provides some benefit for low back pain, however conventional and chiropractic care appear to be ...

  13. Early-light embryonic stimulation suggests a second route, via gene activation, to cerebral lateralization in vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Cinzia Chiandetti; Jessica Galliussi; Andrew, Richard J; Giorgio Vallortigara

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors determine the asymmetrical position of vertebrate embryos allowing asymmetric environmental stimulation to shape cerebral lateralization. In birds, late-light stimulation, just before hatching, on the right optic nerve triggers anatomical and functional cerebral asymmetries. However, some brain asymmetries develop in absence of embryonic light stimulation. Furthermore, early-light action affects lateralization in the transparent zebrafish embryos before their visual system is ...

  14. Dark energy from complementary graviton

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Yugo; Kawamura, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Based on a new kind of complementary principle, we describe physics concerning the cosmological constant problem in the framework of effective field theory and suggest that a dominant part of dark energy can originate from the zero point energy due to another graviton that performs a complementary role vis-a-vis the ordinary one and obtains a tiny mass through the coupling to the vacuum energy of matters.

  15. Measurements of W Charge Asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzbauer, J. L. [Mississippi U.

    2015-10-06

    We discuss W boson and lepton charge asymmetry measurements from W decays in the electron channel, which were made using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of RunII data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The electron charge asymmetry is presented as a function of pseudo-rapidity out to |$\\eta$| $\\le$ 3.2, in five symmetric and asymmetric kinematic bins of electron transverse momentum and the missing transverse energy of the event. We also give the W charge asymmetry as a function of W boson rapidity. The asymmetries are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. These charge asymmetry measurements will allow more accurate determinations of the proton parton distribution functions and are the most precise to date.

  16. Cerebral specialization. [greater performance efficiency for certain mental abilities or processes by one cerebral hemisphere over another

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robin D.; Hopkins, William D.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of greater performance efficiency for certain mental abilities or processes in one cerebral hemisphere rather than the other is referred to as 'cerebral lateralization'. The experimental paradigm for lateralization research involves the study of patients with one damaged hemisphere, which prevents their performance of a certain task or function; this approach, however, presents many difficulties in extrapolating to brain function in normal patients. Attention is presently given to gender differences in lateralization, cerebral asymmetries in other species, and the evolutionary bases of hemispheric specialization.

  17. Handedness, heritability, neurocognition and brain asymmetry in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep-Soboslay, Amy; Hyde, Thomas M; Callicott, Joseph P; Lener, Marc S; Verchinski, Beth A; Apud, José A; Weinberger, Daniel R; Elvevåg, Brita

    2010-10-01

    Higher rates of non-right-handedness (i.e. left- and mixed-handedness) have been reported in schizophrenia and have been a centrepiece for theories of anomalous lateralization in this disorder. We investigated whether non-right-handedness is (i) more prevalent in patients as compared with unaffected siblings and healthy unrelated control participants; (ii) familial; (iii) associated with disproportionately poorer neurocognition; and (iv) associated with grey matter volume asymmetries. We examined 1445 participants (375 patients with schizophrenia, 502 unaffected siblings and 568 unrelated controls) using the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory, a battery of neuropsychological tasks and structural magnetic resonance imaging data. Patients displayed a leftward shift in Edinburgh Handedness Inventory laterality quotient scores as compared with both their unaffected siblings and unrelated controls, but this finding disappeared when sex was added to the model. Moreover, there was no evidence of increased familial risk for non-right-handedness. Non-right-handedness was not associated with disproportionate neurocognitive disadvantage or with grey matter volume asymmetries in the frontal pole, lateral occipital pole or temporal pole. Non-right-handedness was associated with a significant reduction in left asymmetry in the superior temporal gyrus in both patients and controls. Our data neither provide strong support for 'atypical' handedness as a schizophrenia risk-associated heritable phenotype nor that it is associated with poorer neurocognition or anomalous cerebral asymmetries.

  18. Brain perfusion asymmetry in patients with oral somatic delusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Katagiri, Ayano; Watanabe, Motoko; Takenoshita, Miho; Sakuma, Tomomi; Sako, Emi; Sato, Yusuke; Toriihara, Akira; Uezato, Akihito; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Nishikawa, Toru; Motomura, Haruhiko; Toyofuku, Akira

    2013-06-01

    Oral cenesthopathy is a somatic delusion or hallucination involving the oral area and is categorized as a delusional disorder, somatic type. The pathophysiology of this intractable condition remains obscure. In this study, we clarified the pathophysiology of oral cenesthopathy by evaluating regional brain perfusion. We performed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using (99m)Tc-ethylcysteinate dimer in 16 subjects (cenesthopathy:control = 8:8). The SPECT images were visually assessed qualitatively, and quantitative analyses were also performed using a three-dimensional stereotactic region-of-interest template. The visual assessment revealed a right > left perfusion asymmetry in broad areas of the brain among the patients. The quantitative analysis confirmed that the regional cerebral blood flow values on the right side were significantly larger than those on the left side for most areas of the brain in the patients. A comparison of the R/(R + L) ratios in both groups confirmed the significant brain perfusion asymmetry between the two sides in the callosomarginal, precentral, and temporal regions in the patients. Qualitative evaluation of the SPECT images revealed right > left brain perfusion asymmetry in broad regions of the brain. Moreover, the quantitative analyses confirmed the perfusion asymmetry between the two sides in the frontal and temporal areas. Those may provide the key for elucidation of the pathophysiology of oral cenesthopathy.

  19. [Orthopedic approach to asymmetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardinet, Etienne; Duhart, Anne-Marie

    2002-06-01

    Asymmetry being a clinical manifestation of various pathologies, the orthopedic attitude greatly varies from one practitioner to another. Thanks to a better knowledge of the etiopathogenesis, the orthopedic approach in some particular cases reveals very effective, either alone or together with other therapeutics. In mandibular laterodeviations most often consecutive to a maxillary contraction, the best treatment is to expand maxilla which will allow a mandibular centric repositioning. This therapy is often achieved early to limit the asymmetric expression of growth and normalize the dental eruption. In unilateral condylar hypoplasias of variable extension, from a simple defect in condylar growth to a hemifacial microsomia, the therapeutic attitude has mostly evolved. A surgical orthodontic protocol can integrate an increasingly significant orthopedic phase in the course of time. Some authors show that a surgical case may be treated originally only with the help of orthopedics. The devices used are of activator or hyperpropulsor type. In unilateral condylar hyperplasias, orthopedic therapy must be considered with reservations.

  20. Lip asymmetry and smile aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batwa, Waeil; McDonald, Fraser; Cash, Alex

    2013-11-01

    Objective : To determine if lip asymmetry can affect lip aesthetics. Setting and Participants : A group of dentists (n = 40) and cleft patients (n = 40) were recruited from the dental hospital and cleft service. Interventions : Still photographic digital images of lips and teeth were manipulated to produce a computerized gradient of smile appearance with different degrees of upper-lip vertical asymmetry. These five photographs (with 0 mm representing "symmetry," and 1, 2, 2.5, and 3 mm, asymmetries) were assessed by participants using a 5-point Likert scale. Statistics : Descriptive statistics in addition to chi-square test were used to analyze the data. In order to satisfy the requirement of the chi-square test, the five smile ratings were reduced to three. Results : Lip asymmetry did affect relative smile aesthetics, as determined by dentists and cleft patients. Both the dentists and cleft patients rated the 0-mm photograph more attractive than the 2.5-mm and 3-mm smiles (P aesthetics. However, cleft patients and dentists were tolerant of minor asymmetries. This suggests that small degrees of lip asymmetry do not affect relative smile aesthetics as much as large degrees of lip asymmetry (2.5 mm or more).

  1. Parental concerns about complementary feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annemette; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Holm, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    Background/objectives:To investigate and analyze differences in parental concerns during earlier and later phases of complementary feeding.Subject/methods:Eight focus group interviews were conducted with 45 mothers of children aged 7 or 13 months. Deductive and inductive coding procedures were...... applied in the analysis.Results:There were marked differences in mothers' health concerns in early and in later phases of complementary feeding. In the early phase, feeding a child healthy food was an unquestioned and self-evident practice. The child's food was a specific category, separated from the rest....... Contested and partly contradictory practices resulted, including conscious acceptance of some intake of sugar and unhealthy fats. Perceived relevance of nutritional guidelines on complementary feeding was high in the early phase but declined later.Conclusion:Mothers' concerns and practices in the feeding...

  2. Hemispheric asymmetries: The comparative view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eOcklenburg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemispheric asymmetries play an important role in almost all cognitive functions. For more than a century, they were considered to be uniquely human but now an increasing number of findings in all vertebrate classes make it likely that we inherited our asymmetries from common ancestors. Thus, studying animal models could provide unique insights into the mechanisms of lateralization. We outline three such avenues of research by providing an overview of experiments on left-right differences in the connectivity of sensory systems, the embryonic determinants of brain asymmetries, and the genetics of lateralization. All these lines of studies could provide a wealth of insights into our own asymmetries that should and will be exploited by future analyses.

  3. Symmetry and Asymmetry Level Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Garrido

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Usually, Symmetry and Asymmetry are considered as two opposite sides of a coin: an object is either totally symmetric, or totally asymmetric, relative to pattern objects. Intermediate situations of partial symmetry or partial asymmetry are not considered. But this dichotomy on the classification lacks of a necessary and realistic gradation. For this reason, it is convenient to introduce "shade regions", modulating the degree of Symmetry (a fuzzy concept. Here, we will analyze the Asymmetry problem by successive attempts of description and by the introduction of the Asymmetry Level Function, as a new Normal Fuzzy Measure. Our results (both Theorems and Corollaries suppose to be some new and original contributions to such very active and interesting field of research. Previously, we proceed to the analysis of the state of art.

  4. Subtasks affecting step-length asymmetry in post-stroke hemiparetic walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woo-Sub

    2016-10-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether components from trunk progression (TP) and step length were related to step length asymmetry in walking in patients with hemiparesis. Gait analysis was performed for participants with hemiparesis and healthy controls. The distance between the pelvis and foot in the anterior-posterior axis was calculated at initial-contact. Step length was partitioned into anterior foot placement (AFP) and posterior foot placement (PFP). TP was partitioned into anterior trunk progression (ATP) and posterior trunk progression (PTP). The TP pattern and step length pattern were defined to represent intra-TP and intra-step spatial balance, respectively. Of 29 participants with hemiparesis, nine participants showed longer paretic step length, eight participants showed symmetric step length, and 12 participants showed shorter paretic step length. For the hemiparesis group, linear regression analysis showed that ATP asymmetry, AFP asymmetry, and TP patterns had significant predictability regarding step length asymmetry. Prolonged paretic ATP and shortened paretic AFP was the predominant pattern in the hemiparesis group, even in participants with symmetric step length. However, some participants showed same direction of ATP and AFP asymmetry. These findings indicate the following: (1) ATP asymmetries should be observed to determine individual characteristics of step length asymmetry, and (2) TP patterns can provide complementary information for non-paretic limb compensation.

  5. Looking for charming asymmetries

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    New results presented by the LHCb collaboration on the decay of particles containing a “charm” quark delve deeper into the mystery of matter-antimatter asymmetry.   A view of the LHCb experimental cavern. (Photo: Maximilien Brice/CERN) One of the biggest challenges in physics is to understand why everything we see in our universe seems to be formed only of matter, whereas the Big Bang should have created equal amounts of matter and antimatter. CERN’s LHCb experiment is one of the best hopes for physicists looking to solve this longstanding mystery. At the VIII International Workshop on Charm Physics, which took place in Bologna earlier this month, the LHCb Collaboration presented the most precise measurement to date of a phenomenon called Charge-Parity (CP) violation among particles that contain a charm quark. CP symmetry states that laws of physics are the same if a particle is interchanged with its anti-particle (the “C” part) and if its spatia...

  6. [Dreams and interhemispheric asymmetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korabel'nikova, E A; Golubev, V L

    2001-01-01

    The dreams of 103 children and adolescents, aged 10-17 years, have been studied. The test group included 78 patients with neurotic disorders; control one consisted of 25 healthy subjects. Dream features, which were common for those with preferentially left asymmetry profile both in patients as well as in healthy subjects, were: less expressed novelty factor and frequent appearance of rare phenomena, such as "déjà vu in wakefulness", reality, "mixed" (overlapped) dreams, prolonged dreams in repeat sleep, frequent changes of personages and scenes of action. Left-hander dream peculiarities, being detected only in neurotic patients but not in healthy subjects, emerged as lucid phenomena deficit, "dream in dreams" and "dream reminiscence in dream" syndrome, which have been found only in left-handers. Right and left hemispheres seem to contribute in different ways to a dream formation. In authors believe that the left hemisphere seems to provide dream origin while the right hemisphere provides dream vividness, figurativeness and affective activation level.

  7. Industrial Evolution Through Complementary Convergence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev Christensen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The article addresses the dynamics through which product markets become derailed from early product life cycle (PLC)-tracks and engaged in complementary convergence with other product markets or industries. We compare and contrast the theories that can explain, respectively, the PLC...

  8. PERIODIC COMPLEMENTARY BINARY SEQUENCE PAIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuChengqian; ZhaoXiaoqun

    2002-01-01

    A new set of binary sequences-Periodic Complementary Binary Sequence Pair (PCSP)is proposed .A new class of block design-Difference Family Pair (DFP)is also proposed .The relationship between PCSP and DFP,the properties and exising conditions of PCSP and the recursive constructions for PCSP are given.

  9. PERIODIC COMPLEMENTARY BINARY SEQUENCE PAIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chengqian; Zhao Xiaoqun

    2002-01-01

    A new set of binary sequences-Periodic Complementary Binary Sequence Pair (PCSP) is proposed. A new class of block design-Difference Family Pair (DFP) is also proposed.The relationship between PCSP and DFP, the properties and existing conditions of PCSP and the recursive constructions for PCSP are given.

  10. CMB Maximum Temperature Asymmetry Axis: Alignment with Other Cosmic Asymmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We use a global pixel based estimator to identify the axis of the residual Maximum Temperature Asymmetry (MTA) (after the dipole subtraction) of the WMAP 7 year Internal Linear Combination (ILC) CMB temperature sky map. The estimator is based on considering the temperature differences between opposite pixels in the sky at various angular resolutions (4 degrees-15 degrees and selecting the axis that maximizes this difference. We consider three large scale Healpix resolutions (N_{side}=16 (3.7 degrees), N_{side}=8 (7.3 degrees) and N_{side}=4 (14.7 degrees)). We compare the direction and magnitude of this asymmetry with three other cosmic asymmetry axes (\\alpha dipole, Dark Energy Dipole and Dark Flow) and find that the four asymmetry axes are abnormally close to each other. We compare the observed MTA axis with the corresponding MTA axes of 10^4 Gaussian isotropic simulated ILC maps (based on LCDM). The fraction of simulated ILC maps that reproduces the observed magnitude of the MTA asymmetry and alignment wit...

  11. Trunk asymmetry in juveniles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triantafyllopoulos Georgios

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trunk asymmetry (TA is a common phenomenon in children, but its incidence in juveniles is not known. The present cross sectional study reports TA in normal juveniles and provides data which describe the evolution of TA from early childhood to adolescence. Materials and methods The scoliometer readings in both standing and sitting forward bending position (FBP of 3301 children, (1645 boys, and 1656 girls aged from 3 to 9 years old were studied. TA was quantified by measuring angle of trunk rotation (ATR and children were categorized as symmetric (ATR = 0°, mild asymmetric (ATR 1° – 6° and severely asymmetric (ATR ≥ 7°. The difference of TA between standing and sitting FBP as well as differences between boys and girls in frequency of TA were also calculated. The scoliometer readings were analyzed by age to reveal at which age the juvenile pattern of TA changes into the adolescent one. Results 74.2% of boys and 77% of girls were symmetric (ATR = 0° in the thoracic region in standing FBP, while 82.7% of boys and 84.1% of girls were symmetric in the thoracic region in sitting FBP. Juvenile girls are more symmetric than boys but severe TA was found almost the same between the two genders. A significant reduction in the frequency of mild TA from standing into sitting FBP, in all the examined regions in both boys and girls was found, but in severe TA this reduction is very small. Analysing scoliometer readings by age it appears that significant TA changes take place between 8–9 years of age for boys and between 6–7 and 8–9 years for girls. TA in boys is changing into the adolescent pattern at a later age than in girls. Conclusion Juveniles were found more symmetric than adolescents, who were studied previously in a different study. Furthermore, juvenile girls were found more symmetric than boys. Juvenile TA pattern seems to be in accordance with the higher incidence of juvenile idiopathic scoliosis in boys. Furthermore

  12. Narrative journalism as complementary inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgen Jeppesen; Helle Ploug Hansen

    2011-01-01

    Narrative journalism is a method to craft stories worth reading about real people. In this article, we explore the ability of that communicative power to produce insights complementary to those obtainable through traditional qualitative and quantitative research methods. With examples from a study of journalistic narrative as patient involvement in professional rehabilitation, interview data transcribed as stories are analyzed for qualities of heterogeneity, sensibility, transparency, and ref...

  13. Complementary Basic Education in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    大津, 和子

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses current development in the Complementary Basic Education program (COBET), which aims to contribute to the provision of alternative learning opportunities for out-of-school children, particularly girls in a non-formal setting. The Ministry of Education and Culture started the program as part of the Basic Education Master Plan (BEMP) in 1999. Unlike traditional primary schools, the COBET centers have no school fees, no uniforms, no corporal punishment and no child labou...

  14. Asymmetries in the top sector

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, John; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    An experimental overview of top-pair event asymmetries is reported, focusing on the forward-backward asymmetry, $A_{FB}$, at the Tevatron and the charge asymmetry, $A_{c}$, at the LHC. Comparisons between $A_{FB}$ and $A_{c}$ at different ranges of $m_{t\\bar{t}}$ are sensitive to various Beyond the Stand Model (BSM) models. An overview of the first CP violation measurements using top-pair events is reported from both CMS and ATLAS via two different techniques that have a bright future. In this $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV review, all results are compatible with the Standard Model and no BSM models are ruled out. The majority of LHC results are limited in precision by their statistical uncertainty, which hints at exciting opportunities for $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV future results.

  15. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Human Brain Anatomical Network Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Ni; Liu, Yaou; Duan, Yunyun; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-01-01

    The topological architecture of the cerebral anatomical network reflects the structural organization of the human brain. Recently, topological measures based on graph theory have provided new approaches for quantifying large-scale anatomical networks. However, few studies have investigated the hemispheric asymmetries of the human brain from the perspective of the network model, and little is known about the asymmetries of the connection patterns of brain regions, which may reflect the functional integration and interaction between different regions. Here, we utilized diffusion tensor imaging to construct binary anatomical networks for 72 right-handed healthy adult subjects. We established the existence of structural connections between any pair of the 90 cortical and subcortical regions using deterministic tractography. To investigate the hemispheric asymmetries of the brain, statistical analyses were performed to reveal the brain regions with significant differences between bilateral topological properties, such as degree of connectivity, characteristic path length, and betweenness centrality. Furthermore, local structural connections were also investigated to examine the local asymmetries of some specific white matter tracts. From the perspective of both the global and local connection patterns, we identified the brain regions with hemispheric asymmetries. Combined with the previous studies, we suggested that the topological asymmetries in the anatomical network may reflect the functional lateralization of the human brain.

  16. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Human Brain Anatomical Network Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Tractography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Shu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The topological architecture of the cerebral anatomical network reflects the structural organization of the human brain. Recently, topological measures based on graph theory have provided new approaches for quantifying large-scale anatomical networks. However, few studies have investigated the hemispheric asymmetries of the human brain from the perspective of the network model, and little is known about the asymmetries of the connection patterns of brain regions, which may reflect the functional integration and interaction between different regions. Here, we utilized diffusion tensor imaging to construct binary anatomical networks for 72 right-handed healthy adult subjects. We established the existence of structural connections between any pair of the 90 cortical and subcortical regions using deterministic tractography. To investigate the hemispheric asymmetries of the brain, statistical analyses were performed to reveal the brain regions with significant differences between bilateral topological properties, such as degree of connectivity, characteristic path length, and betweenness centrality. Furthermore, local structural connections were also investigated to examine the local asymmetries of some specific white matter tracts. From the perspective of both the global and local connection patterns, we identified the brain regions with hemispheric asymmetries. Combined with the previous studies, we suggested that the topological asymmetries in the anatomical network may reflect the functional lateralization of the human brain.

  17. Perspectives on asymmetry: the Erickson Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M Michael

    2012-12-01

    Topics discussed include asymmetry of the brain; prosopagnosia with asymmetric involvement; the blaspheming brain; effects of the numbers of X chromosomes on brain asymmetry; normal facial asymmetry; kissing asymmetry; left- and right-handedness; left-sided baby cradling; Nodal signaling and left/right asymmetry; primary cilium and left/right asymmetry in zebrafish; right/left asymmetry in snails; species differences in Shh and Fgf8; primary cilium in vertebrate asymmetry; Hedgehog signaling on the cilium; Wnt signaling on the cilium; situs solitus, situs inversus, and situs ambiguus (heterotaxy); ciliopathies; right-sided injuries in trilobites; unilateral ocular use in the octopus; fiddler crabs; scale-eating cichlids; narwhals; left-footed parrots; asymmetric whisker use in rats; and right-sided fatigue fractures in greyhounds.

  18. Asymmetry Reduction Theory of FDI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xin

    In this paper, I first briefly introduce Moon & Roehl’s (1993, 2001) imbalance theory of FDI, then I identify its three deficiencies that may be responsible for the relative lack of impact of the potentially powerful imbalance logic, and then I propose an asymmetry reduction theory (ARC) of FDI...

  19. Heavy Quark Asymmetries at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Halley, A W

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of b and c quark asymmetries using data collected at LEP 1 are described. The relative merits of each of the individual techniques used is emphasised as is the most profitable way of combining them. Effects of radiative corrections are discussed, together with the impact of these measurements on global electroweak fits used to estimate the expected mass of the Higgs boson.

  20. A Global Gait Asymmetry Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Silvia; Resende, Renan A; Clansey, Adam C; Deluzio, Kevin J; Selbie, W Scott; Veloso, António P

    2016-04-01

    High levels of gait asymmetry are associated with many pathologies. Our long-term goal is to improve gait symmetry through real-time biofeedback of a symmetry index. Symmetry is often reported as a single metric or a collective signature of multiple discrete measures. While this is useful for assessment, incorporating multiple feedback metrics presents too much information for most subjects to use as visual feedback for gait retraining. The aim of this article was to develop a global gait asymmetry (GGA) score that could be used as a biofeedback metric for gait retraining and to test the effectiveness of the GGA for classifying artificially-induced asymmetry. Eighteen participants (11 males; age 26.9 y [SD = 7.7]; height 1.8 m [SD = 0.1]; body mass 72.7 kg [SD = 8.9]) walked on a treadmill in 3 symmetry conditions, induced by wearing custom-made sandals: a symmetric condition (identical sandals) and 2 asymmetric conditions (different sandals). The GGA score was calculated, based on several joint angles, and compared between conditions. Significant differences were found among all conditions (P asymmetry, and may be useful for rehabilitation and assessment.

  1. Functional Asymmetries Revealed in Visually Guided Saccades: An fMRI Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, L.; Zago, L.; Vigneau, M.; Crivello, F.; Mazoyer, B.; Mellet, E.; Tzourio-Mazoyer, N. [Centre for Imaging, Neurosciences and Applications to Pathologies, UMR6232 CNRS CEA (France); Mazoyer, B. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Caen (France); Andersson, F. [Institut Federatif de Recherche 135, Imagerie fonctionnelle, Tours (France); Mazoyer, B. [Institut Universitaire de France, Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    Because eye movements are a fundamental tool for spatial exploration, we hypothesized that the neural bases of these movements in humans should be under right cerebral dominance, as already described for spatial attention. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging in 27 right-handed participants who alternated central fixation with either large or small visually guided saccades (VGS), equally performed in both directions. Hemispheric functional asymmetry was analyzed to identify whether brain regions showing VGS activation elicited hemispheric asymmetries. Hemispheric anatomical asymmetry was also estimated to assess its influence on the VGS functional lateralization. Right asymmetrical activations of a saccadic/attentional system were observed in the lateral frontal eye fields (FEF), the anterior part of the intra-parietal sulcus (aIPS), the posterior third of the superior temporal sulcus (STS), the occipito-temporal junction (MT/V5 area), the middle occipital gyrus, and medially along the calcarine fissure (V1). The present rightward functional asymmetries were not related to differences in gray matter (GM) density/sulci positions between right and left hemispheres in the pre-central, intra-parietal, superior temporal, and extrastriate regions. Only V1 asymmetries were explained for almost 20% of the variance by a difference in the position of the right and left calcarine fissures. Left asymmetrical activations of a saccadic motor system were observed in the medial FEF and in the motor strip eye field along the Rolando sulcus. They were not explained by GM asymmetries. We suggest that the leftward saccadic motor asymmetry is part of a general dominance of the left motor cortex in right-handers, which must include an effect of sighting dominance. Our results demonstrate that, although bilateral by nature, the brain network involved in the execution of VGSs, irrespective of their direction, presented specific right and left asymmetries that were not related to

  2. Complementary therapies for cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassileth, Barrie; Trevisan, Carrie; Gubili, Jyothirmai

    2007-08-01

    Pharmacologic treatment of pain does not always meet patients' needs and may produce difficult side effects. Complementary therapies, which are safe, noninvasive, and generally considered to be relatively free of toxicity, may be used adjunctively with standard pain management techniques to improve outcome and reduce the need for prescription medication. Approaches such as acupuncture, massage therapy, mind-body interventions, and music therapy effectively reduce pain, enhance quality of life, and provide patients with the opportunity to participate in their own care. Such therapies have an important role in modern pain management.

  3. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapies by the Families of Children with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Robert E.; Gerlach, Elizabeth King

    2001-01-01

    This article presents a model for communication among providers and families of children with disabilities about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). It discusses treatments for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and cerebral palsy, including the Feingold diet, herbal treatments, CranioSacral therapy, therapeutic…

  4. Asymmetry quantization and application to human mandibles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, Nanna; Nielsen, Mads; Sporring, Jon;

    2004-01-01

    All biological objects exhibit some degree of asymmetry, but for some parts of the human body, excessive asymmetry is a sign of pathology. Hence, the problem is to draw the line between categorization of objects being too asymmetric and objects exhibiting normal asymmetry. With a measure...

  5. Relationship between skull asymmetry and CT findings. Supine head position preference and brain damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamori, Yuriko; Yuge, Mariko; Kanda, Toyoko; Ashida, Hiromi; Fukase, Hiroshi

    1987-07-01

    In order to clarify the relationship between brain damage and skull asymmetry or supine head position preference, we classified CT findings of 330 cases with cerebral palsy or risk of motor disturbance into 6 groups according to skull shape. Those were severe (I, n = 37) and mild (II, n = 114) grades in the right occipital flatness, severe (III, n = 34) and mild (IV, n = 58) grades in the left occipital flatness, long skull with temporal flatness (V, n = 33) and symmetric round skull (control, n = 54). It was considered that the asymmetry of cortical atrophy in appearance was formed physicaly by skull asymmetry but that the asymmetric dilatation in appearance of lateral ventricle was related to the asymmetry of brain damage. The severity and the asymmetry of brain damage were tend to increase the grade of skull asymmetry. The incidence of cases with the right occipital flatness was 1.6 times more frequently than the left sided. The incidence of cases whose left (lateral) ventricle was larger than the right was 4.1 times more than the cases whose right ventricle was larger than the left. The cases with occipital flatness in the contralateral side of the larger lateral ventricle were found more than the cases with occipital flatness in the ipsilateral side of the larger ventricle, that is to say, the direction of supine head position preference during early infant was suspected to be the more severely disturbed side of body. These results suggest that the supine head position preference to the right in newborn babies and infants with scoliosis or cerebral palsy might be the result of transient or permanent asymmetric (left > right) brain dysfunction.

  6. The asymmetry of rainfall process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU RuCong; YUAN WeiHua; LI Jian

    2013-01-01

    Using hourly station rain gauge data in the warm season (May-October) during 1961-2006,the climatological features of the evolution of the rainfall process are analyzed by compositing rainfall events centered on the maximum hourly rainfall amount of each event.The results reveal that the rainfall process is asymmetric,which means rainfall events usually reach the maximum in a short period and then experience a relatively longer retreat to the end of the event.The effects of rainfall intensity,duration and peak time,as well as topography,are also considered.It is found that the asymmetry is more obvious in rainfall events with strong intensity and over areas with complex terrain,such as the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau,the Hengduan Mountains,and the Yungui Plateau.The asymmetry in short-duration rainfall is more obvious than that in long-duration rainfall,but the regional differences are weaker.The rainfall events that reach the maximum during 14:00-02:00 LST exhibit the strongest asymmetry and those during 08:00-14:00 LST show the weakest asymmetry.The rainfall intensity at the peak time stands out,which means that the rainfall intensity increases and decreases quickly both before and after the peak.These results can improve understanding of the rainfall process and provide metrics for the evaluation of climate models.Moreover,the strong asymmetry of the rainfall process should be highly noted when taking measures to defending against geological hazards,such as collapses,landslides and debris flows throughout southwestern China.

  7. Posterior N1 asymmetry to English and Welsh words in Early and Late English-Welsh bilinguals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Giordana; Savill, Nicola; Thomas, Enlli; Thierry, Guillaume

    2010-09-01

    We investigated the lateralization of the posterior event-related potential (ERP) component N1 (120-170 ms) to written words in two groups of bilinguals. Fourteen Early English-Welsh bilinguals and 14 late learners of Welsh performed a semantic categorization task on separate blocks of English and Welsh words. In both groups, the N1 was strongly lateralized over the left posterior sites for both languages. A robust correlation was found between N1 asymmetry for English and N1 asymmetry for Welsh words in both groups. Furthermore, in Late Bilinguals, the N1 asymmetry for Welsh words increased with years of experience in Welsh. These data suggest that, in Late Bilinguals, the lateralization of neural circuits involved in written word recognition for the second language is associated to the organization for the first language, and that increased experience with the second language is associated to a larger functional cerebral asymmetry in favor of the left hemisphere.

  8. Complementary medicine in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Atzeni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. CAM is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA frequently try CAM. This review summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massage, supplements. However, for the great majority of these therapies no evidencebased (clinical randomized trials results are available. CAM is usually used in addition to, and not as a substitute for conventional therapies. The motivation of patients to try CAM is complex; the willingness to take control of their healthcare, the desire to try everything available, the mass-media pressure and the erroneous notion that CAM is without risks. In fact, none of these treatments is totally devoid of risks. While the use of complementary and alternative modalities for the treatment of RA continues to increase, rigorous clinical trials examining their efficacy are needed before definitive recommendations regarding the application of these modalities can be made.

  9. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM)? Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined ...

  10. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems in the muscles or nerves. Instead, faulty development or damage to motor areas in the brain disrupt the brain's ability to adequately control movement and posture (United Cerebral Palsy, 2010). "Cerebral" refers to the ...

  11. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be sure to follow us on Twitter . United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  12. Narrative journalism as complementary inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgen Jeppesen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Narrative journalism is a method to craft stories worth reading about real people. In this article, we explore the ability of that communicative power to produce insights complementary to those obtainable through traditional qualitative and quantitative research methods. With examples from a study of journalistic narrative as patient involvement in professional rehabilitation, interview data transcribed as stories are analyzed for qualities of heterogeneity, sensibility, transparency, and reflexivity. Building on sociological theories of thinking with stories, writing as inquiry, and public journalism as ethnography, we suggest that narrative journalism as a common practice might unfold dimensions of subjective otherness of the self. Aspiring to unite writing in both transparently confrontational and empathetically dialogic ways, the narrative journalistic method holds a potential to expose dynamics of power within the interview.

  13. Multiple complementary gas distribution assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tuoh-Bin; Melnik, Yuriy; Pang, Lily L; Tuncel, Eda; Nguyen, Son T; Chen, Lu

    2016-04-05

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a first gas distribution assembly that includes a first gas passage for introducing a first process gas into a second gas passage that introduces the first process gas into a processing chamber and a second gas distribution assembly that includes a third gas passage for introducing a second process gas into a fourth gas passage that introduces the second process gas into the processing chamber. The first and second gas distribution assemblies are each adapted to be coupled to at least one chamber wall of the processing chamber. The first gas passage is shaped as a first ring positioned within the processing chamber above the second gas passage that is shaped as a second ring positioned within the processing chamber. The gas distribution assemblies may be designed to have complementary characteristic radial film growth rate profiles.

  14. Radiographic study of mandibular asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yeon Hwa; Cho, Bong Hae [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to perform the radiographic measurements and temporomandibular joint evaluation in mandibular asymmetry. For this study, thirty-two patients who have mandibular asymmetry were selected and submentovertex, panoramic and lateral corrected tomographic radiographs were taken. Horizontal and vertical analysis using various landmarks on these radiographs were performed. Also radiographic and clinical evaluation of temporomandibular joint were obtained. The results were as follows: 1. On the submentovertex radiograph, the mean distance of Pogonion to midline was 5.0 {+-} 3.8 mm. 2. The mean distance of Pogonion to Gonion between the deviated and the contra-lateral side (p<0.001). 3. The distance difference of Pogonion to Gonion between the deviated and the contra-lateral side was significantly related to the degree of asymmetry (p<0.001). 4. On panoramic radiograph,the condylar height of the contral-lateral side was significantly longer than the one of the deviated side (p<0.001). 5. On lateral corrected tomogram, bony of temporomandibular joint was observed in 11 condyles of the deviated side and 9 condyles of the contra-lateral side. Erosion and ostephyte were the most common changes in both the deviated and the contra-lateral sides.

  15. Posterior asymmetry and idiopathic scoliosis

    CERN Document Server

    Rousie, D L; Berthoz, A

    2009-01-01

    Study design Are there neuro-anatomical abnormalities associated with idiopathic scoliosis (IS)? Posterior Basicranium (PBA) reflects cerebellum growth and contains vestibular organs, two structures suspected to be involved in scoliosis. Objective The aim of this study was to compare posterior basicranium asymmetry (PBA) in Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) and normal subjects. Method: To measure the shape of PBA in 3D, we defined an intra-cranial frame of reference based on CNS and guided by embryology of the neural tube. Measurements concerned three directions of space referred to a specific intra cranial referential. Data acquisition was performed with T2 MRI (G.E. Excite 1.5T, mode Fiesta). We explored a scoliosis group of 76 women and 20 men with a mean age of 17, 2 and a control group of 26 women and 16 men, with a mean age of 27, 7. Results: IS revealed a significant asymmetry of PBA (Pr>|t|<.0001) in 3 directions of space compared to the control group. This asymmetry was more pronounced in antero-posterior...

  16. Corporate governance and information asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Salehi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of some corporate governance mechanisms on information asymmetry. From among different mechanisms of corporate governance, the number of board members who were not responsible, ownership concentration and the percentage of institutional ownership are considered. Time scale of the study includes the years from 2005 to 2011. Sampling was performed among all the companies accepted in Tehran Stock Exchange using systematic removal method. This sample includes 504 companies-years. This is a post-event study. Experimentally, this study lies in accounting proving research areas and it is based on financial statements of the firms, and regarding purpose is application. Descriptive method has been used in this study. The findings show that there was a positive and significant relationship between the number of board members who are not responsible and the percentage of institutional ownership from the one side, and information asymmetry from the other. In addition, the findings show a negative significant relationship between ownership concentration and information asymmetry.

  17. Nanocrystal Bioassembly: Asymmetry, Proximity, and Enzymatic Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claridge, Shelley A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Research at the interface between biomolecules and inorganic nanocrystals has resulted in a great number of new discoveries. In part this arises from the synergistic duality of the system: biomolecules may act as self-assembly agents for organizing inorganic nanocrystals into functional materials; alternatively, nanocrystals may act as microscopic or spectroscopic labels for elucidating the behavior of complex biomolecular systems. However, success in either of these functions relies heavily uponthe ability to control the conjugation and assembly processes.In the work presented here, we first design a branched DNA scaffold which allows hybridization of DNA-nanocrystal monoconjugates to form discrete assemblies. Importantly, the asymmetry of the branched scaffold allows the formation of asymmetric2assemblies of nanocrystals. In the context of a self-assembled device, this can be considered a step toward the ability to engineer functionally distinct inputs and outputs.Next we develop an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography purification method which allows large gold nanocrystals attached to single strands of very short DNA to be purified. When two such complementary conjugates are hybridized, the large nanocrystals are brought into close proximity, allowing their plasmon resonances to couple. Such plasmon-coupled constructs are of interest both as optical interconnects for nanoscale devices and as `plasmon ruler? biomolecular probes.We then present an enzymatic ligation strategy for creating multi-nanoparticle building blocks for self-assembly. In constructing a nanoscale device, such a strategy would allow pre-assembly and purification of components; these constructs can also act as multi-label probes of single-stranded DNA conformational dynamics. Finally we demonstrate a simple proof-of-concept of a nanoparticle analog of the polymerase chain reaction.

  18. Cerebral microangiopathies; Zerebrale Mikroangiopathien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linn, Jennifer [Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2011-03-15

    Cerebral microangiopathies are a very heterogenous group of diseases characterized by pathological changes of the small cerebral vessels. They account for 20 - 30 % of all ischemic strokes. Degenerative microangiopathy and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiography represent the typical acquired cerebral microangiopathies, which are found in over 90 % of cases. Besides, a wide variety of rare, hereditary microangiopathy exists, as e.g. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), Fabrys disease and MELAS syndrome (Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes). (orig.)

  19. Complementary and Alternative Approaches to Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fight Stress / Stress and Your Brain / Can Prolonged Stress Affect Whether Breast Cancer Returns? / Complementary and Alternative Approaches to Health Winter 2008 Issue: Volume 3 Number 1 Page ...

  20. Complementary Lidstone Interpolation and Boundary Value Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinelas Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We shall introduce and construct explicitly the complementary Lidstone interpolating polynomial of degree , which involves interpolating data at the odd-order derivatives. For we will provide explicit representation of the error function, best possible error inequalities, best possible criterion for the convergence of complementary Lidstone series, and a quadrature formula with best possible error bound. Then, these results will be used to establish existence and uniqueness criteria, and the convergence of Picard's, approximate Picard's, quasilinearization, and approximate quasilinearization iterative methods for the complementary Lidstone boundary value problems which consist of a th order differential equation and the complementary Lidstone boundary conditions.

  1. Control of angular momentum during walking in children with cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, S.M.; Meyns, P.; Jonkers, I.; Kaat, D.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Children with hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (CP) walk with marked asymmetries. For instance, we have recently shown that they have less arm swing on the affected side, and more arm swing at the unaffected side. Such an increase in arm swing at the unaffected side may be aimed at controlling total body

  2. Control of Angular Momentum during Walking in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Kaat, Desloovere; Duysens, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Children with hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (CP) walk with marked asymmetries. For instance, we have recently shown that they have less arm swing on the affected side, and more arm swing at the unaffected side. Such an increase in arm swing at the unaffected side may be aimed at controlling total body angular momentum about the vertical axis,…

  3. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Special Section CAM Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... for low back pain. True False Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes: Meditation Chiropractic Use of natural products, ...

  4. A preliminary study of the effect of restricted gastrocnemius length on foot kinematics and plantar pressure patterns during gait in children with Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Derek

    2008-01-01

      Summary/conclusion Kinematic foot modelling and pedobarography are complementary measurement methods for measuring foot biomechanics in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Pedobarography appears to be the most sensitive instrument measuring significantly decreased hindfoot and increased lateral ...

  5. Complementary energy principle for large elastic deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Yuchen

    2006-01-01

    Using the "base forces" as the fundamental unknowns to determine the state of an elastic system, the complementary energy principle for large elastic deformation is constructed for the conjugate quantities being displacement gradients, which possesses exactly the same form as that of classical linear elasticity. It is revealed that the complementary energy contains deformation part and rotation part.

  6. Information Asymmetry as a Risk Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Ya. Tsvetkov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores information asymmetry as the cause of risks in decision making. The author describes the types of information asymmetry as a risk factor; describes the types of risk arising under different information asymmetries; describes the methods for minimizing such risks; brings to light the principal-agent issue; analyzes the principles of minimizing risks in the event of this issue arising; illustrates the application of special information models for minimizing risks in this issue; describes the cascade method for minimizing risks in decision making under information asymmetry.

  7. Measuring Asymmetry in Time-Stamped Phylogenies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany L Dearlove

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous work has shown that asymmetry in viral phylogenies may be indicative of heterogeneity in transmission, for example due to acute HIV infection or the presence of 'core groups' with higher contact rates. Hence, evidence of asymmetry may provide clues to underlying population structure, even when direct information on, for example, stage of infection or contact rates, are missing. However, current tests of phylogenetic asymmetry (a suffer from false positives when the tips of the phylogeny are sampled at different times and (b only test for global asymmetry, and hence suffer from false negatives when asymmetry is localised to part of a phylogeny. We present a simple permutation-based approach for testing for asymmetry in a phylogeny, where we compare the observed phylogeny with random phylogenies with the same sampling and coalescence times, to reduce the false positive rate. We also demonstrate how profiles of measures of asymmetry calculated over a range of evolutionary times in the phylogeny can be used to identify local asymmetry. In combination with different metrics of asymmetry, this combined approach offers detailed insights of how phylogenies reconstructed from real viral datasets may deviate from the simplistic assumptions of commonly used coalescent and birth-death process models.

  8. Single spin asymmetry for charm mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez Zacarias, G. [PIMAyC, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Apdo. Postal 14-805, D.F. (Mexico); Herrera, G.; Mercado, J. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Apdo. Postal 14-740, D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-08-15

    We study single spin asymmetries of D{sup 0} and D{sup -} mesons in polarized proton-proton collisions. A two component model is used to describe charm meson production. The production of D mesons occurs by recombination of the constituents present in the initial state as well as by fragmentation of quarks in the final state. This model has proved to describe the production of charm. The recombination component involves a mechanism of spin alignment that ends up in a single spin asymmetry. Experimental measurements of single spin asymmetry for pions at RHIC are compared with the model. Predictions for the asymmetry in D mesons are presented. (orig.)

  9. Induction of asymmetry into homodimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardsley, B; Cho, Y R; Westwell, M S; Williams, D H

    1998-01-01

    The self-regulation of biological signalling receptors via homodimerization is discussed in relation to the symmetry changes occurring when these receptors bind their target ligand. The idea of positive and negative cooperativity between dimerization and ligand binding, mediated by changes in the symmetry of the system as a source of signalling control is considered; an analogy made with the homodimerization of a glycopeptide antibiotic, ristocetin A, which displays negative cooperativity. Finally, the regulation of the bacterial aspartate receptor and the human growth hormone receptor is discussed as a function of ligand-induced asymmetry.

  10. Asymmetry a challenge for orthodontists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melsen, Birte

    2007-01-01

    planes of space. A systematic approach to the identification of the cause of the asymmetry head precede the decision whether to correct or to camouflage. The definition of a specific treatment goal should be done only following an analysis of the likelihood that the force system necessary to perform...... the required tooth displacements can be generated. In order to control the interaction between the force systems developed in the three planes of space, the appliances should commonly be segmented. Anchorage problems can occasionally only be solved by means of skeletal anchorage....

  11. Lean mass asymmetry influences force and power asymmetry during jumping in collegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David R; Sanfilippo, Jennifer L; Binkley, Neil; Heiderscheit, Bryan C

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to (a) examine how asymmetry in lower extremity lean mass influenced force and power asymmetry during jumping, (b) determine how power and force asymmetry affected jump height, and (c) report normative values in collegiate athletes. Force and power were assessed from each limb using bilateral force plates during a countermovement jump in 167 division 1 athletes (mass = 85.7 ± 20.3 kg, age = 20.0 ± 1.2 years; 103 men and 64 women). Lean mass of the pelvis, thigh, and shank was assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Percent asymmetry was calculated for lean mass at each region (pelvis, thigh, and shank) as well as force and power. Forward stepwise regressions were performed to determine the influence of lean mass asymmetry on force and power asymmetry. Thigh and shank lean mass asymmetry explained 20% of the variance in force asymmetry (R = 0.20, p lean mass asymmetry of the pelvis, thigh, and shank explained 25% of the variance in power asymmetry (R = 0.25, p 0.05) and greater than 10% asymmetry in power tended to decrease the performance (effect size >1.0). Ninety-five percent of this population (2.5th to 97.5th percentile) displayed force asymmetry between -11.8 and 16.8% and a power asymmetry between -9.9 and 11.5%. A small percentage (lean mass asymmetry in the lower extremity is at least partially responsible for asymmetries in force and power. However, a large percentage remains unexplained by lean mass asymmetry.

  12. Adhesion of microchannel-based complementary surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arun K; Bai, Ying; Nadermann, Nichole; Jagota, Anand; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2012-03-06

    We show that highly enhanced and selective adhesion can be achieved between surfaces patterned with complementary microchannel structures. An elastic material, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), was used to fabricate such surfaces by molding into a silicon master with microchannel profiles patterned by photolithography. We carried out adhesion tests on both complementary and mismatched microchannel/micropillar surfaces. Adhesion, as measured by the energy release rate required to propagate an interfacial crack, can be enhanced by up to 40 times by complementary interfaces, compared to a flat control, and slightly enhanced for some special noncomplementary samples, despite the nearly negligible adhesion for other mismatched surfaces. For each complementary surface, we observe defects in the form of visible striations, where pillars fail to insert fully into the channels. The adhesion between complementary microchannel surfaces is enhanced by a combination of a crack-trapping mechanism and friction between a pillar and channel and is attenuated by the presence of defects.

  13. Increased morphological asymmetry, evolvability and plasticity in human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Robles, Aida; Hopkins, William D; Sherwood, Chet C

    2013-06-22

    The study of hominin brain evolution relies mostly on evaluation of the endocranial morphology of fossil skulls. However, only some general features of external brain morphology are evident from endocasts, and many anatomical details can be difficult or impossible to examine. In this study, we use geometric morphometric techniques to evaluate inter- and intraspecific differences in cerebral morphology in a sample of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging scans of chimpanzees and humans, with special emphasis on the study of asymmetric variation. Our study reveals that chimpanzee-human differences in cerebral morphology are mainly symmetric; by contrast, there is continuity in asymmetric variation between species, with humans showing an increased range of variation. Moreover, asymmetric variation does not appear to be the result of allometric scaling at intraspecific levels, whereas symmetric changes exhibit very slight allometric effects within each species. Our results emphasize two key properties of brain evolution in the hominine clade: first, evolution of chimpanzee and human brains (and probably their last common ancestor and related species) is not strongly morphologically constrained, thus making their brains highly evolvable and responsive to selective pressures; second, chimpanzee and, especially, human brains show high levels of fluctuating asymmetry indicative of pronounced developmental plasticity. We infer that these two characteristics can have a role in human cognitive evolution.

  14. Tunable terahertz electromagnetically induced transparency based on a complementary graphene metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiyun; Zhang, Xiaoqiuyan; Cao, Yanyan; Zeng, Beibei; Zhou, Mingdong; Zhang, Yuping

    2017-01-01

    We proposed a dynamically tunable electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the terahertz region based on a complementary graphene metamaterials within two asymmetric slot structures. A transparency peak is enabled through the coupling between the asymmetric slot-structure elements when their symmetry is broken. The width of transparency window can be controlled by varying the asymmetry degree. Moreover, by varying the Fermi energy of graphene, the transmission peak can be dynamically tuned, realizing a blue-shift without re-optimizing or re-fabricating the nanostructure. Therefore, the work opens up opportunities for the development of tunable compact elements such as slow light devices, sensors and switches.

  15. Evaluating asymmetry in prosthetic gait with step-length asymmetry alone is flawed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, M.; Roeles, S.; der Pas, van S.C.H.; Bosboom, O.; Beek, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Prosthetic gait is often asymmetric in step length, but the direction of this asymmetry varies inconsistently across amputees. This situation is akin to that seen in stroke patients, where step-length asymmetry has been shown to be the additive result of asymmetries in trunk progression and asymmetr

  16. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    Variation in electron density can have significant effect on GNSS signals in terms of propagation delay. Ionospheric scintillation can be caused by rapid change of such delay, specifically, when they last for a longer period of time. Ionospheric irregularities that account for scintillation may vary significantly in spatial range and drift with the background plasma at speeds of 45 to 130 m/sec. These patchy irregularities may occur several times during night, e.g. in equatorial region, with the patches move through the ray paths of the GNSS satellite signals. These irregularities are often characterized as either ‘large scale’ (which can be as large as several hundred km in East-West direction and many times that in the North-South direction) or ‘small scale’ (which can be as small as 1m). These small scale irregularities are regarded as the main cause of scintillation [1,2]. In normal solar activity conditions, the mid-latitude ionosphere is not much disturbed. However, during severe magnetic storms, the aurora oval extends towards the equator and the equator anomaly region may stretched towards poles extending the scintillation phenomena more typically associated with those regions into mid-latitudes. In such stormy conditions, the predicted TEC may deviate largely from the true value of the TEC both at low and mid-latitudes due to which GNSS applications may be strongly degraded. This work is an attempt to analyze ionospheric scintillation (S4 index) using ionospheric asymmetry index [3]. The asymmetry index is based on trans-ionospheric propagation between GPS and LEO satellites in a radio occultation (RO) scenario, using background ionospheric data provided by MIDAS [4]. We attempted to simulate one of the recent geomagnetic storms (NOAA scale G4) occurred over low/mid-latitudes. The storm started on 26 September 2011 at UT 18:00 and lasted until early hours of 27 September 2011. The scintillation data for the storm was taken from an ionospheric

  17. [Cranial osteopathy as a complementary treatment of postural plagiocephaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel-Tison, C; Soyez-Papiernik, E

    2008-06-01

    For the majority of neonates and young infants, appropriate postures and standard physiotherapy succeed in preventing or correcting acquired cranial deformations (fetal due to restricted mobility in utero or postnatal secondary to exclusive dorsal decubitus). However in some cases, when postural management is not efficient, pediatricians will be asked by the parents about the potential benefits of osteopathy. What is osteopathic treatment? At first, diagnostic palpation will identify which suture is normally mobile with the respiratory cycle, and which has limited or absent mobility secondary to abnormal postures. Later on, the goal of the therapeutic phase is to mobilise impaired sutures, by various gentle maneuvers depending on the topography of the impairment. The treatment is not restricted to the skull but extended to the spine, pelvis and lower extremities which contribute to the deformative sequence. Osteopathic treatment belongs to complementary medicine, therefore demonstration of its scientific value and favorable results have to be provided. Based on randomized studies, the answer is yes, it significantly decreases the degree of asymmetry. Do postural deformations matter to the development of an healthy infant? It seems that the prejudice is not only esthetic but also functional, however more research is necessary. In conclusion, pediatricians should be more aware of the method and expectations: major deformative sequence since birth and increasing deformations despite preventive postures and standard physiotherapy are reasonable indications for such complementary treatment. "Preventive" osteopathy in maternity is not justified. Moreover osteopathy has no place in the treatment of craniosynostosis ; the latter belong to malformations, completely distinct from postural deformations.

  18. Resting EEG asymmetry and spider phobia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merckelbach, H; Muris, P; Pool, K; de Jong, Peter

    1998-01-01

    This study examined whether resting EEG asymmetries are related to symptom severity and treatment outcome in spider phobia. Prior to treatment, EEG was recorded in a sample of spider phobic patients (N = 16). Correlations between frontal and parietal asymmetries in alpha power, on the one hand, and

  19. Asymmetry and Performance: Toward a Neurodevelopmental Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, David B.; Barth, Joan M.; Merrill, Edward C.

    2008-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetry implies the existence of developmental influences that affect one hemisphere more than the other. However, those influences are poorly understood. One simple view is that asymmetry may exist because of a relationship between a mental process' degree of lateralization and how well it functions. Data scaling issues have largely…

  20. Gender and age effects in structural brain asymmetry as measured by MRI texture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, Vassili A; Kruggel, Frithjof; von Cramon, D Yves

    2003-07-01

    Effects of gender and age on structural brain asymmetry were studied by 3D texture analysis in 380 adults. Asymmetry is detected by comparing the complex 3D gray-scale image patterns in the left and right cerebral hemispheres as revealed by anatomical T1-weighted MRI datasets. The Talairach and Tournoux parcellation system was applied to study the asymmetry on five levels: the whole cerebrum, nine coronal sections, 12 axial sections, boxes resulting from both coronal and axial subdivisions, and by a sliding spherical window of 9 mm diameter. The analysis revealed that the brain asymmetry increases in the anterior-posterior direction starting from the central region onward. Male brains were found to be more asymmetric than female. This gender-related effect is noticeable in all brain areas but is most significant in the superior temporal gyrus, Heschl's gyrus, the adjacent white matter regions in the temporal stem and the knee of the optic radiation, the thalamus, and the posterior cingulate. The brain asymmetry increases significantly with age in the inferior frontal gyrus, anterior insula, anterior cingulate, parahippocampal gyrus, retrosplenial cortex, coronal radiata, and knee region of the internal capsule. Asymmetry decreases with age in the optic radiation, precentral gyrus, and angular gyrus. The texture-based method reported here is based on extended multisort cooccurrence matrices that employ intensity, gradient, and anisotropy features in a uniform way. It is sensitive, simple to reproduce, robust, and unbiased in the sense that segmentation of brain compartments and spatial transformations are not necessary. Thus, it should be considered as another tool for digital morphometry in neuroscience.

  1. Corrections to Quark Asymmetries at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Freitas, A

    2004-01-01

    The most precise measurement of the weak mixing angle sin^2(theta) at LEP is from the forward-backward asymmetry e+e- --> bbbar at the Z-pole. In this note the QED and electroweak radiative corrections to obtain the pole asymmetry from the measured asymmetry for b- and c-quarks have been calculated using ZFITTER, which has been amended to allow a consistent treatment of partial two-loop corrections for the b-quark final asymmetries. A total correction of dAfbb=0.0019+/-0.0002 and dAfbc=0.0064+/-0.0001 has been found, where the remaining theoretical uncertainty is much too small to explain the apparent discrepancy between sin^2(theta) obtained from Afbb and from the left-right asymmetry at SLD.

  2. Asymmetry measures for QSOs and companions

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchings, J B

    2008-01-01

    An asymmetry index is derived from ellipse-fitting to galaxy images, that gives weight to faint outer features and is not strongly redshift-dependent. These measures are made on a sample of 13 2MASS QSOs and their neighbour galaxies, and a control sample of field galaxies from the same wide-field imaging data. The QSO host galaxy asymmetries correlate well with visual tidal interaction indices previously published. The companion galaxies have somewhat higher asymmetry than the control galaxy sample, and their asymmetry is inversely correlated with distance from the QSO. The distribution of QSO-companion asymmetry indices is different from that for matched control field galaxies at the $\\sim95%$ significance level. We present the data and discuss this evidence for tidal and other disturbances in the vicinity of QSOs.

  3. Anatomic brain asymmetry in vervet monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fears, Scott C; Scheibel, Kevin; Abaryan, Zvart; Lee, Chris; Service, Susan K; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Fairbanks, Lynn A; Cantor, Rita M; Freimer, Nelson B; Woods, Roger P

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetry is a prominent feature of human brains with important functional consequences. Many asymmetric traits show population bias, but little is known about the genetic and environmental sources contributing to inter-individual variance. Anatomic asymmetry has been observed in Old World monkeys, but the evidence for the direction and extent of asymmetry is equivocal and only one study has estimated the genetic contributions to inter-individual variance. In this study we characterize a range of qualitative and quantitative asymmetry measures in structural brain MRIs acquired from an extended pedigree of Old World vervet monkeys (n = 357), and implement variance component methods to estimate the proportion of trait variance attributable to genetic and environmental sources. Four of six asymmetry measures show pedigree-level bias and one of the traits has a significant heritability estimate of about 30%. We also found that environmental variables more significantly influence the width of the right compared to the left prefrontal lobe.

  4. Bs semileptonic asymmetry at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Dufour, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    When neutral $B^{0}_{s,d}$ mesons evolve in time they can change into their own antiparticles. In this mixing process CP symmetry is not necessarily conserved, as the probability for a $B^{0}$ meson to change into a $\\bar{B}^{0}$ meson can be different from the probability for the reverse process. The CP violation in the $B^{0}_{s}$ system as measured using semileptonic decays, defined as $a^{s}_{sl}$, is very small according to the Standard Model. However, earlier measurements of the semileptonic mixing asymmetry in both the $B_s^{0}$ and $B_d^{0}$ systems have shown a $3 \\sigma$ deviation with respect to the Standard Model value. A measurement of $a^{s}_{sl}$ performed using $1 \\text{fb}^{-1}$ of data collected at the LHCb detector is presented, together with an outlook to the updated $3 \\text{fb}^{-1}$ result.

  5. Holography, charge and baryon asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Mongan, T R

    2009-01-01

    The holographic principle indicates the finite number of bits of information available on the particle horizon describes all physics within the horizon. Linking information on the horizon with Standard Model particles requires a holographic model describing constituents (preons) of Standard Model particles in terms of bits of information on the horizon. Standard Model particles have charges 0, 1/3, 2/3 or 1 in units of the electron charge e, so bits in a preon model must be identified with fractional charge. Energy must be transferred to change the state of a bit, and labeling the low energy state of a bit e/3n and the high energy state -e/3n amounts to defining electric charge. Any such charged preon model will produce more protons than anti-protons at the time of baryogenesis and require baryon asymmetry. It will also produce more positrons than electrons, as suggested by astrophysical measurements.

  6. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2016-05-01

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping Atotal fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of 197Au+27Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleon shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).

  7. Focal cerebral hyperemia in postconcussive amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariai, T; Suzuki, R; Ohta, Y; Ohno, K; Hirakawa, K

    2001-12-01

    Transient amnesia caused by minor head injury is commonly encountered in daily neurosurgical practice, but the mechanism of such amnesia has not been extensively studied. We measured the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of patients with postconcussive amnesia with Xe/CT CBF to examine whether a focal disturbance of CBF exists. The Xe/CT CBF study was performed in eight patients with closed head injury without organic cerebral lesion while they were suffering from posttraumatic amnesia (concussion group). The time interval between accident and CBF measurement was less than 2 h in three patients, 5-6 h in two, 8-9 h in two, and 18 in one. The results were compared with those of nine normal volunteers and eight other age-matched patients who recovered without any neurological deficit despite the presence of hemorrhagic regions (mild hemorrhage group). The rCBF of the concussion group was significantly elevated in the bilateral mesial temporal cortex in comparison to the normal group. The rCBF in the mild hemorrhage group was lower than that of normal controls in all regions. The analysis of right-left difference in CBF indicated that there was significant asymmetry (right > left) in the frontal and temporal cortex in the concussion group, but not in the normal and mild hemorrhage group. This Xe/CT CBF study in acute stages of cerebral concussion, in which patients were amnestic, detected focal cerebral hyperemia. Such hyperemia in regions closely related to human memory function may be the result of vasoparalysis or the compensatory activation of memory circuits after denervation injury.

  8. Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is designed to help you talk with your health care provider(s) about your complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use during and after your cancer care. More… Yoga and Cancer People with cancer often suffer from ...

  9. Complementary Lidstone Interpolation and Boundary Value Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi P. Agarwal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We shall introduce and construct explicitly the complementary Lidstone interpolating polynomial P2m(t of degree 2m, which involves interpolating data at the odd-order derivatives. For P2m(t we will provide explicit representation of the error function, best possible error inequalities, best possible criterion for the convergence of complementary Lidstone series, and a quadrature formula with best possible error bound. Then, these results will be used to establish existence and uniqueness criteria, and the convergence of Picard's, approximate Picard's, quasilinearization, and approximate quasilinearization iterative methods for the complementary Lidstone boundary value problems which consist of a (2m+1th order differential equation and the complementary Lidstone boundary conditions.

  10. Homogenization analysis of complementary waveguide metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, Nathan; Hunt, John; Smith, David R.

    2013-11-01

    We analyze the properties of complementary metamaterials as effective inclusions patterned into the conducting walls of metal waveguide structures. We show that guided wave metamaterials can be homogenized using the same retrieval techniques used for volumetric metamaterials, leading to a description in which a given complementary element is conceptually replaced by a block of material within the waveguide whose effective permittivity and permeability result in equivalent scattering characteristics. The use of effective constitutive parameters for waveguide materials provides an alternative point-of-view for the design of waveguide and microstrip based components, including planar lenses and filters, as well as devices with derived from a bulk material response. In addition to imparting effective constitutive properties to the waveguide, complementary metamaterials also couple energy from waveguide modes into radiation. Thus, complementary waveguide metamaterials can be used to modify and optimize a variety of antenna structures.

  11. MRI semi-circular canals in the cranio-facial asymmetry and cranio-mandibular syndrome; IRM des canaux semi-circulaires dans les asymetries cranio-faciales et le syndrome cranio-mandibulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudrillard, J.C.; Foucart, H.; Defache, C. [Centre Hospitalier, 62 -Lens (France); Rousie, D.; Hache, J.C. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 59 - Lille (France); Van Tichelen, P. [Association de Posturologie, Rhumatologie, 59 - Lille (France); Lerais, J.M. [Centre Hospitalier, 39 - Dole (France)

    1995-09-01

    The cranio-mandibular syndrome (CMS) is often secondary to a cranio-facial asymmetry (CFA); it associates a painful masticatory dysfunction syndrome with functional and aching clinical signs in relation with a functional torticollis required for oculo-labyrinthal equilibration maintenance. Our anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol uses tridimensional study of semi-circular canals (SCC) up relation to the medial cerebral axis (MCA), and permit to measure precisely these CFA and propose, with a multi specialist approach, an adapted treatment of the CMS. Application of MRI to SCC asymmetry looks to its future use for spatial intracranial referential of cerebral structures. (authors). 17 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Mild cognitive disorders are associated with different patterns of brain asymmetry than normal ageing: the PATH through life study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Cherbuin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Defining how brain structures differ in pre-clinical dementia is important to better understand the pathological processes involved and to inform clinical practice. The aim of this study was to identify significant brain correlates (volume and asymmetry in volume of mild cognitive disorders when compared to normal controls in a large community-based sample of young-old individuals who were assessed for cognitive impairment. Methods: Cortical and sub-cortical volumes were measured using a semi-automated method in 398 participants aged 65-70 years who were selected from a larger randomly sampled cohort and who agreed to undergo an MRI scan. Diagnoses were reached based on established protocols for MCI and a more inclusive category of any Mild Cognitive Disorder (any-MCD: which includes AAMI, AACD, OCD, MNC, CDR, MCI. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between volume and asymmetry of theoretically relevant cerebral structures (predictors and MCI or any-MCD while controlling for age, sex, and intra-cranial volume. Results: The main correlates of cognitive impairment assessed in multivariate analyses were hippocampal asymmetry (more to left, MCI: OR 0.83, 95%CI 0.71-0.96, p = .013; MCD: OR 0.86, 95%CI 0.77-0.97, p = .011, lateral ventricle asymmetry (more to left, MCI: OR 0.95, 95%CI 0.91-0.99, p = .009; MCD: OR 0.95, 95%CI 0.92-0.98, p = .004, and cerebellar cortex asymmetry (more to left, MCI: OR 1.51, 95%CI 1.13-2.01, p = .005. Conclusions: In this population-based cohort stronger associations were found between asymmetry measures, rather than raw volumes in cerebral structures, and mild cognitive disorders.

  13. AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database is a resource from the Health Care Information Service of the British Library. AMED offers access to complementary and alternative medicine topics, such as acupuncture, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy, hospice care, hypnosis, palliative care, physiotherapy, podiatry, and rehabilitation. This column features a sample search to demonstrate the type of information available within AMED. AMED is available through the EBSCOhost and OVID platforms.

  14. Complementary computer generated holography for aesthetic watermarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Christophe; Lemonnier, Olivier; Laulagnet, Fabien; Fargeix, Alain; Tissot, Florent; Armand, Marie Françoise

    2012-02-27

    We present herein an original solution for the watermarking of holograms in binary graphic arts without unaesthetic diffractive effect. It is based on the Babinet principle of complementary diffractive structures adapted to Lohmann-type computer generated holograms. We introduce the concept and demonstrate its interest for anti-counterfeiting applications with the decoding of a hidden data matrix. A process of thermal lithography is used for the manufacturing of binary graphic arts containing complementary computer generated holograms.

  15. Partial focusing by indefinite complementary metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qiang; Liu, Ruopeng; Mock, Jack J.; Cui, Tie Jun; Smith, David R.

    2008-09-01

    We have experimentally realized a two-dimensional partial focusing within a planar waveguide using complementary indefinite metamaterials. When the electric fields emitted from the dipole are TE polarized, the focusing condition requires negative magnetic response in the propagation direction of the waveguide, which can be achieved by the complementary electric resonator (CELC) structures. We have carefully designed the experimental configurations and the dimensions for the CELC structures. The experimental result is consistent with the theoretical prediction, which validates the partial focusing phenomenon.

  16. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Monica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS are a group of disorders that have in common an acute presentation with headache, reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries, with or without neurological signs and symptoms. In contrast to primary central nervous system vasculitis, they have a relatively benign course. We describe here a patient who was diagnosed with RCVS.

  17. Hemisphere Asymmetry of Response to Pharmacologic Treatment in an Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Ihara, Masafumi; Carare, Roxana O; Garbis, Spiros D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine hemisphere asymmetry of response to pharmacologic treatment in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model using cilostazol as a chemical stimulus. Eight-month-old mice were assigned to vehicle or cilostazol treatment for three months and hemispheres were analyzed using quantitative proteomics. Bioinformatics interpretation showed that following treatment, aggregation of blood platelets significantly decreased in the right hemisphere whereas neurodegeneration significantly decreased and synaptic transmission increased in the left hemisphere only. Our study provides novel evidence on cerebral laterality of pharmacologic activity, with important implications in deciphering regional pharmacodynamic effects of existing drugs thus uncovering novel hemisphere-specific therapeutic targets.

  18. Asymmetry in infants’ selective attention to facial features during visual processing of infant-directed speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Smith

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments used eye tracking to examine how infant and adult observers distribute their eye gaze on videos of a mother producing infant- and adult-directed speech. Both groups showed greater attention to the eyes than to the nose and mouth, as well as an asymmetrical focus on the talker’s right eye for infant-directed speech stimuli. Observers continued to look more at the talker’s apparent right eye when the video stimuli were mirror flipped, suggesting that the asymmetry reflects a perceptual processing bias rather than a stimulus artifact, which may be related to cerebral lateralization of emotion processing.

  19. Management of Asymmetry After Breast Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Onelio

    2016-04-01

    Breast reduction surgery has achieved one of the highest patient satisfaction rates among plastic surgery procedures. Most of the complications encountered are usually minor and related to wound healing. Revision surgery to address these problems is common and usually consists of scar revisions. Postoperative breast asymmetry of a mild degree is also common; however, postoperative asymmetry severe enough to warrant surgical revision is a rare event, occurring in less than 1% of cases. Postmammaplasty revision surgery needs to be individualized. The asymmetry could be the result of nipple malposition or it could consist of a volume or shape discrepancy between the breast mounds.

  20. SUSY CP phases and asymmetries at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittel, Olaf, E-mail: kittel@ugr.e [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos and CAFPE, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2009-06-01

    In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, physical phases of complex parameters lead to CP violation. We show how triple products of particle momenta or spins can be used to construct asymmetries, that allow us to probe these CP phases. To give specific examples, we discuss the production of neutralinos at the International Linear Collider (ILC). For the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), we discuss CP asymmetries in squark decays, and in the tri-lepton signal. We find that the CP asymmetries can be as large as 60%.

  1. Seafloor Asymmetry in the Atlantic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.S.Gao; K.H.Liu

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of seafloor asymmetry at about 360000 pairs of conjugate points along 1250 profiles across the mid-Atlantic Ridge(MAR)provide new constraints on models for the upwelling of the buoyant asthenosphere. The sign and amplitude of the asymmetry vary systematically and are functions of the distance between the spreading center and the location of the inferred location of maximum regional buoyancy(LMRB)in the asthenosphere. The LMRB is a smooth line derived from the observed asymmetry and is more centered at the regional topographic high than the spreading center. These observations are best explained by active upwelling of the underlying buoyant asthenosphere rather than by pressure-release melting.

  2. SUSY CP phases and asymmetries at colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kittel, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, physical phases of complex parameters lead to CP violation. We show how triple products of particle momenta or spins can be used to construct asymmetries, that allow us to probe these CP phases. To give specific examples, we discuss the production of neutralinos at the International Linear Collider. For the Large Hadron Collider, we discuss CP asymmetries in squark decays, and in the tri-lepton signal. We find that the CP asymmetries can be as large as 60%.

  3. VCS-SSA Mainz Experiment. Measurement of the beam spin asymmetry in (e polarized p {yields} ep{gamma}) and (e polarized p {yields} ep{pi}{sup 0}). Final analysis - MEMO II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonvieille, H.; Bensafa, I. [LPC-Clermont-Fd, Universite Blaise Pascal, F-63170 Aubiere Cedex (France)

    2006-06-15

    MEMO-I was written in February 2006 to give details of the second pass analysis of the VCS-SSA experiment. Since then there was our VCS Meeting in March, the production of the PhD thesis by I. Bensafa in May, and complementary studies of the asymmetry which triggered some afterthoughts. Instead of updating MEMO-I which is long enough this memo summarizes these complementary remarks and proposes asymmetry results which are more finalized in view of publication. Various nomenclatures like cuts, variables,etc. have NOT been redefined: please read MEMO-I for that. (authors)

  4. Experimental investigation of transverse spin asymmetries in muon-p SIDIS processes: Sivers asymmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Adolph, C; Alexakhin, V Yu; Alexandrov, Yu; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Antonov, A A; Austregesilo, A; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Barth, J; Baum, G; Bedfer, Y; Bernhard, J; Bertini, R; Bettinelli, M; Bicker, K; Bieling, J; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Braun, C; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Burtin, E; Capozza, L; Chiosso, M; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Crespo, M L; Dalla Torre, S; Das, S; Dasgupta, S S; Dasgupta, S; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dunnweber, W; Dziewiecki, M; Efremov, A; Elia, C; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Filin, A; Finger, M; Fischer, H; Franco, C; von Hohenesche, N.du Fresne; Friedrich, J M; Frolov, V; Garfagnini, R; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gerassimov, S; Geyer, R; Giorgi, M; Gnesi, I; Gobbo, B; Goertz, S; Grabmuller, S; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Gushterski, R; Guskov, A; Guthorl, T; Haas, F; von Harrach, D; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Hess, C; Hinterberger, F; Horikawa, N; Hoppner, Ch; d'Hose, N; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, O; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jary, V; Jasinski, P; Joosten, R; Kabuss, E; Kang, D; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koblitz, S; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Konigsmann, K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Korzenev, A; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Kramer, M; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Lauser, L; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Liska, T; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Makke, N; Mallot, G K; Mann, A; Marchand, C; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Matsuda, T; Meshcheryakov, G; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu V; Moinester, M A; Morreale, A; Mutter, A; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Negrini, T; Nerling, F; Neubert, S; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Nowak, W D; Nunes, A S; Olshevsky, A G; Ostrick, M; Padee, A; Panknin, R; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Perevalova, E; Pesaro, G; Peshekhonov, D V; Piragino, G; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polak, J; Polyakov, V A; Pretz, J; Quaresma, M; Quintans, C; Rajotte, J F; Ramos, S; Rapatsky, V; Reicherz, G; Richter, A; Rocco, E; Rondio, E; Rossiyskaya, N S; Ryabchikov, D I; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Sapozhnikov, M G; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schluter, T; Schmidt, K; Schmitt, L; Schonning, K; Schopferer, S; Schott, M; Schroder, W; Shevchenko, O Yu; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sissakian, A N; Slunecka, M; Smirnov, G I; Sosio, S; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Steiger, L; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Suzuki, H; Sznajder, P; Takekawa, S; Wolbeek, J.Ter; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Tkatchev, L G; Uhl, S; Uman, I; Vandenbroucke, M; Virius, M; Vlassov, N V; Wang, L; Wilfert, M; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Wollny, H; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M; Zhuravlev, N; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    The COMPASS Collaboration at CERN has measured the transverse spin azimuthal asymmetry of charged hadrons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering using a 160 GeV positive muon beam and a transversely polarised NH_3 target. The Sivers asymmetry of the proton has been extracted in the Bjorken x range 0.003 0.03. The asymmetry is different from zero and positive also in the low x region, where sea-quarks dominate. The kinematic dependence of the asymmetry has also been investigated and results are given for various intervals of hadron and virtual photon fractional energy. In contrast to the case of the Collins asymmetry, the results on the Sivers asymmetry suggest a strong dependence on the four-momentum transfer to the nucleon, in agreement with the most recent calculations.

  5. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Katsumi [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, 1-2 Higashi-Takada-cho, Mibu, Nakagyo-ku, 604-8845 Kyoto (Japan); Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko [Department of Pediatric Neurology, St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, 603-8323 Kyoto (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  6. [Complementary and alternative medicine in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, J

    2013-06-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine are frequently used by cancer patients. The main benefit of complementary medicine is that it gives patients the chance to become active. Complementary therapy can reduce the side effects of conventional therapy. However, we have to give due consideration to side effects and interactions: the latter being able to reduce the effectiveness of cancer therapy and so to jeopardise the success of therapy. Therefore, complementary therapy should be managed by the oncologist. It is based on a common concept of cancerogenesis with conventional therapy. Complement therapy can be assessed in studies. Alternative medicine in contrast rejects common rules of evidence-based medicine. It starts from its own concepts of cancerogenesis, which is often in line with the thinking of lay persons. Alternative medicine is offered as either "alternative" to recommended cancer treatment or is used at the same time but without due regard for the interactions. Alternative medicine is a high risk to patients. In the following two parts of the article, the most important complementary and alternative therapies cancer patients use nowadays are presented and assessed according to published evidence.

  7. EFFECT OF LEFT VENTRICULAR SYSTOLIC DYSFUNCTION ON CEREBRAL HEMODYNAMICS IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION (THE RESULTS OF OBSERVATIONAL STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Kulikov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effect of left ventricular (LV systolic dysfunction on cerebral hemodynamic in patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI during acute period. Material and methods. Cerebral hemodynamics ultrasound assessment was performed in the extra-and intracranial vessels in 118 patients with STEMI. Results. Significant changes in cerebral hemodynamics were found in LV systolic dysfunction with ejection fraction (LVEF ≤40% due to hemispheric blood flow asymmetry in the middle cerebral artery (MCA as large as 45.1±6.7% with correlation coefficient r=-0.87. Compensation of cerebral blood flow was manifested in vasoconstriction or vasodilation (resistive index 0.63-0.76 and 0.49-0.43 c.u., respectively. Conclusion. A strong relationship between LV systolic dysfunction and cerebral hemodynamic was found in patients with STEMI. It was manifested in significant contralateral hemispheric blood flow asymmetry in MCA in patients with LVEF ≤40%. Reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity activated autoregulation mechanism in the form of vasoconstriction or vasodilation.

  8. Leptogenesis and gravity: Baryon asymmetry without decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J. I.; Shore, G. M.

    2017-03-01

    A popular class of theories attributes the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe to CP-violating decays of super-heavy BSM particles in the Early Universe. Recently, we discovered a new source of leptogenesis in these models, namely that the same Yukawa phases which provide the CP violation for decays, combined with curved-spacetime loop effects, lead to an entirely new gravitational mechanism for generating an asymmetry, driven by the expansion of the Universe and independent of the departure of the heavy particles from equilibrium. In this Letter, we build on previous work by analysing the full Boltzmann equation, exploring the full parameter space of the theory and studying the time-evolution of the asymmetry. Remarkably, we find regions of parameter space where decays play no part at all, and where the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is determined solely by gravitational effects.

  9. Statistics of gamma ray burst temporal asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Link, B; Link, Bennett; Epstein, Richard

    1996-01-01

    We study the temporal asymmetry of over 600 bursts from the BATSE 3B catalog, encompassing a 200-fold range in peak flux. By comparing the rates of rise and fall of the flux near the highest burst peak, we find that about two-thirds of the bursts exhibit a preferred asymmetry in the sense that the flux rises more rapidly than it falls, confirming the conclusions of previous studies employing smaller databases. The statistical significance of the average time asymmetry of the sample is >99.999\\%; therefore, models that predict time symmetry of the burst profile are ruled out. We find no statistically significant correlation between burst temporal asymmetry and peak. This result is consistent with both cosmological and local interpretations of the gamma ray burst phenomenon.

  10. Optimal branching asymmetry of hydrodynamic pulsatile trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florens, Magali; Sapoval, Bernard; Filoche, Marcel

    2011-04-29

    Most of the studies on optimal transport are done for steady state regime conditions. Yet, there exists numerous examples in living systems where supply tree networks have to deliver products in a limited time due to the pulsatile character of the flow, as it is the case for mammalian respiration. We report here that introducing a systematic branching asymmetry allows the tree to reduce the average delivery time of the products. It simultaneously increases its robustness against the inevitable variability of sizes related to morphogenesis. We then apply this approach to the human tracheobronchial tree. We show that in this case all extremities are supplied with fresh air, provided that the asymmetry is smaller than a critical threshold which happens to match the asymmetry measured in the human lung. This could indicate that the structure is tuned at the maximum asymmetry level that allows the lung to feed all terminal units with fresh air.

  11. Brain asymmetry: both sides of the story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Athina; Tsangaris, George T

    2011-12-01

    Biological systems demonstrate asymmetry, while lateralization has been observed from humans to lower animals structurally, functionally and behaviorally. This may be derived from evolutionary, genetic, developmental, epigenetic and pathologic factors. However, brain structure and function is complex, and macroscopic or microscopic asymmetries are hard to discern from random fluctuations. In this article, we discuss brain laterality and lateralization, beginning with a brief review of the literature on brain structural and functional asymmetries. We conclude with methods to detect and quantify asymmetry, focusing on neuroproteomics, for retrieval of protein-expression patterns, as a method of diagnosis and treatment monitoring. We suggest inter-hemispheric differential proteomics as a valid method to assess the experimental and biological variations in the healthy brain, and neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders.

  12. Hearing loss and asymmetry in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yovell, Y; Sackeim, H A; Epstein, D G; Prudic, J; Devanand, D P; McElhiney, M C; Settembrino, J M; Bruder, G E

    1995-01-01

    To assess patterns of hearing loss and asymmetry in major depressive disorder (MDD), pure-tone and brief-click audiometric thresholds were measured in 59 inpatients with MDD and 40 normal control subjects. For both tasks, patients had higher bilateral thresholds, with marked hearing loss for the highest pure-tone frequency. At lower frequencies, patients displayed significant asymmetry, with poorer hearing in the left ear. After ECT, patients maintained the bilateral hearing losses; however, the baseline asymmetry resolved. These findings suggest that bilateral hearing loss may be a stable characteristic in severe depression. Poorer left ear pure-tone hearing may be present during the depressed state. The baseline asymmetry in audiometric deficits suggests right-hemisphere dysfunction in severe MDD.

  13. Introduction "Workplace (a)symmetries: multimodal perspectives"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmuss, Birte

    Following the seminal work on talk at work (Drew and Heritage, 1992) and later studies on interaction in institutional interaction (Arminen, 2005; Asmuß & Svennevig, 2009; Svennevig 2012a), the panel seeks to pursue the role of interactional micro-practices for the emergence of workplace symmetries...... and asymmetries. Workplaces are settings where different kinds of (a)symmetries are constructed through interaction ((Svennevig, 2012b, Asmuß, 2008). In comparison to interactions between professionals and laypeople, identities in workplace interactions where colleagues interact with each other may be more...... complex due to multiple roles and team alliances (Pomerantz & Denvir, 2007; Djordjilovic, 2012). Thus, participants of workplace interaction have to negotiate their position in a dynamically fluctuating network of symmetries and asymmetries. The emergence of symmetries and asymmetries in talk has been...

  14. Baryon and time asymmetries of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Barnaveli, A T; Barnaveli, Andro; Gogberashvili, Merab

    1995-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of connection between two apparent asymmetries of the nature --- time-asymmetry and Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe (BAU). The brief review of this subjects is given. We consider the particle behavior in curved space-time and the possibility of T- and CPT-violation by the universe expansion. If these symmetries are violated we can dispense with the nonequilibrium condition which is usualy considered as the one of necessary ingredients for BAU-generation. Such mechanism of GUT-scale baryogenesis can provide the observed value of baryon asymmetry. We show this on the example of minimal SU(5) model which usually fails to explain the observed BAU without taking into account gravitational effects. Predominance of matter over antimatter and the cosmological arrow of time (the time-direction in which the Universe expands) seem to be connected facts and, possibly, BAU is the one of observable facts of CPT-violation in nature.

  15. Anestesia e paralisia cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Március Vinícius M Maranhão

    2005-01-01

    JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A paralisia cerebral (PC) é uma doença não progressiva decorrente de lesão no sistema nervoso central, levando a um comprometimento motor do paciente. O portador de PC freqüentemente é submetido a procedimentos cirúrgicos devido a doenças usuais e situações particulares decorrentes da paralisia cerebral. Foi objetivo deste artigo revisar aspectos da paralisia cerebral de interesse para o anestesiologista, permitindo um adequado manuseio pré, intra e pós-operatório n...

  16. Associative asymmetry of compound words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Jeremy B; Boulton, Kathy L; Gagné, Christina L

    2014-07-01

    Early verbal-memory researchers assumed participants represent memory of a pair of unrelated items with 2 independent, separately modifiable, directional associations. However, memory for pairs of unrelated words (A-B) exhibits associative symmetry: a near-perfect correlation between accuracy on forward (A →?) and backward (?← B) cued recall. This was viewed as arguing against the independent-associations hypothesis and in favor of the hypothesis that associations are remembered as holistic units. Here we test the Holistic Representation hypothesis further by examining cued recall of compound words. If we suppose preexisting words are more unitized than novel associations, the Holistic Representation hypothesis predicts compound words (e.g., ROSE BUD) will have a higher forward-backward correlation than novel compounds (e.g., BRIEF TAX). We report the opposite finding: Compound words, as well as noncompound words, exhibited less associative symmetry than novel compounds. This challenges the Holistic Representation account of associative symmetry. Moreover, preexperimental associates (positional family size) influenced associative symmetry-but asymmetrically: Increasing family size of the last constituent increasing decoupled forward and backward recall, but family size of the 1st constituent had no such effect. In short, highly practiced, meaningful associations exhibit associative asymmetry, suggesting associative symmetry is not diagnostic of holistic representations but, rather, is a characteristic of ad hoc associations. With additional learning, symmetric associations may be replaced by directional, independently modifiable associations as verbal associations become embedded within a rich knowledge structure.

  17. Forward-backward asymmetries of atomic photoelectrons.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biheux, J. C.; Dunford, R. W.; Gemmell, D. S.; Hasegawa, S.; Kanter, E. P.; Krassig, B.; Southworth, S. H.; Young, L.

    1999-01-19

    When atomic photoionization is treated beyond the dipole approximation, photoelectron angular distributions are asymmetric forward and backward with respect to the direction of the photon beam. We have measured forward-backward asymmetries of Ar 1s and Kr 1s and 2s photoelectrons using 2-19 keV x-rays. The measured asymmetries compare well with calculations which include interference between electric-dipole and electric-quadrupole amplitudes within the nonrelativistic, independent-particle approximations.

  18. On the azimuthal asymmetries in DIS

    CERN Document Server

    Efremov, E V; Göke, K; Urbano, D

    2000-01-01

    Using the recent experimental data on the left right asymmetry in fragmentation of transversely polarized quarks and the theoretical calculation of the proton transversity distribution in the effective chiral quark soliton model we explain the azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive hadron production on longitudinal (HERMES) and transversely (SMC) polarized targets with no free parameters. On this basis we state that the proton transversity distribution could be successfully measured in future DIS experiments with longitudinally polarized target.

  19. Physical Interpretation Of Asymmetry Parameter in Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakara Mayya

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Early type galaxies, in general, appear to be more symmetric than late type galaxies. There have been attempts to quantify this trend into an asymmetry parameter, aiming to determine the morphological type of distant galaxies. Studies conducted on samples of nearby galaxies find a fairly reasonable correlation between asymmetry and morphological type of galaxies. However, it is important to understand the correlation physically before the correlation could be used to classify distant galaxies. With this purpose we carried out a multi-band analysis of asymmetry of nearby galaxies. We find a dependence between asymmetry parameter and wavelength which can be explained by a model, i n which recently formed stars play an important role. The model also reproduces the correlation of asymmetry parameter with global quantities such as color and Halpha flux of galaxies. From these analyses, we conclude that asymmetry parameter is closely tied to the current star formation rate and hence its use as a morphological indicator is limited.

  20. Demonstration of cerebral vessels by multiplane computed cerebral angiotomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asari S.; Satch, T.; Sakurai, M.; Yamamoto, Y. (Matsuyama Shimin Hospital, Matsuyama (Japan)); Sadamoto, K.

    1981-06-01

    1. Cerebral arteries and veins were demonstrated by multiplane computed cerebral angiotomography (combination of axial, modified coronal, half axial (Towne), and semisagittal planes). The vessels which were demonstrated by various planes were as follows: Axial plane: Willis ring, middle cerebral arteries (horizontal and insular portions), anterior cerebral arteries (Horizontal and ascending portions), posterior cerebral arteries, basal vein of Rosenthal, internal cerebral veins (and the subependymal veins which join the ICV), and vein of Galen. Coronal plane: intermal carotid arteries (supraclinoid portion), anterior cerebral arteries (horizontal portion), middle cerebral arteries (horizontal and insular portions), lenticulostriate arteries, basal vein of Rosenthal (and the subependymal veins which join this vessel), internal cerebral veins, and vein of Galen. Half axial plane (Towne projection): basilar artery, vertebral arteries, posterior cerebral arteries, superior cerebellar arteries, middle cerebral arteries (horizontal portion), and anterior cerebral arteries (horizontal and ascending portions). Semisagittal plane: internal carotid artery (supraclinoid portion), posterior communicating artery, posterior carebral artery, superior cerebellar artery, internal cerebral vein, basal vein of Rosenthal, vein of Galen, and straight shinus. 2. A detailed knowledge of normal cerebrovascular structures acquired by computed tomography (CT) is essential in detecting and more precisely localizing lesions such as cerebrovascular disease, neoplasm or abscess, in differentiating these lesions from the normal contrast-enhanced structures, and in understanding the spatial relationship between the mass lesion and the neighboring vessels. In addition, it will be possible to discover such asymptomatic cerebrovascular diseases as non-ruptured aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, and Moyamoya disease by means of computed cerebral angiotomography.

  1. Statistical parametric mapping of Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT cerebral perfusion in the normal elderly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turlakow, A.; Scott, A.M.; Berlangieri, S.U.; Sonkila, C.; Wardill, T.D.; Crowley, K.; Abbott, D.; Egan, G.F.; McKay, W.J.; Hughes, A. [Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia). Departments of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET Neurology and Clinical Neuropsychology

    1998-06-01

    Full text: The clinical value of Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT cerebral blood flow studies in cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders has been well described. Currently, interpretation of these studies relies on qualitative or semi- quantitative techniques. The aim of our study is to generate statistical measures of regional cerebral perfusion in the normal elderly using statistical parametric mapping (Friston et al, Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, London, UK) in order to facilitate the objective analysis of cerebral blood flow studies in patient groups. A cohort of 20 healthy, elderly volunteers, aged 68 to 81 years, was prospectively selected on the basis of normal physical examination and neuropsychological testing. Subjects with risk factors, or a history of cognitive impairment were excluded from our study group. All volunteers underwent SPECT cerebral blood flow imaging, 30 minutes following the administration of 370 MBq Tc-99m HMPAO, on a Trionix Triad XLT triple-headed scanner (Trionix Research Laboratory Twinsburg, OH) using high resolution, fan-beam collimators resulting in a system resolution of 10 mm full width at half-maximum (FWHM). The SPECT cerebral blood flow studies were analysed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) software specifically developed for the routine statistical analysis of functional neuroimaging data. The SPECT images were coregistered with each individual`s T1-weighted MR volume brain scan and spatially normalized to standardised Talairach space. Using SPM, these data were analyzed for differences in interhemispheric regional cerebral blood flow. Significant asymmetry of cerebral perfusion was detected in the pre-central gyrus at the 95th percentile. In conclusion, the interpretation of cerebral blood flow studies in the elderly should take into account the statistically significant asymmetry in interhemispheric pre-central cortical blood flow. In the future, clinical studies will be compared to statistical data sets in age

  2. Complementary Theories to Supply Chain Management Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halldorsson, Arni; Hsuan, Juliana; Kotzab, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to identify ways by which the theorizing of supply chain management (SCM) takes place, with particular attention to complementary theories. SCM suffers as well as benefits from a “conceptual slack”. Design/methodology/approach – The nature of SCM is discussed...... complementary theories to advancing understanding of SCM can benefit from the five building blocks of theorizing SCM proposed in the paper. Practical implications – Theoretical principles in SCM are not only used to describe practical problems but also to “produce the world”; supply chains can be seen...

  3. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renowden, Shelley [Frenchay Hospital, Bristol BS16 1LE (United Kingdom)

    2004-02-01

    A comprehensive synopsis on cerebral venous thrombosis is presented. It emphasizes the various aetiologies, the wide clinical spectrum and the unpredictable outcome. Imaging techniques and pitfalls are reported and the therapeutic options are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Tomographic cerebral blood flow measurement during carotid surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathenborg, Lisbet Knudsen; Vorstrup, Sidsel; Olsen, K S

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to depict regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during carotid cross clamping using 99mTechnetium-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (TcHMPAO). This tracer rapidly passes the blood-brain barrier and is retained for hours in the brain tissue. Injecting TcHMPAO during...... RESULTS: We found a significant correlation between stump pressure and enhancement of side-to-side asymmetry in rCBF due to carotid cross clamping. Pronounced variations were seen in which regions were deprived of perfusion during clamping. CONCLUSION: TcHMPAO allows tomographic assessment of CBF during...

  5. Exponential Gaussian approach for spectral modelling: The EGO algorithm II. Band asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompilio, Loredana; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe; Cloutis, Edward A.; Craig, Michael A.; Roush, Ted L.

    2010-08-01

    The present investigation is complementary to a previous paper which introduced the EGO approach to spectral modelling of reflectance measurements acquired in the visible and near-IR range (Pompilio, L., Pedrazzi, G., Sgavetti, M., Cloutis, E.A., Craig, M.A., Roush, T.L. [2009]. Icarus, 201 (2), 781-794). Here, we show the performances of the EGO model in attempting to account for temperature-induced variations in spectra, specifically band asymmetry. Our main goals are: (1) to recognize and model thermal-induced band asymmetry in reflectance spectra; (2) to develop a basic approach for decomposition of remotely acquired spectra from planetary surfaces, where effects due to temperature variations are most prevalent; (3) to reduce the uncertainty related to quantitative estimation of band position and depth when band asymmetry is occurring. In order to accomplish these objectives, we tested the EGO algorithm on a number of measurements acquired on powdered pyroxenes at sample temperature ranging from 80 up to 400 K. The main results arising from this study are: (1) EGO model is able to numerically account for the occurrence of band asymmetry on reflectance spectra; (2) the returned set of EGO parameters can suggest the influence of some additional effect other than the electronic transition responsible for the absorption feature; (3) the returned set of EGO parameters can help in estimating the surface temperature of a planetary body; (4) the occurrence of absorptions which are less affected by temperature variations can be mapped for minerals and thus used for compositional estimates. Further work is still required in order to analyze the behaviour of the EGO algorithm with respect to temperature-induced band asymmetry using powdered pyroxene spanning a range of compositions and grain sizes and more complex band shapes.

  6. Acute ischemic cerebral attack

    OpenAIRE

    Franco-Garcia Samir; Barreiro-Pinto Belis

    2010-01-01

    The decrease of the cerebral blood flow below the threshold of autoregulation led to changes of cerebral ischemia and necrosis that traduce in signs and symtoms of focal neurologic dysfunction called acute cerebrovascular symdrome (ACS) or stroke. Two big groups according to its etiology are included in this category the hemorragic that constitue a 20% and the ischemic a 80% of cases. Great interest has wom the ischemic ACS because of its high social burden, being the third cause of no violen...

  7. Early-light embryonic stimulation suggests a second route, via gene activation, to cerebral lateralization in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiandetti, Cinzia; Galliussi, Jessica; Andrew, Richard J; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors determine the asymmetrical position of vertebrate embryos allowing asymmetric environmental stimulation to shape cerebral lateralization. In birds, late-light stimulation, just before hatching, on the right optic nerve triggers anatomical and functional cerebral asymmetries. However, some brain asymmetries develop in absence of embryonic light stimulation. Furthermore, early-light action affects lateralization in the transparent zebrafish embryos before their visual system is functional. Here we investigated whether another pathway intervenes in establishing brain specialization. We exposed chicks' embryos to light before their visual system was formed. We observed that such early stimulation modulates cerebral lateralization in a comparable vein of late-light stimulation on active retinal cells. Our results show that, in a higher vertebrate brain, a second route, likely affecting the genetic expression of photosensitive regions, acts before the development of a functional visual system. More than one sensitive period seems thus available to light stimulation to trigger brain lateralization.

  8. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge;

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  9. [Dextrals and sinistrals (right-handers and left-handers): specificity of interhemispheric brain asymmetry and EEG coherence parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhavoronkova, L A

    2007-01-01

    Data of literature about morphological, functional and biochemical specificity of the brain interhemispheric asymmetry of healthy right-handers and left-handers and about peculiarity of dynamics of cerebral pathology in patients with different individual asymmetry profiles are presented at the present article. Results of our investigation by using coherence parameters of electroencephalogram (EEG) in healthy right-handers and left-handers in state of rest, during functional tests and sleeping and in patients with different forms of the brain organic damage were analyzed too. EEG coherence analysis revealed the reciprocal changing of alpha-beta and theta-delta spectral bands in right-handers whilein left-handers synchronous changing of all EEG spectral bands were observed. Data about regional-frequent specificity of EEG coherence, peculiarity of EEG asymmetry in right-handers and left-handers, aslo about specificity of EEG spectral band genesis and point of view about a role of the brain regulator systems in forming of interhemispheric asymmetry in different functional states allowed to propose the conception about principle of interhermispheric brain asymmetry formation in left-handers and left-handers. Following this conception in dextrals elements of concurrent (summary-reciprocal) cooperation are predominant at the character of interhemispheric and cortical-subcortical interaction while in sinistrals a principle of concordance (supplementary) is preferable. These peculiarities the brain organization determine, from the first side, the quicker revovery of functions damaged after cranio-cerebral trauma in left-handers in comparison right-handers and from the other side - they determine the forming of the more expressed pathology in the remote terms after exposure the low dose of radiation.

  10. Polish Complementary Schools in Iceland and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinska, Malgorzata; Kowzan, Piotr; Ragnarsdóttir, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Since 2004, the opening of labour markets has spurred a considerable number of Poles to emigrate e.g. to Iceland and England. Families with school age children have had the challenge of adapting to foreign environments and school systems. Polish complementary schools have played an important, albeit ambivalent, role in this process. Through focus…

  11. Force network analysis using complementary energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgart, A.; Liem, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The method presented solves statically indeterminate force networks, which are graphical representations of forces (force polygons) of a structure, by using complementary energy. Statically indeterminate force networks, which have nodes where four or more members come together, have for each node mu

  12. Complementary Theories to Supply Chain Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halldorsson, Arni; Hsuan, Juliana; Kotzab, Herbert

    Borrowing from complementary theories has become an important part of theorizing SCM. We build upon principal-agent theory (PAT), transaction cost analysis (TCA), network theory (NT), and resource-based view (RBV) to provide insights on how to structure a supply chain and manage it. Through...

  13. Case-control study of six genes asymmetrically expressed in the two cerebral hemispheres: association of BAIAP2 with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribasés, Marta; Bosch, Rosa; Hervás, Amaia

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disease that persists into adulthood in at least 30% of patients. There is evidence suggesting that abnormal left-right brain asymmetries in ADHD patients may be involved in a variety of ADHD......-related cognitive processes, including sustained attention, working memory, response inhibition and planning. Although mechanisms underlying cerebral lateralization are unknown, left-right cortical asymmetry has been associated with transcriptional asymmetry at embryonic stages and several genes differentially...

  14. Monitoring of cerebral haemodynamics in newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liem, K Djien; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    The most important cerebrovascular injuries in newborn infants, particularly in preterm infants, are cerebral haemorrhage and ischemic injury. The typical cerebral vascular anatomy and the disturbance of cerebral haemodynamics play important roles in the pathophysiology. The term 'cerebral...

  15. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome: case report of fetal unilateral ventriculomegaly and hypoplastic left middle cerebral artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, Ettore; Piccione, Maria; Marrone, Gianluca; Giuffrè, Mario; Corsello, Giovanni

    2013-05-14

    Prenatal ultrasonographic detection of unilateral cerebral ventriculomegaly arises suspicion of pathological condition related to cerebrospinal fluid flow obstruction or cerebral parenchimal pathology. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome is a rare condition characterized by cerebral hemiatrophy, calvarial thickening, skull and facial asymmetry, contralateral hemiparesis, cognitive impairment and seizures. Congenital and acquired types are recognized and have been described, mainly in late childhood, adolescence and adult ages. We describe a female infant with prenatal diagnosis of unilateral left ventriculomegaly in which early brain MRI and contrast enhanced-MRI angiography, showed cerebral left hemiatrophy associated with reduced caliber of the left middle cerebral artery revealing the characteristic findings of the Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome. Prenatal imaging, cerebral vascular anomaly responsible for the cerebral hemiatrophy and the early clinical evolution have never been described before in such a young child and complete the acquired clinical descriptions in older children. Differential diagnosis, genetic investigations, neurophysiologic assessments, short term clinical and developmental follow up are described. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome must be ruled out in differential diagnosis of fetal unilateral ventriculomegaly. Early clinical assessment, differential diagnosis and cerebral imaging including cerebral MRI angiography allow the clinicians to diagnose also in early infancy this rare condition.

  16. Evidence for developmental programming of cerebral laterality in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alexander; Osmond, Clive; Godfrey, Keith M; Phillips, David I W

    2011-02-16

    Adverse fetal environments are associated with depression, reduced cognitive ability and increased stress responsiveness in later life, but underlying mechanisms are unknown. Environmental pressures on the fetus, resulting from variations in placental function and maternal nutrition, health and stress might alter neurodevelopment, promoting the development of some brain regions over others. As asymmetry of cerebral activity, with greater right hemisphere activity, has been associated with psychopathology, we hypothesized that regional specialization during fetal life might be reflected persistently in the relative activity of the cerebral hemispheres. We tested this hypothesis in 140 healthy 8-9 year-old children, using tympanic membrane temperature to assess relative blood flow to the cerebral hemispheres at rest and following psychosocial stress (Trier Social Stress Test for Children). Their birth weight and placental weight had already been measured when their mothers took part in a previous study of pregnancy outcomes. We found that children who had a smaller weight at birth had evidence of greater blood flow to the right hemisphere than to the left hemisphere (r = -.09, P = .29 at rest; r = -.18, P = .04 following stress). This finding was strengthened if the children had a relatively low birth weight for their placental weight (r = -.17, P = .05 at rest; r = -.31, P = .0005 following stress). Our findings suggest that lateralization of cerebral activity is influenced persistently by early developmental experiences, with possible consequences for long-term neurocognitive function.

  17. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bindu Balakrishnan,1 Elizabeth Nance,1 Michael V Johnston,2 Rangaramanujam Kannan,3 Sujatha Kannan1 1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Department of Neurology and Pediatrics, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. Keywords: dendrimer, cerebral palsy, neuroinflammation, nanoparticle, neonatal brain injury, G4OH-PAMAM

  18. Corrections to quark asymmetries at LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, A.; /Fermilab; Monig, K.; /DESY, Zeuthen

    2004-11-01

    The most precise measurement of the weak mixing angle sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup l} at LEP is from the forward-backward asymmetry e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} b{bar b} at the Z-pole. In this note the QED and electroweak radiative corrections to obtain the pole asymmetry from the measured asymmetry for b- and c-quarks have been calculated using ZFITTER, which has been amended to allow a consistent treatment of partial two-loop corrections for the b-quark final asymmetries. A total correction of {delta}A{sub FB}{sup b} = 0.0019 {+-} 0.0002 and {delta}A{sub FB}{sup c} = 0.0064 {+-} 0.0001 has been found, where the remaining theoretical uncertainty is much too small to explain the apparent discrepancy between sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup l} obtained from A{sub FB}{sup b} and from the left-right asymmetry at SLD.

  19. Corrections to quark asymmetries at LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Moenig, K.

    2004-11-01

    The most precise measurement of the weak mixing angle sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub eff}{sup l} at LEP is from the forward-backward asymmetry e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} bb at the Z-pole. In this note the QED and electroweak radiative corrections to obtain the pole asymmetry from the measured asymmetry for b- and c-quarks have been calculated using ZFITTER, which has been amended to allow a consistent treatment of partial two-loop corrections for the b-quark final asymmetries. A total correction of {delta}A{sub FB}{sup b} = 0.0019 {+-} 0.0002 and {delta}A{sub FB}{sup c} = 0.0064 {+-} 0.0001 has been found, where the remaining theoretical uncertainty is much too small to explain the apparent discrepancy between sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub eff}{sup l} obtained from A{sub FB}{sup b} and from the left-right asymmetry at SLD. (orig.)

  20. Asymmetry of the Brain: Development and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboc, Véronique; Dufourcq, Pascale; Blader, Patrick; Roussigné, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Although the left and right hemispheres of our brains develop with a high degree of symmetry at both the anatomical and functional levels, it has become clear that subtle structural differences exist between the two sides and that each is dominant in processing specific cognitive tasks. As the result of evolutionary conservation or convergence, lateralization of the brain is found in both vertebrates and invertebrates, suggesting that it provides significant fitness for animal life. This widespread feature of hemispheric specialization has allowed the emergence of model systems to study its development and, in some cases, to link anatomical asymmetries to brain function and behavior. Here, we present some of what is known about brain asymmetry in humans and model organisms as well as what is known about the impact of environmental and genetic factors on brain asymmetry development. We specifically highlight the progress made in understanding the development of epithalamic asymmetries in zebrafish and how this model provides an exciting opportunity to address brain asymmetry at different levels of complexity.

  1. Plasma current asymmetries during disruptions in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, S. N.; Hender, T. C.; Morris, J.; Riccardo, V.; Zakharov, L. E.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-07-01

    A key feature of disruptions during vertical displacement events, discovered in JET in 1996, is the toroidal variation in the measured plasma current Ip, i.e. the plasma current asymmetries, lasting for almost the entire current quench. The unique magnetic diagnostics at JET (full set of poloidal coils and saddle loops recorded either from two toroidally opposite or from four toroidally orthogonal locations) allow for a comprehensive analysis of asymmetrical disruptions with a large scale database. This paper presents an analysis of 4854 disruptions over an 18 year period that includes both the JET carbon (C) wall and the ITER-like (IL) wall (a mixed beryllium/tungsten first wall). In spite of the Ip quench time significantly increasing for the IL-wall compared to C-wall disruptions, the observed toroidal asymmetry time integral (˜ sideways force impulse), did not increase for IL-wall disruptions. The Ip asymmetry has a dominantly n = 1 structure. Its motion in the toroidal direction has a sporadic behaviour, in general. The distributions of the number of rotation periods are found to be very similar for both C- and IL-wall disruptions, and multi-turn rotation was sometimes observed. The Ip asymmetry amplitude has no degradation with rotation frequency for either the C- or IL-wall disruption. Therefore dynamic amplification remains a potentially serious issue for ITER due to possible mechanical resonance of the machine components with the rotating asymmetry.

  2. Electroacupuncture-attenuated ischemic brain injury increases insulin-like growth factor-1expression in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanmin Gao; Ling Wang; Yunliang Guo

    2010-01-01

    Acupuncture has recently gained popularity in many countries as an alternative and complementary therapeutic intervention.Previous studies have shown that changes in genes,proteins,and their metabolites were measureable during acupuncture for treatment of cerebral ischemia.Through the use of in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry,the present study confirmed that electroacupuncture increased insulin-like growth factor-1 mRNA and protein expression in the corpus striatum following cerebral ischemia,reduced brain edema following middle cerebral artery occlusion repeffusion,and decreased infarct volume.Results suggested that electroacupuncture is effective in the relief of cerebral ischemia by increasing endogenous insulin-like growth factor-1 expression.

  3. Clinical Neuroimaging of cerebral ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawara, Jyoji [Nakamura Memorial Hospital, Sapporo (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Notice points in clinical imaging of cerebral ischemia are reviewed. When cerebral blood flow is determined in acute stage of cerebral embolism (cerebral blood flow SPECT), it is important to find area of ischemic core and ischemic penumbra. When large cortex area is assigned to ischemic penumbra, thrombolytic therapy is positively adapted, but cautious correspondence is necessary when ischemic core is recognized. DWI is superior in the detection of area equivalent to ischemic core of early stage, but, in imaging of area equivalent to ischemic penumbra, perfusion image or distribution image of cerebral blood volume (CBV) by MRI need to be combined. Luxury perfusion detected by cerebral blood flow SPECT in the cases of acute cerebral embolism suggests vascular recanalization, but a comparison with CT/MRI and continuous assessment of cerebral circulation dynamics were necessary in order to predict brain tissue disease (metabolic abnormality). In hemodynamic cerebral ischemia, it is important to find stage 2 equivalent to misery perfusion by quantification of cerebral blood flow SPECT. Degree of diaschisis can indicate seriousness of brain dysfunction for lacuna infarct. Because cerebral circulation reserve ability (perfusion pressure) is normal in all areas of the low cerebral blood flow by diaschisis mechanism, their areas are easily distinguished from those of hemodynamic cerebral ischemia. (K.H.)

  4. Lateral bias of agonistic responses to mirror images and morphological asymmetry in the Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yuichi; Hori, Michio; Myint, Omar; Kohda, Masanori

    2010-03-17

    Behavioural laterality (e.g., during social interactions) is often observed at the individual level in lower vertebrates such as fish, whereas population-level laterality is observed in many higher vertebrates. Population-level laterality can be explained mainly by internal factors (e.g., cerebral lateralization), whereas little is known about the behavioural mechanisms underlying individual-level laterality. Recently, it was revealed that many fish have asymmetrical body morphology, but the relationship between asymmetric morphology and social behaviours has been rarely examined. Here we report the relationship between lateralized eye use during aggressive displays (e.g., body posture) of male Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens, toward their own mirror image and morphological asymmetry. Of 25 males, five exhibited significantly more leftward eye use during left displays, and eight males exhibited predominantly rightward eye use during right displays. Morphological measurement results for the craniovertebral angle and opercular area showed that the craniovertebral angle and opercular area displayed antisymmetry and fluctuating asymmetry, respectively. We found that lateralized eye use during agonistic responses by each fish was associated with the craniovertebral angle, but not with operculum size; lefties (left-curved body) showed mainly left eye use (during left-side displays), and righties (right-curved body) demonstrated the opposite. We suggest that antisymmetric morphologies, such as head incline, are potentially useful for studying the association between cerebral lateralization and individual laterality of behavioural responses. Further, we propose that in fish, morphological asymmetry is related to laterality in various behaviours.

  5. Labour market asymmetries in a monetary union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seneca, Martin; Andersen, Torben M.

    This paper takes a first step in analysing how a monetary union performs in the presence of labour market asymmetries. Differences in wage flexibility, market power and country sizes are allowed for in a setting with both countryspecific and aggregate shocks. The implications of asymmetries...... for both the overall performance of the monetary union and the country-specific situation are analysed. It is shown that asymmetries are not only critical for countryspecific performance but also for the overall performance of the monetary union. A striking finding is that aggregate output volatility...... this is not necessarily the case for aggregate shocks. There may thus be a tension between the degree of flexibility considered optimal at the country level and at the aggregate level within the monetary union....

  6. The electroweak polarization asymmetry: A guided tour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, D.C.

    1988-10-01

    A comprehensive review is provided of the electroweak polarization asymmetry at the Z/sup 0/, a highly accurate measure of the Z/sup 0/ coupling to fermions. Its significance as a precision test of the Standard Model is explored in detail. Emphasized are the role of electroweak symmetry-breaking and radiative corrections; the non-decoupling of new physics beyond the Z/sup 0/; and the testing of extensions of the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry, technicolor, new generations of fermions, grand unification, and new gauge forces. Also discussed are the relationship of the polarization asymmetry to other electroweak observables and its superiority to other Z/sup 0/ asymmetries. Experimental issues are briefly presented, stressing the importance of polarization at the SLC and LEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliders. 42 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. CP asymmetries in semiinclusive B0 decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunietz, Isard

    1999-02-01

    It was recently pointed out that inclusive B^0(t) decays could show CP violation. The totally inclusive asymmetry is expected to be tiny [O(10^{-3})] because of large cancellations among the asymmetries in the charmless, single charm and double charm final states. Enriching particular final state configurations could significantly increase the CP-asymmetry and observability. Such studies can extract fundamental CKM (Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa) parameters, and (perhaps) even Delta m(B_s). A superb vertex detector could see CP violation with 10^5 (10^6) flavor-tagged B_s (B_d) mesons within the CKM model. Because the effects could be significantly larger due to new physics, they should be searched for in existing or soon available data samples.

  8. Asymmetry Dependence of the Nuclear Caloric Curve

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Alan B; Cammarata, Paul; Hagel, Kris; Heilborn, Lauren; Kohley, Zachary; Mabiala, Justin; May, Larry W; Marini, Paola; Raphelt, Andrew; Souliotis, George A; Wuenschel, Sara; Zarrella, Andrew; Yennello, Sherry J

    2012-01-01

    A basic feature of the nuclear equation of state is not yet understood: the dependence of the nuclear caloric curve on the neutron-proton asymmetry. Predictions of theoretical models differ on the magnitude and even the sign of this dependence. In this work, the nuclear caloric curve is examined for fully reconstructed quasi-projectiles around mass A=50. The caloric curve extracted with the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer shows that the temperature varies linearly with quasi-projectile asymmetry (N-Z)/A. An increase in asymmetry of 0.15 units corresponds to a decrease in temperature on the order of 1 MeV. These results also highlight the importance of a full quasi-projectile reconstruction in the study of thermodynamic properties of hot nuclei.

  9. Superheavy thermal dark matter and primordial asymmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Joseph; Unwin, James

    2017-02-01

    The early universe could feature multiple reheating events, leading to jumps in the visible sector entropy density that dilute both particle asymmetries and the number density of frozen-out states. In fact, late time entropy jumps are usually required in models of Affleck-Dine baryogenesis, which typically produces an initial particle-antiparticle asymmetry that is much too large. An important consequence of late time dilution, is that a smaller dark matter annihilation cross section is needed to obtain the observed dark matter relic density. For cosmologies with high scale baryogenesis, followed by radiation-dominated dark matter freeze-out, we show that the perturbative unitarity mass bound on thermal relic dark matter is relaxed to 1010 GeV. We proceed to study superheavy asym-metric dark matter models, made possible by a sizable entropy injection after dark matter freeze-out, and identify how the Affleck-Dine mechanism would generate the baryon and dark asymmetries.

  10. Effect of stress on structural brain asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zach, Petr; Vales, Karel; Stuchlik, Ales; Cermakova, Pavla; Mrzilkova, Jana; Koutela, Antonella; Kutova, Martina

    2016-09-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that stressful events may affect the brain not only as a whole, but also in multiple laterality aspects. The present review is aimed at discussing the effect of stress and stress hormones on structural brain asymmetry. Differences and crossroads of functional and structural asymmetry are briefly mentioned throughout the document. The first part of this review summarizes major findings in the field of structural brain asymmetries in animals and humans from the evolutionary perspective. Additionally, effect of stress on animals is discussed generally. The second part then explores asymmetrical effects of stress on structural changes of principal brain areas - amygdala, hippocampus, neocortex, diencephalon, basal forebrain and basal ganglia from the point of normal lateralization, steroids, trauma and genetic factors. At the end we present hypothesis why stress appears to have asymmetrical effects on lateralized brain structures.

  11. Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis by Exophiala dermatitidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis is a rare and frequently fatal disease. We report a case of cerebral phaeohyphomycosis caused by Exophiala dermatitidis in a young immuno competent male presenting to a tertiary care hospital in Jaipur.

  12. Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis by Exophiala dermatitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, S; Vaid, V K; Sharma, M; Bhartiya, H

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis is a rare and frequently fatal disease. We report a case of cerebral phaeohyphomycosis caused by Exophiala dermatitidis in a young immuno competent male presenting to a tertiary care hospital in Jaipur.

  13. Measurement of CP-violation asymmetries in D0 to Ks pi+ pi-

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.

    2012-01-01

    We report a measurement of time-integrated CP-violation asymmetries in the resonant substructure of the three-body decay D0 to Ks pi+ pi- using CDF II data corresponding to 6.0 invfb of integrated luminosity from Tevatron ppbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. The charm mesons used in this analysis come from D*+(2010) to D0 pi+ and D*-(2010) to D0bar pi-, where the production flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the accompanying pion. We apply a Dalitz-amplitude analysis for the description of the dynamic decay structure and use two complementary approaches, namely a full Dalitz-plot fit employing the isobar model for the contributing resonances and a model-independent bin-by-bin comparison of the D0 and D0bar Dalitz plots. We find no CP-violation effects and measure an asymmetry of ACP = (-0.05 +- 0.57 (stat) +- 0.54 (syst))% for the overall integrated CP-violation asymmetry, consistent with the standard model prediction.

  14. Cerebral glucose metabolism in Wernicke's, Broca's, and conduction aphasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metter, E.J.; Kempler, D.; Jackson, C.; Hanson, W.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral glucose metabolism was evaluated in patients with either Wernicke's (N = 7), Broca's (N = 11), or conduction (N = 10) aphasia using /sup 18/F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose with positron emission tomography. The three aphasic syndromes differed in the degree of left-to-right frontal metabolic asymmetry, with Broca's aphasia showing severe asymmetry and Wernicke's aphasia mild-to-moderate metabolic asymmetry, while patients with conduction aphasia were metabolically symmetric. On the other hand, the three syndromes showed the same degree of metabolic decline in the left temporal region. The parietal region appeared to separate conduction aphasia from both Broca's and Wernicke's aphasias. Common aphasic features in the three syndromes appear to be due to common changes in the temporal region, while unique features were associated with frontal and parietal metabolic differences.

  15. Finite temperature effects on CP violating asymmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Covi, L; Roulet, Esteban; Vissani, F; Covi, Laura; Rius, Nuria; Roulet, Esteban; Vissani, Francesco

    1998-01-01

    We compute the CP violating decay asymmetries relevant for baryogenesis scenarios involving the out of equilibrium decays of heavy particles, including the finite temperature effects arising from the background of light thermal particles which are present during the decay epoch. Thermal effects can modify the size of CP violation by a sizeable fraction in the decay of scalar particles, but we find interesting cancellations in the thermal corrections affecting the asymmetries in the decays of fermions, as well as in the decay of scalars in supersymmetric theories. We also estimate the effects which arise from the motion of the decaying particles with respect to the background plasma.

  16. Particle-antiparticle asymmetries from annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Baldes, Iason; Petraki, Kalliopi; Volkas, Raymond R

    2014-01-01

    An extensively studied mechanism to create particle-antiparticle asymmetries is the out-of-equilibrium and CP violating decay of a heavy particle. Here we instead examine how asymmetries can arise purely from 2 2 annihilations rather than from the usual 1 2 decays and inverse decays. We review the general conditions on the reaction rates that arise from S-matrix unitarity and CPT invariance, and show how these are implemented in the context of a simple toy model. We formulate the Boltzmann equations for this model, and present an example solution.

  17. Discovering Matter-Antimatter Asymmetries with GPUs

    CERN Document Server

    Reichert, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    The search for matter-antimatter asymmetries requires highest precision analyses and thus very large datasets and intensive computing. This contribution discusses two complemen- tary approaches where GPU systems have been successfully exploited in this area. Both approaches make use of the CUDA Thrust library which can be used on supported GPUs. The first approach is a generic search for local asymmetries in phase-space distributions of matter and antimatter particle decays. This powerful analysis method has never been used to date due to its high demand in CPU time. The second approach uses the GooFit framework, which is a generic fitting framework that exploits massive parallelisation on GPUs

  18. Decay Rate Asymmetry of Top Squark

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, M; Aoki, Mayumi; Oshimo, Noriyuki

    1998-01-01

    We discuss a decay rate asymmetry of the top squark, which is induced by a new source of CP violation intrinsic in the supersymmetric standard model. Although new sources of CP violation in this model are severely constrained from the electric dipole moment of the neutron, an unsuppressed CP-violating phase can still coexist with a top squark whose mass is accessible by near-future colliders. Then the dominant decay mode of the top squark has a width different from its CP conjugate process. The magnitude of this $CP$ asymmetry becomes of order $10^{-3}$.

  19. Forward Transverse Single Spin Asymmetries at PHENIX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vossen, Anselm, E-mail: avossen@indiana.edu [Indiana University, CEEM, 2401 Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States)

    2011-09-16

    Recent measurements of single transverse spin asymmetries in proton-proton collisions measured by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC are presented. The focus is on the single particle left-right asymmetry A{sub N} for {pi}{sup 0} at {radical}s = 200 GeV and {radical}s = 62.4 GeV and the measurement of di-hadron correlations at {radical}s = 200 GeV which are produced by the fragmentation of a transversely polarized quark via the Interference Fragmentation Function (IFF) H{sub 1}{sup <} and thus provide a probe for the quark transversity distribution function.

  20. Lower limb asymmetry in mechanical muscle function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, M J; Aagaard, Per; Herzog, W

    2015-01-01

    Due to a high incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-injury in alpine ski racers, this study aims to assess functional asymmetry in the countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), and leg muscle mass in elite ski racers with and without anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL......-R). Elite alpine skiers with ACL-R (n = 9; 26.2 ± 11.8 months post-op) and uninjured skiers (n = 9) participated in neuromuscular screening. Vertical ground reaction force during the CMJ and SJ was assessed using dual force plate methodology to obtain phase-specific bilateral asymmetry indices (AIs...

  1. A pattern of cerebral perfusion anomalies between Major Depressive Disorder and Hashimoto Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altoé Gianmarco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to evaluate relationship between three different clinical conditions: Major Depressive Disorders (MDD, Hashimoto Thyroiditis (HT and reduction in regional Cerebral Blood Flow (rCBF in order to explore the possibility that patients with HT and MDD have specific pattern(s of cerebral perfusion. Methods Design: Analysis of data derived from two separate data banks. Sample: 54 subjects, 32 with HT (29 women, mean age 38.8 ± 13.9; 22 without HT (19 women, mean age 36.5 ± 12.25. Assessment: Psychiatric diagnosis was carried out by Simplified Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDIS using DSM-IV categories; cerebral perfusion was measured by 99 mTc-ECD SPECT. Statistical analysis was done through logistic regression. Results MDD appears to be associated with left frontal hypoperfusion, left temporal hypoperfusion, diffuse hypoperfusion and parietal perfusion asymmetry. A statistically significant association between parietal perfusion asymmetry and MDD was found only in the HT group. Conclusion In HT, MDD is characterized by a parietal flow asymmetry. However, the specificity of rCBF in MDD with HT should be confirmed in a control sample with consideration for other health conditions. Moreover, this should be investigated with a longitudinally designed study in order to determine a possible pathogenic cause. Future studies with a much larger sample size should clarify whether a particular perfusion pattern is associated with a specific course or symptom cluster of MDD.

  2. [Cerebral ischemia and histamine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Naoto

    2002-10-01

    Cerebral ischemia induces excess release of glutamate and an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, which provoke catastrophic enzymatic processes leading to irreversible neuronal injury. Histamine plays the role of neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and histaminergic fibers are widely distributed in the brain. In cerebral ischemia, release of histamine from nerve endings has been shown to be enhanced by facilitation of its activity. An inhibition of the histaminergic activity in ischemia aggravates the histologic outcome. In contrast, intracerebroventricular administration of histamine improves the aggravation, whereas blockade of histamine H2 receptors aggravates ischemic injury. Furthermore, H2 blockade enhances ischemic release of glutamate and dopamine. These findings suggest that central histamine provides beneficial effects against ischemic neuronal damage by suppressing release of excitatory neurotransmitters. However, histaminergic H2 action facilitates the permeability of the blood-brain barrier and shows deleterious effects on cerebral edema.

  3. Cerebral hemodynamics in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hachinski, V C; Olesen, Jes; Norris, J W

    1977-01-01

    Clinical and angiographic findings in migraine are briefly reviewed in relation to cerebral hemodynamic changes shown by regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies. Three cases of migraine studied by the intracarotid xenon 133 method during attacks are reported. In classic migraine, with typical...... prodromal symptoms, a decrease in cerebral blood flow has been demonstrated during the aura. Occasionally, this flow decrease persists during the headache phase. In common migraine, where such prodromata are not seen, a flow decrease has not been demonstrated. During the headache phase of both types...... of migraine, rCBF has usually been found to be normal or in the high range of normal values. The high values may represent postischemic hyperemia, but are probably more frequently secondary to arousal caused by pain. Thus, during the headache phase rCBF may be subnormal, normal or high. These findings do...

  4. [Complementary and alternative medicine for insomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hidehisa; Machino, Akihiko; Shishida, Kazuhiro; Yoshino, Atsuo; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2015-06-01

    Frequency of insomnia is increasing with age. Benzodiazepine receptor agonist has been prescribed for insomnia in the elderly, but there are some patients who complain the effect is not sufficient. Adherence for sleeping pills is very low in elderly Japanese, because there has been strong stigma against sleeping pills. Complementary and alternative medicine for insomnia is widely used in elderly Japanese. Sedative antidepressants, novel antipsychotics, anti-histamine drugs, and supplements are used for insomnia as complementary and alternative medicine. But evidence of these drugs for insomnia is insufficient. In this paper, we outline the previous reports such as the advantages and disadvantages of these drugs for the treatment of insomnia in the elderly.

  5. ICT, Complementary Firm Strategies and Firm Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Rasel, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    This doctoral thesis analyses from different perspectives the relationship between information and communication technologies (ICT), complementary firm strategies and firm performance. One chapter examines the role of ICT and decentralized workplace organization for productivity. Two chapters analyse the association between firms' ICT use, international trade activities and productivity. The empirical analyses are based on data from firms located in Germany from the manufacturing or service s...

  6. Some realizable joint measurements of complementary observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Paul

    1987-09-01

    Noncommuting quantum observables, if considered as unsharp observables, are simultaneously measurable. This fact is exemplified for complementary observables in two-dimensional state spaces. Two proposals of experimentally feasible joint measurements are presented for pairs of photon or neutron polarization observables and for path and interference observables in a photon split-beam experiment. A recent experiment proposed and performed by Mittelstaedt, Prieur, and Schieder in Cologne is interpreted as a partial version of the latter example.

  7. [Complementary medicine: phytotherapy and soyaisoflavones as phytoestrogens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, J; Brignoli, R; Saller, R

    2004-06-01

    After a introduction concerning complementary medicine, naturopathy and phytotherapy a general view of soy isoflavones as phytoestrogens will be given. In german speaking countries the term and topic naturopathy has a tradition of 150 years regarding theoretical development and practical use among lay people and health professionals in European culture. In contrary the term complementary medicine has been used for approximately 15 years in englisch speaking countries as a kind of collective name for European and Non-European medical cultures and traditions. Complementay medicine summarizes a huge variety of cultural, medical and qualitywise different medical methods and treatments which can be a contribution to conventional medicine. One of the oldest and intensly researched fields in European and Non-European complementary medicine is the use of herbal drugs (phytotherapy). Soy isoflavones serve as an example to show the differences between phytotherapy based on multicompounds and dietary supplements (neutraceuticals) based on monosubstances. The differing preparations of soy isoflavones are not phytotherapeutic medicine. A review of the experimental and clinical data concerning soy isoflavones as phytoestrogens for the prevention of cancer, menopausal complaints, osteoporosis or cardiovascular diseases indicates that the consumption of food containing phytoestrogens seems to be health protective. Yet, the relevance of supplementation of single phytoestrogens for an additional health effect is not sufficiently proven.

  8. Biodiverse food solutions to enhance complementary feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Aileen; Parlesak, Alexandr; Greiner, Ted

    2016-01-01

    In her recent editorial, Dr. de Pee (2015) states there are two main ways to provide additional nutrients during complementary feeding: fortification and supplementation. She illustrates some problems associated with these ‘solutions’, including lack of compliance. Rather than conclude that lipid......In her recent editorial, Dr. de Pee (2015) states there are two main ways to provide additional nutrients during complementary feeding: fortification and supplementation. She illustrates some problems associated with these ‘solutions’, including lack of compliance. Rather than conclude...... effects. In conclusion, all UN agencies have joint responsibility to help Member States achieve their Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which create the opportunity to link sustainability and dietary diversity. The Convention on Biological Diversity (WHO 2015) illustrates how dietary diversity can...... help combat global malnutrition by using practical solutions that can be rolled out as public health strategies. Culturally-sensitive, cost-effective, sustainable complementary foods have the potential to increase nutrition security and sovereignty, reduce poverty, hunger and levels of chronic...

  9. Robustness of asymmetry and coherence of quantum states

    CERN Document Server

    Piani, Marco; Bromley, Thomas R; Napoli, Carmine; Johnston, Nathaniel; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Quantum states may exhibit asymmetry with respect to the action of a given group. Such an asymmetry of states can be considered as a resource in applications such as quantum metrology, and it is a concept that encompasses quantum coherence as a special case. We introduce explicitly and study the robustness of asymmetry, a quantifier of asymmetry of states that we prove to have many attractive properties, including efficient numerical computability via semidefinite programming, and an operational interpretation in a channel discrimination context. We also introduce the notion of asymmetry witnesses, whose measurement in a laboratory detects the presence of asymmetry. We prove that properly constrained asymmetry witnesses provide lower bounds to the robustness of asymmetry, which is shown to be a directly measurable quantity itself. We then focus our attention on coherence witnesses and the robustness of coherence, for which we prove a number of additional results; these include an analysis of its specific rele...

  10. A 12-step user guide for analyzing voxel-wise gray matter asymmetries in statistical parametric mapping (SPM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Florian; Gaser, Christian; Luders, Eileen

    2015-02-01

    Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) has been proven capable of capturing cerebral gray matter asymmetries with a high (voxel-wise) regional specificity. However, a standardized reference on how to conduct voxel-wise asymmetry analyses is missing. This protocol provides the scientific community with a carefully developed guide describing, in 12 distinct steps, how to take structural images from data pre-processing, via statistical analysis, to the final interpretation of the significance maps. Key adaptations compared with the standard VBM workflow involve establishing a voxel-wise hemispheric correspondence, capturing the direction and degree of asymmetry and preventing a blurring of information across hemispheres. The workflow incorporates the most recent methodological developments, including high-dimensional spatial normalization and partial volume estimations. Although the protocol is primarily designed to enable relatively inexperienced users to conduct a voxel-based asymmetry analysis on their own, it may also be useful to experienced users who wish to efficiently adapt their existing scripts or pipelines.

  11. Influence of different approaches to training of main movements on physical fitness of 4 years boys with various motor asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galamandjuk L. L.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: determination of effectiveness of different training main movements’ methods in physical fitness improvement of boys with different manual motor asymmetry. Material: 50 boys with ambidexterity (4 years old age took part in the research. There was used the following: oral questioning, dynamometry and methodic by M.M. Bezrukikh. Results: usage of one of variants of “symmetric” approach determines specificities of motor qualities’ development: among boys with ambidexterity in motor asymmetry variant “first with passive hand, then with active one” and variant “first with active and then with passive hand” ensure improvement of all tested qualities (except flexibility and quickness. Boys with right orientation of manual motor asymmetry demonstrated improvement of all qualities (except coordination in ballistic movements for accuracy, fulfilled by right arm in the first variant. In the second variant all qualities (except already mentioned quickness are improved. Conclusions: with any orientation of manual motor asymmetry the necessary condition of high activity and successful child’s training is development of interaction between cerebral semi-spheres. Coordinated movements by left and right arms strengthen such interaction. That is why it is purposeful to consequently fulfill every movement by every arm and by two arms simultaneously.

  12. Facial asymmetry and genetic ancestry in Latin American admixed populations

    OpenAIRE

    Quinto Sanchez, Mirsha; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Acunã Alonzo, Víctor; Cintas, Célia; de Cerqueira, Caio Cesar Silva; Ramallo, Virgínia; Castillo, Lucia; Farrera, Alodi; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, Williams; Fuentes, Macarena; Everardo, Paola; Avila, Francisco de; Jorge A. Gómez Valdés; Hunemeier, Tábita

    2015-01-01

    Fluctuating and directional asymmetry are aspects of morphological variation widely used to infer environmental and genetic factors affecting facial phenotypes. However, the genetic basis and environmental determinants of both asymmetry types is far from being completely known. The analysis of facial asymmetries in admixed individuais can be of help to characterize the impact of a genome's heterozygosity on the deveiopmental basis of both fl.uctuating and directional asymmetries. Here we char...

  13. CP and charge asymmetries at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morello, Michael; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2007-11-01

    We present CDF results on the branching fractions and time-integrated direct CP asymmetries for B0 and B0s decay modes into pairs of charmless charged hadrons (pions or kaons). We report also the first observation of B0s->DsK mode and the measurement of its branching fraction.

  14. Measuring Asymmetry in Insect-Plant Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Claudia P T [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, UFRN - Campus Universitario, Lagoa Nova, CEP 59078 972, Natal, RN (Brazil); De Almeida, Adriana M [Departamento de Botanica, Ecologia e Zoologia, Centro de Biociencias, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, UFRN - Campus Universitario, Lagoa Nova, CEP 59078 972, Natal, RN (Brazil); Corso, Gilberto, E-mail: claudia@dfte.ufrn.br, E-mail: adrianam@ufrn.br, E-mail: corso@cb.ufrn.br [Departamento de Biofisica e Farmacologia, Centro de Biociencias, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, UFRN - Campus Universitario, Lagoa Nova, CEP 59078 972, Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2011-03-01

    In this work we focus on interaction networks between insects and plants and in the characterization of insect plant asymmetry, an important issue in coevolution and evolutionary biology. We analyze in particular the asymmetry in the interaction matrix of animals (herbivorous insects) and plants (food resource for the insects). Instead of driving our attention to the interaction matrix itself we derive two networks associated to the bipartite network: the animal network, D{sub 1}, and the plant network, D{sub 2}. These networks are constructed according to the following recipe: two animal species are linked once if they interact with the same plant. In a similar way, in the plant network, two plants are linked if they interact with the same animal. To explore the asymmetry between D{sub 2} and D{sub 1} we test for a set of 23 networks from the ecologic literature networks: the difference in size, {Delta}L, clustering coefficient difference, {Delta}C, and mean connectivity difference, {Delta}. We used a nonparametric statistical test to check the differences in {Delta}L, {Delta}C and {Delta}. Our results indicate that {Delta}L and {Delta} show a significative asymmetry.

  15. The CP-asymmetry in resonant leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisimov, A. [Institut de Theorie des Phenomenes Physiques, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Broncano, A. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Munich (Germany); Pluemacher, M. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Munich (Germany)]. E-mail: pluemi@mppmu.mpg.de

    2006-03-06

    We study the resonantly enhanced CP-asymmetry in the decays of nearly mass-degenerate heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos for which different formulae have been presented in the literature, depending on the method used to calculate it. We consider two different techniques and show that they lead to the same result, thereby reconciling the different approaches.

  16. The CP-asymmetry in resonant leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Anisimov, A; Plümacher, M

    2006-01-01

    We study the resonantly enhanced CP-asymmetry in the decays of nearly mass-degenerate heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos for which different formulae have been presented in the literature, depending on the method used to calculate it. We consider two different techniques and show that they lead to the same result, thereby reconciling the different approaches.

  17. Search Asymmetry, Sustained Attention, and Response Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Hugh; Russell, Paul N.; Helton, William S.

    2011-01-01

    In the present experiment, we used search asymmetry to test whether the sustained attention to response task is a better measure of response inhibition or sustained attention. Participants performed feature present and feature absent target detection tasks using either a sustained attention to response task (SART; high Go low No-Go) or a…

  18. CP violating rate asymmetries in B decays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N G Deshpande

    2003-02-01

    We briefly discuss measurements of angles and of the unitarity triangle. We then review rate asymmetries using (3) relationships in the standard model (SM). Some methods to measure angle using (3) are then discussed. We note that rate for → can be used to set limits on extra dimensions in which standard model particles propagate.

  19. Analytical formulation of lunar cratering asymmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    We formulate the lunar cratering distribution and verify the cratering asymmetries generated by the main-belt asteroids (MBAs) as well as the near-Earth objects (NEOs). Based on a planar model that excludes the terrestrial and lunar gravitations on the impactors and assuming the impactor encounter speed with Earth $v_{\\rm{enc}}$ is higher than the lunar orbital speed $v_{\\rm{M}}$, we rigorously integrated the lunar cratering distribution, and derived its approximation to the first order of $v_{\\rm{M}}/v_{\\rm{enc}}$. Numerical simulations of lunar bombardment by the MBAs during the late heavy bombardment were performed with an Earth-Moon distance $a_{\\rm{M}}$ = 20--60 Earth radii in five cases. The analytical model directly proves the existence of a leading/trailing asymmetry and the absence of near/far asymmetry. The approximate form of the leading/trailing asymmetry is $(1 + A_1 \\cos\\beta)$, which decreases as the apex distance $\\beta$ increases. The numerical simulations show evidence of a pole/equator asym...

  20. Mandibular asymmetry and the fourth dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaban, Leonard B

    2009-03-01

    This paper represents more than 30 years of discussion and collaboration with Drs Joseph Murray and John Mulliken in an attempt to understand growth patterns over time (ie, fourth dimension) in patients with hemifacial microsomia (HFM). This is essential for the development of rational treatment protocols for children and adults with jaw asymmetry. Traditionally, HFM was thought of as a unilateral deformity, but it was recognized that 20% to 30% of patients had bilateral abnormalities. However, early descriptions of skeletal correction addressed almost exclusively lengthening of the short (affected) side of the face. Based on longitudinal clinical observations of unoperated HFM patients, we hypothesized that abnormal mandibular growth is the earliest skeletal manifestation and that restricted growth of the mandible plays a pivotal role in progressive distortion of both the ipsilateral and contralateral facial skeleton. This hypothesis explains the progressive nature of the asymmetry in patients with HFM and provides the rationale for surgical lengthening of the mandible in children to prevent end-stage deformity. During the past 30 years, we have learned that this phenomenon of progressive distortion of the adjacent and contralateral facial skeleton occurs with other asymmetric mandibular undergrowth (tumor resection, radiation therapy, or posttraumatic defects) and overgrowth (mandibular condylar hyperplasia) conditions. In this paper, I describe the progression of deformity with time in patients with mandibular asymmetry as a result of undergrowth and overgrowth. Understanding these concepts is critical for the development of rational treatment protocols for adults with end-stage asymmetry and for children to minimize secondary deformity.

  1. Asymmetry parameter of peaked Fano line shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierott, S.; Hotz, T.; Néel, N.; Kröger, J.

    2016-10-01

    The spectroscopic line shape of electronic and vibrational excitations is ubiquitously described by a Fano profile. In the case of nearly symmetric and peaked Fano line shapes, the fit of the conventional Fano function to experimental data leads to difficulties in unambiguously extracting the asymmetry parameter, which may vary over orders of magnitude without degrading the quality of the fit. Moreover, the extracted asymmetry parameter depends on initially guessed values. Using the spectroscopic signature of the single-Co Kondo effect on Au(110) the ambiguity of the extracted asymmetry parameter is traced to the highly symmetric resonance profile combined with the inevitable scattering of experimental data. An improved parameterization of the conventional Fano function is suggested that enables the nonlinear optimization in a reduced parameter space. In addition, the presence of a global minimum in the sum of squared residuals and thus the independence of start parameters may conveniently be identified in a two-dimensional plot. An angular representation of the asymmetry parameter is suggested in order to reliably determine uncertainty margins via linear error propagation.

  2. The Cost of Action Miscues: Hemispheric Asymmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenal, Brian V.; Hinze, Stephan; Heilman, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive behaviors require preparation and when necessary inhibition or alteration of actions. The right hemisphere has been posited to be dominant for preparatory motor activation. This experiment was designed to learn if there are hemispheric asymmetries in the control of altered plans of actions. Cues, both valid and invalid, which indicate the…

  3. Infant Frontal Asymmetry Predicts Child Emotional Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Maria; Paulus, Markus; Kühn-Popp, Nina; Meinhardt, Jorg; Sodian, Beate

    2015-01-01

    While factors influencing maternal emotional availability (EA) have been well investigated, little is known about the development of child EA. The present longitudinal study investigated the role of frontal brain asymmetry in young children with regard to child EA (child responsiveness and involvement) in mother-child interaction in a sample of 28…

  4. TMD evolution of the Sivers asymmetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The energy scale dependence of the Sivers asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering is studied numerically within the framework of TMD factorization that was put forward in 2011. The comparison to previous results in the literature shows that the treatment of next-to-leading logarithmic

  5. Auxin asymmetry during gravitropism by tomato hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M. A.; Pickard, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitropic asymmetry of auxin was observed in hypocotyls of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) soon after horizontal placement: the ratio of apically supplied [3H]IAA collected from the lower sides to that from the upper sides was about 1.4 between 5 and 10 minutes. This was adequately early to account for the beginning of curvature. The auxin asymmetry ratio rose to about 2.5 between 20 and 25 minutes, and to 3.5 during the main phase of curvature. This compares reasonably well with the roughly 3.9 ratio for elongation on the lower side to elongation on the upper side that is the basis for the curvature. These data extend evidence that the Went-Cholodny theory for the mediation of tropisms is valid for dicot stems. Also consistent with the theory, an auxin asymmetry ratio of 2.5 was observed when wrong-way gravitropic curvature developed following application of a high level of auxin. In addition to reversing the asymmetry of elongation, the large supplement of auxin resulted in lower net elongation. Previous data established that ethylene is not involved in this decrease of growth as a function of increasing level of auxin.

  6. The devil is in Asymmetries (Rough Version)

    CERN Document Server

    Gnang, Edinah K

    2012-01-01

    We formally investigate some computational obstacles to tractability of computing the variety determined by K complex polynomials in N boolean variables. We show that using algebraic methods for solving combinatorial problems, the obstacles to tractability lies in the order of magnitude of asymmetries admitted by the given system of equations.

  7. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Time to Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with your health care providers any complementary and alternative medicines you take or are thinking about starting. Photo: ... and older use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). But less than one-third who use ...

  8. Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) was used as an experimental model of ischemic stroke. MCAO produces an acute lesion consisting of an ischemic core or focus with severely reduced blood flow surrounded by a borderzone or ischemic penumbra with less pronounced blood flow reduction. Cells in the ischemic focus...

  9. Spin-Azimuthal Asymmetries in DIS at CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakian, Harut

    2003-01-01

    We present latest measurements of beam and target single-spin asymmetries in the single pion electroproduction in the DIS. In addition to significant target single-spin asymmetries the CLAS detector at Jlab also measures a significant beam-spin asymmetry when the analysis is restricted to events for which the pion carries a large fraction of the virtual photon momentum.

  10. Sonographic finding of ventricular asymmetry in neonatal brain.

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, E Y; Huang, F Y

    1989-01-01

    One thousand normal Chinese full term neonates underwent prospective ultrasonography examination. Asymmetry of size between the right and left lateral ventricle was observed in a similar proportion of boys: 257/551 (47%) and girls: 183/449 (41%). The mode of delivery did not significantly influence the occurrence of ventricular asymmetry. We propose four different patterns of asymmetry.

  11. TWO APPROACHES TO IMPROVING THE CONSISTENCY OF COMPLEMENTARY JUDGEMENT MATRIX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuZeshui

    2002-01-01

    By the transformation relations between complementary judgement matrix and reciprocal judgement matrix ,this paper proposes two methods for improving the consistency of complementary judgement matrix and gives two simple practical iterative algorithms. These two algorithms are easy to implement on computer,and the modified complementary judgement matrices remain most information that original matrix contains. Thus the methods supplement and develop the theory and methodology for improving consistency of complementary judgement matrix.

  12. Detection and quantification of microRNA in cerebral microdialysate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Søren; Rasmussen, Rune; Rossing, Maria

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary brain injury accounts for a major part of the morbidity and mortality in patients with spontaneous aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but the pathogenesis and pathophysiology remain controversial. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important posttranscriptional regulators...... of complementary mRNA targets and have been implicated in the pathophysiology of other types of acute brain injury. Cerebral microdialysis is a promising tool to investigate these mechanisms. We hypothesized that miRNAs would be present in human cerebral microdialysate. METHODS: RNA was extracted and miRNA...... profiles were established using high throughput real-time quantification PCR on the following material: 1) Microdialysate sampled in vitro from A) a solution of total RNA extracted from human brain, B) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a neurologically healthy patient, and C) a patient with SAH; and 2...

  13. Significance of postoperative crossed cerebellar hypoperfusion in patients with cerebral hyperperfusion following carotid endarterectomy: SPECT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Suga, Yasunori; Chida, Kohei; Saito, Hideo; Komoribayashi, Nobukazu; Otawara, Yasunari; Ogawa, Akira [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan); Iwate Medical University, Cyclotron Research Center, Morioka (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    Cerebral hyperperfusion after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) results in cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome and cognitive impairment. The goal of the present study was to clarify the clinical significance of postoperative crossed cerebellar hypoperfusion (CCH) in patients with cerebral hyperperfusion after CEA by assessing brain perfusion with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Brain perfusion was quantitatively measured using SPECT and the [{sup 123}I]N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine-autoradiography method before and immediately after CEA and on the third postoperative day in 80 patients with ipsilateral internal carotid artery stenosis ({>=}70%). Postoperative CCH was determined by differences between asymmetry of perfusion in bilateral cerebellar hemispheres before and after CEA. Neuropsychological testing was also performed preoperatively and at the first postoperative month. Eleven patients developed cerebral hyperperfusion (cerebral blood flow increase of {>=}100% compared with preoperative values) on SPECT imaging performed immediately after CEA. In seven of these patients, CCH was observed on the third postoperative day. All three patients with hyperperfusion syndrome exhibited cerebral hyperperfusion and CCH on the third postoperative day and developed postoperative cognitive impairment. Of the eight patients with asymptomatic hyperperfusion, four exhibited CCH despite resolution of cerebral hyperperfusion on the third postoperative day, and three of these patients experienced postoperative cognitive impairment. In contrast, four patients without postoperative CCH did not experience postoperative cognitive impairment. The presence of postoperative CCH with concomitant cerebral hyperperfusion reflects the development of hyperperfusion syndrome. Further, the presence of postoperative CCH in patients with cerebral hyperperfusion following CEA suggests development of postoperative cognitive impairment, even when asymptomatic. (orig.)

  14. Mass predicts web asymmetry in Nephila spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntner, Matjaž; Gregorič, Matjaž; Li, Daiqin

    2010-12-01

    The architecture of vertical aerial orb webs may be affected by spider size and gravity or by the available web space, in addition to phylogenetic and/or developmental factors. Vertical orb web asymmetry measured by hub displacement has been shown to increase in bigger and heavier spiders; however, previous studies have mostly focused on adult and subadult spiders or on several size classes with measured size parameters but no mass. Both estimations are suboptimal because (1) adult orb web spiders may not invest heavily in optimal web construction, whereas juveniles do; (2) size class/developmental stage is difficult to estimate in the field and is thus subjective, and (3) mass scales differently to size and is therefore more important in predicting aerial foraging success due to gravity. We studied vertical web asymmetry in a giant orb web spider, Nephila pilipes, across a wide range of size classes/developmental stages and tested the hypothesis that vertical web asymmetry (measured as hub displacement) is affected by gravity. On a sample of 100 webs, we found that hubs were more displaced in heavier and larger juveniles and that spider mass explained vertical web asymmetry better than other measures of spider size (carapace and leg lengths, developmental stage). Quantifying web shape via the ladder index suggested that, unlike in other nephilid taxa, growing Nephila orbs do not become vertically elongated. We conclude that the ontogenetic pattern of progressive vertical web asymmetry in Nephila can be explained by optimal foraging due to gravity, to which the opposing selective force may be high web-building costs in the lower orb. Recent literature finds little support for alternative explanations of ontogenetic orb web allometry such as the size limitation hypothesis and the biogenetic law.

  15. Ozone Therapy on Cerebral Blood Flow: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Clavo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone therapy is currently being used in the treatment of ischemic disorders, but the underlying mechanisms that result in successful treatment are not well known. This study assesses the effect of ozone therapy on the blood flow in the middle cerebral and common carotid arteries. Seven subjects were recruited for the therapy that was performed by transfusing ozone-enriched autologous blood on 3 alternate days over 1 week. Blood flow quantification in the common carotid artery (n = 14 was performed using color Doppler. Systolic and diastolic velocities in the middle cerebral artery (n = 14 were estimated using transcranial Doppler. Ultrasound assessments were conducted at the following three time points: 1 basal (before ozone therapy, 2 after session #3 and 3 1 week after session #3. The common carotid blood flow had increased by 75% in relation to the baseline after session #3 (P < 0.001 and by 29% 1 week later (P = 0.039. In the middle cerebral artery, the systolic velocity had increased by 22% after session #3 (P = 0.001 and by 15% 1 week later (P = 0.035, whereas the diastolic velocity had increased by 33% after session #3 (P < 0.001 and by 18% 1 week later (P = 0.023. This preliminary Doppler study supports the clinical experience of achieving improvement by using ozone therapy in peripheral ischemic syndromes. Its potential use as a complementary treatment in cerebral low perfusion syndromes merits further clinical evaluation.

  16. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome: frequency of cerebral and cerebellar hemihypertrophy on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torregrosa, A.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Higueras, V.; Poyatos, C. [Department of Radiology, Doctor Peset University Hospital, 46017 Valencia (Spain); Sanchis, A. [Department of Paediatrics, Doctor Peset University Hospital, 46017 Valencia (Spain)

    2000-06-01

    We examined 11 patients, clinically and radiographically diagnosed as having the Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) by MRI. There were four females and seven males, aged 3-51 years (mean 21 years). Two had clear asymmetry of the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. The thickness of the grey matter was normal, without sulcation abnormalities, but the thickness of the white matter was increased; the size of the ipsilateral ventricle was normal. These patients had hypertrophy of the leg and a cutaneous haemangioma on the same side as the brain abnormality. No patient had an intracranial vascular malformation, unilateral megalencephaly, cerebral atrophy or hydrocephalus. The prevalence of cerebral hemihypertrophy in our series of patients with KTS was thus 18%. (orig.)

  17. Discontinuous deformation analysis based on complementary theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The contact between blocks is treated by the open-close iteration in the conventional discontinuous deformation analysis (DDA),which needs to introduce spurious springs between two blocks in contact and to assume the normal stiffness and the tangential stiffness (the penalty factors). Unreasonable values of stiffness would result in numerical problems. To avoid the penalty factors and the open-close iteration,we reformulate the DDA as a mixed complementary problem (MiCP) and then choose the path Newton method (PNM) to solve the problem. Some examples including those originally designed by Shi are reanalyzed,which proves feasibility of the proposed procedure.

  18. The Fresnel-Weyl complementary transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Chuan-Mei; Fan Hong-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Based on the newly developed coherent-entangled state representation,we propose the so-called Fresnel-Weyl complementary transformation operator.The new operator plays the roles of both Fresnel transformation (for (a1 - a2)/√2)and the Weyl transformation (for (a1 + a2)/√2).Physically,(a1 - a2)/√2 and (a1 + a2)/√2 could be a symmetric beamsplitter's two output fields for the incoming fields a1 and a2.We show that the two transformations are concisely expressed in the coherent-entangled state representation as a projective operator in the integration form.

  19. An analytical study of mismatched complementary media

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Lin; Ma, Hongru

    2016-01-01

    Complementary media (CM) interacting with arbitrarily situated obstacles are usually less discussed. In this paper, an analytical framework based on multiple scattering theory is established for analyzing such a mismatched case. As examples, CM-based devices, i.e., a superlens and superscatterer, are discussed. From an analysis, the cancellation mechanism of the mismatched CM is studied. In addition, numerical results are provided for illustration. Moreover, further study shows that such cancellation effects might rely on specific conditions. Actually, the conclusions are not restricted to any specific frequencies; they could be extended to many other areas including applications to active cloaking, antennas, and wireless power transfer.

  20. Traditional and complementary therapies in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyam, B V; Sánchez-Ramos, J R

    1999-01-01

    Parkinson's disease has existed in different parts of the world since ancient times. The first clear description is found in the ancient Indian medical system of Ayurveda under the name Kampavata. Traditional therapies in the form of herbal preparations containing anticholinergics, levodopa, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors were used in the treatment of PD in India, China, and the Amazon basin. Scientific reevaluation of these therapies may be valuable, as shown in the case of Mucuna pruriens and Banisteria caapi. Complementary therapies such as massage therapy, biofeedback, and acupuncture may have beneficial effects for patients and deserve further study.

  1. Complementary Skyrmion Racetrack Memory With Voltage Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wang; Zheng, Chentian; Huang, Yangqi; Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Lv, Weifeng; Zhao, Weisheng

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic skyrmion holds promise as information carriers in the next-generation memory and logic devices, owing to the topological stability, small size and extremely low current needed to drive it. One of the most potential applications of skyrmion is to design racetrack memory (RM), named Sk-RM, instead of utilizing domain wall (DW). However, current studies face some key design challenges, e.g., skyrmion manipulation, data representation and synchronization etc. To address these challenges, we propose here a complementary Sk-RM structure with voltage manipulation. Functionality and performance of the proposed design are investigated with micromagnetic simulations.

  2. Parálisis cerebral Cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Malagon Valdez

    2007-01-01

    El término parálisis cerebral (PC) engloba a un gran número de síndromes neurológicos clínicos, de etiología diversa. Estos síndromes se caracterizan por tener una sintomatología común: los trastornos motores. Algunos autores prefieren manejar términos como "encefalopatía fija", "encefalopatías no evolutivas". Se mencionan la utilidad de programas de intervención temprana y métodos especiales de rehabilitación, así como el manejo de las deficiencias asociadas como la epilepsia, deficiencia me...

  3. Parálisis cerebral Cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Malagon Valdez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El término parálisis cerebral (PC engloba a un gran número de síndromes neurológicos clínicos, de etiología diversa. Estos síndromes se caracterizan por tener una sintomatología común: los trastornos motores. Algunos autores prefieren manejar términos como "encefalopatía fija", "encefalopatías no evolutivas". Se mencionan la utilidad de programas de intervención temprana y métodos especiales de rehabilitación, así como el manejo de las deficiencias asociadas como la epilepsia, deficiencia mental, trastornos del lenguaje, audición, visión, déficit de la atención que mejoran el pronóstico de manera significativa. El pronóstico también depende de la gravedad del padecimiento y de las manifestaciones asociadas.The term cerebral palsy (CP, is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the nonevolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations.

  4. COMPLEMENTARY SERVICES AND COMPLEMENTARY AND EXTRA-SCHOOL ACTIVITIES: AN EDUCATIONAL AND TRAINING NEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Morales Navarro

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This writing has three targets. Firstly, our aim is to establish the difference between complementary and extra-school activities, because there is confusion according to regulations. Secondly, to know if extra-school activities complement the education and formation learnt in our Educational System, and, therefore, to illuminate if they are necessary in order to reach a well-rounded education. And, finally, to analyze in what way these extra-school activities and complementary services can damage educational equity and social cohesion in schools or, on the other hand, if these activities and services suit them.

  5. Complementary medicines in pediatric bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogarapu, S; Bishop, J R; Krueger, C D; Pavuluri, M N

    2008-02-01

    The increasing number and availability of various complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) has resulted in an exponentially growing utilization of these products for everything from minor aches and pains to the treatment of mental illness. Difficulties in treating mental illnesses in children, averseness to having children take psychiatric medications, and stigma all drive patients and their families to research alternative treatments. As a result, there has been an increased utilization of CAM in psychiatry, particularly for hard to treat conditions like pediatric BD. It is important for the health care providers to be aware of the alternative treatments by some of their patients. A review of studies investigating the utility of complementary and alternative medicines in bipolar patients was conducted and selected studies were included. Omega-3 fatty acids and lecithin/ choline have preliminary data indicating potential utility in the CAM treatment for bipolar disorder while S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-e) and inositol have some data supporting their efficacy in the treatment of depressive symptoms. Some data for CAM suggest they may be useful adjunctive treatments but only little data are available to support their use as stand-alone therapy. Thus, the conventional medicines remain the first choice in pediatric bipolar management. Healthcare providers need to routinely inquire about the utilization of these treatments by their patients and become familiar with the risks and benefits involved with their use in children.

  6. Interplay among transversity induced asymmetries in hadron leptoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Adolph, C.; Alexeev, M.G.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C.D.R.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Buchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Chang, W.C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M.L.; Curiel, Q.; d'Hose, N.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; M. Finger jr; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; von Hohenesche, N. du Fresne; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmuller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse-Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; von Harrach, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F.H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; Hsieh, C.Yu; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jorg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Marchand, C.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Montuenga, P.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.C.; Pereira, F.; Pesaro, G.; Pesek, M.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Rossiyskaya, N.S.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rychter, A.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schonning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Selyunin, A.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Wolbeek, J. ter; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2016-01-01

    In the fragmentation of a transversely polarized quark several left-right asymmetries are possible for the hadrons in the jet. When only one unpolarized hadron is selected, it exhibits an azimuthal modulation known as Collins effect. When a pair of oppositely charged hadrons is observed, three asymmetries can be considered, a di-hadron asymmetry and two single hadron asymmetries. In lepton deep inelastic scattering on transversely polarized nucleons all these asymmetries are coupled with the transversity distribution. From the high statistics COMPASS data on oppositely charged hadron-pair production we have investigated for the first time the dependence of these three asymmetries on the difference of the azimuthal angles of the two hadrons. The similarity of transversity induced single and di-hadron asymmetries is discussed. A phenomenological analysis of the data allows to establish quantitative relationships among them, providing strong indication that the underlying fragmentation mechanisms are all driven ...

  7. Observing the top energy asymmetry at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, S.; Westhoff, S.

    2017-01-01

    The top-antitop energy asymmetry is a promising observable of the charge asymmetry in jet-associated top-quark pair production at the LHC. We present new predictions of the energy asymmetry in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV, including QCD corrections at the next-to-leading perturbative order. The effect of QCD corrections on the observable is moderate. With suitable phase-space cuts, the asymmetry can be enhanced at the cost of reducing the cross section. For instance, for a cross section of 1 pb after cuts, we predict an energy asymmetry of -6. 5-0.2+0.1% at the next-to-leading order in QCD. We also investigate scale uncertainties and parton-shower effects, which partially cancel in the normalized asymmetry. Our results provide a sound basis for a measurement of the energy asymmetry at the LHC during run II.

  8. Observing the Top Energy Asymmetry at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Berge, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The top-antitop energy asymmetry is a promising observable of the charge asymmetry in jet-associated top-quark pair production at the LHC. We present new predictions of the energy asymmetry in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV, including QCD corrections at the next-to-leading perturbative order and from the parton shower. The effect of QCD corrections on the observable is moderate. Scale uncertainties and parton-shower effects partially cancel in the normalized asymmetry. With suitable phase-space cuts, the asymmetry can be enhanced at the cost of reducing the cross section. For instance, for a cross section of $1\\,\\text{pb}$ after cuts, we predict an energy asymmetry of $-6.5^{\\,+0.1}_{\\,-0.2}\\%$ at the next-to-leading order in QCD. Our results provide a sound basis for a measurement of the energy asymmetry at the LHC during run II.

  9. Topography of somatosensory processing: cerebral lateralization and focused attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, K J; Allison, J D; Loring, D W; Lavin, T B; Pillai, J J

    2002-03-01

    Healthy dextrals underwent fMRI during a task of graphesthesia requiring detection of any number written consecutively from an otherwise random number sequence. Test conditions included (1) focus on unilateral right hand stimuli, (2) focus on unilateral left hand stimuli, (3) focus on right hand only during bilateral hand stimulation, (4) focus on left hand only during bilateral hand stimulation, and (5) rest. Attention to unilateral hand stimulation produced bihemispheric activation with minimal or no activation of ipsilateral primary sensorimotor region. Attention to unilateral left hand stimuli resulted in more activation than attention to unilateral right hand stimuli. Stimulation of the nonattended hand activated the contralateral somatosensory area, but to a lesser spatial extent than attended stimuli. Comparing focused attention to the left versus right side during identical sensory inputs (i.e., bilateral hand stimulation), focused attention to the right hand increased activation in the left somatosensory region, but focused attention to the left hand increased activation in both cerebral hemispheres. Thus, focused attention to unilateral somatosensory stimuli produces bilateral cerebral activation, but the increase in blood flow is greater in the contralateral hemisphere. Unattended stimuli activate the contralateral primary somatosensory area. Left/right asymmetries were demonstrated consistent with cerebral lateralization.

  10. Complementary functions of the two brain hemispheres: comparisons with earlier conceptions and implications for individual and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeier, H

    1989-07-01

    The concept of different functions for the left and right cerebral hemispheres coincides in an astonishing way with earlier philosophical and psychological work which divided the human mind into two complementary functions without having a neurophysiological explanation. Representative are the ideas of Fichte, Hegel and Jung. The latter postulated the two subsystems Ego and Self and associated the conscious functions of the Ego with the intellect, the capacity for rational thought, and the Self with the mind, which also includes the emotional feelings. For the harmonic development and self-realization of man the functions of both systems in complementary interaction are required. Therefore, the current overaccentuation of the intellect and of progress directed technical-scientific thinking should be corrected by making better use of the much neglected functions of the right hemisphere.

  11. Applications of cerebral SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McArthur, C., E-mail: claire.mcarthur@nhs.net [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Jampana, R.; Patterson, J.; Hadley, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide three-dimensional functional images of the brain following the injection of one of a series of radiopharmaceuticals that crosses the blood-brain barrier and distributes according to cerebral perfusion, neurotransmitter, or cell density. Applications include differentiating between the dementias, evaluating cerebrovascular disease, preoperative localization of epileptogenic foci, diagnosing movement disorders, and evaluation of intracerebral tumours, while also proving a useful research tool. Unlike positronemission tomography (PET), SPECT imaging is widely available and can be performed in any department that has access to a rotating gamma camera. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the utility of cerebral SPECT and increase awareness of its role in the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  12. A Hemispherical Power Asymmetry from Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Erickcek, Adrienne L; Carroll, Sean M

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of temperature fluctuations by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) indicate that the fluctuation amplitude in one half of the sky differs from the amplitude in the other half. We show that such an asymmetry cannot be generated during single-field slow-roll inflation without violating constraints to the homogeneity of the Universe. In contrast, a multi-field inflationary theory, the curvaton model, can produce this power asymmetry without violating the homogeneity constraint. The mechanism requires the introduction of a large-amplitude superhorizon perturbation to the curvaton field, possibly a pre-inflationary remnant or a superhorizon curvaton-web structure. The model makes several predictions, including non-Gaussianity and modifications to the inflationary consistency relation, that will be tested with forthcoming CMB experiments.

  13. CLAS: Double-Pion Beam Asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen Strauch

    2005-10-01

    Beam-helicity asymmetries for the gamma+p -> pi+ + pi- + p reaction have been measured for center-of-mass energies between 1.35 GeV and 2.30 GeV at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer using circularly polarized tagged photons. The beam-helicity asymmetries vary with kinematics and exhibit strong sensitivity to the dynamics of the reaction, as demonstrated in the comparison of the data with results of various phenomenological model calculations. These models currently do not provide an adequate description of the data over the entire kinematic range covered in this experiment. Additional polarization observables are accessible in an upcoming experiment at Jefferson Lab with polarized beam and target.

  14. GDH Integral on the Proton from Asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yelena Prok

    2004-05-01

    Inclusive double spin electron asymmetries have been measured by scattering polarized electrons off the solid polarized {sup 15}NH{sub 3} target in Hall B of Jefferson Lab in 2000-2001. The virtual photon asymmetry A{sub 1} (x), the longitudinal spin structure function, g{sub 1} (x, Q{sup 2}), and the first moment, {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p}, have been evaluated for a kinematic range of 0.05 {ge} Q{sup 2} {ge} 4.5 GeV{sup 2}. The extracted results complement the existing data in the resonance region, extending it to lower and higher Q{sup 2} regions. The results are important in the study of Q{sup 2} evolution of nucleon structure from the hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom.

  15. GDH Integral on the Proton from Asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prok, Yelena [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2004-05-01

    Inclusive double spin electron asymmetries have been measured by scattering polarized electrons off the solid polarized 15NH3 target in Hall B of Jefferson Lab in 2000-2001. The virtual photon asymmetry A1 (x), the longitudinal spin structure function, g1 (x, Q2), and the first moment, γ1p, have been evaluated for a kinematic range of 0.05 ≥ Q2 ≥ 4.5 GeV2. The extracted results complement the existing data in the resonance region, extending it to lower and higher Q2 regions. The results are important in the study of Q2 evolution of nucleon structure from the hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom.

  16. Joint transform correlator fingerprint verification using complementary-reference and complementary-scene images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Hussain A.; Cherri, Abdallah K.

    2009-04-01

    Being a popular choice among the biometric features, the fingerprint has long been used for identification and verification purposes by security agencies. In this paper, additional images are included in the input joint images in a joint transform correlator (JTC) to achieve a fast real-time fingerprint verification. In the proposed scheme, in addition to the reference and the target image, the input joint image has a complementary reference image and a complementary target image. At the correlation output of the JTC, the cross-correlation peak value between the reference and the complementary target image and the cross-correlation peak value between the complementary reference and the target images are used as the criteria to perform the recognition of the target in the input scene. It will be shown that these two cross-correlation peak values will be zero if and only if the input target matches the reference image. The scheme is employed to verify binary characters and binarized fingerprint images.

  17. Phenylpropanolamine and cerebral hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, J.R.; LeBlanc, H.J.

    1985-05-01

    Computerized tomography, carotid angiograms, and arteriography were used to diagnose several cases of cerebral hemorrhage following the use of phenylpropanolamine. The angiographic picture in one of the three cases was similar to that previously described in association with amphetamine abuse and pseudoephedrine overdose, both substances being chemically and pharmacologically similar to phenylpropanolamine. The study suggests that the arterial change responsible for symptoms may be due to spasm rather than arteriopathy. 14 references, 5 figures.

  18. Relic neutrino asymmetry evolution from first principles

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Nicole F.; Volkas, Raymond R.; Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    1998-01-01

    The exact Quantum Kinetic Equations for a two-flavour active-sterile neutrino system are used to provide a systematic derivation of approximate evolution equations for the relic neutrino asymmetry. An extension of the adiabatic approximation for matter-affected neutrino oscillations is developed which incorporates decoherence due to collisions. Exact and approximate expressions for the decoherence and repopulation functions are discussed. A first pass is made over the exact treatment of multi...

  19. LETTER: Synchronization model for stock market asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donangelo, Raul; Jensen, Mogens H.; Simonsen, Ingve; Sneppen, Kim

    2006-11-01

    The waiting time needed for a stock market index to undergo a given percentage change in its value is found to have an up down asymmetry, which, surprisingly, is not observed for the individual stocks composing that index. To explain this, we introduce a market model consisting of randomly fluctuating stocks that occasionally synchronize their short term draw-downs. These synchronous events are parametrized by a 'fear factor', that reflects the occurrence of dramatic external events which affect the financial market.

  20. Mass and chemical asymmetry in QCD matter

    CERN Document Server

    Palhares, L F; Villavicencio, C

    2008-01-01

    We consider two-flavor asymmetric QCD combined with a low-energy effective model inspired by chiral perturbation theory and lattice data to investigate the effects of masses, isospin and baryon number on the pressure and the deconfinement phase transition. Remarkable agreement with lattice results is found for the critical temperature behavior. Further analyses of the cold, dense case and the influence of quark mass asymmetry are also presented.

  1. GENDER ASYMMETRY IN A MODERN POLITICAL DISCOURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakytgul Khamenova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work (article, the author investigates gender asymmetry in modern Kazakhstan society which has social and psychological, is watered - economic scientific measurement. The scientific data base used in this research is wide and authentic enough and can be divided in three groups: first, the social stereotypes and gender aspects, second, the gender and sex theories, imageology, psychology, international politics, third, the scientific sources, devoted to the gender aspects of global and political processes.

  2. ASYMMETRY OF HUMAN INFORMATION SPACE AND DYSLEXIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Levashov

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available There is an increase of dyslexics in many countries up to 15-20% in recent years. In this report I discuss possible reasons for the situation. There are: 1. A bias of contemporary “information space” in visual component vs verbal and sign component. 2. Visual sensory overload in early sensitive period (up to 7-8 which results to specific functional brain asymmetry. 3. Low physical activity of children, especially a deficit of ball games.

  3. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal Dholke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is on the rise, especially in today′s fast-paced world. TBI requires not only neurosurgical expertise but also neurointensivist involvement for a better outcome. Disturbances of sodium balance are common in patients with brain injury, as the central nervous system plays a major role in sodium regulation. Hyponatraemia, defined as serum sodium <135 meq/L is commonly seen and is especially deleterious as it can contribute to cerebral oedema in these patients. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH, is the most well-known cause of hyponatraemia in this subset of patients. Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome (CSWS, leading to renal sodium loss is an important cause of hyponatraemia in patients with TBI. Although incompletely studied, decreased renal sympathetic responses and cerebral natriuretic factors play a role in the pathogenesis of CSWS. Maintaining a positive sodium balance and adequate hydration can help in the treatment. It is important to differentiate between SIADH and CSWS when trying to ascertain a case for patients with acute brain injury, as the treatment of the two are diametrically opposite.

  4. Cerebral oxygenation and hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Richard Bain

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia is associated with marked reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF. Increased distribution of cardiac output to the periphery, increases in alveolar ventilation and resultant hypocapnia each contribute to the fall in CBF during passive hyperthermia; however, their relative contribution remains a point of contention, and probably depends on the experimental condition (e.g. posture and degree of hyperthermia. The hyperthermia-induced hyperventilatory response reduces arterial CO2 pressure (PaCO2 causing cerebral vasoconstriction and subsequent reductions in flow. During supine passive hyperthermia, the majority of recent data indicate that reductions in PaCO2 may be the primary, if not sole, culprit for reduced CBF. On the other hand, during more dynamic conditions (e.g. hemorrhage or orthostatic challenges, an inability to appropriately decrease peripheral vascular conductance presents a condition whereby adequate cerebral perfusion pressure may be compromised secondary to reductions in systemic blood pressure. Although studies have reported maintenance of pre-frontal cortex oxygenation (assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy during exercise and severe heat stress, the influence of cutaneous blood flow is known to contaminate this measure. This review discusses the governing mechanisms associated with changes in CBF and oxygenation during moderate to severe (i.e. 1.0°C to 2.0°C increase in body core temperature levels of hyperthermia. Future research directions are provided.

  5. Azimuthal asymmetries in hard exclusive meson muoproduction off transversely polarized protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolbeek, Johannes ter

    2015-04-15

    } production, which was an evidence for the existence of the transverse GPD H{sub T}. The asymmetries obtained in this analysis can help to constrain Generalized Parton Distributions. This is done by comparing the measurements to model calculations of the asymmetries in the COMPASS kinematics. In this thesis the results are compared to the model from Goloskokov and Kroll, which is in good agreement with the data. Especially in combination with results from other vector meson channels, as for example the ρ{sup 0} meson, which has already been analyzed, additional constrains on quark GPDs E{sup u} and E{sup d} are enabled. Furthermore the pion pole contribution plays an important role in hard exclusive ω production, whereby the ω channel is of special interest. Especially the three single spin asymmetries A{sup sin(φ-φs)}{sub UT}, A{sup sin(2φs-φS)}{sub UT} and A{sup sin} {sup φS}{sub UT} are expected to be sensitive to the sign of the πω form factor and therefore of great importance. The results on the first and second asymmetry are clearly in favor of a negative sign of the form factor, whereas the result on the last one is also compatible with theoretical predictions assuming a positive sign. At the moment the analysis is limited by the available statistic. Therefore more data, taken with transversely polarized protons and deuterons, will be needed. This could also allow for the investigation on heavier vector mesons like the φ and the J/ψ meson, whose production cross section is much smaller compared to the ω and the ρ{sup 0}. The complementary results from various production channels will help to further constrain the GPDs. The present fixed target experiments do not allow for a sufficient increase of statistics. But maybe in the future polarized collider experiments can achieve the needed statistics.

  6. Cerebral malformations without antenatal diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Nadine J. [Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Hopital Timone, Marseille (France)

    2010-06-15

    Cerebral malformations are usually described following the different steps in development. Disorders of neurulation (dysraphisms), or diverticulation (holoprosencephalies and posterior fossa cysts), and total commissural agenesis are usually diagnosed in utero. In contrast, disorders of histogenesis (proliferation-differentiation, migration, organization) are usually discovered in infants and children. The principal clinical symptoms that may be a clue to cerebral malformation include congenital hemiparesis, epilepsy and mental or psychomotor retardation. MRI is the imaging method of choice to assess cerebral malformations. (orig.)

  7. Cerebral Autoregulation in Normal Pregnancy and Preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, Teelkien R.; Panerai, Ronney B.; Haeri, Sina; Griffioen, Annemiek C.; Zeeman, Gerda; Belfort, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that preeclampsia is associated with impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation. METHODS: In a prospective cohort analysis, cerebral blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery (determined by transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (determined by noninvasive arter

  8. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

  9. Transcallosal transfer of information and functional asymmetry of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Anna; Tacikowski, Pawel

    2011-01-01

    The corpus callosum is the largest commissure in the brain and acts as a "bridge" of nerve fibres connecting the two cerebral hemispheres. It plays a crucial role in interhemispheric integration and is responsible for normal communication and cooperation between the two hemispheres. Evolutionary pressures guiding brain size are accompanied by reduced interhemispheric and enhanced intrahemispheric connectivity. Some lines of evidence suggest that the speed of transcallosal conduction is limited in large brains (e.g., in humans), thus favouring intrahemispheric processing and brain lateralisation. Patterns of directional symmetry/asymmetry of transcallosal transfer time may be related to the degree of brain lateralisation. Neural network modelling and electrophysiological studies on interhemispheric transmission provide data supporting this supposition.

  10. Complementary and alternative medicine in rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, E

    2000-12-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has become an important subject for rheumatologists. This article is an attempt to provide an introduction to this subject. It will provide definitions of, and define the prevalence of, CAM. The emphasis of the article is on evaluating the efficacy of CAM treatment modalities. This is achieved by referring to systematic reviews of clinical trials of acupuncture for low back pain, osteo-arthritis, fibromyalgia, inflammatory rheumatoid disease and neck pain. Further areas addressed in this way are herbal remedies, fish oil and glucosamine. Moreover, massage therapy and spinal manipulation for back pain are discussed. The final sections of this review deal with the safety and cost of CAM. It is concluded that, in view of the popularity of CAM with rheumatological patients, rigorous research into CAM is the best way forward.

  11. Alternative, complementary and traditional medicine in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, N

    2006-09-01

    This paper sets out the practice of traditional, alternative and/or complementary medicine in Malaysia. It gives an overview of the types of alternative medicine available, and the legal regulation, or lack of it within the current setting. The relevant policies and governmental action in this area are highlighted. Relevant case law decisions in this area are also included. The practice of spiritual healing as one form of traditional medicine, and its role within the spectrum of alternative medicine is dealt with briefly. The significant question of integration of alternative medicine within the existing allopathic system is addressed. The paper concludes that as interest in, and usage of alternative medicine is not likely to decrease, certain measures must be taken by the relevant authorities to ensure among others, the safety and efficacy of these medicines.

  12. Threefold Complementary Approach to Holographic QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); de Teramond, Guy F. [Univ. of Costa Rica, San Jose (Costa Rica); Dosch, Hans Gunter [Inst. for Theoretical Physics, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-12-27

    A complementary approach, derived from (a) higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, (b) light-front quantization and (c) the invariance properties of the full conformal group in one dimension leads to a nonperturbative relativistic light-front wave equation which incorporates essential spectroscopic and dynamical features of hadron physics. The fundamental conformal symmetry of the classical QCD Lagrangian in the limit of massless quarks is encoded in the resulting effective theory. The mass scale for confinement emerges from the isomorphism between the conformal group andSO(2,1). This scale appears in the light-front Hamiltonian by mapping to the evolution operator in the formalism of de Alfaro, Fubini and Furlan, which retains the conformal invariance of the action. Remarkably, the specific form of the confinement interaction and the corresponding modification of AdS space are uniquely determined in this procedure.

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine in oncology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somani, Salima; Ali, Fauziya; Saeed Ali, Tazeen; Sulaiman Lalani, Nasreen

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has increased globally, particularly among oncology patients. This study investigated the knowledge, experience and attitudes of oncology nurses towards CAM. A quantitative study was conducted in tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan, where 132 oncology nurses were surveyed. The survey revealed that more than 50% of nurses had never heard about many of the CAM therapies used in Pakistan. Approximately 65% of the nurses had knowledge about prayer and less than 30% had experience of CAM education or training. In addition, the majority of nurses had seen patients using CAM and felt that their health status could be enhanced with the use of CAM. This study showed that oncology nurses had a positive experience of and attitude towards CAM, although they needed to enhance their knowledge of it to maximise patient satisfaction and quality of care.

  14. Gait asymmetry: composite scores for mechanical analyses of sprint running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exell, T A; Gittoes, M J R; Irwin, G; Kerwin, D G

    2012-04-01

    Gait asymmetry analyses are beneficial from clinical, coaching and technology perspectives. Quantifying overall athlete asymmetry would be useful in allowing comparisons between participants, or between asymmetry and other factors, such as sprint running performance. The aim of this study was to develop composite kinematic and kinetic asymmetry scores to quantify athlete asymmetry during maximal speed sprint running. Eight male sprint trained athletes (age 22±5 years, mass 74.0±8.7 kg and stature 1.79±0.07 m) participated in this study. Synchronised sagittal plane kinematic and kinetic data were collected via a CODA motion analysis system, synchronised to two Kistler force plates. Bilateral, lower limb data were collected during the maximal velocity phase of sprint running (velocity=9.05±0.37 ms(-1)). Kinematic and kinetic composite asymmetry scores were developed using the previously established symmetry angle for discrete variables associated with successful sprint performance and comparisons of continuous joint power data. Unlike previous studies quantifying gait asymmetry, the scores incorporated intra-limb variability by excluding variables from the composite scores that did not display significantly larger (pcomposite scores and the magnitude of asymmetry observed for each measure varied on an individual participant basis. The new composite scores indicated the inter-participant differences that exist in asymmetry during sprint running and may serve to allow comparisons between overall athlete asymmetry with other important factors such as performance.

  15. Validity and sensitivity of the longitudinal asymmetry index to detect gait asymmetry using Microsoft Kinect data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvinet, E; Multon, F; Manning, V; Meunier, J; Cobb, J P

    2017-01-01

    Gait asymmetry information is a key point in disease screening and follow-up. Constant Relative Phase (CRP) has been used to quantify within-stride asymmetry index, which requires noise-free and accurate motion capture, which is difficult to obtain in clinical settings. This study explores a new index, the Longitudinal Asymmetry Index (ILong) which is derived using data from a low-cost depth camera (Kinect). ILong is based on depth images averaged over several gait cycles, rather than derived joint positions or angles. This study aims to evaluate (1) the validity of CRP computed with Kinect, (2) the validity and sensitivity of ILong for measuring gait asymmetry based solely on data provided by a depth camera, (3) the clinical applicability of a posteriorly mounted camera system to avoid occlusion caused by the standard front-fitted treadmill consoles and (4) the number of strides needed to reliably calculate ILong. The gait of 15 subjects was recorded concurrently with a marker-based system (MBS) and Kinect, and asymmetry was artificially reproduced by introducing a 5cm sole attached to one foot. CRP computed with Kinect was not reliable. ILong detected this disturbed gait reliably and could be computed from a posteriorly placed Kinect without loss of validity. A minimum of five strides was needed to achieve a correlation coefficient of 0.9 between standard MBS and low-cost depth camera based ILong. ILong provides a clinically pragmatic method for measuring gait asymmetry, with application for improved patient care through enhanced disease, screening, diagnosis and monitoring.

  16. Intelligence-related differences in the asymmetry of spontaneous cerebral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Tatti, Elisa; Rossi, Simone; Serino, Vinicio; Rossi, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests the spontaneous BOLD signal synchronization of corresponding interhemispheric, homotopic regions as a stable trait of human brain physiology, with emerging differences in such organization being also related to some pathological conditions. To understand whether such brain functional symmetries play a role into higher-order cognitive functioning, here we correlated the functional homotopy profiles of 119 healthy subjects with their intelligence level. Counterintuitively, reduced homotopic connectivity in above average-IQ versus average-IQ subjects was observed, with significant reductions in visual and somatosensory cortices, supplementary motor area, rolandic operculum, and middle temporal gyrus, possibly suggesting that a downgrading of interhemispheric talk at rest could be associated with higher cognitive functioning. These regions also showed an increased spontaneous synchrony with medial structures located in ipsi- and contralateral hemispheres, with such pattern being mostly detectable for regions placed in the left hemisphere. The interactions with age and gender have been also tested, with different patterns for subjects above and below 25 years old and less homotopic connectivity in the prefrontal cortex and posterior midline regions in female participants with higher IQ scores. These findings support prior evidence suggesting a functional role for homotopic connectivity in human cognitive expression, promoting the reduction of synchrony between primary sensory regions as a predictor of higher intelligence levels.

  17. C, P, and CP asymmetry observables based on triple product asymmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Bevan, Adrian J

    2015-01-01

    The discrete symmetries C, P and CP are known to be violated by the weak interaction. It is possible to probe the breaking of these symmetries using asymmetries constructed from triple products based on the decay of some particle M to a four body final state. These proceedings discuss the full set of possible asymmetries that can be probed and applications to various measurement scenarios, focusing mostly on charm mesons and baryons. The ramifications of what can be learned from such measurements are also discussed.

  18. Evidence for developmental programming of cerebral laterality in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Jones

    Full Text Available Adverse fetal environments are associated with depression, reduced cognitive ability and increased stress responsiveness in later life, but underlying mechanisms are unknown. Environmental pressures on the fetus, resulting from variations in placental function and maternal nutrition, health and stress might alter neurodevelopment, promoting the development of some brain regions over others. As asymmetry of cerebral activity, with greater right hemisphere activity, has been associated with psychopathology, we hypothesized that regional specialization during fetal life might be reflected persistently in the relative activity of the cerebral hemispheres. We tested this hypothesis in 140 healthy 8-9 year-old children, using tympanic membrane temperature to assess relative blood flow to the cerebral hemispheres at rest and following psychosocial stress (Trier Social Stress Test for Children. Their birth weight and placental weight had already been measured when their mothers took part in a previous study of pregnancy outcomes. We found that children who had a smaller weight at birth had evidence of greater blood flow to the right hemisphere than to the left hemisphere (r = -.09, P = .29 at rest; r = -.18, P = .04 following stress. This finding was strengthened if the children had a relatively low birth weight for their placental weight (r = -.17, P = .05 at rest; r = -.31, P = .0005 following stress. Our findings suggest that lateralization of cerebral activity is influenced persistently by early developmental experiences, with possible consequences for long-term neurocognitive function.

  19. New human-specific brain landmark: the depth asymmetry of superior temporal sulcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, François; Cai, Qing; Bogart, Stephanie L; Dubois, Jessica; Coulon, Olivier; Monzalvo, Karla; Fischer, Clara; Glasel, Hervé; Van der Haegen, Lise; Bénézit, Audrey; Lin, Ching-Po; Kennedy, David N; Ihara, Aya S; Hertz-Pannier, Lucie; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Poupon, Cyril; Brysbaert, Marc; Roberts, Neil; Hopkins, William D; Mangin, Jean-François; Dehaene-Lambertz, Ghislaine

    2015-01-27

    Identifying potentially unique features of the human cerebral cortex is a first step to understanding how evolution has shaped the brain in our species. By analyzing MR images obtained from 177 humans and 73 chimpanzees, we observed a human-specific asymmetry in the superior temporal sulcus at the heart of the communication regions and which we have named the "superior temporal asymmetrical pit" (STAP). This 45-mm-long segment ventral to Heschl's gyrus is deeper in the right hemisphere than in the left in 95% of typical human subjects, from infanthood till adulthood, and is present, irrespective of handedness, language lateralization, and sex although it is greater in males than in females. The STAP also is seen in several groups of atypical subjects including persons with situs inversus, autistic spectrum disorder, Turner syndrome, and corpus callosum agenesis. It is explained in part by the larger number of sulcal interruptions in the left than in the right hemisphere. Its early presence in the infants of this study as well as in fetuses and premature infants suggests a strong genetic influence. Because this asymmetry is barely visible in chimpanzees, we recommend the STAP region during midgestation as an important phenotype to investigate asymmetrical variations of gene expression among the primate lineage. This genetic target may provide important insights regarding the evolution of the crucial cognitive abilities sustained by this sulcus in our species, namely communication and social cognition.

  20. Hemispheric preference in visuospatial processing: a complementary approach with fMRI and lesion studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, V W; Eslinger, P J; Williams, S C; Brammer, M J; Bullmore, E T; Andrew, C M; Suckling, J; Morris, R G; Benton, A L

    2000-06-01

    Historically, the left cerebral hemisphere has been considered specialized for language, whereas the right cerebral hemisphere is aligned with spatial processes. However, studies have called into question adherence to this model and suggested that both hemispheres participate in language and spatial cognition. Using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and human brain lesion studies, we determined whether these complementary techniques could clarify issues of hemispheric dominance. Using a modified Benton Judgement of Line Orientation (JLO) test, considered a relatively pure spatial processing task, we found robust and significant (p < 0.0005) bilateral superior parietal lobe activation on fMRI in ten right-handed male adult volunteers. This was corroborated by lesion data in a cohort of 17 patients who showed significant JLO impairments after either right or left parietal lobe damage, with right parietal damage associated with somewhat more severe deficit. Detailed wavelet analysis of the fMRI time-series did, however, reveal a more dominant role of the right parietal lobe in "kick-starting" the task. To our knowledge, this is a novel way of using fMRI to address functional hemispheric differences in a cognitive task that is known to have bilateral representation.

  1. Knowledge Asymmetries - Beyond "To Have and Have Not"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastberg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In this article I begin by presenting what may count as examples of intuitively accepted notions of knowledge asymmetries from a wide variety of research disciplines. I go on to state that knowledge asymmetries are prototypically seen as unwanted aspects of human interaction. Responding...... to that stance, I propose to look at knowledge asymmetry from the viewpoint of another and less confrontationally oriented ideology in the hope that another perspective may lead to other insights and hopefully new avenues of research. In this article I therefore aim at opening a discussion of how knowledge...... asymmetry may be understood conceptually and how this understanding may be evaluated and applied within a wider framework of Knowledge Communication research. In order to do so I (re-)conceptualize knowledge asymmetry from the viewpoint of three perspectives: asymmetry, knowledge and communication...

  2. Surveys of complementary and alternative medicine: Part II. Use of alternative and complementary cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparber, A; Wootton, J C

    2001-06-01

    The second part of this series on surveys of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the United States provides a "point-of-information" summary of the studies on patients with cancer and their use of CAM therapies. Surveys of patients with cancer were the precursors of the recent wave of studies on CAM prevalence and use. Three tables summarize the findings from a total of 18 surveys categorized by Childhood Cancer, Adult Cancer, and Breast Cancer studies.

  3. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H

    2014-01-01

    dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) partial pressures so that hypercapnia/hypoxia increases and hypocapnia/hyperoxia reduces global cerebral blood flow. Cerebral hypoperfusion and TLOC have been associated with hypocapnia related to HV. Notwithstanding pronounced cerebrovascular effects of PaCO2...

  4. Resting cerebral blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ances, B M.; Sisti, D; Vaida, F; Liang, C L.; Leontiev, O; Perthen, J E.; Buxton, R B.; Benson, D; Smith, D M.; Little, S J.; Richman, D D.; Moore, D J.; Ellis, R J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: HIV enters the brain soon after infection causing neuronal damage and microglial/astrocyte dysfunction leading to neuropsychological impairment. We examined the impact of HIV on resting cerebral blood flow (rCBF) within the lenticular nuclei (LN) and visual cortex (VC). Methods: This cross-sectional study used arterial spin labeling MRI (ASL-MRI) to measure rCBF within 33 HIV+ and 26 HIV− subjects. Nonparametric Wilcoxon rank sum test assessed rCBF differences due to HIV serostatus. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis determined optimal rCBF cutoffs for differentiating HIV serostatus. The effects of neuropsychological impairment and infection duration on rCBF were evaluated. Results: rCBF within the LN and VC were significantly reduced for HIV+ compared to HIV− subjects. A 2-tiered CART approach using either LN rCBF ≤50.09 mL/100 mL/min or LN rCBF >50.09 mL/100 mL/min but VC rCBF ≤37.05 mL/100 mL/min yielded an 88% (29/33) sensitivity and an 88% (23/26) specificity for differentiating by HIV serostatus. HIV+ subjects, including neuropsychologically unimpaired, had reduced rCBF within the LN (p = 0.02) and VC (p = 0.001) compared to HIV− controls. A temporal progression of brain involvement occurred with LN rCBF significantly reduced for both acute/early (<1 year of seroconversion) and chronic HIV-infected subjects, whereas rCBF in the VC was diminished for only chronic HIV-infected subjects. Conclusion: Resting cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using arterial spin labeling MRI has the potential to be a noninvasive neuroimaging biomarker for assessing HIV in the brain. rCBF reductions that occur soon after seroconversion possibly reflect neuronal or vascular injury among HIV+ individuals not yet expressing neuropsychological impairment. GLOSSARY AEH = acute/early HIV infection; ANOVA = analysis of variance; ASL-MRI = arterial spin labeling MRI; CART = classification and regression tree; CBF = cerebral blood flow; CH = chronic HIV

  5. Neocortical synaptophysin asymmetry and behavioral lateralization in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherwood, Chet C; Duka, Tetyana; Stimpson, Cheryl D

    2010-01-01

    Although behavioral lateralization is known to correlate with certain aspects of brain asymmetry in primates, there are limited data concerning hemispheric biases in the microstructure of the neocortex. In the present study, we investigated whether there is asymmetry in synaptophysin...... density. In contrast, puncta densities were symmetrical in right-handed chimpanzees. These findings support the conclusion that synapse asymmetry is modulated by lateralization of skilled motor behavior in chimpanzees....

  6. Both morph- and species-dependent asymmetries affect reproductive barriers between heterostylous species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Barbara; de Vos, Jurriaan M; Schmidt-Lebuhn, Alexander N; Thomson, James D; Conti, Elena

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between floral traits and reproductive isolation is crucial to explaining the extraordinary diversity of angiosperms. Heterostyly, a complex floral polymorphism that optimizes outcrossing, evolved repeatedly and has been shown to accelerate diversification in primroses, yet its potential influence on isolating mechanisms remains unexplored. Furthermore, the relative contribution of pre- versus postmating barriers to reproductive isolation is still debated. No experimental study has yet evaluated the possible effects of heterostyly on pre- and postmating reproductive mechanisms. We quantify multiple reproductive barriers between the heterostylous Primula elatior (oxlip) and P. vulgaris (primrose), which readily hybridize when co-occurring, and test whether traits of heterostyly contribute to reproductive barriers in unique ways. We find that premating isolation is key for both species, while postmating isolation is considerable only for P. vulgaris; ecogeographic isolation is crucial for both species, while phenological, seed developmental, and hybrid sterility barriers are also important in P. vulgaris, implicating sympatrically higher gene flow into P. elatior. We document for the first time that, in addition to the aforementioned species-dependent asymmetries, morph-dependent asymmetries affect reproductive barriers between heterostylous species. Indeed, the interspecific decrease of reciprocity between high sexual organs of complementary floral morphs limits interspecific pollen transfer from anthers of short-styled flowers to stigmas of long-styled flowers, while higher reciprocity between low sexual organs favors introgression over isolation from anthers of long-styled flowers to stigmas of short-styled flowers. Finally, intramorph incompatibility persists across species boundaries, but is weakened in long-styled flowers of P. elatior, opening a possible backdoor to gene flow through intramorph pollen transfer between species. Therefore

  7. [Asymmetry of antennal grooming in the cockroach (Periplaneta americana)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the key features of antennal grooming of male American cockroaches in neutral circumstances. It was shown for the first time that the right antenna was cleaned significantly more often than the left one, which indicates the presence of functional asymmetry of antennal grooming in this insect species. At the same time, no statistically significant asymmetry was found for grooming of antennal bases and legs. Morphological asymmetries of antennae and legs and/or brain lateralization are the plausible sources of observed behavioral asymmetry in antennal grooming.

  8. Entanglement asymmetry for boosted black branes

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    We study the effects of asymmetry in entanglement thermodynamics of the CFT subsystems. It is found that `boosted' $p$-branes backgrounds give rise to the first law of the entanglement thermodynamics where the CFT pressure plays decisive role in the entanglement. Two different strip like subsystems, one parallel to the boost and the other perpendicular, are studied in the perturbative regime, where $T_{thermal}\\ll T_E$. We also discuss the AdS-wave backgrounds where some universal bounds can be obtained.

  9. Detecting Gait Asymmetry with Wearable Accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-18

    important to first identify which portions of the data were collected on a smooth walking surface? Can the algorithm be applied to running data? Why...characteristics by trunk ac- celerometry,” Journal of biomechanics 37(1), 121–126 (2004). [15] A. Tura, M. Raggi, L. Rocchi, A.G. Cutti, and L. Chiari, “Gait...Senanayake, “Identifying gait asymmetry using gyroscopes– a cross-correlation and normalized symmetry index approach,” Journal of Biomechanics 44(5), 972

  10. The CMB Derivatives of Planck's Beam Asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Rathaus, Ben

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the anisotropy in cosmic microwave background Planck maps due to the coupling between its beam asymmetry and uneven scanning strategy. Introducing a pixel space estimator based on the temperature gradients, we find a highly significant (~20 \\sigma) preference for these to point along ecliptic latitudes. We examine the scale dependence, morphology and foreground sensitivity of this anisotropy, as well as the capability of detailed Planck simulations to reproduce the effect, which is crucial for its removal, as we demonstrate in a search for the weak lensing signature of cosmic defects.

  11. Measures of Asymmetry Dual to Mean Minkowski Measures of Asymmetry for Convex Bo dies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Dan; Guo Qi

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a family of measures (functions) of asymmetry for convex bodies and discuss their properties. It turns out that this family of measures shares many nice properties with the mean Minkowski measures. As the mean Minkowski measures describe the symmetry of lower dimensional sections of a convex body, these new measures describe the symmetry of lower dimensional orthogonal projections.

  12. Experimental investigation of transverse spin asymmetries in muon-p SIDIS processes: Collins asymmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Adolph, C; Alexakhin, V Yu; Alexandrov, Yu; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Antonov, A A; Austregesilo, A; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Barth, J; Baum, G; Bedfer, Y; Bernhard, J; Bertini, R; Bettinelli, M; Bicker, K; Bieling, J; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Braun, C; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Burtin, E; Capozza, L; Chiosso, M; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Crespo, M L; Dalla Torre, S; Das, S; Dasgupta, S S; Dasgupta, S; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dunnweber, W; Dziewiecki, M; Efremov, A; Elia, C; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Filin, A; Finger, M; Fischer, H; Franco, C; von Hohenesche, N.du Fresne; Friedrich, J M; Frolov, V; Garfagnini, R; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gerassimov, S; Geyer, R; Giorgi, M; Gnesi, I; Gobbo, B; Goertz, S; Grabmuller, S; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Gushterski, R; Guskov, A; Guthorl, T; Haas, F; von Harrach, D; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Hess, C; Hinterberger, F; Horikawa, N; Hoppner, Ch; d'Hose, N; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, O; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jary, V; Jasinski, P; Joosten, R; Kabuss, E; Kang, D; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koblitz, S; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Konigsmann, K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Korzenev, A; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Kramer, M; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Lauser, L; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Liska, T; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Makke, N; Mallot, G K; Mann, A; Marchand, C; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Matsuda, T; Meshcheryakov, G; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu V; Moinester, M A; Morreale, A; Mutter, A; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Negrini, T; Nerling, F; Neubert, S; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Nowak, W D; Nunes, A S; Olshevsky, A G; Ostrick, M; Padee, A; Panknin, R; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Perevalova, E; Pesaro, G; Peshekhonov, D V; Piragino, G; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polak, J; Polyakov, V A; Pretz, J; Quaresma, M; Quintans, C; Rajotte, J F; Ramos, S; Rapatsky, V; Reicherz, G; Richter, A; Rocco, E; Rondio, E; Rossiyskaya, N S; Ryabchikov, D I; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Sapozhnikov, M G; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schluter, T; Schmidt, K; Schmitt, L; Schonning, K; Schopferer, S; Schott, M; Schroder, W; Shevchenko, O Yu; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sissakian, A N; Slunecka, M; Smirnov, G I; Sosio, S; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Steiger, L; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Suzuki, H; Sznajder, P; Takekawa, S; Wolbeek, J.Ter; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Tkatchev, L G; Uhl, S; Uman, I; Vandenbroucke, M; Virius, M; Vlassov, N V; Wang, L; Wilfert, M; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Wollny, H; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M; Zhuravlev, N; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    The COMPASS Collaboration at CERN has measured the transverse spin azimuthal asymmetry of charged hadrons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering using a 160 GeV positive muon beam and a transversely polarised NH_3 target. The Collins asymmetry of the proton was extracted in the Bjorken x range 0.003asymmetries for negative and positive hadrons are similar in magnitude and opposite in sign. They are compatible with model calculations in which the u-quark transversity is opposite in sign and somewhat larger than the d-quark transversity distribution function. The asymmetry is extracted as a function of Bjorken $x$, the relative hadron energy $z$ and the hadron transverse momentum p_T^h. The high statistics and quality of the data also allow for more detailed investigations of the dependence on the ki...

  13. Differences in cerebral cortical anatomy of left- and right-handers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulio eGuadalupe

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The left and right sides of the human brain are specialized for different kinds of information processing, and much of our cognition is lateralized to an extent towards one side or the other. Handedness is a reflection of nervous system lateralization. Roughly ten percent of people are mixed- or left-handed, and they show an elevated rate of reductions or reversals of some cerebral functional asymmetries compared to right-handers. Brain anatomical correlates of left-handedness have also been suggested. However, the relationships of left-handedness to brain structure and function remain far from clear. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of cortical surface area differences between 106 left-handed subjects and 1960 right-handed subjects, measured using an automated method of regional parcellation (FreeSurfer, Destrieux atlas. This is the largest study sample that has so far been used in relation to this issue. No individual cortical region showed an association with left-handedness that survived statistical correction for multiple testing, although there was a nominally significant association with the surface area of a previously implicated region: the left precentral sulcus. Identifying brain structural correlates of handedness may prove useful for genetic studies of cerebral asymmetries, as well as providing new avenues for the study of relations between handedness, cerebral lateralization and cognition.

  14. Maximizing Complementary Quantities by Projective Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Souza, Leonardo A.; Bernardes, Nadja K.; Rossi, Romeu

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we study the so-called quantitative complementarity quantities. We focus in the following physical situation: two qubits ( q A and q B ) are initially in a maximally entangled state. One of them ( q B ) interacts with a N-qubit system ( R). After the interaction, projective measurements are performed on each of the qubits of R, in a basis that is chosen after independent optimization procedures: maximization of the visibility, the concurrence, and the predictability. For a specific maximization procedure, we study in detail how each of the complementary quantities behave, conditioned on the intensity of the coupling between q B and the N qubits. We show that, if the coupling is sufficiently "strong," independent of the maximization procedure, the concurrence tends to decay quickly. Interestingly enough, the behavior of the concurrence in this model is similar to the entanglement dynamics of a two qubit system subjected to a thermal reservoir, despite that we consider finite N. However, the visibility shows a different behavior: its maximization is more efficient for stronger coupling constants. Moreover, we investigate how the distinguishability, or the information stored in different parts of the system, is distributed for different couplings.

  15. Complementary Electromagnetic Non-Destructive Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Gui Yun; Wilson, John; Morozov, Maxim

    2011-06-01

    The use of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) for defect detection and failure prediction in structures and specimens is widespread in energy industries, aimed at ageing power plants and pipelines, material degradation, fatigue and radiation damage, etc. At present there are no suitable electromagnetic NDE methods for the measurement and characterization of material degradation, in irradiated samples in particular, which is very important and timely for the nuclear power industry in the UK. This paper reports recent developments in the field of electromagnetic (EM) NDE at Newcastle University, including pulsed eddy current (PEC), pulsed magnetic flux leakage (PMFL), magnetic Barkhausen emission (MBE) and magneto-acoustic emission (MAE). As different EM methods have different strengths, an integrative EM framework is introduced. Case studies through the second round robin tests organized by the Universal Network for Magnetic Non-Destructive Evaluation (UNMNDE), representing eighteen leading research groups worldwide in the area of electromagnetic NDE, are reported. Twelve samples with different ageing times and rolling reduction ratios were tested using different magnetic methods among the UNMNDE members. Based on the studies, the complementary characteristics of electromagnetic techniques for NDE are discussed.

  16. Complementary resistive switches for passive nanocrossbar memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Eike; Rosezin, Roland; Kügeler, Carsten; Waser, Rainer

    2010-05-01

    On the road towards higher memory density and computer performance, a significant improvement in energy efficiency constitutes the dominant goal in future information technology. Passive crossbar arrays of memristive elements were suggested a decade ago as non-volatile random access memories (RAM) and can also be used for reconfigurable logic circuits. As such they represent an interesting alternative to the conventional von Neumann based computer chip architectures. Crossbar architectures hold the promise of a significant reduction in energy consumption because of their ultimate scaling potential and because they allow for a local fusion of logic and memory, thus avoiding energy consumption by data transfer on the chip. However, the expected paradigm change has not yet taken place because the general problem of selecting a designated cell within a passive crossbar array without interference from sneak-path currents through neighbouring cells has not yet been solved satisfactorily. Here we introduce a complementary resistive switch. It consists of two antiserial memristive elements and allows for the construction of large passive crossbar arrays by solving the sneak path problem in combination with a drastic reduction of the power consumption.

  17. [Alternative and complementary therapies in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, S; Leweling, H; Meinck, H-M

    2005-08-01

    Most MS patients use unconventional therapies, usually as complementary measures in addition to the conventional treatment. Only a few adequate clinical trials exist in this field. By definition, the efficacy of these therapies is unproven. Moreover, the possible risks are also largely unknown. Some therapies rely on rational pathophysiological considerations, other must be regarded as potentially harmful. The influence of diet on MS is unproven. Possibly, unsaturated fatty acids are beneficial. However, a few randomized trials yielded inconclusive results. Long-term supplementation of Vitamin D is associated with a decreased MS incidence. There is, however, insufficient evidence for an influence of Vitamin D on the course of the disease. Because of the high prevalence of osteoporosis in MS patients, prophylaxis with Vitamin D and Calcium is widely accepted. The effects of various minerals, selenium, antioxidant compounds, fish oil or vitamins remain speculative. Many patients use cannabis to alleviate spasticity and pain. Small series indicated positive effects, but randomized trials were negative for spasticity. However, many patients report subjective improvement under cannabis even if their objective parameters remain unchanged. Hyperbaric oxygenation was the subject of several small studies with heterogeneous results which, overall, do not support its use. Generally, physical therapies are perceived as an established therapy for MS. Short-term effects are probable, whereas the possible favourable long-term effects are unclear.

  18. Informed Consent in Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opher Caspi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine complementary and alternative medicine (CAM practitioners’ (i attitudes toward informed consent and (ii to assess whether standards of practice exist with respect to informed consent, and what these standards look like. The design and setting of the study constituted face-to-face qualitative interviews with 28 non-MD, community-based providers representing 11 different CAM therapeutic modalities. It was found that there is great deal of variability with respect to the informed consent process in CAM across providers and modalities. No unique profession-based patterns were identified. The content analysis yielded five major categories related to (i general attitude towards the informed consent process, (ii type and amount of information exchange during that process, (iii disclosure of risks, (iv discussions of alternatives, and (v potential benefits. There is a widespread lack of standards with respect to the practice of informed consent across a broad range of CAM modalities. Addressing this problem requires concerted and systematic educational, ethical and judicial remedial actions. Informed consent, which is often viewed as a pervasive obligation is medicine, must be reshaped to have therapeutic value. Acknowledging current conceptions and misconception surrounding the practice of informed consent may help to bring about this change. More translational research is needed to guide this process.

  19. Ultrasonography and electrodiagnosis: are they complementary techniques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Andrea

    2013-05-01

    In this review, the role of high-resolution ultrasound in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disease as a tool complementary to electrodiagnostic techniques will be discussed, including indications, advantages, limitations, and potential for future research. Ultrasound-guided needle placement can be used to increase accuracy and safety of nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography. Ultrasound imaging of nerve and muscle can provide additional diagnostic information when performed in conjunction with nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography in the setting of nerve entrapment, nerve inflammation, and muscle disease. Its unique features include the ability to image structures dynamically in real time and the technique of sonopalpation. Because neuromuscular ultrasound is a rapidly evolving diagnostic tool with significant changes in technology, which facilitates its increased use, there is a steadily growing body of literature in this area. However, there remains an ongoing need for high-quality studies that evaluate the role and cost-effectiveness of neuromuscular ultrasound, both when used alone and in combination with electrodiagnosis.

  20. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Raphael Alvis-Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment.

  1. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, I. [London, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (United Kingdom)

    1998-06-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics.

  2. Cerebral cartography and connectomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics.

  3. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  4. Cerebral blood flow in patients with dementia of Alzheimer's type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postiglione, A; Lassen, N A; Holman, B L

    1993-01-01

    In the normal brain as well as in Alzheimer's disease (AD), regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) is coupled to metabolic demand and, therefore, changes in CBF reflect variations in neuronal metabolism. The use of radionuclide techniques, such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon...... of the disease. Lateral CBF asymmetry is also very frequent; speech disorders are highly characteristic of left-sided flow reduction, while visuospatial apraxia is dominating in the right-sided cases. In advanced and severe cases of AD, CBF and metabolism tend to be more uniformly reduced throughout the cortex......, sparing only the primary visual and sensory-motor cortices. PET and SPECT measurement of brain perfusion and metabolism has added a new dimension to the knowledge of dementia disorders, with a better differential diagnosis between AD and other forms of dementia. The correlation with neuropsychological...

  5. Hemispheric asymmetry in cerebrovascular reactivity of the human primary motor cortex: an in vivo study at 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Ian D; Andoh, Jamila; Blockley, Nicholas P; Francis, Susan T; Gowland, Penny A; Paus, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    Current functional MRI (fMRI) approaches assess underlying neuronal activity through monitoring the related local variations in cerebral blood oxygenation, blood volume and blood flow. This vascular response is likely to vary across brain regions and across individuals, depending on the composition of the local vascular bed and on the vascular capacity to dilate. The most widely used technique uses the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal, which arises from a complex combination of all of these factors. The model of handedness provides a case where one brain region (dominant motor cortex) is known to have a stronger BOLD response over another (non-dominant motor cortex) during hand motor task performance. We predict that this is accompanied by a higher vascular reactivity in the dominant motor cortex, when compared with the non-dominant motor cortex. Precise measurement of end-tidal CO2 and a novel sinusoidal CO2 respiratory challenge were combined with the high sensitivity and finer spatial resolution available for fMRI at 7 T to measure BOLD cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in eight healthy male participants. BOLD CVR was compared between the left (dominant) and right (non-dominant) primary motor cortices of right-handed adults. Hemispheric asymmetry in vascular reactivity was predicted and observed in the primary motor cortex (left CVR = 0.60 ± 0.15%/mm Hg; right CVR = 0.47 ± 0.08%/mm Hg; left CVR > right CVR, P = 0.04), the first reported evidence of such a vascular difference. These findings demonstrate a cerebral vascular asymmetry between the left and right primary motor cortex. The origin of this asymmetry largely arises from the contribution of large draining veins. This work has implications for future motor laterality studies that use BOLD, and it is also suggestive of a vascular plasticity in the human primary motor cortex.

  6. Assessment of arcuate fasciculus with diffusion-tensor tractography may predict the prognosis of aphasia in patients with left middle cerebral artery infarcts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosomi, Akiko; Nagakane, Yoshinari; Kuriyama, Nagato; Mizuno, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Masanori [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan); Yamada, Kei; Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    2009-09-15

    It is often clinically difficult to assess the severity of aphasia in the earliest stage of cerebral infarction. A method enabling objective assessment of verbal function is needed for this purpose. We examined whether diffusion tensor (DT) tractography is of clinical value in assessing aphasia. Thirteen right-handed patients with left middle cerebral artery infarcts who were scanned within 2 days after stroke onset were enrolled in this study. Magnetic resonance data of ten control subjects were also examined by DT tractography. Based on the severity of aphasia at discharge, patients were divided into two groups: six patients in the aphasic group and seven in the nonaphasic group. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and number of arcuate fasciculus fibers were evaluated. Asymmetry index was calculated for both FA and number of fibers. FA values for the arcuate fasciculus fibers did not differ between hemispheres in either the patient groups or the controls. Number of arcuate fasciculus fibers exhibited a significant leftward asymmetry in the controls and the nonaphasic group but not in the aphasic group. Asymmetry index of number of fibers was significantly lower (rightward) in the aphasic group than in the nonaphasic (P = 0.015) and control (P = 0.005) groups. Loss of leftward asymmetry in number of AF fibers predicted aphasia at discharge with a sensitivity of 0.83 and specificity of 0.86. Asymmetry of arcuate fasciculus fibers by DT tractography may deserve to be assessed in acute infarction for predicting the fate of vascular aphasia. (orig.)

  7. Cerebrovascular hemodynamics in patients with cerebral arteriosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianbo Yang; Changcong Cui; Chengbin Wu

    2011-01-01

    The present study observed hemodynamic changes in 26 patients with cerebral arteriosclerosis using a cerebral circulation dynamics detector and transcranial Doppler.In patients with cerebral arteriosclerosis the blood supply and flow rate in the bilateral carotid arteries and the blood flow rate in the anterior cerebral and middle cerebral arteries were similar to normal controls, but the cerebral vascular resistance, critical pressure and pulsatility index were increased, and cerebral arterial elasticity and cerebral blood flow autoregulation were decreased.Compared with the lesioned hemisphere of patients with cerebral infarction, the total blood supply and blood flow rate of patients with cerebral arteriosclerosis were higher.Compared with normal subjects, patients with cerebral arteriosclerosis exhibited cognitive disturbances, mainly in short-term memory, attention, abstract capability, and spatial and executive dysfunction.Results showed that cerebral arteriosclerosis does not directly affect the blood supply of a cerebral hemisphere, but affects cognitive function.The increased cerebral vascular resistance and reduced autoregulation of cerebral blood vessels may be important hemodynamic mechanisms of arteriosclerosis-induced cerebral infarction.

  8. Configurational asymmetry in vernier offset detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, A K M Rezaul; Kojima, Haruyuki

    2010-10-06

    Two psychophysical experiments were conducted at the horizontal and vertical orientations respectively, demonstrating substantial main effect of configuration, but no effect of offset direction on vernier acuity. In Experiment 1, a pair of horizontal bars were arranged side by side with a large gap between them. The observers were, on average, significantly better at discriminating a vertical offset if the right-hand bar was below the left-hand bar than vice versa, regardless of which bar they experienced as displaced and which as constant. A similar asymmetry was evident in Experiment 2 where observers judged horizontal offset for a pair of vertically oriented bars, where one was placed above the other. In this case average performance was better if the upper bar was on the right of the lower bar rather than on its left. There were large individual variations in the asymmetrical trend, but the effect could not be explained by subjective response bias. Furthermore, vernier acuity improved significantly and the asymmetry decreased more or less as a function of training. The average asymmetrical trend was consistent across training days and across two orientations, which indicates that the processing of line vernier stimuli is possibly configuration-specific in the cardinal orientation.

  9. Cause of East-West Earth Asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Scalera, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The different slope of the Wadati-Benioff zones oriented towards east and west is considered a main asymmetry of the Earth's globe. Under the Americas they have angles of about 30o, while under the Pacific east coasts (Asia, Japan) the angles are steeper. In the framework of plate tectonics geodynamics the cause of this difference can be identified in the tidal drag that would cause a global shift of the lithosphere towards west. But this solution has been many times criticized on the basis of the irrelevance of the tidal forces with respect to viscous friction. Instead, it is possible to show that in a different framework, in which sudden extrusions of mantle materials occur by local phase change toward a more unpacked lattice, the value of the Coriolis fictitious force can rise of several magnitude orders, becoming the main cause of the east-west asymmetry of the Wadati-Benioff zones, which might be ascribed entirely to internal causes of the planet (its rotation and geodynamics) and not to external causes ...

  10. Dynamics, Thermodynamics, and Time-Asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Castagnino, M A; Castagnino, Mario A.; Gunzig, Edgerd

    2000-01-01

    064There are two schools, or lines of thought, that try to unify the apparently divergent laws of dynamics and thermodynamics and to explain the observed time-asymmetry of the universe, and most of its sub-systems, in spite of the fact that these systems are driven by time-symmetric evolution equations. They will be called the coarse-graining and the fine-graining schools (even if these names describe only a part of their philosophy). Coarse-graining school obtains time-asymmetry via a projection of the state space on a space of ''relevant'' states. The corresponding projection of the primitive reversible evolution laws yields effective irreversible evolution laws for the relevant states. Fine-graining always use the same primitive reversible evolution laws. But these laws (in adequate extensions of the usual spaces where these laws are formulated) have a set of solutions $S$ that can be decompose in two subsets $S_{+\\text{}}$ and $S_{-}$ of time asymmetric solutions. Choosing one of these two sets, as the ar...

  11. Quantum Correlations Evolution Asymmetry in Quantum Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Huang, Yun-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-03-01

    It was demonstrated that the entanglement evolution of a specially designed quantum state in the bistochastic channel is asymmetric. In this work, we generalize the study of the quantum correlations, including entanglement and quantum discord, evolution asymmetry to various quantum channels. We found that the asymmetry of entanglement and quantum discord only occurs in some special quantum channels, and the behavior of the entanglement evolution may be quite different from the behavior of the quantum discord evolution. To quantum entanglement, in some channels it decreases monotonously with the increase of the quantum channel intensity. In some other channels, when we increase the intensity of the quantum channel, it decreases at first, then keeps zero for some time, and then rises up. To quantum discord, the evolution becomes more complex and you may find that it evolutes unsmoothly at some points. These results illustrate the strong dependence of the quantum correlations evolution on the property of the quantum channels. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61327901, 61490711, 61225025, 11474268, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities under Grant No. WK2470000018

  12. On Introducing Asymmetry into Circular Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale Umbach

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} We give a brief history of the results which led to the introduction of asymmetry into symmetric circular distributions. This is followed by the presentation of another method of introducing asymmetry. Some properties of the induced distributions are studied. Finally, this new distribution is shown to be a reasonable fit to the Jander ant data as presented in Fisher (1993.

  13. Perceptual asymmetries and handedness: A neglected link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele eMarzoli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Healthy individuals tend to weigh in more the left than the right side of visual space in a variety of contexts, ranging from pseudoneglect to perceptual asymmetries for faces. Among the common explanations proposed for the attentional and perceptual advantages of the left visual field, a link with the prevalence of right-handedness in humans has never been suggested, although some evidence seems to converge in favor of a bias of spatial attention towards the region most likely coincident with another person’s right hand during a face-to-face interaction. Such a bias might imply an increased efficiency in monitoring both communicative and aggressive acts, the right limb being more used than the left in both types of behaviour. Although attentional and perceptual asymmetries could be linked to right-handedness at the level of phylogeny because of the evolutionarily advantage of directing attention towards the region where others’ dominant hand usually operates, it is also legitimate to question whether, at the ontogenetic level, frequent exposure to right-handed individuals may foster leftward biases. These views are discussed in the light of extant literature, and a number of tests are proposed in order to assess our hypotheses.

  14. Does urban poverty increase body fluctuating asymmetry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozener, Bariş

    2011-12-01

    Perturbations during development leave enduring signs on the adult body. Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) is a good bio-indicator of stress during ontogeny. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of urban poverty on the fluctuating asymmetry of young Turkish males. Young males from a lower socioeconomic group (N = 140, Mean age = 18.17 +/- 0.61) were selected from slum areas of Ankara, the capital of Turkey, where urban poverty is intense. An upper socioeconomic group, on the other hand, consisted of students from two private colleges and included children from some of the richest families in Turkey (N = 120, Mean age = 18.08 +/- 0.54). Eight anthropometric traits of all subjects were measured. Considering the seven measurements demonstrate ideal FA, the individuals living in poor areas of the city displayed higher FA. The discrepancy between the two groups was even greater for a measure of composite FA. In conclusion, poor living conditions in Ankara, where urban poverty is intense, adversely impact the developmental stability of young Turkish males.

  15. A Search for Hemispheric Asymmetry on Triton

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, C. M.; Storrs, A. D.

    2004-12-01

    We will present reconstructed images of Neptune's largest satellite Triton as part of an investigation of hemispheric asymmetry. The images we observed from the Hubble Space Telescope in July of 1997, using the Wide Field/Planetary Camera. The images were taken in several filters: F439W, F555W, and F791W. Image restoration was performed using the MISTRAL program (Mugnier, Fusco, and Conan 2003). We present the ratio between the filters to determine if there is any hemispheric color asymmetry at this time. The photometry of Triton appears normal in this data although Hicks and Buratti (2004) observe Triton to be anomalously red in August of 1997. References: Hicks, M.D., and Buratti, B.J. (2004): "The Spectral Variability of Triton from 1997-2000", Icarus 171 pp. 210-218 Mugnier, L.M., T. Fusco, and J.-M. Conan, 2003. "MISTRAL: a Myopic Edge-Preserving Image Restoration Method. Applicaton to Astronomical Adaptive Optics Corrected Long-Exposure Images." JOSA A (submitted)

  16. 49 CFR 37.131 - Service criteria for complementary paratransit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service criteria for complementary paratransit. 37... FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Paratransit as a Complement to Fixed Route Service § 37.131 Service criteria for complementary paratransit. The following service criteria apply to...

  17. 49 CFR 37.127 - Complementary paratransit service for visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Complementary paratransit service for visitors. 37... FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Paratransit as a Complement to Fixed Route Service § 37.127 Complementary paratransit service for visitors. (a) Each public entity required to provide...

  18. CEREBRAL PALSY AND MUSIC ACHIEVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miodrag L. STOSHLJEVIKJ

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Pupils with cerebral palsy attend elementary education accordind to a regular and special teaching plan and program. Regular school curriculum was reformed in 1992, while special plan and program has not been changed and adapted according to pupil’s needs and capacities. Music is one of the best means of expressing oneself and plays a very important role in the development of every child, the child with cerebral palsy in particular.In order to test the possibility of pupils with cerebral palsy, with and without mental retardation, to apprehend the actual program content, we have conducted research on musical achievement of children with cerebral palsy. During 2007 a research was carried out, on the sample of 27 pupils with cerebral palsy and mild mental retardation who attended classes in the school “Miodrag Matikj”, and a sample of16 students with cerebral palsy without mental retardation who attended the school “Dr. Dragan Hercog” in Belgrade.Results of the research, as well as analysis of music curriculum content, indicated that the capacities of students with cerebral palsy to carry out the curriculum tasks require special approach and methodology. Therefore, we introduced some proposals to overcome the difficulties in fulfilling music curriculum demands of those pupils. We made special emphasis on the use of computer based Assistive technology which facilitates the whole process to a large extent.

  19. Systematization, distribution and territory of the caudal cerebral artery on the brain's surface of the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarílis Díaz de Carvalho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thirty Meleagris gallopavo heads with their neck segments were used. Animals were contained and euthanized with the association of mebezonium iodide, embutramide and tetracaine hydrochloride (T 61, Intervet by intravenous injection. The arterial system was rinsed with cold saline solution (15°C, with 5000IU heparin and filled with red-colored latex. The samples were fixed in 20% formaldehyde for seven days. The brains were removed with a segment of cervical spinal cord and after, the dura-mater was removed and the arteries dissected. The cerebral carotid arteries, after the intercarotid anastomosis, were projected around the hypophysis, until they reached the tuber cinereum and divided into their terminal branches, the caudal branch and the rostral branch. The rostral branch was projected rostrolateralwards and gave off, in sequence, two collateral branches, the caudal cerebral and the middle cerebral arteries and the terminal branch was as cerebroethmoidal artery. The caudal cerebral artery of one antimere formed the interhemispheric artery, which gave off dorsal hemispheric branches to the convex surface of both antimeres. Its dorsal tectal mesencephalic branch, of only one antimere, originated the dorsal cerebellar artery. In the interior of the cerebral transverse fissure, after the origin of the dorsal tectal mesencephalic artery, the caudal cerebral artery emitted occipital hemispheric branches, pineal branches and medial hemispheric branches, on both antimeres. The caudal cerebral artery's territory comprehended the entire surface of the dorsal hemioptic lobe, the rostral surface of the cerebellum, the diencephalic structures, the caudal pole and the medial surface of the cerebral hemisphere and in the convex surface, the sagittal eminence except for its most rostral third. Due to the asymmetry found in the caudal cerebral arteries' ramifications, the models were classified into three types and their respective subtypes.

  20. CEREBRAL PALSY : ANTENATAL RISK FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cerebral palsy (CP is a group of permanent movement disorders that appear in early childhood. Cerebral palsy is caused by abnormal development or damage to the parts of the brain that control movement, balance, and posture. Most often the problems occur during pregnancy; however, they may also occur during childbirth, or shortly after birth. Often the cause is unknown. AIM: To study the different antenatal maternal risk factors associated with cerebral palsy in the study group. MATERIA LS AND METHODS: Retrospective study was done to assess possible associated antenatal risk factors for cerebral palsy. Mothers of 100 cerebral palsy children were selected who are treated in Rani Chandramani Devi Hospital, a Government hospital in Visakhapa tn am, Andhra Pradesh State, India , from 2012 to 2014 and 100 controls, mothers of normal children were studied. Detailed antenatal history was obtained from the mothers of the children in both affected and control group. RESULTS: From the data, we conclude that the association of maternal anaemia with cerebral palsy is 7.3 times higher; association of maternal hypertension with cerebral palsy is 6.6 time higher, association with Pre - eclampsia is 6 times higher; association with Eclampsia is 8.6 times higher ; with antepartum haemorrhage, the association is 8.6 times higher and association of multiple pregnancy with cerebral palsy is 4.8 times higher than with controls. CONCLUSION: From this study of the role of antenatal risk factors, in the occurrence of cer ebral palsy in children it is concluded that the most common risk factor associated with cerebral palsy is the maternal anaemia and the other important risk factors associated being hypertension, pre eclampsia, eclampsia, antepartum haemorrhage and multipl e births.

  1. Complementary versus companion diagnostics: apples and oranges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Christopher-Paul; Bryan, Crystal; Garafalo, Steven; McKiernan, Marie

    2015-01-01

    There have been several major problems that have plagued biopharmaceutical development since the end of the 1990s, but two in particular have reached the point where they are impacting the economic viability of the industry: the lack of efficacy of new drugs and increasing competition among therapeutics that broadly attack certain common diseases and disease areas. The US FDA has noted that the era of one-size-fits-all treatment may well be reaching its end days as companies increasingly adopt approaches that involve biomarkers (there are now commercial databases that purport to track over 11,000 of them). Pharmacogenomic biomarkers in particular are used to create diagnostics that help to differentiate or stratify the likely outcomes a patient will experience with a drug, which can now be said to be targeted or tailored to patients with particular traits (i.e., personalized), leading to an era of so-called precision medicine. As more is understood about diseases and the why and how of their effects on people through advances in biomarkers and genomics, personalized medicine is becoming a natural result of biomedical science and a natural trajectory for the innovation-based biopharmaceutical industry. The focus of this article is to examine an apparent divergence in that trajectory engendered by a growing differentiation in the approaches to personalized medicines in terms of their accompanying diagnostics: companion diagnostics are typically linked to a specific drug within its approved label, while complementary diagnostics are associated more broadly, usually not with a specific drug but with a class of drugs, and not confined to specific uses by labeling, with consequent ramifications for economic, regulatory and strategic considerations.

  2. Nutritional Properties of Enriched Local Complementary Flours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.R. Compaoré

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the nutritional, functional, sensory and microbiological profile of experimental nutritional flours, produced with local products in Burkina Faso. The raw materials included maize (Zea mays, millet (Pennisetum glaucum and rice (Oryza sativa. Local ingredients were pulps of Adansonia digitata and Parkia biglobosa and seeds of Cucurbita maxima and Moringa oleifera. Three formula were developed, the first (F1 with maize, the second (F2 with rice and the last (F3 with millet. Each of these cereals was mixed with predetermined portions of seeds and pulps in order to obtain enriched flour. Nutritional, microbiological and functional analysis and the acceptability criteria of these enriched flours were assessed and compared to Misola (F4, the existing local complementary flour. The fat content of experimental flours were respectively in the first (F1, second (F2 and third formula (F3 15.91±0.01%, 11.82±0.02% and 17.02±0.02%. The carbohydrate range was 65.46±0.06%, 70.81±0.01% and 64.51±0.01% for F1, F2 and F3, while the energetic value is higher than recommended (453.07±0.05, 424.56±0.03 and 458.96±0.05 kcal respectively for F1, F2 and F3. Functional characteristics indicated the good viscosity (117, 119 and 121 mm/30 sec for F1, F2 and F3 least gelation (9, 6 and 7% and water absorption capacity (2, 4 and 1 g/g. Trained sensory evaluation panellists gore the enriched flour porridge a score of acceptable. These enriched flours have great potential as a weaning food in resource-poor and technologically under-developed countries.

  3. Abrasive water jet: a complementary tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte, J. P.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The abrasive water jet is a powerful cutting tool, whose main advantages lie in the absence of thermal effects and the capability of cutting highly thick materials. Compared with Laser, the abrasive water jet allows the cutting of a larger range of thicknesses and a wider variety of materials such as: ornamental stones, metals, polymers, composites, wood, glass and ceramics. The application of this technology has suffered an extensive growth, with successful applications in varied industrial sectors like the automotive, aerospace, textile, metalworking, ornamental stones, etc. The present communication aims at introducing the abrasive water jet as a complementary tool to laser cutting, presenting its advantages by showing some documented examples of pieces cut for different industries.

    O jacto de água abrasivo é uma poderosa ferramenta de corte, tendo como principais vantagens a ausência de processo térmico e permitir o corte de elevadas espessuras. Comparativamente com o laser o jacto de água abrasivo permite cortar uma maior gama de espessuras, e uma maior diversidade de materiais: rochas ornamentais, metais, polimeros, compósitos, madeiras, vidro e cerâmicos. A aplicação desta tecnologia tem sofrido um crescimento acentuado, existindo aplicações de sucesso nos mais variados sectores industriáis como a indústria automóvel, aeroespacial, têxtil, metalomecânica e rochas ornamentáis. Esta comunição pretende apresentar o corte por jacto de agua abrasivo como uma ferramenta de corte complementar ao corte por laser, apresentando as suas vantagens documentadas através de alguns exemplos de peças executadas para as diferentes indústrias.

  4. Case-control study of six genes asymmetrically expressed in the two cerebral hemispheres: association of BAIAP2 with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribasés, Marta; Bosch, Rosa; Hervás, Amaia

    2009-01-01

    -related cognitive processes, including sustained attention, working memory, response inhibition and planning. Although mechanisms underlying cerebral lateralization are unknown, left-right cortical asymmetry has been associated with transcriptional asymmetry at embryonic stages and several genes differentially...... ADHD patients (270 adults and 317 children) and 587 control subjects. RESULTS: The single- and multiple-marker analysis provided evidence for a contribution of BAIAP2 to adulthood ADHD (p = .0026 and p = .0016, respectively). We thus tested BAIAP2 for replication in two independent adult samples from...

  5. Study of trunk asymmetry in normal children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivas, Theodoros B; Vasiliadis, Elias S; Koufopoulos, Georgios; Segos, Dimitrios; Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios; Mouzakis, Vasilios

    2006-11-30

    The scoliometer readings in both standing and sitting position of 2071 children and adolescents (1099 boys and 972 girls) aged from 5 to 18 years old were studied. The angle of trunk rotation (ATR) was measured, in order to quantify the existing trunk asymmetry. Children and adolescents were divided in two groups according to the severity of trunk asymmetry. In the first group asymmetry was 1 to 6 degrees and in the second group was 7 or more degrees. Radiographic and leg length inequality evaluation were also performed in a number of children. The mean frequency of symmetric (ATR = 0 degrees) boys and girls was 67.06% and 65.01% for the standing screening position and 76.5% and 75.1% for the sitting position, respectively. The mean difference of frequency of asymmetry (ATR > 0 degrees) at standing minus sitting forward bending position for boys and girls was 10.22% and 9.37%, respectively. The mean frequency of asymmetry of 7 or more degrees was 3.23% for boys and 3.92% for girls at the standing forward bending position and 1.62% and 2.21% at the sitting, respectively. Girls are found to express higher frequency of asymmetry than boys. Right trunk asymmetry was more common than left. The sitting position is the preferred screening position for examining the rib or loin hump during school screening as it demonstrates the best correlation with the spinal deformity exposing the real trunk asymmetry.

  6. Study of trunk asymmetry in normal children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triantafyllopoulos Georgios

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The scoliometer readings in both standing and sitting position of 2071 children and adolescents (1099 boys and 972 girls aged from 5 to 18 years old were studied. The angle of trunk rotation (ATR was measured, in order to quantify the existing trunk asymmetry. Children and adolescents were divided in two groups according to the severity of trunk asymmetry. In the first group asymmetry was 1 to 6 degrees and in the second group was 7 or more degrees. Radiographic and leg length inequality evaluation were also performed in a number of children. The mean frequency of symmetric (ATR = 0 degrees boys and girls was 67.06% and 65.01% for the standing screening position and 76.5% and 75.1% for the sitting position, respectively. The mean difference of frequency of asymmetry (ATR > 0 degrees at standing minus sitting forward bending position for boys and girls was 10.22% and 9.37%, respectively. The mean frequency of asymmetry of 7 or more degrees was 3.23% for boys and 3.92% for girls at the standing forward bending position and 1.62% and 2.21% at the sitting, respectively. Girls are found to express higher frequency of asymmetry than boys. Right trunk asymmetry was more common than left. The sitting position is the preferred screening position for examining the rib or loin hump during school screening as it demonstrates the best correlation with the spinal deformity exposing the real trunk asymmetry.

  7. On reducing information asymmetry in U.S. health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Oswald A J; Kesavan, Ram; Bernacchi, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Information asymmetry is a significant issue facing the U.S. health care system. In this article, we investigate some methods of reducing this asymmetry. We trace the information asymmetry using the "wicked problem" of the health care distribution system. An information asymmetry reduction method requiring joint responsibilities among health care stakeholders is developed. It is argued that information asymmetry is a contributor to enormous health care inflation. Hence, any reduction in such asymmetry will reduce health care costs. Concepts from both signaling and corrective justice theories are integrated in this article to help reduce the information asymmetry that exists in the U.S. health care system. Getting health care costs in line with other "advanced" nations, is the long-term solution to the wicked problem that currently exists in the U.S. health care system. There is an immediate need for a centralized health care database with adequate provisions for individual privacy. Both processes as well as an outcome-based control system are essential for reducing information asymmetries in the U.S. health care system.

  8. Can Asymmetry of Solar Activity be Extended into Extended Cycle?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    With the use of the Royal Greenwich Observatory data set of sunspot groups, an attempt is made to examine the north-south asymmetry of solar activity in the "extended" solar cycles. It is inferred that the asymmetry established for individual solar cycles does not extend to the "extended" cycles.

  9. Asymmetries of Knowledge and Epistemic Change in Social Gaming Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piirainen-Marsh, Arja; Tainio, Liisa

    2014-01-01

    While a growing number of studies investigate the role of knowledge and interactional management of knowledge asymmetries in conversation analysis, the epistemic organization of multilingual and second language interactions is still largely unexplored. This article addresses this issue by investigating how knowledge asymmetries and changing…

  10. A Point-Wise Quantification of Asymmetry Using Deformation Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Lanche, Stephanie; Darvann, Tron Andre;

    2007-01-01

    sutures, which gives rise to a highly asymmetric growth. Quantification and localisation of this asymmetry is of high value with respect to surgery planning and treatment evaluation. Using the proposed method, asymmetry was calculated in each point of the surface of Crouzon mice and wild-type mice...

  11. Information Asymmetries as Trade Barriers: ISO 9000 Increases International Commerce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potoski, Matthew; Prakash, Aseem

    2009-01-01

    Spatial, cultural, and linguistic barriers create information asymmetries between buyers and sellers that impede international trade. The International Organization for Standardization's ISO 9000 program is designed to reduce these information asymmetries by providing assurance about the product quality of firms that receive its certification.…

  12. Charge asymmetry in the photonic production of charmed mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhnoy, A V

    2006-01-01

    Charge asymmetries for the charm meson production ($D^{*+}$--$D^{*-}$, $D^{*0}$--$\\bar D^{*0}$ and $D^+_s$--$\\bar D^-_s$) have been estimated for the COMPASS kinematic conditions in the framework of perturbative recombination model. Mass corrections have been taken into account in the calculations. The large asymmetry for $D^+_s$--$\\bar D^-_s$ production has been predicted.

  13. Interactions between white matter asymmetry and language during neurodevelopment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Dean, Douglas C; Dirks, Holly; Waskiewicz, Nicole; Lehman, Katie; Jerskey, Beth A; Deoni, Sean C L

    2013-10-09

    The human brain is asymmetric in gross structure as well as functional organization. However, the developmental basis and trajectory of this asymmetry is unclear, and its relationship(s) to functional and cognitive development, especially language, remain to be fully elucidated. During infancy and early childhood, in concert with cortical gray matter growth, underlying axonal bundles become progressively myelinated. This myelination is critical for efficient and coherent interneuronal communication and, as revealed in animal studies, the degree of myelination changes in response to environment and neuronal activity. Using a novel quantitative magnetic resonance imaging method to investigate myelin content in vivo in human infants and young children, we investigated gross asymmetry of myelin in a large cohort of 108 typically developing children between 1 and 6 years of age, hypothesizing that asymmetry would predict language abilities in this cohort. While asymmetry of myelin content was evident in multiple cortical and subcortical regions, language ability was predicted only by leftward asymmetry of caudate and frontal cortex myelin content and rightward asymmetry in the extreme capsule. Importantly, the influence of this asymmetry was found to change with age, suggesting an age-specific influence of structure and myelin on language function. The relationship between language ability and asymmetry of myelin stabilized at ∼4 years, indicating anatomical evidence for a critical time during development before which environmental influence on cognition may be greatest.

  14. Hemispheric Asymmetry in the Efficiency of Attentional Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanowicz, Dariusz; Marzecova, Anna; Jaskowski, Piotr; Wolski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Despite the fact that hemispheric asymmetry of attention has been widely studied, a clear picture of this complex phenomenon is still lacking. The aim of the present study was to provide an efficient and reliable measurement of potential hemispheric asymmetries of three attentional networks, i.e. alerting, orienting and executive attention.…

  15. Nodal signalling and asymmetry of the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signore, Iskra A; Palma, Karina; Concha, Miguel L

    2016-12-19

    The role of Nodal signalling in nervous system asymmetry is still poorly understood. Here, we review and discuss how asymmetric Nodal signalling controls the ontogeny of nervous system asymmetry using a comparative developmental perspective. A detailed analysis of asymmetry in ascidians and fishes reveals a critical context-dependency of Nodal function and emphasizes that bilaterally paired and midline-unpaired structures/organs behave as different entities. We propose a conceptual framework to dissect the developmental function of Nodal as asymmetry inducer and laterality modulator in the nervous system, which can be used to study other types of body and visceral organ asymmetries. Using insights from developmental biology, we also present novel evolutionary hypotheses on how Nodal led the evolution of directional asymmetry in the brain, with a particular focus on the epithalamus. We intend this paper to provide a synthesis on how Nodal signalling controls left-right asymmetry of the nervous system.This article is part of the themed issue 'Provocative questions in left-right asymmetry'.

  16. Fluctuating Asymmetry and General Intelligence: No Genetic or Phenotypic Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wendy; Segal, Nancy L.; Bouchard, Thomas J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) is the non-pathological left-right asymmetry of body traits that are usually left-right symmetrical, such as eye breadths and elbow to wrist lengths in humans, but which can be affected by developmental stressors. It is generally considered throughout biology to be an indicator of developmental instability and thus of…

  17. Disentangling the Relationship between Hemispheric Asymmetry and Cognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirnstein, Marco; Leask, Stuart; Rose, Jonas; Hausmann, Markus

    2010-01-01

    It is widely believed that advantages of hemispheric asymmetries originated in better cognitive processing, hence it is often implied that the relationship between hemispheric asymmetry and cognitive performance is linearly positive: the higher the degree of lateralization in a specific cognitive domain, the better the performance in a…

  18. Asymmetry of White Matter Pathways in Developing Human Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae W; Mitchell, Paul D; Kolasinski, James; Ellen Grant, P; Galaburda, Albert M; Takahashi, Emi

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the emergence of structural asymmetry of white matter tracts during early brain development. We examined whether and when asymmetry in diffusion parameters of limbic and association white matter pathways emerged in humans in 23 brains ranging from 15 gestational weeks (GW) up to 3 years of age (11 ex vivo and 12 in vivo cases) using high-angular resolution diffusion imaging tractography. Age-related development of laterality was not observed in a limbic connectional pathway (cingulum bundle or fornix). Among the studied cortico-cortical association pathways (inferior longitudinal fasciculus [ILF], inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and arcuate fasciculus), only the ILF showed development of age-related laterality emerging as early as the second trimester. Comparisons of ages older and younger than 40 GW revealed a leftward asymmetry in the cingulum bundle volume and a rightward asymmetry in apparent diffusion coefficient and leftward asymmetry in fractional anisotropy in the ILF in ages older than 40 GW. These results suggest that morphometric asymmetry in cortical areas precedes the emergence of white matter pathway asymmetry. Future correlative studies will investigate whether such asymmetry is anatomically/genetically driven or associated with functional stimulation.

  19. INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE ASYMMETRY: AN INDICATOR FOR GLAUCOMA DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha R.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM To investigate the amount of intraocular pressure asymmetry between fellow eyes in patients with and without primary open angle glaucoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a retrospective case control study conducted at a tertiary care hospital of Central India. A single pre-treatment IOP of the primary open angle glaucoma patients was recorded from the Glaucoma Clinic data from Jan 2013 to Dec 2013. The inter-eye IOP asymmetry of these cases was compared with normal subjects without primary open angle glaucoma (POAG. RESULTS There were 84 (POAG glaucoma patients and 168 control subjects in the study. It was observed that 23.8% patients suffering from glaucoma had an asymmetry of 2 mmHg while 20.23% had no asymmetry. Asymmetry as high as >20 mmHg was also seen in glaucomatous patients. Intraocular pressure asymmetry was a significant factor for having glaucoma (Odds ratio, 18.89%; P<0.001. CONCLUSION Inter-eye asymmetry of IOP is a common finding in patients with POAG. There is a direct relationship between the amount of IOP asymmetry between the fellow eyes and the likelihood of having glaucoma.

  20. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, F.; Steudel, H.; Klotz, D.

    1986-02-01

    Since 1982 (Hauser and co-workers), literature has reported focal cerebral tissue charges in AIDS patients whose diagnosis was unclear at first but which could be identified finally as florid toxoplasmosis encephalitis by biopsy and autopsy. It was found that the value of otherwise reliable serological tests (KBR, Sabin-Feldmann tests, etc.) is questionable in patients with severely impaired or incompetent immune systems, and, in particular, that a negative or uncharacteristic test result may not preclude any opportunistic infection process. Furthermore, isolation of Toxoplasma gondii or specific antibodies from the cerebrospinal fluid will be successful in exceptional cases only. In patients with AIDS or lymphadenopathy syndrome, the differential diagnosis will have to include - first and foremost - reactivated toxoplasma infection (not newly acquired, as a rule) if central neurological symptoms occur.

  1. Changes of Cerebral

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To explore the strengthening of acupuncture analgesic mechanism on the level of β-endorphin and proopimelanocortin mRNA expression in the arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus in rats following electroacupuncture(EA) combined with melatonin (MEL). Methods: Integrated optical density (IOD) was measured by ABC immuno-histochemical and in situ hybridization technique with computerized image processing. The rat's brain was coronally sectioned after combination of EA and MEL. Results: IOD of β-endorphin-like immunopositive substance in rat's brain was lowered significantly, which was measured after MEL (60 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally and followed by EA 30 min later for 30 min, and the IOD of cerebral POMC mRNA positive substance increased significantly 10 hrs later. Conclusion:The mechanism of MEL in enhancing EA analgesic effect might be related with the release and synthesis of β-endorphin

  2. Cerebral Arterial Fenestrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Daniel L; Stout, Charles E; Kim, Warren T; Kansagra, Akash P; Yu, John Paul; Gu, Amy; Jewell, Nicholas P; Hetts, Steven W; Higashida, Randall T; Dowd, Christopher F; Halbach, Van V

    2014-01-01

    Summary Arterial fenestrations are an anatomic variant with indeterminate significance. Given the controversy surrounding fenestrations we sought their prevalence within our practice along with their association with other cerebrovascular anomalies. We retrospectively reviewed 10,927 patients undergoing digital subtraction angiography between 1992 and 2011. Dictated reports were searched for the terms “fenestration” or “fenestrated” with images reviewed for relevance, yielding 228 unique cases. A Medline database search from February 1964 to January 2013 generated 304 citations, 127 cases of which were selected for analysis. Cerebral arterial fenestrations were identified in 228 patients (2.1%). At least one aneurysm was noted in 60.5% of patients, with an aneurysm arising from the fenestration in 19.6% of patients. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage or non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were present in 60.1% and 15.8%, respectively. For the subset of patients with an aneurysm arising directly from a fenestration relative to those patients with an aneurysm not immediately associated with a fenestration, the prevalence of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage was 66.7% vs. 58.6% (p = 0.58). Fenestrations were more often within the posterior circulation (73.2%) than the anterior circulation (24.6%), though there was no difference in the prevalence of aneurysms within these groups (61.1% vs. 60.7%, p = 1.0). Cerebral arterial fenestrations are an anatomic variant more often manifesting at the anterior communicating arterial complex and basilar artery and with no definite pathological relationship with aneurysms. PMID:24976087

  3. Magnetic fields and chiral asymmetry in the early hot universe

    CERN Document Server

    Sidorenko, Maxim; Shtanov, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study analytically the process of external generation and subsequent free evolution of the lepton chiral asymmetry and helical magnetic fields in the early hot universe. This process is known to be affected by the Abelian anomaly of the electroweak gauge interactions. As a consequence, chiral asymmetry in the fermion distribution generates magnetic fields of non-zero helicity, and vice versa. We take into account the presence of thermal bath, which serves as a seed for the development of instability in magnetic field in the presence of externally generated lepton chiral asymmetry. The developed helical magnetic field and lepton chiral asymmetry support each other, considerably prolonging their mutual existence, in the process of 'inverse cascade' transferring magnetic-field power from small to large spatial scales. For cosmologically interesting initial conditions, the chiral asymmetry and the energy density of helical magnetic field are shown to evolve by scaling laws, effectively depending...

  4. Forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orbaker, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; et. al.

    2011-12-12

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions in the final state containing a lepton and at least four jets. Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure the t{bar t} forward-backward asymmetry to be (9.2 {+-} 3.7)% at the reconstruction level. When corrected for detector acceptance and resolution, the asymmetry is found to be (19.6 {+-} 6.5)%. We also measure a corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from a top quark decay, found to be (15.2 {+-} 4.0)%. The results are compared to predictions based on the next-to-leading-order QCD generator mc@nlo. The sensitivity of the measured and predicted asymmetries to the modeling of gluon radiation is discussed.

  5. Conceptual and data-based investigation of genetic influences and brain asymmetry: a twin study of multiple structural phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyler, Lisa T; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Panizzon, Matthew S; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Neale, Michael C; Chen, Chi-Hua; Jak, Amy; Franz, Carol E; Lyons, Michael J; Thompson, Wesley K; Spoon, Kelly M; Fischl, Bruce; Dale, Anders M; Kremen, William S

    2014-05-01

    Right-left regional cerebral differences are a feature of the human brain linked to functional abilities, aging, and neurodevelopmental and mental disorders. The role of genetic factors in structural asymmetry has been incompletely studied. We analyzed data from 515 individuals (130 monozygotic twin pairs, 97 dizygotic pairs, and 61 unpaired twins) from the Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging to answer three questions about genetic determinants of brain structural asymmetry: First, does the magnitude of heritability differ for homologous regions in each hemisphere? Despite adequate power to detect regional differences, heritability estimates were not significantly larger in one hemisphere versus the other, except left > right inferior lateral ventricle heritability. Second, do different genetic factors influence left and right hemisphere size in homologous regions? Interhemispheric genetic correlations were high and significant; in only two subcortical regions (pallidum and accumbens) did the estimate statistically differ from 1.0. Thus, there was little evidence for different genetic influences on left and right hemisphere regions. Third, to what extent do genetic factors influence variability in left-right size differences? There was no evidence that variation in asymmetry (i.e., the size difference) of left and right homologous regions was genetically determined, except in pallidum and accumbens. Our findings suggest that genetic factors do not play a significant role in determining individual variation in the degree of regional cortical size asymmetries measured with MRI, although they may do so for volume of some subcortical structures. Despite varying interpretations of existing data, we view the present results as consistent with previous findings.

  6. Anestesia e paralisia cerebral Anestesia y parálisis cerebral Anesthesia and cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Március Vinícius M Maranhão

    2005-01-01

    JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A paralisia cerebral (PC) é uma doença não progressiva decorrente de lesão no sistema nervoso central, levando a um comprometimento motor do paciente. O portador de PC freqüentemente é submetido a procedimentos cirúrgicos devido a doenças usuais e situações particulares decorrentes da paralisia cerebral. Foi objetivo deste artigo revisar aspectos da paralisia cerebral de interesse para o anestesiologista, permitindo um adequado manuseio pré, intra e pós-operatório n...

  7. Neuromodulation of cerebral blood flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Laan, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Dit proefschrift behandelt de modulatie van de cerebrale doorbloeding (cerebral blood flow, CBF) door cervicale elektrische stimulatie en de aanname dat het sympathisch zenuwstelsel hierin een specifieke rol speelt. Enkele resultaten met cervicale ruggenmergsstimulatie (spinal cord stimulation, SCS)

  8. Learn More About Cerebral Palsy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-03-30

    This podcast describes the causes, preventions, types, and signs and symptoms of cerebral palsy.  Created: 3/30/2008 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities.   Date Released: 3/21/2008.

  9. Cerebral Laterality and Verbal Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Jay L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Research suggests that we process information by way of two distinct and functionally separate coding systems. Their location, somewhat dependent on cerebral laterality, varies in right- and left-handed persons. Tests this dual coding model. (Editor/RK)

  10. Assessing and conceptualizing frontal EEG asymmetry: An updated primer on recording, processing, analyzing, and interpreting frontal alpha asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ezra E; Reznik, Samantha J; Stewart, Jennifer L; Allen, John J B

    2017-01-01

    Frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha asymmetry is widely researched in studies of emotion, motivation, and psychopathology, yet it is a metric that has been quantified and analyzed using diverse procedures, and diversity in procedures muddles cross-study interpretation. The aim of this article is to provide an updated tutorial for EEG alpha asymmetry recording, processing, analysis, and interpretation, with an eye towards improving consistency of results across studies. First, a brief background in alpha asymmetry findings is provided. Then, some guidelines for recording, processing, and analyzing alpha asymmetry are presented with an emphasis on the creation of asymmetry scores, referencing choices, and artifact removal. Processing steps are explained in detail, and references to MATLAB-based toolboxes that are helpful for creating and investigating alpha asymmetry are noted. Then, conceptual challenges and interpretative issues are reviewed, including a discussion of alpha asymmetry as a mediator/moderator of emotion and psychopathology. Finally, the effects of two automated component-based artifact correction algorithms-MARA and ADJUST-on frontal alpha asymmetry are evaluated.

  11. Single-Spin Asymmetries at CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakian, Harutyun

    2003-05-01

    Single spin asymmetries (SSA) are crucial tools in the study of the spin structure of hadrons in pion electroproduction, since they are directly related to some hot topics,including transverse polarization distribution functions, fragmentation of polarized quarks and generalized parton distribution functions. At low beam energies, when the virtual photon has a relatively large angle with respect to the initial spin direction, the measured single-target spin-dependent sin φ moment in the cross section for the longitudinally polarized target contain contributions from the target spin components, both longitudinal and transverse with respect to the photon direction.This contribution presents preliminary results from Jefferson Lab's CLAS detector on beam and target SSA in pion azimuthal distributions in one particle inclusive electroproduction in the DIS regime (Q2 > 1GeV 2,W > 2GeV ) off a polarized NH3 target.

  12. Leptophilic Dark Matter from the Lepton Asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    We present a model of weak scale Dark Matter (DM) where the thermal DM density is set by the lepton asymmetry due to the presence of higher dimension lepton violating operators. In these models there is generically a separation between the annihilation cross-section responsible for the relic abundance (through lepton violating operators) and the annihilation cross-section that is relevant for the indirect detection of DM (through lepton preserving operators). Due to this separation, there is a perceived boost in the annihilation cross-section in the galaxy today relative to that derived for canonical thermal freeze-out. This results in a natural explanation for the observed cosmic ray electron and positron excesses, without resorting to a Sommerfeld enhancement. Generating the indirect signals also sets the magnitude of the direct detection cross-section which implies a signal for the next generation of experiments. More generically these models motivate continued searches for DM with apparently non-thermal a...

  13. Dark Atoms: Asymmetry and Direct Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, David E. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Krnjaic, Gordan Z. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rehermann, Keith R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Wells, Christopher M. [Houghton College, NY (United States)

    2011-10-01

    We present a simple UV completion of Atomic Dark Matter (aDM) in which heavy right-handed neutrinos decay to induce both dark and lepton number densities. This model addresses several outstanding cosmological problems: the matter/anti-matter asymmetry, the dark matter abundance, the number of light degrees of freedom in the early universe, and the smoothing of small-scale structure. Additionally, this realization of aDM may reconcile the CoGeNT excess with recently published null results and predicts a signal in the CRESST Oxygen band. We also find that, due to unscreened long-range interactions, the residual un recombined dark ions settle into a diffuse isothermal halo.

  14. Asymmetry of atmospheric microstructure over synoptic scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Worthington

    Full Text Available Distortions are often seen in the angular distribution of echo-power from VHF wind-profiling radars, suggesting that thin stable layers, within the air flow, are distorted and tilted from horizontal. In vertical shear of the horizontal wind, the distribution of the layer tilt angles becomes skewed. A case study using six days of VHF radar data and synoptic charts above western Europe indicates that this asymmetry of atmospheric microstructure can exist throughout the troposphere and lower stratosphere, above and below the jet wind maximum, over horizontal scales of thousands of kilometres.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; synoptic-scale meteorology; turbulence.

  15. Baryon asymmetry from primordial black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hamada, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new scenario of the baryogenesis from primordial black holes (PBH). Assuming presence of a microscopic baryon (or lepton) number violation and a CP violating operator such as $\\partial_\\alpha F(\\mathcal{R_{....}} ) J^\\alpha$ where $F(\\mathcal{R_{....}})$ is a scalar function of the Riemann tensor, time evolution of an evaporating black hole generates baryonic (leptonic) chemical potential at the horizon; consequently PBH enumerates asymmetric Hawking radiation between baryons (leptons) and anti-baryons (leptons). Though the operator is higher dimensional and largely suppressed by a high mass scale $M_*$, we show that sufficient amount of asymmetry can be generated for wide range of parameters of the PBH mass $M_{\\rm PBH}$, its abundance $\\Omega_{\\rm PBH}$, and the scale $M_*$.

  16. Single Spin Asymmetry in Charmonium Production

    CERN Document Server

    Godbole, Rohini M; Misra, Anuradha; Rawoot, Vaibhav S

    2014-01-01

    We present estimates of Single Spin Asymmetry (SSA) in the electroproduction of $J/\\psi$ taking into account the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) evolution of the gluon Sivers function and using Color Evaporation Model of charmonium production. We estimate SSA for JLab, HERMES, COMPASS and eRHIC energies using recent parameters for the quark Sivers functions which are fitted using an evolution kernel in which the perturbative part is resummed up to next-to-leading logarithms (NLL) accuracy. We find that these SSAs are much smaller as compared to our first estimates obtained using DGLAP evolution but are comparable to our estimates obtained using TMD evolution where we had used approximate analytical solution of the TMD evolution equation for the purpose.

  17. Dark Matter and the Baryon Asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Farrar, G R; Farrar, Glennys R.; Zaharijas, Gabrijela

    2006-01-01

    We present a mechanism to generate the baryon asymmetry of the Universe which preserves the net baryon number created in the Big Bang. If dark matter particles carry baryon number $B_X$, and $\\sigma^{\\rm annih}_{\\bar{X}} < \\sigma^{\\rm annih}_{X} $, the $\\bar{X}$'s freeze out at a higher temperature and have a larger relic density than $X$'s. If $m_X \\lsi 4.5 B_X $GeV and the annihilation cross sections differ by $\\mathcal{O}$(10%) or more, this type of scenario naturally explains the observed $\\Omega_{DM} \\approx 5 \\Omega_b$. Two concrete examples are given, one of which can be excluded on observational grounds.

  18. A Combinatorial Approach to Time Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Tamm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, simple models for the multiverse are analyzed. Each universe is viewed as a path in a graph, and by considering very general statistical assumptions, essentially originating from Boltzmann, we can make the set of all such paths into a finite probability space. We can then also attempt to compute the probabilities for different kinds of behavior and in particular under certain conditions argue that an asymmetric behavior of the entropy should be much more probable than a symmetric one. This offers an explanation for the asymmetry of time as a broken symmetry in the multiverse. The focus here is on simple models which can be analyzed using methods from combinatorics. Although the computational difficulties rapidly become enormous when the size of the model grows, this still gives hints about how a full-scale model should behave.

  19. Heritability of Directional Asymmetry in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley J. R. Carter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Directional asymmetry (DA, the consistent difference between a pair of morphological structures in which the same side is always larger than the other, presents an evolutionary mystery. Although many paired traits show DA, genetic variation for DA has not been unambiguously demonstrated. Artificial selection is a powerful technique for uncovering selectable genetic variation; we review and critique the limited number of previous studies that have been performed to select on DA and present the results of a novel artificial selection experiment on the DA of posterior crossvein location in Drosophila wings. Fifteen generations of selection in two genetically distinct lines were performed and none of the lines showed a significant response to selection. Our results therefore support and reconfirm previous findings; despite apparent natural variation and evolution of DA in nature, DA remains a paradoxical trait that does not respond to artificial selection.

  20. Lepton asymmetry and neutrino oscillations interplay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirilova, Daniela, E-mail: dani@astro.bas.bg [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Astronomy and NAO (Bulgaria)

    2013-03-15

    We discuss the interplay between lepton asymmetry L and {nu} oscillations in the early Universe. Neutrino oscillations may suppress or enhance previously existing L. On the other hand L is capable to suppress or enhance neutrino oscillations. The mechanism of L enhancement in MSW resonant {nu} oscillations in the early Universe is numerically analyzed. L cosmological effects through {nu} oscillations are discussed. We discuss how L may change the cosmological BBN constraints on neutrino and show that BBN model with {nu}{sub e}{r_reversible}{nu}{sub s} oscillations is extremely sensitive to L - it allows to obtain the most stringent constraints on L value. We discuss also the cosmological role of active-sterile {nu} mixing and L in connection with the indications about additional relativistic density in the early Universe, pointed out by BBN, CMB and LSS data and the analysis of global {nu} data.

  1. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaabane, M.; Ladeb, M.F.; Bouhaouala, M.H.; Ben Hammouda, M.; Ataalah, R.; Gannouni, A.; Krifa, H.

    1989-07-01

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.).

  2. Parálisis cerebral :

    OpenAIRE

    Giral Lamenca, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Se aborda el tema de la parálisis cerebral definiendo qué es, clasificando los tipos de parálisis dependiendo de la afectación y las características principales. Se explican algunos de sus tratamientos, se dan sistemas alternativos y/o aumentativos de comunicación para un alumno con PC (parálisis cerebral).

  3. The dynamic behaviors of complementary correlations under decoherence channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ming-Ming; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2017-01-01

    Complementary correlations can reveal the genuine quantum correlations present in a composite quantum system. Here, we explore an effective method to identify the entangled Bell diagonal states by means of Pearson correlation, one of the complementary correlations. Then, we extend this method to expose the dynamic behavior of complementary correlations under various kinds of decoherence channels. The sudden death and revival of entanglement can be explained by the idea of Pearson correlation. The threshold that is used to identify entanglement is proposed. Furthermore, we put forward a new method to expound the underlying physical mechanisms for which classical and quantum correlations suffer a sudden change in the decoherence process.

  4. Moral injury: A new challenge for complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacz, Marek S; Connery, April L; Bishop, Todd M; Bryan, Craig J; Drescher, Kent D; Currier, Joseph M; Pigeon, Wilfred R

    2016-02-01

    Moral injury represents an emerging clinical construct recognized as a source of morbidity in current and former military personnel. Finding effective ways to support those affected by moral injury remains a challenge for both biomedical and complementary and alternative medicine. This paper introduces the concept of moral injury and suggests two complementary and alternative medicine, pastoral care and mindfulness, which may prove useful in supporting military personnel thought to be dealing with moral injury. Research strategies for developing an evidence-base for applying these, and other, complementary and alternative medicine modalities to moral injury are discussed.

  5. Therapeutic implications of melatonin in cerebral edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnasamy, Gurugirijha; Ling, Eng-Ang; Kaur, Charanjit

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral edema/brain edema refers to the accumulation of fluid in the brain and is one of the fatal conditions that require immediate medical attention. Cerebral edema develops as a consequence of cerebral trauma, cerebral infarction, hemorrhages, abscess, tumor, hypoxia, and other toxic or metabolic factors. Based on the causative factors cerebral edema is differentiated into cytotoxic cerebral edema, vasogenic cerebral edema, osmotic and interstitial cerebral edema. Treatment of cerebral edema depends on timely diagnosis and medical assistance. Pragmatic treatment strategies such as antihypertensive medications, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, barbiturates, steroids, glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists and trometamol are used in clinical practice. Although the above mentioned treatment approaches are being used, owing to the complexity of the mechanisms involved in cerebral edema, a single therapeutic strategy which could ameliorate cerebral edema is yet to be identified. However, recent experimental studies have suggested that melatonin, a neurohormone produced by the pineal gland, could be an effective alternative for treating cerebral edema. In animal models of stroke, melatonin was not only shown to reduce cerebral edema but also preserved the blood brain barrier. Melatonin's beneficial effects were attributed to its properties, such as being a potent anti-oxidant, and its ability to cross the blood brain barrier within minutes after its administration. This review summarizes the beneficial effects of melatonin when used for treating cerebral edema.

  6. Using asymmetry observables to discover and distinguish Z' signals in top pair production with the lepton-plus-jets final state at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cerrito, Lucio; Moretti, Stefano; Spanò, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of top pair production with six-fermion decay at the LHC to the presence and nature of an underlying Z' boson, accounting for full tree-level Standard Model ttbar interference, with all intermediate particles allowed off-shell. We concentrate on the lepton-plus-jets final state and simulate experimental conditions, including kinematic requirements and top quark pair reconstruction in the presence of missing transverse energy and combinatorial ambiguity in jet-top assignment. We focus on the differential mass spectra of the cross section and asymmetry observables, especially demonstrating the use of the latter in probing the coupling structure of a new neutral resonance, in addition to cases in which the asymmetry forms a complementary discovery observable.

  7. Hα Line Profile Asymmetries and the Chromospheric Flare Velocity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Simões, P. J. A.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Carlsson, M.; Jafarzadeh, S.; Allred, J. C.; Kowalski, A. F.; Kennedy, M.; Fletcher, L.; Graham, D.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-11-01

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Hα and Ca ii λ8542 lines are studied using high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Hα line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca ii λ8542 line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesize spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Hα is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, we conclude that the steep velocity gradients in the flaring chromosphere modify the wavelength of the central reversal in the Hα line profile. The shift in the wavelength of maximum opacity to shorter and longer wavelengths generates the red and blue asymmetries, respectively.

  8. Magnetic fields and chiral asymmetry in the early hot universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydorenko, Maksym; Tomalak, Oleksandr; Shtanov, Yuri

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study analytically the process of external generation and subsequent free evolution of the lepton chiral asymmetry and helical magnetic fields in the early hot universe. This process is known to be affected by the Abelian anomaly of the electroweak gauge interactions. As a consequence, chiral asymmetry in the fermion distribution generates magnetic fields of non-zero helicity, and vice versa. We take into account the presence of thermal bath, which serves as a seed for the development of instability in magnetic field in the presence of externally generated lepton chiral asymmetry. The developed helical magnetic field and lepton chiral asymmetry support each other, considerably prolonging their mutual existence, in the process of `inverse cascade' transferring magnetic-field power from small to large spatial scales. For cosmologically interesting initial conditions, the chiral asymmetry and the energy density of helical magnetic field are shown to evolve by scaling laws, effectively depending on a single combined variable. In this case, the late-time asymptotics of the conformal chiral chemical potential reproduces the universal scaling law previously found in the literature for the system under consideration. This regime is terminated at lower temperatures because of scattering of electrons with chirality change, which exponentially washes out chiral asymmetry. We derive an expression for the termination temperature as a function of the chiral asymmetry and energy density of helical magnetic field.

  9. Shifting brain asymmetry: the link between meditation and structural lateralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Florian; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan; Toga, Arthur W; Luders, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed an increased fractional anisotropy and greater thickness in the anterior parts of the corpus callosum in meditation practitioners compared with control subjects. Altered callosal features may be associated with an altered inter-hemispheric integration and the degree of brain asymmetry may also be shifted in meditation practitioners. Therefore, we investigated differences in gray matter asymmetry as well as correlations between gray matter asymmetry and years of meditation practice in 50 long-term meditators and 50 controls. We detected a decreased rightward asymmetry in the precuneus in meditators compared with controls. In addition, we observed that a stronger leftward asymmetry near the posterior intraparietal sulcus was positively associated with the number of meditation practice years. In a further exploratory analysis, we observed that a stronger rightward asymmetry in the pregenual cingulate cortex was negatively associated with the number of practice years. The group difference within the precuneus, as well as the positive correlations with meditation years in the pregenual cingulate cortex, suggests an adaptation of the default mode network in meditators. The positive correlation between meditation practice years and asymmetry near the posterior intraparietal sulcus may suggest that meditation is accompanied by changes in attention processing.

  10. Replenishment success linked to fluctuating asymmetry in larval fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberget, Tove; McCormick, Mark I

    2009-02-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA), defined as random deviations from perfect symmetry, has become a popular tool with which to examine the effects of stress during the development of bilaterally symmetrical organisms. Recent studies have suggested that FA in otoliths may serve as an indicator of stress in fish larvae. We examined the relationship between otolith asymmetry and temporal patterns in the occurrence of late-stage larvae to a tropical reef (i.e. replenishment) for the Caribbean lizardfish, Saurida suspicio (family Synodontidae). Late-stage larvae were collected in light traps over a period of 18 consecutive lunar months in the San Blas Archipelago, Panama. Asymmetry within otolith pairs was calculated from 24 variables: area, perimeter, longest and shortest axis of the otolith and 20 shape descriptors (Fourier harmonics). Otolith asymmetry was correlated strongly with fluctuations in lunar light trap catches. Two measured variables, otolith area and one of the 20 shape descriptors, accounted for 60% of the variability in lunar replenishment of S. suspicio. Individuals from small replenishment pulses exhibited higher levels of asymmetry compared to larvae from large pulses. When dry and wet seasons were analysed separately, otolith asymmetry explained a surprising 70 and 97% of the variation, respectively. Although the generality of these results remain to be tested among other populations and species, otolith asymmetry may be an important indicator, and potentially a predictor, of larval quality and replenishment success.

  11. Interplay among transversity induced asymmetries in hadron leptoproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Adolph

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the fragmentation of a transversely polarized quark several left–right asymmetries are possible for the hadrons in the jet. When only one unpolarized hadron is selected, it exhibits an azimuthal modulation known as the Collins effect. When a pair of oppositely charged hadrons is observed, three asymmetries can be considered, a di-hadron asymmetry and two single hadron asymmetries. In lepton deep inelastic scattering on transversely polarized nucleons all these asymmetries are coupled with the transversity distribution. From the high statistics COMPASS data on oppositely charged hadron-pair production we have investigated for the first time the dependence of these three asymmetries on the difference of the azimuthal angles of the two hadrons. The similarity of transversity induced single and di-hadron asymmetries is discussed. A new analysis of the data allows quantitative relationships to be established among them, providing for the first time strong experimental indication that the underlying fragmentation mechanisms are all driven by a common physical process.

  12. Breast asymmetry pattern in women with idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Norma I; Korchin, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Breast asymmetry is frequent in women with idiopathic scoliosis. To understand the pattern of breast asymmetry in these women a clinical study was performed in which 54 female patients with idiopathic scoliosis were evaluated. The information recorded for each patient included: age, weight, height, scoliosis type, Cobb angle, breast measurements, and presence of rib cage asymmetry. Breast volume was calculated using anatomic measurements (anthropomorphic method). The mean age of the group was 25 +/- 7 years. A right convex thoracic curve occurred in 85%, with a mean Cobb angle of 32 +/- 15 degrees. Our study indicated that women with idiopathic scoliosis consistently presented breast asymmetry that followed a predictable pattern. The breast on the side of the convex thoracic scoliosis curve is always smaller in volume (mean difference 59 +/- 39 mi). The affected side also presents a smaller areola, a higher position of the nipple (mean difference 2.2 +/- 1.3 cm) and a higher position of the inframammary fold (mean difference 2.1 +/- 1.4 cm) when compared to the opposite breast. Though the asymmetry is predictable, the degree to which the patient presents these changes does not correlate with the severity of the scoliosis (Cobb angle). We believe that the severity of the asymmetry is a result of the difference between the hypoplastic breast and the normal breasts. In women with very large opposite breasts the asymmetry appears to be worse.

  13. Cerebral edema associated with acute hepatic failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiwara,Masachika

    1985-02-01

    Full Text Available The clinicopathological findings of cerebral edema were investigated in patients with acute hepatic failure autopsied at Okayama University Hospital between 1970 and 1980 retrospectively. Nine (64% of 14 hepatic failure cases were found to have cerebral edema during a post-mortem examination of the brain. Clinical features of the patients with cerebral edema were not significantly different from those of the patients without cerebral edema. However, general convulsions were observed more frequently in patients later found to have cerebral edema. Moreover, the length of time from deep coma to death was much shorter in the brain edema cases with cerebral herniation than without herniation.

  14. Monitoring Cerebral Oxygenation in Neonates: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Laura Marie Louise; van Bel, Frank; Lemmers, Petra Maria Anna

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral oxygenation is not always reflected by systemic arterial oxygenation. Therefore, regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) monitoring with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is of added value in neonatal intensive care. rScO2 represents oxygen supply to the brain, while cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction, which is the ratio between rScO2 and systemic arterial oxygen saturation, reflects cerebral oxygen utilization. The balance between oxygen supply and utilization provides insight in neonatal cerebral (patho-)physiology. This review highlights the potential and limitations of cerebral oxygenation monitoring with NIRS in the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:28352624

  15. Extent of structural asymmetry in homodimeric proteins: prevalence and relevance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmipuram Seshadri Swapna

    Full Text Available Most homodimeric proteins have symmetric structure. Although symmetry is known to confer structural and functional advantage, asymmetric organization is also observed. Using a non-redundant dataset of 223 high-resolution crystal structures of biologically relevant homodimers, we address questions on the prevalence and significance of asymmetry. We used two measures to quantify global and interface asymmetry, and assess the correlation of several molecular and structural parameters with asymmetry. We have identified rare cases (11/223 of biologically relevant homodimers with pronounced global asymmetry. Asymmetry serves as a means to bring about 2:1 binding between the homodimer and another molecule; it also enables cellular signalling arising from asymmetric macromolecular ligands such as DNA. Analysis of these cases reveals two possible mechanisms by which possible infinite array formation is prevented. In case of homodimers associating via non-topologically equivalent surfaces in their tertiary structures, ligand-dependent mechanisms are used. For stable dimers binding via large surfaces, ligand-dependent structural change regulates polymerisation/depolymerisation; for unstable dimers binding via smaller surfaces that are not evolutionarily well conserved, dimerisation occurs only in the presence of the ligand. In case of homodimers associating via interaction surfaces with parts of the surfaces topologically equivalent in the tertiary structures, steric hindrance serves as the preventive mechanism of infinite array. We also find that homodimers exhibiting grossly symmetric organization rarely exhibit either perfect local symmetry or high local asymmetry. Binding of small ligands at the interface does not cause any significant variation in interface asymmetry. However, identification of biologically relevant interface asymmetry in grossly symmetric homodimers is confounded by the presence of similar small magnitude changes caused due to

  16. Face-brain asymmetry in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, P; Forster-Gibson, C; Chudley, A E; Allanson, J E; Hutton, T J; Farrell, S A; McKenzie, J; Holden, J J A; Lewis, M E S

    2008-06-01

    The heterogeneity of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) confounds attempts to identify causes and pathogenesis. Identifiable endophenotypes and reliable biomarkers within ASDs would help to focus molecular research and uncover genetic causes and developmental mechanisms. We used dense surface-modelling techniques to compare the facial morphology of 72 boys with ASD and 128 first-degree relatives to that of 254 unrelated controls. Pattern-matching algorithms were able to discriminate between the faces of ASD boys and those of matched controls (AUC=0.82) and also discriminate between the faces of unaffected mothers of ASD children and matched female controls (AUC=0.76). We detected significant facial asymmetry in boys with ASD (Pbrain. Unaffected mothers of children with ASD display similar significant facial asymmetry, more exaggerated than that in matched controls (Pasymmetry of the periorbital region. Unaffected fathers of children with ASD did not show facial asymmetry to a significant degree compared to controls. Two thirds of unaffected male siblings tested were classified unseen as more facially similar to unrelated boys with ASD than to unrelated controls. These unaffected male siblings and two small groups of girls with ASD and female siblings, all show overall directional asymmetry, but without achieving statistical significance in two-tailed t-tests of individual asymmetry of ASD family and matched control groups. We conclude that previously identified right dominant asymmetry of the frontal poles of boys with ASD could explain their facial asymmetry through the direct effect of brain growth. The atypical facial asymmetry of unaffected mothers of children with ASD requires further brain studies before the same explanation can be proposed. An alternative explanation, not mutually exclusive, is a simultaneous and parallel action on face and brain growth by genetic factors. Both possibilities suggest the need for coordinated face and brain studies on ASD

  17. Age and Practice Effects on Inter-manual Performance Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Francis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Manual dexterity declines with increasing age however, the way in which inter-manual asymmetry responds to aging is unclear. Our purpose was to determine the effect of age and practice on inter-manual performance asymmetry in an isometric force pinch line tracing task that varied in difficulty within segments. Thirty right handed participants, 5 males and 5 females in each of three age groups, young (Y20, young-old (O70, and old-old (O80, practiced an isometric force pinch task for 10 trials with each hand on each of five consecutive days. Inter-manual performance asymmetry of the right and left hands was analyzed with a repeated measures ANOVA of asymmetry with age groups, practice, task difficulty, and hand as factors. The within-individual magnitude of asymmetry was also analyzed with a repeated measures ANOVA of manual asymmetry calculated as an asymmetry index (AI. Post hoc pair-wise comparisons were performed when significance was found. We observed no inter-manual performance asymmetry on this isometric tracing task among any of the age groups, either in the hand performance differences or in the magnitude of the asymmetry index (AI. Age and practice interacted in terms of manual performance: the Y20 and O70 group improved accuracy and task time across the five days of practice but the O80 group did not. However, practice did not differentially affect the AI for accuracy or task time for any group. Accuracy of performance of the two hands was differentially affected by practice. All age groups exhibited poorer performance and larger AIs on the most difficult segments of the task (3 and 6 and this did not change with practice.

  18. The initiation of complementary feeding among Qom indigenous people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irene Olmedo, Sofía; Valeggia, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    As of six months of life, breastfeeding no longer covers an infant’s energy or micronutrient needs, so appropriate complementary feeding should be provided. The objective of this study was to assess the time and adequacy for introducing complementary feeding in a Qom/Toba population and analyze the sociocultural concepts of families regarding complementary feeding. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected by participant observation and semistructured surveys administered to mothers of 0–2 year old infants. Qom breastfeed their infants long term and on demand. Most infants have an adequate nutritional status and start complementary feeding at around 6 months old as per the local health center and international standards. However, mostly due to socioeconomic factors, foods chosen to complement breastfeeding have a relatively scarce nutritional value. PMID:24862808

  19. Contextualising complementary feeding in a broader framework for stunting prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Christine P; Iannotti, Lora; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2013-01-01

    An estimated 165 million children are stunted due to the combined effects of poor nutrition, repeated infection and inadequate psychosocial stimulation. The complementary feeding period, generally corresponding to age 6-24 months, represents an important period of sensitivity to stunting...... with lifelong, possibly irrevocable consequences. Interventions to improve complementary feeding practices or the nutritional quality of complementary foods must take into consideration the contextual as well as proximal determinants of stunting. This review presents a conceptual framework that highlights...... the role of complementary feeding within the layers of contextual and causal factors that lead to stunted growth and development and the resulting short- and long-term consequences. Contextual factors are organized into the following groups: political economy; health and health care systems; education...

  20. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Treatments and Pediatric Psychopharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Joseph M.; Walter, Garry; Soh, Nerissa

    2008-01-01

    Children and adolescents often use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments outside their indications, particularly to lose weight. Some of the herbal remedies and dietary supplements that may of relevance for psychopharmacological practice are discussed with respect to CAM treatments.

  1. Critical review of complementary therapies in haemato-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joske, D J L; Rao, A; Kristjanson, L

    2006-09-01

    There is evidence of the increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine by Australians diagnosed with cancer. Given the increasing desire of cancer patients to use complementary and alternative medicine, it is important that clinicians have a good understanding of the evidence available in this field. This critical review aims to provide an overview of the current evidence pertaining to a range of complementary therapies that are used in a supportive role in the treatment of cancer patients. Treatment methods considered are acupuncture, music therapy, massage and touch therapies and psychological interventions. The efficacy of these complementary therapies in terms of improvement in symptoms and quality of life is examined. Evidence that relates to an effect on immune function and survival is also investigated.

  2. THE PECULIARITIES OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Kulikov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study extra- and intracranial hemodynamics in patients with chronic hepatitis of different activity.Material and methods. Ultrasonography of the cerebral blood flow was performed in 576 patients with chronic hepatitis.Results. Contralateral hemyspherical asymmetry (more than 30 % of the maximum linear rate of blood flow in the medium cerebral arteries and decrease in resistance index (0,55±0,09 and pulsativity index (1,34±0,66 were found in 33,8 % of patients with chronic hepatitis of high activity. Collateral blood flow reduction through connecting arteries of Willis circle was revealed in 13,8 % of patients. The tortuosity of arteries and thickening of intima-media complex was found in patients with chronic hepatitis (mainly of high activity. It leads to decline of cerebral blood flow.Conclusion. Symptomatic and asymptomatic cerebral blood flow disturbances were observed in 23,2% and 38,8% of patients with active chronic hepatitis respectively.

  3. THE PECULIARITIES OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Kulikov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study extra- and intracranial hemodynamics in patients with chronic hepatitis of different activity.Material and methods. Ultrasonography of the cerebral blood flow was performed in 576 patients with chronic hepatitis.Results. Contralateral hemyspherical asymmetry (more than 30 % of the maximum linear rate of blood flow in the medium cerebral arteries and decrease in resistance index (0,55±0,09 and pulsativity index (1,34±0,66 were found in 33,8 % of patients with chronic hepatitis of high activity. Collateral blood flow reduction through connecting arteries of Willis circle was revealed in 13,8 % of patients. The tortuosity of arteries and thickening of intima-media complex was found in patients with chronic hepatitis (mainly of high activity. It leads to decline of cerebral blood flow.Conclusion. Symptomatic and asymptomatic cerebral blood flow disturbances were observed in 23,2% and 38,8% of patients with active chronic hepatitis respectively.

  4. Supramolecular Assembly of Complementary Cyanine Salt J-Aggregates

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhong’an

    2015-09-09

    An understanding of structure–property relationships in cyanine dyes is critical for their design and application. Anionic and cationic cyanines can be organized into complementary cyanine salts, offering potential building blocks to modulate their intra/intermolecular interactions in the solid state. Here, we demonstrate how the structures of these complementary salts can be tuned to achieve highly ordered J-type supramolecular aggregate structures of heptamethine dyes in crystalline solids.

  5. Supramolecular Assembly of Complementary Cyanine Salt J-Aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong'an; Mukhopadhyay, Sukrit; Jang, Sei-Hum; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2015-09-23

    An understanding of structure-property relationships in cyanine dyes is critical for their design and application. Anionic and cationic cyanines can be organized into complementary cyanine salts, offering potential building blocks to modulate their intra/intermolecular interactions in the solid state. Here, we demonstrate how the structures of these complementary salts can be tuned to achieve highly ordered J-type supramolecular aggregate structures of heptamethine dyes in crystalline solids.

  6. HERBAL MEDICINE AMONG COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ruban; Rodioniva, T.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative medicine methods may incorporate or base themselves on traditional medicine [1], folk knowledge [2], spiritual beliefs, or newly conceived approaches to healing. The major complementary and alternative medicine systems have many common characteristics, treating the whole person, including a focus on individualizing treatments, promoting self-care and self-healing, and recognizing the spiritual nature of each individual. Complementary and alternative medicine often lacks or has onl...

  7. Measurement of Charge Asymmetries in Charmless Hadronic B Meson Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, S; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Menon, N; Miller, D H; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Pavlunin, V; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Kwon, Y; Lyon, A L; Thorndike, E H; Jessop, C P; Marsiske, H; Perl, Martin Lewis; Savinov, V; Ugolini, D W; Zhou, X; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J; Wlodek, T; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Boulahouache, C; Bukin, K; Dambasuren, E; Karamov, S; Kopp, S E; Majumder, G; Moneti, G C; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Wang, J C; Wolf, A; Wu, J; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; McLean, K W; Marka, S; Xu, Z; Godang, R; Kinoshita, K; Lai, I C; Schrenk, S; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Perera, L P; Zhou, G J; Eigen, G; Lipeles, E; Schmidtler, M; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Würthwein, F; Jaffe, D E; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Potter, E M; Prell, S; Sharma, V; Asner, D M; Eppich, A; Gronberg, J B; Hill, T S; Lange, D J; Morrison, R J; Nelson, H N; Briere, R A; Behrens, B H; Ford, W T; Gritsan, A; Roy, J D; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Baker, R; Bebek, C; Berger, B E; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Dickson, M; Drell, P S; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Foland, A D; Gaidarev, P B; Gibbons, L K; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hopman, P I; Jones, C D; Kreinick, D L; Lohner, M; Magerkurth, A; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Ng, C R; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Thayer, J G; Thies, P G; Valant-Spaight, B L; Warburton, A; Avery, P; Prescott, C; Rubiera, A I; Yelton, J; Zheng, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Gao, Y S; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Browder, T E; Li, Y; Rodríguez, J L; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gladding, G E; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Johnson, E; Karliner, I; Marsh, M A; Palmer, M; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Janicek, R; Patel, P M; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Bean, A; Besson, D; Davis, R; Kravchenko, I V; Kwak, N; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Mahapatra, R; O'Neill, J J; Poling, R A; Riehle, T; Smith, A; Urheim, J; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Athar, S B; Jian, L; Ling, L; Mahmood, A H; Saleem, M; Timm, S; Wappler, F; Anastassov, A; Duboscq, J E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Lorenc, J; Pedlar, T K; Schwarthoff, H; Von Törne, E; Zoeller, M M; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Undrus, A

    2000-01-01

    We search for CP-violating asymmetries (Acp) in the B meson decays to K+- pi-+, K+- pi0, Ks pi+-, K+- eta', and omega pi+-. Using 9.66 million Upsilon(4S) decays collected with the CLEO detector, the statistical precision on Acp is in the range of \\pm 0.12 to \\pm 0.25 depending on decay mode. While CP-violating asymmetries of up to \\pm 0.5 are possible within the Standard Model, the measured asymmetries are consistent with zero in all five decay modes studied.

  8. The asymmetry of radiation: Reinterpreting the Wheeler-Feynman argument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Huw

    1991-08-01

    This paper suggests a novel reinterpretation of the mathematical core of Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory, and hence a new route to the conclusion that the temporal asymmetry of classical electromagnetic radiation has the same origin as that of thermodynamics. The argument begins (Sec. 2) with a careful analysis of what the apparent asymmetry of radiation actually involves. Two major flaws in the standard version of the Wheeler-Feynman treatment of radiative asymmetry are then identified (Secs. 4 5), and the proposed reinterpretation is described (Sec. 6). This avoids the two flaws previously mentioned, and also the problematic dependence of radiation on cosmological structure.

  9. On the cos 2 phi asymmetry in unpolarized leptoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Barone, V; Ma, B Q; Barone, Vincenzo; Lu, Zhun; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the origin of the cos 2 phi azimuthal asymmetry in unpolarized semiinclusive DIS. The contributions to this asymmetry arising from the intrinsic transverse motion of quarks are explicitly evaluated, and predictions for the HERMES and COMPASS kinematic regimes are presented. We show that the effect of the leading-twist Boer-Mulders function h_1^perp(x, k_T^2), which describes a correlation between the transverse momentum and the transverse spin of quarks, is quite significant and may also account for a part of the cos 2 phi asymmetry measured by ZEUS in the perturbative domain.

  10. Measuring the cosmological lepton asymmetry through the CMB anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Kinney, W H; Kinney, William H.; Riotto, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    A large lepton asymmetry in the Universe is still a viable possibility and leads to many interesting phenomena such as gauge symmetry nonrestoration at high temperature. We show that a large lepton asymmetry changes the predicted cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy and that any degeneracy in the relic neutrino sea will be measured to a precision of 1% or better when the CMB anisotropy is measured at the accuracy expected to result from the planned satellite missions MAP and Planck. In fact, the current measurements already put an upper limit on the lepton asymmetry of the Universe which is stronger than the one coming from considerations of primordial nucleosynthesis and structure formation.

  11. Baryon Asymmetry, Neutrino Mixing and Supersymmetric SO(10) Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Plümacher, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The baryon asymmetry of the universe can be explained by the out-of-equilibrium decays of heavy right-handed neutrinos. We analyse this mechanism in the framework of a supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model and show that lepton number violating scatterings are indispensable for baryogenesis, even though they may wash-out a generated asymmetry. By assuming a similar pattern of mixings and masses for neutrinos and up-type quarks, as suggested by SO(10) unification, we can generate the observed baryon asymmetry without any fine tuning, if (B-L) is broken at the unification scale preferred by the MSW solution to the solar neutrino deficit.

  12. Cerebral trypanosomiasis and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes Apio Claudio Martins

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36 year-old black female, complaining of headache of one month's duration presented with nausea, vomiting, somnolence, short memory problems, loss of weight, and no fever history. Smoker, intravenous drugs abuser, promiscuous lifestyle. Physical examination: left homonimous hemianopsia, left hemiparesis, no papilledema, diffuse hyperreflexia, slowness of movements. Brain CT scan: tumor-like lesion in the splenium of the corpus calosum, measuring 3.5 x 1.4 cm, with heterogeneous enhancing pattern, sugesting a primary CNS tumor. Due to the possibility of CNS infection, a lumbar puncture disclosed an opening pressure of 380 mmH(20; 11 white cells (lymphocytes; glucose 18 mg/dl (serum glucose 73 mg/dl; proteins 139 mg/dl; presence of Trypanosoma parasites. Serum Elisa-HIV tests turned out to be positive. Treatment with benznidazole dramatically improved clinical and radiographic picture, but the patient died 6 weeks later because of respiratory failure. T. cruzi infection of the CNS is a rare disease, but we have an increasing number of cases in HIV immunecompromised patients. Diagnosis by direct observation of CSF is uncommon, and most of the cases are diagnosed by pathological examination. It is a highly lethal disease, even when properly diagnosed and treated. This article intends to include cerebral trypanosomiasis in the differential diagnosis of intracranial space-occupying lesions, especially in immunecompromised patients from endemic regions.

  13. Pseudotumoral delayed cerebral radionecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciaudo-Lacroix, C.; Lapresle, J. (Centre Hospitalier de Bicetre, 94 - Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France))

    1985-01-01

    A 60 year-old woman with a scalp epithelioma underwent radiotherapy, the dose being 57 Gray. A first epileptic seizure occurred twenty months later. Neurological examination revealed signs of left hemisphere involvement. ..gamma..EG, angiography, CT scans, demonstrated a pseudotumoral avascular process. On account of the localisation, the patient being right-handed, no surgical procedure was performed. In spite of corticotherapy and anticonvulsive treatment, seizures recurred and neurological signs slowly progressed. The patient died, 22 months after the first seizure, of an associated disseminated carcinoma with cachexia. Neuropathological examination showed a massive lesion presenting all the features of delayed radionecrosis in the left hemisphere: situated mainly in the white matter; numerous vascular abnormalities; wide-spread demyelination; disappearance of oligoglial cells. The Authors recall the clinical and anatomical aspects of this condition for which the only successful treatment is surgical removal when location and size of the lesion permit. Finally, the mechanisms which have been proposed to explain this delayed cerebral radionecrosis are discussed.

  14. Complementary Hand Responses Occur in Both Peri- and Extrapersonal Space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim W Faber

    Full Text Available Human beings have a strong tendency to imitate. Evidence from motor priming paradigms suggests that people automatically tend to imitate observed actions such as hand gestures by performing mirror-congruent movements (e.g., lifting one's right finger upon observing a left finger movement; from a mirror perspective. Many observed actions however, do not require mirror-congruent responses but afford complementary (fitting responses instead (e.g., handing over a cup; shaking hands. Crucially, whereas mirror-congruent responses don't require physical interaction with another person, complementary actions often do. Given that most experiments studying motor priming have used stimuli devoid of contextual information, this space or interaction-dependency of complementary responses has not yet been assessed. To address this issue, we let participants perform a task in which they had to mirror or complement a hand gesture (fist or open hand performed by an actor depicted either within or outside of reach. In three studies, we observed faster reaction times and less response errors for complementary relative to mirrored hand movements in response to open hand gestures (i.e., 'hand-shaking' irrespective of the perceived interpersonal distance of the actor. This complementary effect could not be accounted for by a low-level spatial cueing effect. These results demonstrate that humans have a strong and automatic tendency to respond by performing complementary actions. In addition, our findings underline the limitations of manipulations of space in modulating effects of motor priming and the perception of affordances.

  15. 76 FR 30735 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine ] Special... Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 6707...

  16. 75 FR 57970 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-09-23

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  17. 76 FR 59707 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2011-09-27

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  18. 76 FR 6806 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-02-08

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  19. 76 FR 35227 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-06-16

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  20. 75 FR 35075 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-06-21

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  1. 78 FR 21381 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

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  2. 77 FR 28396 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-05-14

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  3. 75 FR 26260 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

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  4. 78 FR 56238 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-09-12

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  5. 76 FR 12744 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Assistance Program Nos. 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and Alternative Medicine,...

  6. 77 FR 52751 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-08-30

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  7. 77 FR 31862 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-05-30

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  8. 75 FR 63498 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-10-15

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  9. 76 FR 16433 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

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  10. 75 FR 6039 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-02-05

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  11. 76 FR 79201 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2011-12-21

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  12. 78 FR 10184 - National Center For Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2013-02-13

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  13. 78 FR 47328 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-08-05

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  14. 76 FR 10913 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-02-28

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  15. 78 FR 66755 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-11-06

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  16. 77 FR 1940 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-01-12

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  17. 75 FR 1796 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2010-01-13

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  18. 75 FR 26780 - Request for Comment: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... Comment: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Strategic Planning White Papers ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) was established in 1998 with the mission...

  19. 77 FR 10540 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-02-22

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  20. 76 FR 17140 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-03-28

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  1. 76 FR 27651 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-05-12

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  2. 75 FR 43994 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... Committee: National Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date: September 3, 2010... remarks by the Director of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, presentation...

  3. 75 FR 6041 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-02-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and...

  4. 78 FR 37836 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: June 18, 2013. Michelle...

  5. 78 FR 34664 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-06-10

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  6. 77 FR 58402 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-09-20

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  7. 75 FR 65498 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 15, 2010. Jennifer...

  8. 76 FR 38404 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Shau, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, National Center for Complementary and Alternative...

  9. Disentangling the Effects of Attentional and Amplitude Asymmetries on Relative Phase Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Poel, Harjo J.; Peper, C. E.; Beek, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Attentional asymmetry in rhythmic interlimb coordination induces an asymmetry in relative phase dynamics, allegedly reflecting an asymmetry in coupling strength. However, relative phase asymmetries may also be engendered by an attention-induced difference between the amplitudes (and hence the preferred frequencies) of the limb movements. The…

  10. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during rowing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Niels Henry; Pott, F; Knudsen, L.;

    1997-01-01

    original,arterial blood pressure,central venous pressure,cerebral blood flow, exercise, transcranial Doppler......original,arterial blood pressure,central venous pressure,cerebral blood flow, exercise, transcranial Doppler...

  11. Supernova deleptonization asymmetry: Impact on self-induced flavor conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Sovan; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Mueller, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    During the accretion phase of a core-collapse supernova (SN), the deleptonization flux has recently been found to develop a global dipole pattern (LESA---Lepton Emission Self-sustained Asymmetry). The $\

  12. The effect of asymmetry of posture on anticipatory postural adjustments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruin, Alexander S

    2006-06-19

    The study investigates the effect of body asymmetry on anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). Subjects performed a task involving a standard load release induced by a shoulder abduction movement while standing symmetrically or in an asymmetrical stance with either their right or left leg in 45 degrees of external rotation. EMG activities of trunk and leg muscles were recorded during the postural perturbation and were quantified within the time intervals typical of APAs. Anticipatory postural adjustments were observed in all experimental conditions. It was found that asymmetrical body positioning was associated with significant asymmetrical patterns of APAs seen in the right and left distal muscles. These APA asymmetries were dependant upon the side in which the body asymmetry was induced: reduced APAs were observed in the leg muscles on the side of leg rotation, while increased APAs were seen in the muscles on the contralateral side. These findings stress the important role that body asymmetries play in the control of upright posture.

  13. Mixing-induced CP Asymmetries in Inclusive $B$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Beneke, Martin; Dunietz, Isard; Beneke, Martin; Buchalla, Gerhard; Dunietz, Isard

    1996-01-01

    We consider CP violating asymmetries that are induced by particle-antiparticle mixing in inclusive channels of neutral $B$ meson decay. Not only are the branching ratios sizable, at the 1% to 50% level, but some of those asymmetries are expected to be large because of substantial CKM phases. The inclusive sum partially dilutes the asymmetries, but the dilution factor is calculable, assuming local quark-hadron duality, and CKM parameters can be reliably extracted. We discuss in detail the determination of $sin asymmetries for other inclusive final states. While probably not yet sensitive to standard model predictions, meaningful CP violation studies can be conducted with existing data samples of inclusive neutral $B$ decays.

  14. Transverse velocity shifts in protostellar jets: rotation or velocity asymmetries?

    CERN Document Server

    De Colle, Fabio; Riera, Angels

    2016-01-01

    Observations of several protostellar jets show systematic differences in radial velocity transverse to the jet propagation direction, which have been interpreted as evidence of rotation in the jets. In this paper we discuss the origin of these velocity shifts, and show that they could be originated by rotation in the flow, or by side to side asymmetries in the shock velocity, which could be due to asymmetries in the jet ejection velocity/density or in the ambient medium. For typical poloidal jet velocities (~ 100-200 km/s), an asymmetry >~ 10% can produce velocity shifts comparable to those observed. We also present three dimensional numerical simulations of rotating, precessing and asymmetric jets, and show that, even though for a given jet there is a clear degeneracy between these effects, a statistical analysis of jets with different inclination angles can help to distinguish between the alternative origins of transverse velocity shifts. Our analysis indicate that side to side velocities asymmetries could ...

  15. Cell polarity determinants establish asymmetry in MEN signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje-Casas, Fernando; Amon, Angelika

    2009-01-01

    Components of the mitotic exit network (MEN), a signaling pathway that triggers exit from mitosis, localize to the spindle pole body (SPB) that migrates into the daughter cell during anaphase but are largely absent from the SPB that remains in the mother cell. Through the analysis of one of the determinants of this asymmetry, Bfa1, we find that the machinery responsible for establishing cell polarity and cytoplasmic microtubules collaborate to establish MEN asymmetry. In cells defective in the Cdc42 signaling pathway or the formin Bni1, Bfa1 localizes to both SPBs. The quantitative analysis of Bfa1 localization further shows that Bfa1 can associate with both SPBs in a transient and highly dynamic fashion, but the protein is stabilized on the SPB that migrates into the daughter cell during anaphase through microtubule-bud cortex interactions. Our results indicate that mother-daughter cell asymmetry determinants establish MEN signaling asymmetry through microtubule-bud cortex interactions.

  16. The small scale power asymmetry in the cosmic microwave background

    CERN Document Server

    Flender, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the hemispherical power asymmetry in the cosmic microwave background on small angular scales. We find an anomalously high asymmetry in the multipole range l=601-2048, with a naive statistical significance of 6.5 sigma. However, we show that this extreme anomaly is simply a coincidence of three other effects, relativistic power modulation, edge effects from the mask applied, and inter-scale correlations. After correcting for all of these effects, the significance level drops to ~1 sigma, i.e., there is no anomalous intrinsic asymmetry in the small angular scales. Using this null result, we derive a constraint on a potential dipolar modulation amplitude, A(k)<0.0045 on the ~10 Mpc-scale, at 95% C.L. This new constraint must be satisfied by any theoretical model attempting to explain the hemispherical asymmetry at large angular scales.

  17. Resurrection of large lepton number asymmetries from neutrino flavor oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Park, Wan-Il

    2016-01-01

    We numerically solve the evolution equations of neutrino three-flavor density matrices, and show that, even if neutrino oscillations mix neutrino flavors, large lepton number asymmetries are still allowed in certain limits by Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN).

  18. Flavor versus mass eigenstates in neutrino asymmetries: implications for cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Park, Wan-Il

    2016-01-01

    We show that, if they exist, lepton number asymmetries ($L_\\alpha$) of neutrino flavors should be distinguished from the ones ($L_i$) of mass eigenstates, since Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) bounds on the flavor eigenstates cannot be directly applied to the mass eigenstates. Similarly, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) constraints on mass eigenstates do not directly constrain flavor asymmetries. Due to the difference of mass and flavor eigenstates, the cosmological constraint on the asymmetries of neutrino flavors can be much stronger than conventional expectation, but not uniquely determined unless at least the asymmetry of the heaviest neutrino is well constrained. Cosmological constraint on $L_i$ for a specific case is presented as an illustration.

  19. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry of Pedersen conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y.; Lu, Y.; Sheng, C.; Yue, X.

    2015-12-01

    Ionospheric conductance is very important to the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in the high latitude region, since it connects the polar cap potential with the currents. Meanwhile, the altitudinal distribution of Pederson conductance gives us a rough idea about the altitudinal distribution of Joule heating at high latitudes. Based on the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) satellites observations of electron density profiles from 2009-2014, Pedersen conductivity has been calculated. A climatologic study of the height-integrated Pedersen conductivities in both E (100-150 km) and F (150-600 km) regions and their ratio in different seasons, solar and geomagnetic conditions have been conducted. A significant inter-hemispheric asymmetry is identified in the seasonal variation. Meanwhile, the conductance in both regions and the conductance ratio show a strong dependence on F10.7 and Ap indices. This result will strongly help our understanding of the inter-hemispheric difference in the high-latitude electrodynamics.

  20. Visual field asymmetries in visual evoked responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagler, Donald J

    2014-12-19

    Behavioral responses to visual stimuli exhibit visual field asymmetries, but cortical folding and the close proximity of visual cortical areas make electrophysiological comparisons between different stimulus locations problematic. Retinotopy-constrained source estimation (RCSE) uses distributed dipole models simultaneously constrained by multiple stimulus locations to provide separation between individual visual areas that is not possible with conventional source estimation methods. Magnetoencephalography and RCSE were used to estimate time courses of activity in V1, V2, V3, and V3A. Responses to left and right hemifield stimuli were not significantly different. Peak latencies for peripheral stimuli were significantly shorter than those for perifoveal stimuli in V1, V2, and V3A, likely related to the greater proportion of magnocellular input to V1 in the periphery. Consistent with previous results, sensor magnitudes for lower field stimuli were about twice as large as for upper field, which is only partially explained by the proximity to sensors for lower field cortical sources in V1, V2, and V3. V3A exhibited both latency and amplitude differences for upper and lower field responses. There were no differences for V3, consistent with previous suggestions that dorsal and ventral V3 are two halves of a single visual area, rather than distinct areas V3 and VP.

  1. INTERHEMISPHERIC ASYMMETRY OF INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOR IN MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Mikheev

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of the left and right hemispheres in realization of behavior for SHR, DBA/2 and C57BL/6 males mice in open field was studied. All three lines of mice differed each from other in elements of individual behavior. Comparison of effects of unilateral inactivation in SHR mice revealed domination of the right hemisphere in regulation of total duration of rearings and grooming, the most specialization of hemispheres being registered in regulation of temporary parameters of behavioral reactions. In DBA/2 mice, the left hemisphere dominated in control of rearings, and the right one did on seating. In C57BL/6 mice, the right hemisphere dominated only on locomotion. Therefore, the cortex of the brain (after inactivation did not participate in regulation of individual behavior in the majority of the experiments (11 from 18. In two cases, the symmetric participation of hemispheres in regulation of behavioral reactions was obtained, and in 5 cases, the unilateral domination of hemispheres in control of behavioral elements was registered. Thus, in three lines of mice, the pattern of interhemispheric asymmetry of individual behavior is principally different.

  2. Value, obligation and the asymmetry question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, Michael

    1998-04-01

    Is there a prima facie obligation to produce additional individuals whose lives would be worth living? In his paper 'Is it good to make happy people?', Stuart Rachels argues not only that there is, but, also, that precisely as much weight should be assigned to the quality of life that would be enjoyed by such potential persons, if they were to be actualized, as to the quality of life enjoyed by actually existing persons. In response, I shall argue, first, that Rachels' view is exposed to very serious objections, and secondly, that his arguments in support of his position involve a crucial assumption, which cannot be sustained, concerning the relation between, on the one hand, propositions about good-making and bad-making properties, and, on the other, propositions about right-making and wrong-making ones. I shall then argue that there is a very plausible position concerning the conditions under which an action can be morally wrong which entails the following asymmetry: there is a prima facie obligation not to bring into existence individuals whose lives are not worth living, but there is no corresponding obligation to create additional individuals whose lives would be worth living.

  3. Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Salih Sevdi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A serum sodium (Na value below 135 mEq/L is evaluated as hyponatremia. Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality observed in hospitalized patients in particular. Hypovolemic hypoosmolar hyponatremia is the most frequent clinical table. One of the reasons of this is cerebral salt-wasting syndrome (CSWS. CSWS is a rare condition progressing with low plasma osmolality, urine osmolality above 100-150 mOsm/kg and urine- Na concentration above 20 mEq/L. In the blood and urine sample analysis performed upon sudden loss of consciousness on the 15th day of the intensive care unit follow-up of 79-year-old female patients due to falling from stairs, blood biochemistry Na value was 120 mEq/L, plasma osmolality was 250 mOsm/kg, urine Na value was 180 mEq/L, urine osmolality was 1200 mOsm/kg, urine diuresis was >3 mL/kg/hour. The central venous pressure was 2 mmHg. The patient, considered to be diagnosed with CSWS, was treated with 9% NaCl and 3% hypertonic saline solution. Her clinical course was improved on the 18th day. She died on the 81st day secondary to septicemia in the subsequent follow-up. In this article, it was aimed to report a patient with CSWS which progresses with low percentage in intensive care unit patients with head trauma, is frequently confused with inappropriate antidiuretic hormone syndrome and progresses mortally when not diagnosed distinctively well.

  4. Tuning piezoresistive transduction in nanomechanical resonators by geometrical asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llobet, J.; Sansa, M.; Lorenzoni, M.; Pérez-Murano, F., E-mail: francesc.perez@csic.es [Institut de Microelectrònica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Borrisé, X. [Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra Spain (Spain); San Paulo, A. [Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (IMM-CSIC), 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-08-17

    The effect of geometrical asymmetries on the piezoresistive transduction in suspended double clamped beam nanomechanical resonators is investigated. Tapered silicon nano-beams, fabricated using a fast and flexible prototyping method, are employed to determine how the asymmetry affects the transduced piezoresistive signal for different mechanical resonant modes. This effect is attributed to the modulation of the strain in pre-strained double clamped beams, and it is confirmed by means of finite element simulations.

  5. Beam asymmetry in near threshold omega photoproduction off the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Frank; Bacelar, J C S; Bantes, B; Bartholomy, O; Bayadilov, D; Beck, R; Beloglasov, Yu A; Castelijns, R; Credé, V; Dutz, H; Ehmanns, A; Elsner, D; Essig, K; Ewald, R; Fabry, I; Fuchs, M; Funke, C; Gregor, R; Gridnev, A B; Gutz, E; Hoffgen, S; Hoffmeister, P; Horn, I; Jaegle, I; Junkersfeld, J; Kalinowsky, H; Kammer, S; Kleber, V; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E; Konrad, M; Kotulla, M; Krusche, B; Lang, M; Löhner, H; Lopatin, I V; Lotz, J; Lugert, S; Menze, D; Mertens, T; Messchendorp, J G; Metag, V; Morales, C; Nanova, M; Nikonov, V A; Novinski, D; Novotny, R; Ostrick, M; Pant, L M; Van Pee, H; Pfeiffer, M; Radkov, A; Roy, A; Sarantsev, A V; Schadmand, S; Schmidt, C; Schmieden, H; Schoch, B; Shende, S V; Sokhoyan, V; Sule, A; Sumachev, V V; Szczepanek, T; Thoma, U; Trnka, D; Varma, R; Walther, D; Weinheimer, C; Wendel, C

    2008-01-01

    The photoproduction of omega mesons off protons has been studied at the Bonn ELSA accelerator from threshold to E_gamma = 1700 MeV. Linearly polarized beams were produced via coherent bremsstrahlung. Large photon asymmtries in excess of 50% were obtained, whereas the pion asymmetries from omega \\to pi^0 gamma are close to zero. The asymmetries do characteristically depend on Theta_{cm} rather than |t| and indicate s-channel resonance formation on top of t-channel exchange processes.

  6. Cell Polarity Determinants Establish Asymmetry in MEN Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Monje-Casas, Fernando; Amon, Angelika

    2009-01-01

    Components of the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), a signaling pathway that triggers exit from mitosis, localize to the spindle pole body (SPB) that migrates into the daughter cell during anaphase but are largely absent from the SPB that remains in the mother cell. Through the analysis of one of the determinants of this asymmetry, Bfa1, we find that the machinery responsible for establishing cell polarity and cytoplasmic microtubules collaborate to establish MEN asymmetry. In cells defective in th...

  7. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Linah Wafai; Aladin Zayegh; John Woulfe; Syed Mahfuzul Aziz; Rezaul Begg

    2015-01-01

    Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual’s quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standar...

  8. A voxel-based approach to gray matter asymmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luders, E; Gaser, C; Jancke, L; Schlaug, G

    2004-06-01

    Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to analyze gray matter (GM) asymmetries in a large sample (n = 60) of male and female professional musicians with and without absolute pitch (AP). We chose to examine these particular groups because previous studies using traditional region-of-interest (ROI) analyses have shown differences in hemispheric asymmetry related to AP and gender. Voxel-based methods may have advantages over traditional ROI-based methods since the analysis can be performed across the whole brain with minimal user bias. After determining that the VBM method was sufficiently sensitive for the detection of differences in GM asymmetries between groups, we found that male AP musicians were more leftward lateralized in the anterior region of the planum temporale (PT) than male non-AP musicians. This confirmed the results of previous studies using ROI-based methods that showed an association between PT asymmetry and the AP phenotype. We further observed that male non-AP musicians revealed an increased leftward GM asymmetry in the postcentral gyrus compared to female non-AP musicians, again corroborating results of a previously published study using ROI-based methods. By analyzing hemispheric GM differences across our entire sample, we were able to partially confirm findings of previous studies using traditional morphometric techniques, as well as more recent, voxel-based analyses. In addition, we found some unusually pronounced GM asymmetries in our musician sample not previously detected in subjects unselected for musical training. Since we were able to validate gender- and AP-related brain asymmetries previously described using traditional ROI-based morphometric techniques, the results of our analyses support the use of VBM for examinations of GM asymmetries.

  9. The 'Goldilocks Zone': getting the measure of manual asymmetries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael K Raw

    Full Text Available Some studies have shown that manual asymmetries decrease in older age. These results have often been explained with reference to models of reduced hemispheric specialisation. An alternative explanation, however, is that hand differences are subtle, and capturing them requires tasks that yield optimal performance with both hands. Whereas the hemispheric specialisation account implies that reduced manual asymmetries should be reliably observed in older adults, the 'measurement difficulty' account suggests that manual asymmetries will be hard to detect unless a task has just the right level of difficulty--i.e. within the 'Goldilocks Zone', where it is not too easy or too hard, but just right. Experiment One tested this hypothesis and found that manual asymmetries were only detected when participants performed in this zone; specifically, performance on a tracing task was only superior in the preferred hand when task constraints were high (i.e. fast speed tracing. Experiment Two used three different tasks to examine age differences in manual asymmetries; one task produced no asymmetries, whilst two tasks revealed asymmetries in both younger and older groups (with poorer overall performance in the old group across all tasks. Experiment Three revealed task-dependent asymmetries in both age groups, but highlighted further detection difficulties linked with the metric of performance and compensatory strategies used by participants. Results are discussed with reference to structural learning theory, whereby we suggest that the processes of inter-manual transfer lead to relatively small performance differences between the hands (despite a strong phenomenological sense of performance disparities.

  10. Meyer's loop asymmetry and language lateralisation in epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Nowell, Mark; Vos, Sjoerd B; Sidhu, Meneka; Wilcoxen, Kaitlin; Sargsyan, Narek; Ourselin, Sebastien; Duncan, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Several studies have suggested an asymmetry in Meyer's loop in individuals, with the left loop anterior to the right. In this study we test the hypothesis that there is an association between Meyer's loop asymmetry (MLA) and language lateralisation. Methods 57 patients with epilepsy were identified with language functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion MRI acquisition. Language lateralisation indices from fMRI(LI) and optic radiation and arcuate fasciculus probabilistic tractography was...

  11. Cerebral venous thrombosis in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, T.A.G.M.; Martin, E.; Willi, U.V. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, University Children' s Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Holzmann, D. [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2001-09-01

    This was a retrospective study to determine different etiologies of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) in childhood and to correlate extent and location of thrombosis with the etiology and the age of the child as well as the final outcome. In addition, the radiologic approach is discussed. This was a retrospective analysis of 19 children with CVT. The children were examined by contrast-enhanced dynamic CT. Radiologic findings were correlated with the etiology of CVT. Cerebral venous thrombosis is not as infrequent in children as has been thought. Cerebral venous thrombosis in children can occur due to trauma (n=9), infections (n=7), or coagulation disorders (n=3). Extent and location of thrombosis, as well as complications, final outcome, and therapy, depend on the etiology. Computed tomography remains a valuable primary imaging modality in the diagnosis of CVT in the acutely injured or diseased child. (orig.)

  12. Neuronal autophagy in cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xu; Jin-Hua Gu; Zheng-Hong Qin

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy has evolved as a conserved process for the bulk degradation and recycling of cytosolic components,such as long-lived proteins and organelles.In neurons,autophagy is important for homeostasis and protein quality control and is maintained at relatively low levels under normal conditions,while it is upregulated in response to pathophysiological conditions,such as cerebral ischemic injury.However,the role of autophagy is more complex.It depends on age or brain maturity,region,severity of insult,and the stage of ischemia.Whether autophagy plays a beneficial or a detrimental role in cerebral ischemia depends on various pathological conditions.In this review,we elucidate the role of neuronal autophagy in cerebral ischemia.

  13. Gaussian quantum steering and its asymmetry in curved spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieci; Cao, Haixin; Jing, Jiliang; Fan, Heng

    2016-06-01

    We study Gaussian quantum steering and its asymmetry in the background of a Schwarzschild black hole. We present a Gaussian channel description of quantum state evolution under the influence of Hawking radiation. We find that thermal noise introduced by the Hawking effect will destroy the steerability between an inertial observer Alice and an accelerated observer Bob who hovers outside the event horizon, while it generates steerability between Bob and a hypothetical observer anti-Bob inside the event horizon. Unlike entanglement behaviors in curved spacetime, here the steering from Alice to Bob suffers from a "sudden death" and the steering from anti-Bob to Bob experiences a "sudden birth" with increasing Hawking temperature. We also find that the Gaussian steering is always asymmetric and the maximum steering asymmetry cannot exceed ln 2 , which means the state never evolves to an extremal asymmetry state. Furthermore, we obtain the parameter settings that maximize steering asymmetry and find that (i) s =arccosh cosh/2r 1 -sinh2r is the critical point of steering asymmetry and (ii) the attainment of maximal steering asymmetry indicates the transition between one-way steerability and both-way steerability for the two-mode Gaussian state under the influence of Hawking radiation.

  14. Determining asymmetry of roll-over shapes in prosthetic walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Curtze, MSc

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available How does the inherent asymmetry of the locomotor system in people with lower-limb amputation affect the ankle-foot roll-over shape of prosthetic walking? In a single-case design, we evaluated the walking patterns of six people with lower-limb amputation (3 transtibial and 3 transfemoral and three matched nondisabled controls. We analyzed the walking patterns in terms of roll-over characteristics and spatial and temporal factors. We determined the level of asymmetry by roll-over shape comparison (root-mean-square distance as well as differences in radius of curvature. In addition, we calculated ratios to determine spatial and temporal asymmetries and described different aspects of asymmetry of roll-over shapes. All participants showed some level of asymmetry in roll-over shape, even the nondisabled controls. Furthermore, we found good intralimb reproducibility for the group as a whole. With respect to spatial and temporal factors, the participants with transtibial amputation had a quite symmetrical gait pattern, while the gait in the participants with transfemoral amputation was more asymmetrical. The individual ankle-foot roll-over shapes provide additional insight into the marked individual adjustments occurring during the stance phase of the nondisabled limb. The two methods we present are suitable for determining asymmetry of roll-over shapes; both methods should be used complementarily.

  15. Halpha line profile asymmetries and the chromospheric flare velocity field

    CERN Document Server

    Kuridze, D; Simões, P J A; van der Voort, L Rouppe; Carlsson, M; Jafarzadeh, S; Allred, J C; Kowalski, A F; Kennedy, M; Fletcher, L; Graham, D; Keenan, F P

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Halpha and Ca II 8542 {\\AA} lines are studied using high spatial, temporal and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Halpha line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum, and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca II 8542 {\\AA} line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesise spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Halpha is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, w...

  16. Cosmological lepton asymmetry with a nonzero mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$

    CERN Document Server

    Castorina, Emanuele; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Lesgourgues, Julien; Mangano, Gianpiero; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pastor, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    While the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is nowadays well measured by cosmological observations, the bounds on the lepton asymmetry in the form of neutrinos are still significantly weaker. We place limits on the relic neutrino asymmetries using some of the latest cosmological data, taking into account the effect of flavor oscillations. We present our results for two different values of the neutrino mixing angle \\theta_{13}, and show that for large \\theta_{13} the limits on the total neutrino asymmetry become more stringent, diluting even large initial flavor asymmetries. In particular, we find that the present bounds are still dominated by the limits coming from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, while the limits on the total neutrino mass from cosmological data are essentially independent of \\theta_{13}. Finally, we perform a forecast for COrE, taken as an example of a future CMB experiment, and find that it could improve the limits on the total lepton asymmetry approximately by up to a factor 5.

  17. Mercury exposure may influence fluctuating asymmetry in waterbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Ackerman, Josh

    2017-01-01

    Variation in avian bilateral symmetry can be an indicator of developmental instability in response to a variety of stressors, including environmental contaminants. The authors used composite measures of fluctuating asymmetry to examine the influence of mercury concentrations in 2 tissues on fluctuating asymmetry within 4 waterbird species. Fluctuating asymmetry increased with mercury concentrations in whole blood and breast feathers of Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri), a species with elevated mercury concentrations. Specifically, fluctuating asymmetry in rectrix feather 1 was the most strongly correlated structural variable of those tested (wing chord, tarsus, primary feather 10, rectrix feather 6) with mercury concentrations in Forster's terns. However, for American avocets (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), and Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia), the authors found no relationship between fluctuating asymmetry and either whole-blood or breast feather mercury concentrations, even though these species had moderate to elevated mercury exposure. The results indicate that mercury contamination may act as an environmental stressor during development and feather growth and contribute to fluctuating asymmetry of some species of highly contaminated waterbirds.

  18. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  19. Fenestration of the anterior cerebral artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, J.; Washiyama, K.; Hong, K.C.; Ibuchi, Y.

    1981-08-01

    Three cases of angiographically demonstrated fenestration of the anterior cerebral artery are reported. Fenestration occurred at the medial half of the horizontal segment of the anterior cerebral artery in all cases. Its embryology and clinical significance are briefly discussed, and the anatomical and radiological literature on fenestration of the anterior cerebral artery is reviewed.

  20. Cerebral toksoplasmose primaert diagnosticeret som tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortsen, M E; Skøt, J; Skriver, E B

    1992-01-01

    Three cases of cerebral toxoplasmosis as the presenting manifestation of AIDS are reported. The initial diagnoses were brain tumors because of the cerebral mass lesions which resembled glioblastoma. In the light of the increasing occurrence of AIDS, attention is drawn to cerebral toxoplasmosis...