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Sample records for cerebellum

  1. Cerebellum - function (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cerebellum processes input from other areas of the brain, spinal cord and sensory receptors to provide precise timing for coordinated, smooth movements of the skeletal muscular system. A stroke ...

  2. Cerebellum and nonmotor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strick, Peter L; Dum, Richard P; Fiez, Julie A

    2009-01-01

    Does the cerebellum influence nonmotor behavior? Recent anatomical studies demonstrate that the output of the cerebellum targets multiple nonmotor areas in the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex, as well as the cortical motor areas. The projections to different cortical areas originate from distinct output channels within the cerebellar nuclei. The cerebral cortical area that is the main target of each output channel is a major source of input to the channel. Thus, a closed-loop circuit represents the major architectural unit of cerebro-cerebellar interactions. The outputs of these loops provide the cerebellum with the anatomical substrate to influence the control of movement and cognition. Neuroimaging and neuropsychological data supply compelling support for this view. The range of tasks associated with cerebellar activation is remarkable and includes tasks designed to assess attention, executive control, language, working memory, learning, pain, emotion, and addiction. These data, along with the revelations about cerebro-cerebellar circuitry, provide a new framework for exploring the contribution of the cerebellum to diverse aspects of behavior. PMID:19555291

  3. The cerebellum and psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph ePhillips

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum has been considered for a long time to play a role solely in motor coordination. However, studies over the past two decades have shown that the cerebellum also plays a key role in many motor, cognitive, and emotional processes. In addition, studies have also shown that the cerebellum is implicated in many psychiatric disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders. In this review, we discuss existing studies reporting cerebellar dysfunction in various psychiatric disorders. We will also discuss future directions for studies linking the cerebellum to psychiatric disorders.

  4. Regional functionality of the cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witter, Laurens; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2015-01-01

    Over the recent years, advances in brain imaging, optogenetics and viral tracing have greatly advanced our understanding of the cerebellum and its connectivity. It has become clear that the cerebellum can be divided into functional units, each connected with particular brain areas involved in specif

  5. Cerebellum and Ocular Motor Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir eKheradmand

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available An intact cerebellum is a prerequisite for optimal ocular motor performance. The cerebellum fine-tunes each of the subtypes of eye movements so they work together to bring and maintain images of objects of interest on the fovea. Here we review the major aspects of the contribution of the cerebellum to ocular motor control. The approach will be based on structural-functional correlation, combining the effects of lesions and the results from physiologic studies, with the emphasis on the cerebellar regions known to be most closely related to ocular motor function: 1 the flocculus/paraflocculus for high-frequency (brief vestibular responses, sustained pursuit eye movements and gaze-holding, 2 the nodulus/ventral uvula for low-frequency (sustained vestibular responses, and 3 the dorsal oculomotor vermis and its target in the posterior portion of the fastigial nucleus (the fastigial oculomotor region for saccades and pursuit initiation.

  6. The Cerebellum as a Novel Tinnitus Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Carol A.; Wisner, Kurt; Sybert, Lauren T.; Brozoski, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the cerebellum in auditory processing is largely unknown. Recently it was shown that rats with psychophysical evidence of tinnitus had significantly elevated neural activity in the paraflocculus of the cerebellum (PFL), as indicated by functional imaging. It was further shown that PFL activity was not elevated in normal rats listening to a tinnitus-like sound. This suggests that plastic changes in the PFL may underpin chronic tinnitus, i.e., it may serve as a tinnitus generator. U...

  7. The basal ganglia communicate with the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostan, Andreea C; Dum, Richard P; Strick, Peter L

    2010-05-01

    The basal ganglia and cerebellum are major subcortical structures that influence not only movement, but putatively also cognition and affect. Both structures receive input from and send output to the cerebral cortex. Thus, the basal ganglia and cerebellum form multisynaptic loops with the cerebral cortex. Basal ganglia and cerebellar loops have been assumed to be anatomically separate and to perform distinct functional operations. We investigated whether there is any direct route for basal ganglia output to influence cerebellar function that is independent of the cerebral cortex. We injected rabies virus (RV) into selected regions of the cerebellar cortex in cebus monkeys and used retrograde transneuronal transport of the virus to determine the origin of multisynaptic inputs to the injection sites. We found that the subthalamic nucleus of the basal ganglia has a substantial disynaptic projection to the cerebellar cortex. This pathway provides a means for both normal and abnormal signals from the basal ganglia to influence cerebellar function. We previously showed that the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum has a disynaptic projection to an input stage of basal ganglia processing, the striatum. Taken together these results provide the anatomical substrate for substantial two-way communication between the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Thus, the two subcortical structures may be linked together to form an integrated functional network. PMID:20404184

  8. The cerebellum as a novel tinnitus generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Carol A; Kurt, Wisner; Sybert, Lauren T; Brozoski, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    The role of the cerebellum in auditory processing is largely unknown. Recently it was shown that rats with psychophysical evidence of tinnitus had significantly elevated neural activity in the paraflocculus of the cerebellum (PFL), as indicated by functional imaging. It was further shown that PFL activity was not elevated in normal rats listening to a tinnitus-like sound. This suggests that plastic changes in the PFL may underpin chronic tinnitus, i.e., it may serve as a tinnitus generator. Using a rat model of acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus, the role of the cerebellum was further examined in a series of experiments:The PFL was surgically ablated in animals with established tinnitus; the PFL was surgically ablated in animals before induction of tinnitus; the PFL was reversibly inactivated by chronic lidocaine infusion into the subarcuate fossa of animals with established tinnitus. It was found that PFL ablation eliminated established tinnitus without altering auditory discrimination. Similar to the ablation results, PFL inactivation with lidocaine reversibly eliminated existing tinnitus. In contrast however, PFL ablation before tinnitus induction attenuated, but did not completely eliminate, tinnitus. In a rat model of noise-induced chronic tinnitus, the cerebellar PFL may serve as a sufficient but non-obligatory generator of tinnitus. PMID:23418634

  9. A computational model of the cerebellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travis, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    The need for realistic computational models of neural microarchitecture is growing increasingly apparent. While traditional neural networks have made inroads on understanding cognitive functions, more realism (in the form of structural and connectivity constraints) is required to explain processes such as vision or motor control. A highly detailed computational model of mammalian cerebellum has been developed. It is being compared to physiological recordings for validation purposes. The model is also being used to study the relative contributions of each component to cerebellar processing. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  10. New roles for the cerebellum in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Reeber, Stacey L.; Otis, Tom S.; Sillitoe, Roy V.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum has a well-established role in maintaining motor coordination and studies of cerebellar learning suggest that it does this by recognizing neural patterns, which it uses to predict optimal movements. Serious damage to the cerebellum impairs this learning and results in a set of motor disturbances called ataxia. However, recent work implicates the cerebellum in cognition and emotion, and it has been argued that cerebellar dysfunction contributes to non-motor conditions such as au...

  11. How the cerebellum may monitor sensory information for spatial representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure eRondi-Reig

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum has already been shown to participate in the navigation function. We propose here that this structure is involved in maintaining a sense of direction and location during self-motion by monitoring sensory information and interacting with navigation circuits to update the mental representation of space.To better understand the processing performed by the cerebellum in the navigation function, we have reviewed: the anatomical pathways that convey self-motion information to the cerebellum; the computational algorithm(s thought to be performed by the cerebellum from these multi-source inputs; the cerebellar outputs directed toward navigation circuits and the influence of self-motion information on space-modulated cells receiving cerebellar outputs. This review highlights that the cerebellum is adequately wired to combine the diversity of sensory signals to be monitored during self-motion and fuel the navigation circuits. The direct anatomical projections of the cerebellum toward the head-direction cell system and the parietal cortex make those structures possible relays of the cerebellum influence on the hippocampal spatial map. We describe computational models of the cerebellar function showing that the cerebellum can filter out the components of the sensory signals that are predictable, and provides a novelty output. We finally speculate that this novelty output is taken into account by the navigation structures, which implement an update over time of position and stabilize perception during navigation.

  12. Functional Anatomy Of The Intermediate Cerebellum In The Rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.C.T.M. Pijpers (Angelique)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe cerebellum is situated in the posterior part of the scull, dorsal to the brainstem and pontine nuclei (Fig.1). Despite the fact that it is called “little brain” it harbors about half of the total number of neurons within the central nervous system (Kandel, 2003). The cerebellum is di

  13. The cerebellum: a neuronal learning machine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J. L.; Lisberger, S. G.; Mauk, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    Comparison of two seemingly quite different behaviors yields a surprisingly consistent picture of the role of the cerebellum in motor learning. Behavioral and physiological data about classical conditioning of the eyelid response and motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex suggests that (i) plasticity is distributed between the cerebellar cortex and the deep cerebellar nuclei; (ii) the cerebellar cortex plays a special role in learning the timing of movement; and (iii) the cerebellar cortex guides learning in the deep nuclei, which may allow learning to be transferred from the cortex to the deep nuclei. Because many of the similarities in the data from the two systems typify general features of cerebellar organization, the cerebellar mechanisms of learning in these two systems may represent principles that apply to many motor systems.

  14. Reciprocal evolution of the cerebellum and neocortex in fossil humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Anne H

    2005-03-01

    Human brain evolution involved both neurological reorganization and an increase in overall brain volume relative to body mass. It is generally difficult to draw functional inferences about the timing and nature of brain reorganization, given that superficial brain morphology recorded on fossil endocasts is functionally ambiguous. However, the cerebellum, housed in the clearly delineated posterior cranial fossa, is functionally and ontologically discrete. The cerebellum is reciprocally connected to each of 14 neocortical regions important to human cognitive evolution. Cerebellar volume varies significantly relative to overall brain volume among mammalian orders, as well as within the primate order. There is also significant diachronic variation among fossil human taxa. In the australopithecines and early members of the genus Homo, the cerebral hemispheres were large in proportion to the cerebellum, compared with other hominoids. This trend continued in Middle and Late Pleistocene humans, including Neandertals and Cro-Magnon 1, who have the largest cerebral hemispheres relative to cerebellum volume of any primates, including earlier and Holocene humans. In recent humans, however, the pattern is reversed; the cerebellum is larger with respect to the rest of the brain (and, conversely, the cerebral hemispheres are smaller with respect to the cerebellum) than in Late Pleistocene humans. The cerebellum and cerebral hemispheres appear to have evolved reciprocally. Cerebellar development in Holocene humans may have provided greater computational efficiency for coping with an increasingly complex cultural and conceptual environment. PMID:15731345

  15. Ectopic anterior cerebellum (ala lobule centralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algin, Oktay; Ozmen, Evrim

    2015-06-01

    In this case report we present an adolescent girl who was referred to our radiology department for assessment with advanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging on suspicion of low-grade quadrigeminal cistern neoplasm on 1.5 Tesla MR examination. We were able to evaluate detailed cerebellar anatomy more clearly, and detected that the lesion was compatible with ectopic cerebellar tissue (a very rare developmental variation) on submillimetric 3-dimensional (3D) images from a 3 Tesla MR unit which has a 32-channel head coil. Our findings were further supported by diffusion tensor imaging which clearly indicated that the lesion was a part of the cerebellum. Furthermore, MR spectroscopic metabolite ratios were in accordance with the characteristics of normal neuronal tissue. As far we know there is no published report that contains similar findings to those of our patient. In conclusion, cranial MR images, if possible in 3D format (with very small isotropic voxels) should be obtained for the precise diagnosis of the lesions located in this region; in addition, the differential diagnostic list should be well known and advanced imaging techniques should be used when necessary. PMID:26246096

  16. Active Inference and Learning in the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, Karl; Herreros, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    This letter offers a computational account of Pavlovian conditioning in the cerebellum based on active inference and predictive coding. Using eyeblink conditioning as a canonical paradigm, we formulate a minimal generative model that can account for spontaneous blinking, startle responses, and (delay or trace) conditioning. We then establish the face validity of the model using simulated responses to unconditioned and conditioned stimuli to reproduce the sorts of behavior that are observed empirically. The scheme's anatomical validity is then addressed by associating variables in the predictive coding scheme with nuclei and neuronal populations to match the (extrinsic and intrinsic) connectivity of the cerebellar (eyeblink conditioning) system. Finally, we try to establish predictive validity by reproducing selective failures of delay conditioning, trace conditioning, and extinction using (simulated and reversible) focal lesions. Although rather metaphorical, the ensuing scheme can account for a remarkable range of anatomical and neurophysiological aspects of cerebellar circuitry-and the specificity of lesion-deficit mappings that have been established experimentally. From a computational perspective, this work shows how conditioning or learning can be formulated in terms of minimizing variational free energy (or maximizing Bayesian model evidence) using exactly the same principles that underlie predictive coding in perception.

  17. Temporal learning in the cerebellum: The microcircuit model

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    Miles, Coe F.; Rogers, David

    1990-01-01

    The cerebellum is that part of the brain which coordinates motor reflex behavior. To perform effectively, it must learn to generate specific motor commands at the proper times. We propose a fundamental circuit, called the MicroCircuit, which is the minimal ensemble of neurons both necessary and sufficient to learn timing. We describe how learning takes place in the MicroCircuit, which then explains the global behavior of the cerebellum as coordinated MicroCircuit behavior.

  18. Cerebellum lesion impairs eyeblink-like classical conditioning in goldfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, A; Durán, E; Salas, C; Rodríguez, F

    2010-03-10

    The cerebellum of mammals is an essential component of the neural circuitry underlying classical conditioning of eyeblink and other discrete responses. Although the neuroanatomical organization of the cerebellum is notably well conserved in vertebrates, little is actually known about the cerebellar learning functions in nonmammal vertebrate groups. In this work we studied whether the cerebellum of teleost fish plays a critical role in the classical conditioning of a motor response. In Experiment 1, we classically conditioned goldfish in a procedure analogous to the eyeblink conditioning paradigm commonly used in mammals. Goldfish were able to learn to express an eyeblink-like conditioned response to a predictive light (conditioned stimulus) that was paired with a mild electric shock (unconditioned stimulus). The application of unpaired and extinction control procedures demonstrated that also in teleosts the learning of this motor response depends on associative rules. In Experiment 2 we studied whether classical conditioning of this response is critically dependent on the cerebellum and independent of telencephalic structures as occurs in mammals. Cerebellum lesion prevented the acquisition of the eyeblink-like conditioned response whereas telencephalon ablation did not impair the learning of this response. No deficit was observed following lesions in the performance of the unconditioned response or in the percentage of spontaneous responses. These results suggest that cerebellum ablation in goldfish affects a critical component of the circuitry necessary for the acquisition of the conditioned response but does not interfere with the ability of the animal to perform the response itself. The striking similarity in the role of cerebellum in classical conditioning of a motor response between teleost fish and mammals suggests that this learning function of the cerebellum could be a primitive feature of the vertebrate brain that has been conserved through evolution.

  19. Autism Spectrum Disorders and Neuropathology of the Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Hampson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum contains the largest number of neurons and synapses of any structure in the central nervous system. The concept that the cerebellum is solely involved in fine motor function has become outdated; substantial evidence has accumulated linking the cerebellum with higher cognitive functions including language. Cerebellar deficits have been implicated in autism for more than two decades. The computational power of the cerebellum is essential for many, if not most of the processes that are perturbed in autism including language and communication, social interactions, stereotyped behavior, motor activity and motor coordination, and higher cognitive functions. The link between autism and cerebellar dysfunction should not be surprising to those who study its cellular, physiological, and functional properties. Postmortem studies have revealed neuropathological abnormalities in cerebellar cellular architecture while studies on mouse lines with cell loss or mutations in single genes restricted to cerebellar Purkinje cells have also strongly implicated this brain structure in contributing to the autistic phenotype. This connection has been further substantiated by studies investigating brain damage in humans restricted to the cerebellum. In this review, we summarize advances in research on idiopathic autism and three genetic forms of autism that highlight the key roles that the cerebellum plays in this spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  20. Anomalous extracellular diffusion in rat cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  1. PECULIARITIES OF THE CEREBELLUM NUCLEI IN AGED PERSONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyian, D; Galata, D; Potapov, S; Gargin, V

    2016-04-01

    The study of the clinical anatomy and functional features of the cortex, subcortical and conductive pathways of the cerebellum is necessary for clinicians for elaboration rational surgical approaches to these formations, for determination the localization of pathological processes associated with these formations. Cerebellar nucleus neurons are crucial to the olivo-cerebellar circuit as they provide the sole output of the entire cerebellum. The relationship between mobility and cognition in aging is well established, but the relationship between mobility and the structure and function of the aging brain is relatively unknown. In connection with the above, the purpose of our study was detection of the morphological characteristics of the cerebellum nuclei in aged persons. Study was performed on 48 specimens of the cerebellum from people (24 male and 24 female), who died at the age from 75 to 99 years due to diseases, which were not related to the central nervous system damaging. Formalin-fixed human hemispheres were dissected with the Ludwig and Klingler fiber dissection technique under x6 to x40 magnifications of binocular microscope Olympus BX41 (Japan). The morphological features of the human cerebellar nuclei were established. Namely, on the series of sections of the cerebellum in the horizontal, frontal and sagittal planes, as well as on the macro-microscopic preparations of the cerebellar nuclei location, their relative position, shape, linear dimensions, weight and volume were described. The features of macro-microscopic and histological structure of the nuclei of the cerebellum were made own classification of the gyri and teeth of the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum was offered. Macro-microscopic dissection of persons died after 75 years old show no significant variability of linear dimensions of cerebellar nuclei with their specific location and options. Simultaneously, reliable reducing of cellular density was detected for Purkinje, granule and basket

  2. New roles for the cerebellum in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey L Reeber

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum has a well-established role in maintaining motor coordination and studies of cerebellar learning suggest that it does this by recognizing neural patterns, which it uses to predict optimal movements. Serious damage to the cerebellum impairs this learning and results in a set of motor disturbances called ataxia. However, recent work implicates the cerebellum in cognition and emotion, and it has been argued that cerebellar dysfunction contributes to non-motor conditions such as autism spectrum disorders. Based on human and animal model studies, two major questions arise. Does the cerebellum contribute to non-motor as well as motor diseases, and if so, how does altering its function contribute to such diverse symptoms? The architecture and connectivity of cerebellar circuits may hold the answers to these questions. An emerging view is that cerebellar defects can trigger motor and non-motor neurological conditions by globally influencing brain function. Furthermore, during development cerebellar circuits may play a role in wiring events necessary for higher cognitive functions such as social behavior and language. We discuss genetic, electrophysiological, and behavioral evidence that implicates Purkinje cell dysfunction as a major culprit in several diseases and offer a hypothesis as to how canonical cerebellar functions might be at fault in non-motor as well as motor diseases.

  3. Comparative morphology of the avian cerebellum: I. Degree of foliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Hurd, Peter L; Wylie, Douglas R W

    2006-01-01

    Despite the conservative circuitry of the cerebellum, there is considerable variation in the shape of the cerebellum among vertebrates. One aspect of cerebellar morphology that is of particular interest is the degree of folding, or foliation, of the cerebellum and its functional significance. Here, we present the first comprehensive analysis of variation in cerebellar foliation in birds with the aim of determining the effects that allometry, phylogeny and development have on species differences in the degree of cerebellar foliation. Using both conventional and phylogenetically based statistics, we assess the effects of these variables on cerebellar foliation among 91 species of birds. Overall, our results indicate that allometry exerts the strongest effect and accounts for more than half of the interspecific variation in cerebellar foliation. In addition, we detected a significant phylogenetic effect. A comparison among orders revealed that several groups, corvids, parrots and seabirds, have significantly more foliated cerebella than other groups, after accounting for allometric effects. Lastly, developmental mode was weakly correlated with relative cerebellar foliation, but incubation period and fledging age were not. From our analyses, we conclude that allometric and phylogenetic effects exert the strongest effects and developmental mode a weak effect on avian cerebellar foliation. The phylogenetic distribution of highly foliated cerebella also suggests that cognitive and/or behavioral differences play a role in the evolution of the cerebellum. PMID:16717442

  4. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Clinical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-León, Julián; Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    Essential tremor (ET) might be a family of diseases unified by the presence of kinetic tremor, but also showing etiological, pathological, and clinical heterogeneity. In this review, we will describe the most significant clinical evidence, which suggests that ET is linked to the cerebellum. Data for this review were identified by searching PUBMED (January 1966 to May 2015) crossing the terms "essential tremor" (ET) and "cerebellum," which yielded 201 entries, 11 of which included the term "cerebellum" in the article title. This was supplemented by articles in the author's files that pertained to this topic. The wide spectrum of clinical features of ET that suggest that it originates as a cerebellar or cerebellar outflow problem include the presence of intentional tremor, gait and balance abnormalities, subtle features of dysarthria, and oculomotor abnormalities, as well as deficits in eye-hand coordination, motor learning deficits, incoordination during spiral drawing task, abnormalities in motor timing and visual reaction time, impairment of social abilities, improvement in tremor after cerebellar stroke, efficacy of deep brain stimulation (which blocks cerebellar outflow), and cognitive dysfunction. It is unlikely, however, that cerebellar dysfunction, per se, fully explains ET-associated dementia, because the cognitive deficits that have been described in patients with cerebellar lesions are generally mild. Overall, a variety of clinical findings suggest that in at least a sizable proportion of patients with ET, there is an underlying abnormality of the cerebellum and/or its pathways. PMID:26521074

  5. PATTERN FORMATION DURING DEVELOPMENT OF THE EMBRYONIC CEREBELLUM

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Hawkes

    2012-01-01

    The patterning of the embryonic cerebellum is vital to establish the elaborate zone and stripe architecture of the adult. This review considers early stages in cerebellar Purkinje cell patterning, from the organization of the ventricular zone to the development of Purkinje cell clusters – the precursors of the adult stripes.

  6. The cerebellum ages slowly according to the epigenetic clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Steve; Mah, Vei; Lu, Ake T; Woo, Jennifer S; Choi, Oi-Wa; Jasinska, Anna J; Riancho, José A; Tung, Spencer; Coles, Natalie S; Braun, Jonathan; Vinters, Harry V; Coles, L Stephen

    2015-05-01

    Studies that elucidate why some human tissues age faster than others may shed light on how we age, and ultimately suggest what interventions may be possible. Here we utilize a recent biomarker of aging (referred to as epigenetic clock) to assess the epigenetic ages of up to 30 anatomic sites from supercentenarians (subjects who reached an age of 110 or older) and younger subjects. Using three novel and three published human DNA methylation data sets, we demonstrate that the cerebellum ages more slowly than other parts of the human body. We used both transcriptional data and genetic data to elucidate molecular mechanisms which may explain this finding. The two largest superfamilies of helicases (SF1 and SF2) are significantly over-represented (p=9.2x10-9) among gene transcripts that are over-expressed in the cerebellum compared to other brain regions from the same subject. Furthermore, SNPs that are associated with epigenetic age acceleration in the cerebellum tend to be located near genes from helicase superfamilies SF1 and SF2 (enrichment p=5.8x10-3). Our genetic and transcriptional studies of epigenetic age acceleration support the hypothesis that the slow aging rate of the cerebellum is due to processes that involve RNA helicases. PMID:26000617

  7. Oscillations, Timing, Plasticity, and Learning in the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheron, G; Márquez-Ruiz, J; Dan, B

    2016-04-01

    The highly stereotyped, crystal-like architecture of the cerebellum has long served as a basis for hypotheses with regard to the function(s) that it subserves. Historically, most clinical observations and experimental work have focused on the involvement of the cerebellum in motor control, with particular emphasis on coordination and learning. Two main models have been suggested to account for cerebellar functioning. According to Llinás's theory, the cerebellum acts as a control machine that uses the rhythmic activity of the inferior olive to synchronize Purkinje cell populations for fine-tuning of coordination. In contrast, the Ito-Marr-Albus theory views the cerebellum as a motor learning machine that heuristically refines synaptic weights of the Purkinje cell based on error signals coming from the inferior olive. Here, we review the role of timing of neuronal events, oscillatory behavior, and synaptic and non-synaptic influences in functional plasticity that can be recorded in awake animals in various physiological and pathological models in a perspective that also includes non-motor aspects of cerebellar function. We discuss organizational levels from genes through intracellular signaling, synaptic network to system and behavior, as well as processes from signal production and processing to memory, delegation, and actual learning. We suggest an integrative concept for control and learning based on articulated oscillation templates.

  8. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellum mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellum SRX191026,SRX191022,...X669237,SRX669238,SRX685923,SRX685874,SRX685922,SRX150263,SRX150262,SRX685876 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellum.bed ...

  9. File list: InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellum SRX191026,SRX191022,...X150264,SRX150265,SRX019017,SRX022867,SRX022866,SRX150262,SRX150263 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellum mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellum SRX191026,SRX062950,...X669237,SRX150265,SRX019017,SRX685922,SRX685924,SRX150262,SRX685876,SRX150263 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellum.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellum mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Cerebellum SRX062952,SRX14381...7,SRX026424,SRX026426,SRX026423,SRX026425 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellum.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. The involvement of the human cerebellum in eyeblink conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwig, M; Kolb, F P; Timmann, D

    2007-01-01

    Besides its known importance for motor coordination, the cerebellum plays a major role in associative learning. The form of cerebellum-dependent associative learning, which has been examined in greatest detail, is classical conditioning of eyeblink responses. The much advanced knowledge of anatomical correlates, as well as cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in eyeblink conditioning in animal models are of particular importance because there is general acceptance that findings in humans parallel the animal data. The aim of the present review is to give an update of findings in humans. Emphasis is put on human lesion studies, which take advantage of the advances of high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, findings of functional brain imaging in healthy human subjects are reviewed. The former helped to localize areas involved in eyeblink conditioning within the cerebellum, the latter was in particular helpful in delineating extracerebellar neural substrates, which may contribute to eyeblink conditioning. Human lesion studies support the importance of cortical areas of the ipsilateral superior cerebellum both in the acquisition and timing of conditioned eyeblink responses (CR). Furthermore, the ipsilateral cerebellar cortex seems to be also important in extinction of CRs. Cortical areas, which are important for CR acquisition, overlap with areas related to the control of the unconditioned eyeblink response. Likewise, cortical lesions are followed by increased amplitudes of unconditioned eyeblinks. These findings are in good accordance with the animal literature. Knowledge about contributions of the cerebellar nuclei in humans, however, is sparse. Due to methodological limitations both of human lesion and functional MRI studies, at present no clear conclusions can be drawn on the relative contributions of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei.

  12. The cerebellum ages slowly according to the epigenetic clock

    OpenAIRE

    Horvath, Steve; Mah, Vei; Lu, Ake T.; Woo, Jennifer S.; Choi, Oi‐Wa; Jasinska, Anna J.; Riancho Moral, José Antonio; Tung, Spencer; Coles, Natalie S.; Braun, Jonathan; Vinters, Harry V.; Coles, L. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Studies that elucidate why some human tissues age faster than others may shed light on how we age, and ultimately suggest what interventions may be possible. Here we utilize a recent biomarker of aging (referred to as epigenetic clock) to assess the epigenetic ages of up to 30 anatomic sites from supercentenarians (subjects who reached an age of 110 or older) and younger subjects. Using three novel and three published human DNA methylation data sets, we demonstrate that the cerebellum ages mo...

  13. Cerebellum and cognition: viewed from philosophy of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frings, M; Maschke, M; Timmann, D

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, it is believed, that the primary function of the cerebellum is to coordinate movement. During the past three decades, it has been controversially discussed, whether the cerebellum may also contribute to cognition and mental states like emotions. In this paper, no position relating to this controversy will be taken. Instead, the hypothesis of non-motor functions of the cerebellum will be viewed from the position of the philosophy of mind. The remarkably uniform microscopic structure and neuronal networks of the cerebellum have led to computer analogies by several authors. The main idea of functionalism, i.e., a theory within the philosophy of mind, is that the mental relates to the physical as computer software does to hardware. This raises the question, whether a cerebellar contribution to cognition and mental states would support functionalism in the philosophy of mind. No support of functionalism could be found in this study, investigating the classical philosophical arguments pro and con functionalism such as those of multiple realizability, the Chinese room and the explanatory gap, while taking the results of cerebellar research into account. On the other hand, philosophical reflection suggests a careful use of the phrases "cognitive dysmetria" (Andreasen et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 1996;93:9985-90) in the context of mental illness and of "dysmetria of thought" (Schmahmann Arch Neurol. 1991;48:1178-87). According to the argument of the explanatory gap there is at present little support for the assumption that the phenomenal experiencing of an altered emotion can be reduced to the dysmetria of movement.

  14. Encoding of action by the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzfeld, David J; Kojima, Yoshiko; Soetedjo, Robijanto; Shadmehr, Reza

    2015-10-15

    Execution of accurate eye movements depends critically on the cerebellum, suggesting that the major output neurons of the cerebellum, Purkinje cells, may predict motion of the eye. However, this encoding of action for rapid eye movements (saccades) has remained unclear: Purkinje cells show little consistent modulation with respect to saccade amplitude or direction, and critically, their discharge lasts longer than the duration of a saccade. Here we analysed Purkinje-cell discharge in the oculomotor vermis of behaving rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and found neurons that increased or decreased their activity during saccades. We estimated the combined effect of these two populations via their projections to the caudal fastigial nucleus, and uncovered a simple-spike population response that precisely predicted the real-time motion of the eye. When we organized the Purkinje cells according to each cell's complex-spike directional tuning, the simple-spike population response predicted both the real-time speed and direction of saccade multiplicatively via a gain field. This suggests that the cerebellum predicts the real-time motion of the eye during saccades via the combined inputs of Purkinje cells onto individual nucleus neurons. A gain-field encoding of simple spikes emerges if the Purkinje cells that project onto a nucleus neuron are not selected at random but share a common complex-spike property. PMID:26469054

  15. Effect of Maternal Diabetes on Cerebellum Histomorphometry in Neonatal Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Khaksar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In pregnant mothers, maternal diabetes occurs when pancreas can't produce enough insulin resulting in increased blood glucose levels in the mother and subsequently in the fetus. This investigation was conducted to evaluate the effects of maternal diabetes on cerebellum of offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM, which was carried out at the veterinary faculty of Shiraz University in 2007-2008. Methods: This was an experimental study that included sixteen normal adult female rats divided in two groups. Diabetes was induced in one group by Alloxan agent. Both groups became pregnant by natural mating . At 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after birth, the cerebellum of all offsprings were collected and the weight of neonates was also measured. After producing histological slides, Olympus BX51 microscope and ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ Olysia softwarwere used. Various histological parameters used included gray and white matters thicknesses (µ, the number of cells in gray and white matter separately per unit and the ratio of gray matter to white matter. Results: Cerebellar parameters decreased in ODM as compared to the control group. The body weight of ODM was significantly more than that of the control group (p< 0.05. Conclusions: Maternal hyperglycaemia exhibited deleterious effects on cerebellum during fetal life, which remained persistent during postneonatal period. Maternal diabetes also resulted in reduction of number of cells and thicknesses of both gray and white matter.

  16. STUDY ON THE GROWTH OF CEREBELLUM IN NEWBORN INFANTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟利; 钟美萍; 吴圣楣; 罗敏洁

    2000-01-01

    Objective To know the growth of the cerebellum in newborn infants. Methods The central vermian area (CVA) of the cerebellum was measured by head ultrasonography in 90 newborns including 65full- terms, 14 preterms and 11 small for gestational age infants (SGA). Results The average age of the newborn infants were 4.7d (3~7d). The mean CVA in full- terms was 5.8±0.8cm2, which was significantly greater than that in preterms (3.7±1.0cm2), and SGA (5.1±0.8cm2), respectively. However, when corrected for birth weight (BW), the ratio of CVA/BW in term SGA was 2.07, being significantly higher than the ratio of 1.72 in normal full-term newborns. There was no difference between male and female infants. Statistically significant relationships were found between CVA and BW (r=0.8129, P<0.01) and between CVA and gestational age (r=0.7450, P<0.01). Conclusion The study provide some understanding on the growth of the cerebellum, and the cerebellar measurement by cranial ultrasound is helpful for the assessment of neurological maturation in newborn infants.

  17. The therapeutic potential of the cerebellum in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal Lynn Parker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The cognitive role of the cerebellum is critically tied to its distributed connections throughout the brain. Accumulating evidence from anatomical, structural and functional imaging, and lesion studies advocate a cognitive network involving indirect connections between the cerebellum and non-motor areas in the prefrontal cortex. Cerebellar stimulation dynamically influences activity in several regions of the frontal cortex and effectively improves cognition in schizophrenia. In this manuscript, we summarize current literature on the cingulocerebellar circuit and we introduce a method to interrogate this circuit combining opotogenetics, neuropharmacology, and electrophysiology in awake-behaving animals while minimizing incidental stimulation of neighboring cerebellar nuclei. We propose the novel hypothesis that optogenetic cerebellar stimulation can restore aberrant frontal activity and rescue impaired cognition in schizophrenia. We focus on how a known cognitive region in the frontal cortex, the anterior cingulate, is influenced by the cerebellum. This circuit is of particular interest because it has been confirmed using tracing studies, neuroimaging reveals its role in cognitive tasks, it is conserved from rodents to humans, and diseases such as schizophrenia and autism appear in its aberrancy. Novel tract tracing results presented here provide support for how these two areas communicate. The primary pathway involves a disynaptic connection between the cerebellar dentate nuclei and the anterior cingulate cortex. Secondarily, the pathway from cerebellar fastigial nuclei to the ventral tegmental area, which supplies dopamine to the prefrontal cortex, may play a role as schizophrenia characteristically involves dopamine deficiencies. We hope that the hypothesis described here will inspire new therapeutic strategies targeting currently untreatable cognitive impairments in schizophrenia.

  18. MRI Study of the Cerebellum in Young Bipolar Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Monkul, E. Serap; Hatch, John P; Sassi, Roberto B.; Axelson, David; Brambilla, Paolo; Nicoletti, Mark A.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Soares, Jair C.

    2007-01-01

    Prior studies demonstrate structural abnormalities of cerebellar vermis in adult bipolar patients. Cerebella of 16 young bipolar patients (mean age ± S.D. = 15.5 ± 3.4) and 21 healthy controls (mean age ± S.D. = 16.9 ± 3.8) were examined using magnetic resonance imaging. The volumes of right, left and total cerebellum, vermis, and areas of vermal regions V1 (lobules I–V), V2 (lobules VI–VII), and V3 (lobules VIII–X) were measured. Analysis of covariance, with age, gender, and intra-cranial br...

  19. Encoding of action by the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum

    OpenAIRE

    Herzfeld, David J.; Kojima, Yoshiko; Soetedjo, Robijanto; Shadmehr, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Summary Execution of accurate eye movements depends critically on the cerebellum 1,2,3 , suggesting that Purkinje cells (P-cells) may predict motion of the eye. Yet, this encoding has remained a long-standing puzzle: P-cells show little consistent modulation with respect to saccade amplitude 4,5 or direction 4 , and critically, their discharge lasts longer than duration of a saccade 6,7 . Here, we analyzed P-cell discharge in the oculomotor vermis of behaving monkeys 8,9 and found neurons tha...

  20. The human cerebellum: a review of physiologic neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roostaei, Tina; Nazeri, Arash; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Minagar, Alireza

    2014-11-01

    The cerebellum resides in the posterior cranial fossa dorsal to the brainstem and has diverse connections to the cerebrum, brain stem, and spinal cord. It is anatomically and physiologically divided into distinct functional compartments and is composed of highly regular arrays of neuronal units, each sharing the same basic cerebellar microcircuitry. Its circuitry is critically involved in motor control and motor learning, and its role in nonmotor cognitive and affective functions is becoming increasingly recognized. This article describes the cerebellar gross and histologic neuroanatomy in relation to its function, and the relevance of cerebellar circuitry and firing patterns to motor learning. PMID:25439284

  1. The cerebellum: a new key structure in the navigation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle eRochefort

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Early investigations of cerebellar function focused on motor learning, in particular on eyeblink conditioning and adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, and led to the general view that cerebellar Long Term Depression (LTD at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses is the neural correlate of cerebellar motor learning. Thereafter, while the full complexity of cerebellar plasticities was being unraveled, cerebellar involvement in more cognitive tasks - including spatial navigation - was further investigated. However, cerebellar implication in spatial navigation remains a matter of debate because motor deficits frequently associated with cerebellar damage often prevent the dissociation between its role in spatial cognition from its implication in motor function. Here, we review recent findings from behavioral and electrophysiological analyses of cerebellar mutant mouse models, which show that the cerebellum might participate in the construction of hippocampal spatial representation map (i.e. place cells and thereby in goal-directed navigation. These recent advances in cerebellar research point toward a model in which computation from the cerebellum could be required for spatial representation and would involve the integration of multi-source self-motion information to: 1 transform the reference frame of vestibular signals and 2 distinguish between self- and externally-generated vestibular signals. We eventually present herein anatomical and functional connectivity data supporting a cerebello-hippocampal interaction. Whilst a direct cerebello-hippocampal projection has been suggested, recent investigations rather favor a multi-synaptic pathway involving posterior parietal and retrosplenial cortices, two regions critically involved in spatial navigation.

  2. Cerebellum: from Fundamentals to Translational Approaches. The Seventh International Symposium of the Society for Research on the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter

    2016-02-01

    In terms of cerebellar research and ataxiology, a most fascinating period is currently going on. Numerous academic groups are now focusing their innovative research on the so-called little brain, hidden at the bottom of our brain. Indeed, its unique anatomical features make the cerebellum a wonderful window to address major questions about the central nervous system. The seventh international symposium of the SRC was held in Brussels at the Palace of Academies from May 8 to 10, 2015. The main goal of this dense symposium was to gather in a 2-day meeting senior researchers of exceptional scientific quality and talented junior scientists from all over the world working in the multidisciplinary field of cerebellar research. Fundamental and clinical researchers shared the latest knowledge and developments in this rapidly growing field. New ideas, addressed in a variety of inspiring talks, provoked a vivid debate. Advances in genetics, development, electrophysiology, neuroimaging, neurocognition and affect, as well as in the cerebellar ataxias and the controversies on the roles and functions of the cerebellum were presented. The Ferdinando Rossi lecture and the key-note lecture were delivered by Jan Voogd and Chris De Zeeuw, respectively. Contacts between researchers of different neuroscientific disciplines established a robust basis for novel trends and promising new cooperations between researchers and their centers spread all over the world. PMID:26744149

  3. High frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to the cerebellum and implicit processing of happy facial expressions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Enter, D.; Hoppenbrouwers, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous research has demonstrated that the cerebellum is involved in emotive and cognitive processes. Furthermore, recent findings suggest high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the cerebellum has mood-improving properties. We sought to further explore the

  4. Wavelet analysis of MR functional data from the cerebellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen, Romero Sánchez, E-mail: alphacentauri-hp@hotmail.com, E-mail: marcos-vaquezr@hotmail.com, E-mail: isabeldgg@hotmail.com; Vásquez Reyes Marcos, A., E-mail: alphacentauri-hp@hotmail.com, E-mail: marcos-vaquezr@hotmail.com, E-mail: isabeldgg@hotmail.com; González Gómez Dulce, I., E-mail: alphacentauri-hp@hotmail.com, E-mail: marcos-vaquezr@hotmail.com, E-mail: isabeldgg@hotmail.com; Hernández López, Javier M., E-mail: javierh@fcfm.buap.mx [Faculty of Physics and Mathematics, BUAP, Puebla, Pue (Mexico); Silvia, Hidalgo Tobón, E-mail: shidbon@gmail.com [Infant Hospital of Mexico, Federico Gómez, Mexico DF. Mexico and Physics Department, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana. Iztapalapa, Mexico DF. (Mexico); Pilar, Dies Suarez, E-mail: pilydies@yahoo.com, E-mail: neurodoc@prodigy.net.mx; Eduardo, Barragán Pérez, E-mail: pilydies@yahoo.com, E-mail: neurodoc@prodigy.net.mx [Infant Hospital of Mexico, Federico Gómez, Mexico DF. (Mexico); Benito, De Celis Alonso, E-mail: benileon@yahoo.com [Faculty of Physics and Mathematics, BUAP, Puebla, Pue. Mexico and Foundation for Development Carlos Sigüenza. Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    The main goal of this project was to create a computer algorithm based on wavelet analysis of BOLD signals, which automatically diagnosed ADHD using information from resting state MR experiments. Male right handed volunteers (infants with ages between 7 and 11 years old) were studied and compared with age matched controls. Wavelet analysis, which is a mathematical tool used to decompose time series into elementary constituents and detect hidden information, was applied here to the BOLD signal obtained from the cerebellum 8 region of all our volunteers. Statistical differences between the values of the a parameters of wavelet analysis was found and showed significant differences (p<0.02) between groups. This difference might help in the future to distinguish healthy from ADHD patients and therefore diagnose ADHD.

  5. CEREBELLUM: LINKS BETWEEN DEVELOPMENT, DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS AND MOTOR LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario U Manto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the links and interactions between development and motor learning has noticeable implications for the understanding and management of neurodevelopmental disorders. This is particularly relevant for the cerebellum which is critical for sensorimotor learning. The olivocerebellar pathway is a key pathway contributing to learning of motor skills. Its developmental maturation and remodelling are being unravelled. Advances in genetics have led to major improvements in our appraisal of the genes involved in cerebellar development, especially studies in mutant mice. Cerebellar neurogenesis is compartmentalized in relationship with neurotransmitter fate. The Engrailed-2 gene is a major actor of the specification of cerebellar cell types and late embryogenic morphogenesis. Math1, expressed by the rhombic lip (RL, is required for the genesis of glutamatergic neurons. Mutants deficient for the transcription factor Ptf1a display a lack of Purkinje cells and gabaergic interneurons. Rora gene contributes to the developmental signalling between granule cells and Purkinje neurons. The expression profile of SHH (Sonic hedgehog in postnatal stages determines the final size/shape of the cerebellum. Genes affecting the development impact upon the physiological properties of the cerebellar circuits. For instance, receptors are developmentally regulated and their action interferes directly with developmental processes. Another field of research which is expanding relates to very preterm neonates. They are at risk for cerebellar lesions, which may themselves impair the developmental events. Very preterm neonates often show sensori-motor deficits, highlighting another major link between impaired development and learning deficiencies. Pathways playing a critical role in cerebellar development are likely to become therapeutical targets for several neurodevelopmental disorders.

  6. The cerebellum and visual perceptual learning: evidence from a motion extrapolation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deluca, Cristina; Golzar, Ashkan; Santandrea, Elisa; Lo Gerfo, Emanuele; Eštočinová, Jana; Moretto, Giuseppe; Fiaschi, Antonio; Panzeri, Marta; Mariotti, Caterina; Tinazzi, Michele; Chelazzi, Leonardo

    2014-09-01

    Visual perceptual learning is widely assumed to reflect plastic changes occurring along the cerebro-cortical visual pathways, including at the earliest stages of processing, though increasing evidence indicates that higher-level brain areas are also involved. Here we addressed the possibility that the cerebellum plays an important role in visual perceptual learning. Within the realm of motor control, the cerebellum supports learning of new skills and recalibration of motor commands when movement execution is consistently perturbed (adaptation). Growing evidence indicates that the cerebellum is also involved in cognition and mediates forms of cognitive learning. Therefore, the obvious question arises whether the cerebellum might play a similar role in learning and adaptation within the perceptual domain. We explored a possible deficit in visual perceptual learning (and adaptation) in patients with cerebellar damage using variants of a novel motion extrapolation, psychophysical paradigm. Compared to their age- and gender-matched controls, patients with focal damage to the posterior (but not the anterior) cerebellum showed strongly diminished learning, in terms of both rate and amount of improvement over time. Consistent with a double-dissociation pattern, patients with focal damage to the anterior cerebellum instead showed more severe clinical motor deficits, indicative of a distinct role of the anterior cerebellum in the motor domain. The collected evidence demonstrates that a pure form of slow-incremental visual perceptual learning is crucially dependent on the intact cerebellum, bearing the notion that the human cerebellum acts as a learning device for motor, cognitive and perceptual functions. We interpret the deficit in terms of an inability to fine-tune predictive models of the incoming flow of visual perceptual input over time. Moreover, our results suggest a strong dissociation between the role of different portions of the cerebellum in motor versus

  7. Emotion and Theory of Mind in Schizophrenia-Investigating the Role of the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersill, Omar; Knee-Zaska, Charlotte; Donohoe, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Social cognitive dysfunction, including deficits in facial emotion recognition and theory of mind, is a core feature of schizophrenia and more strongly predicts functional outcome than neurocognition alone. Although traditionally considered to play an important role in motor coordination, the cerebellum has been suggested to play a role in emotion processing and theory of mind, and also shows structural and functional abnormalities in schizophrenia. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the specific role of the cerebellum in emotion and theory of mind deficits in schizophrenia using previously published functional neuroimaging studies. PubMed and PsycINFO were used to search for all functional neuroimaging studies reporting altered cerebellum activity in schizophrenia patients during emotion processing or theory of mind tasks, published until December 2014. Overall, 14 functional neuroimaging studies were retrieved. Most emotion studies reported lower cerebellum activity in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls. In contrast, the theory of mind studies reported mixed findings. Altered activity was observed across several posterior cerebellar regions involved in emotion and cognition. Weaker cerebellum activity in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls during emotion processing may contribute to blunted affect and reduced ability to recognise emotion in others. This research could be expanded by examining the relationship between cerebellum function, symptomatology and behaviour, and examining cerebellum functional connectivity in patients during emotion and theory of mind tasks. PMID:26155761

  8. Alternative kynurenic acid synthesis routes studied in the rat cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonali eBlanco Ayala

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Kynurenic acid (KYNA, an astrocyte-derived, endogenous antagonist of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine and excitatory amino acid receptors, regulates glutamatergic, GABAergic, cholinergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission in several regions of the rodent brain. Synthesis of KYNA in the brain and elsewhere is generally attributed to the enzymatic conversion of L-kynurenine (L-KYN by kynurenine aminotransferases (KATs. However, alternative routes, including KYNA formation from D-kynurenine (D-KYN by D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO and the direct transformation of kynurenine to KYNA by reactive oxygen species (ROS, have been demonstrated in the rat brain. Using the rat cerebellum, a region of low KAT activity and high DAAO activity, the present experiments were designed to examine KYNA production from L-KYN or D-KYN by KAT and DAAO, respectively, and to investigate the effect of ROS on KYNA synthesis. In chemical combinatorial systems, both L-KYN and D-KYN interacted directly with peroxynitrite (ONOO- and hydroxyl radicals (OH•, resulting in the formation of KYNA. In tissue homogenates, the non-specific KAT inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA; 1 mM reduced KYNA production from L-KYN and D-KYN by 85.1 ± 1.7% and 27.1 ± 4.5%, respectively. Addition of DAAO inhibitors (benzoic acid, kojic acid or 3-methylpyrazole-5-carboxylic acid; 5 µM each attenuated KYNA formation from L-KYN and D-KYN by ~35% and ~66%, respectively. ONOO- (25 µM potentiated KYNA production from both L-KYN and D-KYN, and these effects were reduced by DAAO inhibition. AOAA attenuated KYNA production from L-KYN + ONOO- but not from D-KYN + ONOO-. In vivo, extracellular KYNA levels increased rapidly after perfusion of ONOO- and, more prominently, after subsequent perfusion with L-KYN or D-KYN (100 µM. Taken together, these results suggest that different mechanisms are involved in KYNA production in the rat cerebellum, and that, specifically, DAAO and ROS can function as alternative routes

  9. Fractal dimension analysis of cerebellum in Chiari Malformation type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Engin; Kara, Sadık; Akdemir, Hidayet; Kırış, Adem

    2015-09-01

    Chiari Malformation type I (CM-I) is a serious neurological disorder that is characterized by hindbrain herniation. Our aim was to evaluate the usefulness of fractal analysis in CM-I patients. To examine the morphological complexity features of this disorder, fractal dimension (FD) of cerebellar regions were estimated from magnetic resonance images (MRI) of 17 patients with CM-I and 16 healthy control subjects in this study. The areas of white matter (WM), gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were calculated and the corresponding FD values were computed using a 2D box-counting method in both groups. The results indicated that CM-I patients had significantly higher (p<0.05) FD values of GM, WM and CSF tissues compared to control group. According to the results of correlation analysis between FD values and the corresponding area values, FD and area values of GM tissues in the patients group were found to be correlated. The results of the present study suggest that FD values of cerebellar regions may be a discriminative feature and a useful marker for investigation of abnormalities in the cerebellum of CM-I patients. Further studies to explore the changes in cerebellar regions with the help of 3D FD analysis and volumetric calculations should be performed as a future work.

  10. [Ultrastructural changes in the cerebellum of experimental hypothyroidism (cretinism)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshimaru, M; Miyakawa, T; Kuramoto, M

    1983-08-01

    We examined the cerebellum of the rats being the experimental hypothyroidism (cretinism) on the 20th day, 35th day and 60th day by the light and electron microscope. The remarkable findings were observed to the experimental group on the 20th day. The maturational states of this group correspond to that of the 16th day of the control group. On the other hand, the remarkable pathological findings were not observed on the 35th and 60th day of the experimental group. According to the findings of the experimental rats on the 20th day, the changes of the cells were the retention of the external granule cells and the maturational changes of the internal granule cells. We recognized the retardation of the maturational timing and a disagreement of the maturational rate of the internal granule cells. The lamellar bodies being the disturbance of the mitochondrial cristae were observed. About the white matter, the myelinated nerve fibers were a small quantity in number, and the deficiency of the myelin synthesis, the maturational disturbance of oligoglia were seen. In the several axons, the lamellar bodies and the honeycomb like structures were seen. It is concluded that the maturational disturbance of the internal granule cells are due to the disturbance of the secondary protein synthesis by the hypothyroid state and the degeneration of the mitocondria. The deficiency of the myelin synthesis is related to the maturational disturbance of oligoglia. PMID:6639807

  11. Sudden death due to a cystic lesion in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igari, Yui; Hosoya, Tadashi; Hayashizaki, Yoshie; Usui, Akihito; Kawasumi, Yusuke; Usui, Kiyotaka; Funayama, Masato

    2014-12-01

    A middle-aged female patient with a depressive disorder presented to a mental hospital because of a 2-month worsening history of headache, dizziness, and nausea. The next morning, she was observed to be sleeping, but was then found dead 1h later. Postmortem computed tomography and autopsy revealed a large cyst in the right cerebellar hemisphere, hydrocephalus, and transforaminal herniation. Careful observation revealed an approximately 0.4cm×0.8cm slightly grayish discoloration in the cyst wall that was diagnosed as hemangioblastoma based on its histological features. Finally, we concluded that the cause of death in this case was attributable to the brain stem compression, which was caused by obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to the cystic hemangioblastoma in the cerebellum. The symptoms for 2 months before her death had most likely resulted from increased intracranial pressure. Hemangioblastomas usually appear as nodules in the wall of the cyst, but the tumor in our case looked like just a slightly grayish discoloration. Therefore, cystic lesions in the CNS need to be carefully examined. PMID:25459277

  12. [Synapse elimination and functional neural circuit formation in the cerebellum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Masanobu

    2013-06-01

    Neuronal connections are initially redundant, but unnecessary connections are eliminated subsequently during postnatal development. This process, known as 'synapse elimination', is thought to be crucial for establishing functionally mature neural circuits. The climbing fiber (CF) to the Purkinje cell (PC) synapse in the cerebellum is a representative model of synapse elimination. We disclose that one-to-one connection from CF to PC is established through four distinct phases: (1) strengthening of a single CF among multiple CFs in each PC at P3-P7, (2) translocation of a single strengthened CF to PC dendrites from around P9, and (3) early phase (P7 to around P11) and (4) late phase (around P12 to P17) of elimination of weak CF synapses from PC somata. Mice with PC-selective deletion of P/Q-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (VDCC) exhibit severe defects in strengthening of single CFs, dendritic translocation of single CFs and CF elimination from P7. In contrast, mice with a mutation of a single allele for the GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 have a selective impairment of CF elimination from P10 due to reduced inhibition and elevated Ca2+ influx to PC somata. Thus, regulation of Ca2+ influx to PCs is crucial for the four phases of CF synapse elimination. PMID:25069248

  13. Ethanol Neurotoxicity in the Developing Cerebellum: Underlying Mechanisms and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrish Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is the main constituent of alcoholic beverages that exerts toxicity to neuronal development. Ethanol affects synaptogenesis and prevents proper brain development. In humans, synaptogenesis takes place during the third trimester of pregnancy, and in rodents this period corresponds to the initial few weeks of postnatal development. In this period neuronal maturation and differentiation begin and neuronal cells start migrating to their ultimate destinations. Although the neuronal development of all areas of the brain is affected, the cerebellum and cerebellar neurons are more susceptible to the damaging effects of ethanol. Ethanol’s harmful effects include neuronal cell death, impaired differentiation, reduction of neuronal numbers, and weakening of neuronal plasticity. Neuronal development requires many hormones and growth factors such as retinoic acid, nerve growth factors, and cytokines. These factors regulate development and differentiation of neurons by acting through various receptors and their signaling pathways. Ethanol exposure during development impairs neuronal signaling mechanisms mediated by the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptors, the retinoic acid receptors, and by growth factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF. In combination, these ethanol effects disrupt cellular homeostasis, reduce the survival and migration of neurons, and lead to various developmental defects in the brain. Here we review the signaling mechanisms that are required for proper neuronal development, and how these processes are impaired by ethanol resulting in harmful consequences to brain development.

  14. The cerebellum: its role in language and related cognitive and affective functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Hyo Jung; Paquier, Philippe; Verhoeven, Jo; Mariën, Peter

    2013-12-01

    The traditional view on the cerebellum as the sole coordinator of motor function has been substantially redefined during the past decades. Neuroanatomical, neuroimaging and clinical studies have extended the role of the cerebellum to the modulation of cognitive and affective processing. Neuroanatomical studies have demonstrated cerebellar connectivity with the supratentorial association areas involved in higher cognitive and affective functioning, while functional neuroimaging and clinical studies have provided evidence of cerebellar involvement in a variety of cognitive and affective tasks. This paper reviews the recently acknowledged role of the cerebellum in linguistic and related cognitive and behavioral-affective functions. In addition, typical cerebellar syndromes such as the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS) and the posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) will be briefly discussed and the current hypotheses dealing with the presumed neurobiological mechanisms underlying the linguistic, cognitive and affective modulatory role of the cerebellum will be reviewed.

  15. Remote Hemorrhage in the Cerebellum and Temporal Lobe after Lumbar Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Shotaro Watanabe; Seiji Ohtori; Sumihisa Orita; Kazuyo Yamauchi; Yawara Eguchi; Yasuchika Aoki; Junichi Nakamura; Masayuki Miyagi; Miyako Suzuki; Gou Kubota; Kazuhide Inage; Takeshi Sainoh; Jun Sato; Yasuhiro Shiga; Koki Abe

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar hemorrhage remote from the site of surgery can complicate neurosurgical procedures. However, this complication after lumbar surgery is rare. Furthermore, hemorrhage in both the cerebellum and the temporal lobe after spine surgery is rarer still. Herein we present a case of remote hemorrhage in both the cerebellum and the temporal lobe after lumbar spine surgery. A 79-year-old woman with a Schwannoma at the L4 level presented with low back and bilateral leg pain refractory to conser...

  16. Cerebellar Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptors are Intrinsic to the Cerebellum: Implications for Diverse Functional Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jill R.; Ortinski, Pavel I.; Sherrard, Rachel M.

    2016-01-01

    Although recent studies have delineated the specific nicotinic subtypes present in the mammalian cerebellum, very little is known about their location or function within the cerebellum. This is of increased interest since nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) in the cerebellum have recently been implicated in the pathology of autism spectrum disorders. To begin to better understand the roles of these heteromeric nAChRs in the cerebellar circuitry and their therapeutic potential as targets for drug development, we used various chemical and stereotaxic lesion models in conjunction with slice electrophysiology to examine how specific heteromeric nAChR subtypes may influence the surrounding cerebellar circuitry. Using subunit-specific immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled nAChRs in the cerebella following N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride, p-chloroamphetamine, and pendunculotomy lesions, we show that most, if not all, cerebellar nicotinic receptors are present in cells within the cerebellum itself and not in extracerebellar afferents. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the β4-containing, but not the β2-containing, nAChRs intrinsic to the cerebellum can regulate inhibitory synaptic efficacy at two major classes of cerebellar neurons. These tandem findings suggest that nAChRs may present a potential drug target for disorders involving the cerebellum. PMID:21562921

  17. Realtime cerebellum: a large-scale spiking network model of the cerebellum that runs in realtime using a graphics processing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tadashi; Igarashi, Jun

    2013-11-01

    The cerebellum plays an essential role in adaptive motor control. Once we are able to build a cerebellar model that runs in realtime, which means that a computer simulation of 1 s in the simulated world completes within 1 s in the real world, the cerebellar model could be used as a realtime adaptive neural controller for physical hardware such as humanoid robots. In this paper, we introduce "Realtime Cerebellum (RC)", a new implementation of our large-scale spiking network model of the cerebellum, which was originally built to study cerebellar mechanisms for simultaneous gain and timing control and acted as a general-purpose supervised learning machine of spatiotemporal information known as reservoir computing, on a graphics processing unit (GPU). Owing to the massive parallel computing capability of a GPU, RC runs in realtime, while reproducing qualitatively the same simulation results of the Pavlovian delay eyeblink conditioning with the previous version. RC is adopted as a realtime adaptive controller of a humanoid robot, which is instructed to learn a proper timing to swing a bat to hit a flying ball online. These results suggest that RC provides a means to apply the computational power of the cerebellum as a versatile supervised learning machine towards engineering applications. PMID:23434303

  18. The Intracellular Signaling Molecule Darpp-32 Is a Marker for Principal Neurons in the Cerebellum and Cerebellum-Like Circuits of Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robra, Lena; Thirumalai, Vatsala

    2016-01-01

    The dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein of apparent molecular weight 32 kDa (Darpp-32) is an inhibitory subunit of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1). Darpp-32 activity is regulated by multiple ligand-activated G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). This protein is coded for by the protein phosphatase-1 regulatory subunit 1b (ppp1r1b) gene. Here, we provide experimental evidence for the presence of multiple isoforms of ppp1r1b in zebrafish. We show that these isoforms are differentially expressed during development with the full-length isoform being maternally deposited. Next, with a custom polyclonal antibody generated against the full-length protein, we show that in the adult, Darpp-32 is strongly expressed in principal neurons of the cerebellum and cerebellum-like circuits. These include Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum, Type-I neurons in the optic tectum, and crest cells in the medial octavolateralis nucleus (MON). We confirmed the identity of these neurons through their colocalization with Parvalbumin 7 immunoreactivity. Darpp-32 is seen in the somata and dendrites of these neurons with faint staining in the axons. In all of these regions, Darpp-32-immunoreactive cells were in close proximity to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactive puncta indicating the presence of direct catecholaminergic input to these neurons. Darpp-32 immunoreactivity was seen in Purkinje neurons as early as 3 days post-fertilization (dpf) when Purkinje neurons are first specified. In sum, we show that Darpp-32, a signaling integrator, is a specific marker of principal neurons in the cerebellum and cerebellum-like circuits in zebrafish. PMID:27540357

  19. Social cognition and the cerebellum: a meta-analysis of over 350 fMRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Overwalle, Frank; Baetens, Kris; Mariën, Peter; Vandekerckhove, Marie

    2014-02-01

    This meta-analysis explores the role of the cerebellum in social cognition. Recent meta-analyses of neuroimaging studies since 2008 demonstrate that the cerebellum is only marginally involved in social cognition and emotionality, with a few meta-analyses pointing to an involvement of at most 54% of the individual studies. In this study, novel meta-analyses of over 350 fMRI studies, dividing up the domain of social cognition in homogeneous subdomains, confirmed this low involvement of the cerebellum in conditions that trigger the mirror network (e.g., when familiar movements of body parts are observed) and the mentalizing network (when no moving body parts or unfamiliar movements are present). There is, however, one set of mentalizing conditions that strongly involve the cerebellum in 50-100% of the individual studies. In particular, when the level of abstraction is high, such as when behaviors are described in terms of traits or permanent characteristics, in terms of groups rather than individuals, in terms of the past (episodic autobiographic memory) or the future rather than the present, or in terms of hypothetical events that may happen. An activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis conducted in this study reveals that the cerebellum is critically implicated in social cognition and that the areas of the cerebellum which are consistently involved in social cognitive processes show extensive overlap with the areas involved in sensorimotor (during mirror and self-judgments tasks) as well as in executive functioning (across all tasks). We discuss the role of the cerebellum in social cognition in general and in higher abstraction mentalizing in particular. We also point out a number of methodological limitations of some available studies on the social brain that hamper the detection of cerebellar activity.

  20. Effects of combined prenatal stress and toluene exposure on apoptotic neurodegeneration in cerebellum and hippocampus of rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Ole; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Hass, Ulla;

    2004-01-01

    the offspring for developmental neurotoxicity and level of apoptosis in the brain. The number of apoptotic cells in cerebellum postnatal day 22, 24, and 27 and in hippocampus (postnatal day 22, 24, and 27) were counted after visualization by the TUNEL staining or measured by DNA-laddering technique. Caspase-3...... activity was determined in cerebellum (postnatal day 6, 22, 24, and 27) and in hippocampus (postnatal day 6 and 22). TUNEL staining and DNA-laddering technique showed a marked decrease in number of apoptotic cells from postnatal day 22 to 27 in both cerebellum and hippocampus. Apparently, a peak...... in the number of TUNEL positive cells was identified in cerebellum at postnatal day 22. There was no statistically significant influence of exposure except that DNA-laddering in cerebellum at postnatal day 27 was increased by toluene exposure. Caspase-3 activity decreased in cerebellum and hippocampus with age...

  1. Hh and Wnt signaling regulate formation of olig2+ neurons in the zebrafish cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Karen A; Topczewska, Jolanta M; Weidinger, Gilbert; Dorsky, Richard I; Appel, Bruce

    2008-06-01

    The cerebellum, which forms from anterior hindbrain, coordinates motor movements and balance. Sensory input from the periphery is relayed and modulated by cerebellar interneurons, which are organized in layers. The mechanisms that specify the different neurons of the cerebellum and direct its layered organization remain poorly understood. Drawing from investigations of spinal cord, we hypothesized that the embryonic cerebellum is patterned on the dorsoventral axis by opposing morphogens. We tested this using zebrafish. Here we show that expression of olig2, which encodes a bHLH transcription factor, marks a distinct subset of neurons with similarities to eurydendroid neurons, the principal efferent neurons of the teleost cerebellum. In combination with other markers, olig2 reveals a dorsoventral organization of cerebellar neurons in embryos. Disruption of Hedgehog signaling, which patterns the ventral neural tube, produced a two-fold increase in the number of olig2(+) neurons. By contrast, olig2(+) neurons did not develop in embryos deficient for Wnt signaling, which patterns dorsal neural tube, nor did they develop in embryos deficient for both Hedgehog and Wnt signaling. Our data indicate that Hedgehog and Wnt work in opposition across the dorsoventral axis of the cerebellum to regulate formation of olig2(+) neurons. Specifically, we propose that Hedgehog limits the range of Wnt signaling, which is necessary for olig2(+) neuron development.

  2. Effects of local anesthesia of the cerebellum on classical fear conditioning in goldfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirano Ruriko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Besides the amygdala, of which emotion roles have been intensively studied, the cerebellum has also been demonstrated to play a critical role in simple classical fear conditioning in both mammals and fishes. In the present study, we examined the effect of local administration of the anesthetic agent lidocaine into the cerebellum on fear-related, classical heart-rate conditioning in goldfish. Methods The effects of microinjection of the anesthetic agent lidocaine into the cerebellum on fear conditioning were investigated in goldfish. The fear conditioning paradigm was delayed classical conditioning with light as a conditioned stimulus and electric shock as an unconditioned stimulus; cardiac deceleration (bradycardia was the conditioned response. Results Injecting lidocaine into the cerebellum had no effect on the base heart rate, an arousal/orienting response to the novel stimulus (i.e., the first presentation of light, or an unconditioned response to electric shock. However, lidocaine injection greatly impaired acquisition of conditioned bradycardia. Lidocaine injection 60 min before the start of the conditioning procedure showed no effect on acquisition of conditioned bradycardia, indicating that the effect of lidocaine was reversible. Conclusions The present results further confirm the idea that the cerebellum in teleost fish, as in mammals, is critically involved in classical fear conditioning.

  3. Expression of thrombin and its associated protein in cerebellum of human and rat after intracerebral hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-yi; QI Ji-ping; ZHU Hong; SONG Yue-jia; WU He; JIA Ying; ZHANG Guang-mei

    2010-01-01

    Background Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) can cause brain damage through a number of pathways.The purpose of the study was to explore the effect of thrombin, protease nexin-1 (PN-1) and protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) in rat and human cerebellum after ICH.Methods A model of ICH was produced in adult Sprague-Dawley rats by direct injection of autologous blood (50 μl) into caudate nucleus.Patients with injured hemorrhage were also enrolled in this study.Different expressions of thrombin,PAR-1, PN-1 were detected in rat and human cerebellum by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization.Results In rat cerebellum, thrombin protein significantly increased at 6 hours and reached the maximum 2 days afterICH.The expression of PAR-1 protein reached the maximum at 24-48 hours, and then began to decrease.The expression of PN-1 protein reached the maximum at 3 hours, decreased somewhat after that and increased a little at 5days after ICH.While in human cerebellum, the changing tendency of thrombin, PAR-1 and PN-1 was almost conform to the rat.Conclusion In cerebellum, thrombin can activate PAR-1 expression after ICH, and PN-1 appears quickly after ICH in order to control the deleterious effect of thrombin.

  4. Dysfunctional Activation of the Cerebellum in Schizophrenia: A Functional Neuroimaging Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Jessica A.; Mittal, Vijay A.

    2014-01-01

    The cognitive dysmetria framework postulates that the deficits seen in schizophrenia are due to underlying cerebello-thalamo-cortical dysfunction. The cerebellum is thought to be crucial in the formation of internal models for both motor and cognitive behaviors. In healthy individuals there is a functional topography within the cerebellum. Alterations in the functional topography and activation of the cerebellum in schizophrenia patients may be indicative of altered internal models, providing support for this framework. Using state-of-the-art neuroimaging meta-analysis, we investigated cerebellar activation across a variety of task domains affected in schizophrenia and in comparison to healthy controls. Our results indicate an altered functional topography in patients. This was especially apparent for emotion and working memory tasks, and may be related to deficits in these domains. Results suggest that an altered cerebellar functional topography in schizophrenia may be contributing to the many deficits associated with the disease, perhaps due to dysfunctional internal models. PMID:26392921

  5. Effects of Cinnamon Extract on Cerebellum Histomorphometry in Diabetic Rats’ Fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Rafati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: In pregnant women, maternal diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, so glucose increases in the mother's blood and the blood of the fetus therefore causing many complications in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cinnamon on morphometric histologic changes on fetal cerebellum of diabetic rats at days 18 and 20. Methods: In this study, 32 healthy female Wistar rats were prepared and randomly divided into four groups, normal control, diabetic, healthy subjects treated with cinnamon and cinnamon extract-treated diabetic groups. Diabetic groups were subjected by intraperitoneal of streptozotocin. All groups were charged with natural mating and they received a dose of 60 mg/ kg of cinnamon at the first day off pregnancy. After formation of the nervous system, in the eighteenth and twentieth day of pregnancy, the mother of the four mice were anesthetized and the fetus was removed for sampling. The histological slides were prepared and various parameters were studied in the cerebellum. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Duncan test. Results: The thickness of gray matter, and the gray matter white cells in the cerebellum of diabetic rats compared to other groups tested at days of18 and 20 and embryonic cells in the white matter of the cerebellum at day 18 was significantly decreased (p< 0.05. Conclusion: Administration of cinnamon extract reduces mothers’ blood sugar levels therefore preventing the complications of diabetes on the fetal cerebellum. Key words: cinnamon extract, Diabetes, cerebellum, Rat.

  6. An intact action-perception coupling depends on the integrity of the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Andrea; Giese, Martin A; Sultan, Fahad; Mueller, Oliver M; Goericke, Sophia L; Ilg, Winfried; Timmann, Dagmar

    2014-05-01

    It is widely accepted that action and perception in humans functionally interact on multiple levels. Moreover, areas originally suggested to be predominantly motor-related, as the cerebellum, are also involved in action observation. However, as yet, few studies provided unequivocal evidence that the cerebellum is involved in the action perception coupling (APC), specifically in the integration of motor and multisensory information for perception. We addressed this question studying patients with focal cerebellar lesions in a virtual-reality paradigm measuring the effect of action execution on action perception presenting self-generated movements as point lights. We measured the visual sensitivity to the point light stimuli based on signal detection theory. Compared with healthy controls cerebellar patients showed no beneficial influence of action execution on perception indicating deficits in APC. Applying lesion symptom mapping, we identified distinct areas in the dentate nucleus and the lateral cerebellum of both hemispheres that are causally involved in APC. Lesions of the right ventral dentate, the ipsilateral motor representations (lobules V/VI), and most interestingly the contralateral posterior cerebellum (lobule VII) impede the benefits of motor execution on perception. We conclude that the cerebellum establishes time-dependent multisensory representations on different levels, relevant for motor control as well as supporting action perception. Ipsilateral cerebellar motor representations are thought to support the somatosensory state estimate of ongoing movements, whereas the ventral dentate and the contralateral posterior cerebellum likely support sensorimotor integration in the cerebellar-parietal loops. Both the correct somatosensory as well as the multisensory state representations are vital for an intact APC.

  7. Automatic Segmentation of the Cerebellum in Ultrasound Volumes of the Fetal Brain

    OpenAIRE

    G. Velásquez Rodríguez; F. Arámbula Cosío; M.E. Guzmán Huerta; L. Camargo Marín; H. Borboa Olivares; Boris Escalante Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    The size of the cerebellum in ultrasound volumes of the fetal brain has shown a high correlation with gestational age, which makes it a valuable feature to detect fetal growth restrictions. Manual annotation of the 3D surface of the cerebellum in an ultrasound volume is a time consuming task, which needs to be performed by a highly trained expert. In order to assist the experts in the evaluation of cerebellar dimensions, we developed an automatic scheme for the segmentation of the 3D surface ...

  8. White matter of the cerebellum demonstrated by computed tomography: normal anatomy and physical principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maravilla, K R; Pastel, M S; Kirkpatrick, J B

    1978-04-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) delineation of normal white matter of the cerebral hemispheres has been well documented, there has been no description of white matter within the cerebellum. Through the use of phantom studies, CT number correlations between cerebellum and cerebral hemispheres, and anatomic correlation with in vitro specimens, the ability to visualize cerebellar white matter is demonstrated. Thin sections decrease volume averaging and enable consistent imaging of these structures. Size and shape of the corpus medullaris on CT scan may vary with the scan angle and level of section. Representative examples of various normal appearances are illustrated.

  9. fMRI Activities in the Emotional Cerebellum: A Preference for Negative Stimuli and Goal-Directed Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.K. Schraa-Tam (Caroline); W.J.R. Rietdijk (Wim); W.J.M.I. Verbeke (Willem); R.C. Dietvorst (Roeland); W.E. van den Berg (Wouter); R.P. Bagozzi (Richard); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSeveral studies indicate that the cerebellum might play a role in experiencing and/or controlling emphatic emotions, but it remains to be determined whether there is a distinction between positive and negative emotions, and, if so, which specific parts of the cerebellum are involved in t

  10. The role of the cerebellum in schizophrenia: from cognition to molecular pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Yeganeh-Doost

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Beside its role in motor coordination, the cerebellum is involved in cognitive function such as attention, working memory, verbal learning, and sensory discrimination. In schizophrenia, a disturbed prefronto-thalamo-cerebellar circuit has been proposed to play a role in the pathophysiology. In addition, a deficit in the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAf receptor has been hypothesized. The risk gene neuregulin 1 may play a major role in this process. We demonstrated a higher expression of the NMDA receptor subunit 2D in the right cerebellar regions of schizophrenia patients, which may be a secondary upregulation due to a dysfunctional receptor. In contrast, the neuregulin 1 risk variant containing at least one C-allele was associated with decreased expression of NMDA receptor subunit 2C, leading to a dysfunction of the NMDA receptor, which in turn may lead to a dysfunction of the gamma amino butyric acid (GABA system. Accordingly, from post-mortem studies, there is accumulating evidence that GABAergic signaling is decreased in the cerebellum of schizophrenia patients. As patients in these studies are treated with antipsychotics long term, we evaluated the effect of long-term haloperidol and clozapine treatment in an animal model. We showed that clozapine may be superior to haloperidol in restoring a deficit in NMDA receptor subunit 2C expression in the cerebellum. We discuss the molecular findings in the light of the role of the cerebellum in attention and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  11. Extinction as New Learning versus Unlearning: Considerations from a Computer Simulation of the Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, Michael D.; Ohyama, Tatsuya

    2004-01-01

    Like many forms of Pavlovian conditioning, eyelid conditioning displays robust extinction. We used a computer simulation of the cerebellum as a tool to consider the widely accepted view that extinction involves new, inhibitory learning rather than unlearning of acquisition. Previously, this simulation suggested basic mechanistic features of…

  12. Reliability of Visual and Somatosensory Feedback in Skilled Movement: The Role of the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizelle, J C; Oparah, Alexis; Wheaton, Lewis A

    2016-01-01

    The integration of vision and somatosensation is required to allow for accurate motor behavior. While both sensory systems contribute to an understanding of the state of the body through continuous updating and estimation, how the brain processes unreliable sensory information remains to be fully understood in the context of complex action. Using functional brain imaging, we sought to understand the role of the cerebellum in weighting visual and somatosensory feedback by selectively reducing the reliability of each sense individually during a tool use task. We broadly hypothesized upregulated activation of the sensorimotor and cerebellar areas during movement with reduced visual reliability, and upregulated activation of occipital brain areas during movement with reduced somatosensory reliability. As specifically compared to reduced somatosensory reliability, we expected greater activations of ipsilateral sensorimotor cerebellum for intact visual and somatosensory reliability. Further, we expected that ipsilateral posterior cognitive cerebellum would be affected with reduced visual reliability. We observed that reduced visual reliability results in a trend towards the relative consolidation of sensorimotor activation and an expansion of cerebellar activation. In contrast, reduced somatosensory reliability was characterized by the absence of cerebellar activations and a trend towards the increase of right frontal, left parietofrontal activation, and temporo-occipital areas. Our findings highlight the role of the cerebellum for specific aspects of skillful motor performance. This has relevance to understanding basic aspects of brain functions underlying sensorimotor integration, and provides a greater understanding of cerebellar function in tool use motor control.

  13. Gating of Long-Term Potentiation by Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors at the Cerebellum Input Stage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Prestori (Francesca); C. Bonardi (Claudia); L. Mapelli (Lisa); P. Lombardo (Paola); R. Goselink (Rianne); M.E. de Stefano (Maria Egle); D. Gandolfi (Daniela); J. Mapelli (Jonathan); D. Bertrand (Daniel); M. Schonewille (Martijn); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); E. D'Angelo (Egidio)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe brain needs mechanisms able to correlate plastic changes with local circuit activity and internal functional states. At the cerebellum input stage, uncontrolled induction of long-term potentiation or depression (LTP or LTD) between mossy fibres and granule cells can saturate synaptic

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and motor plasticity in human lateral cerebellum : Dual effect on saccadic adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panouilleres, Muriel; Neggers, Sebastiaan F. W.; Gutteling, Tjerk P.; Salemme, Romeo; van der Stigchel, Stefan; van der Geest, Josef N.; Frens, Maarten A.; Pelisson, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum is a key area for movement control and sensory-motor plasticity. Its medial part is considered as the exclusive cerebellar center controlling the accuracy and adaptive calibration of saccadic eye movements. However, the contribution of other zones situated in its lateral part is unkno

  15. Information to cerebellum on spinal motor networks mediated by the dorsal spinocerebellar tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stecina, Katinka; Fedirchuk, Brent; Hultborn, Hans

    2013-01-01

    of peripheral sensory input to the cerebellum in general, and during rhythmic movements such as locomotion and scratch. In contrast, the VSCT was seen as conveying a copy of the output of spinal neuronal circuitry, including those circuits generating rhythmic motor activity (the spinal central pattern generator...

  16. The Role of the Pediatric Cerebellum in Motor Functions, Cognition, and Behavior: A Clinical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Michael S; Tsai, Peter

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses the contribution of the pediatric cerebellum to locomotion, ocular motor control, speech articulation, cognitive function, and behavior modulation. Hypotheses on cerebellar function are discussed. Clinical features in patients with cerebellar disorders are outlined. Cerebellar abnormalities in cognitive and behavioral disorders are detailed. PMID:27423796

  17. Social cognition and the cerebellum: A meta-analytic connectivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Overwalle, Frank; D'aes, Tine; Mariën, Peter

    2015-12-01

    This meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) study explores the functional connectivity of the cerebellum with the cerebrum in social cognitive processes. In a recent meta-analysis, Van Overwalle, Baetens, Mariën, and Vandekerckhove (2014) documented that the cerebellum is implicated in social processes of "body" reading (mirroring; e.g., understanding other persons' intentions from observing their movements) and "mind" reading (mentalizing, e.g., inferring other persons' beliefs, intentions or personality traits, reconstructing persons' past, future, or hypothetical events). In a recent functional connectivity study, Buckner et al. (2011) offered a novel parcellation of cerebellar topography that substantially overlaps with the cerebellar meta-analytic findings of Van Overwalle et al. (2014). This overlap suggests that the involvement of the cerebellum in social reasoning depends on its functional connectivity with the cerebrum. To test this hypothesis, we explored the meta-analytic co-activations as indices of functional connectivity between the cerebellum and the cerebrum during social cognition. The MACM results confirm substantial and distinct connectivity with respect to the functions of (a) action understanding ("body" reading) and (b) mentalizing ("mind" reading). The consistent and strong connectivity findings of this analysis suggest that cerebellar activity during social judgments reflects distinct mirroring and mentalizing functionality, and that these cerebellar functions are connected with corresponding functional networks in the cerebrum. PMID:26419890

  18. Automatic segmentation of the fetal cerebellum using spherical harmonics and gray level profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez-Rodríguez, Gustavo; Arámbula Cosío, Fernando; Escalate Ramírez, Boris

    2015-12-01

    The cerebellum is an important structure to determine the gestational age, cerebellar diameter obtained by ultrasound volumes of the fetal brain has shown a high correlation with gestational age, therefore is useful to determine fetal growth restrictions. The manual annotation of 3D surfaces from the fetal brain is time consuming and needs to be done by a highly trained expert. To help with the annotation in the evaluation of cerebellar diameter, we developed a new automatic scheme for the segmentation of the 3D surface of the cerebellum in ultrasound volumes, using a spherical harmonics model and the optimization of an objective function based on gray level voxel profiles. The results on 10 ultrasound volumes of the fetal brain show an accuracy in the segmentation of the cerebellum (mean Dice coefficient of 0.7544). The method reported shows potential to effectively assist the experts in the assessment of fetal growth in ultrasound volumes. We consider the proposed cerebellum segmentation method a contribution for the SPHARM segmentations models, because it is capable to run without hardware restriction, (GPU), and gives adequate results in a reasonable amount of time.

  19. Cerebellum development during childhood and adolescence: A longitudinal morphometric MRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); R.K. Lenroot (Rhoshel); D.K. Greenstein (Deanna); L. Tran (Lan); R. Pierson (Ronald); J.N. Giedd (Jay)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn addition to its well-established role in balance, coordination, and other motor skills, the cerebellum is increasingly recognized as a prominent contributor to a wide array of cognitive and emotional functions. Many of these capacities undergo dramatic changes during childhood and ado

  20. The Cerebellum in Emotion Regulation: A Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Honk, E.J. van

    2009-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the cerebellum may play a role in the regulation of emotion. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that inhibition of cerebellar function using slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) would lead to increased negative mood as a

  1. Monitoring the native phosphorylation state of plasma membrane proteins from a single mouse cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schindler, J.; Ye, J. Y.; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard;

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal processing in the cerebellum involves the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of various plasma membrane proteins such as AMPA or NMDA receptors. Despite the importance of changes in phosphorylation pattern, no global phospho-proteome analysis has yet been performed. As plasma membrane...

  2. Alcohol hangover induces mitochondrial dysfunction and free radical production in mouse cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadayian, A G; Bustamante, J; Czerniczyniec, A; Lombardi, P; Cutrera, R A; Lores-Arnaiz, S

    2015-09-24

    Alcohol hangover (AH) is defined as the temporary state after alcohol binge-like drinking, starting when ethanol (EtOH) is absent in plasma. Previous data indicate that AH induces mitochondrial dysfunction and free radical production in mouse brain cortex. The aim of this work was to study mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species production in mouse cerebellum at the onset of AH. Male mice received a single i.p. injection of EtOH (3.8g/kg BW) or saline solution. Mitochondrial function was evaluated 6h after injection (AH onset). At the onset of AH, malate-glutamate and succinate-supported state 4 oxygen uptake was 2.3 and 1.9-fold increased leading to a reduction in respiratory control of 55% and 48% respectively, as compared with controls. Decreases of 38% and 16% were found in Complex I-III and IV activities. Complex II-III activity was not affected by AH. Mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial permeability changes were evaluated by flow cytometry. Mitochondrial membrane potential and permeability were decreased by AH in cerebellum mitochondria. Together with this, AH induced a 25% increase in superoxide anion and a 92% increase in hydrogen peroxide production in cerebellum mitochondria. Related to nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) protein expression was 52% decreased by the hangover condition compared with control group. No differences were found in cerebellum NO production between control and treated mice. The present work demonstrates that the physiopathological state of AH involves mitochondrial dysfunction in mouse cerebellum showing the long-lasting effects of acute EtOH exposure in the central nervous system. PMID:26192095

  3. Real-Time Simulation of Passage-of-Time Encoding in Cerebellum Using a Scalable FPGA-Based System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junwen; Coapes, Graeme; Mak, Terrence; Yamazaki, Tadashi; Tin, Chung; Degenaar, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    The cerebellum plays a critical role for sensorimotor control and learning. However, dysmetria or delays in movements' onsets consequent to damages in cerebellum cannot be cured completely at the moment. Neuroprosthesis is an emerging technology that can potentially substitute such motor control module in the brain. A pre-requisite for this to become practical is the capability to simulate the cerebellum model in real-time, with low timing distortion for proper interfacing with the biological system. In this paper, we present a frame-based network-on-chip (NoC) hardware architecture for implementing a bio-realistic cerebellum model with  ∼ 100 000 neurons, which has been used for studying timing control or passage-of-time (POT) encoding mediated by the cerebellum. The simulation results verify that our implementation reproduces the POT representation by the cerebellum properly. Furthermore, our field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based system demonstrates excellent computational speed that it can complete 1sec real world activities within 25.6 ms. It is also highly scalable such that it can maintain approximately the same computational speed even if the neuron number increases by one order of magnitude. Our design is shown to outperform three alternative approaches previously used for implementing spiking neural network model. Finally, we show a hardware electronic setup and illustrate how the silicon cerebellum can be adapted as a potential neuroprosthetic platform for future biological or clinical application. PMID:26452290

  4. Effects of Estrogen on ER, NGF, and ChAT Expression in Cerebellum of Aging Female Sprague-Dawley Rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zheng-li; FAN Guang-li; LUO Qi-hui; ZHU Chun-mei; HUANG Yi-dan

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the effects of estrogen on the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), nerve growth factor (NGF), and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in the cerebellum of rats. The model of aging female rat was established to study the expression and distribution of ER, NGF, and ChAT in the cerebellum following 17β-estradiol treatment using the technique of immunohistochemical ultrasensitive SP in sprague-dawley rat. The immunoreactive productions were distributed in stratum Purkinje cell, nucleus dentatus, nucleus interpositus, and nucleus fastigii of cerebellum, and the ER positive production was mainly located in the plasma, cytoplasmic membrane, and neurite, and also existed in nucleus. The general tendency of the expression of ER, NGF, and ChAT positive production in the cerebellum cortex and nuclei of aging rat significantly decreases, while the intensity and quantity of the immunoreactive production ascends predominantly after 17β-estradiol treatment. Simultaneously, the positive neurite of Purkinje cell shows a similar tendency. The abovementioned results suggest that the estrogen upregulates the expression of NGF and ChAT, and plays a vital role in sustaining and protecting the structure and function of cerebellum neurons. Furthermore, the similarity of their changing tendency implies that they were correlated and cooperated during the course in effect of estrogen on cerebellum. It also showed that the action of estrogen in cerebellum could be via genomic and nongenomic mechanism.

  5. Effect of Cerebellum Radiation Dosimetry on Cognitive Outcomes in Children With Infratentorial Ependymoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Sharma, Shelly [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Xiong, Xiaoping; Wu, Shengjie [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Conklin, Heather [Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Cognitive decline is a recognized effect of radiation therapy (RT) in children treated for brain tumors. The importance of the cerebellum and its contribution to cognition have been recognized; however, the effect of RT on cerebellum-linked neurocognitive deficits has yet to be explored. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six children (39 males) at a median 3.3 years of age (range, 1-17 years old) were irradiated for infratentorial ependymoma from 1997 to 2008. The total prescribed dose was 54 to 59.4 Gy administered to the postoperative tumor bed with 5- or 10-mm clinical target volume margin. Age-appropriate cognitive and academic testing was performed prior to the start of RT and was then repeated at 6 months and annually throughout 5 years. The anterior and posterior cerebellum and other normal brain volumes were contoured on postcontrast, T1-weighted postoperative magnetic resonance images registered to treatment planning computed tomography images. Mean doses were calculated and used with time after RT and other clinical covariates to model their effect on neurocognitive test scores. Results: Considering only the statistically significant rates in longitudinal changes for test scores and models that included mean dose, there was a correlation between mean infratentorial dose and intelligence quotient (IQ; −0.190 patients/Gy/year; P=.001), math (−0.164 patients/Gy/year; P=.010), reading (−0.137 patients/Gy/year; P=.011), and spelling scores (−0.147 patients/Gy/year; P=.012), where Gy was measured as the difference between the mean dose received by an individual patient and the mean dose received by the patient group. There was a correlation between mean anterior cerebellum dose and IQ scores (−0.116 patients/Gy/year; P=.042) and mean posterior cerebellum dose and IQ (−0.150 patients/Gy/year; P=.002), math (−0.120 patients/Gy/year; P=.023), reading (−0.111 patients/Gy/year; P=.012), and spelling (−0.117 patients/Gy/year; P=.015

  6. Effect of Cerebellum Radiation Dosimetry on Cognitive Outcomes in Children With Infratentorial Ependymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cognitive decline is a recognized effect of radiation therapy (RT) in children treated for brain tumors. The importance of the cerebellum and its contribution to cognition have been recognized; however, the effect of RT on cerebellum-linked neurocognitive deficits has yet to be explored. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six children (39 males) at a median 3.3 years of age (range, 1-17 years old) were irradiated for infratentorial ependymoma from 1997 to 2008. The total prescribed dose was 54 to 59.4 Gy administered to the postoperative tumor bed with 5- or 10-mm clinical target volume margin. Age-appropriate cognitive and academic testing was performed prior to the start of RT and was then repeated at 6 months and annually throughout 5 years. The anterior and posterior cerebellum and other normal brain volumes were contoured on postcontrast, T1-weighted postoperative magnetic resonance images registered to treatment planning computed tomography images. Mean doses were calculated and used with time after RT and other clinical covariates to model their effect on neurocognitive test scores. Results: Considering only the statistically significant rates in longitudinal changes for test scores and models that included mean dose, there was a correlation between mean infratentorial dose and intelligence quotient (IQ; −0.190 patients/Gy/year; P=.001), math (−0.164 patients/Gy/year; P=.010), reading (−0.137 patients/Gy/year; P=.011), and spelling scores (−0.147 patients/Gy/year; P=.012), where Gy was measured as the difference between the mean dose received by an individual patient and the mean dose received by the patient group. There was a correlation between mean anterior cerebellum dose and IQ scores (−0.116 patients/Gy/year; P=.042) and mean posterior cerebellum dose and IQ (−0.150 patients/Gy/year; P=.002), math (−0.120 patients/Gy/year; P=.023), reading (−0.111 patients/Gy/year; P=.012), and spelling (−0.117 patients/Gy/year; P=.015

  7. MRI measurements of the brain stem and cerebellum in high functioning autistic children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Tayama, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Masahito; Murakawa, Kazuyoshi; Kuroda, Yasuhiro (Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-01-01

    To determine involvements of the brain stem and/or cerebellum in autism, we compared midsagittal magnetic resonance images of the brains of high functioning autistic children with those of normal controls. We found that the midbrain and medulla oblongata were significantly smaller in these autistic children than in the control children. The pons area did not differ between the two groups, nor was there any difference in the cerebellar vermis area. The ratio of the brain stem and cerebellum to the posterior fossa area did not differ significantly between the high functioning autistic and the control children. The development of the cerebellar vermis area was delayed in autistic children as compared with that in the control children. Thus, it was suggested that significant anatomical changes in the midbrain and medulla oblongata existed in the autistic children. (author).

  8. Tri-layer wrinkling as a mechanism for anchoring center initiation in the developing cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, Emma; Javili, Ali; Weickenmeier, Johannes; Kuhl, Ellen; Linder, Christian

    2016-07-01

    During cerebellar development, anchoring centers form at the base of each fissure and remain fixed in place while the rest of the cerebellum grows outward. Cerebellar foliation has been extensively studied; yet, the mechanisms that control anchoring center initiation and position remain insufficiently understood. Here we show that a tri-layer model can predict surface wrinkling as a potential mechanism to explain anchoring center initiation and position. Motivated by the cerebellar microstructure, we model the developing cerebellum as a tri-layer system with an external molecular layer and an internal granular layer of similar stiffness and a significantly softer intermediate Purkinje cell layer. Including a weak intermediate layer proves key to predicting surface morphogenesis, even at low stiffness contrasts between the top and bottom layers. The proposed tri-layer model provides insight into the hierarchical formation of anchoring centers and establishes an essential missing link between gene expression and evolution of shape. PMID:27252048

  9. MRI measurements of the brain stem and cerebellum in high functioning autistic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine involvements of the brain stem and/or cerebellum in autism, we compared midsagittal magnetic resonance images of the brains of high functioning autistic children with those of normal controls. We found that the midbrain and medulla oblongata were significantly smaller in these autistic children than in the control children. The pons area did not differ between the two groups, nor was there any difference in the cerebellar vermis area. The ratio of the brain stem and cerebellum to the posterior fossa area did not differ significantly between the high functioning autistic and the control children. The development of the cerebellar vermis area was delayed in autistic children as compared with that in the control children. Thus, it was suggested that significant anatomical changes in the midbrain and medulla oblongata existed in the autistic children. (author)

  10. A comprehensive volumetric analysis of the cerebellum in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Julia A.; Schumann, Cynthia Mills; Goodlin-Jones, Beth L.; Amaral, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and postmortem neuropathological studies have implicated the cerebellum in the pathophysiology of autism. Controversy remains, however, concerning the nature and the consistency of cerebellar alterations. MRI studies of the cross-sectional area of the vermis have found both decreases and no difference in autism groups. Volumetric analysis of the vermis, which is less prone to “plane of section artifacts” may provide a more reliable assessment of size differenc...

  11. Influence of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation to the Cerebellum on Standing Posture Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inukai, Yasuto; Saito, Kei; Sasaki, Ryoki; Kotan, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Masaki; Onishi, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Damage to the vestibular cerebellum results in dysfunctional standing posture control. Patients with cerebellum dysfunction have a larger sway in the center of gravity while standing compared with healthy subjects. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive technique for selectively exciting or inhibiting specific neural structures with potential applications in functional assessment and treatment of neural disorders. However, the specific stimulation parameters for influencing postural control have not been assessed. In this study, we investigated the influence of tDCS when applied over the cerebellum on standing posture control. Sixteen healthy subjects received tDCS (20 min, 2 mA) over the scalp 2 cm below the inion. In Experiment 1, all 16 subjects received tDCS under three stimulus conditions, Sham, Cathodal, and Anodal, in a random order with the second electrode placed on the forehead. In Experiment 2, five subjects received cathodal stimulation only with the second electrode placed over the right buccinator muscle. Center of gravity sway was measured twice for 60 s before and after tDCS in a standing posture with eyes open and legs closed, and average total locus length, locus length per second, rectangular area, and enveloped area were calculated. In Experiment 1, total locus length and locus length per second decreased significantly after cathodal stimulation but not after anodal or sham stimulation, while no tDCS condition influenced rectangular or enveloped areas. In Experiment 2, cathodal tDCS again significantly reduced total locus length and locus length per second but not rectangular and enveloped areas. The effects of tDCS on postural control are polarity-dependent, likely reflecting the selective excitation or inhibition of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Cathodal tDCS to the cerebellum of healthy subjects can alter body sway (velocity).

  12. Immunocytochemical localization of microtubule-associated protein 1 in rat cerebellum using monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining with monoclonal antibodies showed that microtubule-associated protein 1 (MAP1) has a restricted cellular distribution in the rat cerebellum. Anti-MAP1 staining was found only in neurons, where it was much stronger in dendrites than in axons. There were striking variations in the apparent concentration of MAP1 in different classes of neurons. Purkinje cells were the most strongly labeled, while granule cell neurons gave a faint, threshold-level reaction with the an...

  13. The Pediatric Cerebellum in Inherited Neurodegenerative Disorders: A Pattern-recognition Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaser, Susan I; Steinlin, Maja; Al-Maawali, Almundher; Yoon, Grace

    2016-08-01

    Evaluation of imaging studies of the cerebellum in inherited neurodegenerative disorders is aided by attention to neuroimaging patterns based on anatomic determinants, including biometric analysis, hyperintense signal of structures, including the cerebellar cortex, white matter, dentate nuclei, brainstem tracts, and nuclei, the presence of cysts, brain iron, or calcifications, change over time, the use of diffusion-weighted/diffusion tensor imaging and T2*-weighted sequences, magnetic resonance spectroscopy; and, in rare occurrences, the administration of contrast material. PMID:27423800

  14. Specific regions within the embryonic midbrain and cerebellum require different levels of FGF signaling during development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basson, M. Albert; Echevarria, Diego; Ahn, Christina Petersen; Sudarov, Anamaria; Joyner, Alexandra L.; Mason, Ivor J.; Martinez, Salvador; Martin, Gail R.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Development of the prospective midbrain and cerebellum are coordinated by FGF ligands produced by the isthmic organizer. Previous studies have suggested that the midbrain and cerebellum require different levels of FGF signaling for their development. However, little is known about the extent to which specific regions within these two parts of the brain differ in their requirement for FGF signaling during embryogenesis. In this study, we have explored the effects of inhibiting FGF signaling within the embryonic midbrain (mesencephalon) and cerebellum (rhombomere 1) by misexpressing Sprouty2 (Spry2) specifically in the mouse mesencephalon and rhombomere 1 from an early stage. We show that such Spry2 misexpression moderately reduces FGF signaling, and that this reduction causes the death of cells in the anterior mesencephalon, the region furthest from the source of FGF ligands. Interestingly, the remaining cells in the posterior mesencephalon develop into anterior midbrain, indicating that a low level of FGF signaling is sufficient to promote only anterior midbrain development. Spry2 misexpression also affects development of the vermis, the medial part of the cerebellum that spans the midline. We found that whereas misexpression of Spry2 alone caused loss of the anterior vermis, reducing FGF signaling further, by decreasing Fgf8 gene dosage, resulted in loss of the entire vermis. We provide evidence that cell death is not responsible for this tissue loss. Instead, our data suggest that the vermis fails to develop because reducing FGF signaling perturbs the balance between vermis and roof plate development in rhombomere 1. We suggest a molecular explanation for this phenomenon by providing evidence that FGF signaling functions to inhibit the BMP signaling that promotes roof plate development. PMID:18216176

  15. Models of basal ganglia and cerebellum for sensorimotor integration and predictive control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabri, Marwan A.; Huang, Jerry; Coenen, Olivier J. D.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2000-10-01

    This paper presents a sensorimotor architecture integrating computational models of a cerebellum and a basal ganglia and operating on a microrobot. The computational models enable a microrobot to learn to track a moving object and anticipate future positions using a CCD camera. The architecture features pre-processing modules for coordinate transformation and instantaneous orientation extraction. Learning of motor control is implemented using predictive Hebbian reinforcement-learning algorithm in the basal ganglia model. Learning of sensory predictions makes use of a combination of long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP) adaptation rules within the cerebellum model. The basal ganglia model uses the visual inputs to develop sensorimotor mapping for motor control, while the cerebellum module uses robot orientation and world- coordinate transformed inputs to predict the location of the moving object in a robot centered coordinate system. We propose several hypotheses about the functional role of cell populations in the cerebellum and argue that mossy fiber projections to the deep cerebellar nucleus (DCN) could play a coordinate transformation role and act as gain fields. We propose that such transformation could be learnt early in the brain development stages and could be guided by the activity of the climbing fibers. Proprioceptor mossy fibers projecting to the DCN and providing robot orientation with respect to a reference system could be involved in this case. Other mossy fibers carrying visual sensory input provide visual patterns to the granule cells. The combined activities of the granule and the Purkinje cells store spatial representations of the target patterns. The combinations of mossy and Purkinje projections to the DCN provide a prediction of the location of the moving target taking into consideration the robot orientation. Results of lesion simulations based on our model show degradations similar to those reported in cerebellar lesion

  16. Effects of Cinnamon Extract on Cerebellum Histomorphometry in Diabetic Rats’ Fetus

    OpenAIRE

    AR Rafati; SS Hashemi; O Hashemi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background & aim: In pregnant women, maternal diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, so glucose increases in the mother's blood and the blood of the fetus therefore causing many complications in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cinnamon on morphometric histologic changes on fetal cerebellum of diabetic rats at days 18 and 20. Methods: In this study, 32 healthy female Wistar rats were prepared and randomly divided into...

  17. Branching patterns of olivocerebellar axons in relation to the compartmental organization of the cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi eFujita

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A single olivocerebellar (OC axon gives rise to about seven branches that terminate as climbing fibers (CFs. Branching patterns of an OC axon, which are classified into local, transverse and longitudinal types, are highly organized, in relation to the longitudinal molecular (aldolase C or zebrin II compartmentalization and the transverse lobulation of the cerebellum. Local branching is involved in forming a narrow band-shaped functional subarea within a molecular compartment. On the other hand, transverse and longitudinal branchings appear to be involved in linking mediolaterally separated molecular compartments and rostrocaudally separated lobular areas, respectively. Longitudinal branching occurs frequently between equivalent molecular compartments of specific combinations of lobules. These combinations include lobule V-simple lobule and crus II-paramedian lobule in the pars intermedia and hemisphere, and lobules I-V and lobule VIII in the vermis. The longitudinal branching pattern not only fits with mirror-imaged somatosensory double representation of the body in the pars intermedia, but it also suggests a general rostrocaudal link exists for the whole cerebellum across the putative rostrocaudal boundary in lobule VIc-crus I. Molecular compartments of the cerebellar cortex originate from the Purkinje cell (PC clusters that appear in the late embryonic stage, when the immature OC projection is formed. Some clusters split rostrocaudally across crus I during the development of cortical compartments, which would result in longitudinal branching of OC projection across crus I. Supposing that the branching pattern of OC axons represents an essential organization of the cerebellum, longitudinal branching suggests a functional and developmental links between the rostral and caudal cerebellum across lobule VIc-crus I throughout the cerebellar cortex.

  18. Influence of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation to the Cerebellum on Standing Posture Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inukai, Yasuto; Saito, Kei; Sasaki, Ryoki; Kotan, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Masaki; Onishi, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Damage to the vestibular cerebellum results in dysfunctional standing posture control. Patients with cerebellum dysfunction have a larger sway in the center of gravity while standing compared with healthy subjects. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive technique for selectively exciting or inhibiting specific neural structures with potential applications in functional assessment and treatment of neural disorders. However, the specific stimulation parameters for influencing postural control have not been assessed. In this study, we investigated the influence of tDCS when applied over the cerebellum on standing posture control. Sixteen healthy subjects received tDCS (20 min, 2 mA) over the scalp 2 cm below the inion. In Experiment 1, all 16 subjects received tDCS under three stimulus conditions, Sham, Cathodal, and Anodal, in a random order with the second electrode placed on the forehead. In Experiment 2, five subjects received cathodal stimulation only with the second electrode placed over the right buccinator muscle. Center of gravity sway was measured twice for 60 s before and after tDCS in a standing posture with eyes open and legs closed, and average total locus length, locus length per second, rectangular area, and enveloped area were calculated. In Experiment 1, total locus length and locus length per second decreased significantly after cathodal stimulation but not after anodal or sham stimulation, while no tDCS condition influenced rectangular or enveloped areas. In Experiment 2, cathodal tDCS again significantly reduced total locus length and locus length per second but not rectangular and enveloped areas. The effects of tDCS on postural control are polarity-dependent, likely reflecting the selective excitation or inhibition of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Cathodal tDCS to the cerebellum of healthy subjects can alter body sway (velocity). PMID:27458358

  19. The mutant Moonwalker TRPC3 channel links calcium signaling to lipid metabolism in the developing cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulneva, Anna; Lee, Sheena; Oliver, Peter L; Di Gleria, Katalin; Kessler, Benedikt M; Davies, Kay E; Becker, Esther B E

    2015-07-15

    The Moonwalker (Mwk) mouse is a model of dominantly inherited cerebellar ataxia caused by a gain-of-function mutation in the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel TRPC3. Here, we report impairments in dendritic growth and synapse formation early on during Purkinje cell development in the Mwk cerebellum that are accompanied by alterations in calcium signaling. To elucidate the molecular effector pathways that regulate Purkinje cell dendritic arborization downstream of mutant TRPC3, we employed transcriptomic analysis of developing Purkinje cells isolated by laser-capture microdissection. We identified significant gene and protein expression changes in molecules involved in lipid metabolism. Consistently, lipid homeostasis in the Mwk cerebellum was found to be disturbed, and treatment of organotypic cerebellar slices with ceramide significantly improved dendritic outgrowth of Mwk Purkinje cells. These findings provide the first mechanistic insights into the TRPC3-dependent mechanisms, by which activated calcium signaling is coupled to lipid metabolism and the regulation of Purkinje cell development in the Mwk cerebellum.

  20. Neurotrophins and their Trk-receptors in the cerebellum of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatta, Claudia; Altamura, Gennaro; Avallone, Luigi; Castaldo, Luciana; Corteggio, Annunziata; D'Angelo, Livia; de Girolamo, Paolo; Lucini, Carla

    2016-06-01

    Neurotrophins (NTs) and their specific Trk-receptors are key molecules involved in the regulation of survival, proliferation, and differentiation of central nervous system during development and adulthood in vertebrates. In the present survey, we studied the expression and localization of neurotrophins and their Trk-receptors in the cerebellum of teleost fish Danio rerio (zebrafish). Teleostean cerebellum is composed of a valvula, body and vestibulolateral lobe. Valvula and body show the same three-layer structure as cerebellar cortex in mammals. The expression of NTs and Trk-receptors in the whole brain of zebrafish has been studied by Western blotting analysis. By immunohistochemistry, the localization of NTs has been observed mainly in Purkinje cells; TrkA and TrkB-receptors in cells and fibers of granular and molecular layers. TrkC was faintly detected. The occurrence of NTs and Trk-receptors suggests that they could have a synergistic action in the cerebellum of zebrafish. J. Morphol. 277:725-736, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27197756

  1. Cutaneous and periodontal inputs to the cerebellum of the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana K Sarko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber is a small fossorial rodent with specialized dentition that is reflected by the large cortical area dedicated to representation of the prominent incisors. Due to naked mole-rats’ behavioral reliance on the incisors for digging and for manipulating objects, as well as their ability to move the lower incisors independently, we hypothesized that expanded somatosensory representations of the incisors would be present within the cerebellum in order to accommodate a greater degree of proprioceptive, cutaneous, and periodontal input. Multiunit electrophysiological recordings targeting the ansiform lobule were used to investigate tactile inputs from receptive fields on the entire body with a focus on the incisors. Similar to other rodents, a fractured somatotopy appeared to be present with discrete representations of the same receptive fields repeated within each folium of the cerebellum. These findings confirm the presence of somatosensory inputs to a large area of the naked mole-rat cerebellum with particularly extensive representations of the lower incisors and mystacial vibrissae. We speculate that these extensive inputs facilitate processing of tactile cues as part of a sensorimotor integration network that optimizes how sensory stimuli are acquired through active exploration and in turn adjusts motor outputs (such as independent movement of the lower incisors. These results highlight the diverse sensory specializations and corresponding brain organizational schemes that have evolved in different mammals to facilitate exploration of and interaction with their environment.

  2. Using a million cell simulation of the cerebellum: network scaling and task generality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Ke; Hausknecht, Matthew J; Stone, Peter; Mauk, Michael D

    2013-11-01

    Several factors combine to make it feasible to build computer simulations of the cerebellum and to test them in biologically realistic ways. These simulations can be used to help understand the computational contributions of various cerebellar components, including the relevance of the enormous number of neurons in the granule cell layer. In previous work we have used a simulation containing 12000 granule cells to develop new predictions and to account for various aspects of eyelid conditioning, a form of motor learning mediated by the cerebellum. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of scaling up this simulation to over one million granule cells using parallel graphics processing unit (GPU) technology. We observe that this increase in number of granule cells requires only twice the execution time of the smaller simulation on the GPU. We demonstrate that this simulation, like its smaller predecessor, can emulate certain basic features of conditioned eyelid responses, with a slight improvement in performance in one measure. We also use this simulation to examine the generality of the computation properties that we have derived from studying eyelid conditioning. We demonstrate that this scaled up simulation can learn a high level of performance in a classic machine learning task, the cart-pole balancing task. These results suggest that this parallel GPU technology can be used to build very large-scale simulations whose connectivity ratios match those of the real cerebellum and that these simulations can be used guide future studies on cerebellar mediated tasks and on machine learning problems.

  3. An electrophysiological link between the cerebellum, cognition and emotion: Frontal theta EEG activity to single-pulse cerebellar TMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Honk, E.J. van

    2006-01-01

    Early intracranial electrical stimulation studies in animals demonstrated cerebellar connectivity to brain structures involved in cognitive and emotive functions. Human electrophysiological data to support cerebellum involvement in the latter functions are however lacking. In the present study, elec

  4. Involvement of the ipsilateral and contralateral cerebellum in the acquisition of unilateral classical eyeblink conditioning in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo HU; Xi LIN; Lushuai HUANG; Li YANG; Hua FENG; Jianfeng SUI

    2009-01-01

    Aim:The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative contributions of the ipsilateral and contralateral cerebellum to the acquisition of unilateral classical eyeblink conditioning (EBCC).Methods: The unilateral EBCC was achieved using a binaural tone conditioned stimulus (CS) paired with a left airpuff unconditioned stimulus (US).A high-resolution potentiometer was used to monitor eyeblink responses.Guinea pigs received one CS-US session followed by three CS-US sessions (sessions 2 to 4),during which microinjections of muscimol,a GABAA receptor agonist,were performed to reversibly inactivate the cerebellum unilaterally prior to training.To test whether any learning had occurred during these inactivation sessions,training was continued for six more CS-US sessions (sessions 5 to 10) without any inactivation.Results: Animals with inactivation of the left cerebellum had no signs of left conditioned response (CR) during sessions 2 to 4,and their CR acquisition during sessions 5 to 10 was not distinguishable from that of control animals during sessions 2 to 7.In contrast,animals with inactivation of the right cerebellum acquired left CRs during sessions 2 to 4,although their CR acquisition was significantly retarded during session 2.In addition,microinjections of muscimol into the right cerebellum did not affect left neuro-behavioral activity.Finally,microinjections of muscimol into either the left or the right cerebellum did not affect the performance of tone-airpuff evoked unconditioned response (UR).Conclusion: In contrast to the essential role of the ipsilateral cerebellum,the contralateral cerebellum is potentially involved in the acquisition of unilateral EBCC during the early stage of training.

  5. The Cerebellum: New Computational Model that Reveals its Primary Function to Calculate Multibody Dynamics Conform to Lagrange-Euler Formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtaj, Lavdim; Limani, Ilir; Shatri, Vjosa; Skeja, Avni

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellum is part of the brain that occupies only 10% of the brain volume, but it contains about 80% of total number of brain neurons. New cerebellar function model is developed that sets cerebellar circuits in context of multibody dynamics model computations, as important step in controlling balance and movement coordination, functions performed by two oldest parts of the cerebellum. Model gives new functional interpretation for granule cells-Golgi cell circuit, including distinct function ...

  6. Robust Machine Learning-Based Correction on Automatic Segmentation of the Cerebellum and Brainstem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yi Wang

    Full Text Available Automated segmentation is a useful method for studying large brain structures such as the cerebellum and brainstem. However, automated segmentation may lead to inaccuracy and/or undesirable boundary. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether SegAdapter, a machine learning-based method, is useful for automatically correcting large segmentation errors and disagreement in anatomical definition. We further assessed the robustness of the method in handling size of training set, differences in head coil usage, and amount of brain atrophy. High resolution T1-weighted images were acquired from 30 healthy controls scanned with either an 8-channel or 32-channel head coil. Ten patients, who suffered from brain atrophy because of fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, were scanned using the 32-channel head coil. The initial segmentations of the cerebellum and brainstem were generated automatically using Freesurfer. Subsequently, Freesurfer's segmentations were both manually corrected to serve as the gold standard and automatically corrected by SegAdapter. Using only 5 scans in the training set, spatial overlap with manual segmentation in Dice coefficient improved significantly from 0.956 (for Freesurfer segmentation to 0.978 (for SegAdapter-corrected segmentation for the cerebellum and from 0.821 to 0.954 for the brainstem. Reducing the training set size to 2 scans only decreased the Dice coefficient ≤0.002 for the cerebellum and ≤ 0.005 for the brainstem compared to the use of training set size of 5 scans in corrective learning. The method was also robust in handling differences between the training set and the test set in head coil usage and the amount of brain atrophy, which reduced spatial overlap only by <0.01. These results suggest that the combination of automated segmentation and corrective learning provides a valuable method for accurate and efficient segmentation of the cerebellum and brainstem, particularly in large

  7. Is the cerebellum the optimal reference region for intensity normalization of perfusion MR studies in early Alzheimer's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Lacalle-Aurioles

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is the region most commonly used as a reference when normalizing the intensity of perfusion images acquired using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in Alzheimer's disease (AD studies. In addition, the cerebellum provides unbiased estimations with nuclear medicine techniques. However, no reports confirm the cerebellum as an optimal reference region in MRI studies or evaluate the consequences of using different normalization regions. In this study, we address the effect of using the cerebellum, whole-brain white matter, and whole-brain cortical gray matter in the normalization of cerebral blood flow (CBF parametric maps by comparing patients with stable mild cognitive impairment (MCI, patients with AD and healthy controls. According to our results, normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter enables more sensitive detection of perfusion abnormalities in AD patients and reveals a larger number of affected regions than data normalized by the cerebellum or whole-brain white matter. Therefore, the cerebellum is not the most valid reference region in MRI studies for early stages of AD. After normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter, we found a significant decrease in CBF in both parietal lobes and an increase in CBF in the right medial temporal lobe. We found no differences in perfusion between patients with stable MCI and healthy controls either before or after normalization.

  8. Is the Cerebellum the Optimal Reference Region for Intensity Normalization of Perfusion MR Studies in Early Alzheimer’s Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacalle-Aurioles, María; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan Adán; Cruz-Orduña, Isabel; Olazarán, Javier; Mateos-Pérez, José María; Martino, María Elena; Desco, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum is the region most commonly used as a reference when normalizing the intensity of perfusion images acquired using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) studies. In addition, the cerebellum provides unbiased estimations with nuclear medicine techniques. However, no reports confirm the cerebellum as an optimal reference region in MRI studies or evaluate the consequences of using different normalization regions. In this study, we address the effect of using the cerebellum, whole-brain white matter, and whole-brain cortical gray matter in the normalization of cerebral blood flow (CBF) parametric maps by comparing patients with stable mild cognitive impairment (MCI), patients with AD and healthy controls. According to our results, normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter enables more sensitive detection of perfusion abnormalities in AD patients and reveals a larger number of affected regions than data normalized by the cerebellum or whole-brain white matter. Therefore, the cerebellum is not the most valid reference region in MRI studies for early stages of AD. After normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter, we found a significant decrease in CBF in both parietal lobes and an increase in CBF in the right medial temporal lobe. We found no differences in perfusion between patients with stable MCI and healthy controls either before or after normalization. PMID:24386081

  9. Subchronic Exposure to Arsenic Represses the TH/TRβ1-CaMK IV Signaling Pathway in Mouse Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai Guan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that arsenic (As impaired learning and memory by down-regulating calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMK IV in mouse cerebellum. It has been documented that the thyroid hormone receptor (TR/retinoid X receptor (RXR heterodimer and thyroid hormone (TH may be involved in the regulation of CaMK IV. To investigate whether As affects the TR/RXR heterodimer and TH, we determined As concentration in serum and cerebellum, 3,5,3’-triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxin (T4 levels in serum, and expression of CaMK IV, TR and RXR in cerebellum of mice exposed to As. Cognition function was examined by the step-down passive avoidance task and Morris water maze (MWM tests. Morphology of the cerebellum was observed by Hematoxylin-Eosin staining under light microscope. Our results showed that the concentrations of As in the serum and cerebellum of mice both increased with increasing As-exposure level. A significant positive correlation was found between the two processes. Adeficit in learning and memory was found in the exposed mice. Abnormal morphologic changes of Purkinje cells were observed in cerebellum of the exposed mice. Moreover, the cerebellar expressions of CaMK IV protein and the TRβ gene, and TRβ1 protein were significantly lower in As-exposed mice than those in controls. Subchronic exposure to As appears to increase its level in serum and cerebella of mice, impairing learning and memory and down-regulating expression of TRβ1 as well as down-stream CaMK IV. It is also suggested that the increased As may be responsible for down-regulation of TRβ1 and CaMK IV in cerebellum and that the down-regulated TRβ1 may be involved in As-induced impairment of learning and memory via inhibiting CaMK IV and its down-stream pathway.

  10. Cerebellum and psychiatric disorders O cerebelo e os transtornos psiquiátricos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Baldaçara

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this update article is to report structural and functional neuroimaging studies exploring the potential role of cerebellum in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. METHOD: A non-systematic literature review was conducted by means of Medline using the following terms as a parameter: "cerebellum", "cerebellar vermis", "schizophrenia", "bipolar disorder", "depression", "anxiety disorders", "dementia" and "attention deficit hyperactivity disorder". The electronic search was done up to April 2008. DISCUSSION: Structural and functional cerebellar abnormalities have been reported in many psychiatric disorders, namely schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, dementia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Structural magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported smaller total cerebellar and vermal volumes in schizophrenia, mood disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies using cognitive paradigms have shown alterations in cerebellar activity in schizophrenia, anxiety disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In dementia, the cerebellum is affected in later stages of the disease. CONCLUSION: Contrasting with early theories, cerebellum appears to play a major role in different brain functions other than balance and motor control, including emotional regulation and cognition. Future studies are clearly needed to further elucidate the role of cerebellum in both normal and pathological behavior, mood regulation, and cognitive functioning.OBJETIVO: Este artigo de atualização tem como objetivo avaliar estudos em neuroimagem estrutural e funcional a fim de explorar o papel do cerebelo na patofisiologia dos transtornos psiquiátricos. MÉTODO: Uma revisão não sistemática foi realizada através do Medline utilizando-se como parâmetro os seguintes termos: "cerebellum", "cerebellar vermis", "schizophrenia

  11. Processing of Visual Signals Related to Self-motion in the Cerebellum of Pigeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Richard Wylie

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I describe the key features of optic flow processing in pigeons. Optic flow is the visual motion that occurs across the entire retina as a result of self-motion and is processed by subcortical visual pathways that project to the cerebellum. These pathways originate in two retinal-recipient nuclei, the nucleus of the basal optic root and the nucleus lentiformis mesencephali, which project to the vestibulocerebellum (folia IXcd and X, directly as mossy fibres, and indirectly as climbing fibres from the inferior olive. Optic flow information is integrated with vestibular input in the vestibulocerebellum. There is a clear separation of function in the vestibulocerebellum: Purkinje cells in the flocculus process optic flow resulting from self-rotation, whereas Purkinje cells in the uvula/nodulus process optic flow resulting from self-translation. Furthermore, Purkinje cells with particular optic flow preferences are organized topographically into parasagittal zones. These zones are correlated with expression of the isoenzyme aldolase C, also known as zebrin II (ZII. ZII expression is heterogeneous such that there are parasagittal stripes of Purkinje cells that have high expression (ZII+ alternating with stripes of Purkinje cells with low expression (ZII-. A functional zone spans a ZII+/- stripe pair. That is, each zone that contains Purkinje cells responsive to a particular pattern of optic flow is subdivided into a strip containing ZII+ Purkinje cells and a strip containing ZII- Purkinje cells. Additionally, there is optic flow input to folia VI-VIII of the cerebellum from lentiformis mesencephali. These folia also receive visual input from the tectofugal system via pontine nuclei. As the tectofugal system is involved in the analysis of local motion, there is integration of optic flow and local motion information in VI-VIII. This part of the cerebellum may be important for moving through a cluttered environment.

  12. Cerebellum in levodopa-induced dyskinesias: the unusual suspect in the motor network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha eKishore

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The exact mechanisms that generate levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID during chronic levodopa therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD are not yet fully established. The most widely accepted theories incriminate the non-physiological synthesis, release and reuptake of dopamine generated by exogenously administered levodopa in the striatum, and the aberrant plasticity in the corticostriatal loops. However, normal motor performance requires the correct recruitment of motor maps. This depends on a high level of synergy within the primary motor cortex (M1 as well as between M1 and other cortical and subcortical areas, for which dopamine is necessary. The plastic mechanisms within M1 which are crucial for the maintenance of this synergy are disrupted both during OFF and dyskinetic states in PD. When tested without levodopa, dyskinetic patients show loss of treatment benefits on long-term potentiation and long-term depression-like plasticity of the intracortical circuits. When tested with the regular pulsatile levodopa doses, they show further impairment of the M1 plasticity, such as inability to depotentiate an already facilitated synapse and paradoxical facilitation in response to afferent input aimed at synaptic inhibition. Dyskinetic patients have also severe impairment of the associative, sensorimotor plasticity of M1 attributed to deficient cerebellar modulation of sensory afferents to M1. Here we review the anatomical and functional studies, including the recently described bidirectional connections between the cerebellum and the basal ganglia that support a key role of the cerebellum in the generation of LID. This model stipulates that aberrant neuronal synchrony in PD with LID may propagate from the sub thalamic nucleus to the cerebellum and lock the cerebellar cortex in a hyperactive state. This could affect critical cerebellar functions such as the dynamic and discrete modulation of M1 plasticity and the matching of motor commands with sensory

  13. Neuropathologic features in the hippocampus and cerebellum of three older men with fragile X syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greco Claudia M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fragile X syndrome (FXS is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability, and is the most common single-gene disorder known to be associated with autism. Despite recent advances in functional neuroimaging and our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, only limited neuropathologic information on FXS is available. Methods Neuropathologic examinations were performed on post-mortem brain tissue from three older men (aged 57, 64 and 78 years who had received a clinical or genetic diagnosis of FXS. In each case, physical and cognitive features were typical of FXS, and one man was also diagnosed with autism. Guided by reports of clinical and neuroimaging abnormalities of the limbic system and cerebellum of individuals with FXS, the current analysis focused on neuropathologic features present in the hippocampus and the cerebellar vermis. Results Histologic and immunologic staining revealed abnormalities in both the hippocampus and cerebellar vermis. Focal thickening of hippocampal CA1 and irregularities in the appearance of the dentate gyrus were identified. All lobules of the cerebellar vermis and the lateral cortex of the posterior lobe of the cerebellum had decreased numbers of Purkinje cells, which were occasionally misplaced, and often lacked proper orientation. There were mild, albeit excessive, undulations of the internal granular cell layer, with patchy foliar white matter axonal and astrocytic abnormalities. Quantitative analysis documented panfoliar atrophy of both the anterior and posterior lobes of the vermis, with preferential atrophy of the posterior lobule (VI to VII compared with age-matched normal controls. Conclusions Significant morphologic changes in the hippocampus and cerebellum in three adult men with FXS were identified. This pattern of pathologic features supports the idea that primary defects in neuronal migration, neurogenesis and aging may underlie the neuropathology reported in FXS.

  14. Chronic exposure to hypergravity affects thyrotropin-releasing hormone levels in rat brainstem and cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunton, N. G.; Tang, F.; Corcoran, M. L.; Fox, R. A.; Man, S. Y.

    1998-01-01

    In studies to determine the neurochemical mechanisms underlying adaptation to altered gravity we have investigated changes in neuropeptide levels in brainstem, cerebellum, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex by radioimmunoassay. Fourteen days of hypergravity (hyperG) exposure resulted in significant increases in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) content of brainstem and cerebellum, but no changes in levels of other neuropeptides (beta-endorphin, cholecystokinin, met-enkephalin, somatostatin, and substance P) examined in these areas were found, nor were TRH levels significantly changed in any other brain regions investigated. The increase in TRH in brainstem and cerebellum was not seen in animals exposed only to the rotational component of centrifugation, suggesting that this increase was elicited by the alteration in the gravitational environment. The only other neuropeptide affected by chronic hyperG exposure was met-enkephalin, which was significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex. However, this alteration in met-enkephalin was found in both hyperG and rotation control animals and thus may be due to the rotational rather than the hyperG component of centrifugation. Thus it does not appear as if there is a generalized neuropeptide response to chronic hyperG following 2 weeks of exposure. Rather, there is an increase only of TRH and that occurs only in areas of the brain known to be heavily involved with vestibular inputs and motor control (both voluntary and autonomic). These results suggest that TRH may play a role in adaptation to altered gravity as it does in adaptation to altered vestibular input following labyrinthectomy, and in cerebellar and vestibular control of locomotion, as seen in studies of ataxia.

  15. Interaction of plasticity and circuit organization during the acquisition of cerebellum-dependent motor learning

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yan; Lisberger, Stephen G.

    2013-01-01

    eLife digest Practice makes perfect in many areas of life, such as playing sport or even just drinking coffee from a cup without spilling any. Our brains can learn and improve these motor skills through trial, error and learning, with such “motor learning” depending on the cerebellum, a part of the brain that helps to coordinate all kinds of movements. Motor learning is a product of the organization of the cerebellar circuit, which is well understood, and the “plasticity” in the synapses that...

  16. Neuroimaging of Infectious and Inflammatory Diseases of the Pediatric Cerebellum and Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Martinetti, Carola; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Cerebellar involvement by infectious-inflammatory conditions is rare in children. Most patients present with acute ataxia, and are typically previously healthy, young (often preschool) children. Viral involvement is the most common cause and ranges from acute postinfectious ataxia to acute cerebellitis MR imaging plays a crucial role in the evaluation of patients suspected of harboring inflammatory-infectious involvement of the cerebellum and brainstem. Knowledge of the imaging features of these disorders and technical competence on pediatric MR imaging are necessary for a correct interpretation of findings, which in turn prompts further management.

  17. Cerebellum in levodopa-induced dyskinesias: the unusual suspect in the motor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Asha; Popa, Traian

    2014-01-01

    The exact mechanisms that generate levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID) during chronic levodopa therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) are not yet fully established. The most widely accepted theories incriminate the non-physiological synthesis, release and reuptake of dopamine generated by exogenously administered levodopa in the striatum, and the aberrant plasticity in the cortico-striatal loops. However, normal motor performance requires the correct recruitment of motor maps. This depends on a high level of synergy within the primary motor cortex (M1) as well as between M1 and other cortical and subcortical areas, for which dopamine is necessary. The plastic mechanisms within M1, which are crucial for the maintenance of this synergy, are disrupted both during "OFF" and dyskinetic states in PD. When tested without levodopa, dyskinetic patients show loss of treatment benefits on long-term potentiation and long-term depression-like plasticity of the intracortical circuits. When tested with the regular pulsatile levodopa doses, they show further impairment of the M1 plasticity, such as inability to depotentiate an already facilitated synapse and paradoxical facilitation in response to afferent input aimed at synaptic inhibition. Dyskinetic patients have also severe impairment of the associative, sensorimotor plasticity of M1 attributed to deficient cerebellar modulation of sensory afferents to M1. Here, we review the anatomical and functional studies, including the recently described bidirectional connections between the cerebellum and the basal ganglia that support a key role of the cerebellum in the generation of LID. This model stipulates that aberrant neuronal synchrony in PD with LID may propagate from the subthalamic nucleus to the cerebellum and "lock" the cerebellar cortex in a hyperactive state. This could affect critical cerebellar functions such as the dynamic and discrete modulation of M1 plasticity and the matching of motor commands with sensory information

  18. Neuroprotection by taurine in ethanol-induced apoptosis in the developing cerebellum

    OpenAIRE

    Taranukhin Andrey G; Taranukhina Elena Y; Saransaari Pirjo; Podkletnova Irina M; Pelto-Huikko Markku; Oja Simo S

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Acute ethanol administration leads to massive apoptotic neurodegeneration in the developing central nervous system. We studied whether taurine is neuroprotective in ethanol-induced apoptosis in the mouse cerebellum during the postnatal period. Methods The mice were divided into three groups: ethanol-treated, ethanol+taurine-treated and controls. Ethanol (20% solution) was administered subcutaneously at a total dose of 5 g/kg (2.5 g/kg at time 1 h and 2.5 g/kg at 3 h) to th...

  19. Early-stage hemangioblastoma presenting as a small lesion with significant edema in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Quanmin; Guo, Pin; Shen, Lin; Li, Xiaoxiong; Qiu, Yongming

    2015-03-01

    Hemangioblastomas are benign tumors that are frequently associated with peritumoral cysts; however, their early characteristics before cyst formation remain unclear. In this article, the authors present a novel case of a cerebellar hemangioblastoma presenting as a small solid lesion with significant edema. Surgery was performed to resect the tumor, and a follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed complete excision of the mass and resolution of the cerebellar edema. Histological examination confirmed that the lesion was a hemangioblastoma. This is the only report in the literature to describe the imaging and histopathologic characteristics of an initial hemangioblastoma in the cerebellum. PMID:25699527

  20. Neuroimaging of Infectious and Inflammatory Diseases of the Pediatric Cerebellum and Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Martinetti, Carola; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Cerebellar involvement by infectious-inflammatory conditions is rare in children. Most patients present with acute ataxia, and are typically previously healthy, young (often preschool) children. Viral involvement is the most common cause and ranges from acute postinfectious ataxia to acute cerebellitis MR imaging plays a crucial role in the evaluation of patients suspected of harboring inflammatory-infectious involvement of the cerebellum and brainstem. Knowledge of the imaging features of these disorders and technical competence on pediatric MR imaging are necessary for a correct interpretation of findings, which in turn prompts further management. PMID:27423804

  1. Cerebellum and processing of negative facial emotions: cerebellar transcranial DC stimulation specifically enhances the emotional recognition of facial anger and sadness

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrucci, Roberta; Giannicola, Gaia; Rosa, Manuela; Fumagalli, Manuela; Boggio, Paulo Sergio; Hallett, Mark; Zago, Stefano; Priori, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Some evidence suggests that the cerebellum participates in the complex network processing emotional facial expression. To evaluate the role of the cerebellum in recognizing facial expressions we delivered transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the cerebellum and prefrontal cortex. A facial emotion recognition task was administered to 21 healthy subjects before and after cerebellar tDCS; we also tested subjects with a visual attention task and a visual analogue scale (VAS) for mood.

  2. Sperm whales and killer whales with the largest brains of all toothed whales show extreme differences in cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Sam H; Hanson, Alicia C

    2014-01-01

    Among cetaceans, killer whales and sperm whales have the widest distribution in the world's oceans. Both species use echolocation, are long-lived, and have the longest periods of gestation among whales. Sperm whales dive much deeper and much longer than killer whales. It has long been thought that sperm whales have the largest brains of all living things, but our brain mass evidence, from published sources and our own specimens, shows that big males of these two species share this distinction. Despite this, we also find that cerebellum size is very different between killer whales and sperm whales. The sperm whale cerebellum is only about 7% of the total brain mass, while the killer whale cerebellum is almost 14%. These results are significant because they contradict claims that the cerebellum scales proportionally with the rest of the brain in all mammals. They also correct the generalization that all cetaceans have enlarged cerebella. We suggest possible reasons for the existence of such a large cerebellar size difference between these two species. Cerebellar function is not fully understood, and comparing the abilities of animals with differently sized cerebella can help uncover functional roles of the cerebellum in humans and animals. Here we show that the large cerebellar difference likely relates to evolutionary history, diving, sensory capability, and ecology. PMID:24852603

  3. Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Brain and Cerebellum in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kułak, Piotr; Maciorkowska, Elżbieta; Gościk, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies are rarely used in the diagnosis of patients with cerebral palsy. The aim of present study was to assess the relationships between the volumetric MRI and clinical findings in children with cerebral palsy compared to control subjects. Materials and Methods. Eighty-two children with cerebral palsy and 90 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were collected. Results. The dominant changes identified on MRI scans in children with cerebral palsy were periventricular leukomalacia (42%) and posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (21%). The total brain and cerebellum volumes in children with cerebral palsy were significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Significant grey matter volume reduction was found in the total brain in children with cerebral palsy compared with the control subjects. Positive correlations between the age of the children of both groups and the grey matter volumes in the total brain were found. Negative relationship between width of third ventricle and speech development was found in the patients. Positive correlations were noted between the ventricles enlargement and motor dysfunction and mental retardation in children with cerebral palsy. Conclusions. By using the voxel-based morphometry, the total brain, cerebellum, and grey matter volumes were significantly reduced in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:27579318

  4. Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Brain and Cerebellum in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kułak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies are rarely used in the diagnosis of patients with cerebral palsy. The aim of present study was to assess the relationships between the volumetric MRI and clinical findings in children with cerebral palsy compared to control subjects. Materials and Methods. Eighty-two children with cerebral palsy and 90 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were collected. Results. The dominant changes identified on MRI scans in children with cerebral palsy were periventricular leukomalacia (42% and posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (21%. The total brain and cerebellum volumes in children with cerebral palsy were significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Significant grey matter volume reduction was found in the total brain in children with cerebral palsy compared with the control subjects. Positive correlations between the age of the children of both groups and the grey matter volumes in the total brain were found. Negative relationship between width of third ventricle and speech development was found in the patients. Positive correlations were noted between the ventricles enlargement and motor dysfunction and mental retardation in children with cerebral palsy. Conclusions. By using the voxel-based morphometry, the total brain, cerebellum, and grey matter volumes were significantly reduced in children with cerebral palsy.

  5. Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Brain and Cerebellum in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciorkowska, Elżbieta; Gościk, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies are rarely used in the diagnosis of patients with cerebral palsy. The aim of present study was to assess the relationships between the volumetric MRI and clinical findings in children with cerebral palsy compared to control subjects. Materials and Methods. Eighty-two children with cerebral palsy and 90 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were collected. Results. The dominant changes identified on MRI scans in children with cerebral palsy were periventricular leukomalacia (42%) and posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (21%). The total brain and cerebellum volumes in children with cerebral palsy were significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Significant grey matter volume reduction was found in the total brain in children with cerebral palsy compared with the control subjects. Positive correlations between the age of the children of both groups and the grey matter volumes in the total brain were found. Negative relationship between width of third ventricle and speech development was found in the patients. Positive correlations were noted between the ventricles enlargement and motor dysfunction and mental retardation in children with cerebral palsy. Conclusions. By using the voxel-based morphometry, the total brain, cerebellum, and grey matter volumes were significantly reduced in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:27579318

  6. Sprouty genes prevent excessive FGF signalling in multiple cell types throughout development of the cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tian; Yaguchi, Yuichiro; Echevarria, Diego; Martinez, Salvador; Basson, M. Albert

    2011-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and regulators of the FGF signalling pathway are expressed in several cell types within the cerebellum throughout its development. Although much is known about the function of this pathway during the establishment of the cerebellar territory during early embryogenesis, the role of this pathway during later developmental stages is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the function of sprouty genes (Spry1, Spry2 and Spry4), which encode feedback antagonists of FGF signalling, during cerebellar development in the mouse. Simultaneous deletion of more than one of these genes resulted in a number of defects, including mediolateral expansion of the cerebellar vermis, reduced thickness of the granule cell layer and abnormal foliation. Analysis of cerebellar development revealed that the anterior cerebellar neuroepithelium in the early embryonic cerebellum was expanded and that granule cell proliferation during late embryogenesis and early postnatal development was reduced. We show that the granule cell proliferation deficit correlated with reduced sonic hedgehog (SHH) expression and signalling. A reduction in Fgfr1 dosage during development rescued these defects, confirming that the abnormalities are due to excess FGF signalling. Our data indicate that sprouty acts both cell autonomously in granule cell precursors and non-cell autonomously to regulate granule cell number. Taken together, our data demonstrate that FGF signalling levels have to be tightly controlled throughout cerebellar development in order to maintain the normal development of multiple cell types. PMID:21693512

  7. Motor and linguistic linking of space and time in the cerebellum.

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    Massimiliano Oliveri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent literature documented the presence of spatial-temporal interactions in the human brain. The aim of the present study was to verify whether representation of past and future is also mapped onto spatial representations and whether the cerebellum may be a neural substrate for linking space and time in the linguistic domain. We asked whether processing of the tense of a verb is influenced by the space where response takes place and by the semantics of the verb. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Responses to past tense were facilitated in the left space while responses to future tense were facilitated in the right space. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of the right cerebellum selectively slowed down responses to future tense of action verbs; rTMS of both cerebellar hemispheres decreased accuracy of responses to past tense in the left space and to future tense in the right space for non-verbs, and to future tense in the right space for state verbs. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that representation of past and future is mapped onto spatial formats and that motor action could represent the link between spatial and temporal dimensions. Right cerebellar, left motor brain networks could be part of the prospective brain, whose primary function is to use past experiences to anticipate future events. Both cerebellar hemispheres could play a role in establishing the grammatical rules for verb conjugation.

  8. Gating of long-term potentiation by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the cerebellum input stage.

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    Francesca Prestori

    Full Text Available The brain needs mechanisms able to correlate plastic changes with local circuit activity and internal functional states. At the cerebellum input stage, uncontrolled induction of long-term potentiation or depression (LTP or LTD between mossy fibres and granule cells can saturate synaptic capacity and impair cerebellar functioning, which suggests that neuromodulators are required to gate plasticity processes. Cholinergic systems innervating the cerebellum are thought to enhance procedural learning and memory. Here we show that a specific subtype of acetylcholine receptors, the α7-nAChRs, are distributed both in cerebellar mossy fibre terminals and granule cell dendrites and contribute substantially to synaptic regulation. Selective α7-nAChR activation enhances the postsynaptic calcium increase, allowing weak mossy fibre bursts, which would otherwise cause LTD, to generate robust LTP. The local microperfusion of α7-nAChR agonists could also lead to in vivo switching of LTD to LTP following sensory stimulation of the whisker pad. In the cerebellar flocculus, α7-nAChR pharmacological activation impaired vestibulo-ocular-reflex adaptation, probably because LTP was saturated, preventing the fine adjustment of synaptic weights. These results show that gating mechanisms mediated by specific subtypes of nicotinic receptors are required to control the LTD/LTP balance at the mossy fibre-granule cell relay in order to regulate cerebellar plasticity and behavioural adaptation.

  9. Ablation of BRaf impairs neuronal differentiation in the postnatal hippocampus and cerebellum.

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    Verena Pfeiffer

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the role of the kinase BRaf in postnatal brain development. Mice expressing truncated, non-functional BRaf in neural stem cell-derived brain tissue demonstrate alterations in the cerebellum, with decreased sizes and fuzzy borders of the glomeruli in the granule cell layer. In addition we observed reduced numbers and misplaced ectopic Purkinje cells that showed an altered structure of their dendritic arborizations in the hippocampus, while the overall cornus ammonis architecture appeared to be unchanged. In male mice lacking BRaf in the hippocampus the size of the granule cell layer was normal at postnatal day 12 (P12 but diminished at P21, as compared to control littermates. This defect was caused by a reduced ability of dentate gyrus progenitor cells to differentiate into NeuN positive granule cell neurons. In vitro cell culture of P0/P1 hippocampal cells revealed that BRaf deficient cells were impaired in their ability to form microtubule-associated protein 2 positive neurons. Together with the alterations in behaviour, such as autoaggression and loss of balance fitness, these observations indicate that in the absence of BRaf all neuronal cellular structures develop, but neuronal circuits in the cerebellum and hippocampus are partially disturbed besides impaired neuronal generation in both structures.

  10. An fMRI Study of Intra-Individual Functional Topography in the Human Cerebellum

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    Catherine J. Stoodley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies report cerebellar activation during both motor and non-motor paradigms, and suggest a functional topography within the cerebellum. Sensorimotor tasks activate the anterior lobe, parts of lobule VI, and lobule VIII, whereas higher-level tasks activate lobules VI and VII in the posterior lobe. To determine whether these activation patterns are evident at a single-subject level, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during five tasks investigating sensorimotor (finger tapping, language (verb generation, spatial (mental rotation, working memory (N-back, and emotional processing (viewing images from the International Affective Picture System. Finger tapping activated the ipsilateral anterior lobe (lobules IV-V as well as lobules VI and VIII. Activation during verb generation was found in right lobules VII and VIIIA. Mental rotation activated left-lateralized clusters in lobules VII-VIIIA, VI-Crus I, and midline VIIAt. The N-back task showed bilateral activation in right lobules VI-Crus I and left lobules VIIB-VIIIA. Cerebellar activation was evident bilaterally in lobule VI while viewing arousing vs. neutral images. This fMRI study provides the first proof of principle demonstration that there is topographic organization of motor execution vs. cognitive/emotional domains within the cerebellum of a single individual, likely reflecting the anatomical specificity of cerebro-cerebellar circuits underlying different task domains. Inter-subject variability of motor and non-motor topography remains to be determined.

  11. Brain metabolites in the hippocampus-amygdala region and cerebellum in autism: an {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, H.; Harada, M.; Hisaoka, S.; Nishitani, H. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Tokushima, Tokushima City (Japan); Mori, K. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. of Tokushima (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Histological abnormalities of the brain in autism have been investigated extensively. We studied metabolites in the hippocampusamygdala (HA) region and cerebellum. We examined the right HA region and left cerebellar hemisphere of 27 autistic patients 2-18 years old, 21 boys and 6 girls and 10 normal children 6-14 years old, 4 boys and 6 girls, using the STEAM sequence. This sequence was used to minimise the influence of relaxation times. The N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) concentration was significantly lower (P=0.042) in autistic patients than in normal children (9.37 and 10.95 mM, respectively). There was no significant difference in other metabolites. The correlation coefficient (r value) of NAA between the HA region and cerebellum was 0.616. The decreased NAA concentration may be due to neuronal hypofunction or immature neurons. The NAA concentration in the HA region and cerebellum may be related, because of neuronal circuits or networks. (orig.)

  12. Brain metabolites in the hippocampus-amygdala region and cerebellum in autism: an 1H-MR spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histological abnormalities of the brain in autism have been investigated extensively. We studied metabolites in the hippocampusamygdala (HA) region and cerebellum. We examined the right HA region and left cerebellar hemisphere of 27 autistic patients 2-18 years old, 21 boys and 6 girls and 10 normal children 6-14 years old, 4 boys and 6 girls, using the STEAM sequence. This sequence was used to minimise the influence of relaxation times. The N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) concentration was significantly lower (P=0.042) in autistic patients than in normal children (9.37 and 10.95 mM, respectively). There was no significant difference in other metabolites. The correlation coefficient (r value) of NAA between the HA region and cerebellum was 0.616. The decreased NAA concentration may be due to neuronal hypofunction or immature neurons. The NAA concentration in the HA region and cerebellum may be related, because of neuronal circuits or networks. (orig.)

  13. Metabolic changes and DNA hypomethylation in cerebellum are associated with behavioral alterations in mice exposed to trichloroethylene postnatally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies demonstrated that low-level postnatal and early life exposure to the environmental contaminant, trichloroethylene (TCE), in the drinking water of MRL +/+ mice altered glutathione redox homeostasis and increased biomarkers of oxidative stress indicating a more oxidized state. Plasma metabolites along the interrelated transmethylation pathway were also altered indicating impaired methylation capacity. Here we extend these findings to further characterize the impact of TCE exposure in mice exposed to water only or two doses of TCE in the drinking water (0, 2, and 28 mg/kg/day) postnatally from birth until 6 weeks of age on redox homeostasis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in the cerebellum. In addition, pathway intermediates involved in methyl metabolism and global DNA methylation patterns were examined in cerebellar tissue. Because the cerebellum is functionally important for coordinating motor activity, including exploratory and social approach behaviors, these parameters were evaluated in the present study. Mice exposed to 28 mg/kg/day TCE exhibited increased locomotor activity over time as compared with control mice. In the novel object exploration test, these mice were more likely to enter the zone with the novel object as compared to control mice. Similar results were obtained in a second test when an unfamiliar mouse was introduced into the testing arena. The results show for the first time that postnatal exposure to TCE causes key metabolic changes in the cerebellum that may contribute to global DNA methylation deficits and behavioral alterations in TCE-exposed mice. - Highlights: • We exposed male mice to low-level trichloroethylene from postnatal days 1 through 42. • This exposure altered redox potential and increased oxidative stress in cerebellum. • This exposure altered metabolites important in cellular methylation in cerebellum. • This exposure promoted DNA hypomethylation in cerebellum. • This exposure enhanced locomotor

  14. The Cerebellum in Maintenance of a Motor Skill: A Hierarchy of Brain and Spinal Cord Plasticity Underlies H-Reflex Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; Chen, Xiang Yang

    2006-01-01

    Operant conditioning of the H-reflex, the electrical analog of the spinal stretch reflex, is a simple model of skill acquisition and involves plasticity in the spinal cord. Previous work showed that the cerebellum is essential for down-conditioning the H-reflex. This study asks whether the cerebellum is also essential for maintaining…

  15. Cell death in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum of senescence accelerated mouse (SAMP(8)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yonghong; Lee, Cleo C L; Lam, W P; Wai, Maria S M; Rudd, John A; Yew, David T

    2007-10-01

    The cerebella of SAMP(8) (accelerated aging mouse) and SAMR(1) controls were analyzed by Western Blotting of tyrosine hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase, as well as by TUNEL and histological silver staining. Both tyrosine hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase levels were higher in SAMR(1) than in SAMP(8). There was also an age-related decrease in enzyme levels in SAMP(8), with the reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase being more apparent. Concomitantly, there was an age-related increase of apoptosis in the medial neocerebellum and the vermis as revealed by TUNEL, with changes being significant in the SAMP(8) strain. Histologically, some Purkinje cells appeared to disappear during aging. Taken together, the data suggests that the aging SAMP(8) strain displays differential Purkinje cell death in the medial cerebellum and that some of the dying cells are likely to be catecholaminergic. PMID:17415677

  16. Signalling by CGRP and Adrenomedullin in the Cerebellum and Other Systems

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    David Poyner

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The best characterised signalling pathway activated by both CGRP and adrenomedullin is stimulation of adenylate cyclase via Gs. However, it is clear that in some circumstances the peptides can activate other signal transduction pathways, e.g., increases in intracellular calcium. Many of these signalling pathways can be observed in cultured cells but it is important also to examine isolated tissues to discover the full repertoire of transduction events. In the rat cerebellum there are receptors that respond to both CGRP and adrenomedullin. These seem to be located postsynaptically on Parallel Fibre nerve terminals and modulate transmission to Purkinje cells. Adrenomedullin acts via cAMP, apparently to augment neurotransmitter release. By contrast, CGRP decreases transmitter release, via a non-cAMP mediated pathway. We are currently examining the role of NO and tyrosine kinases in the responses to these peptides.

  17. Cerebellum segmentation in MRI using atlas registration and local multi-scale image descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Lijn, F.; de Bruijne, M.; Hoogendam, Y.Y.;

    2009-01-01

    We propose a novel cerebellum segmentation method for MRI, based on a combination of statistical models of the structure's expected location in the brain and its local appearance. The appearance model is obtained from a k-nearest-neighbor classifier, which uses a set of multi-scale local image...... descriptors as features. The spatial model is constructed by registering multiple manually annotated datasets to the unlabeled target image. The two components are then combined in a Bayesian framework. The method is quantitatively validated in a leave-one-out experiment using 18 MR images of elderly subjects....... The experiment showed that the method produces accurate segmentations. The mean Dice similarity index compared to the manual reference was 0.953 for left and right, and the mean surface distance was 0.49 mm for left and 0.50 mm for right. The combined atlas- and appearance-based method was found to be more...

  18. Plastic corollary discharge predicts sensory consequences of movements in a cerebellum-like circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requarth, Tim; Sawtell, Nathaniel B

    2014-05-21

    The capacity to predict the sensory consequences of movements is critical for sensory, motor, and cognitive function. Though it is hypothesized that internal signals related to motor commands, known as corollary discharge, serve to generate such predictions, this process remains poorly understood at the neural circuit level. Here we demonstrate that neurons in the electrosensory lobe (ELL) of weakly electric mormyrid fish generate negative images of the sensory consequences of the fish's own movements based on ascending spinal corollary discharge signals. These results generalize previous findings describing mechanisms for generating negative images of the effects of the fish's specialized electric organ discharge (EOD) and suggest that a cerebellum-like circuit endowed with associative synaptic plasticity acting on corollary discharge can solve the complex and ubiquitous problem of predicting sensory consequences of movements. PMID:24853945

  19. Structural brain abnormalities in the frontostriatal system and cerebellum in pedophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Boris; Peschel, Thomas; Paul, Thomas; Gizewski, Elke; Forsting, Michael; Leygraf, Norbert; Schedlowski, Manfred; Krueger, Tillmann H C

    2007-11-01

    Even though previous neuropsychological studies and clinical case reports have suggested an association between pedophilia and frontocortical dysfunction, our knowledge about the neurobiological mechanisms underlying pedophilia is still fragmentary. Specifically, the brain morphology of such disorders has not yet been investigated using MR imaging techniques. Whole brain structural T1-weighted MR images from 18 pedophile patients (9 attracted to males, 9 attracted to females) and 24 healthy age-matched control subjects (12 hetero- and 12 homosexual) from a comparable socioeconomic stratum were processed by using optimized automated voxel-based morphometry within multiple linear regression analyses. Compared to the homosexual and heterosexual control subjects, pedophiles showed decreased gray matter volume in the ventral striatum (also extending into the nucl. accumbens), the orbitofrontal cortex and the cerebellum. These observations further indicate an association between frontostriatal morphometric abnormalities and pedophilia. In this respect these findings may support the hypothesis that there is a shared etiopathological mechanism in all obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders.

  20. Role of the flocculus of the cerebellum in motor learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highstein, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    Structure-function studies at the systems level are an effective method for understanding the relationship of the central nervous system to behavior. Motor learning or adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex is a clear example wherein this approach has been productive. During a vestibulo-ocular reflex the brain converts a head velocity signal, transduced through the vestibular semicircular canals, into an eye movement command delivered to the extraocular muscles. If the viewed target remains on the fovea of the retina, the reflex is compensatory, and its gain, eye velocity/head velocity, is one. When the image of the viewed object slips across the retina, visual acuity decreases, and the gain of the reflex, which is no longer one, is plastically adapted or adjusted until retinal stability is restored. The anatomic substrate for this plasticity thus involves brain structures in which visual-vestibular interaction can potentially occur, as well as vestibular and visual sensory and oculomotor motor structures. Further, it has been known for many years that removal of the flocculus of the cerebellum permanently precludes further vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation, demonstrating the involvement of the cerebellum in this behavior. Maekawa and Simpson (J Neurophysiol 1973;36: 649-66) discovered that one visual input to the flocculus involved the accessory optic system and the inferior olive. Ensuing work has demonstrated that the visual signals used to adapt the vestibulo-ocular reflex are transmitted by this accessory optic system to the flocculus and subsequently to brain stem structures involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex plasticity. Presently the inclusive list of anatomic sites involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex circuitry and its adaptive plasticity is small. Our laboratory continues to believe that this behavior should be caused by interactions within this small class of neurons. By studying each class of identified neuron and its interactions with others within

  1. Reduction of GABA/sub B/ receptor binding induced by climbing fiber degeneration in the rat cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the rat cerebellar climbing fibers degenerated, as induced by lesioning the inferior olive with 3-acetylpyridine (3-AP), GABA/sub B/ receptor binding determined with 3H-(+/-)baclofen was reduced in the cerebellum but not in the cerebral cortex of rats. Computer analysis of saturation data revealed two components of the binding sites, and indicated that decrease of the binding in the cerebellum was due to reduction in receptor density, mainly of the high-affinity sites, the B/sub max/ of which was reduced to one-third that in the control animals. In vitro treatment with 3-AP, of the membranes prepared from either the cerebellum or the cerebral cortex, induced no alteration in the binding sites, thereby indicating that the alteration of GABA/sub B/ sites induced by in vivo treatment with 3-AP is not due to a direct action of 3-AP on the receptor. GABA/sub A/ and benzodiazepine receptor binding labelled with 3H-muscimol and 3H-diazepam, respectively, in both of brain regions was not affected by destruction of the inferior olive. These results provide evidence that some of the GABA/sub B/ sites but neither GABA/sub A/ nor benzodiazepine receptors in the cerebellum are located at the climbing fiber terminals. 28 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  2. Reduction of GABA/sub B/ receptor binding induced by climbing fiber degeneration in the rat cerebellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, K.; Fukuda, H.

    1985-07-22

    When the rat cerebellar climbing fibers degenerated, as induced by lesioning the inferior olive with 3-acetylpyridine (3-AP), GABA/sub B/ receptor binding determined with /sup 3/H-(+/-)baclofen was reduced in the cerebellum but not in the cerebral cortex of rats. Computer analysis of saturation data revealed two components of the binding sites, and indicated that decrease of the binding in the cerebellum was due to reduction in receptor density, mainly of the high-affinity sites, the B/sub max/ of which was reduced to one-third that in the control animals. In vitro treatment with 3-AP, of the membranes prepared from either the cerebellum or the cerebral cortex, induced no alteration in the binding sites, thereby indicating that the alteration of GABA/sub B/ sites induced by in vivo treatment with 3-AP is not due to a direct action of 3-AP on the receptor. GABA/sub A/ and benzodiazepine receptor binding labelled with /sup 3/H-muscimol and /sup 3/H-diazepam, respectively, in both of brain regions was not affected by destruction of the inferior olive. These results provide evidence that some of the GABA/sub B/ sites but neither GABA/sub A/ nor benzodiazepine receptors in the cerebellum are located at the climbing fiber terminals. 28 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  3. SELECTIVE EFFECTS OF DATURA STRAMONIUM ON THE GRANULAR PARALLEL FIBRES AND PURKINJE CELLS OF THE CEREBELLUM IN WISTAR RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E. Ekanem

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Datura stramonium (DS is a tropical ubiquitous shrub which is often used to increase intoxication in some beverages and is also freely used as a hallucinogen. It is a depressant of the central nervous system, yet commonly smoked in like manner tobacco. The present study investigated changes induced by intoxication with DS on the purkinje cells and parallel fibres of the cerebellum in Wistar rats to further elucidate the effects of this drug on cerebellar structure. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on both male and female Wistar rats (200-250 g. They were placed into three batches and four groups were derived from each batch, with eight animals per group. Ethanolic dried seed extract of DS was diluted in normal saline and administered intraperitoneally (I.P. at a dose of 750mg/kg and given to the treatment groups: once in batch 1, twice in batch 2, twelve hourly and thrice in batch 3, eight hourly per day respectively for 4 weeks, while the control groups received an equivalent of normal saline. The rats were euthanized and sections of the cerebellum were histologically processed in all groups. Silver impregnation stain for degenerating axons and neurons was used to elucidate the actions of DS on purkinje cells and the parallel fibres of the cerebellum. Results: The result of IP administration of DS extract (750 mg/kg given three times daily to the treated rats showed significant histological changes, which included atrophy of the parallel fibres but no significant changes in the purkinje cells of the cerebellum. Conclusions: Intoxication of DS seed as a result of excessive ingestion may have a selective degenerative effect on the parallel fibres of the granule cells of the cerebellum while the purkinje cells are spared; the implication being motor dysfunction.

  4. Role of the cerebellum and motor cortex in the regulation of visually controlled locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, D M; Marple-Horvat, D E

    1996-04-01

    An account is given of the current state of knowledge of the contributions of the cerebellum and the forelimb motor cortex (MC) to the neural control of walking movements in the cat. The main emphasis is on information obtained by recording from single MC and cerebellar neurones in chronically instrumented cats engaged in walking on the rungs of a horizontal ladder, a form of locomotion that is heavily dependent on visual input and for which the integrity of MC is essential. Evidence from the authors' laboratory and from other studies is presented which establishes that MC neurones, including pyramidal tract neurones, show higher levels of activity during ladder walking than during overground walking (i.e., when less constraint exists over the locus of footfall) and that this increase is greatest in late swing-early stance in the contralateral forelimb, consistent with one role of MC being to help determine the locus of footfall. However, many MC neurones develop peak activity at other times in the step cycle, and a comparison with recordings during treadmill walking suggests MC may also help regulate stance duration when walking speed is an important performance variable. Recordings from Purkinje cells and cerebellar nuclear neurones show that during ladder walking step-related activity is widespread in the vermal, paravermal, and crural regions of cortex and in the interposed and dentate nuclei. Nuclear cell activity is so timed that it could be contributing to producing the locomotor rhythms evident in MC cells, although this is not yet proven. Results are also presented and discussed relating to MC and cerebellar neuronal responses that occur when a step onto an unstable rung results in an unexpected external perturbation of the forelimb step cycle. MC responses begin with onset latency as short as 20 ms so that MC may assist spinal reflex mechanisms to produce a post hoc compensatory change in motor output. However, work in progress suggests that corresponding

  5. Ethanol sensitivity: a central role for CREB transcription regulation in the cerebellum

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    Biswal Shyam

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lowered sensitivity to the effects of ethanol increases the risk of developing alcoholism. Inbred mouse strains have been useful for the study of the genetic basis of various drug addiction-related phenotypes. Inbred Long-Sleep (ILS and Inbred Short-Sleep (ISS mice differentially express a number of genes thought to be implicated in sensitivity to the effects of ethanol. Concomitantly, there is evidence for a mediating role of cAMP/PKA/CREB signalling in aspects of alcoholism modelled in animals. In this report, the extent to which CREB signalling impacts the differential expression of genes in ILS and ISS mouse cerebella is examined. Results A training dataset for Machine Learning (ML and Exploratory Data Analyses (EDA was generated from promoter region sequences of a set of genes known to be targets of CREB transcription regulation and a set of genes whose transcription regulations are potentially CREB-independent. For each promoter sequence, a vector of size 132, with elements characterizing nucleotide composition features was generated. Genes whose expressions have been previously determined to be increased in ILS or ISS cerebella were identified, and their CREB regulation status predicted using the ML scheme C4.5. The C4.5 learning scheme was used because, of four ML schemes evaluated, it had the lowest predicted error rate. On an independent evaluation set of 21 genes of known CREB regulation status, C4.5 correctly classified 81% of instances with F-measures of 0.87 and 0.67 respectively for the CREB-regulated and CREB-independent classes. Additionally, six out of eight genes previously determined by two independent microarray platforms to be up-regulated in the ILS or ISS cerebellum were predicted by C4.5 to be transcriptionally regulated by CREB. Furthermore, 64% and 52% of a cross-section of other up-regulated cerebellar genes in ILS and ISS mice, respectively, were deemed to be CREB-regulated. Conclusion These

  6. Bilateral contributions of the cerebellum to the complex motor tasks on EPI fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate activation signals within the cerebellar cortex and to determine the side of the cerebellar cortex eliciting activation signals in response to complex motor tasks, as seen on EPI fMRI. Seven right-handed subjects (M : F=3 : 4; mean age, 30.3 years) underwent repetitive finger apposition with the dominant right hand. Using a 1.5 T MRI scanner, EPI fMR images were obtained. MR parameters used for EPI fMRI were TR/TE/Flip angle : 0.96 msec/64msec/90 deg FOV 22cm, 128 X 128 matrix, 10 slices, 10mm thickness while those for SE T1 weighted localized images were TR/TE : 450/16, FOV 23cm, 256 X 256 matrix. The paradigm was three sets of alternate resting and moving fingers for six cycles, resulting in times of 360 seconds (10 slices X 15 EPI X 6 cycles = 900 images). Image processing involved the use of a 200mHz Dual Pentium PC with homemade software. T-testing (p < 0.005 approx.= p < 0.0005) and time series analysis were performed, and to verify the locations of activated regions, resulting images were analyzed in a color-coded overlay to reference T1-weighted spin echo coronal images. Percentage change in signal intensity (PCSI) was calculated from the processed data. All normal subjects showed significant activation signals in both the contralateral (left) primary motor cortex (PCSI = 3.12% 0.96) and ipsilateral (right) cerebellar cortex (PCSI = 3.09% ±1.14). Signal activation was detected in the contralateral supplemental motor area (2.91% ±0.82), and motor activation in the anterior upper half of the contralateral cerebellum (PCSI 2.50% ±0.69). The difference in activation signals between both sides of the cerebellar cortex was not statistically significant. All data were matched with time-series analysis. Bilateral cerebellar activation is associated with unilateral complex finger movements, as seen on fMRI. This result may support the recent neurological observation that the cerebellum may exert bilateral effects on motor performance

  7. Muscarinic receptor subtypes differentially control synaptic input and excitability of cerebellum-projecting medial vestibular nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-04-01

    Neurons in the vestibular nuclei have a vital function in balance maintenance, gaze stabilization, and posture. Although muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are expressed and involved in regulating vestibular function, it remains unclear how individual mAChR subtypes regulate vestibular neuronal activity. In this study, we determined which specific subtypes of mAChRs control synaptic input and excitability of medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons that project to the cerebellum. Cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons were labeled by a fluorescent retrograde tracer and then identified in rat brainstem slices. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested that M2 and M3 were the possible major mAChR subtypes expressed in the MVN. The mAChR agonist oxotremorine-M significantly reduced the amplitude of glutamatergic excitatory post-synaptic currents evoked by stimulation of vestibular primary afferents, and this effect was abolished by the M2-preferring antagonist AF-DX 116. However, oxotremorine-M had no effect on GABA-mediated spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents of labeled MVN neurons. Furthermore, oxotremorine-M significantly increased the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons, and this effect was blocked by the M3-preferring antagonist J104129 in most neurons tested. In addition, AF-DX 116 reduced the onset latency and prolonged the excitatory effect of oxotremorine-M on the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons. Our findings suggest that M3 is the predominant post-synaptic mAChR involved in muscarinic excitation of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. Pre-synaptic M2 mAChR regulates excitatory glutamatergic input from vestibular primary afferents, which in turn influences the excitability of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. This new information has important therapeutic implications for treating vestibular disorders with mAChR subtype-selective agents. Medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons projecting to the cerebellum are involved in balance control. We

  8. Effects of microwave exposure on motor learning and GluR2 phosphorylation in rabbit cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effects of microwave exposure on motor learning and Glutamate receptor 2(GluR2) phosphorylation in rat cerebellum. Methods: The rabbits were trained for seven days to form eye-blink conditioning, and then divided randomly into control and microwave exposure group (at hours 0,3,24 and 72 subgroups after exposure, respectively). The rabbits were accepted 90 mW/cm2 microwave exposure for 30 minutes, and the rectal temperature were detected immediately after exposure and specific absorption rate (SAR) value were calculated. Eye-blink conditioning were detected immediately after exposure, and cerebellar GluR2 protein and GluR2 phosphorylation were detected with Western blotting. Results: Rectal temperature of rabbits were increased by 3.02 degree C after exposure, and SAR value was 8.74 W/kg. The eye-blink conditioning decreased significantly after exposure, and cerebellar GluR2 protein expression had no significant alteration but phosphorylation reduced significantly after exposure. Conclusions: 90 mW/cm2 microwave exposure has injurious effects on cerebellar GluR2 phosphorylation and motor learning. (authors)

  9. Altered functional connectivity of the language network in ASD: Role of classical language areas and cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein Verly

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of language, social interaction and communicative skills is remarkably different in the child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Atypical brain connectivity has frequently been reported in this patient population. However, the neural correlates underlying their disrupted language development and functioning are still poorly understood. Using resting state fMRI, we investigated the functional connectivity properties of the language network in a group of ASD patients with clear comorbid language impairment (ASD-LI; N = 19 and compared them to the language related connectivity properties of 23 age-matched typically developing children. A verb generation task was used to determine language components commonly active in both groups. Eight joint language components were identified and subsequently used as seeds in a resting state analysis. Interestingly, both the interregional and the seed-based whole brain connectivity analysis showed preserved connectivity between the classical intrahemispheric language centers, Wernicke's and Broca's areas. In contrast however, a marked loss of functional connectivity was found between the right cerebellar region and the supratentorial regulatory language areas. Also, the connectivity between the interhemispheric Broca regions and modulatory control dorsolateral prefrontal region was found to be decreased. This disruption of normal modulatory control and automation function by the cerebellum may underlie the abnormal language function in children with ASD-LI.

  10. The cerebellum link to neuroticism: a volumetric MRI association study in healthy volunteers.

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    Schutter, Dennis J L G; Koolschijn, P Cédric M P; Peper, Jiska S; Crone, Eveline A

    2012-01-01

    Prior research suggests an association between reduced cerebellar volumes and symptoms of depression and anxiety in patients with mood disorders. However, whether a smaller volume in itself reflects a neuroanatomical correlate for increased susceptibility to develop mood disorders remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between cerebellar volume and neurotic personality traits in a non-clinical subject sample. 3T Structural magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired, and trait depression and anxiety scales of the revised NEO personality inventory were assessed in thirty-eight healthy right-handed volunteers. Results showed that cerebellar volume corrected for total brain volume was inversely associated with depressive and anxiety-related personality traits. Cerebellar gray and white matter contributed equally to the observed associations. Our findings extend earlier clinical observations by showing that cerebellar volume covaries with neurotic personality traits in healthy volunteers. The results may point towards a possible role of the cerebellum in the vulnerability to experience negative affect. In conclusion, cerebellar volumes may constitute a clinico-neuroanatomical correlate for the development of depression- and anxiety-related symptoms.

  11. The cerebellum link to neuroticism: a volumetric MRI association study in healthy volunteers.

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    Dennis J L G Schutter

    Full Text Available Prior research suggests an association between reduced cerebellar volumes and symptoms of depression and anxiety in patients with mood disorders. However, whether a smaller volume in itself reflects a neuroanatomical correlate for increased susceptibility to develop mood disorders remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between cerebellar volume and neurotic personality traits in a non-clinical subject sample. 3T Structural magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired, and trait depression and anxiety scales of the revised NEO personality inventory were assessed in thirty-eight healthy right-handed volunteers. Results showed that cerebellar volume corrected for total brain volume was inversely associated with depressive and anxiety-related personality traits. Cerebellar gray and white matter contributed equally to the observed associations. Our findings extend earlier clinical observations by showing that cerebellar volume covaries with neurotic personality traits in healthy volunteers. The results may point towards a possible role of the cerebellum in the vulnerability to experience negative affect. In conclusion, cerebellar volumes may constitute a clinico-neuroanatomical correlate for the development of depression- and anxiety-related symptoms.

  12. Cerebellum and Integration of Neural Networks in Dual-Task Processing

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    Wu, Tao; Liu, Jun; Hallett, Mark; Zheng, Zheng; Chan, Piu

    2014-01-01

    Performing two tasks simultaneously (dual-task) is common in human daily life. The neural correlates of dual-task processing remain unclear. In the current study, we used a dual motor and counting task with functional MRI (fMRI) to determine whether there are any areas additionally activated for dual-task performance. Moreover, we investigated the functional connectivity of these added activated areas, as well as the training effect on brain activity and connectivity. We found that the right cerebellar vermis, left lobule V of the cerebellar anterior lobe and precuneus are additionally activated for this type of dual-tasking. These cerebellar regions had functional connectivity with extensive motor- and cognitive-related regions. Dual-task training induced less activation in several areas, but increased the functional connectivity between these cerebellar regions and numbers of motor- and cognitive-related areas. Our findings demonstrate that some regions within the cerebellum can be additionally activated with dual-task performance. Their role in dual motor and cognitive task processes is likely to integrate motor and cognitive networks, and may be involved in adjusting these networks to be more efficient in order to perform dual-tasking properly. The connectivity of the precuneus differs from the cerebellar regions. A possible role of the precuneus in dual-task may be monitoring the operation of active brain networks. PMID:23063842

  13. Differential effects of benzodiazepines on phospholipid methylation in hippocampus and cerebellum of rats

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    Tacconi, M.T.; Salmona, M.

    1988-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between the occupancy of BDZ binding sites and phospholipid methylation in brain, the authors examined phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) activity in synaptosomes of rat hippocampi and cerebella in the presence of BDZ ligands with different modes of action. We found that Ro 5-4864, a specific ligand for peripheral type receptors, increased PL methylation in hippocampal and cerebellar synaptosomes. This effect was directly related to receptor occupancy, since the specific antagonist PK11195 inhibited the rise in PEMT activity induced by Ro 5-4864. Clonazepam, on the other hand, tended to reduce PL production in cerebellum and hippocampus except for hiccocampal (/sup 3/H)-phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine which was elevated by 40 to 70% at doses ranging from 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -6/M. When equimolar concentrations of the antagonist Ro 15-1788 were given in association the clonazepam-induced phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine increase was reduced by 70%. These data support the involvement of structural and functional membrane alterations in the action of BDZ. 20 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Differential effects of benzodiazepines on phospholipid methylation in hippocampus and cerebellum of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To elucidate the relationship between the occupancy of BDZ binding sites and phospholipid methylation in brain, the authors examined phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) activity in synaptosomes of rat hippocampi and cerebella in the presence of BDZ ligands with different modes of action. We found that Ro 5-4864, a specific ligand for peripheral type receptors, increased PL methylation in hippocampal and cerebellar synaptosomes. This effect was directly related to receptor occupancy, since the specific antagonist PK11195 inhibited the rise in PEMT activity induced by Ro 5-4864. Clonazepam, on the other hand, tended to reduce PL production in cerebellum and hippocampus except for hiccocampal (3H)-phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine which was elevated by 40 to 70% at doses ranging from 10-9 to 10-6M. When equimolar concentrations of the antagonist Ro 15-1788 were given in association the clonazepam-induced phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine increase was reduced by 70%. These data support the involvement of structural and functional membrane alterations in the action of BDZ. 20 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  15. HISTOMORPHOLOGIC ALTERATIONS OF THE CEREBELLUM OF WISTAR RATS FOLLOWING AMODIAQUINE PLUS ARTESUNATE ADMINISTRATION

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    Mr. M. B. Ekong

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Amodiaquine and artesunate are two antimalarial drugs sold in combination as Larimal®. This drug is a very effective artemisinin-base combination. This study was to access the effects of amodiaquine and artesunate combination on the histology of the cerebellum. Twenty adult Wistar rats weighing between 150-180g were divided into four groups (A, B, C and D of five animals each. Group A served as the control and the animals received distilled water, while group B received 8.75+2.86mg/kg of amodiaquine and artesunate combination for three days, group C received 8.75+2.86mg/kg of amodiaquine and artesunate combination for six days and group D received 17.50+5.71mg/kg of amodiaquine and artesunate combination for three days. Histological sections showed destruction of the Purkinje cortical layers in group B, with increased destructions in groups C and D compared to the control. These results reveal that amodiaquine and artesunate combination causes histological alterations, which were dose and time dependent and these may result in cerebellar dysfunction.

  16. Coenzyme Q10 Levels Are Decreased in the Cerebellum of Multiple-System Atrophy Patients.

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    Lucia V Schottlaender

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the levels of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 in brain tissue of multiple system atrophy (MSA patients differ from those in elderly controls and in patients with other neurodegenerative diseases.Flash frozen brain tissue of a series of 20 pathologically confirmed MSA patients [9 olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA type, 6 striatonigral degeneration (SND type, and 5 mixed type] was used for this study. Elderly controls (n = 37 as well as idiopathic Parkinson's disease (n = 7, dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 20, corticobasal degeneration (n = 15 and cerebellar ataxia (n = 18 patients were used as comparison groups. CoQ10 was measured in cerebellar and frontal cortex tissue by high performance liquid chromatography.We detected a statistically significant decrease (by 3-5% in the level of CoQ10 in the cerebellum of MSA cases (P = 0.001, specifically in OPCA (P = 0.001 and mixed cases (P = 0.005, when compared to controls as well as to other neurodegenerative diseases [dementia with Lewy bodies (P<0.001, idiopathic Parkinson's disease (P<0.001, corticobasal degeneration (P<0.001, and cerebellar ataxia (P = 0.001].Our results suggest that a perturbation in the CoQ10 biosynthetic pathway is associated with the pathogenesis of MSA but the mechanism behind this finding remains to be elucidated.

  17. Is Autism a Disease of the Cerebellum?: An integration of clinical and pre-clinical results

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    Tiffany D. Rogers

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by deficits in social skills and communication, unusual and repetitive behavior, and a range of deficits in cognitive function. While the etiology of autism is unknown, current research indicates that abnormalities of the cerebellum, now believed to be involved in cognitive function and the prefrontal cortex (PFC, are associated with autism. The current paper proposes that impaired cerebello-cortical circuitry could, at least in part, underlie autistic symptoms. The use of animal models that allow for manipulation of genetic and environmental influences are an effective means of elucidating both distal and proximal etiological factors in autism and their potential impact on cerebello-cortical circuitry. Some existing rodent models of autism, as well as some models not previously applied to the study of the disorder, display cerebellar and behavioral abnormalities that parallel those commonly seen in autistic patients. The novel findings produced from research utilizing rodent models could provide a better understanding of the neurochemical and behavioral impact of changes in cerebello-cortical circuitry in autism.

  18. The Proteome Profiles of the Cerebellum of Juvenile, Adult and Aged Rats—An Ontogenetic Study

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    Michael Wille

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we searched for proteins that change their expression in the cerebellum (Ce of rats during ontogenesis. This study focuses on the question of whether specific proteins exist which are differentially expressed with regard to postnatal stages of development. A better characterization of the microenvironment and its development may result from these study findings. A differential two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2DE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS analysis of the samples revealed that the number of proteins of the functional classes differed depending on the developmental stages. Especially members of the functional classes of biosynthesis, regulatory proteins, chaperones and structural proteins show the highest differential expression within the analyzed stages of development. Therefore, members of these functional protein groups seem to be involved in the development and differentiation of the Ce within the analyzed development stages. In this study, changes in the expression of proteins in the Ce at different postnatal developmental stages (postnatal days (P 7, 90, and 637 could be observed. At the same time, an identification of proteins which are involved in cell migration and differentiation was possible. Especially proteins involved in processes of the biosynthesis and regulation, the dynamic organization of the cytoskeleton as well as chaperones showed a high amount of differentially expressed proteins between the analyzed dates.

  19. Cerebellum as Initial Site of Distant Metastasis from Papillary Carcinoma of Thyroid: Review of Three Cases

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    Mutahir A. Tunio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The cerebellum as initial site of distant metastasis from differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC including papillary (PTC and follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC is rare manifestation. Case Presentations. Herein, we present three cases of cerebellar metastasis (CBM of PTC. Mean age of patients was 67 years (range: 64–72, and mean duration between initial diagnosis and CBM was 49.6 months (range: 37–61. Frequent location was left cerebellar hemisphere and was associated with hydrocephalus. All patients underwent suboccipital craniectomy, and in two patients postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT was given to deliver 5000 cGy in 25 fractions to residual lesions. Patient without postoperative IMRT had cerebellar recurrence along with lung and bone metastasis after 38 months. However, two patients were found alive and free of disease at the time of last follow-up. Conclusion. CBM from PTC is a rare clinical entity and is often associated with hydrocephalus. Histopathological diagnosis is important to initiate effective treatment, which relies on multidisciplinary approach to prolong the disease-free and overall survival rates.

  20. Structural brain abnormalities in the frontostriatal system and cerebellum in pedophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Boris; Peschel, Thomas; Paul, Thomas; Gizewski, Elke; Forsting, Michael; Leygraf, Norbert; Schedlowski, Manfred; Krueger, Tillmann H C

    2007-11-01

    Even though previous neuropsychological studies and clinical case reports have suggested an association between pedophilia and frontocortical dysfunction, our knowledge about the neurobiological mechanisms underlying pedophilia is still fragmentary. Specifically, the brain morphology of such disorders has not yet been investigated using MR imaging techniques. Whole brain structural T1-weighted MR images from 18 pedophile patients (9 attracted to males, 9 attracted to females) and 24 healthy age-matched control subjects (12 hetero- and 12 homosexual) from a comparable socioeconomic stratum were processed by using optimized automated voxel-based morphometry within multiple linear regression analyses. Compared to the homosexual and heterosexual control subjects, pedophiles showed decreased gray matter volume in the ventral striatum (also extending into the nucl. accumbens), the orbitofrontal cortex and the cerebellum. These observations further indicate an association between frontostriatal morphometric abnormalities and pedophilia. In this respect these findings may support the hypothesis that there is a shared etiopathological mechanism in all obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders. PMID:16876824

  1. Acupuncture Enhances Effective Connectivity between Cerebellum and Primary Sensorimotor Cortex in Patients with Stable Recovery Stroke

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    Zijing Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that stimulation of acupuncture at motor-implicated acupoints modulates activities of brain areas relevant to the processing of motor functions. This study aims to investigate acupuncture-induced changes in effective connectivity among motor areas in hemiparetic stroke patients by using the multivariate Granger causal analysis. A total of 9 stable recovery stroke patients and 8 healthy controls were recruited and underwent three runs of fMRI scan: passive finger movements and resting state before and after manual acupuncture stimuli. Stroke patients showed significantly attenuated effective connectivity between cortical and subcortical areas during passive motor task, which indicates inefficient information transmissions between cortical and subcortical motor-related regions. Acupuncture at motor-implicated acupoints showed specific modulations of motor-related network in stroke patients relative to healthy control subjects. This specific modulation enhanced bidirectionally effective connectivity between the cerebellum and primary sensorimotor cortex in stroke patients, which may compensate for the attenuated effective connectivity between cortical and subcortical areas during passive motor task and, consequently, contribute to improvement of movement coordination and motor learning in subacute stroke patients. Our results suggested that further efficacy studies of acupuncture in motor recovery can focus on the improvement of movement coordination and motor learning during motor rehabilitation.

  2. The Contribution of the Cerebellum to Cognition in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6

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    Freya E. Cooper

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study sought evidence for a specific cerebellar contribution to cognition by characterising the cognitive phenotype of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 (SCA-6; an autosomal dominant genetic disease which causes a highly specific late-onset cerebellar degeneration. A comprehensive neuropsychological assessment was administered to 27 patients with genetically confirmed SCA-6. General intellectual ability, memory and executive function were examined using internationally standardised tests (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III, Wechsler Memory Scale-III, Delis and Kaplan Executive Function System, Brixton Spatial Anticipation test. The patient group showed no evidence of intellectual or memory decline. However, tests of executive function involving skills of cognitive flexibility, inhibition of response and verbal reasoning and abstraction demonstrated significant impairment at the group level with large effect sizes. The results demonstrate an executive deficit due to SCA-6 that can be conceptualised as parallel to the motor difficulties suffered by these patients: the data support a role for the cerebellum in the regulation and coordination of cognitive, as well as motor processes that is relevant to individual performance.

  3. Optogenetics in the cerebellum: Purkinje cell-specific approaches for understanding local cerebellar functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Tadashi; Ohashi, Yohei; Tamura, Keita

    2013-10-15

    The cerebellum consists of the cerebellar cortex and the cerebellar nuclei. Although the basic neuronal circuitry of the cerebellar cortex is uniform everywhere, anatomical data demonstrate that the input and output relationships of the cortex are spatially segregated between different cortical areas, which suggests that there are functional distinctions between these different areas. Perturbation of cerebellar cortical functions in a spatially restricted fashion is thus essential for investigating the distinctions among different cortical areas. In the cerebellar cortex, Purkinje cells are the sole output neurons that send information to downstream cerebellar and vestibular nuclei. Therefore, selective manipulation of Purkinje cell activities, without disturbing other neuronal types and passing fibers within the cortex, is a direct approach to spatially restrict the effects of perturbations. Although this type of approach has for many years been technically difficult, recent advances in optogenetics now enable selective activation or inhibition of Purkinje cell activities, with high temporal resolution. Here we discuss the effectiveness of using Purkinje cell-specific optogenetic approaches to elucidate the functions of local cerebellar cortex regions. We also discuss what improvements to current methods are necessary for future investigations of cerebellar functions to provide further advances.

  4. Effects of lead exposure on histological structure and antioxidant capacity in the cerebellum of 30-day-old mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wang; Shengqing Wang

    2011-01-01

    The current study sought to observe the effects of lead on histological structure and antioxidant capacity in 30-day-old mice. Spectrophotometry was used to detect the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase and the malondialdehyde content. The results revealed that Purkinje cells in the lead-exposed group exhibited obvious pyknosis, atrophy and a decrease in overall number. Granular cells exhibited a disorderly arrangement, and were reduced in number. Administration of lead decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, alkaline phosphatase and acid phosphatase, while malondialdehyde content increased. Two-way analysis of variance indicated that dose contributed more to lead-induced cerebellum damage than treatment time. The present study demonstrated that lead exerted strong effects on histological structure and inhibited antioxidant capacity of the cerebellum in 30-day-old mice.

  5. A case report of rod migration into cerebellum through foramen magnum after lateral mass fixation of cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, Belsare; Sharma, Ayush; Prashant, Gedam; Parekh, Aseem

    2016-04-01

    We report on a rare case of connecting rod migration into the posterior cranial fossa after posterior cervical decompression and lateral mass screw fixation. A 55-year-old male patient who was operated on for ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament complained of sudden-onset giddiness followed by loss of consciousness one and half year following surgery. CT scan showed migration of left-sided connecting rod into the right cerebellum through foramen magnum. The patient was operated on for rod removal but he sustained a cardiorespiratory arrest and died on the eighth postoperative day. Autopsy confirmed damage to the right cerebellum due to rod migration. The clinician should be aware that superior rod migration is a rare but potentially disastrous complication. Regular follow-up with radiological evaluation should be done to look for implant loosening, migration, and non-union even in asymptomatic patients. The implant should be subsequently removed after it has served its purpose. PMID:26748502

  6. Occult left atrial ball-like thrombus in a patient referred for surgical removal of suspected cerebellum tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atrial fibrillation and related cardio-embolic cerebrovascular accidents are two well-defined major healthcare problems worldwide. It has been approximated that 2.2 million people in America and 4.5 million in European Union have paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation. And atrial fibrillation itself is an independent long-term risk factor of stroke. We present a case of patient referred to our center for surgical removal of suspected cerebellum tumor, a case that had a rather unexpected ending. A 58-year-old male patient with a history of atrial fibrillation, congestive heart failure (NYHA II/III), stable coronary artery disease, diabetes type 2 and hyperlipidemia presented with vertigo, headaches, mainly during physical activity and increased tiredness. Performed computer tomography revealed two lesions in the cerebellum and in the left lateral chamber. The diagnosis of a proliferative disease of the cerebellum was established and patient was referred to the Neurosurgical Department. Fortunately, before the operation the echocardiography was performed, which revealed two lesions in left atrium. The decision of the Heart Team was to refer the patient for an open-heart surgery, in which two thrombi were removed. Neurosurgeons decided to withdraw from further surgery and proceed with head MRI and conservative treatment, deciding that the lesion in the cerebellum was most likely an ischemic area. Looking at the brain lesion should always be done from the whole patient’s perspective. And using mutlimodality imaging may lead to appropriate diagnosis, correct course of therapeutic action and unexpected ending of a rather non-extraordinary case

  7. Induction of brain CYP2E1 by chronic ethanol treatment and related oxidative stress in hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethanol is one of the most commonly abused substances, and oxidative stress is an important causative factor in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) is involved in ethanol metabolism in the brain. This study investigates the role of brain CYP2E1 in the susceptibility of certain brain regions to ethanol neurotoxicity. Male Wistar rats were intragastrically treated with ethanol (3.0 g/kg, 30 days). CYP2E1 protein, mRNA expression, and catalytic activity in various brain regions were respectively assessed by immunoblotting, quantitative quantum dot immunohistochemistry, real-time RT-PCR, and LC–MS. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was analyzed using a laser confocal scanning microscope. The hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem were selectively damaged after ethanol treatment, indicated by both lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and histopathological analysis. Ethanol markedly increased the levels of CYP2E1 protein, mRNA expression, and activity in the hippocampus and cerebellum. CYP2E1 protein and activity were significantly increased by ethanol in the brainstem, with no change in mRNA expression. ROS levels induced by ethanol paralleled the enhanced CYP2E1 proteins in the hippocampus, granular layer and white matter of cerebellum as well as brainstem. Brain CYP2E1 activity was positively correlated with the damage to the hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem. These results suggest that the selective sensitivity of brain regions to ethanol neurodegeneration may be attributed to the regional and cellular-specific induction of CYP2E1 by ethanol. The inhibition of CYP2E1 levels may attenuate ethanol-induced oxidative stress via ROS generation.

  8. Expression of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor and Tyrosine Kinase B in Cerebellum of Poststroke Depression Rat Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Li; Chun Peng; Xu Guo; Jun-Jie You; Harishankar Prasad Yadav

    2015-01-01

    Background:The pathophysiology of poststroke depression (PSD) remains elusive because of its proposed multifactorial nature.Accumulating evidence suggests that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in the pathophysiology of depression and PSD.And the cerebellar dysfunction may be important in the etiology of depression;it is not clear whether it also has a major effect on the risk of PSD.This study aimed to explore the expression of BDNF and high-affinity receptors tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) in the cerebellum of rats with PSD.Methods:The rat models with focal cerebral ischemic were made using a thread embolization method.PSD rat models were established with comprehensive separate breeding and unpredicted chronic mild stress (UCMS) on this basis.A normal control group,depression group,and a stroke group were used to compare with the PSD group.Thirteen rats were used in each group.Immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detecting the expression of BDNF and TrkB protein and mRNA in the cerebellum were used at the 29th day following the UCMS.Results:Compared with the normal control group and the stroke group,the number ofBDNF immunoreactive (IR) positive neurons was less in the PSD group (P < 0.05).Furthermore,the number ofTrkB IR positive cells was significantly less in the PSD group than that in the normal control group (P < 0.05).The gene expression of BDNF and TrkB in the cerebellum of PSD rats also decreased compared to the normal control group (P < 0.05).Conclusions:These findings suggested a possible association between expression of BDNF and TrkB in the cerebellum and the pathogenesis of PSD.

  9. Limited effects of preterm birth and the first enteral nutrition on cerebellum morphology and gene expression in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Anders; Kaalund, Sanne S; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Andersen, Anders D; Pakkenberg, Bente; Rosenørn, Ann; van Elburg, Ruurd M; Thymann, Thomas; Greisen, Gorm O; Sanglid, Per T

    2016-07-01

    Preterm pigs show many signs of immaturity that are characteristic of preterm infants. In preterm infants, the cerebellum grows particularly rapid and hypoplasia and cellular lesions are associated with motor dysfunction and cognitive deficits. We hypothesized that functional brain delays observed in preterm pigs would be paralleled by both structural and molecular differences in the cerebellum relative to term born piglets. Cerebella were collected from term (n = 56) and preterm (90% gestation, n = 112) pigs at 0, 5, and 26 days after birth for stereological volume estimations, large-scale qPCR gene expression analyses (selected neurodevelopmental genes) and western blot protein expression analysis (Sonic Hedgehog pathway). Memory and learning was tested using a T-maze, documenting that preterm pigs showed delayed learning. Preterm pigs also showed reduced volume of both white and gray matter at all three ages but the proportion of white matter increased postnatally, relative to term pigs. Early initiation of enteral nutrition had limited structural or molecular effects. The Sonic Hedgehog pathway was unaffected by preterm birth. Few differences in expression of the selected genes were found, except consistently higher mRNA levels of Midkine, p75, and Neurotrophic factor 3 in the preterm cerebellum postnatally, probably reflecting an adaptive response to preterm birth. Pig cerebellar development appears more affected by postconceptional age than by environmental factors at birth or postnatally. Compensatory mechanisms following preterm birth may include faster white matter growth and increased expression of selected genes for neurotrophic factors and regulation of angiogenesis. While the pig cerebellum is immature in 90% gestation preterm pigs, it appears relatively mature and resilient toward environmental factors. PMID:27462071

  10. Apparent diffusion coefficient evaluation for secondary changes in the cerebellum of rats after middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunjun; Gao, Lingyun; Fu, Jun; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yuxin; Yin, Bo; Chen, Weijian; Geng, Daoying

    2013-11-01

    Supratentorial cerebral infarction can cause functional inhibition of remote regions such as the cerebellum, which may be relevant to diaschisis. This phenomenon is often analyzed using positron emission tomography and single photon emission CT. However, these methods are expensive and radioactive. Thus, the present study quantified the changes of infarction core and remote regions after unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion using apparent diffusion coefficient values. Diffusion-weighted imaging showed that the area of infarction core gradually increased to involve the cerebral cortex with increasing infarction time. Diffusion weighted imaging signals were initially increased and then stabilized by 24 hours. With increasing infarction time, the apparent diffusion coefficient value in the infarction core and remote bilateral cerebellum both gradually decreased, and then slightly increased 3-24 hours after infarction. Apparent diffusion coefficient values at remote regions (cerebellum) varied along with the change of supratentorial infarction core, suggesting that the phenomenon of diaschisis existed at the remote regions. Thus, apparent diffusion coefficient values and diffusion weighted imaging can be used to detect early diaschisis. PMID:25206615

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the rat cerebellum during electrical stimulation of the fore- and hindpaw at 7 T

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    Peeters, Ronald; Verhoye, Marleen; Vos, Bart; De Schutter, Erik; Van der Linden, Anne-Marie

    1999-05-01

    Blood oxygenation level dependent contrast (BOLD) functional MRI responses at 7T were observed in the cerebellum of alpha- chloralose anesthetized rats in response to innocuous electrical stimulation of a forepaw or hindpaw. The responses were imaged in both coronal and sagittal slices which allowed for a clear delineation and localization of the observed activations. We demonstrate the validity of our fMRI protocol by imaging the responses in somatosensory cortex to the same stimuli and by showing a high level of reproducibility of the cerebellar responses. Widespread bilateral activations were found with mainly a patchy and medio-lateral band organization, more pronounced ipsilaterally. There was no overlap between the cerebellar activations caused by forepaw or hindpaw stimulation. Most remarkable was the overall horizontal organization of these responses: for both stimulation paradigms the patches and bands of activation were roughly positioned in either a cranial or caudal plane running antero-posteriorly through the whole cerebellum. This is the first fMRI study in the cerebellum of the rat. We relate our findings to the known projection patterns found with other techniques and to human fMRI studies. The horizontal organization found wasn't observed before in other studies using other techniques.

  12. Participação do cerebelo no processamento auditivo Participation of the cerebellum in auditory processing

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    Patrícia Maria Sens

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O cerebelo era tradicionalmente visto como um órgão coordenador da motricidade, entretanto é atualmente considerado como um importante centro de integração de sensibilidades e coordenação de várias fases do processo cognitivo. OBJETIVO: é sistematizar as informações da literatura quanto à participação do cerebelo na percepção auditiva. MÉTODOS: foram selecionados na literatura trabalhos em animais sobre a fisiologia e anatomia das vias auditivas do cerebelo, além de trabalhos em humanos sobre diversas funções do cerebelo na percepção auditiva. Foram discutidos os achados da literatura, que há evidências que o cerebelo participa das seguintes funções cognitivas relacionadas à audição: geração verbal; processamento auditivo; atenção auditiva; memória auditiva; raciocínio abstrato; timing; solução de problemas; discriminação sensorial; informação sensorial; processamento da linguagem; operações lingüísticas. CONCLUSÃO: Foi constatado que são incompletas as informações sobre as estruturas, funções e vias auditivas do cerebelo.The cerebellum, traditionally conceived as a controlling organ of motricity, it is today considered an all-important integration center for both sensitivity and coordination of the various phases of the cognitive process. AIM: This paper aims at gather and sort literature information on the cerebellum’s role in the auditory perception. METHODS: We have selected animal studies of both the physiology and the anatomy of the cerebellum auditory pathway, as well as papers on humans discussing several functions of the cerebellum in auditory perception. As for the literature, it has been discussed and concluded that there is evidence that the cerebellum participates in many cognitive functions related to hearing: speech generation, auditory processing, auditory memory, abstract reasoning, timing, solution of problems, sensorial discrimination, sensorial information, language

  13. Effect of Nonionizing Radiation onThe Cerebellum of Neonatal Mice

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    Samir A. Nassar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although the use of mobile telephones is common, increasing and beneficial, it is still considered as an environmental pollutant nowaday. This is because these devices require to be held close to the head and the exposure effects on the brain remain controversial. Being so, we designed this study. Aim: The present study was done in an attempt to investigate the morphological, histochemical and ultrastructural changes produced in the cerebellum of neonatal mice as a result of exposure to the nonionizing radiation of the mobile phone. Material and Methods: Eleven neonatal mice were used in this study. Five of them were exposed (as experimental group to mobile phone microwaves (900- 1800 MHz, SAR: 0.92 w/kg during their late prenatal and early postnatal life (1 hour/day for 30 consecutive days. While the other six served as control animals. Comparable parts of cerebella were removed from all animals and processed for the examination by the light and the transmission electron microscopes. Results: The whole body exposure of the neonatal mice to this type of nonionizing radiation resulted in several morphological, histochemical and ultrastructural changes. These changes included a statistically significant decrease in the mean cell distribution, DNA content and total protein content of Purkinje cells and other cerebellar elements of exposed animals. On the other hand an increase in the Purkinje cell volume was recorded. In addition, the ultrastructural observations were corrugated plasma and nuclear membranes, ruptured mitochondria, destruction of Golgi apparatus , dilatation and disintegration of RER, scarcity of ribosomes and Nissl bodies in Purkinje cells. Damage in the cell membranes, chromatin clumping and increase in electron density of the cells of granular layer also observed. In the molecular layer; degeneration of axons and dendrites, increased electron density and damage of neurons occurred. Conclusion: The whole

  14. Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes modulating neurotransmission at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses in rat cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, S A; Garthwaite, J; Batchelor, A M

    2001-07-01

    The actions of reportedly group-selective metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor agonists and antagonists on neurotransmission at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses in the rat cerebellum have been characterised using sharp microelectrode recording and an in vitro slice preparation. Application of the group I agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) or the group III selective agonist L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) depressed synaptic transmission in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner (EC(50)=18 and 5 microM, respectively). The depression produced by DHPG was unrelated to the depolarisation observed in some Purkinje cells. The group II agonist (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG IV, 1 microM) had no effect. The effects of DHPG were inhibited by the group I-selective antagonist 7-hydroxyiminocyclopropan[b]chromen-1a-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (CPCCOEt), but not by the group II/III antagonist alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG). The effect of L-AP4 was inhibited by MPPG, but not by the group I/II antagonist (S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG). By themselves, the antagonists did not affect the EPSPs, suggesting that neither receptor is activated during low frequency neurotransmission. It is concluded that, in addition to the excitatory role for group I receptors described previously, both group I and III (but not group II) mGlu receptors operate at this synapse to inhibit synaptic transmission. The specific receptor subtypes involved are likely to be mGlu1 and mGlu4. PMID:11445184

  15. The effects of ethanol on the developing cerebellum and eyeblink classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, John T

    2004-01-01

    In rats, developmental ethanol exposure has been used to model the central nervous system deficits associated with human fetal alcohol syndrome. Binge-like ethanol exposure of neonatal rats depletes cells in the cerebellum, including Purkinje cells, granule cells, and deep nuclear cells, and produces deficits in simple tests of motor coordination. However, the extent to which anatomical damage is related to behavioral deficits has been difficult to estimate. Eyeblink classical conditioning is known to engage a discrete brain stem-cerebellar circuit, making it an ideal test of cerebellar functional integrity after developmental ethanol exposure. Eyeblink conditioning is a simple form of motor learning in which a neutral stimulus (such as a tone) comes to elicit an eyeblink when repeatedly paired with a stimulus that evokes an eyeblink prior to training (such as mild periorbital stimulation). In eyeblink conditioning, one of the deep cerebellar nuclei, the interpositus nucleus, as well as specific Purkinje cell populations, are sites of convergence for tone conditioned stimulus and somatosensory unconditioned stimulus information, and, together with brain stem nuclei, provide the necessary and sufficient substrate for the learned response. A series of studies have shown that eyeblink conditioning is impaired in both weanling and adult rats given binge-like exposure to ethanol as neonates. In addition, interpositus nucleus neurons from ethanol-exposed rats showed impaired activation during eyeblink conditioning. These deficits are accompanied by a permanent reduction In the deep cerebellar nuclear cell population. Because particular cerebellar cell populations are utilized in well-defined ways during eyeblink conditioning, conclusions regarding the underlying neural substrates of behavioral change after developmental ethanol exposure are greatly strengthened.

  16. The output signal of Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and circadian rhythmicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Mordel

    Full Text Available Measurement of clock gene expression has recently provided evidence that the cerebellum, like the master clock in the SCN, contains a circadian oscillator. The cerebellar oscillator is involved in anticipation of mealtime and possibly resides in Purkinje cells. However, the rhythmic gene expression is likely transduced into a circadian cerebellar output signal to exert an effective control of neuronal brain circuits that are responsible for feeding behavior. Using electrophysiological recordings from acute and organotypic cerebellar slices, we tested the hypothesis whether Purkinje cells transmit a circadian modulated signal to their targets in the brain. Extracellular recordings from brain slices revealed the typical discharge pattern previously described in vivo in single cell recordings showing basically a tonic or a trimodal-like firing pattern. However, in acute sagittal cerebellar slices the average spike rate of randomly selected Purkinje cells did not exhibit significant circadian variations, irrespective of their specific firing pattern. Also, frequency and amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents and the amplitude of GABA- and glutamate-evoked currents did not vary with circadian time. Long-term recordings using multielectrode arrays (MEA allowed to monitor neuronal activity at multiple sites in organotypic cerebellar slices for several days to weeks. With this recording technique we observed oscillations of the firing rate of cerebellar neurons, presumably of Purkinje cells, with a period of about 24 hours which were stable for periods up to three days. The daily renewal of culture medium could induce circadian oscillations of the firing rate of Purkinje cells, a feature that is compatible with the behavior of slave oscillators. However, from the present results it appears that the circadian expression of cerebellar clock genes exerts only a weak influence on the electrical output of cerebellar neurons.

  17. The Neural Code for Motor Control in the Cerebellum and Oculomotor Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisanguanthum, Kris S; Joshua, Mati; Medina, Javier F; Bialek, William; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2014-01-01

    A single extra spike makes a difference. Here, the size of the eye velocity in the initiation of smooth eye movements in the right panel depends on whether a cerebellar Purkinje cell discharges 3 (red), 4 (green), 5 (blue), or 6 (black) spikes in the 40-ms window indicated by the gray shading in the rasters on the left. Spike trains are rich in information that can be extracted to guide behaviors at millisecond time resolution or across longer time intervals. In sensory systems, the information usually is defined with respect to the stimulus. Especially in motor systems, however, it is equally critical to understand how spike trains predict behavior. Thus, our goal was to compare systematically spike trains in the oculomotor system with eye movement behavior on single movements. We analyzed the discharge of Purkinje cells in the floccular complex of the cerebellum, floccular target neurons in the brainstem, other vestibular neurons, and abducens neurons. We find that an extra spike in a brief analysis window predicts a substantial fraction of the trial-by-trial variation in the initiation of smooth pursuit eye movements. For Purkinje cells, a single extra spike in a 40 ms analysis window predicts, on average, 0.5 SDs of the variation in behavior. An optimal linear estimator predicts behavioral variation slightly better than do spike counts in brief windows. Simulations reveal that the ability of single spikes to predict a fraction of behavior also emerges from model spike trains that have the same statistics as the real spike trains, as long as they are driven by shared sensory inputs. We think that the shared sensory estimates in their inputs create correlations in neural spiking across time and across each population. As a result, one or a small number of spikes in a brief time interval can predict a substantial fraction of behavioral variation.

  18. Three dimensional multi-scale visual words for texture-based cerebellum segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foncubierta-Rodríguez, Antonio; Depeursinge, Adrien; Gui, Laura; Müller, Henning

    2012-02-01

    Segmentation of the various parts of the brain is a challenging area in medical imaging and it is a prerequisite for many image analysis tasks useful for clinical research. Advances have been made in generating brain image templates that can be registered to automatically segment regions of interest in the human brain. However, these methods may fail with some subjects if there is a significant shape distortion or difference from the proposed models. This is also the case of newborns, where the developing brain strongly differs from adult magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) templates. In this article, a texture-based cerebellum segmentation method is described. The algorithm presented does not use any prior spatial knowledge to segment the MRI images. Instead, the system learns the texture features by means of a multi-scale filtering and visual words feature aggregation. Visual words are a commonly used technique in image retrieval. Instead of using visual features directly, the features of specific regions are modeled (clustered) into groups of discriminative features. This means that the final feature space can be reduced in size and also that the visual words in local regions are really discriminative for the given data set. The system is currently trained and tested with a dataset of 18 adult brain MRIs. An extension to the use with newborn brain images is being foreseen as this could highlight the advantages of the proposed technique. Results show that the use of texture features can be valuable for the task described and can lead to good results. The use of visual words can potentially improve robustness of existing shape-based techniques for cases with significant shape distortion or other differences from the models. As the visual words based techniques are not assuming any prior knowledge such techniques could be used for other types of segmentations as well using a large variety of basic visual features.

  19. Direct neural current imaging in an intact cerebellum with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Padmavathi; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Wells, William; Orbach, Darren; Orringer, Daniel; Mulkern, Robert; Okada, Yoshio

    2016-05-15

    The ability to detect neuronal currents with high spatiotemporal resolution using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is important for studying human brain function in both health and disease. While significant progress has been made, we still lack evidence showing that it is possible to measure an MR signal time-locked to neuronal currents with a temporal waveform matching concurrently recorded local field potentials (LFPs). Also lacking is evidence that such MR data can be used to image current distribution in active tissue. Since these two results are lacking even in vitro, we obtained these data in an intact isolated whole cerebellum of turtle during slow neuronal activity mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors using a gradient-echo EPI sequence (TR=100ms) at 4.7T. Our results show that it is possible (1) to reliably detect an MR phase shift time course matching that of the concurrently measured LFP evoked by stimulation of a cerebellar peduncle, (2) to detect the signal in single voxels of 0.1mm(3), (3) to determine the spatial phase map matching the magnetic field distribution predicted by the LFP map, (4) to estimate the distribution of neuronal current in the active tissue from a group-average phase map, and (5) to provide a quantitatively accurate theoretical account of the measured phase shifts. The peak values of the detected MR phase shifts were 0.27-0.37°, corresponding to local magnetic field changes of 0.67-0.93nT (for TE=26ms). Our work provides an empirical basis for future extensions to in vivo imaging of neuronal currents. PMID:26899788

  20. Topography of Purkinje cells and other calbindin-immunoreactive cells within adult and hatchling turtle cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Michael; Ward, Kyle C; Tolbert, Daniel L

    2009-12-01

    The turtle's cerebellum (Cb) is an unfoliated sheet, so the topography of its entire cortex can be easily studied physiologically by optical recordings. However, unlike the mammalian Cb, little is known about the topography of turtle Purkinje cells (PCs). Here, topography was examined using calbindin-D(28K) immunohistochemistry of adult and hatchling turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans, 2.5-15 cm carapace length). Each Cb was flattened between two Sylgard sheets and fixed in paraformaldehyde. Sections (52 microm thick) were cut parallel to the flattened cortex (tangential), resulting in calbindin-immunolabeled PCs being localized to three to six sections for each turtle. PC position and size were quantified using Neurolucida Image Analysis system. Although hatchling Cb were medial-laterally narrower (3.0 vs. 6.5 mm) and rostral-caudally shorter (2.5 vs. 5.5 mm) than adult Cb, both averaged near 15,000 PCs distributed uniformly. Hatchling PCs were smaller than adult PCs (178 vs. 551 microm(2)) and more densely packed (2,180 vs. 625 cells/mm(2)). Calbindin immunoreactivity also labeled non-PCs along the Cb's marginal rim and its caudal pole. Many of these were very small (22.9 microm(2)) ovoid-shaped cells clustered together, possibly proliferating external granule layer cells. Other labeled cells were larger and fusiform-shaped (12.6 x 33.4 microm) adjacent to inner granule cells along the marginal rim, suggestive of migrating cells. It is not known whether these are new neurons being generated within the adult and hatchling Cb and if they connect to efferent and afferent paths. Based on these anatomical findings, we suggest that unique physiological features may exist along the rim of the turtle Cb.

  1. The cerebellum: a neural system for the study of reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Rodney A; Kerr, Abigail L; Thompson, Richard F

    2011-01-01

    In its strictest application, the term "reinforcement learning" refers to a computational approach to learning in which an agent (often a machine) interacts with a mutable environment to maximize reward through trial and error. The approach borrows essentials from several fields, most notably Computer Science, Behavioral Neuroscience, and Psychology. At the most basic level, a neural system capable of mediating reinforcement learning must be able to acquire sensory information about the external environment and internal milieu (either directly or through connectivities with other brain regions), must be able to select a behavior to be executed, and must be capable of providing evaluative feedback about the success of that behavior. Given that Psychology informs us that reinforcers, both positive and negative, are stimuli or consequences that increase the probability that the immediately antecedent behavior will be repeated and that reinforcer strength or viability is modulated by the organism's past experience with the reinforcer, its affect, and even the state of its muscles (e.g., eyes open or closed); it is the case that any neural system that supports reinforcement learning must also be sensitive to these same considerations. Once learning is established, such a neural system must finally be able to maintain continued response expression and prevent response drift. In this report, we examine both historical and recent evidence that the cerebellum satisfies all of these requirements. While we report evidence from a variety of learning paradigms, the majority of our discussion will focus on classical conditioning of the rabbit eye blink response as an ideal model system for the study of reinforcement and reinforcement learning.

  2. The cerebellum: A neural system for the study of reinforcement learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney A. Swain

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In its strictest application, the term reinforcement learning refers to a computational approach to learning in which an agent (often a machine interacts with a mutable environment to maximize reward through trial and error. The approach borrows essentials from several fields, most notably Computer Science, Behavioral Neuroscience, and Psychology. At the most basic level, a neural system capable of mediating reinforcement learning must be able to acquire sensory information about the external environment and internal milieu (either directly or through connectivities with other brain regions, must be able to select a behavior to be executed, and must be capable of providing evaluative feedback about the success of that behavior. Given that Psychology informs us that reinforcers, both positive and negative, are stimuli or consequences that increase the probability that the immediately antecedent behavior will be repeated and that reinforcer strength or viability is modulated by the organism’s past experience with the reinforcer, its affect, and even the state of its muscles (e.g., eyes open or closed; it is the case that any neural system that supports reinforcement learning must also be sensitive to these same considerations. Once learning is established, such a neural system must finally be able to maintain continued response expression and prevent response drift. In this report, we examine both historical and recent evidence that the cerebellum satisfies all of these requirements. While we report evidence from a variety of learning paradigms, the majority of our discussion will focus on classical conditioning of the rabbit eye blink response as an ideal model system for the study of reinforcement and reinforcement learning.

  3. Clinical significance of brain SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in cerebral palsy with normal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cerebral palsy(CP) encephalopathies are often of uncertain etiology and various functional image findings comparing with anatomical image findings have been reported. However, only a few have mentioned its clinical implications. The purpose of our report is to compare clinical severity and functional SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in CP patients with normal MRI. Thirty six CP patients with bilateral spastic palsy who had normal MRI and brain SPECT were studied from July 1996 to September 1997. The patients' age at the time of SPECT was 22.84±17.69 months. The patients were divided into two groups according to motor quotient(MQ); moderate defect (>50MQ : n=27 MQ=22.78±10.36), mild defect (2 test. Brain SPECT was performed following IV administration of 0.05-0.1 mCi/kg (minimum 2.0 mCi) of Tc-99m ECD and chloral hydrate sedation (50-80 mg/kg p.o) using a triple head system (MS 3, Siemens). Interpretation of brain SPECT was visual analysis: severe decrease is defined when the defect is moderate to marked and mild decrease in rCBF as mild. Seven of 36 (19.4%) showed unilateral or bilateral moderate decrease in rCBF in thalami, 20(55.6%) showed mild decrease, and 9(25.0%) showed no decreased rCBF. All 7 who had moderate thalamic defect reveled moderate motor defect clinically. Ten of 36(27.9%) revealed unilateral or bilateral moderate rCBF defect, 23 (63.9%) depicted mild defect, and 3(8.3%) showed no defect. Sixteen with moderate thalamic rCBF defect showed moderate motor defect in 15 patients. There was statistically significant (p=0.02605) relationship between rCBF defect and motor defect in our CP patients. In conclusion, brain SPECT appears sensitive, non-invasive tool in the evaluation as well as in the prognostication of bilateral spastic cerebral palsy patients and deserves further study using larger number of patients

  4. Clinical significance of brain SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in cerebral palsy with normal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C. H.; Lim, S. Y.; Lee, I. Y.; Kim, O. H.; Bai, M. S.; Kim, S. J.; Yoon, S. N.; Cho, C. W. [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The cerebral palsy(CP) encephalopathies are often of uncertain etiology and various functional image findings comparing with anatomical image findings have been reported. However, only a few have mentioned its clinical implications. The purpose of our report is to compare clinical severity and functional SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in CP patients with normal MRI. Thirty six CP patients with bilateral spastic palsy who had normal MRI and brain SPECT were studied from July 1996 to September 1997. The patients' age at the time of SPECT was 22.84{+-}17.69 months. The patients were divided into two groups according to motor quotient(MQ); moderate defect (>50MQ : n=27 MQ=22.78{+-}10.36), mild defect (<50MQ : n=9, MQ=66.11{+-}13.87). The degree of rCBF decrease between the two groups was evaluated by {chi}{sup 2} test. Brain SPECT was performed following IV administration of 0.05-0.1 mCi/kg (minimum 2.0 mCi) of Tc-99m ECD and chloral hydrate sedation (50-80 mg/kg p.o) using a triple head system (MS 3, Siemens). Interpretation of brain SPECT was visual analysis: severe decrease is defined when the defect is moderate to marked and mild decrease in rCBF as mild. Seven of 36 (19.4%) showed unilateral or bilateral moderate decrease in rCBF in thalami, 20(55.6%) showed mild decrease, and 9(25.0%) showed no decreased rCBF. All 7 who had moderate thalamic defect reveled moderate motor defect clinically. Ten of 36(27.9%) revealed unilateral or bilateral moderate rCBF defect, 23 (63.9%) depicted mild defect, and 3(8.3%) showed no defect. Sixteen with moderate thalamic rCBF defect showed moderate motor defect in 15 patients. There was statistically significant (p=0.02605) relationship between rCBF defect and motor defect in our CP patients. In conclusion, brain SPECT appears sensitive, non-invasive tool in the evaluation as well as in the prognostication of bilateral spastic cerebral palsy patients and deserves further study using larger number of patients.

  5. Barhl1 is directly regulated by thyroid hormone in the developing cerebellum of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hongyan, E-mail: hongyan_dong@hc-sc.gc.ca [Hazard Identification Division, Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, 50 Columbine Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9 (Canada); Yauk, Carole L. [Mechanistic Studies Division, Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, 50 Columbine Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9 (Canada); Wade, Michael G. [Hazard Identification Division, Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, 50 Columbine Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9 (Canada)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thyroid hormone receptor binds to the promoter region of Barhl1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Barhl1 expression in cerebellum is negatively regulated by thyroid hormone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Negative regulation of Barhl1 by thyroid hormone was confirmed in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thyroid hormone may play a role in normal brain development through transcriptional control of Barhl1. -- Abstract: Thyroid hormones (THs) are essential for the brain development. Despite considerable effort, few genes directly regulated by THs have been identified. In this study, we investigate the effects of THs on the regulation of Barhl1, a transcription factor that regulates sensorineural development. Using DNA microarray combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip), we identified a TR{beta} binding site in the promoter of Barhl1. The binding was further confirmed by ChIP-PCR. The site is located approximately 755 bp upstream of the transcription start site. Reporter vectors containing the binding site or mutated fragments were transfected into GH3 cells. T3 treatment decreased the transcriptional activity of the wild fragment but not the mutant. Two 28 bp oligonucleotides containing sequences that resemble known TH response elements (TREs) were derived from this binding site and DNA-protein interaction was performed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Binding analysis in a nuclear extract containing TR{beta} revealed that one of these fragments bound TR{beta}. This complex was shifted with the addition of anti-TR{beta} antibody. We investigated Barhl1 expression in animal models and TH-treated cultured cells. Both long term treatment with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil and short-term treatment with 0.05% methimazole/1% sodium perchlorate (both treatments render mice hypothyroid) resulted in up-regulation of Barhl1. TH supplementation of hypothyroid mice caused a decrease in the expression of Barhl1

  6. Weanling piglet cerebellum: a surrogate for tolerance to MRT (microbeam radiation therapy) in pediatric neuro-oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laissue, Jean A.; Blattmann, Hans; Di Michiel, Marco; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Lyubimova, Nadia; Guzman, Raphael; Zimmermann, Werner; Birrer, Stephan; Bley, Tim; Kircher, Patrick; Stettler, Regina; Fatzer, Rosmarie; Jaggy, Andre; Smilowitz, Henry; Brauer, Elke; Bravin, Alberto; Le Duc, Geraldine; Nemoz, Christian; Renier, Michel; Thomlinson, William C.; Stepanek, Jiri; Wagner, Hans-Peter

    2001-12-01

    The cerebellum of the weanling piglet (Yorkshire) was used as a surrogate for the radiosensitive human infant cerebellum in a Swiss-led program of experimental microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) at the ESRF. Five weanlings in a 47 day old litter of seven, and eight weanlings in a 40 day old litter of eleven were irradiated in November, 1999 and June, 2000, respectively. A 1.5 cm-wide x 1.5 xm-high array of equally space approximately equals 20-30 micrometers wide, upright microbeams spaced at 210 micrometers intervals was propagated horizontally, left to right, through the cerebella of the prone, anesthetized piglets. Skin-entrance intra-microbeam peak adsorbed doses were uniform, either 150, 300, 425, or 600 gray (Gy). Peak and inter-microbeam (valley) absorbed doses in the cerebellum were computed with the PSI version of the Monte Carlo code GEANT and benchmarked using Gafchromic and radiochromic film microdosimetry. For approximately equals 66 weeks [first litter; until euthanasia], or approximately equals 57 weeks [second litter; until July 30, 2001] after irradiation, the littermates were developmentally, behaviorally, neurologically and radiologically normal as observed and tested by experienced farmers and veterinary scientists unaware of which piglets were irradiated or sham-irradiated. Morever, MRT implemented at the ESRF with a similar array of microbeams and a uniform skin-entrance peak dose of 625 Gy, followed by immunoprophylaxis, was shown to be palliative or curative in young adult rats bearing intracerebral gliosarcomas. These observations give further credence to MRT's potential as an adjunct therapy for brain tumors in infancy, when seamless therapeutic irradiation of the brain is hazardous.

  7. Neural correlates of sensory prediction errors in monkeys: evidence for internal models of voluntary self-motion in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Kathleen E; Brooks, Jessica X

    2015-02-01

    During self-motion, the vestibular system makes essential contributions to postural stability and self-motion perception. To ensure accurate perception and motor control, it is critical to distinguish between vestibular sensory inputs that are the result of externally applied motion (exafference) and that are the result of our own actions (reafference). Indeed, although the vestibular sensors encode vestibular afference and reafference with equal fidelity, neurons at the first central stage of sensory processing selectively encode vestibular exafference. The mechanism underlying this reafferent suppression compares the brain's motor-based expectation of sensory feedback with the actual sensory consequences of voluntary self-motion, effectively computing the sensory prediction error (i.e., exafference). It is generally thought that sensory prediction errors are computed in the cerebellum, yet it has been challenging to explicitly demonstrate this. We have recently addressed this question and found that deep cerebellar nuclei neurons explicitly encode sensory prediction errors during self-motion. Importantly, in everyday life, sensory prediction errors occur in response to changes in the effector or world (muscle strength, load, etc.), as well as in response to externally applied sensory stimulation. Accordingly, we hypothesize that altering the relationship between motor commands and the actual movement parameters will result in the updating in the cerebellum-based computation of exafference. If our hypothesis is correct, under these conditions, neuronal responses should initially be increased--consistent with a sudden increase in the sensory prediction error. Then, over time, as the internal model is updated, response modulation should decrease in parallel with a reduction in sensory prediction error, until vestibular reafference is again suppressed. The finding that the internal model predicting the sensory consequences of motor commands adapts for new

  8. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging evaluation in perfusion abnormalities of the cerebellum after supratentorial unilateral hyperacute cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Liang; Yunjun Yang; Weijian Chen; Yuxia Duan; Hongqing Wang; Xiaotong Wang

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of 10 patients with hyperacute cerebral infarction (≤ 6 hours) were retrospectively analyzed. Six patients exhibited perfusion defects on negative enhancement integral maps, four patients exhibited perfusion differences in pseudo-color on mean time to enhance maps, and three patients exhibited perfusion differences in pseudo-color on time to minimum maps. Dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion weighted imaging revealed a significant increase in region negative enhancement integral in the affected hemisphere of patients with cerebral infarction. The results suggest that dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion weighted imaging can clearly detect perfusion abnormalities in the cerebellum after unilateral hyperacute cerebral infarction.

  9. A Low Ethanol Dose Affects all Types of Cells in Mixed Long-Term Embryonic Cultures of the Cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickering, Chris; Wicher, Grzegorz; Rosendahl, Sofi;

    2010-01-01

    . We exposed a primary culture of rat cerebellum from embryonic day 17 (corresponding to second trimester in humans) to ethanol at a concentration of 17.6 mM which is roughly equivalent to one glass of wine. Acutely, there was no change in cell viability after 5 or 8 days of exposure relative to...... of this ethanol dose, cultures were exposed for 30 days. After this period, virtually no neurons or myelinating oligodendrocytes were present in the ethanol-treated cultures. In conclusion, chronic exposure to ethanol, even at small doses, dramatically and persistently affects normal development....

  10. Investigation of the mouse cerebellum using STIM and {mu}-PIXE spectrometric and FTIR spectroscopic mapping and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, M.J. [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Siegele, R., E-mail: rns@ansto.gov.au [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights NSW 2234 (Australia); El-Assaad, F. [Vascular Immunology Unit, Bosch Institute and School of Medical Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McQuillan, J.A. [Molecular Immunopathology Unit, Bosch Institute and School of Medical Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Aitken, J.B.; Carter, E.A. [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Grau, G.E. [Vascular Immunology Unit, Bosch Institute and School of Medical Sciences, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hunt, N.H. [Molecular Immunopathology Unit, Bosch Institute and School of Medical Sciences, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cohen, D. [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights NSW 2234 (Australia); Lay, P.A. [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    The cerebral biochemistry associated with the development of many neurological diseases remains poorly understood. In particular, incomplete understanding of the mechanisms through which vascular inflammation manifests in tissue damage and altered brain function is a significant hindrance to the development of improved patient therapies. To this extent, a combination of spectrometric/spectroscopic mapping/imaging methods with an inherent ability to provide a wealth of biochemical and physical information have been investigated to understand further the pathogenesis of brain disease. In this study, proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) mapping was combined with scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) mapping and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) imaging of the same tissue sample to study directly the composition of the murine (mouse) cerebellum. The combination of the elemental, density and molecular information provided by these techniques enabled differentiation between four specific tissue types within the murine cerebellum (grey matter, white matter, molecular layer and micro blood vessels). The results presented are complementary, multi-technique measurements of the same tissue sample. They show elemental, density and molecular differences among the different tissue types.

  11. eNOS uncoupling in the cerebellum after BBB disruption by exposure to Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Edilene Siqueira; Mendonça, Monique Culturato Padilha; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2015-09-15

    Numerous studies have shown that the venom of Phoneutria nigriventer (PNV) armed-spider causes excitotoxic signals and blood-brain barrier breakdown (BBBb) in rats. Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule which has a role in endothelium homeostasis and vascular health. The present study investigated the relevance of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) uncoupling to clinical neurotoxic evolution induced by PNV. eNOS immunoblotting of cerebellum lysates processed through low-temperature SDS-PAGE revealed significant increased monomerization of the enzyme at critical periods of severe envenoming (1-2 h), whereas eNOS dimerization reversal paralleled to amelioration of animals condition (5-72 h). Moreover, eNOS uncoupling was accompanied by increased expression in calcium-sensing calmodulin protein and calcium-binding calbindin-D28 protein in cerebellar neurons. It is known that greater eNOS monomers than dimers implies the inability of eNOS to produce NO leading to superoxide production and endothelial/vascular barrier dysfunction. We suggest that transient eNOS deactivation and disturbances in calcium handling reduce NO production and enhance production of free radicals thus contributing to endothelial dysfunction in the cerebellum of envenomed rats. In addition, eNOS uncoupling compromises the enzyme capacity to respond to shear stress contributing to perivascular edema and it is one of the mechanisms involved in the BBBb promoted by PNV.

  12. PEX13 deficiency in mouse brain as a model of Zellweger syndrome: abnormal cerebellum formation, reactive gliosis and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Catharina Müller

    2011-01-01

    Delayed cerebellar development is a hallmark of Zellweger syndrome (ZS, a severe neonatal neurodegenerative disorder. ZS is caused by mutations in PEX genes, such as PEX13, which encodes a protein required for import of proteins into the peroxisome. The molecular basis of ZS pathogenesis is not known. We have created a conditional mouse mutant with brain-restricted deficiency of PEX13 that exhibits cerebellar morphological defects. PEX13 brain mutants survive into the postnatal period, with the majority dying by 35 days, and with survival inversely related to litter size and weaning body weight. The impact on peroxisomal metabolism in the mutant brain is mixed: plasmalogen content is reduced, but very-long-chain fatty acids are normal. PEX13 brain mutants exhibit defects in reflex and motor development that correlate with impaired cerebellar fissure and cortical layer formation, granule cell migration and Purkinje cell layer development. Astrogliosis and microgliosis are prominent features of the mutant cerebellum. At the molecular level, cultured cerebellar neurons from E19 PEX13-null mice exhibit elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase-2 (MnSOD, and show enhanced apoptosis together with mitochondrial dysfunction. PEX13 brain mutants show increased levels of MnSOD in cerebellum. Our findings suggest that PEX13 deficiency leads to mitochondria-mediated oxidative stress, neuronal cell death and impairment of cerebellar development. Thus, PEX13-deficient mice provide a valuable animal model for investigating the molecular basis and treatment of ZS cerebellar pathology.

  13. Prophylactic role of melatonin against radiation induced damage in mouse cerebellum with special reference to Purkinje cells

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    Sisodia, Rashmi; Kumari, Seema; Verma, Rajesh Kumar; Bhatia, A L [Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302004 (India)

    2006-06-15

    Melatonin, a hormone with a proven antioxidative efficacy, crosses all morphophysiological barriers, including the blood-brain barrier, and distributes throughout the cell. The present study is an attempt to investigate the prophylactic influence of a chronic low level of melatonin against an acute radiation induced oxidative stress in the cerebellum of Swiss albino mice, with special reference to Purkinje cells. After 15 days of treatment the mice were sacrificed at various intervals from 1 to 30 days. Biochemical parameters included lipid peroxidation (LPO) and glutathione (GSH) levels as the endpoints. The quantitative study included alterations in number and volume of Purkinje cells. Swiss albino mice were orally administered a very low dose of melatonin (0.25 mg/mouse/day) for 15 consecutive days before single exposure to 4 Gy gamma radiation. Melatonin checked the augmented levels of LPO, by approximately 55%, by day 30 day post-exposure. Radiation induced depleted levels of GSH could be raised by 68.9% by day 30 post-exposure. Radiation exposure resulted in a reduction of the volume of Purkinje cells and their total number. The administration of melatonin significantly protected against the radiation induced decreases in Purkinje cell volume and number. Results indicate the antioxidative properties of melatonin resulting in its prophylactic property against radiation induced biochemical and cellular alterations in the cerebellum. The findings support the idea that melatonin may be used as an anti-irradiation drug due to its potent free radical scavenging and antioxidative efficacy.

  14. Defects in myelination, paranode organization and Purkinje cell innervation in the ether lipid-deficient mouse cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teigler, Andre; Komljenovic, Dorde; Draguhn, Andreas; Gorgas, Karin; Just, Wilhelm W

    2009-06-01

    Ether lipids (ELs), particularly plasmalogens, are essential constituents of the mammalian central nervous system. The physiological role of ELs, in vivo, however is still enigmatic. In the present study, we characterized a mouse model carrying a targeted deletion of the peroxisomal dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase gene that results in the complete lack of ELs. Investigating the cerebellum of these mice, we observed: (i) defects in foliation patterning and delay in precursor granule cell migration, (ii) defects in myelination and concomitant reduction in the level of myelin basic protein, (iii) disturbances in paranode organization by extending the Caspr distribution and disrupting axo-glial septate-like junctions, (iv) impaired innervation of Purkinje cells by both parallel fibers and climbing fibers and (v) formation of axon swellings by the accumulation of inositol-tris-phosphate receptor 1 containing smooth ER-like tubuli. Functionally, conduction velocity of myelinated axons in the corpus callosum was significantly reduced. Most of these phenotypes were already apparent at P20 but still persisted in 1-year-old animals. In summary, these data show that EL deficiency results in severe developmental and lasting structural alterations at the cellular and network level of the cerebellum, and reveal an important role of ELs for proper brain function. Common molecular mechanisms that may underlie these phenotypes are discussed. PMID:19270340

  15. The quantification of COMT mRNA in post mortem cerebellum tissue: diagnosis, genotype, methylation and expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Ian W

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The COMT gene is located on chromosome 22q11, a region strongly implicated in the aetiology of several psychiatric disorders, in particular schizophrenia. Previous research has suggested that activity and expression of COMT is altered in schizophrenia, and is mediated by one or more polymorphisms within the gene, including the functional Val158Met polymorphism. Method In this study we examined the expression levels of COMT mRNA using quantitative RT-PCR in 60 post mortem cerebellum samples derived from individuals with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and no history of psychopathology. Furthermore, we have examined the methylation status of two CpG sites in the promoter region of the gene. Results We found no evidence of altered COMT expression or methylation in any of the psychiatric diagnoses examined. We did, however, find evidence to suggest that genotype is related to COMT gene expression, replicating the findings of two previous studies. Specifically, val158met (rs165688; Val allele rs737865 (G allele and rs165599 (G allele all showed reduced expression (P COMT expression, with females exhibiting significantly greater levels of COMT mRNA. Conclusion The expression of COMT does not appear to be altered in the cerebellum of individuals suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or depression, but does appear to be influenced by single nucleotide polymorphisms within the gene.

  16. Loss of NCB5OR in the cerebellum disturbs iron pathways, potentiates behavioral abnormalities, and exacerbates harmaline-induced tremor in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, Matthew A; Winter, Michelle K; Swerdlow, Russell H; McCarson, Kenneth E; Zhu, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Iron dyshomeostasis has been implicated in many diseases, including a number of neurological conditions. Cytosolic NADH cytochrome b5 oxidoreductase (NCB5OR) is ubiquitously expressed in animal tissues and is capable of reducing ferric iron in vitro. We previously reported that global gene ablation of NCB5OR resulted in early-onset diabetes and altered iron homeostasis in mice. To further investigate the specific effects of NCB5OR deficiency on neural tissue without contributions from known phenotypes, we generated a conditional knockout (CKO) mouse that lacks NCB5OR only in the cerebellum and midbrain. Assessment of molecular markers in the cerebellum of CKO mice revealed changes in pathways associated with cellular and mitochondrial iron homeostasis. (59)Fe pulse-feeding experiments revealed cerebellum-specific increased or decreased uptake of iron by 7 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Additionally, we characterized behavioral changes associated with loss of NCB5OR in the cerebellum and midbrain in the context of dietary iron deprivation-evoked generalized iron deficiency. Locomotor activity was reduced and complex motor task execution was altered in CKO mice treated with an iron deficient diet. A sucrose preference test revealed that the reward response was intact in CKO mice, but that iron deficient diet consumption altered sucrose preference in all mice. Detailed gait analysis revealed locomotor changes in CKO mice associated with dysfunctional proprioception and locomotor activation independent of dietary iron deficiency. Finally, we demonstrate that loss of NCB5OR in the cerebellum and midbrain exacerbated harmaline-induced tremor activity. Our findings suggest an essential role for NCB5OR in maintaining both iron homeostasis and the proper functioning of various locomotor pathways in the mouse cerebellum and midbrain. PMID:27188291

  17. Distribution of mGluR1alpha and SMI 311 immunoreactive Lugaro cells in the kitten cerebellum.

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    Víg, Julianna; Takács, József; Vastagh, Csaba; Baldauf, Zsolt; Veisenberger, Eleonóra; Hámori, József

    2003-03-01

    The Lugaro cell is a feedback interneuron of the cerebellar cortex, recognizable by its characteristic morphology. Postnatal neuronal migration to the cortex has been described for several cerebellar interneurons. Since in our previous studies we observed Lugaro-like cells (LCs) in the white matter (WM) and internal granular layer (IGL) of the cerebellum of young cats, we assumed that a proportion of these cells migrate also postnatally to their destination. In the present study using and immunostaining for the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1alpha and neurofilament protein SMI 311 the number and spatial distribution of LCs at different postnatal days were investigated. We found that the number and distribution of both mGluR1a-immunoreactive (ir) and of SMI 311-ir LCs changed with age in the developing cerebellar cortex of kittens: developing LCs express mGluR1alpha already in the newborn, while expression of SMI 311-ir in LCs appears only about a week later. At postnatal day 1 (P1) relatively few mGluR1-ir LCs were detected in the WM and at the border of WM and IGL. Later, their number increased sharply until P15 (6-7 fold) and decreased continuously between P15 and P135. SMI 311-ir LCs were not present at P1 and even at P8 only a few were observed in the WM or in infraganglionic positions. Their number increased gradually (12-14 fold) until adulthood when their number was stabilized at 8.000-10.000/cerebellum. At the same time the number of probably ectopic SMI 311-ir LCs decreased with age: at P22 about one third of them was found in "ectopic" position, whereas in the adult cat only about 10-12% of LCs's was either in the WM or scattered in the whole depth of the granular layer. These results suggest that: (1) most LCs appear in the cerebellar cortex postnatally; and (2) postnatal migration and incorporation of LCs to the cortex is a much longer process than previously expected, occurring even after the cytoarchitectonic built-up (about P65-P70 in cat) of

  18. Aroclor 1254, a developmental neurotoxicant, alters energy metabolism- and intracellular signaling-associated protein networks in rat cerebellum and hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S., E-mail: kodavanti.prasada@epa.gov [Neurotoxicology Branch, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States); Osorio, Cristina [Systems Proteomics Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Program on Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Royland, Joyce E.; Ramabhadran, Ram [Genetic and Cellular Toxicology Branch, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States); Alzate, Oscar [Department of Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Systems Proteomics Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Program on Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2011-11-15

    The vast literature on the mode of action of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) indicates that PCBs are a unique model for understanding the mechanisms of toxicity of environmental mixtures of persistent chemicals. PCBs have been shown to adversely affect psychomotor function and learning and memory in humans. Although the molecular mechanisms for PCB effects are unclear, several studies indicate that the disruption of Ca{sup 2+}-mediated signal transduction plays significant roles in PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity. Culminating events in signal transduction pathways include the regulation of gene and protein expression, which affects the growth and function of the nervous system. Our previous studies showed changes in gene expression related to signal transduction and neuronal growth. In this study, protein expression following developmental exposure to PCB is examined. Pregnant rats (Long Evans) were dosed with 0.0 or 6.0 mg/kg/day of Aroclor-1254 from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21, and the cerebellum and hippocampus from PND14 animals were analyzed to determine Aroclor 1254-induced differential protein expression. Two proteins were found to be differentially expressed in the cerebellum following PCB exposure while 18 proteins were differentially expressed in the hippocampus. These proteins are related to energy metabolism in mitochondria (ATP synthase, sub unit {beta} (ATP5B), creatine kinase, and malate dehydrogenase), calcium signaling (voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1) and ryanodine receptor type II (RyR2)), and growth of the nervous system (dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 4 (DPYSL4), valosin-containing protein (VCP)). Results suggest that Aroclor 1254-like persistent chemicals may alter energy metabolism and intracellular signaling, which might result in developmental neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We performed brain proteomic analysis of rats exposed to the neurotoxicant

  19. More consistently altered connectivity patterns for cerebellum and medial temporal lobes than for amygdala and striatum in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning ePeters

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain architecture can be divided into a cortico-thalamic system and modulatory ‘subcortical-cerebellar’ systems containing key structures such as striatum, medial temporal lobes (MTLs, amygdala, and cerebellum. Subcortical-cerebellar systems are known to be altered in schizophrenia. In particular, intrinsic functional brain connectivity (iFC between these systems has been consistently demonstrated in patients. While altered connectivity is known for each subcortical-cerebellar system separately, it is unknown whether subcortical-cerebellar systems’ connectivity patterns with the cortico-thalamic system are comparably altered across systems, i.e., if separate subcortical-cerebellar systems’ connectivity patterns are consistent across patients. Methods: To investigate this question, 18 patients with schizophrenia (3 unmedicated, 15 medicated with atypical antipsychotics and 18 healthy controls were assessed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Independent component analysis of fMRI data revealed cortical intrinsic brain networks (NWs with time courses representing proxies for cortico-thalamic system activity. Subcortical-cerebellar systems’ activity was represented by fMRI-based time courses of selected regions-of-interest (ROIs (i.e., striatum, MTL, amygdala, cerebellum. Correlation analysis among ROI- and NWs-time courses yielded individual connectivity matrices (i.e. connectivity between NW and ROIs (allROIs-NW, separateROI-NW, only NWs (NWs-NWs, and only ROIs (allROIs-allROIs as main outcome measures, which were classified by support-vector-machine-based leave-one-out cross-validation. Differences in classification accuracy were statistically evaluated for consistency across subjects and systems. Results: Correlation matrices based on allROIs-NWs yielded 91% classification accuracy, which was significantly superior to allROIs-allROIs and NWs-NWs (56% and 74%, respectively. Considering separate

  20. Essential Function of Dicer in Resolving DNA Damage in the Rapidly Dividing Cells of the Developing and Malignant Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Swahari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of genomic integrity is critical during neurodevelopment, particularly in rapidly dividing cerebellar granule neuronal precursors that experience constitutive replication-associated DNA damage. As Dicer was recently recognized to have an unexpected function in the DNA damage response, we examined whether Dicer was important for preserving genomic integrity in the developing brain. We report that deletion of Dicer in the developing mouse cerebellum resulted in the accumulation of DNA damage leading to cerebellar progenitor degeneration, which was rescued with p53 deficiency; deletion of DGCR8 also resulted in similar DNA damage and cerebellar degeneration. Dicer deficiency also resulted in DNA damage and death in other rapidly dividing cells including embryonic stem cells and the malignant cerebellar progenitors in a mouse model of medulloblastoma. Together, these results identify an essential function of Dicer in resolving the spontaneous DNA damage that occurs during the rapid proliferation of developmental progenitors and malignant cells.

  1. Effects of acute versus repeated cocaine exposure on the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana ePalomino

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Growing awareness of cerebellar involvement in addiction is based on the cerebellum’s intermediary position between motor and reward, potentially acting as an interface between motivational and cognitive functions. Here, we examined the impact of acute and repeated cocaine exposure on the two main signaling systems in the mouse cerebellum: the endocannabinoid (eCB and glutamate systems. To this end, we investigated whether eCB signaling-related gene and protein expression (CB1 receptors and enzymes that produce (DAGLα/β and NAPE-PLD and degrade (MAGL and FAAH eCB were altered. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression of relevant components of the glutamate signaling system (glutamate synthesizing enzymes LGA and KGA, mGluR3/5 metabotropic receptors, and NR1/2A/2B/2C-NMDA and GluR1/2/3/4-AMPA ionotropic receptor subunits and the gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, because noradrenergic terminals innervate the cerebellar cortex. Results indicated that acute cocaine exposure decreased DAGLα expression, suggesting a down-regulation of 2-AG production, as well as gene expression of TH, KGA, mGluR3 and all ionotropic receptor subunits analyzed in the cerebellum. The acquisition of conditioned locomotion and sensitization after repeated cocaine exposure were associated with an increased NAPE-PLD/FAAH ratio, suggesting enhanced anandamide production, and a decreased DAGLβ/MAGL ratio, suggesting decreased 2-AG generation. Repeated cocaine also increased LGA gene expression but had no effect on glutamate receptors. These findings indicate that acute cocaine modulates the expression of the eCB and glutamate systems. Repeated cocaine results in normalization of glutamate receptor expression, although sustained changes in eCB is observed. We suggest that cocaine-induced alterations to cerebellar eCB should be considered when analyzing the adaptations imposed by psychostimulants that

  2. Interindividual methylomic variation across blood, cortex, and cerebellum: implications for epigenetic studies of neurological and neuropsychiatric phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Eilis; Lunnon, Katie; Schalkwyk, Leonard; Mill, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Given the tissue-specific nature of epigenetic processes, the assessment of disease-relevant tissue is an important consideration for epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS). Little is known about whether easily accessible tissues, such as whole blood, can be used to address questions about interindividual epigenomic variation in inaccessible tissues, such as the brain. We quantified DNA methylation in matched DNA samples isolated from whole blood and 4 brain regions (prefrontal cortex, entorhinal cortex, superior temporal gyrus, and cerebellum) from 122 individuals. We explored co-variation between tissues and the extent to which methylomic variation in blood is predictive of interindividual variation identified in the brain. For the majority of DNA methylation sites, interindividual variation in whole blood is not a strong predictor of interindividual variation in the brain, although the relationship with cortical regions is stronger than with the cerebellum. Variation at a subset of probes is strongly correlated across tissues, even in instances when the actual level of DNA methylation is significantly different between them. A substantial proportion of this co-variation, however, is likely to result from genetic influences. Our data suggest that for the majority of the genome, a blood-based EWAS for disorders where brain is presumed to be the primary tissue of interest will give limited information relating to underlying pathological processes. These results do not, however, discount the utility of using a blood-based EWAS to identify biomarkers of disease phenotypes manifest in the brain. We have generated a searchable database for the interpretation of data from blood-based EWAS analyses ( http://epigenetics.essex.ac.uk/bloodbrain/).

  3. Altered cerebellum development and impaired motor coordination in mice lacking the Btg1 gene: Involvement of cyclin D1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Manuela; Micheli, Laura; D'Andrea, Giorgio; De Bardi, Marco; Scheijen, Blanca; Ciotti, MariaTeresa; Leonardi, Luca; Luvisetto, Siro; Tirone, Felice

    2015-12-01

    Cerebellar granule neurons develop postnatally from cerebellar granule precursors (GCPs), which are located in the external granule layer (EGL) where they massively proliferate. Thereafter, GCPs become postmitotic, migrate inward to form the internal granule layer (IGL), further differentiate and form synapses with Purkinje cell dendrites. We previously showed that the Btg family gene, Tis21/Btg2, is required for normal GCP migration. Here we investigated the role in cerebellar development of the related gene, Btg1, which regulates stem cell quiescence in adult neurogenic niches, and is expressed in the cerebellum. Knockout of Btg1 in mice caused a major increase of the proliferation of the GCPs in the EGL, whose thickness increased, remaining hyperplastic even after postnatal day 14, when the EGL is normally reduced to a few GCP layers. This was accompanied by a slight decrease of differentiation and migration of the GCPs and increase of apoptosis. The GCPs of double Btg1/Tis21-null mice presented combined major defects of proliferation and migration outside the EGL, indicating that each gene plays unique and crucial roles in cerebellar development. Remarkably, these developmental defects lead to a permanent increase of the adult cerebellar volume in Btg1-null and double mutant mice, and to impairment in all mutants, including Tis21-null, of the cerebellum-dependent motor coordination. Gain- and loss-of-function strategies in a GCP cell line revealed that Btg1 regulates the proliferation of GCPs selectively through cyclin D1. Thus, Btg1 plays a critical role for cerebellar maturation and function.

  4. Increased expression of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum in the valproic acid model of autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianling; Wu, Wei; Fu, Yingmei; Yu, Shunying; Cui, Donghong; Zhao, Min; Du, Yasong; Li, Jijun; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to investigate alterations in enzymes associated with fatty acid synthesis, namely fatty acid synthase (FASN) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum of the valproic acid (VPA)-induced animal model of autism. In this model, pregnant rats were given a single intraperitoneal injection of VPA, and prefrontal cortex and cerebellum samples from their pups were analyzed. The results of western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated that the protein and mRNA expression levels of FASN, ACC and phospho-ACC (pACC) were increased in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum of the VPA model of autism. Furthermore, in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum of the VPA model of autism, AMPK expression is increased, whereas PI3K and Akt expression are unchanged. This suggests that disorder of the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/FASN and/or adenosine 5′-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/ACC pathway may be involved in the pathogenesis of autism. It is hypothesized that fatty acid synthesis participates in autism through PI3K/Akt/FASN and AMPK/ACC pathways. PMID:27602061

  5. Organohalogen contaminants and metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid and cerebellum gray matter in short-beaked common dolphins and Atlantic white-sided dolphins from the western North Atlantic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montie, Eric W., E-mail: emontie@marine.usf.ed [Departments of Biology (EWM and MEH) and Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry (CMR), Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution - WHOI, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Reddy, Christopher M. [Departments of Biology (EWM and MEH) and Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry (CMR), Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution - WHOI, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Gebbink, Wouter A. [Wildlife and Landscape Science Directorate, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1A OH3 (Canada); Touhey, Katie E. [Cape Cod Stranding Network, Buzzards Bay, MA 02542 (United States); Hahn, Mark E. [Departments of Biology (EWM and MEH) and Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry (CMR), Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution - WHOI, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Letcher, Robert J. [Wildlife and Landscape Science Directorate, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1A OH3 (Canada)

    2009-08-15

    Concentrations of several congeners and classes of organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) and/or their metabolites, namely organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated-PCBs (OH-PCBs), methylsulfonyl-PCBs (MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants, and OH-PBDEs, were measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of short-beaked common dolphins (n = 2), Atlantic white-sided dolphins (n = 8), and gray seal (n = 1) from the western North Atlantic. In three Atlantic white-sided dolphins, cerebellum gray matter (GM) was also analyzed. The levels of OCs, PCBs, MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs, PBDEs, and OH-PBDEs in cerebellum GM were higher than the concentrations in CSF. 4-OH-2,3,3',4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (4-OH-CB107) was the only detectable OH-PCB congener present in CSF. The sum (SIGMA) OH-PCBs/SIGMA PCB concentration ratio in CSF was approximately two to three orders of magnitude greater than the ratio in cerebellum GM for dolphins. - Organohalogens and/or metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid and cerebellum gray matter in short-beaked common dolphins, Atlantic white-sided dolphins, and gray seal.

  6. Internal modeling of upcoming speech: A causal role of the right posterior cerebellum in non-motor aspects of language production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnqvist, Elin; Bonnard, Mireille; Gauvin, Hanna S; Attarian, Shahram; Trébuchon, Agnès; Hartsuiker, Robert J; Alario, F-Xavier

    2016-08-01

    Some language processing theories propose that, just as for other somatic actions, self-monitoring of language production is achieved through internal modeling. The cerebellum is the proposed center of such internal modeling in motor control, and the right cerebellum has been linked to an increasing number of language functions, including predictive processing during comprehension. Relating these findings, we tested whether the right posterior cerebellum has a causal role for self-monitoring of speech errors. Participants received 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation during 15 min to lobules Crus I and II in the right hemisphere, and, in counterbalanced orders, to the contralateral area in the left cerebellar hemisphere (control) in order to induce a temporary inactivation of one of these zones. Immediately afterwards, they engaged in a speech production task priming the production of speech errors. Language production was impaired after right compared to left hemisphere stimulation, a finding that provides evidence for a causal role of the cerebellum during language production. We interpreted this role in terms of internal modeling of upcoming speech through a verbal working memory process used to prevent errors.

  7. Internal modeling of upcoming speech: A causal role of the right posterior cerebellum in non-motor aspects of language production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnqvist, Elin; Bonnard, Mireille; Gauvin, Hanna S; Attarian, Shahram; Trébuchon, Agnès; Hartsuiker, Robert J; Alario, F-Xavier

    2016-08-01

    Some language processing theories propose that, just as for other somatic actions, self-monitoring of language production is achieved through internal modeling. The cerebellum is the proposed center of such internal modeling in motor control, and the right cerebellum has been linked to an increasing number of language functions, including predictive processing during comprehension. Relating these findings, we tested whether the right posterior cerebellum has a causal role for self-monitoring of speech errors. Participants received 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation during 15 min to lobules Crus I and II in the right hemisphere, and, in counterbalanced orders, to the contralateral area in the left cerebellar hemisphere (control) in order to induce a temporary inactivation of one of these zones. Immediately afterwards, they engaged in a speech production task priming the production of speech errors. Language production was impaired after right compared to left hemisphere stimulation, a finding that provides evidence for a causal role of the cerebellum during language production. We interpreted this role in terms of internal modeling of upcoming speech through a verbal working memory process used to prevent errors. PMID:27249802

  8. Organohalogen contaminants and metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid and cerebellum gray matter in short-beaked common dolphins and Atlantic white-sided dolphins from the western North Atlantic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of several congeners and classes of organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) and/or their metabolites, namely organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated-PCBs (OH-PCBs), methylsulfonyl-PCBs (MeSO2-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants, and OH-PBDEs, were measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of short-beaked common dolphins (n = 2), Atlantic white-sided dolphins (n = 8), and gray seal (n = 1) from the western North Atlantic. In three Atlantic white-sided dolphins, cerebellum gray matter (GM) was also analyzed. The levels of OCs, PCBs, MeSO2-PCBs, PBDEs, and OH-PBDEs in cerebellum GM were higher than the concentrations in CSF. 4-OH-2,3,3',4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (4-OH-CB107) was the only detectable OH-PCB congener present in CSF. The sum (Σ) OH-PCBs/Σ PCB concentration ratio in CSF was approximately two to three orders of magnitude greater than the ratio in cerebellum GM for dolphins. - Organohalogens and/or metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid and cerebellum gray matter in short-beaked common dolphins, Atlantic white-sided dolphins, and gray seal.

  9. Preliminary morphological and morphometric study of rat cerebellum following sodium arsenite exposure during rapid brain growth (RBG) period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of arsenic exposure during rapid brain growth (RBG) period were studied in rat brains with emphasis on the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. The RBG period in rats extends from postnatal day 4 (PND 4) to postnatal day 10 (PND 10) and is reported to be highly vulnerable to environmental insults. Mother reared Wistar rat pups were administered intraperitoneal injections (i.p.) of sodium arsenite (aqueous solution) in doses of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg body weight (bw) to groups II, III and IV (n = 6 animals/group) from PND 4 to 10 (sub acute). Control animals (group I) received distilled water by the same route. On PND 11, the animals were perfusion fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (PB) with pH 7.4. The cerebellum obtained from these animals was post-fixed and processed for paraffin embedding. Besides studying the morphological characteristics of Purkinje cells in cresyl violet (CV) stained paraffin sections (10 μm), morphometric analysis of Purkinje cells was carried out using Image Analysis System (Image Proplus software version 4.5) attached to Nikon Microphot-FX microscope. The results showed that on PND 11, the Purkinje cells were arranged in multiple layers extending from Purkinje cell layer (PL) to outer part of granule cell layer (GL) in experimental animals (contrary to monolayer arrangement within PL in control animals). Also, delayed maturation (well defined apical cytoplasmic cones and intense basal basophilia) was evident in Purkinje cells of experimental animals on PND 11. The mean Purkinje cell nuclear area was significantly increased in the arsenic treated animals compared to the control animals. The observations of the present study (faulty migration, delayed maturation and alteration in nuclear area measurements of Purkinje cells subsequent to arsenic exposure) thus provided the morphological evidence of structural alterations subsequent to arsenite induced developmental neurotoxicity which could be presumed to be

  10. Effects of acute versus repeated cocaine exposure on the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino, Ana; Pavón, Francisco-Javier; Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Arrabal, Sergio; Rivera, Patricia; Alén, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rubio, Leticia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Growing awareness of cerebellar involvement in addiction is based on the cerebellum’s intermediary position between motor and reward, potentially acting as an interface between motivational and cognitive functions. Here, we examined the impact of acute and repeated cocaine exposure on the two main signaling systems in the mouse cerebellum: the endocannabinoid (eCB) and glutamate systems. To this end, we investigated whether eCB signaling-related gene and protein expression {cannabinoid receptor type 1 receptors and enzymes that produce [diacylglycerol lipase alpha/beta (DAGLα/β) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD)] and degrade [monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amino hydrolase (FAAH)] eCB} were altered. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression of relevant components of the glutamate signaling system [glutamate synthesizing enzymes liver-type glutaminase isoform (LGA) and kidney-type glutaminase isoform (KGA), metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR3/5), NMDA-ionotropic glutamatergic receptor (NR1/2A/2B/2C) and AMPA-ionotropic receptor subunits (GluR1/2/3/4)] and the gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, because noradrenergic terminals innervate the cerebellar cortex. Results indicated that acute cocaine exposure decreased DAGLα expression, suggesting a down-regulation of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) production, as well as gene expression of TH, KGA, mGluR3 and all ionotropic receptor subunits analyzed in the cerebellum. The acquisition of conditioned locomotion and sensitization after repeated cocaine exposure were associated with an increased NAPE-PLD/FAAH ratio, suggesting enhanced anandamide production, and a decreased DAGLβ/MAGL ratio, suggesting decreased 2-AG generation. Repeated cocaine also increased LGA gene expression but had no effect on glutamate receptors. These findings indicate that acute cocaine modulates the expression of the eCB and

  11. Altered Activation in Cerebellum Contralateral to Unilateral Thalamotomy May Mediate Tremor Suppression in Parkinson's Disease: A Short-Term Regional Homogeneity fMRI Study.

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    Zhi Wen

    Full Text Available Ventral intermediate nucleus thalamotomy is an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease tremor. However, its mechanism is still unclear.We used resting-state fMRI to investigate short-term ReHo changes after unilateral thalamotomy in tremor-dominant PD, and to speculate about its possible mechanism on tremor suppression.26 patients and 31 healthy subjects (HS were recruited. Patients were divided into two groups according to right- (rPD and left-side (lPD thalamotomy. Tremor was assessed using the 7-item scale from the Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale motor score (mUPDRS. Patients were scanned using resting state fMRI after 12h withdrawal of medication, both preoperatively (PDpre and 7- day postoperatively (PDpost, whereas healthy subjects were scanned once. The regions associated with tremor and altered ReHo due to thalamic ablation were examined.The impact of unilateral VIM thalamotomy was characterized in the frontal, parietal, temporal regions, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Compared with PDpre, significantly reduced ReHo was found in the left cerebellum in patients with rPDpost, and slightly decreased ReHo in the cerebellum vermis in patients with lPDpost, which was significantly higher than HS. We demonstrated a positive correlation between the ReHo values in the cerebellum (in rPD, peak coordinate [-12, -54, -21], R = 0.64, P = 0.0025, and peak coordinate [-9, -54, -18], R = 0.71, P = 0.0025; in lPD, peak coordinate [3, -45, -15], R = 0.71, P = 0.004 in the pre-surgical condition, changes of ReHo induced by thalamotomy (in rPD, R = 0.63, P = 0.021, R = 0.6, P = 0.009; in lPD, R = 0.58, P = 0.028 and tremor scores contralateral to the surgical side, respectively.The specific area that may be associated with PD tremor and altered ReHo due to thalamic ablation is the cerebellum. The neural basis underlying thalamotomy is complex; cerebellum involvement is far beyond cerebello-thalamic tract breakage.

  12. Altered Activation in Cerebellum Contralateral to Unilateral Thalamotomy May Mediate Tremor Suppression in Parkinson’s Disease: A Short-Term Regional Homogeneity fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhi; Zhang, Jie; Li, Jielan; Dai, Jiankun; Lin, Fuchun; Wu, Guangyao

    2016-01-01

    Background Ventral intermediate nucleus thalamotomy is an effective treatment for Parkinson’s disease tremor. However, its mechanism is still unclear. Purpose We used resting-state fMRI to investigate short-term ReHo changes after unilateral thalamotomy in tremor-dominant PD, and to speculate about its possible mechanism on tremor suppression. Methods 26 patients and 31 healthy subjects (HS) were recruited. Patients were divided into two groups according to right- (rPD) and left-side (lPD) thalamotomy. Tremor was assessed using the 7-item scale from the Unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale motor score (mUPDRS). Patients were scanned using resting state fMRI after 12h withdrawal of medication, both preoperatively (PDpre) and 7- day postoperatively (PDpost), whereas healthy subjects were scanned once. The regions associated with tremor and altered ReHo due to thalamic ablation were examined. Results The impact of unilateral VIM thalamotomy was characterized in the frontal, parietal, temporal regions, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Compared with PDpre, significantly reduced ReHo was found in the left cerebellum in patients with rPDpost, and slightly decreased ReHo in the cerebellum vermis in patients with lPDpost, which was significantly higher than HS. We demonstrated a positive correlation between the ReHo values in the cerebellum (in rPD, peak coordinate [-12, -54, -21], R = 0.64, P = 0.0025, and peak coordinate [-9, -54, -18], R = 0.71, P = 0.0025; in lPD, peak coordinate [3, -45, -15], R = 0.71, P = 0.004) in the pre-surgical condition, changes of ReHo induced by thalamotomy (in rPD, R = 0.63, P = 0.021, R = 0.6, P = 0.009; in lPD, R = 0.58, P = 0.028) and tremor scores contralateral to the surgical side, respectively. Conclusion The specific area that may be associated with PD tremor and altered ReHo due to thalamic ablation is the cerebellum. The neural basis underlying thalamotomy is complex; cerebellum involvement is far beyond cerebello

  13. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 cerebellum identifies protein biomarkers and provides pathological insight.

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    Stephanie M Cologna

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1 is a fatal, neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no definitive therapy. In NPC1, a pathological cascade including neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and neuronal apoptosis likely contribute to the clinical phenotype. While the genetic cause of NPC1 is known, we sought to gain a further understanding into the pathophysiology by identifying differentially expressed proteins in Npc1 mutant mouse cerebella. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, 77 differentially expressed proteins were identified in Npc1 mutant mice cerebella compared to controls. These include proteins involved in glucose metabolism, detoxification/oxidative stress and Alzheimer disease-related proteins. Furthermore, members of the fatty acid binding protein family, including FABP3, FABP5 and FABP7, were found to have altered expression in the Npc1 mutant cerebellum relative to control. Translating our findings from the murine model to patients, we confirm altered expression of glutathione s-transferase α, superoxide dismutase, and FABP3 in cerebrospinal fluid of NPC1 patients relative to pediatric controls. A subset of NPC1 patients on miglustat, a glycosphingolipid synthesis inhibitor, showed significantly decreased levels of FABP3 compared to patients not on miglustat therapy. This study provides an initial report of dysregulated proteins in NPC1 which will assist with further investigation of NPC1 pathology and facilitate implementation of therapeutic trials.

  14. Curcumin alters motor coordination but not total number of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum of adolescent male Wistar rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ginus Partadiredja; Sutarman; Taufik Nur Yahya; Christiana Tri Nuryana; Rina Susilowati

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:The present study aimed at investigating the effects of curcumin on the motor coordination and the estimate of the total number of cerebellar Purkinje cells of adolescent Wistar rats exposed to ethanol.METHODS:The total of 21 male Wistar rats aged 37 d old were divided into three groups,namely ethanol,ethanol-curcumin,and control groups.The ethanol group received 1.5 g/kg ethanol injected intraperitoneally and water given per oral; the ethanol-curcumin group received 1.5 g/kg ethanol injected intraperitoneally and curcumin extract given per oral; the control group received saline injection and oral water.The treatment was carried out daily for one month,after which the motor coordination performance of the rats was examined using revolving drum apparatus at test days 1,8,and 15.The rats were finally sacrificed and the cerebellum of the rats was further processed for stereological analysis.The estimate of the total number of Purkinje cells was calculated using physical fractionator method.RESULTS:The ethanol-curcumin group performed better than both ethanol and control groups in the motor coordination ability at day 8 of testing (P< 0.01).No Purkinje cell loss was observed as a result of one month intraperitoneal injection of ethanol.CONCLUSION:Curcumin may exert beneficial effects on the motor coordination of adolescent rats exposed to ethanol via undetermined hormetic mechanisms.

  15. Infrared spectroscopic imaging of the biochemical modifications induced in the cerebellum of the Niemann-Pick type C mouse

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    Kidder, Linda H.; Colarusso, Pina; Stewart, Sarah A.; Levin, Ira W.; Appel, Nathan M.; Lester, David S.; Pentchev, Peter G.; Lewis, E. N.

    1999-01-01

    WE have applied Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging to the investigation of the neuropathologic effects of a genetic lipid storage disease, Niemann-Pick type C (NPC). Tissue sections both from the cerebella of a strain of BALB/c mice that demonstrated morphology and pathology of the human disease and from control animals were used. These samples were analyzed by standard histopathological procedures as well as this new IR imaging approach. The IR absorbance images exhibit contrast based on biochemical variations and allow for the identification of the cellular layers within the tissue samples. Furthermore, these images provide a qualitative description of the localized biochemical differences existing between the diseased and control tissue in the absence of histological staining. Statistical analyses of the IR spectra extracted from individual cell layers of the imaging data sets provide concise quantitative descriptions of these biochemical changes. The results indicate that lipid is depleted specifically in the white matter of the NPC mouse in comparison to the control samples. Minor differences were noted for the granular layers, but no significant differences were observed in the molecular layers of the cerebellar tissue. These changes are consistent with significant demyelination within the cerebellum of the NPC mouse.

  16. Non-familial degenerative disease and atrophy of brainstem and cerebellum. Clinical and CT data in 47 patients.

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    Staal, A; Meerwaldt, J D; van Dongen, K J; Mulder, P G; Busch, H F

    1990-03-01

    We studied the clinical features of 47 patients with a non-hereditary degenerative disease and with atrophy of brainstem or cerebellum or both in CT scanning. There was no relation between the CT findings and duration or severity of the disease, nor with the kind of the neurological signs which comprised ataxia, a hypokinetic rigid syndrome, oculomotor abnormalities, upper and lower motor neuron signs, orthostatic hypotension and dementia. The 2 main diagnoses were olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), or a combination of OPCA and striatonigral degeneration (SND). The differential diagnosis with Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy was discussed. We concluded, that a CT scan is warranted in all cases of suspected Parkinson's disease, especially in those without tremor, and in cases of motoneuron disease with broad-based gait. In our patients with mainly hypokinesia and rigidity, levodopa treatment had no or brief beneficial effects. If ataxia predominated, OPCA appeared the most sensible diagnosis; if a hypokinetic-rigid syndrome predominated, the diagnoses SND plus OPCA appeared the most suitable. We assessed the degree of atrophy on CT subjectively, because an interobserver study of 60 normal CT scans, did not produce reliable measurements.

  17. Treadmill exercise ameliorates motor dysfunction through inhibition of Purkinje cell loss in cerebellum of valproic acid-induced autistic rats.

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    Cho, Han-Sam; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Park, Hye-Sang; Shin, Mal-Soon; Baek, Seung-Soo

    2016-08-01

    Autism is a complex developmental disorder with impairments in social interaction, communication, repetitive behavior and motor skills. Exercise enhances cognitive function, ameliorates motor dysfunction, and provides protective profits against neurodegeneration. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of treadmill exercise on the motor coordination and Purkinje cell loss in relation with reactive astrocytes and microglial activation in the cerebellum using valproic acid (VPA)-induced autism rat model. On the 12th day of pregnancy, the pregnant rats in the VPA-exposed group received intraperitoneal injections of 600-mg/kg VPA. After birth, the rat pups were divided into four groups: the control group, the exercise group, the VPA-treated group, the VPA-treated and exercise group. The rat pups in the exercise groups were forced to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. In the present results, motor balance and coordination was disturbed by induction of autism, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated motor dysfunction in the autistic rats. Purkinje cell loss, reactive astrocytes, and microglial activation were occurred by induction of autism, in contrast, treadmill exercise enhanced survival rate of Purkinje neurons through inhibition of reactive astrocytes and microglia in the autistic rats. The present study showed that exercise may provide a potential therapeutic strategy for the alleviation of motor dysfunction in autistic patients. PMID:27656625

  18. Using eyeblink classical conditioning as a test of the functional consequences of exposure of the developing cerebellum to alcohol.

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    Green, John T

    2003-01-01

    Exposure of the developing brain to alcohol produces profound Purkinje cell loss in the cerebellum, and deficits in tests of motor coordination. However, the precise relationship between these two sets of findings has been difficult to determine. Eyeblink classical conditioning is known to engage a discrete brainstem-cerebellar circuit, making it an ideal test of cerebellar functional integrity after developmental alcohol exposure. In eyeblink conditioning, one of the deep cerebellar nuclei, the interpositus nucleus, as well as specific Purkinje cell populations, are sites of convergence for CS and US information. A series of studies have shown that eyeblink conditioning is impaired in both weanling and adult rats given binge-like exposure to alcohol as neonates, and that these deficits can be traced, at least in part, to impaired activation of cerebellar interpositus nucleus neurons and to an overall reduction in the deep cerebellar nuclear cell population. Because particular cerebellar cell populations are utilized in well-defined ways during eyeblink conditioning, conclusions regarding specific changes in the mediation of behavior by these cell populations are greatly strengthened. Further studies will be directed towards the impact of early exposure to alcohol on the functionality of specific Purkinje cell populations, as well as towards brainstem areas that process the tone CS and the somatosensory US.

  19. A realistic bi-hemispheric model of the cerebellum uncovers the purpose of the abundant granule cells during motor control

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    Ruben Dario Pinzon Morales

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar granule cells (GCs have been proposed to perform lossless, adaptive spatio-temporal coding of incoming sensory/motor information required by downstream cerebellar circuits to textcolor{red}{support} motor learning, motor coordination, and cognition. Here we use a physio-anatomically inspired bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network (biCNN to selectively enable/disable the output of GCs and evaluate the behavioral and neural consequences during three different control scenarios. The control scenarios are a simple direct current motor (1 degree of freedom: DOF, an unstable two-wheel balancing robot (2 DOFs, and a simulation model of a quadcopter (6 DOFs. Results showed that adequate control was maintained with a relatively small number of GCs ($<$ 200 in all the control scenarios. However, the minimum number of GCs required to successfully govern each control plant increased with their complexity (i.e., DOFs. It was also shown that increasing the number of GCs resulted in higher robustness against changes in the initialization parameters of the biCNN model (i.e., synaptic connections and synaptic weights. Therefore, we suggest that the abundant GCs in the cerebellar cortex provide the computational power during the large repertoire of motor activities and motor plants the cerebellum is involved with, and bring robustness against changes in the cerebellar microcircuit (e.g., neuronal connections.

  20. A realistic bi-hemispheric model of the cerebellum uncovers the purpose of the abundant granule cells during motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar granule cells (GCs) have been proposed to perform lossless, adaptive spatio-temporal coding of incoming sensory/motor information required by downstream cerebellar circuits to support motor learning, motor coordination, and cognition. Here we use a physio-anatomically inspired bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network (biCNN) to selectively enable/disable the output of GCs and evaluate the behavioral and neural consequences during three different control scenarios. The control scenarios are a simple direct current motor (1 degree of freedom: DOF), an unstable two-wheel balancing robot (2 DOFs), and a simulation model of a quadcopter (6 DOFs). Results showed that adequate control was maintained with a relatively small number of GCs (< 200) in all the control scenarios. However, the minimum number of GCs required to successfully govern each control plant increased with their complexity (i.e., DOFs). It was also shown that increasing the number of GCs resulted in higher robustness against changes in the initialization parameters of the biCNN model (i.e., synaptic connections and synaptic weights). Therefore, we suggest that the abundant GCs in the cerebellar cortex provide the computational power during the large repertoire of motor activities and motor plants the cerebellum is involved with, and bring robustness against changes in the cerebellar microcircuit (e.g., neuronal connections). PMID:25983678

  1. Coordinated regulation of endocannabinoid-mediated retrograde synaptic suppression in the cerebellum by neuronal and astrocytic monoacylglycerol lipase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojie; Chen, Yao; Vickstrom, Casey R.; Li, Yan; Viader, Andreu; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Liu, Qing-song

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) mediates retrograde synaptic depression including depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) and inhibition (DSI). 2-AG is degraded primarily by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), which is expressed in neurons and astrocytes. Using knockout mice in which MAGL is deleted globally or selectively in neurons or astrocytes, we investigated the relative contribution of neuronal and astrocytic MAGL to the termination of DSE and DSI in Purkinje cells (PCs) in cerebellar slices. We report that neuronal MAGL plays a predominant role in terminating DSE at climbing fiber (CF) to PC synapses, while both neuronal and astrocytic MAGL significantly contributes to the termination of DSE at parallel fiber (PF) to PC synapses and DSI at putative Stellate cell to PC synapses. Thus, DSE and DSI at different synapses is not uniformly affected by global and cell type-specific knockout of MAGL. Additionally, MAGL global knockout, but not cell type-specific knockout, caused tonic activation and partial desensitization of the CB1 receptor at PF-PC synapses. This tonic CB1 activation is mediated by 2-AG since it was blocked by the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor DO34. Together, these results suggest that both neuronal and astrocytic MAGL contribute to 2-AG clearance and prevent CB1 receptor over-stimulation in the cerebellum. PMID:27775008

  2. Seizure-related 6,a brain-specific expression gene,is highly expressed in the human cerebellum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianming Jiang; Long Yu; Yangtai Guan; Zhiliang Yu; Xinghua Huang; Xiaosong Chen; Lisha Tang; Xianning Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy is a complex,Mendelian disease,and most cases are sporadic.Genomic comparisons of tissue from identified monogenic epilepsies with multigenic and acquired syndromes could ultimately reveal crucial molecular neuropathology for an epileptic phenotype.In the present study,a novel gene,human seizure-related(hSEZ)-6,was isolated from a human brain cDNA library.hSEZ-6 comprises 17 exons and spans a region of at least 55.6 kb,which was localized to 17q12 by radiation hybridization,hSEZ-6 exhibits two isoform types,hSEZ-6A and hSEZ-6B,which encode996 and 995 amino acids,respectively.The two putative hSEZ-6 proteins contain similar motifs and share 82% and 84% identity with mouse SEZ-6A protein,whose expression level increased in mouse cerebral cortex-derived cells treated with a convulsant drug,pentylentetrazole.Northern blot analysis demonstrated that hSEZ-6 is expressed highly in the cerebellum and in nucleus of the extrapyramidal system,such as the caudate nucleus and putamen.Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that hSEZ-6 is expressed in neurons rather than gliocytes,which suggests that hSEZ-6 is a seizure-related gene.

  3. Spike timing regulation on the millisecond scale by distributed synaptic plasticity at the cerebellum input stage: a simulation study

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    Jesus A Garrido

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The way long-term synaptic plasticity regulates neuronal spike patterns is not completely understood. This issue is especially relevant for the cerebellum, which is endowed with several forms of long-term synaptic plasticity and has been predicted to operate as a timing and a learning machine. Here we have used a computational model to simulate the impact of multiple distributed synaptic weights in the cerebellar granular layer network. In response to mossy fiber bursts, synaptic weights at multiple connections played a crucial role to regulate spike number and positioning in granule cells. The weight at mossy fiber to granule cell synapses regulated the delay of the first spike and the weight at mossy fiber and parallel fiber to Golgi cell synapses regulated the duration of the time-window during which the first-spike could be emitted. Moreover, the weights of synapses controlling Golgi cell activation regulated the intensity of granule cell inhibition and therefore the number of spikes that could be emitted. First spike timing was regulated with millisecond precision and the number of spikes ranged from 0 to 3. Interestingly, different combinations of synaptic weights optimized either first-spike timing precision or spike number, efficiently controlling transmission and filtering properties. These results predict that distributed synaptic plasticity regulates the emission of quasi-digital spike patterns on the millisecond time scale and allows the cerebellar granular layer to flexibly control burst transmission along the mossy fiber pathway.

  4. Histopathological and Behavioral Assessment of Toxin-Produced Cerebellar Lesion: A Potent Model for Cell Transplantation Studies in The Cerebellum

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    Mohammad Amin Edalatmanesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available cognition, learning and memory functions. This study presents a permanent model of a toxin produced cerebellar lesion characterized according to contemporary motor and cognitive abnormalities. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, slow administration of quinolinic acid (QA, 5 μl of 200 μmol, 1 μl/minute in the right cerebellar hemisphere (lobule VI caused noticeable motor and cognitive disturbances along with cellular degeneration in all treated animals. We assessed behavioral and histopathological studies over ten weeks after QA treatment. The data were analyzed with ANOVA and the student’s t test. Results: The QA treated group showed marked motor learning deficits on the rotating rod test (p≤0.0001, locomotor asymmetry on the cylinder test (p≤0.0001, dysmetria on the beam balance test (p≤0.0001, abnormalities in neuromuscular strength on the hang wire test (p≤0.0001, spatial memory deficits in the Morris water maze (MWM, p≤0.001 and fear conditioned memory on the passive avoidance test (p≤0.01 over a ten-week period compared with the control animals. Histopathological analysis showed loss of Purkinje cells (p≤0.001 and granular cell density (p≤0.0001 in the lesioned hemisphere of the cerebellum. Conclusion: Results of the present study show that QA can remove numerous cells which respond to this toxin in hemispheric lobule VI and thus provide a potential model for functional and cell-based studies.

  5. High-pass filtering and dynamic gain regulation enhance vertical bursts transmission along the mossy fiber pathway of cerebellum

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    Jonathan Mapelli

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Signal elaboration in the cerebellum mossy fiber input pathway presents controversial aspects, especially concerning gain regulation and the spot-like (rather than beam-like appearance of granular-to-molecular layer transmission. By using voltage-sensitive dye (VSD imaging in rat cerebellar slices (Mapelli et al., 2010, we found that mossy fiber bursts optimally excited the granular layer above ~50 Hz and the overlaying molecular layer above ~100 Hz, thus generating a cascade of high-pass filters. NMDA receptors enhanced transmission in the granular, while GABA-A receptors depressed transmission in both the granular and molecular layer. Burst transmission gain was controlled through a dynamic frequency-dependent involvement of these receptors. Moreover, while high-frequency transmission was enhanced along vertical lines connecting the granular to molecular layer, no high-frequency enhancement was observed along the parallel fiber axis in the molecular layer. This was probably due to the stronger effect of Purkinje cell GABA-A receptor-mediated inhibition occurring along the parallel fibers than along the granule cell axon ascending branch. The consequent amplification of burst responses along vertical transmission lines could explain the spot-like activation of Purkinje cells observed following punctuate stimulation in vivo .

  6. Commentary: How ethanol short-circuits the cerebellum-actions on Golgi cells in freely-moving animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Ronald K

    2012-11-01

    This commentary discusses the important contributions of the article published in this journal by Huang and colleagues, titled, "Acute ethanol exposure increases firing and induces oscillations in cerebellar Golgi cells of freely moving rats." In this manuscript, Huang and colleagues present a number of interesting and important findings. While it has been shown previously that ethanol (EtOH) causes an increase in the firing of cerebellar Golgi cells in brain slice preparations and anesthetized animals, here the authors provide the first evidence that this action of EtOH occurs in vivo in freely moving, unanesthetized animals. These results also enhance our understanding of cerebellar functioning by describing the mechanism by which EtOH essentially de-afferentates (blocks specific inputs to) the cerebellum from the normal processing of sensory signals due to EtOH-induced Golgi neuron excitation, resulting in inhibition of granule cells. Furthermore, the authors characterize the novel observation of EtOH-induced neuronal oscillations, which was not previously observed in other preparations.

  7. Treadmill exercise ameliorates motor dysfunction through inhibition of Purkinje cell loss in cerebellum of valproic acid-induced autistic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Han-Sam; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Park, Hye-Sang; Shin, Mal-Soon; Baek, Seung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a complex developmental disorder with impairments in social interaction, communication, repetitive behavior and motor skills. Exercise enhances cognitive function, ameliorates motor dysfunction, and provides protective profits against neurodegeneration. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of treadmill exercise on the motor coordination and Purkinje cell loss in relation with reactive astrocytes and microglial activation in the cerebellum using valproic acid (VPA)-induced autism rat model. On the 12th day of pregnancy, the pregnant rats in the VPA-exposed group received intraperitoneal injections of 600-mg/kg VPA. After birth, the rat pups were divided into four groups: the control group, the exercise group, the VPA-treated group, the VPA-treated and exercise group. The rat pups in the exercise groups were forced to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. In the present results, motor balance and coordination was disturbed by induction of autism, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated motor dysfunction in the autistic rats. Purkinje cell loss, reactive astrocytes, and microglial activation were occurred by induction of autism, in contrast, treadmill exercise enhanced survival rate of Purkinje neurons through inhibition of reactive astrocytes and microglia in the autistic rats. The present study showed that exercise may provide a potential therapeutic strategy for the alleviation of motor dysfunction in autistic patients.

  8. The contribution of delta subunit-containing GABAA receptors to phasic and tonic conductance changes in cerebellum, thalamus and neocortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen G Brickley

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have made use of the delta subunit-selective allosteric modulator DS2 (4-chloro-N-[2-(2-thienylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-yl benzamide to assay the contribution of delta-GABAARs to tonic and phasic conductance changes in the cerebellum, thalamus and neocortex. In cerebellar granule cells, an enhancement of the tonic conductance was observed for DS2 and the orthosteric agonist THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol. As expected, DS2 did not alter the properties of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic synaptic currents (IPSCs supporting a purely extrasynaptic role for delta-GABAARs in cerebellar granule cells. DS2 also enhanced the tonic conductance recorded from thalamic relay neurons of the visual thalamus with no alteration in IPSC properties. However, in addition to enhancing the tonic conductance DS2 also slowed the decay of IPSCs recorded from layer II/III neocortical neurons. A slowing of the IPSC decay also occurred in the presence of the voltage-gated sodium channel blocker TTX. Moreover, under conditions of reduced GABA release the ability of DS2 to enhance the tonic conductance was attenuated. These results indicate that delta-GABAARs can be activated following vesicular GABA release onto neocortical neurons and that the actions of DS2 on the tonic conductance may be influenced by the ambient GABA levels present in particular brain regions.

  9. Behavioral deficit and decreased GABA receptor functional regulation in the cerebellum of epileptic rats: effect of Bacopa monnieri and bacoside A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Jobin; Peeyush Kumar, T; Khan, Reas S; Paulose, C S

    2010-04-01

    In the present study, the effects of Bacopa monnieri and its active component, bacoside A, on motor deficit and alterations of GABA receptor functional regulation in the cerebellum of epileptic rats were investigated. Scatchard analysis of [(3)H]GABA and [(3)H]bicuculline in the cerebellum of epileptic rats revealed a significant decrease in B(max) compared with control. Real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification of GABA(A) receptor subunits-GABA(Aalpha1), GABA(Aalpha5,) and GABA(Adelta)-was downregulated (Pbacoside A reversed these changes to near-control levels. Our results suggest that changes in GABAergic activity, motor learning, and memory deficit are induced by the occurrence of repetitive seizures. Treatment with B. monnieri and bacoside A prevents the occurrence of seizures thereby reducing the impairment of GABAergic activity, motor learning, and memory deficit.

  10. Cerebelo: más allá de la coordinación motora Anatomía y conexiones del cerebelo Cerebellum: beyond motor coordination

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    José William Cornejo Ochoa

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Siempre se ha reconocido la función que ejerce el cerebelo sobre la motricidad. Sin embargo, en las últimas dos décadas son cada vez más frecuentes los reportes del papel que puede tener esta estructura sobre varias funciones cognitivas como la atención, el aprendizaje y la memoria o sobre algunos síndromes como el autismo. Se revisa la literatura sobre este tópico. The motor function of the cerebellum has ever been recognized. During the last two decades the cerebellum has been implicated in cognitive functions like memory, attention and learning or in syndromes such as the autistic spectrum. These topics are reviewed in this article.

  11. Study of surgical management of spontaneous hemorrhage of cerebellum%小脑血肿的急诊外科处置

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾新平; 丛海平; 木依提·阿不力米提; 党金山; 刘继新; 贾宏宇; 木塔力甫

    2001-01-01

    Objective For heightening horizon of surgical management 21 cases with spontaneous hemorrhage of cerebellum were retrospectively analysed.Methods In the 21 patients with spontaneous hemorrhage of cerebellum,3 cases were treated by paraventriculostomy of anterior horn,14 cases by scavenging intracerebral hemorrhage of cerebellum through posterior cranial fossa approach,after scavenging intracerebral hemorrhage 4 cases were treaded by paraventriculostomy of anterior horn.Results 6 cases were died after operation,2 cases supervened dysdipsia,4 cases supervened dysphonia,1 case supervened communicating hydrocephalus and 7 cases without any complications.Conclusion The most effective means of preventing subsequent pathological process that patient with spontaneous hemorrhage of cerebellum is operation which is carried out as early as possible.%目的通过对21例经过手术的自发性小脑出血病例的回顾性分析,以期提高对此病的手术治疗水平。方法 21例病例,行侧脑室前角穿刺外引流3例,行后颅窝开颅清除血肿14例,开颅清除血肿后又行侧脑室前角穿刺引流术4例。结果术后死亡6例,饮水呛咳2例,发音障碍4例,交通性脑积水1例,无后遗症7例。结论对小脑出血病人尽早实施手术治疗是阻断继发性病理改变最有效的手段。

  12. MRI measurements of the pons and cerebellum in children born preterm; associations with the severity of periventricular leukomalacia and perinatal risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyropoulou, M.I.; Xydis, V.; Argyropoulou, P.I.; Efremidis, S.C. [Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina (Greece); Drougia, A.; Andronikou, S. [Neonatology Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Medical School, University of Ioannina (Greece); Tzoufi, M. [Department of Paediatrics, Medical School, University of Ioannina (Greece); Bassounas, A. [Department of Computer Science, Unit of Medical Technology and Intelligent Information Systems, University of Ioannina (Greece)

    2003-10-01

    Our purpose was to measure the size of the pons and cerebellum in preterm babies with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), and to study their relationship with the severity of PVL and with perinatal risk factors. We examined 33 premature children, mean gestational age 31 weeks, range 26-36 weeks with PVL on MRI, and 27 full-term controls. On MRI at 0.4-5.5 years (mean 1.4 years) we measured the area of the corpus callosum and vermis, the anteroposterior diameter of the pons and the volume of the cerebellum. The area of the corpus callosum was used as a marker of white matter loss and PVL severity. All regional brain measurements except that of the vermis were significantly lower in patients than controls: corpus callosum (mm{sup 2}): 239.6{+-}92.5 vs 434.8{+-}126.8, P <0.01; pons (mm): 14.8{+-}3.0 vs 17.9{+-}1.4, P <0.01; cerebellum (cm{sup 3}): 68.2{+-}31.6 vs 100.6{+-}28.3, P <0.01; vermis (mm{sup 2}): 808.1{+-}292.2 vs 942.2{+-}246.2, NS. Significant reduction in the area of the vermis: 411.3{+-}203.3 vs 935{+-}252.6 mm{sup 2}; cerebellar volume: 16.3{+-}12.5 vs 96.6{+-}20.2 mm{sup 3}; and the diameter of the pons: 10.1{+-}2.2 vs 17.5{+-}1.3 mm (P <0.01) were observed in seven children with gestational age {<=}28 weeks, severe hypotension and large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). There was a significant correlation between the duration of mechanical ventilation and the size of the vermis, pons and cerebellum (R=-0.65, -0.57 and -0.73, respectively, P <0.01). (orig.)

  13. Cocaine differentially regulates activator protein-1 mRNA levels and DNA-binding complexes in the rat striatum and cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couceyro, P; Pollock, K M; Drews, K; Douglass, J

    1994-10-01

    Cocaine is a psychomotor stimulant that exerts many of its behavioral and physiological effects through alteration of catecholamine reuptake systems. One early cellular response to cocaine administration is a brain region-specific alteration in the transcriptional pattern of immediate early genes belonging to the Fos/Jun family of nucleotide sequence-specific [activator protein-1 (AP-1)] DNA-binding proteins. The work described here compares cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation of immediate early gene mRNA levels, as well as AP-1 DNA-binding activity, within the striatum and cerebellum. In the striatum, acute cocaine administration increases cellular levels of c-fos and jun-B mRNA, whereas transcriptional effects in the cerebellum are limited to c-fos mRNA. After chronic cocaine treatment a desensitization of c-fos mRNA induction is observed in the striatum, with sensitization of the same transcriptional effect occurring in the cerebellum. Pharmacological studies further reveal that the dopamine D1, dopamine D2, gamma-aminobutyric acid type B, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor systems mediate the effects of cocaine on cerebellar neurons, whereas striatal effects are modulated through D1 and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Gel retention analysis using antibodies to the various Fos and Jun proteins was used to characterize cocaine-dependent alterations in the composition of striatal and cerebellar AP-1 DNA-binding complexes. In striatum, cocaine increases the relative levels of c-Fos, Fos-B, Jun-B, and Jun-D proteins that bind the AP-1 DNA sequence element, whereas in the cerebellum only c-Fos and Jun-D binding activities are increased. These data suggest two possible neuroanatomical sites where tolerance and sensitization to cocaine can be examined at the genomic level. PMID:7969045

  14. Effects of taurine depletion on cell migration and NCAM expression in cultures of dissociated mouse cerebellum and N2A cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maar, T E; Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Gegelashvili, G;

    1998-01-01

    Cultures of dissociated cerebellum from 5- to 6-day-old mice as well as of the N2A neuronal cell line were exposed to guanidino ethane sulfonate (GES, 2-5 mM) to reduce the cellular taurine content. Control cultures were kept in culture medium or medium containing 2-5 mM GES plus 2-5 mM taurine...

  15. [123I]epidepride binding to cerebellar dopamine D2/D3 receptors is displaceable: implications for the use of cerebellum as a reference region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinborg, Lars H; Videbaek, Charlotte; Ziebell, Morten; Mackeprang, Torben; Friberg, Lars; Rasmussen, Hans; Knudsen, Gitte M; Glenthoj, Birte Y

    2007-02-15

    The low density of cerebellar dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptors provides the basis for using the cerebellum as a representation of free- and non-specifically bound radioligand in positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies. With the development of ultra high-affinity dopamine D(2)/D(3) ligands like [(123)I]epidepride, [(18)F]fallypride, and [(11)C]FLB-457, quantification of extrastriatal low density receptor populations including the cerebellum is possible with important implications for calculation of binding parameters. [(123)I]epidepride-SPECT was performed in 23 patients with schizophrenia before and after 3 months of antipsychotic treatment with either risperidone (n=14) or zuclopenthixol (n=9). In the unblocked situation and partially blocked situation, the average distribution volumes were 5.2+/-1.3 mL/mL and 4.0+/-0.8 mL/mL, respectively. The paired distribution volumes were reduced by 22+/-15% (mean+/-SD) after antipsychotic treatment (pepidepride was calculated to be 3.3+/-0.8 mL/mL. Both the % [(123)I]epidepride fraction of plasma radioactivity (p>0.76) and the plasma [(123)I]epidepride concentration (p>0.45) were unchanged after antipsychotic treatment (paired Student's t-test). These results strongly suggest the presence of "non-negligible" specific [(123)I]epidepride binding to dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptors in the cerebellum. Using the cerebellum as a representation of free and non-specifically bound radioligand and neglecting the specifically bound component may lead to results that erroneously imply that antipsychotic drugs bind to extrastriatal dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptors with a higher affinity than to striatal dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptors. PMID:17175177

  16. Marked inhibition of Na+, K(+)- ATPase activity and the respiratory chain by phytanic acid in cerebellum from young rats: possible underlying mechanisms of cerebellar ataxia in Refsum disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Zanatta, Ângela; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Viegas, Carolina Maso; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Ribeiro, César Augusto João; Wajner, Moacir

    2013-02-01

    Refsum disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of peroxisomal metabolism biochemically characterized by highly elevated concentrations of phytanic acid (Phyt) in a variety of tissues including the cerebellum. Reduction of plasma Phyt levels by dietary restriction intake ameliorates ataxia, a common clinical manifestation of this disorder, suggesting a neurotoxic role for this branched-chain fatty acid. Therefore, considering that the underlying mechanisms of cerebellum damage in Refsum disease are poorly known, in the present study we tested the effects of Phyt on important parameters of bioenergetics, such as the activities of the respiratory chain complexes I to IV, creatine kinase and Na(+), K(+)- ATPase in cerebellum preparations from young rats. The activities of complexes I, II, I-III and II-III and Na(+), K(+)- ATPase were markedly inhibited (65-85%) in a dose-dependent manner by Phyt. In contrast, creatine kinase and complex IV activities were not altered by this fatty acid. Therefore, it is presumed that impairment of the electron flow through the respiratory chain and inhibition of Na(+), K(+)- ATPase that is crucial for synaptic function may be involved in the pathophysiology of the cerebellar abnormalities manifested as ataxia in Refsum disease and in other peroxisomal disorders in which brain Phyt accumulates.

  17. Microarray analysis reveals higher gestational folic Acid alters expression of genes in the cerebellum of mice offspring-a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Subit; Kuizon, Salomon; Chadman, Kathryn K; Brown, W Ted; Junaid, Mohammed A

    2015-01-01

    Folate is a water-soluble vitamin that is critical for nucleotide synthesis and can modulate methylation of DNA by altering one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies have shown that folate status during pregnancy is associated with various congenital defects including the risk of aberrant neural tube closure. Maternal exposure to a methyl supplemented diet also can alter DNA methylation and gene expression, which may influence the phenotype of offspring. We investigated if higher gestational folic acid (FA) in the diet dysregulates the expression of genes in the cerebellum of offspring in C57BL/6 J mice. One week before gestation and throughout the pregnancy, groups of dams were supplemented with FA either at 2 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg of diet. Microarray analysis was used to investigate the genome wide gene expression profile in the cerebellum from day old pups. Our results revealed that exposure to the higher dose FA diet during gestation dysregulated expression of several genes in the cerebellum of both male and female pups. Several transcription factors, imprinted genes, neuro-developmental genes and genes associated with autism spectrum disorder exhibited altered expression levels. These findings suggest that higher gestational FA potentially dysregulates gene expression in the offspring brain and such changes may adversely alter fetal programming and overall brain development. PMID:25629700

  18. Presymptomatic Alterations in Amino Acid Metabolism and DNA Methylation in the Cerebellum of a Murine Model of Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Barry E; Hundert, Amos S; Goguen, Donna; Weaver, Ian C G; Karten, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    The fatal neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) is caused in most cases by mutations in NPC1, which encodes the late endosomal NPC1 protein. Loss of NPC1 disrupts cholesterol trafficking from late endosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane, causing cholesterol accumulation in late endosomes/lysosomes. Neurons are particularly vulnerable to this cholesterol trafficking defect, but the pathogenic mechanisms through which NPC1 deficiency causes neuronal dysfunction remain largely unknown. Herein, we have investigated amino acid metabolism in cerebella of NPC1-deficient mice at different stages of NPC disease. Imbalances in amino acid metabolism were evident from increased branched chain amino acid and asparagine levels and altered expression of key enzymes of glutamine/glutamate metabolism in presymptomatic and early symptomatic NPC1-deficient cerebellum. Increased levels of several amino acid intermediates of one-carbon metabolism indicated disturbances in folate and methylation pathways. Alterations in DNA methylation were apparent in decreased expression of DNA methyltransferase 3a and methyl-5'-cytosine-phosphodiester-guanine-domain binding proteins, reduced 5-methylcytosine immunoreactivity in the molecular and Purkinje cell layers, demethylation of genome-wide repetitive LINE-1 elements, and hypermethylation in specific promoter regions of single-copy genes in NPC1-deficient cerebellum at early stages of the disease. Alterations in amino acid metabolism and epigenetic changes in the cerebellum at presymptomatic stages of NPC disease represent previously unrecognized mechanisms of NPC pathogenesis. PMID:27083515

  19. Microarray Analysis Reveals Higher Gestational Folic Acid Alters Expression of Genes in the Cerebellum of Mice Offspring—A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subit Barua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Folate is a water-soluble vitamin that is critical for nucleotide synthesis and can modulate methylation of DNA by altering one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies have shown that folate status during pregnancy is associated with various congenital defects including the risk of aberrant neural tube closure. Maternal exposure to a methyl supplemented diet also can alter DNA methylation and gene expression, which may influence the phenotype of offspring. We investigated if higher gestational folic acid (FA in the diet dysregulates the expression of genes in the cerebellum of offspring in C57BL/6 J mice. One week before gestation and throughout the pregnancy, groups of dams were supplemented with FA either at 2 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg of diet. Microarray analysis was used to investigate the genome wide gene expression profile in the cerebellum from day old pups. Our results revealed that exposure to the higher dose FA diet during gestation dysregulated expression of several genes in the cerebellum of both male and female pups. Several transcription factors, imprinted genes, neuro-developmental genes and genes associated with autism spectrum disorder exhibited altered expression levels. These findings suggest that higher gestational FA potentially dysregulates gene expression in the offspring brain and such changes may adversely alter fetal programming and overall brain development.

  20. Bacopa monnieri Extract (CDRI-08 Modulates the NMDA Receptor Subunits and nNOS-Apoptosis Axis in Cerebellum of Hepatic Encephalopathy Rats

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    Papia Mondal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE, characterized by impaired cerebellar functions during chronic liver failure (CLF, involves N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR overactivation in the brain cells. Bacopa monnieri (BM extract is a known neuroprotectant. The present paper evaluates whether BM extract is able to modulate the two NMDAR subunits (NR2A and NR2B and its downstream mediators in cerebellum of rats with chronic liver failure (CLF, induced by administration of 50 mg/kg bw thioacetamide (TAA i.p. for 14 days, and in the TAA group rats orally treated with 200 mg/kg bw BM extract from days 8 to 14. NR2A is known to impart neuroprotection and that of NR2B induces neuronal death during NMDAR activation. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase- (nNOS- apoptosis pathway is known to mediate NMDAR led excitotoxicity. The level of NR2A was found to be significantly reduced with a concomitant increase of NR2B in cerebellum of the CLF rats. This was consistent with significantly enhanced nNOS expression, nitric oxide level, and reduced Bcl2/Bax ratio. Moreover, treatment with BM extract reversed the NR2A/NR2B ratio and also normalized the levels of nNOS-apoptotic factors in cerebellum of those rats. The findings suggest modulation of NR2A and NR2B expression by BM extract to prevent neurochemical alterations associated with HE.

  1. Potential role of oxidative stress in mediating the effect of altered gravity on the developing rat cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, Elizabeth M.; Nguon, Kosal; Sulkowski, Zachary L.; Lipinski, Boguslaw

    We have previously reported that perinatal exposure to hypergravity affects cerebellar structure and motor coordination in rat neonates. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that exposure to hypergravity results in oxidative stress that may contribute to the decrease in Purkinje cell number and the impairment of motor coordination in hypergravity-exposed rat neonates. To test this hypothesis we compared cerebellar oxidative stress markers 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT; an index of oxidative protein modification) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG; an index of oxidative DNA damage) between stationary control (SC) and rat neonates exposed to 1.65 G (HG) on a 24-ft centrifuge from gestational day (G) 8 to postnatal day (P) 21. The levels of 3-NT and 8-OH-dG were determined by specific ELISAs. We also compared the Purkinje cell number (stereorologically) and rotarod performance between the two groups. The levels of 3-NT were increased only in HG females on P6 and on P12 in the cerebellum, and only in HG females on P12 in the extracellabellar tissue. Limited cerebellar data suggests an increase in the levels of 8-OH-dG on P12 only in HG females. In extracerebellar tissue the increase in 8-OH-dG levels was observed in both HG males and HG females except on P6 when it was only observed in HG males. While preliminary, these data suggest that the effect of hypergravity on the developing brain is sex-dependent and may involve oxidative stress. Oxidative stress may, in turn, contribute to the decrease Purkinje cell number and impaired motor behavior observed in hypergravity-exposed rats.

  2. Regulation of synaptic transmission in the mossy fibre-granule cell pathway of rat cerebellum by metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, P; Garthwaite, J; Batchelor, A M

    1999-06-01

    The role of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in the mossy fibre-granule cell pathway in rat cerebellum was studied using slice preparations and electrophysiological techniques. Application of the group I selective agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) evoked, in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 33 microM), a depolarising/hyperpolarising complex response from granule cells which was preferentially inhibited by the group I selective antagonist (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (4CPG). The group III selective agonist L-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (AP4) evoked a hyperpolarising response (EC50 = 10 microM) which was inhibited by the group II/III selective antagonist (S)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG). The group II agonist (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxylcyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV) elicited no measurable voltage change. The amplitude of the synaptically-mediated mossy fibre response in granule cells was unaffected during application of AP4, was reduced by DHPG and was enhanced by DCG-IV (EC50 = 80 nM). These effects were inhibited by the group selective antagonists 4CPG and (2S,1'S,2'S,3'R)-2-(2'-carboxy-3'-phenylcyclopropyl)glycine (PCCG-4), respectively. Further investigation using patch-clamp recording revealed that DCG-IV potently inhibited spontaneous GABAergic currents. We conclude that group I and III (but not group II) mGluRs are functionally expressed by granule cells, whereas unexpectedly group II or III mGluRs do not appear to be present presynaptically on mossy fibre terminals. Group II mGluRs are located on Golgi cell terminals; when activated these receptors cause disinhibition, a function which may be important for gating information transfer from the mossy fibres to the granule cells. PMID:10465684

  3. Alterations in the cell cycle in the cerebellum of hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rat: a possible link with apoptosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Celeste Robert

    Full Text Available Severe hyperbilirubinemia causes neurological damage both in humans and rodents. The hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rat shows a marked cerebellar hypoplasia. More recently bilirubin ability to arrest the cell cycle progression in vascular smooth muscle, tumour cells, and, more importantly, cultured neurons has been demonstrated. However, the involvement of cell cycle perturbation in the development of cerebellar hypoplasia was never investigated before. We explored the effect of sustained spontaneous hyperbilirubinemia on cell cycle progression and apoptosis in whole cerebella dissected from 9 day old Gunn rat by Real Time PCR, Western blot and FACS analysis. The cerebellum of the hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats exhibits an increased cell cycle arrest in the late G0/G1 phase (p < 0.001, characterized by a decrease in the protein expression of cyclin D1 (15%, p < 0.05, cyclin A/A1 (20 and 30%, p < 0.05 and 0.01, respectively and cyclin dependent kinases2 (25%, p < 0.001. This was associated with a marked increase in the 18 kDa fragment of cyclin E (67%, p < 0.001 which amplifies the apoptotic pathway. In line with this was the increase of the cleaved form of Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (54%, p < 0.01 and active Caspase3 (two fold, p < 0.01. These data indicate that the characteristic cerebellar alteration in this developing brain structure of the hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rat may be partly due to cell cycle perturbation and apoptosis related to the high bilirubin concentration in cerebellar tissue mainly affecting granular cells. These two phenomena might be intimately connected.

  4. Identification of thyroid hormone receptor binding sites and target genes using ChIP-on-chip in developing mouse cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Dong

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone (TH is critical to normal brain development, but the mechanisms operating in this process are poorly understood. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to enrich regions of DNA bound to thyroid receptor beta (TRbeta of mouse cerebellum sampled on post natal day 15. Enriched target was hybridized to promoter microarrays (ChIP-on-chip spanning -8 kb to +2 kb of the transcription start site (TSS of 5000 genes. We identified 91 genes with TR binding sites. Roughly half of the sites were located in introns, while 30% were located within 1 kb upstream (5' of the TSS. Of these genes, 83 with known function included genes involved in apoptosis, neurodevelopment, metabolism and signal transduction. Two genes, MBP and CD44, are known to contain TREs, providing validation of the system. This is the first report of TR binding for 81 of these genes. ChIP-on-chip results were confirmed for 10 of the 13 binding fragments using ChIP-PCR. The expression of 4 novel TH target genes was found to be correlated with TH levels in hyper/hypothyroid animals providing further support for TR binding. A TRbeta binding site upstream of the coding region of myelin associated glycoprotein was demonstrated to be TH-responsive using a luciferase expression system. Motif searches did not identify any classic binding elements, indicating that not all TR binding sites conform to variations of the classic form. These findings provide mechanistic insight into impaired neurodevelopment resulting from TH deficiency and a rich bioinformatics resource for developing a better understanding of TR binding.

  5. Identification of Thyroid Hormone Receptor Binding Sites and Target Genes Using ChIP-on-Chip in Developing Mouse Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongyan; Yauk, Carole L.; Rowan-Carroll, Andrea; You, Seo-Hee; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Lambert, Iain; Wade, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is critical to normal brain development, but the mechanisms operating in this process are poorly understood. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to enrich regions of DNA bound to thyroid receptor beta (TRβ) of mouse cerebellum sampled on post natal day 15. Enriched target was hybridized to promoter microarrays (ChIP-on-chip) spanning −8 kb to +2 kb of the transcription start site (TSS) of 5000 genes. We identified 91 genes with TR binding sites. Roughly half of the sites were located in introns, while 30% were located within 1 kb upstream (5′) of the TSS. Of these genes, 83 with known function included genes involved in apoptosis, neurodevelopment, metabolism and signal transduction. Two genes, MBP and CD44, are known to contain TREs, providing validation of the system. This is the first report of TR binding for 81 of these genes. ChIP-on-chip results were confirmed for 10 of the 13 binding fragments using ChIP-PCR. The expression of 4 novel TH target genes was found to be correlated with TH levels in hyper/hypothyroid animals providing further support for TR binding. A TRβ binding site upstream of the coding region of myelin associated glycoprotein was demonstrated to be TH-responsive using a luciferase expression system. Motif searches did not identify any classic binding elements, indicating that not all TR binding sites conform to variations of the classic form. These findings provide mechanistic insight into impaired neurodevelopment resulting from TH deficiency and a rich bioinformatics resource for developing a better understanding of TR binding. PMID:19240802

  6. The microstructural effects of aqueous extract of Garcinia kola (Linn) on the hippocampus and cerebellum of malnourished mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunday A Ajayi; David A Ofusori; Gideon B Ojo; Oladele A Ayoka; Taiwo A Abayomi; Adekilekun A Tijani

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the neuroprotective effects of aqueous extract of Garcinia kola on neurotoxin administered malnourished mice adopting histological procedure. Methods: The study was carried out using thirty-two adult malnourished mice which were randomly assigned into four groups (n=8): A, B, C and D. Group A served as control, while the other groups served as the experimental groups. Animals in group A were fed malnourished diet ad libitum and given water liberally. Animals in group B were administered with 3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP) (neurotoxin) only at 20 mg/kg body weight, group C were given only Garcinia kola extracts, and group D were pre-treated with Garcinia kola extracts at 200 mg/kg for seven days prior to administration of neurotoxin at 20 mg/kg body weight. After three days of neurotoxins administration in the relevant groups, the brains were excised and fixed in formal calcium for histological processing. Results:The study showed that hippocampal and cerebellar neurons of animals in group B exhibited some cellular degeneration and blood vessel blockage, which were not seen in groups A, C and D. Cresyl violet staining was least intense in group B than in groups A, C and D. Despite the fact that animals in group D has equal administration of 3-Nitropropionic acid concentration, there were no traces of neural degeneration as it was evidenced in group B. Conclusions: It is concluded that Garcinia kola has protective effects on the neurons of the hippocampus and cerebellum of malnourished mice.

  7. Single session imaging of cerebellum at 7 Tesla: obtaining structure and function of multiple motor subsystems in individual subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, Melissa A; Petridou, Natalia; Klomp, Dennis W J; Frens, Maarten A; Neggers, Sebastiaan F W

    2015-01-01

    The recent increase in the use of high field MR systems is accompanied by a demand for acquisition techniques and coil systems that can take advantage of increased power and accuracy without being susceptible to increased noise. Physical location and anatomical complexity of targeted regions must be considered when attempting to image deeper structures with small nuclei and/or complex cytoarchitechtonics (i.e. small microvasculature and deep nuclei), such as the brainstem and the cerebellum (Cb). Once these obstacles are overcome, the concomitant increase in signal strength at higher field strength should allow for faster acquisition of MR images. Here we show that it is technically feasible to quickly and accurately detect blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal changes and obtain anatomical images of Cb at high spatial resolutions in individual subjects at 7 Tesla in a single one-hour session. Images were obtained using two high-density multi-element surface coils (32 channels in total) placed beneath the head at the level of Cb, two channel transmission, and three-dimensional sensitivity encoded (3D, SENSE) acquisitions to investigate sensorimotor activations in Cb. Two classic sensorimotor tasks were used to detect Cb activations. BOLD signal changes during motor activity resulted in concentrated clusters of activity within the Cb lobules associated with each task, observed consistently and independently in each subject: Oculomotor vermis (VI/VII) and CrusI/II for pro- and anti-saccades; ipsilateral hemispheres IV-VI for finger tapping; and topographical separation of eye- and hand- activations in hemispheres VI and VIIb/VIII. Though fast temporal resolution was not attempted here, these functional patches of highly specific BOLD signal changes may reflect small-scale shunting of blood in the microvasculature of Cb. The observed improvements in acquisition time and signal detection are ideal for individualized investigations such as differentiation of

  8. Single session imaging of cerebellum at 7 Tesla: obtaining structure and function of multiple motor subsystems in individual subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Batson

    Full Text Available The recent increase in the use of high field MR systems is accompanied by a demand for acquisition techniques and coil systems that can take advantage of increased power and accuracy without being susceptible to increased noise. Physical location and anatomical complexity of targeted regions must be considered when attempting to image deeper structures with small nuclei and/or complex cytoarchitechtonics (i.e. small microvasculature and deep nuclei, such as the brainstem and the cerebellum (Cb. Once these obstacles are overcome, the concomitant increase in signal strength at higher field strength should allow for faster acquisition of MR images. Here we show that it is technically feasible to quickly and accurately detect blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal changes and obtain anatomical images of Cb at high spatial resolutions in individual subjects at 7 Tesla in a single one-hour session. Images were obtained using two high-density multi-element surface coils (32 channels in total placed beneath the head at the level of Cb, two channel transmission, and three-dimensional sensitivity encoded (3D, SENSE acquisitions to investigate sensorimotor activations in Cb. Two classic sensorimotor tasks were used to detect Cb activations. BOLD signal changes during motor activity resulted in concentrated clusters of activity within the Cb lobules associated with each task, observed consistently and independently in each subject: Oculomotor vermis (VI/VII and CrusI/II for pro- and anti-saccades; ipsilateral hemispheres IV-VI for finger tapping; and topographical separation of eye- and hand- activations in hemispheres VI and VIIb/VIII. Though fast temporal resolution was not attempted here, these functional patches of highly specific BOLD signal changes may reflect small-scale shunting of blood in the microvasculature of Cb. The observed improvements in acquisition time and signal detection are ideal for individualized investigations such as

  9. The effects of heavy ion particles on the developing murine cerebellum, with special reference to cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Chikako; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan). Research Inst. for Neurological Diseases and Geriatrics; Nojima, Kumie [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Internatinal Space Radiation Lab.

    2003-07-01

    We report here the effects of heavy ion beams on postnatal mouse cerebellar development, with reference to cell death. Eight-day-old B6C3F1 mice were irradiated with single doses of 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy, using a carbon beam of 290 MeV delivered from a heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). To compare the effects of X-rays with those of accelerated carbon ions, 8-day-old mice were exposed to X-rays single doses of 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy, respectively. Pups were fixed at 1, 6, 12 and 24 hr after exposure to HIMAC beams or X-rays. Four-{mu}m-thick parasagittal sections of the cerebella were processed for hematoxylin-eosin staining as well as for staining with the TUNEL (terminal dUTP nick-end labeling) technique. The density of fragmented nuclei in the external granular layer increased with time, peaking at 6 hr after exposure, in both the HIMAC and X-irradiated groups. In the HIMAC groups, the density was significantly higher in those animals exposed to 0.25 Gy or more compared to 0 Gy, whereas in the X-irradiated groups it was significantly higher in those mice exposed to 0.5 Gy or more. Electron microscopic examinations revealed chromatin condensation in the cell nuclei in the HIMAC groups. This is the first in vivo evidence that apoptotic cell death is induced in developing mouse cerebellum after exposure to heavy ion particles. The difference in the frequency of dying cells between exposure to heavy ion particles and to X-rays may reflect the high linear energy transfer (LET) associated with a heavy ion beam. (author)

  10. Effects of algal-produced neurotoxins on metabolic activity in telencephalon, optic tectum and cerebellum of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakke, Marit Jorgensen [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, PO Box 8146 Dep., N-0033 Oslo (Norway); Horsberg, Tor Einar [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, PO Box 8146 Dep., N-0033 Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: tor.e.horsberg@veths.no

    2007-11-30

    Neurotoxins from algal blooms have been reported to cause mortality in a variety of species, including sea birds, sea mammals and fish. Farmed fish cannot escape harmful algal blooms and their potential toxins, thus they are more vulnerable for exposure than wild stocks. Sublethal doses of the toxins are likely to affect fish behaviour and may impair cognitive abilities. In the present study, changes in the metabolic activity in different parts of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) brain involved in central integration and cognition were investigated after exposure to sublethal doses of three algal-produced neurotoxins; saxitoxin (STX), brevetoxin (BTX) and domoic acid (DA). Fish were randomly selected to four groups for i.p. injection of saline (control) or one of the neurotoxins STX (10 {mu}g STX/kg bw), BTX (68 {mu}g BTX/kg bw) or DA (6 mg DA/kg bw). In addition, {sup 14}C-2-deoxyglucose was i.m. injected to measure brain metabolic activity by autoradiography. The three regions investigated were telencephalon (Tel), optic tectum (OT) and cerebellum (Ce). There were no differences in the metabolic activity after STX and BTX exposure compared to the control in these regions. However, a clear increase was observed after DA exposure. When the subregions with the highest metabolic rate were pseudocoloured in the three brain regions, the three toxins caused distinct differences in the respective patterns of metabolic activation. Fish exposed to STX displayed similar patterns as the control fish, whereas fish exposed to BTX and DA showed highest metabolic activity in subregions different from the control group. All three neurotoxins affected subregions that are believed to be involved in cognitive abilities in fish.

  11. Disruption of the LTD dialogue between the cerebellum and the cortex in Angelman syndrome model: a timing hypothesis

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    Guy eCheron

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Angelman syndrome is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder in which cerebellar functioning impairment has been documented despite the absence of gross structural abnormalities. Characteristically, a spontaneous 160 Hz oscillation emerges in the Purkinje cells network of the Ube3am-/p+ Angelman mouse model. This abnormal oscillation is induced by enhanced Purkinje cell rhythmicity and hypersynchrony along the parallel fiber beam. We present a pathophysiological hypothesis for the neurophysiology underlying major aspects of the clinical phenotype of Angelman syndrome, including cognitive, language and motor deficits, involving long-range connection between the cerebellar and the cortical networks. This hypothesis states that the alteration of the cerebellar rhythmic activity impinges cerebellar long-term depression (LTD plasticity, which in turn alters the LTD plasticity in the cerebral cortex. This hypothesis was based on preliminary experiments using electrical stimulation of the whiskers pad performed in alert mice showing that after a 8 Hz LTD-inducing protocol, the cerebellar LTD accompanied by a delayed response in the wild type mice is missing in Ube3am-/p+ mice and that the LTD induced in the barrel cortex following the same peripheral stimulation in wild mice is reversed into a LTP in the Ube3am-/p+ mice. The control exerted by the cerebellum on the excitation vs inhibition balance in the cerebral cortex and possible role played by the timing plasticity of the Purkinje cell LTD on the spike–timing dependent plasticity (STDP of the pyramidal neurons are discussed in the context of the present hypothesis.

  12. Alteration in IGF-I binding in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of neonatal rats during protein-calorie malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, H G; Mermelstein, S; vonSchlegell, A S; Shambaugh, G E

    1997-03-01

    Neonatal brain development in the rat is adversely affected by malnutrition. Alterations in tissue binding of IGF-I in the malnourished brain were tested in rat pups from mothers who were fed a 20% protein diet (C) or a 4% protein diet (M) starting from day 21 of gestation and continued throughout suckling. IGF-I binding in both cortex and cerebellum decreased progressively in C and M groups from day 6 to day 13. At day 9, 11, and 13, the binding was significantly greater (p < 0.02) in M compared to C groups. To investigate whether these changes might be related to the alteration in receptor activity, membranes were incubated with 125I-IGF in the presence of excess insulin with or without unlabeled IGF-I. In the absence of insulin, specific IGF-I binding in the M group was increased by 41.8 +/- 13.8% (mean +/- SEM p < 0.05) relative to C group. Insulin produced a consistent but incomplete inhibition of binding in both C and M, of 75% and 67% respectively. In addition, the specific IGF-I binding in the presence of insulin was increased in M group by 70.2 +/- 9.4% relative to C, p < 0.05. To characterize the nature of this binding, cerebral cortical membranes, from both groups, incubated with 125I-IGF-I were cross-linked, and electrophoresed on 6% and 10% SDS-PAGE gels under reducing conditions. Autoradiography of the 6% gel showed two specific bands at 115 kD and 240 kD, consistent with monomeric and dimeric forms of the IGF-I receptor, which were inhibited by excess insulin. In contrast, a 10% gel showed an additional band at 35 kD (IGF-binding protein) that was not inhibited by insulin. In both gels, membrane preparations from the M group showed a heightened intensity of the bands relative to C. The increase in binding protein relative to the receptor suggests a disequilibrium that may limit the availability of exogenous IGF-I to the tissues.

  13. Differential modulation of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway by distinct neurosteroids in cerebellum in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauli, O; González-Usano, A; Agustí, A; Felipo, V

    2011-09-01

    The glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway mediates many responses to activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, including modulation of some types of learning and memory. The glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway is modulated by GABAergic neurotransmission. Activation of GABA(A) receptors reduces the function of the pathway. Several neurosteroids modulate the activity of GABA(A) and/or NMDA receptors, suggesting that they could modulate the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway. The aim of this work was to assess, by in vivo microdialysis, the effects of several neurosteroids with different effects on GABA(A) and NMDA receptors on the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo. To assess the effects of the neurosteroids on the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway, they were administered through the microdialysis probe before administration of NMDA and the effects on NMDA-induced increase in extracellular cGMP were analyzed. We also assessed the effects of the neurosteroids on basal levels of extracellular cGMP. To assess the effects of neurosteroids on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and on NMDA-induced activation of NOS, we also measured the effects of the neurosteroids on extracellular citrulline. Pregnanolone and tetrahydrodeoxy-corticosterone (THDOC) behave as agonists of GABA(A) receptors and completely block NMDA-induced increase in cGMP. Pregnanolone but not THDOC also reduced basal levels of extracellular cGMP. Pregnenolone did not affect extracellular cGMP or its increase by NMDA administration. Pregnenolone sulfate increased basal extracellular cGMP and potentiated NMDA-induced increase in cGMP, behaving as an enhancer of NMDA receptors activation. Allopregnanolone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate behave as antagonists of NMDA receptors, increasing basal cGMP and blocking completely NMDA-induced increase in cGMP. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate seems to do this by activating sigma receptors. These data support the concept that, at

  14. Neuromodulatory Adaptive Combination of Correlation-based Learning in Cerebellum and Reward-based Learning in Basal Ganglia for Goal-directed Behavior Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakyasingha eDasgupta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Goal-directed decision making in biological systems is broadly based on associations between conditional and unconditional stimuli. This can be further classified as classical conditioning (correlation-based learning and operant conditioning (reward-based learning. A number of computational and experimental studies have well established the role of the basal ganglia in reward-based learning, where as the cerebellum plays an important role in developing specific conditioned responses. Although viewed as distinct learning systems, recent animal experiments point towards their complementary role in behavioral learning, and also show the existence of substantial two-way communication between these two brain structures. Based on this notion of co-operative learning, in this paper we hypothesize that the basal ganglia and cerebellar learning systems work in parallel and interact with each other. We envision that such an interaction is influenced by reward modulated heterosynaptic plasticity (RMHP rule at the thalamus, guiding the overall goal directed behavior. Using a recurrent neural network actor-critic model of the basal ganglia and a feed-forward correlation-based learning model of the cerebellum, we demonstrate that the RMHP rule can effectively balance the outcomes of the two learning systems. This is tested using simulated environments of increasing complexity with a four-wheeled robot in a foraging task in both static and dynamic configurations. Although modeled with a simplified level of biological abstraction, we clearly demonstrate that such a RMHP induced combinatorial learning mechanism, leads to stabler and faster learning of goal-directed behaviors, in comparison to the individual systems. Thus in this paper we provide a computational model for adaptive combination of the basal ganglia and cerebellum learning systems by way of neuromodulated plasticity for goal-directed decision making in biological and bio-mimetic organisms.

  15. Neuromodulatory adaptive combination of correlation-based learning in cerebellum and reward-based learning in basal ganglia for goal-directed behavior control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2014-01-01

    Goal-directed decision making in biological systems is broadly based on associations between conditional and unconditional stimuli. This can be further classified as classical conditioning (correlation-based learning) and operant conditioning (reward-based learning). A number of computational and experimental studies have well established the role of the basal ganglia in reward-based learning, where as the cerebellum plays an important role in developing specific conditioned responses. Although viewed as distinct learning systems, recent animal experiments point toward their complementary role in behavioral learning, and also show the existence of substantial two-way communication between these two brain structures. Based on this notion of co-operative learning, in this paper we hypothesize that the basal ganglia and cerebellar learning systems work in parallel and interact with each other. We envision that such an interaction is influenced by reward modulated heterosynaptic plasticity (RMHP) rule at the thalamus, guiding the overall goal directed behavior. Using a recurrent neural network actor-critic model of the basal ganglia and a feed-forward correlation-based learning model of the cerebellum, we demonstrate that the RMHP rule can effectively balance the outcomes of the two learning systems. This is tested using simulated environments of increasing complexity with a four-wheeled robot in a foraging task in both static and dynamic configurations. Although modeled with a simplified level of biological abstraction, we clearly demonstrate that such a RMHP induced combinatorial learning mechanism, leads to stabler and faster learning of goal-directed behaviors, in comparison to the individual systems. Thus, in this paper we provide a computational model for adaptive combination of the basal ganglia and cerebellum learning systems by way of neuromodulated plasticity for goal-directed decision making in biological and bio-mimetic organisms. PMID:25389391

  16. A bi-hemispheric neuronal network model of the cerebellum with spontaneous climbing fiber firing produces asymmetrical motor learning during robot control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    To acquire and maintain precise movement controls over a lifespan, changes in the physical and physiological characteristics of muscles must be compensated for adaptively. The cerebellum plays a crucial role in such adaptation. Changes in muscle characteristics are not always symmetrical. For example, it is unlikely that muscles that bend and straighten a joint will change to the same degree. Thus, different (i.e., asymmetrical) adaptation is required for bending and straightening motions. To date, little is known about the role of the cerebellum in asymmetrical adaptation. Here, we investigate the cerebellar mechanisms required for asymmetrical adaptation using a bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network model (biCNN). The bi-hemispheric structure is inspired by the observation that lesioning one hemisphere reduces motor performance asymmetrically. The biCNN model was constructed to run in real-time and used to control an unstable two-wheeled balancing robot. The load of the robot and its environment were modified to create asymmetrical perturbations. Plasticity at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses in the biCNN model was driven by error signal in the climbing fiber (cf) input. This cf input was configured to increase and decrease its firing rate from its spontaneous firing rate (approximately 1 Hz) with sensory errors in the preferred and non-preferred direction of each hemisphere, as demonstrated in the monkey cerebellum. Our results showed that asymmetrical conditions were successfully handled by the biCNN model, in contrast to a single hemisphere model or a classical non-adaptive proportional and derivative controller. Further, the spontaneous activity of the cf, while relatively small, was critical for balancing the contribution of each cerebellar hemisphere to the overall motor command sent to the robot. Eliminating the spontaneous activity compromised the asymmetrical learning capabilities of the biCNN model. Thus, we conclude that a bi

  17. A bi-hemispheric neuronal network model of the cerebellum with spontaneous climbing fiber firing produces asymmetrical motor learning during robot control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Dario Pinzon Morales

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To acquire and maintain precise movement controls over a lifespan, changes in the physical and physiological characteristics of muscles must be compensated for adaptively. The cerebellum plays a crucial role in such adaptation. Changes in muscle characteristics are not always symmetrical. For example, it is unlikely that muscles that bend and straighten a joint will change to the same degree. Thus, different (i.e., asymmetrical adaptation is required for bending and straightening motions. To date, little is known about the role of the cerebellum in asymmetrical adaptation. Here, we investigate the cerebellar mechanisms required for asymmetrical adaptation using a bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network model (biCNN. The bi-hemispheric structure is inspired by the observation that lesioning one hemisphere reduces motor performance asymmetrically. The biCNN model was constructed to run in real-time and used to control an unstable two-wheeled balancing robot. The load of the robot and its environment were modified to create asymmetrical perturbations. Plasticity at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses in the biCNN model was driven by error signal in the climbing fiber (cf input. This cf input was configured to increase and decrease its firing rate from its spontaneous firing rate (approximately 1 Hz with sensory errors in the preferred and non-preferred direction of each hemisphere, as demonstrated in the monkey cerebellum. Our results showed that asymmetrical conditions were successfully handled by the biCNN model, in contrast to a single hemisphere model or a classical non-adaptive proportional and derivative controller. Further, the spontaneous activity of the cf, while relatively small, was critical for balancing the contribution of each cerebellar hemisphere to the overall motor command sent to the robot. Eliminating the spontaneous activity compromised the asymmetrical learning capabilities of the biCNN model. Thus, we conclude that a bi

  18. Implication of Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase and its Novel Variants in the Hippocampus and Cerebellum During the Developing and Adult Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kanai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO is a first and rate-limiting enzyme for the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. Using Tdo-/-mice, we have recently shown that TDO plays a pivotal role in systemic tryptophan metabolism and brain serotonin synthesis as well as emotional status and adult neurogenesis. However, the expression of TDO in the brain has not yet been well characterized, in contrast to its predominant expression in the liver. To further examine the possible role of local TDO in the brain, we quantified the levels of tdo mRNA in various nervous tissues, using Northern blot and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Higher levels of tdo mRNA expression were detected in the cerebellum and hippocampus. We also identified two novel variants of the tdo gene, termed tdo variant1 and variant2, in the brain. Similar to the known TDO form (TDO full-form, tetramer formation and enzymatic activity were obtained when these variant forms were expressed in vitro. While quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that the tissue distribution of these variants was similar to that of tdo full-form, the expression patterns of these variants during early postnatal development in the hippocampus and cerebellum differed. Our findings indicate that in addition to hepatic TDO, TDO and its variants in the brain might function in the developing and adult nervous system. Given the previously reported associations of tdo gene polymorphisms in the patients with autism and Tourette syndrome, the expression of TDO in the brain suggests the possible influence of TDO on psychiatric status. Potential functions of TDOs in the cerebellum, hippocampus and cerebral cortex under physiological and pathological conditions are discussed.

  19. Maternal exposure to a continuous 900-MHz electromagnetic field provokes neuronal loss and pathological changes in cerebellum of 32-day-old female rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odacı, Ersan; Hancı, Hatice; İkinci, Ayşe; Sönmez, Osman Fikret; Aslan, Ali; Şahin, Arzu; Kaya, Haydar; Çolakoğlu, Serdar; Baş, Orhan

    2016-09-01

    Large numbers of people are unknowingly exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMF) from wireless devices. Evidence exists for altered cerebellar development in association with prenatal exposure to EMF. However, insufficient information is still available regarding the effects of exposure to 900 megahertz (MHz) EMF during the prenatal period on subsequent postnatal cerebellar development. This study was planned to investigate the 32-day-old female rat pup cerebellum following exposure to 900MHz EMF during the prenatal period using stereological and histopathological evaluation methods. Pregnant rats were divided into control, sham and EMF groups. Pregnant EMF group (PEMFG) rats were exposed to 900MHz EMF for 1h inside an EMF cage during days 13-21 of pregnancy. Pregnant sham group (PSG) rats were also placed inside the EMF cage during days 13-21 of pregnancy for 1h, but were not exposed to any EMF. No procedure was performed on the pregnant control group (PCG) rats. Newborn control group (CG) rats were obtained from the PCG mothers, newborn sham group (SG) rats from the PSG and newborn EMF group (EMFG) rats from the PEMFG rats. The cerebellums of the newborn female rats were extracted on postnatal day 32. The number of Purkinje cells was estimated stereologically, and histopathological evaluations were also performed on cerebellar sections. Total Purkinje cell numbers calculated using stereological analysis were significantly lower in EMFG compared to CG (pprenatal exposure to EMF affects the development of Purkinje cells in the female rat cerebellum and that the consequences of this pathological effect persist after the postnatal period. PMID:26391347

  20. Acute liver failure in rats activates glutamine-glutamate cycle but declines antioxidant enzymes to induce oxidative stress in cerebral cortex and cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Liver dysfunction led hyperammonemia (HA causes a nervous system disorder; hepatic encephalopathy (HE. In the brain, ammonia induced glutamate-excitotoxicity and oxidative stress are considered to play important roles in the pathogenesis of HE. The brain ammonia metabolism and antioxidant enzymes constitute the main components of this mechanism; however, need to be defined in a suitable animal model. This study was aimed to examine this aspect in the rats with acute liver failure (ALF. METHODS: ALF in the rats was induced by intraperitoneal administration of 300 mg thioacetamide/Kg. b.w up to 2 days. Glutamine synthetase (GS and glutaminase (GA, the two brain ammonia metabolizing enzymes vis a vis ammonia and glutamate levels and profiles of all the antioxidant enzymes vis a vis oxidative stress markers were measured in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of the control and the ALF rats. RESULTS: The ALF rats showed significantly increased levels of ammonia in the blood (HA but little changes in the cortex and cerebellum. This was consistent with the activation of the GS-GA cycle and static levels of glutamate in these brain regions. However, significantly increased levels of lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl contents were consistent with the reduced levels of all the antioxidant enzymes in both the brain regions of these ALF rats. CONCLUSION: ALF activates the GS-GA cycle to metabolize excess ammonia and thereby, maintains static levels of ammonia and glutamate in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Moreover, ALF induces oxidative stress by reducing the levels of all the antioxidant enzymes which is likely to play important role, independent of glutamate levels, in the pathogenesis of acute HE.

  1. Grey matter volume and resting-state functional connectivity of the motor cortex-cerebellum network reflect the individual variation in masticatory performance in the healthy elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Shu eLin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies have consistently identified brain activation in the motor area and the cerebellum during chewing. In this study, we further investigated the structural and functional brain signature associated with masticatory performance, which is a widely used index for evaluating overall masticatory function in the elderly. Twenty-five healthy elderly participants underwent oral examinations, masticatory performance tests, and behavioral assessments, including the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument and the short-form Geriatric Depression Scale. Masticatory performance was assessed with the validated colorimetric method, using color-changeable chewing gum. T1-weighted structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and resting-state function MRI were performed. We analyzed alterations in grey matter volume (GMV using voxel-based morphometry and resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC between brain regions using the seed-based method. The structural and functional MRI analyses revealed the following findings: (1 the GMV change in the premotor cortex was positively correlated with masticatory performance. (2 The rsFC between the cerebellum and the premotor cortex was positively correlated with masticatory performance. (3 The GMV changes in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, as well as the rsFC between the cerebellum and the DLPFC, was positively correlated with masticatory performance. The findings showed that in the premotor cortex, a reduction of GMV and rsFC would reflect declined masticatory performance. The positive correlation between DLPFC connectivity and masticatory performance implies that masticatory ability is associated with cognitive function in the elderly. Our findings highlighted the role of the central nervous system in masticatory performance and increased our understanding of the structural and functional brain signature underlying individual variations in masticatory performance in the elderly.

  2. Immunohistochemical examination of the INK4 and Cip inhibitors in the rat neonatal cerebellum: cellular localization and the impact of protein calorie malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambaugh, G E; Haines, G K; Koch, A; Lee, E J; Zhou, J n; Pestell, R

    2000-02-01

    Expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs) has been linked to the inhibition of cellular proliferation and the induction of differentiation. Based on structure function analysis, two distinct families of CDKIs, the INK4 and the Cip/Kip family have been identified. The INK4 family member p16(Ink4), and the Cip/Kip protein p27(Kip1) have been implicated in normal development of the CNS and cerebellum. Recent studies have suggested a functional inter-dependence between the CKI and the abundance of cyclin D1 in orchestrating growth factor-induced cellular proliferation. The neonatal rat cerebellum undergoes proliferative growth and differentiation, localized to distinct topographical regions and cell types. The cell type and the temporal profile of CKI expression during postnatal cerebellar development had not been described. The current studies determined the specific cerebellar cell types in which the CKIs were expressed during post natal development by co-staining for cell-type specific markers. p16(Ink4a) and p27(Kip1) immunostaining was identified in both neurons and glial cells, increasing progressively between postnatal days 6 to 13 into adulthood. By contrast, neuronal and glial cell p21(Cip1) staining was prominent at days 6-11 and decreased thereafter. Cyclin D1 was expressed in the proliferating external granular cells, with occassional staining in the molecular, and internal granular layers. Dual immunostaining demonstrated cyclin D1 within cells expressing CKI (p16(Ink4a), p21(Cip1),p27(Kip1)). Cerebellar cellular growth arrest, induced by protein-calorie malnutrition, inhibited cyclin D1 protein levels without affecting CKI immunostaining suggesting CKI do not mediate the developmental arrest. These results demonstrate that the CKIs are induced by differentiation cues in specific cell types with distinct kinetics in the developing cerebellum in vivo.

  3. A bi-hemispheric neuronal network model of the cerebellum with spontaneous climbing fiber firing produces asymmetrical motor learning during robot control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    To acquire and maintain precise movement controls over a lifespan, changes in the physical and physiological characteristics of muscles must be compensated for adaptively. The cerebellum plays a crucial role in such adaptation. Changes in muscle characteristics are not always symmetrical. For example, it is unlikely that muscles that bend and straighten a joint will change to the same degree. Thus, different (i.e., asymmetrical) adaptation is required for bending and straightening motions. To date, little is known about the role of the cerebellum in asymmetrical adaptation. Here, we investigate the cerebellar mechanisms required for asymmetrical adaptation using a bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network model (biCNN). The bi-hemispheric structure is inspired by the observation that lesioning one hemisphere reduces motor performance asymmetrically. The biCNN model was constructed to run in real-time and used to control an unstable two-wheeled balancing robot. The load of the robot and its environment were modified to create asymmetrical perturbations. Plasticity at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses in the biCNN model was driven by error signal in the climbing fiber (cf) input. This cf input was configured to increase and decrease its firing rate from its spontaneous firing rate (approximately 1 Hz) with sensory errors in the preferred and non-preferred direction of each hemisphere, as demonstrated in the monkey cerebellum. Our results showed that asymmetrical conditions were successfully handled by the biCNN model, in contrast to a single hemisphere model or a classical non-adaptive proportional and derivative controller. Further, the spontaneous activity of the cf, while relatively small, was critical for balancing the contribution of each cerebellar hemisphere to the overall motor command sent to the robot. Eliminating the spontaneous activity compromised the asymmetrical learning capabilities of the biCNN model. Thus, we conclude that a bi

  4. Reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression and presence of BDNF-immunoreactive granules in the spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Makoto; Ishikawa, Kinya; Sato, Nozomu; Obayashi, Masato; Niimi, Yusuke; Ishiguro, Taro; Yamada, Mitsunori; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takeo; Takao, Masaki; Murayama, Shigeo; Mori, Osamu; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2012-12-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a small expansion of tri-nucleotide (CAG) repeat encoding polyglutamine (polyQ) in the gene for α(1A) voltage-dependent calcium channel (Ca(v) 2.1). Thus, this disease is one of the nine neurodegenerative disorders called polyQ diseases. The Purkinje cell predominant neuronal loss is the characteristic neuropathology of SCA6, and a 75-kDa carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF) of Ca(v) 2.1 containing polyQ, which remains soluble in normal brains, becomes insoluble in the cytoplasm of SCA6 Purkinje cells. Because the suppression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression is a potentially momentous phenomenon in many other polyQ diseases, we implemented BDNF expression analysis in SCA6 human cerebellum using quantitative RT-PCR for the BDNF mRNA, and by immunohistochemistry for the BDNF protein. We observed significantly reduced BDNF mRNA levels in SCA6 cerebellum (n = 3) compared to controls (n = 6) (Mann-Whitney U-test, P = 0.0201). On immunohistochemistry, BDNF protein was only weakly stained in control cerebellum. On the other hand, we found numerous BDNF-immunoreactive granules in dendrites of SCA6 Purkinje cells. We did not observe similar BDNF-immunoreactive granules in other polyQ diseases, such as Huntington's disease or SCA2. As we often observed that the 1C2-positive Ca(v) 2.1 aggregates existed more proximally than the BDNF-positive granules in the dendrites, we speculated that the BDNF protein trafficking in dendrites may be disturbed by Ca(v) 2.1 aggregates in SCA6 Purkinje cells. We conclude that the SCA6 pathogenic mechanism associates with the BDNF mRNA expression reduction and abnormal localization of BDNF protein.

  5. 小脑在血管性认知功能障碍中的作用%Role of Cerebellum on Vascular Cognitive Impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹顺雄; 闵连秋

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum is not only associated with the motor, but also the cognitive functions of the non-motor. Vascular cognitive impairment is one of the most important branches among the cognitive function disorder. It has close relations with the risk factors of cerebrovascular disease and old ages. The damage of the nerve cell and nerve ifber bundle caused by cerebral ischemia is the main pathogenesis of vascular cognitive impairment. The strategic positions associated with vascular cognitive impairment include the frontal lobe (especially the prefrontal cortex), anterior cingulate gyrus, hippocampal gyrus, hypothalamus, basal ganglia, parietal lobe (especially the gyrus angular of dominant hemisphere), and temporal cortex, most of which are associated with the cerebellum through the ifbers. This article reviews the recent studies about the modular organization and function of the cerebellum, and its relationships with vascular cognitive impairment, to investigate the role of each anatomic site of the cerebellum on vascular cognitive impairment.%小脑不仅与运动有关,而且也参与非运动的认知功能。血管性认知功能障碍是认知功能疾病中的一个重要分支,其主要与脑血管病危险因素及高龄有关。脑组织缺血导致的神经细胞及神经纤维束损害是血管性认知功能损害的主要发病机制,其关键部位在额叶(尤其是前额区)、前扣带回、海马回、下丘脑、基底节、顶叶(特别是优势半球角回)和颞叶等,这些部位多数与小脑存在纤维联系。本文综述了近年来对小脑各部分组件式结构和功能,及其与血管性认知功能损害关系等方面的研究,探讨小脑在血管性认知功能损害中的作用。

  6. Interaction of electrical stimulation and voluntary hand movement in SII and the cerebellum during simulated therapeutic functional electrical stimulation in healthy adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iftime-Nielsen, Simona Denisia; Christensen, Mark Schram; Vingborg, Rune Jersin;

    2012-01-01

    ) and we compare this activity to that produced when FES and voluntary activity (VOL) are performed alone. FESVOL revealed greater cerebellar activity compared with FES alone and reduced activity bilaterally in secondary somatosensory areas (SII) compared with VOL alone. Reduced activity was also observed...... for FESVOL compared with FES alone in the angular gyrus, middle frontal gyrus and inferior frontal gyrus. These findings indicate that during the VOL condition the cerebellum predicts the sensory consequences of the movement and this reduces the subsequent activation in SII. The decreased SII activity may...

  7. Grey Matter Volume in the Cerebellum is Related to the Processing of Grammatical Rules in a Second Language: A Structural Voxel-based Morphometry Study

    OpenAIRE

    Pliatsikas, Christos; Johnstone, Tom; Marinis, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    The experience of learning and using a second language (L2) has been shown to affect the grey matter (GM) structure of the brain. Importantly, GM density in several cortical and subcortical areas has been shown to be related to performance in L2 tasks. Here, we show that bilingualism can lead to increased GM volume in the cerebellum, a structure that has been related to the processing of grammatical rules. Additionally, the cerebellar GM volume of highly proficient L2 speakers is correlated t...

  8. Neuromodulatory Adaptive Combination of Correlation-based Learning in Cerebellum and Reward-based Learning in Basal Ganglia for Goal-directed Behavior Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2014-01-01

    Goal-directed decision making in biological systems is broadly based on associations between conditional and unconditional stimuli. This can be further classified as classical conditioning (correlation-based learning) and operant conditioning (reward-based learning). A number of computational...... and experimental studies have well established the role of the basal ganglia in reward-based learning, where as the cerebellum plays an important role in developing specific conditioned responses. Although viewed as distinct learning systems, recent animal experiments point toward their complementary role...

  9. Total Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Activity of Different Types of Chocolate, Milk, Semisweet, Dark, and Soy, in Cerebral Cortex, Hippocampus, and Cerebellum of Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niara da Silva Medeiros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chocolate is a product consumed worldwide and it stands out for presenting an important amount of phenolic compounds. In this study, the total phenolic content and antioxidant activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of male Wistar rats when consuming different types of chocolate, including milk, semisweet, dark, and soy, was evaluated. The total polyphenols concentration and antioxidant activity in vitro by the method of DPPH radical-scavenging test were evaluated in chocolate samples. Lipid peroxidation (TBARS, protein oxidation (carbonyl, sulfhydryl groups, and activity of SOD enzyme in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of rats treated or not with hydrogen peroxide and/or chocolate were also evaluated. The dark chocolate demonstrated higher phenolic content and antioxidant activity, followed by semisweet, soy, and milk chocolates. The addition of chocolate in the diet of the rats reduced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation caused by hydrogen peroxide. In the sulfhydryl assay, we observed that the levels of nonenzymatic defenses only increased with the chocolate treatments The SOD enzyme activity was modulated in the tissues treated with the chocolates. We observed in the samples of chocolate a significant polyphenol content and an important antioxidant activity; however, additional studies with different chocolates and other tissues are necessary to further such findings.

  10. Increased anxiety-like behaviour and altered GABAergic system in the amygdala and cerebellum of VPA rats - An animal model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olexová, Lucia; Štefánik, Peter; Kršková, Lucia

    2016-08-26

    Anxiety is one of the associated symptoms of autism spectrum disorder. According to the literature, increases in anxiety are accompanied by GABAergic system deregulation. The aim of our study, performed using an animal model of autism in the form of rats prenatally treated with valproic acid (VPA rats), was to investigate changes in anxiety-like behaviour and the gene expression of molecules that control levels of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. Anxiety-like behaviours were investigated using zone preferences in the open field test. The levels of the 65 and 67kDa enzymes of l-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) mRNAs and type 1 GABA transporter (GAT1) were evaluated in the amygdala, as well as GABA producing enzymes in the cortex layer of the cerebellum. Our research showed that adult VPA rats spent less time in the inner zone of the testing chamber and more time in the outer zone of the testing chamber in the open field test. We also found that adult VPA rats had increased expression of GAT1 in the amygdala, as well as decreased levels of GAD65 and GAD67 mRNA in the cerebellum compared to control animals. These findings support the existence of a relationship between increased anxiety-like behaviour and changes in the regulation of the GABAergic system in VPA rats. PMID:27353514

  11. Expression of estrogen receptor (ER) -α and -β transcripts in the neonatal and adult rat cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the present study expression of estrogen receptor subtype -α (ERα) and -β (ERβ) in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb was investigated and compared between neonatal (1~ 3-days-old) and adult (250~350g) rats, using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). No ERα transcripts were detectable in the adult cerebellum and olfactory bulb, whereas very weak expression of ERα was present in the adult cerebral cortex. No significant difference in ERβ transcripts was detectable between the neonatal and adult rats. While transcripts for both ER subtypes were co-expressed in these brain areas of neonatal rats, although ERα expression was significantly weaker than ERβ. Even in the cerebral cortex known to contain both ER subtypes in adult rats, ERα transcripts in neonatal rats were much higher than in adult. These observations provide evidence for the existence of different expression patterns of ERα/ERβ transcripts in these three brain areas between the neonatal and adult rats, suggesting that each ER subtype may play a distinct role in the regulation of differentiation, development, and functions of the brain by estrogen.

  12. [Image and quantity analysis of prostaglandin in rats' blood plasma and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in their cerebellum during the prevention of motion sickness by cinnarizine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, W; Tian, D; Zhang, M

    1998-06-01

    To study the mechanism of cinnarizine in preventing motion sickness, TXB2, 6-Keto-PGF1 alpha in rats' blood plasma and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in the endothelial cells of their cerebellar capillary were measured and analysed by a radioactive immunity analyser and a computer image system. The results showed that TXB2 and 6-Keto-PGF1 alpha in rats' blood plasma in the cinnarizine preventing group (CPG) decreased remarkably, compared with those in the motion sickness group(MSG) (p < 0.05). The activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in the endothelial cells of rats' cerebellar capillary in CPG was higher than that in MSG (p < 0.01). The authors suggest that the lower concentration of TXB2 and 6-Keto-PGF1 alpha in rats' blood plasma in CPG is closely related to cinnarizine which prevents Ca2+ from entering into the platelets and into the endothelial cells of blood vessels. The higher activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in the cerebellum may be caused by cinnarizene which dilates the blood vessels in the brain, increases the blood flow therein, and hinders Ca2+ from getting into the cerebellum cells. These change are believed to be the important mechanism of how cinnarizine prevents motion sickness. PMID:12548903

  13. Accurate measurement of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in human cerebellum DNA by oxidative bisulfite on an array (OxBS-array.

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    Sarah F Field

    Full Text Available The Infinium 450K Methylation array is an established tool for measuring methylation. However, the bisulfite (BS reaction commonly used with the 450K array cannot distinguish between 5-methylcytosine (5mC and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC. The oxidative-bisulfite assay disambiguates 5mC and 5hmC. We describe the use of oxBS in conjunction with the 450K array (oxBS-array to analyse 5hmC/5mC in cerebellum DNA. The "methylation" level derived by the BS reaction is the combined level of 5mC and 5hmC at a given base, while the oxBS reaction gives the level of 5mC alone. The level of 5hmC is derived by subtracting the oxBS level from the BS level. Here we present an analysis method that distinguishes genuine positive levels of 5hmC at levels as low as 3%. We performed four replicates of the same sample of cerebellum and found a high level of reproducibility (average r for BS = 98.3, and average r for oxBS = 96.8. In total, 114,734 probes showed a significant positive measurement for 5hmC. The range at which we were able to distinguish 5hmC occupancy was between 3% and 42%. In order to investigate the effects of multiple replicates on 5hmC detection we also simulated fewer replicates and found that decreasing the number of replicates to two reduced the number of positive probes identified by > 50%. We validated our results using qPCR in conjunction with glucosylation of 5hmC sites followed by MspI digestion and we found good concordance with the array estimates (r = 0.94. This experiment provides a map of 5hmC in the cerebellum and a robust dataset for use as a standard in future 5hmC analyses. We also provide a novel method for validating the presence of 5hmC at low levels, and highlight some of the pitfalls associated with measuring 5hmC and 5mC.

  14. Elevated 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in the Engrailed-2 (EN-2) promoter is associated with increased gene expression and decreased MeCP2 binding in autism cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S J; Shpyleva, S; Melnyk, S; Pavliv, O; Pogribny, I P

    2014-10-07

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate programmed gene expression during prenatal neurogenesis and serve as a mediator between genetics and environment in postnatal life. The recent discovery of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), with highest concentration in the brain, has added a new dimension to epigenetic regulation of neurogenesis and the development of complex behavior disorders. Here, we take a candidate gene approach to define the role 5-hmC in Engrailed-2 (EN-2) gene expression in the autism cerebellum. The EN-2 homeobox transcription factor, previously implicated in autism, is essential for normal cerebellar patterning and development. We previously reported EN-2 overexpression associated with promoter DNA hypermethylation in the autism cerebellum but because traditional DNA methylation methodology cannot distinguish 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) from 5-hmC, we now extend our investigation by quantifying global and gene-specific 5-mC and 5-hmC. Globally, 5-hmC was significantly increased in the autism cerebellum and accompanied by increases in the expression of de novo methyltransferases DNMT3A and DNMT3B, ten-eleven translocase genes TET1 and TET3, and in 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) content, a marker of oxidative DNA damage. Within the EN-2 promoter, there was a significant positive correlation between 5-hmC content and EN-2 gene expression. Based on reports of reduced MeCP2 affinity for 5-hmC, MeCP2 binding studies in the EN-2 promoter revealed a significant decrease in repressive MeCP2 binding that may contribute to the aberrant overexpression of EN-2. Because normal cerebellar development depends on perinatal EN-2 downregulation, the sustained postnatal overexpression suggests that a critical window of cerebellar development may have been missed in some individuals with autism with downstream developmental consequences. Epigenetic regulation of the programmed on-off switches in gene expression that occur at birth and during early brain development warrants

  15. Connectivity pattern differences bilaterally in the cerebellum posterior lobe in healthy subjects after normal sleep and sleep deprivation: a resting-state functional MRI study

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    Liu XM

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Xuming Liu,1 Zhihan Yan,2 Tingyu Wang,1 Xiaokai Yang,1 Feng Feng,3 Luping Fan,1 Jian Jiang4 1Department of Radiology, The Third Clinical Institute Affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 2Department of Radiology, The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 3Peking Union Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 4Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, People’s Republic of China Objective: The aim of this study was to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI technique to explore the resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC differences of the bilaterial cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL after normal sleep (NS and after sleep deprivation (SD. Methods: A total of 16 healthy subjects (eight males, eight females underwent an fMRI scan twice at random: once following NS and the other following 24 hours’ SD, with an interval of 1 month between the two scans. The fMRI scanning included resting state and acupuncture stimulation. The special activated regions located during the acupuncture stimulation were selected as regions of interest for rsFC analysis. Results: Bilateral CPLs were positively activated by acupuncture stimulation. In the NS group, the left CPL showed rsFC with the bilateral CPL, bilateral frontal lobe (BFL, left precuneus and right inferior parietal lobule, while the right CPL showed rsFC with the bilateral temporal lobe, right cerebellum anterior lobe, right CPL, left frontal lobe, left anterior cingulate, right posterior cingulate, and bilateral inferior parietal lobule. In the SD group, the left CPL showed rsFC with the left posterior cingulate gyrus bilateral CPL, left precuneus, left precentral gyrus, BFL, and the left parietal lobe, while the right CPL showed rsFC with bilateral cerebellum anterior lobe, bilateral CPL, left frontal lobe and left temporal lobe. Compared with the NS group, the

  16. Protective Effects of N-Acetyl-L-cystein on 3,4-Methylene Dioxymethamphetamie-Induced Neurotoxicity in Cerebellum of Male Rats

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    Sara Soleimani Asl

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: 3-4, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA causes apoptosis in nervous system and several studies suggest that oxidative stress contributes to MDMA-induced neurotoxicity. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of N-acetyl-L-Cystein (NAC as an antioxidant on MDMA-induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: 21 Sprague dawley male rats (200-250mg were treated with MDMA (2×0,5mg/kg or MDMA plus NAC (100mg/kg IP for 7 day. After last administration of MDMA, rats were killed, cerebellum was removed and Bax and Bcl-2 expression was assessed by western blotting method. Results: The results of this study showed that MDMA causes up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and NAC administration attenuated MDMA-induced apoptosis. Conclusion: The present study suggests that NAC treatment may improve MDMA-induced neurotoxicity.

  17. Sex Differences in the Cerebellum and its Correlates with Some Body Traits in the African Grasscutter (Thryonomys swinderianus – Temminck, 1827: Morphometric Study

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    Obadiah Byanet

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sexual dimorphisms in biological structures such as brain and behaviour have been widely recognized in animals and humans. The purpose of this study was to examine whether there are sex differences in the size of the cerebellum with other body traits, such as the head, tail and brain.Methods:Twelve grasscutters comprising of 6 males and 6 females were used in this study. Each brain was extracted from the skull by standard procedures and the mean values of the weights, dimensions and volumes of the brain, cerebellum, head and tail were compared in male and female using quantitative analytical statistical method.Results:The results showed that the absolute mean brain weight and volume obtained in the male was slightly higher than that of the female, while the cerebellar mean weight was slightly higher in the female; although these values were not statistically significant (P> 0.05. The mean cerebellar lengths and widths did not differ between the two sexes (> 0.05, but the mean cerebellar circumference in the male was statistically higher than in the female (P< 0.05. The female cerebellar length was positively correlated with the length of the brain, head, body and tail.Discussion:In conclusion, the brain weight was slightly higher in the male than female, while the cerebellar weight was higher in the female than male. The significantly higher value of the cerebellar circumference in the male may partly be responsible for the big round head seen in the live male grasscutter.

  18. Expression pattern of immediate early genes in the cerebellum of D1R KO, D2R KO, and wild type mice under vestibular-controlled activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toru; Sato, Asako; Kitsukawa, Takashi; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the different motor abilities of D1R knockout (KO), D2R KO and wild-type (WT) mice. To understand the interaction between the cerebellum and the striatal direct and indirect pathways, we examined the expression patterns of immediate early genes (IEG) in the cerebellum of these three genotypes of mice. In the WT naive mice, there was little IEG expression. However, we observed a robust expression of c-fos mRNA in the vermis and hemisphere after running rota-rod tasks. In the vermis, c-fos was expressed throughout the lobules except lobule 7, and also in crus 1 of the ansiform lobule (Crus1), copula of the pyramis (Cop) and most significantly in the flocculus in the hemisphere. jun-B was much less expressed but more preferentially expressed in Purkinje cells. In addition, we observed significant levels of c-fos and jun-B expressions after handling mice, and after the stationary rota-rod task in naive mice. Surprisingly, we observed significant expression of c-fos and jun-B even 30 min after single weighing. Nonetheless, certain additional c-fos and jun-B expressions were observed in three genotypes of the mice that experienced several sessions of motor tasks 24 h after stationary rota-rod task and on days 1 and 5 after rota-rod tasks, but no significant differences in expressions after the running rota-rod tasks were observed among the three genotypes. In addition, there may be some differences 24 h after the stationary rota-rod task between the naive mice and the mice that experienced several sessions of motor tasks.

  19. Alternative splicing generates a smaller assortment of CaV2.1 transcripts in cerebellar Purkinje cells than in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanumilli, Srinivasan; Tringham, Elizabeth W; Payne, C Elizabeth; Dupere, Jonathan R B; Venkateswarlu, Kanamarlapudi; Usowicz, Maria M

    2006-01-12

    P/Q-type calcium channels control many calcium-driven functions in the brain. The CACNA1A gene encoding the pore-forming CaV2.1 (alpha1A) subunit of P/Q-type channels undergoes alternative splicing at multiple loci. This results in channel variants with different phenotypes. However, the combinatorial patterns of alternative splice events at two or more loci, and hence the diversity of CaV2.1 transcripts, are incompletely defined for specific brain regions and types of brain neurons. Using RT-PCR and splice variant-specific primers, we have identified multiple CaV2.1 transcript variants defined by different pairs of splice events in the cerebellum of adult rat. We have uncovered new splice variations between exons 28 and 34 (some of which predict a premature stop codon) and a new variation in exon 47 (which predicts a novel extended COOH-terminus). Single cell RT-PCR reveals that each individual cerebellar Purkinje neuron also expresses multiple alternative CaV2.1 transcripts, but the assortment is smaller than in the cerebellum. Two of these variants encode different extended COOH-termini which are not the same as those previously reported in Purkinje cells of the mouse. Our patch-clamp recordings show that calcium channel currents in the soma and dendrites of Purkinje cells are largely inhibited by a concentration of omega-agatoxin IVA selective for P-type over Q-type channels, suggesting that the different transcripts may form phenotypic variants of P-type calcium channels in Purkinje cells. These results expand the known diversity of CaV2.1 transcripts in cerebellar Purkinje cells, and propose the selective expression of distinct assortments of CaV2.1 transcripts in different brain neurons and species.

  20. Endurance training upregulates the nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase/cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate pathway in the striatum, midbrain and cerebellum of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalimoniuk, Małgorzata; Chrapusta, Stanisław J; Lukačova, Nadežda; Langfort, Józef

    2015-08-27

    The nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/sGC/cGMP) brain pathway plays an important role in motor control. We studied the effects of 6-week endurance training (running) of moderate intensity on this pathway by comparing, between sedentary and endurance-trained young adult male Wistar rats, the expression of endothelial (eNOS) and neuronal (nNOS) NO synthases and of α1, α2 and β1 GC subunits, as well as cGMP levels, in the brain cortex, hippocampus, striatum, midbrain and cerebellum. Additionally, we compared the respective regional expressions of BDNF and the BDNF receptor TrkB. Twenty-four hours after the last training session, the endurance-trained rats showed 3-fold higher spontaneous locomotor activity than their sedentary counterparts in an open-field test. Forty-eight hours after the completion of the training, the trained rats showed significantly elevated BDNF and TrKB mRNAs in the hippocampus, midbrain and striatum, and significantly increased BDNF levels in the hippocampus and striatum. Simultaneously, significant increases were found in mRNA and protein levels and activities of nNOS and eNOS as well as in mRNA and protein levels of GCα2 and GCβ1, but not GCα1, in the striatum, midbrain and cerebellum; no change in these variables was found in the cortex and hippocampus except for marked elevations in cortical GCβ1 mRNA and protein. Changes in regional cGMP levels paralleled those in eNOS, nNOS and GCα2 expression and NOSs' activities. These results suggest that favorable extrapyramidal motor effects of physical training are related to the enhanced activity of the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway in certain motor control-related subcortical brain regions.

  1. Metabolic changes of prefrontal cerebral lobe ,white matter and cerebellum in patients with post-stroke depression A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinggang Xu; Hong Cao; Qingwei Song; Jianlin Wu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy(1H-MRS)non-invasively detects changes in chemical substances in the brain,which reflects the pathological metabolism.OBJECTIVE:To investigate changes in N-acetyl-aspartate(NAA),choline(Cho),creatine(Cr),and myoinositol(MI)in the gray and white matter of cerebral prefrontal lobe and cerebellum of patients with differential degrees of post-stroke depression(PSD)using 1H-MRS.DESIGN:A case control study.SETTING:The First Affiliated Hospital of the Dalian Medical University.PARTICIPANTS:A total of 38 patients with stroke(28 male and 10 female patients,aged 40 to 79 years)were selected from the Department of Neurology,1st Atfiliated Hospital,Dalian Medical University,from February to October in 2004.All subjects met the DSM-IV criteria for cerebrovascular disease and depression.The degree of depression was defined according to Hamilton criteria.38 patients with PSD were divided into two groups according to the time after ischemia,20 patients in the acute group with less than 10 days after ischemic attack(mild:16 patients,moderate/severe:4 patients)and 18 patients in the chronic group with more than 11 days after ischemic attack(mild:15 patients,moderate/severe:3 patients).Seventeen healthy volunteers with matching age from 41 to 80 years were examined as a control group.The study was approved by the Medical Ethics Committee of the University Medical Center Utrecht,and each participant signed an informed consent form.METHODS:Spectra were acquired by multi-voxel point-resolved spectroscopy(PRESS)sequence with GE signal.ST MP-di,localized in prefrontal cerebral lobe and cerebellum.Values of NAA,Cho,MI,and Cr ere compared between different graded PSD patients and control subjects with one-way analysis of variance in software SPSS11.5.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Metabolite concentration in different brain regions of interest.Difference in metabolites between distinctly graded PSD patients and control subjects.Exclusion of age

  2. Altered CB1 receptor coupling to G-proteins in the post-mortem caudate nucleus and cerebellum of alcoholic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdozain, Amaia M; Rubio, Marina; Meana, J Javier; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Callado, Luis F

    2015-11-01

    Biochemical, pharmacological and genetic evidence suggests the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in alcohol dependence. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the state of CB1 receptors in post-mortem caudate nucleus, hippocampus and cerebellum of alcoholic subjects.CB1 protein levels were measured by Western blot, CB1 receptor density and affinity by [(3)H]WIN55,212-2 saturation assays and CB1 functionality by [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays. Experiments were performed in samples from 24 subjects classified as non-suicidal alcoholics (n = 6), suicidal alcoholics (n = 6), non-alcoholic suicide victims (n = 6) and control subjects (n = 6).Alcoholic subjects presented hyperfunctional CB1 receptors in the caudate nucleus resulting in a higher maximal effect in both alcoholic groups compared to the non-alcoholic groups (p CB1 protein expression in either region. In the hippocampus of alcoholic subjects, no changes were observed either in the functionality, density or protein levels.Our data support an association between endocannabinoid system activity and alcoholism. The modifications reported here could be either a consequence of high lifetime ethanol consumption or a vulnerability factor to develop alcohol addiction.

  3. Metabolomic method: UPLC-q-ToF polar and non-polar metabolites in the healthy rat cerebellum using an in-vial dual extraction.

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    Amera A Ebshiana

    Full Text Available Unbiased metabolomic analysis of biological samples is a powerful and increasingly commonly utilised tool, especially for the analysis of bio-fluids to identify candidate biomarkers. To date however only a small number of metabolomic studies have been applied to studying the metabolite composition of tissue samples, this is due, in part to a number of technical challenges including scarcity of material and difficulty in extracting metabolites. The aim of this study was to develop a method for maximising the biological information obtained from small tissue samples by optimising sample preparation, LC-MS analysis and metabolite identification. Here we describe an in-vial dual extraction (IVDE method, with reversed phase and hydrophilic liquid interaction chromatography (HILIC which reproducibly measured over 4,000 metabolite features from as little as 3mg of brain tissue. The aqueous phase was analysed in positive and negative modes following HILIC separation in which 2,838 metabolite features were consistently measured including amino acids, sugars and purine bases. The non-aqueous phase was also analysed in positive and negative modes following reversed phase separation gradients respectively from which 1,183 metabolite features were consistently measured representing metabolites such as phosphatidylcholines, sphingolipids and triacylglycerides. The described metabolomics method includes a database for 200 metabolites, retention time, mass and relative intensity, and presents the basal metabolite composition for brain tissue in the healthy rat cerebellum.

  4. Modeling Spike-Train Processing in the Cerebellum Granular Layer and Changes in Plasticity Reveal Single Neuron Effects in Neural Ensembles

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    Chaitanya Medini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum input stage has been known to perform combinatorial operations on input signals. In this paper, two types of mathematical models were used to reproduce the role of feed-forward inhibition and computation in the granular layer microcircuitry to investigate spike train processing. A simple spiking model and a biophysically-detailed model of the network were used to study signal recoding in the granular layer and to test observations like center-surround organization and time-window hypothesis in addition to effects of induced plasticity. Simulations suggest that simple neuron models may be used to abstract timing phenomenon in large networks, however detailed models were needed to reconstruct population coding via evoked local field potentials (LFP and for simulating changes in synaptic plasticity. Our results also indicated that spatio-temporal code of the granular network is mainly controlled by the feed-forward inhibition from the Golgi cell synapses. Spike amplitude and total number of spikes were modulated by LTP and LTD. Reconstructing granular layer evoked-LFP suggests that granular layer propagates the nonlinearities of individual neurons. Simulations indicate that granular layer network operates a robust population code for a wide range of intervals, controlled by the Golgi cell inhibition and is regulated by the post-synaptic excitability.

  5. Endurance training effects on 5-HT(1B) receptors mRNA expression in cerebellum, striatum, frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennaoui, M; Drogou, C; Gomez-Merino, D; Grimaldi, B; Fillion, G; Guezennec, C Y

    2001-07-01

    The 5-HT(1B) receptors are the predominant auto- and heteroreceptors located on serotonergic and non-serotonergic terminals where they regulate the neuronal release of neurotransmitters. The present study investigated the effects of a 7 week period of physical training on the expression of cerebral 5-HT(1B) receptors by measuring corresponding mRNA levels in rat. Using RNase protection assay technique, we have observed no change in 5-HT(1B) receptor mRNA levels in the striatum and in the hippocampus after moderate as well as after intensive training. In contrast, a significant decrease in 5-HT(1B) receptor mRNA levels was observed in cerebellum of intensively trained rats. Moreover, in frontal cortex, a significant decrease in 5-HT(1B) receptors mRNA level occurred in both groups of trained rats. These data suggest the existence of regional differences in the effect of physical exercise on the expression of 5-HT(1B) receptors. PMID:11516568

  6. Calcium, potassium, iron, copper and zinc concentrations in the white and gray matter of the cerebellum and corpus callosum in brain of four genetic mouse strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M. H.; Devès, G.; Guillou, F.

    2005-04-01

    In the central nervous system, metallic cations are involved in oligodendrocyte maturation and myelinogenesis. Moreover, the metallic cations have been associated with pathogenesis, particularly multiple sclerosis and malignant gliomas. The brain is vulnerable to either a deficit or an excess of available trace elements. Relationship between trace metals and myelinogenesis is important in understanding a severe human pathology : the multiple sclerosis, which remains without efficient treatment. One approach to understand this disease has used mutant or transgenic mice presenting myelin deficiency or excess. But to date, the concentration of trace metals and mineral elements in white and gray matter areas in wild type brain is unknown. The aim of this study is to establish the reference concentrations of trace metals (iron, copper and zinc) and minerals (potassium and calcium) in the white and gray matter of the mouse cerebellum and corpus callosum. The brains of four different genetic mouse strains (C57Black6/SJL, C57Black6/D2, SJL and C3H) were analyzed. The freeze-dried samples were prepared to allow PIXE (Proton-induced X-ray emission) and RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) analyses with the nuclear microprobe in Bordeaux. The results obtained give the first reference values. Furthermore, one species out of the fours testes exhibited differences in calcium, iron and zinc concentrations in the white matter.

  7. Interaction of electrical stimulation and voluntary hand movement in SII and the cerebellum during simulated therapeutic functional electrical stimulation in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftime-Nielsen, Simona Denisia; Christensen, Mark Schram; Vingborg, Rune Jersin; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Roepstorff, Andreas; Grey, Michael James

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) has shown promising clinical results in the rehabilitation of post-stroke hemiplegia. It appears that the effect is optimal when the patterned electrical stimulation is used in close synchrony with voluntary movement, although the neural mechanisms that underlie the clinical successes reported with therapeutic FES are unknown. One possibility is that therapeutic FES takes advantage of the sensory consequences of an internal model. Here, we investigate fMRI cortical activity when FES is combined with voluntary effort (FESVOL) and we compare this activity to that produced when FES and voluntary activity (VOL) are performed alone. FESVOL revealed greater cerebellar activity compared with FES alone and reduced activity bilaterally in secondary somatosensory areas (SII) compared with VOL alone. Reduced activity was also observed for FESVOL compared with FES alone in the angular gyrus, middle frontal gyrus and inferior frontal gyrus. These findings indicate that during the VOL condition the cerebellum predicts the sensory consequences of the movement and this reduces the subsequent activation in SII. The decreased SII activity may reflect a better match between the internal model and the actual sensory feedback. The greater cerebellar activity coupled with reduced angular gyrus activity in FESVOL compared with FES suggests that the cortex may interpret sensory information during the FES condition as an error-like signal due to the lack of a voluntary component in the movement.

  8. Acupuncture Decreases Blood Pressure Related to Hypothalamus Functional Connectivity with Frontal Lobe, Cerebellum, and Insula: A Study of Instantaneous and Short-Term Acupuncture Treatment in Essential Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Zhang, Jiping; Wang, Yanjie; Wang, Yuying; Lan, Yujun; Qu, Shanshan; Tang, Chunzhi; Huang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of acupuncture in decreasing blood pressure are ambiguous and underlying acupuncture in hypertension treatment has not been investigated. Our objective was to observe the change of quality of life and compare the differences in brain functional connectivity by investigating instantaneous and short-term acupuncture treatment in essential hypertension patients. A total of 30 patients were randomly divided into the LR3 group and sham acupoint group. Subjects received resting-state fMRI among preacupuncture, postinstantaneous, and short-term acupuncture treatment in two groups. Hypothalamus was selected as the seed point to analyze the changes in connectivity. We found three kinds of results: (1) There was statistical difference in systolic blood pressure in LR3 group after the short-term treatment and before acupuncture. (2) Compared with sham acupoint, acupuncture at LR3 instantaneous effects in the functional connectivity with seed points was more concentrated in the frontal lobe. (3) Compared with instantaneous effects, acupuncture LR3 short-term effects in the functional connectivity with seed points had more regions in frontal lobe, cerebellum, and insula. These brain areas constituted a neural network structure with specific functions that could explain the mechanism of therapy in hypertension patients by LR3 acupoint. PMID:27688791

  9. Autistic-Like Behaviors, Oxidative Stress Status, and Histopathological Changes in Cerebellum of Valproic Acid Rat Model of Autism Are Improved by the Combined Extract of Purple Rice and Silkworm Pupae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morakotsriwan, Nartnutda; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Kirisattayakul, Woranan; Chaisiwamongkol, Kowit

    2016-01-01

    Due to the crucial role of oxidative stress on the pathophysiology of autism and the concept of synergistic effect, the benefit of the combined extract of purple rice and silkworm pupae (AP1) for autism disorder was the focus. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effect of AP1 on autistic-like behaviors, oxidative stress status, and histopathological change of cerebellum in valproic acid (VPA) rat model of autism. VPA was injected on postnatal day (PND) 14 and the animals were orally given AP1 at doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg·kg(-1) BW between PND 14 and PND 40. The autism-like behaviors were analyzed via hot-plate, rotarod, elevated plus-maze, learning, memory, and social behavior tests. Oxidative stress and the histological change in the cerebellum were assessed at the end of study. AP1 treated rats improved behaviors in all tests except that in hot-plate test. The improvement of oxidative stress and Purkinje cell loss was also observed in the cerebellum of VPA-treated rats. Our data suggest that AP1 partially reduced autism-like behaviors by improving oxidative stress and Purkinje cell loss. Further research is required to identify the active ingredients in AP1 and gender difference effect.

  10. Autistic-Like Behaviors, Oxidative Stress Status, and Histopathological Changes in Cerebellum of Valproic Acid Rat Model of Autism Are Improved by the Combined Extract of Purple Rice and Silkworm Pupae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nartnutda Morakotsriwan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the crucial role of oxidative stress on the pathophysiology of autism and the concept of synergistic effect, the benefit of the combined extract of purple rice and silkworm pupae (AP1 for autism disorder was the focus. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effect of AP1 on autistic-like behaviors, oxidative stress status, and histopathological change of cerebellum in valproic acid (VPA rat model of autism. VPA was injected on postnatal day (PND 14 and the animals were orally given AP1 at doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg·kg−1 BW between PND 14 and PND 40. The autism-like behaviors were analyzed via hot-plate, rotarod, elevated plus-maze, learning, memory, and social behavior tests. Oxidative stress and the histological change in the cerebellum were assessed at the end of study. AP1 treated rats improved behaviors in all tests except that in hot-plate test. The improvement of oxidative stress and Purkinje cell loss was also observed in the cerebellum of VPA-treated rats. Our data suggest that AP1 partially reduced autism-like behaviors by improving oxidative stress and Purkinje cell loss. Further research is required to identify the active ingredients in AP1 and gender difference effect.

  11. Autistic-Like Behaviors, Oxidative Stress Status, and Histopathological Changes in Cerebellum of Valproic Acid Rat Model of Autism Are Improved by the Combined Extract of Purple Rice and Silkworm Pupae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morakotsriwan, Nartnutda; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Kirisattayakul, Woranan; Chaisiwamongkol, Kowit

    2016-01-01

    Due to the crucial role of oxidative stress on the pathophysiology of autism and the concept of synergistic effect, the benefit of the combined extract of purple rice and silkworm pupae (AP1) for autism disorder was the focus. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effect of AP1 on autistic-like behaviors, oxidative stress status, and histopathological change of cerebellum in valproic acid (VPA) rat model of autism. VPA was injected on postnatal day (PND) 14 and the animals were orally given AP1 at doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg·kg(-1) BW between PND 14 and PND 40. The autism-like behaviors were analyzed via hot-plate, rotarod, elevated plus-maze, learning, memory, and social behavior tests. Oxidative stress and the histological change in the cerebellum were assessed at the end of study. AP1 treated rats improved behaviors in all tests except that in hot-plate test. The improvement of oxidative stress and Purkinje cell loss was also observed in the cerebellum of VPA-treated rats. Our data suggest that AP1 partially reduced autism-like behaviors by improving oxidative stress and Purkinje cell loss. Further research is required to identify the active ingredients in AP1 and gender difference effect. PMID:27034733

  12. Inhibition of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in the hypothalamus, pons and cerebellum of the offspring rat due to experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koromilas, Christos; Liapi, Charis; Zarros, Apostolos; Tsela, Smaragda; Zissis, Konstantinos M; Kalafatakis, Konstantinos; Skandali, Nikolina; Voumvourakis, Konstantinos; Carageorgiou, Haris; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2015-08-01

    Neurodevelopment is known to be particularly susceptible to thyroid hormone insufficiency and can result in extensive structural and functional deficits within the central nervous system (CNS), subsequently leading to the establishment of cognitive impairment and neuropsychiatric symptomatology. The current study evaluated the effects of gestational and/or lactational maternal exposure to propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism (as a suggestive multilevel experimental approach to the study of hypothyroidism-induced changes that has been developed and characterized by the authors) on crucial brain enzyme activities of 21-day-old Wistar rat offspring in a CNS region-specific manner. The activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase in the offspring hypothalamus, cerebellum and pons were assessed. The study demonstrated that maternal exposure to PTU (0.05% w/v in the drinking water) during the critical periods of neurodevelopment can result in an inhibition of hypothalamic, pontine and cerebellar Na(+),K(+)-ATPase; a major marker of neuronal excitability and metabolic energy production as well as an important regulator of important systems of neurotransmission. On the other hand, no significant changes in the activities of the herein offspring CNS regions' AChE and Mg(2+)-ATPase were recorded. The observed Na(+),K(+)-ATPase inhibition: (i) is region-specific (and non-detectable in whole brain homogenetes), (ii) could constitute a central event in the pathophysiology of clinically-relevant hypothyroidism-associated developmental neurotoxicity, (iii) occurs under all examined experimental schemes, and (iv) certainly deserves further clarification at a molecular and histopathological level. As these findings are analyzed and compared to the available literature, they also underline the need for the adoption and further study of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity as a consistent neurochemical marker within the context of a systematic

  13. Motor Learning and the Cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Zeeuw, Chris I; Ten Brinke, Michiel M

    2015-01-01

    Although our ability to store semantic declarative information can nowadays be readily surpassed by that of simple personal computers, our ability to learn and express procedural memories still outperforms that of supercomputers controlling the most advanced robots. To a large extent, our procedural

  14. Effects of differential postnatal exposure of the rat cerebellum to x-rays on spatial discrimination learning as a function of age and position preference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present research was to analyze the effects of postnatal exposure of the cerebellum to x-irradiation on the use of proprioceptive feedback in spatial learning. A total of 337 naive male Long-Evans hooded rats were assigned at birth to one of four treatments: 12-15x, 4-5x, 4-15x and control. Subjects assigned to the 12-15x treatment were exposed to 200R at 12 and 13 days of age, and to 150R at 15 days of age. The subjects exposed to the 4-5x schedule received 200R on days 4 and 5. The 4-15x subjects are exposed to 200R on days 4 and 5, and to 150R on days 7, 9, 11, 13, 15. Subjects from each treatment started spatial discrimination testing in a T-shaped water maze at 30 to 31, 60 to 63, or 180 to 185 days of age. A preference effect was evident in the control, 12-15x and 4-5x subjects, but not in the 4-15x subjects during acquisition testing. Those control, 12-15x and 4-5x subjects trained against their preference made more errors and required more trials to attain acquisition criterion than did those subjects trained toward their preference. The absence of a position preference in the 4-15x subjects is attributed to the absence of the mossy fiber channel of input to the Purkinje cells in this preparation. Deficits in spatial learning were evident in both the 12-15x and 4-15x subjects, the former differing significantly from control subjects and the latter from the 4-5x subjects in the number of trials needed to complete reversal testing and/or the number of errors made during this phase of the testing. It is the upper portion of the molecular layer, absent in the 12-15x and 4-15x preparations, which receives afferent input from the spinal cord

  15. Exposure to altered gravity during specific developmental periods differentially affects growth, development, the cerebellum and motor functions in male and female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguon, K.; Ladd, B.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that perinatal exposure to hypergravity affects cerebellar structure and motor coordination in rat neonates. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that neonatal cerebellar structure and motor coordination may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of hypergravity during specific developmental stages. To test this hypothesis, we compared neurodevelopment, motor behavior and cerebellar structure in rat neonates exposed to 1.65 G on a 24-ft centrifuge during discrete periods of time: the 2nd week of pregnancy [gestational day (G) 8 through G15; group A], the 3rd week of pregnancy (G15 through birth on G22/G23; group B), the 1st week of nursing [birth through postnatal day (P) 6; group C], the 2nd and 3rd weeks of nursing (P6 through P21; group D), the combined 2nd and 3rd weeks of pregnancy and nursing (G8 through P21; group E) and stationary control (SC) neonates (group F). Prenatal exposure to hypergravity resulted in intrauterine growth retardation as reflected by a decrease in the number of pups in a litter and lower average mass at birth. Exposure to hypergravity immediately after birth impaired the righting response on P3, while the startle response in both males and females was most affected by exposure during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth. Hypergravity exposure also impaired motor functions, as evidenced by poorer performance on a rotarod; while both males and females exposed to hypergravity during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth performed poorly on P21, male neonates were most dramatically affected by exposure to hypergravity during the second week of gestation, when the duration of their recorded stay on the rotarod was one half that of SC males. Cerebellar mass was most reduced by later postnatal exposure. Thus, for the developing rat cerebellum, the postnatal period that overlaps the brain growth spurt is the most vulnerable to hypergravity. However, male motor behavior is also affected by midpregnancy exposure to

  16. Ontogenic Changes and Differential Localization of T-type Ca2+ Channel Subunits Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 in Mouse Hippocampus and Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Carolina; García-Madrona, Sebastián; Gil-Minguez, Mercedes; Luján, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    T-type calcium (Ca2+) channels play a central role in regulating membrane excitability in the brain. Although the contributions of T-type current to neuron output is often proposed to reflect a differential distribution of T-type channel subtypes to somato-dendritic compartments, their precise subcellular distributions in central neurons are not fully determined. Using histoblot and high-resolution immunoelectron microscopic techniques, we have investigated the expression, regional distribution and subcellular localization of T-type Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channel subunits in the adult brain, as well as the ontogeny of expression during postnatal development. Histoblot analysis showed that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 proteins were widely expressed in the brain, with mostly non-overlapping patterns. Cav3.1 showed the highest expression level in the molecular layer (ml) of the cerebellum (Cb), and Cav3.2 in the hippocampus (Hp) and the ml of Cb. During development, levels of Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 increased with age, although there were marked region- and developmental stage-specific differences in their expression. At the cellular and subcellular level, immunoelectron microscopy showed that labeling for Cav3.1 was present in somato-dendritic domains of hippocampal interneurons and Purkinje cells (PCs), while Cav3.2 was present in somato-dendritic domains of CA1 pyramidal cells, hippocampal interneurons and PCs. Most of the immunoparticles for Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 were either associated with the plasma membrane or the intracellular membranes, with notable differences depending on the compartment. Thus, Cav3.1 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of interneurons, whereas Cav3.2 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of dendritic spines and had a major intracellular distribution in dendritic shafts. In PCs, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 showed similar distribution patterns. In addition to its main postsynaptic distribution, Cav3.2 but not Cav3.1 was also detected in axon terminals establishing

  17. Ornithine In Vivo Administration Disrupts Redox Homeostasis and Decreases Synaptic Na(+), K (+)-ATPase Activity in Cerebellum of Adolescent Rats: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Hyperornithinemia-Hyperammonemia-Homocitrullinuria (HHH) Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Ângela; Viegas, Carolina Maso; Hickmann, Fernanda Hermes; de Oliveira Monteiro, Wagner; Sitta, Angela; de Moura Coelho, Daniela; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Wajner, Moacir

    2015-08-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is an inborn error of metabolism caused by a defect in the transport of ornithine (Orn) into mitochondrial matrix leading to accumulation of Orn, homocitrulline (Hcit), and ammonia. Affected patients present a variable clinical symptomatology, frequently associated with cerebellar symptoms whose pathogenesis is poorly known. Although in vitro studies reported induction of oxidative stress by the metabolites accumulating in HHH syndrome, so far no report evaluated the in vivo effects of these compounds on redox homeostasis in cerebellum. Therefore, the present work was carried out to investigate the in vivo effects of intracerebellar administration of Orn and Hcit on antioxidant defenses (reduced glutathione concentrations and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), lipid oxidation (malondialdehyde concentrations), as well as on the activity of synaptic Na(+), K(+)-ATPase, an enzyme highly vulnerable to free radical attack, in the cerebellum of adolescent rats. Orn significantly increased malondialdehyde levels and the activities of all antioxidant enzymes, and reduced Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. In contrast, glutathione concentrations were not changed by Orn treatment. Furthermore, intracerebellar administration of Hcit was not able to alter any of these parameters. The present data show for the first time that Orn provokes in vivo lipid oxidative damage, activation of the enzymatic antioxidant defense system, and reduction of the activity of a crucial enzyme involved in neurotransmission. It is presumed that these pathomechanisms may contribute at least partly to explain the neuropathology of cerebellum abnormalities and the ataxia observed in patients with HHH syndrome.

  18. Maternal exposure of rats to nicotine via infusion during gestation produces neurobehavioral deficits and elevated expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in the cerebellum and CA1 subfield in the offspring at puberty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy is known to be a significant contributor to developmental neurological health problems in the offspring. In animal studies, nicotine treatment via injection during gestation has been shown to produce episodic hypoxia in the developing fetus. Nicotine delivery via mini osmotic pump, while avoiding effects due to hypoxia-ischemia, it also provides a steady level of nicotine in the plasma. In the present study timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g) were treated with nicotine (3.3 mg/kg, in bacteriostatic water via s.c. implantation of mini osmotic pump) from gestational days (GD) 4-20. Control animals were treated with bacteriostatic water via s.c. implantation of mini osmotic pump. Offspring on postnatal day (PND) 30 and 60, were evaluated for changes in the ligand binding for various types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and neuropathological alterations. Neurobehavioral evaluations for sensorimotor functions, beam-walk score, beam-walk time, incline plane and grip time response were carried out on PND 60 offspring. Beam-walk time and forepaw grip time showed significant impairments in both male and female offspring. Ligand binding densities for [3H]epibatidine, [3H]cytisine and [3H]α-bungarotoxin did not show any significant changes in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors subtypes in the cortex at PND 30 and 60. Histopathological evaluation using cresyl violet staining showed significant decrease in surviving Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum and a decrease in surviving neurons in the CA1 subfield of hippocampus on PND 30 and 60. An increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immuno-staining was observed in cerebellum white matter as well as granular cell layer of cerebellum and the CA1 subfield of hippocampus on PND 30 and 60 of both male and female offspring. These results indicate that maternal exposure to nicotine produces significant neurobehavioral deficits, a decrease in the surviving neurons and an

  19. Axonal localization of Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 is critical for subcellular locality of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 release affecting proper development of postnatal mouse cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsushi Sadakata

    Full Text Available Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 (CAPS2 is a protein that is essential for enhanced release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 from cerebellar granule cells. We previously identified dex3, a rare alternative splice variant of CAPS2, which is overrepresented in patients with autism and is missing an exon 3 critical for axonal localization. We recently reported that a mouse model CAPS2Δex3/Δex3 expressing dex3 showed autistic-like behavioral phenotypes including impaired social interaction and cognition and increased anxiety in an unfamiliar environment. Here, we verified impairment in axonal, but not somato-dendritic, localization of dex3 protein in cerebellar granule cells and demonstrated cellular and physiological phenotypes in postnatal cerebellum of CAPS2Δex3/Δex3 mice. Interestingly, both BDNF and NT-3 were markedly reduced in axons of cerebellar granule cells, resulting in a significant decrease in their release. As a result, dex3 mice showed developmental deficits in dendritic arborization of Purkinje cells, vermian lobulation and fissurization, and granule cell precursor proliferation. Paired-pulse facilitation at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses was also impaired. Together, our results indicate that CAPS2 plays an important role in subcellular locality (axonal vs. somato-dendritic of enhanced BDNF and NT-3 release, which is indispensable for proper development of postnatal cerebellum.

  20. Evidence for oxidative stress in the developing cerebellum of the rat after chronic mild carbon monoxide exposure (0.0025% in air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez Ivan A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that chronic very mild prenatal carbon monoxide (CO exposure (25 parts per million subverts the normal development of the rat cerebellar cortex. Studies at this chronic low CO exposure over the earliest periods of mammalian development have not been performed to date. Pregnant rats were exposed chronically to CO from gestational day E5 to E20. In the postnatal period, rat pups were grouped as follows: Group A: prenatal exposure to CO only; group B: prenatal exposure to CO then exposed to CO from postnatal day 5 (P5 to P20; group C: postnatal exposure only, from P5 to P20, and group D, controls (air without CO. At P20, immunocytochemical analyses of oxidative stress markers, and structural and functional proteins were assessed in the cerebellar cortex of the four groups. Quantitative real time PCR assays were performed for inducible (iNOS, neuronal (nNOS, and endothelial (eNOS nitric oxide synthases. Results Superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1, SOD2, and hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1 immunoreactivity increased in cells of the cerebellar cortex of CO-exposed pups. INOS and nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity also increased in blood vessels and Purkinje cells (PCs of pups from group-A, B and C. By contrast, nNOS immunoreactivity decreased in PCs from group-B. Endothelial NOS immunoreactivity showed no changes in any CO-exposed group. The mRNA levels for iNOS were significantly up-regulated in the cerebellum of rats from group B; however, mRNA levels for nNOS and eNOS remained relatively unchanged in groups A, B and C. Ferritin-H immunoreactivity increased in group-B. Immunocytochemistry for neurofilaments (structural protein, synapsin-1 (functional protein, and glutamic acid decarboxylase (the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, were decreased in groups A and B. Immunoreactivity for two calcium binding proteins, parvalbumin and calbindin, remained

  1. The role of the cerebellum in auditory processing using the SSI test A participação do cerebelo no processamento auditivo com o uso do teste SSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Maria Sens

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Synthetic Sentence Identification (SSI test assesses central auditory pathways by measuring auditory and visual sensitivity and testing selective attention. Cerebellum activation in auditory attention and sensorial activity modulation have already been described. Assessing patients with cerebellar lesions alone using the SSI test can confirm the role of the cerebellum in auditory processing. AIM: To evaluate the role of the cerebellum in auditory processing in individuals with normal hearing and in those with chronic cerebellum lesions, using the SSI test. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional cohort study. A study group comprising 18 patients with chronic cerebellar lesion and a control group of 20 healthy individuals were assessed. The SSI test was applied in an Ipsilateral Competitive Message (ICM and Contralateral Competitive Message (CCM modes. To compare the results between groups, we used the chi-square test for qualitative variables. RESULTS: A statistically significant difference was found between the study and control groups using the ICM mode of the SSI test (p=0.035, but not in the CCM mode (p=0.083. CONCLUSION: The results on the SSI confirmed cerebellar participation in auditory processing in individuals with chronic cerebellar lesions and in those with normal hearing assessed in this study.O teste de Identificação de Sentenças Sintéticas (SSI avalia as vias centrais da audição utilizando a sensibilidade auditiva e visual e testando a atenção seletiva. A ativação do cerebelo na atenção auditiva, assim como na modulação da atividade sensorial, já é descrita. Avaliar pacientes com lesão exclusiva do cerebelo por meio do teste SSI pode confirmar ou refutar a hipótese da participação do cerebelo no processamento auditivo. OBJETIVO: Avaliar pelo teste SSI a participação do cerebelo no processamento auditivo, em indivíduos com lesão crônica do cerebelo e audição normal. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Estudo coorte

  2. Observation and Nursing of Microsurgical Treatment for Entity Hemangioblastoma in Cerebellum%显微手术治疗小脑内成血管细胞瘤的观察及护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵欣; 陈静; 曹立

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the nursing of microsurgical treatment of the entity hemangioblastoma in cerebellum. Methods The clinical data of 24 cases with microsurgical treatment of the entity hemangioblastoma in cerebellum were retrospectively analyzed to summarize the clinical nursing experience. Results Of the 24 patients,21 developed single tumor:8 in the left cerebellar hemisphere and 13 in right;3 developed multiple tumors:2-4 tumor nodules, in the cerebellar hemisphere and cerebellopontine arm. All patients received microsurgery tumor resection completely and the postoperative symptoms were improved and no death occurred. Conclusion Intensive observation and nursing of such patients in the perioperative period can significantly increase the success rate of surgery, reduce complications, promote the rehabilitation process and improve the life quality.%目的 探讨显微手术治疗小脑内成血管细胞瘤的护理.方法 回顾性分析经显微手术治疗的24例小脑内成血管细胞瘤患者的临床资料,总结临床护理经验.结果 24例患者中,肿瘤单发21例:分布于左侧小脑半球8例,右侧小脑半球13例;小脑内多发3例,有2~4个瘤结节,分布于小脑半球以及桥小脑臂.所有患者均行显微手术完全切除肿瘤,术后症状均完全改善,无一例死亡.结论 加强小脑内成血管细胞瘤患者的围术期观察与护理,对提高手术成功率、减少并发症、促进患者康复、提高患者的生活质量具有重要意义.

  3. Behavior Cognition Computational Model Based on Cerebellum and Basal Ganglia Mechanism%基于小脑-基底神经节机理的行为认知计算模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈静; 阮晓钢; 戴丽珍

    2012-01-01

    针对智能体的行为认知问题,提出一种小脑与基底神经节相互协调的行为认知计算模型.该模型核心为操作条件学习算法,包括评价机制、行为选择机制、取向机制及小脑与基底神经节的协调机制.初期的学习信号来自于下橄榄体和黑质两部分,在熵的意义上说明该算法是收敛的.采用该学习方法为自平衡两轮机器人建立运动神经认知系统,利用RBF网络逼近行为和评价网络.仿真实验表明该方法改善仅有基底神经节作用的行为-评价算法学习速度慢和失败次数多的问题,学习后期通过温度的不断降低,加快学习速度,震荡逐渐消失,改善学习效果.%Aiming at agent' s behavioral cognition problem, a behavior cognition computational model based on the coordination of cerebellum and basal ganglia is proposed. Operant conditioning learning algorithm is the central algorithm including evaluation mechanism, action selection mechanism, tropism mechanism, and the coordination mechanism between cerebellum and basal ganglia. The learning signals come from not only the Inferior Olive but also the Substantia Nigra in the beginning. The convergence of the algorithm can be guaranteed in the sense of entropy. With the proposed method, a motor nerve cognitive system for the self-balancing two-wheeled robot has been built using the RBF neural network as the actor and evaluation function approximator. The simulation results show that the learning speed is increased as well as the failure times are reduced by the proposed method than by the Actor-Critic method with the only Basal Ganglia mechanism. Through decreasing temperature in the late stage, the learning speed is increased and the vibration disappeares eventually, and the learning effect is improved.

  4. Aplicações da ultra-sonografia tridimensional na avaliação do cerebelo fetal Three-dimensional ultrasonography in the evaluation of the fetal cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Araujo Júnior

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Nos últimos anos a ultra-sonografia tridimensional tem-se tornado um método de imagem de grande importância no diagnóstico em obstetrícia. Um de seus benefícios seria a maior sensibilidade, em relação ao ultra-som bidimensional, no diagnóstico de algumas malformações fetais. As potenciais aplicações desse novo método seriam uma maior acurácia na medida do volume de órgãos fetais, a possibilidade de rever volumes na ausência da paciente, a possibilidade de utilizar diferentes planos para avaliar determinada estrutura anatômica e a capacidade de transmissão de volumes para centros de referência. A avaliação ultra-sonográfica do cerebelo fetal é de extrema importância, pois, comprovadamente, alterações no seu desenvolvimento estão correlacionadas com alterações do crescimento fetal e anomalias congênitas. O objetivo desta atualização é demonstrar os métodos VOCAL™ e 3D XI™ na avaliação do cerebelo fetal, seus potenciais benefícios e o que há de mais atual na literatura a respeito deste assunto.For the last years three-dimensional ultrasonography has become an imaging diagnosis method of great importance in obstetrics. One of its advantages would be the higher sensitivity compared with two-dimensional ultrasound in the diagnosis of some fetal malformations. The potential applications of this new method would be an improved accuracy in the measurement of fetal organs, the possibility of reviewing volumes in the absence of the patient, and using different planes to assess specific anatomical structures, as well as the capacity to transfer data files to remote reference centers. Ultrasonographic evaluation of fetal cerebellum is particularly important, since developmental alterations are correlated with the fetal growth alterations and congenital anomalies. The objective of this updating is to demonstrate the VOCAL™ and 3D XI™ methods in the evaluation of the fetal cerebellum, their potential benefits

  5. Lycium europaeum fruit extract: antiproliferative activity on A549 human lung carcinoma cells and PC12 rat adrenal medulla cancer cells and assessment of its cytotoxicity on cerebellum granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Wafa; Vaudry, David; Jouenne, Thierry; Marzouki, Mohamed Nejib

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a major worldwide health problem and one of the leading causes of death either in developed or developing countries. Plant extracts and derivatives have always been used for various disease treatments and many anticancer agents issued from plants and vegetables are clinically recognized and used all over the world. Lycium europaeum (Solanaceae) also called "wolfberry" was known since ancient times in the Mediterranean area as a medicinal plant and used in several traditional remedies. The Lycium species capacity of reducing the incidence of cancer and also of halting or reserving the growth of cancer was reported by traditional healers. In this study, the antiproliferative capacity, protective properties, and antioxidant activity of the hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of Lycium europaeum were investigated. Results showed that Lycium extract exhibits the ability to reduce cancer cell viability, inhibits proliferation, and induces apoptosis in A549 human lung cancer cells and PC12 rat adrenal medulla cancer cells, in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Cytotoxic effect on normal rat cerebellum granule cells was assessed to be nonsignificant. Results also showed that Lycium fruit extract protected lipids, proteins, and DNA against oxidative stress damages induced by H2O2 via scavenging reactive oxygen species.

  6. Redox Status and Neuro Inflammation Indexes in Cerebellum and Motor Cortex of Wistar Rats Supplemented with Natural Sources of Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Astaxanthin: Fish Oil, Krill Oil, and Algal Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana G. Polotow

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Health authorities worldwide have consistently recommended the regular consumption of marine fishes and seafood to preserve memory, sustain cognitive functions, and prevent neurodegenerative processes in humans. Shrimp, crabs, lobster, and salmon are of particular interest in the human diet due to their substantial provision of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3/PUFAs and the antioxidant carotenoid astaxanthin (ASTA. However, the optimal ratio between these nutraceuticals in natural sources is apparently the key factor for maximum protection against most neuro-motor disorders. Therefore, we aimed here to investigate the effects of a long-term supplementation with (n-3/PUFAs-rich fish oil, ASTA-rich algal biomass, the combination of them, or krill oil (a natural combination of both nutrients on baseline redox balance and neuro-inflammation indexes in cerebellum and motor cortex of Wistar rats. Significant changes in redox metabolism were only observed upon ASTA supplementation, which reinforce its antioxidant properties with a putative mitochondrial-centered action in rat brain. Krill oil imposed mild astrocyte activation in motor cortex of Wistar rats, although no redox or inflammatory index was concomitantly altered. In summary, there is no experimental evidence that krill oil, fish oil, oralgal biomass (minor variation, drastically change the baseline oxidative conditions or the neuro-inflammatory scenario in neuromotor-associated rat brain regions.

  7. Redox Status and Neuro Inflammation Indexes in Cerebellum and Motor Cortex of Wistar Rats Supplemented with Natural Sources of Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Astaxanthin: Fish Oil, Krill Oil, and Algal Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polotow, Tatiana G.; Poppe, Sandra C.; Vardaris, Cristina V.; Ganini, Douglas; Guariroba, Maísa; Mattei, Rita; Hatanaka, Elaine; Martins, Maria F.; Bondan, Eduardo F.; Barros, Marcelo P.

    2015-01-01

    Health authorities worldwide have consistently recommended the regular consumption of marine fishes and seafood to preserve memory, sustain cognitive functions, and prevent neurodegenerative processes in humans. Shrimp, crabs, lobster, and salmon are of particular interest in the human diet due to their substantial provision of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3/PUFAs) and the antioxidant carotenoid astaxanthin (ASTA). However, the optimal ratio between these nutraceuticals in natural sources is apparently the key factor for maximum protection against most neuro-motor disorders. Therefore, we aimed here to investigate the effects of a long-term supplementation with (n-3)/PUFAs-rich fish oil, ASTA-rich algal biomass, the combination of them, or krill oil (a natural combination of both nutrients) on baseline redox balance and neuro-inflammation indexes in cerebellum and motor cortex of Wistar rats. Significant changes in redox metabolism were only observed upon ASTA supplementation, which reinforce its antioxidant properties with a putative mitochondrial-centered action in rat brain. Krill oil imposed mild astrocyte activation in motor cortex of Wistar rats, although no redox or inflammatory index was concomitantly altered. In summary, there is no experimental evidence that krill oil, fish oil, oralgal biomass (minor variation), drastically change the baseline oxidative conditions or the neuro-inflammatory scenario in neuromotor-associated rat brain regions. PMID:26426026

  8. Domoic Acid-Induced Neurotoxicity Is Mainly Mediated by the AMPA/KA Receptor: Comparison between Immature and Mature Primary Cultures of Neurons and Glial Cells from Rat Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena T. Hogberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid (DomA is a naturally occurring shellfish toxin that can induce brain damage in mammalians. Neonates have shown increased sensitivity to DomA-induced toxicity, and prenatal exposure has been associated with e.g. decreased brain GABA levels, and increased glutamate levels. Here, we evaluated DomA-induced toxicity in immature and mature primary cultures of neurons and glial cells from rat cerebellum by measuring the mRNA levels of selected genes. Moreover, we assessed if the induced toxicity was mediated by the activation of the AMPA/KA and/or the NMDA receptor. The expression of all studied neuronal markers was affected after DomA exposure in both immature and mature cultures. However, the mature cultures seemed to be more sensitive to the treatment, as the effects were observed at lower concentrations and at earlier time points than for the immature cultures. The DomA effects were completely prevented by the antagonist of the AMPA/KA receptor (NBQX, while the antagonist of the NMDA receptor (APV partly blocked the DomA-induced effects. Interestingly, the DomA-induced effect was also partly prevented by the neurotransmitter GABA. DomA exposure also affected the mRNA levels of the astrocytic markers in mature cultures. These DomA-induced effects were reduced by the addition of NBQX, APV, and GABA.

  9. A marked paucity of granule cells in the developing cerebellum of the Npc1−/− mouse is corrected by a single injection of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusca, S.; Canterini, S.; Palladino, G.; Bruno, F.; Mangia, F.; Erickson, R.P.; Fiorenza, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we show that postnatal development of cerebellar granule neurons (GNs) is defective in Npc1−/− mice. Compared to age-matched wild-type littermates, there is an accelerated disappearance of the external granule layer (EGL) in these mice. This is due to a premature exit from the cell cycle of GN precursors residing at the level of the EGL. As a consequence, the size of cerebellar lobules of these mice displays a 20%–25% reduction compared to that of age-matched wild-type mice. This size reduction is detectable at post-natal day 28 (PN28), when cerebellar GN development is completed while signs of neuronal atrophy are not yet apparent. Based on the analysis of EGL thickness and the determination of proliferating GN fractions at increasing developmental times (PN8–PN14), we trace the onset of this GN developmental defect during the second postnatal week. We also show that during this developmental time Shh transcripts undergo a significant reduction in Npc1−/− mice compared to age-matched wild-type mice. In light of the mitogenic activity of Shh on GNs, this observation further supports the presence of defective GN proliferation in Npc1−/− mice. A single injection of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin at PN7 rescues this defect, restoring the normal patterns of granule neuron proliferation and cerebellar lobule size. To our knowledge, these findings identify a novel developmental defect that was underappreciated in previous studies. This defect was probably overlooked because Npc1 loss-of-function does not affect cerebellar foliation and causes the internal granule layer and molecular layer to decrease proportionally, giving rise to a normally appearing, yet harmoniously smaller, cerebellum. PMID:24969023

  10. Study on Altered Resting State Functional Connectivity of Cerebellum in Alzheimer's Disease Pa-tients%阿尔茨海默病患者静息态下磁共振成像对小脑功能评估价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚秀婷; 陈博宇; 毕思伟; 祝清勇; 范国光; 商秀丽

    2016-01-01

    Objective]To detect the patterns of functional connectivity of cerebellum in Alzheimei's disease (AD)patients,mild cognition impairment subjects (MCI),and normal healthy controls using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).[Methods]Images were acquired from 1 9 AD patients,1 6 MCI subjects,and 1 9 healthy controls.The bilateral dentate nucleus (DN)was defined as regions of interest (ROI) in a voxel-wise functional connectivity analysis.The altered functional connectivity pattern between AD sub-jects and controls were evaluated by two-sample t-tests.Then,the MCI subjects were included to evaluate how different stages of the disease affect the functional connectivity of the cerebellum.[Results]Some regions of the cerebellum such as the left supramarginal gyrus,left inferior parietal lobule,and right lentiform nucleus (P<0.05,corrected by AlphaSim)in AD subjects showed decreased functional connectivity with the bilateral DN.We also found increased functional connectivity of DN with the right cerebellum anterior lobe,right inferi-or temporal gyrus,left and right inferior occipital gyrus,right middle temporal gyrus,right precentral gyrus, and left postcentral gyrus (P <0.05,corrected by AlphaSim)in AD patients.[Conclusion]Findings of altered functional connectivity of the cerebellum suggest its important role in AD and MCI.More studies are needed to improve our understanding of them.%【目的】应用静息态功能磁共振成像技术(fMRI)观察阿尔茨海默病(Alzheimer's disease,AD)患者,轻度认知功能障碍(mild cognition impairment,MCI)和正常人静息态下小脑齿状核功能连接改变的差异。【方法】对19例 AD 患者,16例 MCI 患者及19例正常对照者在静息态下行 fMRI 检查。以双侧齿状核为感兴趣区,对功能连接的相关系数进行双样本 t 检验,比较不同组别小脑功能连接改变的差异。【结果】AD 组小脑齿状核与左缘上回/顶下小叶、右豆状核、左顶下

  11. Cerebellum and motor learning, motor memory and motor integration: morphology and distribution of neuropeptide Y neurons in rat cerebellar cortex%大鼠小脑皮质内神经肽Y能神经元的形态与分布小脑的运动学习、记忆及整合功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王省; 孙银平; 蔡新华

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons are extensively located in various brain regions such as cerebral cortex, caudate-putamen nucleus, syslimbic system, thalamus and brain stem. They are also involved in various brain activities such as motor learning, motor memory and motor integration. Considering the fact that cerebellum can reorganize through motor learning, we tried to identify the morphology and distribution of NPY neurons in rat's cerebellar cortex to obtain the morphologic knowledge that is related to its cerebellar-cortex-based motor learning.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the morphology and distribution of NPY -immunoreactive neurons in rat's cerebellar cortex, and discuss the relationship between NPY neurons and cerebellum motor learning and motor memory.DESIGN: A single-sample-study based on animal samples.SETTING: Anatomy Department, Pathophysiology Department and Morphology Center in Xinxiang Medical College.MATERIALS: From July to December 2001, the experiment was performed at the Morphology Center in Xinxiang Medical College. Ten Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, clean grade, regardless of their gender and weighing 100-200 g,were selected.METHODS: After intraperitoneal injection anesthesia and ascending aorta infusion fixation, the cerebellum was taken out by craniosurgery. The cerebellum was immersed in the same fixative fluid for duration of 48 hours, and then was embedded in paraffin. The next step was to make continuous sagittal sections. NPY neurons were identified by SP immunohistochemical staining, using rats cerebral section as the positive control. In the negative control, the first antibody replaced by Bovine Calf Serum(BCS), and the second antibody replaced by 0.01 mol/L PBS. Sequentially the light-microscopic observation and micrography were recorded.MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: The Morphology and distribution of NPY neurons in rat's cerebellar cortex were taken as main outcome measurements.RESULTS: NPY-immunoreactive neurons were distributed in

  12. The change of pathology and expression of caspase-3 in cerebral cortex and hippocampus and cerebellum of alcoholism rats%大鼠酒精中毒后大脑皮质、海马、小脑的病理学改变及caspase-3的异常表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾明月; 朱丹; 陈嘉峰

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨大鼠慢性酒精中毒后大脑皮质、海马、小脑的病理学改变及caspase-3的异常表达.方法 选用健康雄性Wistar大鼠随机分为两组,其中酒精中毒组30只;盐水对照组20只.酒精中毒组每日每只大鼠分别按8ml/kg灌胃2w,随后再按照10ml/kg灌胃1w,按12ml/kg灌胃1w,共灌胃4w.每日灌胃两次,其间隔均为6h,酒精浓度为50%.对照组用等量的生理盐水灌胃.并对两组大鼠进行体重、一般生物学特征、HE染色、TUNEL染色、免疫组化caspase-3的检测.结果 造模成功后,两组大鼠的体重存在的统计学差异;HE染色后酒精组大鼠大脑皮质、海马、小脑锥体细胞数目减少,部分神经元变性、坏死;TUNEL法测定酒精组大鼠凋亡细胞数量明显多于对照组(P<0.05),酒精组大鼠大脑皮质、海马、小脑的caspase-3表达明显高于对照组(P<0.05).结论 慢性酒精中毒可引起大鼠大脑皮质、海马及小脑的病理学改变,出现神经细胞凋亡,引起与凋亡相对应部位caspase-3阳性表达,并参与大鼠酒精中毒后凋亡机制的发生、发展.%Objective To discuse the change of pathology and expression of caspase-3 in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of alcoholism rats. Methods There were 50 male healthy Wistar rats divided into 2 groups randomly, alcoholism group,30 rats,saline control group,20 rats. Alcoholic group;every rat was fed with 8ml/kg50% alcohol twice a day, and two weeks later, increased to 10ml/kg for one week, then 12ml/kg for one week. The interval of time was 6 hours of all. Control group: every rat was fed with the same dosage of 0.9% sodium chloride at the same time for four weeks. During the experiment, we measured their weight, observed their general condition, HE dyes, TUNEL dying and expression of caspase-3 by SP dying method. Results After 4 weeks,the alcoholic group rats appeared malnutrition,emaciated,moreover,some also appeared the performance of

  13. Diagnóstico de tumores do ângulo ponto-cerebelar com o auxílio de técnicas de inteligência artificial A diagnostic model for cerebellum-pontine angle tumors using artificial intelligence techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLÁVIO LEITÃO

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de estudo multidisciplinar, cujo objetivo é a obtenção de modelo discriminatório entre diagnóstico de tumores do ângulo ponto-cerebelar (APC e de distúrbios otorrinolaringológicos. Presentemente, a realização de um acurado exame neurológico e/ou otorrinolaringológico é incapaz de firmar diagnóstico de tumor do APC, sem valer-se de exames radiológicos de alto custo (tomografia computadorizada, ressonância magnética. O modelo proposto foi obtido através da utilização de técnicas de inteligência artificial e apresentou bom nível de acurácia (88,4% no teste de novos casos, considerando-se apenas o exame clínico e sem o auxílio de exames radiológicos.We are concerned in this paper with learning classification procedures from known cases. More precisely, we provide a diagnostic model that discriminate between cerebellum-pontine angle (CPA tumors and otorhinolaryngological (ENT disorders. Usually, in order to distinguish between CPA tumors and ENT disorders one must perform clinical-neurological examination together with expensive radiological imagery (CT and MRI. The proposed model was obtained through artificial intelligence methods and presented a good accuracy level (88.4% when tested against new cases, considering only clinical examination without radiological imagery results.

  14. Expression changes of DSCAM in the cerebellum of APPtransgenic mice%唐氏综合征黏附分子(DSCAM)在APP转基因阳性小鼠小脑内的表达变化及其意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾永林; 景黎君; 鲁晶晶; 韩瑞; 王淑阳; 彭涛; 贾延劼

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究唐氏综合征细胞黏附分子(DSCAM)在β-淀粉样蛋白前体蛋白(APP)转基因小鼠脑内的表达变化规律,初步探讨其意义.方法 选择月龄分别为新生、1个月、3个月、6个月和12个月的APP转基因阳性和阴性小鼠,应用免疫组化和免疫荧光法对全脑切片进行染色,观察DSCAM在APP转基因阳性小鼠脑内的表达,特别是在小脑内的表达部位及表达量的变化规律.结果 DSCAM主要在APP转基因阳性模型小鼠小脑中的浦肯野细胞、大脑皮层、海马安蒙氏角(Ammon's horn)的锥体细胞、海马齿状回的颗粒细胞层、丘脑及脑干神经元中表达.新生小鼠和1个月小鼠DSCAM的小脑表达量无明显差异(P>0.05),1月龄小鼠小脑内的表达量较3月龄小鼠低(P<0.05),到达3个月时,其表达量达到高峰,6个月时,DSCAM的表达量和3个月时无明显差异(P>0.05),12月龄的小鼠小脑内的DSCAM的表达量较6月龄低(P<0.05).在3个月和6个月时,DSCAM在APP转基因阳性小鼠小脑中的表达量明显高于同龄阴性小鼠(P<0.05).结论 DSCAM在一定月龄APP转基因阳性小鼠小脑内存在过度表达,推测DSCAM作为一种黏附分子,其过度表达在APP小鼠的学习运动能力和运动协调能力的缺陷中可能起重要作用.%[Objective] To investigate the changing regularity of the Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecule (DSCAM) expression in the brain of amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice and explore the significance of DSCAM expression. [ Methods ] With immunohistochemistry and immumofluorescence, the expression of DSCAM in the brains of APP positive transgenic mice (neonate, aged lm, 3m, 6m, 12m), especially the expression pattern of location and strength in cerebellum, was detected. The control groups were APP negative mice (neonate, aged lm, 3m, 6m, 12m). [Results] We had found that DSCAM widely expressed in the cerebellar purkinje cell, the cerebral cortex, the hippocampal

  15. The role of the cerebellum in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weier, Katrin; Banwell, Brenda; Cerasa, Antonio;

    2015-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), cerebellar signs and symptoms as well as cognitive dysfunction are frequent and contribute to clinical disability with only poor response to symptomatic treatment. The current consensus paper highlights the broad range of clinical signs and symptoms of MS patients, which...... relate to cerebellar dysfunction. There is considerable evidence of cerebellar involvement in MS based on clinical, histopathological as well as structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. The review of the recent literature, however, also demonstrates a high variability...

  16. [Cerebellum and language: speech therapy intervention to treat their disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Lluís

    2015-02-25

    Introduccion. Los avances en las tecnicas de neuroimagen han propiciado un creciente interes por el estudio del cerebelo y su participacion en los procesos cognitivos. Es cada vez mas evidente la relacion que existe entre este organo y la produccion linguistica, y entre las patologias cerebelosas y determinados trastornos del lenguaje, como la disartria cerebelosa. Objetivo. Revisar la contribucion del cerebelo a las funciones linguisticas, analizar los trastornos del lenguaje que derivan de las enfermedades cerebelosas y plantear la intervencion logopedica en este tipo de afectaciones. Desarrollo. Se realiza un analisis de la funcion moduladora del cerebelo en el lenguaje, de la disartria cerebelosa, de los factores etiologicos y de las manifestaciones clinicas observables en la produccion verbal. Se plantean los procedimientos para la valoracion funcional y los contenidos del tratamiento logopedico. Conclusiones. La adquisicion del lenguaje en la infancia esta condicionado, entre otros aspectos, por la conformacion anatomica y la actividad neurofisiologica del cerebelo. Las alteraciones en el desarrollo de la estructura cerebelosa, las patologias y las disfunciones neurofisiologicas de este pueden ocasionar trastornos del lenguaje. El diagnostico logopedico ha de servir para iniciar lo mas pronto posible el tratamiento, que incidira en la mejora de la organizacion perceptiva, las habilidades motrices, el perfil cognitivo y las competencias linguisticas. El programa de trabajo se planteara de manera global e interdisciplinar. La intervencion familiar y su participacion en el proceso terapeutico sera una contribucion de gran valor para contar con entornos de recuperacion positivos.

  17. Infratentorial and intraparenchymal subependymoma in the cerebellum: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yook; Lee, Seung Young; Yi, Kyung Sik; Cha, Sang Hoon; Gang, Min Ho; Cho, Bum Sang; Lee, Yong Moon

    2014-01-01

    Subependymomas are rare benign tumors located in the ventricular system. Intraparenchymal subependymoma is extremely rare; only 6 cases have been reported, and all were located in the supratentorial region. We describe a case of infratentorial, intraparenchymal subependymoma in a 28-year-old man with intermittent headache. Imaging revealed a well-demarcated cystic and solid cerebellar mass near the fourth ventricle. The mass had a microcystic component and calcification without contrast enhancement. Complete surgical excision was performed, and histopathology confirmed a subependymoma.

  18. Infratentorial and intraparenchymal Subependymoma In the cerebellum: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yook; Yi, Kyung Sik; Gang, Min Ho; Lee, Yong Moon [Chungbuk National University Hospital, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Cho, Bum Sang [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Subependymomas are rare benign tumors located in the ventricular system. Intraparenchymal subependymoma is extremely rare; only 6 cases have been reported, and all were located in the supratentorial region. We describe a case of infratentorial, intraparenchymal subependymoma in a 28-year-old man with intermittent headache. Imaging revealed a well-demarcated cystic and solid cerebellar mass near the fourth ventricle. The mass had a microcystic component and calcification without contrast enhancement. Complete surgical excision was performed, and histopathology confirmed a subependymoma.

  19. Multiple sclerosis impairs regional functional connectivity in the cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Kasper Winther; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard;

    2013-01-01

    . Patients with MS showed a decrease in regional homogeneity in the upper left cerebellar hemisphere in lobules V and VI relative to healthy controls. Similar trend changes in regional homogeneity were present in the right cerebellar hemisphere. The results indicate a disintegration of regional processing...

  20. Mathematical Modeling of Neuro-Vascular Coupling in Rat Cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tina

    Activity in the neurons called climbing fibers causes blood flow changes. But the physiological mechanisms which mediate the coupling are not well understood. This PhD thesis investigates the mechanisms of neuro-vascular coupling by means of mathematical methods. In experiments, the extracellularly...... measured field potential is used as an indicator of neuronal activity, and the cortical blood flow is measured by means of laser-Doppler flowmetry. Using system identification methods, these measurements have been used to construct and validate parametric mathematical models of the neuro-vascular system...

  1. Radially expanding transglial calcium waves in the intact cerebellum

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogland, Tycho M; Kuhn, Bernd; Göbel, Werner; Huang, Wenying; Nakai, Junichi; HELMCHEN, Fritjof; Flint, Jane; Wang, Samuel S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Multicellular glial calcium waves may locally regulate neural activity or brain energetics. Here, we report a diffusion-driven astrocytic signal in the normal, intact brain that spans many astrocytic processes in a confined volume without fully encompassing any one cell. By using 2-photon microscopy in rodent cerebellar cortex labeled with fluorescent indicator dyes or the calcium-sensor protein G-CaMP2, we discovered spontaneous calcium waves that filled approximately ellipsoidal domains of ...

  2. The contribution of the cerebellum to cognition in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Freya E.; Manon Grube; Elsegood, Kelly J.; Welch, John L.; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2010-01-01

    This study sought evidence for a specific cerebellar contribution to cognition by characterising the cognitive phenotype of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 (SCA-6); an autosomal dominant genetic disease which causes a highly specific late-onset cerebellar degeneration. A comprehensive neuropsychological assessment was administered to 27 patients with genetically confirmed SCA-6. General intellectual ability, memory and executive function were examined using internationally standardised tests (W...

  3. [Simultaneous demonstration of glutamate decarboxylase and synaptophysin in paraffin sections of rat cerebellum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzhevskiy, D E; Gilerovich, Ye G; Kirik, O V; Alekseyeva, O S; Grigoriyev, I P

    2015-01-01

    The article presents highly reproducible and inexpensive protocol for simultaneous demonstration of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD67), the key enzyme of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis and synaptophysin (SYP), a marker protein of synaptic vesicles using confocal laser microscopy. In the cerebellar cortex, GAD labels Purkinje cells and pinceaux in their basal parts and is unevenly distributed in the neuropil of molecular and granular layers. SYP clearly marks the contours of large dendrites of Purkinje cells in molecular layer, while in the granular layers it labels parts of cerebellar glomeruli--the terminals of the mossy fibers. GAD-immunopositive structures (GABA-ergic axons of stellate cells--Golgi cells) are often located at periphery of the glomeruli. In the peripheral zone of the glomeruli, colocalization of GAD- and SYP-immunopositive structures was observed, suggesting the presence of GABA-ergic synapses in this zone.

  4. Genetic variants near MLST8 and DHX57 affect the epigenetic age of the cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ake T.; Hannon, Eilis; Levine, Morgan E.; Hao, Ke; Crimmins, Eileen M.; Lunnon, Katie; Kozlenkov, Alexey; Mill, Jonathan; Dracheva, Stella; Horvath, Steve

    2016-02-01

    DNA methylation (DNAm) levels lend themselves for defining an epigenetic biomarker of aging known as the `epigenetic clock'. Our genome-wide association study (GWAS) of cerebellar epigenetic age acceleration identifies five significant (Pepigenetic tissue age as endophenotype in GWAS.

  5. Electro-Acupuncture for Treatment of Dysequillibrium Due to Cerebellum or Brain Stem Infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵宏; 刘志顺; 刘效娟

    2003-01-01

    @@ The authors treated 26 cases of dysequillibrium due tocerebellum or brain stem infarction byelectro-acupuncture from Aug 2000 - April 2002. Theresults were quite satisfactory and reported as follows.

  6. Myosin Va is developmentally regulated and expressed in the human cerebellum from birth to old age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.R. Souza

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Myosin Va functions as a processive, actin-based motor molecule highly enriched in the nervous system, which transports and/or tethers organelles, vesicles, and mRNA and protein translation machinery. Mutation of myosin Va leads to Griscelli disease that is associated with severe neurological deficits and a short life span. Despite playing a critical role in development, the expression of myosin Va in the central nervous system throughout the human life span has not been reported. To address this issue, the cerebellar expression of myosin Va from newborns to elderly humans was studied by immunohistochemistry using an affinity-purified anti-myosin Va antibody. Myosin Va was expressed at all ages from the 10th postnatal day to the 98th year of life, in molecular, Purkinje and granular cerebellar layers. Cerebellar myosin Va expression did not differ essentially in localization or intensity from childhood to old age, except during the postnatal developmental period. Structures resembling granules and climbing fibers in Purkinje cells were deeply stained. In dentate neurons, long processes were deeply stained by anti-myosin Va, as were punctate nuclear structures. During the first postnatal year, myosin Va was differentially expressed in the external granular layer (EGL. In the EGL, proliferating prospective granule cells were not stained by anti-myosin Va antibody. In contrast, premigratory granule cells in the EGL stained moderately. Granule cells exhibiting a migratory profile in the molecular layer were also moderately stained. In conclusion, neuronal myosin Va is developmentally regulated, and appears to be required for cerebellar function from early postnatal life to senescence.

  7. Periconception Maternal Folate Status and Human Embryonic Cerebellum Growth Trajectories: The Rotterdam Predict Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene V Koning

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate whether periconceptional maternal folate status affects human embryonic cerebellar size and growth trajectories. In a prospective periconceptional cohort participants filled out questionnaires and received weekly transvaginal 3D-ultrasounds between 7+0 and 12+6 weeks gestational age (GA. Viable non-malformed singleton pregnancies were selected for cerebellar measurements; transcerebellar diameter, (TCD, left and right cerebellar diameters (LCD, RCD. Linear mixed models were performed to estimate associations between questionnaire data on the timing of maternal folic acid supplement initiation and longitudinal cerebellar measurements as a function of crown-rump length (CRL and GA. Maternal red blood cell folate concentrations were analysed before 8 weeks GA to validate the associations. A total of 263 serial high quality three-dimensional ultrasound scans of 135 pregnancies were studied. Preconceptional compared to postconceptional initiation of folic acid use was associated with slightly larger cerebellar diameters per millimetre increase of CRL (TCD: β = 0.260mm, 95%CI = 0.023-0.491, p<0.05; LCD: β = 0.171mm, 95%CI = 0.038-0.305, p<0.05; RCD: β = 0.156mm, 95%CI = 0.032-0.280, p<0.05 and with proportional cerebellar growth (TCD/CRL:β = 0.015mm/mm, 95%CI = 0.005-0.024, p<0.01; LCD/CRL:β = 0.012mm/mm, 95%CI = 0.005-0.018, p<0.01; RCD/CRL:β = 0.011mm/mm, 95%CI = 0.005-0.017, p<0.01. Cerebellar growth was significantly highest in the third quartile of maternal red blood cell folate levels (1538-1813 nmol/L. These first findings show that periconceptional maternal folate status is associated with human embryonic cerebellar development. Implications of these small but significant variations for fetal cerebellar growth trajectories and the child's neurodevelopmental outcome are yet unknown and warrant further investigation.

  8. The prominent role of the cerebellum in the learning, origin and advancement of culture

    OpenAIRE

    Vandervert, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Background Vandervert described how, in collaboration with the cerebral cortex, unconscious learning of cerebellar internal models leads to enhanced executive control in working memory in expert music performance and in scientific discovery. Following Vandervert’s arguments, it is proposed that since music performance and scientific discovery, two pillars of cultural learning and advancement, are learned through in cerebellar internal models, it is reasonable that additional if not all compon...

  9. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan D.T. Engbers

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs. In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (IT and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (IH are activated during trains of IPSPs. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with IT generating a rebound burst and IH controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing IH to increase the efficacy of IT, and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect effects on membrane properties.

  10. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Jordan D T; Anderson, Dustin; Zamponi, Gerald W; Turner, Ray W

    2013-11-27

    T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa) channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (I T) and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (I H) are activated during trains of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with I T generating a rebound burst and I H controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing I H to increase the efficacy of I T and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect effects on membrane properties.

  11. GABAergic Neuron Specification in the Spinal Cord, the Cerebellum, and the Cochlear Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Kei Hori; Mikio Hoshino

    2012-01-01

    In the nervous system, there are a wide variety of neuronal cell types that have morphologically, physiologically, and histochemically different characteristics. These various types of neurons can be classified into two groups: excitatory and inhibitory neurons. The elaborate balance of the activities of the two types is very important to elicit higher brain function, because its imbalance may cause neurological disorders, such as epilepsy and hyperalgesia. In the central nervous system, inhi...

  12. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Jordan D. T.; Anderson, Dustin; Zamponi, Gerald W.; Turner, Ray W.

    2013-01-01

    T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa) channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (IT) and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (IH) are activated during trains of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with IT generating a rebound burst and IH controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing IH to increase the efficacy of IT and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect effects on membrane properties. PMID:24348329

  13. Deletion of Atoh1 disrupts Sonic Hedgehog signaling in the developing cerebellum and prevents medulloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Flora, Adriano; Klisch, Tiemo J.; Schuster, Gabriele; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2009-01-01

    Granule neuron precursors (GNPs) are the most actively proliferating cells in the post-natal nervous system and mutations in pathways controlling their cell cycle can result in medulloblastoma. The transcription factor Atoh1 has been suspected to contribute to GNP proliferation, but its role in normal and neoplastic post-natal cerebellar development remains unexplored. We show that Atoh1 regulates the signal transduction pathway of Sonic Hedgehog, an extracellular factor that is essential for...

  14. Periconception Maternal Folate Status and Human Embryonic Cerebellum Growth Trajectories : The Rotterdam Predict Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Irene V; Groenenberg, Irene A L; Gotink, Anniek W; Willemsen, Sten P; Gijtenbeek, Manon; Dudink, Jeroen; Go, Attie T J I; Reiss, Irwin K M; Steegers, Eric A P; Steegers-Theunissen, Régine P M

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether periconceptional maternal folate status affects human embryonic cerebellar size and growth trajectories. In a prospective periconceptional cohort participants filled out questionnaires and received weekly transvaginal 3D-ultrasounds between 7+0 and 12+6 weeks gestatio

  15. Persistent Angiogenesis in the Autism Brain: An Immunocytochemical Study of Postmortem Cortex, Brainstem and Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmitia, E. C.; Saccomano, Z. T.; Alzoobaee, M. F.; Boldrini, M.; Whitaker-Azmitia, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    In the current work, we conducted an immunocytochemical search for markers of ongoing neurogenesis (e.g. nestin) in auditory cortex from postmortem sections of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and age-matched control donors. We found nestin labeling in cells of the vascular system, indicating blood vessels plasticity. Evidence of angiogenesis was…

  16. Biohybrid control of general linear systems using the adaptive filter model of cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma D. Wilson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive filter model of the cerebellar microcircuit has been successfully applied to biological motor control problems such as the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR and to sensory processing problems such as the adaptive cancellation of reafferent noise. It has also been successfully applied to problems in robotics such as adaptive camera stabilisation and sensor noise cancellation. In previous applications to inverse control problems the algorithm was applied to the velocity control of a plant dominated by viscous and elastic elements. Naive application of the adaptive filter model to the displacement (as opposed to velocity control of this plant results in unstable learning and control. To be more generally useful in engineering problems it is essential to remove this restriction to enable the stable control of plants of any order. We address this problem here by developing a biohybrid model reference adaptive control (MRAC scheme, which stabilises the control algorithm for strictly proper plants. We evaluate the performance of this novel cerebellar inspired algorithm with MRAC scheme in the experimental control of a dielectric electroactive polymer, a class of artificial muscle. The results show that the augmented cerebellar algorithm is able to accurately control the displacement response of the artificial muscle. The proposed solution not only greatly extends the practical applicability of the cerebellar-inspired algorithm, but may also shed light on cerebellar involvement in a wider range of biological control tasks.

  17. Role of cerebellum in motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex-similarities and disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Palla, Antonella; Marti, Sarah; Olasagasti, Itsaso; Optican, Lance M; Zee, David S; Straumann, Dominik

    2013-02-01

    Vestibular velocity storage enhances the efficacy of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during relatively low-frequency head rotations. This function is modulated by GABA-mediated inhibitory cerebellar projections. Velocity storage also exists in perceptual pathway and has similar functional principles as VOR. However, it is not known whether the neural substrate for perception and VOR overlap. We propose two possibilities. First, there is the same velocity storage for both VOR and perception; second, there are nonoverlapping neural networks: one might be involved in perception and the other for the VOR. We investigated these possibilities by measuring VOR and perceptual responses in healthy human subjects during whole-body, constant-velocity rotation steps about all three dimensions (yaw, pitch, and roll) before and after 10 mg of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). 4-AP, a selective blocker of inward rectifier potassium conductance, can lead to increased synchronization and precision of Purkinje neuron discharge and possibly enhance the GABAergic action. Hence 4-AP could reduce the decay time constant of the perceived angular velocity and VOR. We found that 4-AP reduced the decay time constant, but the amount of reduction in the two processes, perception and VOR, was not the same, suggesting the possibility of nonoverlapping or partially overlapping neural substrates for VOR and perception. We also noted that, unlike the VOR, the perceived angular velocity gradually built up and plateau prior to decay. Hence, the perception pathway may have additional mechanism that changes the dynamics of perceived angular velocity beyond the velocity storage. 4-AP had no effects on the duration of build-up of perceived angular velocity, suggesting that the higher order processing of perception, beyond the velocity storage, might not occur under the influence of mechanism that could be influenced by 4-AP.

  18. Oligodendrocyte ablation affects the coordinated interaction between granule and Purkinje neurons during cerebellum development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oligodendrocytes (OLs) are the glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS) classically known to be devoted to the formation of myelin sheaths around most axons of the vertebrate brain. We have addressed the role of these cells during cerebellar development, by ablating OLs in vivo. Previous analyses had indicated that OL ablation during the first six postnatal days results into a striking cerebellar phenotype, whose major features are a strong reduction of granule neurons and aberrant Purkinje cells development. These two cell types are highly interconnected during cerebellar development through the production of molecules that help their proliferation, differentiation and maintenance. In this article, we present data showing that OL ablation has major effects on the physiology of Purkinje (PC) and granule cells (GC). In particular, OL ablation results into a reduction of sonic hedgehog (Shh), Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), and Reelin (Rln) expression. These results indicate that absence of OLs profoundly alters the normal cerebellar developmental program

  19. Massive calcification in basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum caused by postoperative hypoparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depicted case is of a 65 year old woman, who was admitted to hospital with complaints of excess sweating, dizziness and loss of consciousness. Symptomatic epilepsy was established after examination from a neurologist. A CT scan showed hyperdense symmetrical striation of the hemisphere of the small brain (parasagittal); symmetrical double-sided calcifications in the caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, thalamus and medial to the capsula interna; snake-like calcifications of the sulcus (occipital, parasagittai). Paraclinical tests have found hypocalcemia and hypoparathyroidism. Past illnesses: resection of the thyroid due to a nodose struma 20 years before. Key words: Calcifications in Basal Ganglia. Calcifications in the Cerebrum. Hypoparathyroidism

  20. Modeling neuro-vascular coupling in rat cerebellum: characterization of deviations from linearity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tina; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Lauritzen, Martin

    2009-01-01

    and dips in blood flow responses to stimulation for 60 s, and overgrowth of blood flow responses to stimulation for 600 s. In another set of experiments, stimulation frequencies were in the range 0.5-10 Hz and the stimulation duration was 15 s. The neuro-vascular system could be approximated by the linear......We investigated the quantitative relation between neuronal activity and blood flow by means of a general parametric mathematical model which described the neuro-vascular system as being dynamic, linear, time-invariant, and subjected to additive noise. The model was constructed from measurements...

  1. Purkinje cell NMDA receptors assume a key role in synaptic gain control in the mature cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Piochon (Claire); C. Levenes (Carole); G. Ohtsuki (Gen); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractA classic view in cerebellar physiology holds that Purkinje cells do not express functional NMDA receptors and that, therefore, postsynaptic NMDA receptors are not involved in the induction of long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje cell synapses. Recently, it has b

  2. Purkinje cell NMDA receptors assume a key role in synaptic gain control in the mature cerebellum

    OpenAIRE

    Piochon, Claire; Levenes, Carole; Ohtsuki, Gen; Hansel, Christian

    2010-01-01

    textabstractA classic view in cerebellar physiology holds that Purkinje cells do not express functional NMDA receptors and that, therefore, postsynaptic NMDA receptors are not involved in the induction of long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje cell synapses. Recently, it has been demonstrated that functional NMDA receptors are postsynaptically expressed at climbing fiber (CF) to Purkinje cell synapses in mice, reaching full expression levels at ∼2 months after birth. He...

  3. Autism associated gene, engrailed2, and flanking gene levels are altered in post-mortem cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyeon Choi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous genetic studies demonstrated association between the transcription factor engrailed2 (EN2 and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD. Subsequent molecular analysis determined that the EN2 ASD-associated haplotype (rs1861972-rs1861973 A-C functions as a transcriptional activator to increase gene expression. EN2 is flanked by 5 genes, serotonin receptor5a (HTR5A, insulin induced gene1 (INSIG1, canopy1 homolog (CNPY1, RNA binding motif protein33 (RBM33, and sonic hedgehog (SHH. These flanking genes are co-expressed with EN2 during development and coordinate similar developmental processes. To investigate if mRNA levels for these genes are altered in individuals with autism, post-mortem analysis was performed. METHODS: qRT-PCR quantified mRNA levels for EN2 and the 5 flanking genes in 78 post-mortem cerebellar samples. mRNA levels were correlated with both affection status and rs1861972-rs1861973 genotype. Molecular analysis investigated whether EN2 regulates flanking gene expression. RESULTS: EN2 levels are increased in affected A-C/G-T individuals (p = .0077. Affected individuals also display a significant increase in SHH and a decrease in INSIG1 levels. Rs1861972-rs1861973 genotype is correlated with significant increases for SHH (A-C/G-T and CNPY1 (G-T/G-T levels. Human cell line over-expression and knock-down as well as mouse knock-out analysis are consistent with EN2 and SHH being co-regulated, which provides a possible mechanism for increased SHH post-mortem levels. CONCLUSIONS: EN2 levels are increased in affected individuals with an A-C/G-T genotype, supporting EN2 as an ASD susceptibility gene. SHH, CNPY1, and INSIG1 levels are also significantly altered depending upon affection status or rs1861972-rs1861973 genotype. Increased EN2 levels likely contribute to elevated SHH expression observed in the post-mortem samples.

  4. The role of basal ganglia and cerebellum in motor learning. A computational model

    OpenAIRE

    Senatore, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    2010 - 2011 Our research activity investigates the computational processes underlying the execution of complex sequences of movements and aims at understanding how different levels of the nervous system interact and contribute to the gradual improvement of motor performance during learning. Many research areas, from neuroscience to engineering, investigate, from different perspectives and for diverse purposes, the processes that allow humans to efficiently perform skilled movem...

  5. Neuroprotective effect of melatonin against ischemia/reperfusion-induced neuronal apoptosis in mouse cerebellum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiuhong Duan; Tao Lu; Yixiang Han; Zhiqiang Lu; Ximing Wang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some experiments have demonstrated that melatonin (N-aceyl-5-methoxytryptamine, Mel) has antioxidation. However, whether it has neuroprotective effect in the ischemia/reperfusion injury of central nervous system is unclear.OBJECTIVE: To observe the protective effect of Mel on ischemia/reperfusion-induced cerebellar neuronal apoptosis of rats, and the action mechanism. DESIGN: Controlled observation experiment.SETTING: Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology.MATERIALS: Eight Sprague-Dawley rats aged 7-8 days and weighing 10-12 g were provided by Medical Experimental Animal Center, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Anti-cytochrome C monoclonal antibody was purchased from R & D Company; 7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate(DCFH-DA), rhodamine 123 and Mel were purchased from Sigma Company (USA). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) kit was purchased from Nanjing Jiancheng Bioengineering Institute.METHODS: This experiment was carried out in the laboratory for Department of Biochemistry and Molecule Biology, Tongji Medical College between October 2002 and March 2004. Cerebellar neurons of rats were cultured in vitro. After oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 90 minutes, 1×10-4, 1×10-6, 1×10-9 mol/L Mel was added, respectively, namely high-, middle-, and low-concentration Mel groups. Cells, which were cultured by OGD, served as model group, and control group, in which OGD intervention was omitted, was set. ①Cytochrome C level of mitochondrial cells in each group was detected by ELISA method. ②LDH activity in the cell culture fluid was measured, and cell membrane permeability change was analyzed. The cells in the Mel group with the lowest LDH activity served as Mel treatment group, I.e. Cells were cultured with OGD, and then Mel was added; Meanwhile, Mel prevention group was set, I.e. Mel was added before OGD. Intervention was not changed in the model group and control group. ③DNA level was analyzed and cell apoptosis was observed by agarose gel electrophoresis(AGE). ④Mitochondrial transmembrane potential of cells, and apoptotic way in each group were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ①Mitochondrial cytochrome C level of cerebellar nerve cells. ②LDH activity of cerebellar nerve cells. ③DNA AGE results. ④Mitochondrial transmembrane potential change.RESULTS: ①Mitochondrial cytochrome C level of cerebellar nerve cells: cytochrome C was obviously released at 6 hours of OGD-reperfusion. Mel inhibited the release of cytochrome C in dose-dependent manner. ②LDH activity of cerebellar nerve cells: LDH activity (A value) was significantly lower in the high- and middle-concentration Mel groups than in the model group (P<0.05). LDH activity (A value) in the low-concentration Mel group was 0.415 0 + 0.012 9, indicating that Mel could decrease LDH activity of OGD-treated cell supernatant and promote membrane stablization in dose-dependent manner.③AGE results of DNA: 1×10-9 mol/L was considered as the best concentration of melatonin. Cell DNA was extracted for AGE. Results presented typical ladder shape, indicating apoptosis appeared, while apoptosis was lessened in the Mel treatment group and Mel prevention group.④Mitochondrial transmembrane potential change: Experimental results showed that green fluorescein was evenly distributed in cerebellar granule cells cultured normally, and the axons of neurons were very clear. The body of neurons was condensed and the axons disappeared after cerebellar granule cells undergoing OGD injury. Mel could compltetly reverse the effect of OGD.CONCLUSION:Mel can enhance crerbellar neuronal membrane stabilization of rats in dose-dependent manner,and suppress OGD-induced apoptosis of cerebellar granule cells by preventing against mitochondrial apoptosis.

  6. Measurement by in vivo brain microdialysis of nitric oxide release in the rat cerebellum.

    OpenAIRE

    Shintani, F; Kanba, S; Nakaki, T; Sato, K.; Yagi, G; Kato, R; Asai, M

    1994-01-01

    Using a new method which combines a brain microdialysis technique and measurement of nitrite/nitrate levels by the Griess reaction, it has been proven that activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the cerebelli of rats which had been under non-anesthetic and freely moving conditions induces the release of nitric oxide (NO). Since L-NG-monomethylarginine (L-NMMA), which competitively blocks NO synthesis from L-arginine, significantly inhibited the release of nitrite/nitrate from ...

  7. N-Acetyl-L-Leucine Accelerates Vestibular Compensation after Unilateral Labyrinthectomy by Action in the Cerebellum and Thalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Günther; Roswitha Beck; Guoming Xiong; Heidrun Potschka; Klaus Jahn; Peter Bartenstein; Thomas Brandt; Mayank Dutia; Marianne Dieterich; Michael Strupp; Christian la Fougère; Andreas Zwergal

    2015-01-01

    An acute unilateral vestibular lesion leads to a vestibular tone imbalance with nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance. These deficits gradually decrease over days to weeks due to central vestibular compensation (VC). This study investigated the effects of i.v. N-acetyl-DL-leucine, N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine on VC using behavioural testing and serial [18F]-Fluoro-desoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG)-μPET in a rat model of unilateral chemical labyrinthectomy (UL). Vestibular beha...

  8. N-acetyl-L-leucine accelerates vestibular compensation after unilateral labyrinthectomy by action in the cerebellum and thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Lisa; Beck, Roswitha; Xiong, Guoming; Potschka, Heidrun; Jahn, Klaus; Bartenstein, Peter; Brandt, Thomas; Dutia, Mayank; Dieterich, Marianne; Strupp, Michael; la Fougère, Christian; Zwergal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An acute unilateral vestibular lesion leads to a vestibular tone imbalance with nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance. These deficits gradually decrease over days to weeks due to central vestibular compensation (VC). This study investigated the effects of i.v. N-acetyl-DL-leucine, N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine on VC using behavioural testing and serial [18F]-Fluoro-desoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG)-μPET in a rat model of unilateral chemical labyrinthectomy (UL). Vestibular behavioural testing included measurements of nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance as well as sequential whole-brain [18F]-FDG-μPET was done before and on days 1,3,7 and 15 after UL. A significant reduction of postural imbalance scores was identified on day 7 in the N-acetyl-DL-leucine (p D-leucine group (comparison for applied dose of 24 mg i.v. per rat, equivalent to 60 mg/kg body weight, in each group). The course of postural compensation in the DL- and L-group was accelerated by about 6 days relative to controls. The effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on postural compensation depended on the dose: in contrast to 60 mg/kg, doses of 15 mg/kg and 3.75 mg/kg had no significant effect. N-acetyl-L-leucine did not change the compensation of nystagmus or head roll tilt at any dose. Measurements of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) by means of μPET revealed that only N-acetyl-L-leucine but not N-acetyl-D-leucine caused a significant increase of rCGM in the vestibulocerebellum and a decrease in the posterolateral thalamus and subthalamic region on days 3 and 7. A similar pattern was found when comparing the effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on rCGM in an UL-group and a sham UL-group without vestibular damage. In conclusion, N-acetyl-L-leucine improves compensation of postural symptoms after UL in a dose-dependent and specific manner, most likely by activating the vestibulocerebellum and deactivating the posterolateral thalamus. PMID:25803613

  9. Modulation of ERK1/2 and p38MAPK by lead in the cerebellum of Brazilian catfish Rhamdia quelen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead (Pb2+) is a neurotoxic trace metal, widespread in aquatic environment that can change physiologic, biochemical and behavioral parameters in diverse fish species. Chemical exposure may drive modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) that are a family of highly conserved enzymes which comprise ubiquitous groups of signaling proteins playing critical regulatory roles in cell physiology. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) and p38MAPK control complex programs such as gene expression, embryogenesis, cell differentiation, cell proliferation, cell death and synaptic plasticity. Little information is available about MAPKs in aquatic organisms and their modulation by trace metals. The aim of this work was to determine the modulation of ERK1/2 and p38MAPK phosphorylation by Pb2+ in vivo and in vitro, in cerebellar slices of the catfish, Rhamdia quelen. In the in vitro model, slices were incubated for 3 h with lead acetate (1-10 μM). In the in vivo studies, the animals were exposed for 2 days to lead acetate (1 mg L-1). ERK1/2 and p38MAPK (total and phosphorylated forms) were immunodetected in cerebellar slices by Western blotting. Pb2+ added in vitro at 5 and 10 μM increased significantly the phosphorylation of both MAPKs. The in vivo exposed animals also showed a significant increase of ERK1/2 and p38MAPK phosphorylation without changes in the total content of the enzymes. In conclusion, the present work indicates that it is possible to evaluate the ERK1/2 and p38MAPK activation in the central nervous system (CNS) of a freshwater fish largely distributed in South America. Moreover, Pb2+, an important environmental pollutant may activate in vitro and in vivo ERK1/2 and p38MAPK enzymes. These findings are important considering the functional and ecologic implications associated to Pb2+ exposure of a freshwater fish species, such as R. quelen, and the roles of ERK1/2 and p38MAPK in the control of brain development, neuroplasticity and cell death

  10. Activity-dependent increases in local oxygen consumption correlate with post-synaptic currents in the mouse cerebellum in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Claus; Caesar, Kirsten; Thomsen, Kirsten Joan;

    2011-01-01

    Evoked neural activity correlates strongly with rises in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) and cerebral blood flow. Activity-dependent rises in CMRO2 fluctuate with ATP turnover due to ion pumping. In vitro studies suggest that increases in cytosolic Ca2+ stimulate oxidative metabolism via...

  11. Activity-dependent increases in local oxygen consumption correlate with postsynaptic currents in the mouse cerebellum in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Claus; Caesar, Kirsten; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund;

    2011-01-01

    Evoked neural activity correlates strongly with rises in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). Activity-dependent rises in CMRO(2) fluctuate with ATP turnover due to ion pumping. In vitro studies suggest that increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) stimulate oxidative...

  12. Up-Regulation of Oligodendrocyte Lineage Markers in the Cerebellum of Autistic Patients: Evidence from Network Analysis of Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; de Oliveira, Ben-Hur Neves; Casanova, Manuel F; Casanova, Emily L; Noda, Mami; Salmina, Alla B; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-08-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder manifested by impaired social interaction, deficits in communication skills, restricted interests, and repetitive behaviors. In neurodevelopmental, neurodegenerative, and psychiatric disorders, glial cells undergo morphological, biochemical, and functional rearrangements, which are critical for neuronal development, neurotransmission, and synaptic connectivity. Cerebellar function is not limited to motor coordination but also contributes to cognition and may be affected in autism. Oligodendrocytes and specifically oligodendroglial precursors are highly susceptible to oxidative stress and excitotoxic insult. In the present study, we searched for evidence for developmental oligodendropathy in the context of autism by performing a network analysis of gene expression of cerebellar tissue. We created an in silico network model (OLIGO) showing the landscape of interactions between oligodendrocyte markers and demonstrated that more than 50 % (16 out of 30) of the genes within this model displayed significant changes of expression (corrected p value disorders (ASD). PMID:26189831

  13. Exome sequencing revealed PMM2 gene mutations in a French-Canadian family with congenital atrophy of the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreau, Anne; Beauchemin, Philippe; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A; Dupré, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Two affected and one unaffected siblings from a French-Canadian family were evaluated in our neurogenetic clinic. The oldest brother had intentional and postural hand tremor while his youngest sister presented mild ataxia, a similar hand tremor and global developmental delay. Brain MRIs of the two affected family members further revealed a significant cerebellar atrophy. For this study we conducted a whole exome sequencing (WES) investigation using genomic DNA prepared from the affected brother and sister, alongside DNA prepared from their unaffected mother, and identified two mutations previously reported to cause a rare disorder known as Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation, type Ia (CDG1A) (OMIM #212065). This study emphasizes how the diagnosis of patients presenting a mild tremor phenotype associated with cerebellar atrophy may benefit from WES in establishing genetic defects associated with their conditions. PMID:26331032

  14. The role of vestibular system and the cerebellum in adapting to gravitoinertial, spatial orientation and postural challenges of REM sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharani, Nataraj E

    2005-01-01

    The underlying reasons for, and mechanisms of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep events remain a mystery. The mystery has arisen from interpreting REM sleep events as occurring in 'isolation' from the world at large, and phylogenetically ancient brain areas using 'primal' gravity-dependent coordinates, reflexes and stimuli parameters to relay and process information about self and environment. This paper views REM sleep as a phylogenetically older form of wakefulness, wherein the brain uses a gravitoinertial-centred reference frame and an internal self-object model to evaluate and integrate inputs from several sensory systems and to adapt to spatial-temporal disintegration and malignant cholinergic-induced vasodepressor/ventilatory threat. The integration of vestibular and non-vestibular sensory graviceptor signals enables estimation and control of centre of the body mass, position and spatial relationship of body parts, gaze, head and whole-body tilt, spatial orientation and autonomic functions relative to gravity. The vestibulocerebellum and vermis, via vestibular and fastigial nucleus, coordinate inputs and outputs from several sensory systems and modulate the amplitude and duration of 'fight-or-flight' vestibulo-orienting and autonomic 'burst' responses to overcome the ongoing challenges. Resolving multisystem conflicts during the unique stresses (gravitoinertial, hypoxic, thermal, immobilisation, etc.) of REM sleep enables learning, cross-modal plasticity, higher-order integration and multidimensional spatial updating of sensory-motor-cognitive components. This paper aims to generate discussion, reinterpretation and creative testing of this novel hypothesis, which, if experimentally confirmed, has major implications across medicine, bioscience and space physiology, from developmental, clinical, research and theoretical perspectives.

  15. Ameliorative effect of Pimpinella anisum oil on immunohistochemical and ultrastuctural changes of cerebellum of albino rats induced by aspartame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hamid, Manal; Gallaly, Sanaa Rida

    2014-05-01

    The study aims to investigate the protective effect of Pimpinella anisum oil on aspartame (ASP) which resulted in cerebellar changes. The rats were divided into four equal groups: Group 1: (control group): served as control animals. Group 2: control P. anisum oil received .5 mL/kg/d/b wt. once daily. Group 3 (ASP group): received daily 250 mg/kg/b wt. of ASP dissolved in distilled water and given orally to the animals by intra-gastric tube for 2 months. Group 4: received .5 mL/kg/b wt. of prophylactic P. anisum oil once daily, followed by ASP after 2 h for 2 months. The histopathological approach revealed marked changes in the Purkinje cells, myleinated nerve fibers and granular cells of ASP-treated animals. Some of these cells appeared with deeply stained cytoplasm. Ultrastructural examination showed Purkinje cells with dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum and condensed mitochondria. Granular cells appeared with less c nuclei and surrounded by dissolution of most Mossy rosettes structures. Most myelinated nerve fibers showed thickening of myelinated sheath and others showed splitting of their myelin sheath. The histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural alterations were much less observed in concomitant use of P. anisum oil with ASP. Cerebellar cortex is considered target areas of ASP neurotoxicity, while P. anisum oil, when used in combination with ASP displays a protective action against neurotoxicity.

  16. Activity-dependent increases in local oxygen consumption correlate with postsynaptic currents in the mouse cerebellum in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Claus; Caesar, Kirsten; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund;

    2011-01-01

    ) field EPSCs (∑fEPSCs) in Purkinje cells (PCs) in response to stimulation of the climbing fiber (CF) pathway. Blocking stimulus-evoked rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) in PCs with the P/Q-type channel blocker ω-agatoxin-IVA (ω-AGA), or the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol, did not lead to a time...

  17. Regional differences in the temporal expression of nonapoptotic caspase-3-positive Bergmann glial cells in the developing rat cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VelvetLee Finckbone

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Although caspases have been intimately linked to apoptotic events, some of the pro-apoptotic caspases also may regulate differentiation. We previously demonstrated that active caspase-3 is expressed and has an apparent non-apoptotic function during the development of cerebellar Bergmann glia. The current study seeks to further correlate active/cleaved caspase-3 expression with the developmental phenotype of Bergmann glia by examining regional differences in the temporal pattern of expression of cleaved caspase-3 immunoreactivity in lobules of the cerebellar vermis. In general, we found that the expression pattern of cleaved caspase-3 corresponds to the reported developmental temporal profile of the lobes and that its levels peak at 15 days and declines thereafter. Compared to intermediate or late maturing lobules, early maturing lobules had higher levels of active caspase-3 at earlier postnatal times. This period of postnatal development is precisely the time during which Bergmann glia initiate differentiation.

  18. [Hypomyelination with atrophy of the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Contribution of two new cases to a recently reported entity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás-Vila, Miguel; Menor, Francisco; Ley-Martos, Myriam; Jumillas-Luján, M José; Marco-Hernández, Ana V; Barbero, Pedro

    2014-02-16

    Introduccion. La hipomielinizacion con atrofia de ganglios basales y de cerebelo (H-ABC) es una rara entidad descrita recientemente. Se presentan dos nuevos casos pertenecientes a una misma familia. Casos clinicos. Caso 1: niño de 17 meses con retraso grave en todas las areas, ausencia de lenguaje y de contacto visual. En la exploracion destacaba una microcefalia con tetraparesia espastica. En la resonancia magnetica cerebral se apreciaba atrofia cerebelosa de predominio vermiano con perdida de volumen de ambos nucleos del putamen y la cabeza del caudado, y patron de hipomielinizacion de la sustancia blanca. En la electromiografia se objetivo un patron de polineuropatia cronica de predominio motor. Presento un descenso de los valores de acido homovalinico y de acido 5-hidroxindolacetico. El tratamiento con levodopa/carbidopa no fue efectivo. Caso 2: niña de 11 meses, hermana del caso anterior. Presentaba un retraso grave en todas las areas y en la exploracion clinica se detecto una microcefalia con tetraparesia espastica. La resonancia magnetica cerebral mostro hallazgos superponibles a los del hermano, con hipomielinizacion, atrofia cerebelosa y afectacion putaminal y de ambos caudados; en la electromiografia, hallazgos compatibles con polineuropatia motora de caracter desmielinizante. Presento un descenso de los valores de acido homovalinico y acido 5-hidroxindolacetico en el liquido cefalorraquideo. El tratamiento con levodopa/carbidopa resulto ineficaz. Conclusiones. Estos dos nuevos casos ayudan a caracterizar mejor esta entidad y refuerzan la hipotesis del origen genetico del sindrome, dado que se trata de dos casos pertenecientes a una misma familia.

  19. Developmental Exposure to A Commercial PBDE Mixture: Effects on Protein Networks in the Cerebellum and Hippocampus of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are structurally similar topolychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and have both central (learning and memory deficits) and peripheral (motor dysfunction) neurotoxic effects at concentrations/doses similar to those of PCBs. The cellular...

  20. Perturbation of myelin basic protein (Mbp) splice variant expression in developing rat cerebellum following perinatal exposure to methylmercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Bhaja K; Pelletier, Guillaume

    2012-09-18

    Myelin sheaths surrounding axons are essential for saltatory conduction of nerve impulse in the central nervous system. A major protein constituent of myelin sheaths is produced by the myelin basic protein (Mbp) gene, whose expression in oligodendrocytes is conserved across vertebrates. In rat, five Mbp splice variants resulting from alternative splicing of exons 2, 5 and/or 6 are characterized. We developed a PCR-based strategy to quantify individual Mbp splice variants and characterized a sixth Mbp splice variant lacking only exon 5. This newly identified splice variant is predominantly expressed in developing rat brain and has orthologs in mouse and human. Many neurotoxic chemicals can perturb myelination and Mbp gene expression. Regulation of Mbp gene expression at the post-transcriptional level was assessed following perinatal exposure to neurotoxic methylmercury (2 mg/kg b.w./day). Similar reductions in total and individual Mbp splice variant mRNA levels suggest that methylmercury-induced perturbation in Mbp gene expression occurred as a consequence of decreased oligodendrocyte cell population in absence of a significant impact on its post-transcriptional regulation.

  1. Single Session Imaging of Cerebellum at 7 Tesla : Obtaining Structure and Function of Multiple Motor Subsystems in Individual Subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batson, Melissa A.; Petridou, N; Klomp, DWJ; Frens, Maarten A.; Neggers, Bas

    2015-01-01

    The recent increase in the use of high field MR systems is accompanied by a demand for acquisition techniques and coil systems that can take advantage of increased power and accuracy without being susceptible to increased noise. Physical location and anatomical complexity of targeted regions must be

  2. Single session imaging of cerebellum at 7 tesla: Obtaining structure and function of multiple motor subsystems in individual subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Batson (Melissa); N. Petridou (Natalia); D.W.J. Klomp (Dennis); M.A. Frens (Maarten); S.F.W. Neggers (Sebastiaan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe recent increase in the use of high field MR systems is accompanied by a demand for acquisition techniques and coil systems that can take advantage of increased power and accuracy without being susceptible to increased noise. Physical location and anatomical complexity of targeted reg

  3. Genomic convergence analysis of schizophrenia: mRNA sequencing reveals altered synaptic vesicular transport in post-mortem cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joann Mudge

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia (SCZ is a common, disabling mental illness with high heritability but complex, poorly understood genetic etiology. As the first phase of a genomic convergence analysis of SCZ, we generated 16.7 billion nucleotides of short read, shotgun sequences of cDNA from post-mortem cerebellar cortices of 14 patients and six, matched controls. A rigorous analysis pipeline was developed for analysis of digital gene expression studies. Sequences aligned to approximately 33,200 transcripts in each sample, with average coverage of 450 reads per gene. Following adjustments for confounding clinical, sample and experimental sources of variation, 215 genes differed significantly in expression between cases and controls. Golgi apparatus, vesicular transport, membrane association, Zinc binding and regulation of transcription were over-represented among differentially expressed genes. Twenty three genes with altered expression and involvement in presynaptic vesicular transport, Golgi function and GABAergic neurotransmission define a unifying molecular hypothesis for dysfunction in cerebellar cortex in SCZ.

  4. Single session imaging of cerebellum at 7 tesla: Obtaining structure and function of multiple motor subsystems in individual subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa A Batson; Natalia Petridou; Dennis W.J. Klomp; Maarten A Frens; Neggers, Sebastiaan F. W.

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe recent increase in the use of high field MR systems is accompanied by a demand for acquisition techniques and coil systems that can take advantage of increased power and accuracy without being susceptible to increased noise. Physical location and anatomical complexity of targeted regions must be considered when attempting to image deeper structures with small nuclei and/or complex cytoarchitechtonics (i.e. small microvasculature and deep nuclei), such as the brainstem and the ...

  5. Limited effects of preterm birth and the first enteral nutrition on cerebellum morphology and gene expression in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Kaalund, Sanne S.; Skovgaard, Kerstin;

    2016-01-01

    three ages but the proportion of white matter increased postnatally, relative to term pigs. Early initiation of enteral nutrition had limited structural or molecular effects. The Sonic Hedgehog pathway was unaffected by preterm birth. Few differences in expression of the selected genes were found...

  6. An Integrated Approach Identifies Nhlh1 and Insm1 as Sonic Hedgehog-regulated Genes in Developing Cerebellum and Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico De Smaele

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma (MB is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood arising from deregulated cerebellar development. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh pathway plays a critical role in cerebellar development and its aberrant expression has been identified in MB. Gene expression profiling of cerebella from 1- to 14-day-old mice unveiled a cluster of genes whose expression correlates with the levels of Hedgehog (HH activity. From this cluster, we identified Insm1 and Nhlh1/NSCL1 as novel HH targets induced by Shh treatment in cultured cerebellar granule cell progenitors. Nhlh1 promoter was found to be bound and activated by Gli1 transcription factor. Remarkably, the expression of these genes is also upregulated in mouse and human HH-dependent MBs, suggesting that they may be either a part of the HH-induced tumorigenic process or a specific trait of HH-dependent tumor cells.

  7. The volume of Purkinje cells decreases in the cerebellum of acrylamide-intoxicated rats, but no cells are lost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Tandrup, T; Braendgaard, H

    1994-01-01

    The effects of acrylamide intoxication on the numbers of granule and Purkinje cells and the volume of Purkinje cell perikarya have been evaluated with stereological methods. The analysis was carried out in the cerebella of rats that had received a dose of 33.3 mg/kg acrylamide, twice a week, for 7...

  8. The Anatomical, physiological and computational principles of adaptive learning in the cerebellum: the micro and macrocircuits of the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Zucca, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    The human brain is undoubtedly the most complex product of evolution. Understanding how complex behaviour is generated by the intricacy of hundred billion of neurons and synapses fascinated scientists and philosophers for millennia. The multiscale trait of the central nervous system is a hallmark of its architecture and brain functions emerge from the interaction of its components at di erent temporal and spatial scales. A full understanding cannot be achieved unless we appr...

  9. Transient expression of functional serotonin 5-HT3 receptors by glutamatergic granule cells in the early postnatal mouse cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Oostland; J. Sellmeijer; J.A. van Hooft

    2011-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT3 receptor is the only ligand-gated ion channel activated by serotonin and is expressed by GABAergic interneurons in many brain regions, including the cortex, amygdala and hippocampus. Furthermore, 5-HT3 receptors are expressed by glutamatergic Cajal-Retzius cells in the cerebral c

  10. The critical role of Golgi cells in regulating spatio-temporal integration and plasticity at the cerebellum input stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available After the discovery at the end of the 19th century (Golgi, 1883, the Golgi cell was precisely described by S.R. y Cajal (see Cajal, 1987, 1995 and functionally identified as an inhibitory interneuron 50 years later by J.C. Eccles and colleagues (Eccles e al., 1967. Then, its role has been casted by Marr (1969 within the Motor Learning Theory as a codon size regulator of granule cell activity. It was immediately clear that Golgi cells had to play a critical role, since they are the main inhibitory interneuron of the granular layer and control activity of as many as 100 millions granule cells. In vitro, Golgi cells show pacemaking, resonance, phase-reset and rebound-excitation in the theta-frequency band. These properties are likely to impact on their activity in vivo, which shows irregular spontaneous beating modulated by sensory inputs and burst responses to punctuate stimulation followed by a silent pause. Moreover, investigations have given insight into Golgi cells connectivity within the cerebellar network and on their impact on the spatio-temporal organization of activity. It turns out that Golgi cells can control both the temporal dynamics and the spatial distribution of information transmitted through the cerebellar network. Moreover, Golgi cells regulate the induction of long-term synaptic plasticity at the mossy fiber - granule cell synapse. Thus, the concept is emerging that Golgi cells are of critical importance for regulating granular layer network activity bearing important consequences for cerebellar computation as a whole.

  11. Cortical spreading depression and involvement of the motor cortex, auditory cortex, and cerebellum in eyeblink classical conditioning of the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Gilbert R; Lavond, David G; Thompson, Richard F

    2002-09-01

    The interrelationships of cerebellar and cerebral neural circuits in the eyeblink paradigm were explored with the controlled application of cortical spreading depression (CSD) and lidocaine in the New Zealand albino rabbit. The initial research focus was directed toward the involvement of the motor cortex in the conditioned eyeblink response. However, CSD timing and triangulation results indicate that other areas in the cerebral cortex, particularly the auditory cortex (acoustic conditioned stimulus), appear to be critical for the CSD effect on the eyeblink response. In summary: (1) CSD can be elicited, monitored, and timed and its side effects controlled in 97% of awake rabbits in the right and/or left cerebral hemisphere(s) during eyeblink conditioning. (2) The motor cortex appears to play little or no part in classical conditioning of the eyeblink in the rabbit in the delay paradigm. (3) Inactivating the auditory cortex with CSD or lidocaine temporarily impairs the conditioned response during the first 5 to 15 days of training, but has little effect past that point.

  12. [123I]epidepride binding to cerebellar dopamine D2/D3 receptors is displaceable: implications for the use of cerebellum as a reference region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Lars H; Videbaek, Charlotte; Ziebell, Morten;

    2007-01-01

    ]epidepride-SPECT was performed in 23 patients with schizophrenia before and after 3 months of antipsychotic treatment with either risperidone (n=14) or zuclopenthixol (n=9). In the unblocked situation and partially blocked situation, the average distribution volumes were 5.2+/-1.3 mL/mL and 4.0+/-0.8 mL/mL, respectively...

  13. [123I]epidepride binding to cerebellar dopamine D2/D3 receptors is displaceable: implications for the use of cerebellum as a reference region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Lars H; Videbaek, Charlotte; Ziebell, Morten;

    2007-01-01

    . The paired distribution volumes were reduced by 22+/-15% (mean+/-SD) after antipsychotic treatment (p0.76) and the plasma [(123)I]epidepride concentration (p>0.45) were unchanged after antipsychotic treatment (paired Student's t-test). These results strongly suggest the presence of "non-negligible" specific...

  14. Microarray Analysis Reveals Higher Gestational Folic Acid Alters Expression of Genes in the Cerebellum of Mice Offspring—A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Subit Barua; Salomon Kuizon; Chadman, Kathryn K.; W. Ted Brown; Mohammed A. Junaid

    2015-01-01

    Folate is a water-soluble vitamin that is critical for nucleotide synthesis and can modulate methylation of DNA by altering one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies have shown that folate status during pregnancy is associated with various congenital defects including the risk of aberrant neural tube closure. Maternal exposure to a methyl supplemented diet also can alter DNA methylation and gene expression, which may influence the phenotype of offspring. We investigated if higher gestational fo...

  15. Metabolomic Method UPLC-q-ToF Polar and Non-polar Metabolites in the Healthy Rat Cerebellum Using an In-Vial Dual Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Ebshiana, Amera A.; Snowden, Stuart G.; Madhav Thambisetty; Richard Parsons; Abdul Hye; Cristina Legido-Quigley

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased metabolomic analysis of biological samples is a powerful and increasingly commonly utilised tool, especially for the analysis of bio-fluids to identify candidate biomarkers. To date however only a small number of metabolomic studies have been applied to studying the metabolite composition of tissue samples, this is due, in part to a number of technical challenges including scarcity of material and difficulty in extracting metabolites. The aim of this study was to develop a method for...

  16. An Integrated Approach Identifies Nhlh1 and Insm1 as Sonic Hedgehog-regulated Genes in Developing Cerebellum and Medulloblastoma1,2

    OpenAIRE

    De Smaele, Enrico; Fragomeli, Caterina; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Pelloni, Marianna; Po, Agnese; Canettieri, Gianluca; Coni, Sonia; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Greco, Azzura; Moretti, Marta; Di Rocco, Concezio; Pazzaglia, Simona; Maroder, Marella; Screpanti, Isabella; Giannini, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood arising from deregulated cerebellar development. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathway plays a critical role in cerebellar development and its aberrant expression has been identified in MB. Gene expression profiling of cerebella from 1- to 14-day-old mice unveiled a cluster of genes whose expression correlates with the levels of Hedgehog (HH) activity. From this cluster, we identified Insm1 and Nhlh1/NSCL1 as novel HH targets i...

  17. Quantitative proteomic profiling of membrane proteins from the mouse brain cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum using the HysTag reagent: mapping of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper V; Nielsen, Peter Aa; Andersen, Jens R;

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of the brain proteome and studying brain diseases through clinical biopsies and animal disease models require methods of quantitative proteomics that are sensitive and allow identification and quantification of low abundant membrane proteins from minute amount of tissue. Taking advantage...

  18. Long-term NR2B expression in the cerebellum alters granule cell development and leads to NR2A down-regulation and motor deficits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlett, K; Pieri, [No Value; Metzger, F; Marchetti, L; Dere, E; Kirilly, D; Tarnok, K; Barabas, B; Varga, AK; Gerspach, J; Huston, JP; Pfizenmaier, K; Kohr, G; Eisel, ULM; Pieri, Isabelle; Steigerwald, Frank; Kis Varga, Ágnes; Huston, Joseph P.; Köhr, Georg

    2004-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) composition in granule cells changes characteristically during cerebellar development. To analyze the importance of NR2B replacement by NR2C and NR2A subunits until the end of the first month of age, we generated mice with lasting NR2B expression but deficiency

  19. Quantitative meta-analysis of fMRI and PET studies reveals consistent activation in fronto-striatal-parietal regions and cerebellum during antisaccades and prosaccades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharna eJamadar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The antisaccade task is a classic task of oculomotor control that requires participants to inhibit a saccade to a target and instead make a voluntary saccade to the mirror opposite location. By comparison, the prosaccade task requires participants to make a visually-guided saccade to the target. These tasks have been studied extensively using behavioural oculomotor, electrophysiological and neuroimaging in both non-human primates and humans. In humans, the antisaccade task is under active investigation as a potential endophenotype or biomarker for multiple psychiatric and neurological disorders. A large and growing body of literature has used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET to study the neural correlates of the antisaccade and prosaccade tasks. We present a quantitative meta-analysis of all published voxel-wise fMRI and PET studies (18 of the antisaccade task and show that consistent activation for antisaccades and prosaccades is obtained in a fronto-subcortical-parietal network encompassing frontal and supplementary eye fields, thalamus, striatum and intraparietal cortex. This network is strongly linked to oculomotor control and was activated to a greater extent for antisaccade than prosaccade trials. Antisaccade but not prosaccade trials additionally activated dorsolateral and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices. We also found that a number of additional regions not classically linked to oculomotor control were activated to a greater extent for antisaccade versus prosaccade trials; these regions are often reported in antisaccade studies but rarely commented upon. While the number of studies eligible to be included in this meta-analysis was small, the results of this systematic review reveal that antisaccade and prosaccade trials consistently activate a distributed network of regions both within and outside the classic definition of the oculomotor network.

  20. Is vestibular self-motion perception controlled by the velocity storage? Insights from patients with chronic degeneration of the vestibulo-cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Bertolini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex (rVOR generates compensatory eye movements in response to rotational head accelerations. The velocity-storage mechanism (VSM, which is controlled by the vestibulo-cerebellar nodulus and uvula, determines the rVOR time constant. In healthy subjects, it has been suggested that self-motion perception in response to earth-vertical axis rotations depends on the VSM in a similar way as reflexive eye movements. We aimed at further investigating this hypothesis and speculated that if the rVOR and rotational self-motion perception share a common VSM, alteration in the latter, such as those occurring after a loss of the regulatory control by vestibulo-cerebellar structures, would result in similar reflexive and perceptual response changes. We therefore set out to explore both responses in patients with vestibulo-cerebellar degeneration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Reflexive eye movements and perceived rotational velocity were simultaneously recorded in 14 patients with chronic vestibulo-cerebellar degeneration (28-81 yrs and 12 age-matched healthy subjects (30-72 yrs after the sudden deceleration (90°/s2 from constant-velocity (90°/s rotations about the earth-vertical yaw and pitch axes. rVOR and perceived rotational velocity data were analyzed using a two-exponential model with a direct pathway, representing semicircular canal activity, and an indirect pathway, implementing the VSM. We found that VSM time constants of rVOR and perceived rotational velocity co-varied in cerebellar patients and in healthy controls (Pearson correlation coefficient for yaw 0.95; for pitch 0.93, p0.8. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results confirm that self-motion perception in response to rotational velocity-steps may be controlled by the same velocity storage network that controls reflexive eye movements and that no additional, e.g. cortical, mechanisms are required to explain perceptual dynamics.

  1. Modulation of ERK1/2 and p38{sup MAPK} by lead in the cerebellum of Brazilian catfish Rhamdia quelen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, Rodrigo B. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Centro de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil)]. E-mail: bainyle@mbox1.ufsc.br; Ribeiro, Sandro Jose [Departamento de Bioquimica, Centro de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil); Posser, Thais [Departamento de Bioquimica, Centro de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil); Cordova, Fabiano M. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Centro de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil); Escola de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia, Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Araguaina - TO 77804-970 (Brazil); Rigon, Ana Paula [Departamento de Bioquimica, Centro de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil); Filho, Evoy Zaniboni [Departamento de Aquicultura, Centro de Ciencias Agrarias, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil); Bainy, Afonso C.D. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Centro de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil)

    2006-04-20

    Lead (Pb{sup 2+}) is a neurotoxic trace metal, widespread in aquatic environment that can change physiologic, biochemical and behavioral parameters in diverse fish species. Chemical exposure may drive modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) that are a family of highly conserved enzymes which comprise ubiquitous groups of signaling proteins playing critical regulatory roles in cell physiology. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) and p38{sup MAPK} control complex programs such as gene expression, embryogenesis, cell differentiation, cell proliferation, cell death and synaptic plasticity. Little information is available about MAPKs in aquatic organisms and their modulation by trace metals. The aim of this work was to determine the modulation of ERK1/2 and p38{sup MAPK} phosphorylation by Pb{sup 2+} in vivo and in vitro, in cerebellar slices of the catfish, Rhamdia quelen. In the in vitro model, slices were incubated for 3 h with lead acetate (1-10 {mu}M). In the in vivo studies, the animals were exposed for 2 days to lead acetate (1 mg L{sup -1}). ERK1/2 and p38{sup MAPK} (total and phosphorylated forms) were immunodetected in cerebellar slices by Western blotting. Pb{sup 2+} added in vitro at 5 and 10 {mu}M increased significantly the phosphorylation of both MAPKs. The in vivo exposed animals also showed a significant increase of ERK1/2 and p38{sup MAPK} phosphorylation without changes in the total content of the enzymes. In conclusion, the present work indicates that it is possible to evaluate the ERK1/2 and p38{sup MAPK} activation in the central nervous system (CNS) of a freshwater fish largely distributed in South America. Moreover, Pb{sup 2+}, an important environmental pollutant may activate in vitro and in vivo ERK1/2 and p38{sup MAPK} enzymes. These findings are important considering the functional and ecologic implications associated to Pb{sup 2+} exposure of a freshwater fish species, such as R. quelen, and the roles of ERK1/2 and p38{sup MAPK} in the control of brain development, neuroplasticity and cell death.

  2. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor types 1 and 2 are differentially expressed in pre- and post-synaptic elements in the post-natal developing rat cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinny, JD; Kalicharan, D; Blaauw, EH; Ijkema-Paassen, J; Shi, F; Gramsbergen, A; van der Want, JJL

    2003-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-like proteins act via two G-protein-coupled receptors (CRF-R1 and CRF-R2) playing important neuromodulatory roles in stress responses and synaptic plasticity. The cerebellar expression of corticotropin-releasing factor-like ligands has been well documented, but t

  3. Connectivity pattern differences bilaterally in the cerebellum posterior lobe in healthy subjects after normal sleep and sleep deprivation: a resting-state functional MRI study

    OpenAIRE

    Liu XM; Yan ZH; Wang TY; Yang XK; Feng F; Fan LP; Jiang J.

    2015-01-01

    Xuming Liu,1 Zhihan Yan,2 Tingyu Wang,1 Xiaokai Yang,1 Feng Feng,3 Luping Fan,1 Jian Jiang4 1Department of Radiology, The Third Clinical Institute Affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 2Department of Radiology, The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 3Peking Union Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 4Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, People&rsq...

  4. Dopamine D4 receptors modulate brain metabolic activity in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum at rest and in response to methylphenidate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelides, M.; Wang, G.; Michaelides, M.; Pascau, J.; Gispert, J.-D.; Delis, F.; Grandy, D.K.; Wang, G.-J.; Desco, M.; Rubinstein, M.; Volkow, N.D.; Thanos, P.K.

    2010-07-16

    Methylphenidate (MP) is widely used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Variable number of tandem repeats polymorphisms in the dopamine D4 receptor (D{sub 4}) gene have been implicated in vulnerability to ADHD and the response to MP. Here we examined the contribution of dopamine D4 receptors (D4Rs) to baseline brain glucose metabolism and to the regional metabolic responses to MP. We compared brain glucose metabolism (measured with micro-positron emission tomography and [{sup 18}F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose) at baseline and after MP (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administration in mice with genetic deletion of the D{sub 4}. Images were analyzed using a novel automated image registration procedure. Baseline D{sub 4}{sup -/-} mice had lower metabolism in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and greater metabolism in the cerebellar vermis (CBV) than D{sub 4}{sup +/+} and D{sub 4}{sup +/-} mice; when given MP, D{sub 4}{sup -/-} mice increased metabolism in the PFC and decreased it in the CBV, whereas in D{sub 4}{sup +/+} and D{sub 4}{sup +/-} mice, MP decreased metabolism in the PFC and increased it in the CBV. These findings provide evidence that D4Rs modulate not only the PFC, which may reflect the activation by dopamine of D4Rs located in this region, but also the CBV, which may reflect an indirect modulation as D4Rs are minimally expressed in this region. As individuals with ADHD show structural and/or functional abnormalities in these brain regions, the association of ADHD with D4Rs may reflect its modulation of these brain regions. The differential response to MP as a function of genotype could explain differences in brain functional responses to MP between patients with ADHD and healthy controls and between patients with ADHD with different D{sub 4} polymorphisms.

  5. A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Foreign-Language Vocabulary Learning Enhanced by Phonological Rehearsal: The Role of the Right Cerebellum and Left Fusiform Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Kai; Yamazaki, Mika; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Koike, Takahiko; Kochiyama, Takanori; Yokokawa, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Haruyo; Sadato, Norihiro

    2013-01-01

    Psychological research suggests that foreign-language vocabulary acquisition recruits the phonological loop for verbal working memory. To depict the neural underpinnings and shed light on the process of foreign language learning, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging of Japanese participants without previous exposure to the Uzbek…

  6. Ozone Effects on Protein Carbonyl Content in the Frontal Cortex and Cerebellum of Young-Adult, Middle Age, and Senescent Brown Norway Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress (OS) plays an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. Understanding age-related susceptibility is a critical part of community-based human health risk assessment of chemical exposures. There is growing concern over a common air pollutant, ozone ...

  7. 小脑:它的组件式神经元环路是如何进行运动学习和经典式条件反射活动的?%Cerebellum: How Does the Modular Organization in Cerebellum Fit with Its Roles in Activities of Motor Learning and Classical Conditioning?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩中胜; 乔健天

    2008-01-01

    近年来积累的资料表明,脊椎动物小脑不仅参与一向公认的躯体平衡、运动协调和技巧动作的获得,而且也同神经系统的高级认知功能(cognitive function)有关;但如何把这些功能活动同小脑特有、而又规则地遍布于小脑各部分的组件式结构(modular organization)联系起来,却存在较大的分歧和研究空间.本文仅就小脑的结构特点,以及如何将它们同近年来已成为研究热点的有关运动学习(motor learning)和经典式条件反射形成机制联系起来,作一些重点介绍.

  8. Influence of arsenic trioxide on gene expression profile of oxidation reduction enzyme in the cerebellum of mice%三氧化二砷对小鼠小脑氧化还原相关酶基因表达谱的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪岩; 朴丰源; 王艳艳; 刘鹏

    2008-01-01

    目的 应用基因芯片技术观察三氧化二砷(As2O3)对小鼠小脑组织氧化还原相关酶基因表达谱的影响.方法 昆明种小鼠30只随机分为3组,即生理盐水对照组、低剂量组(1 mg/L As2O3染毒组)和高剂量组(4 mg/L As2O3)染毒组),连续染毒60 d,断头法处死小鼠,利用基因芯片技术检测基因表达谱的变化.结果 基因芯片筛选结果显示,与对照组比较,染砷组中差异表达2倍及以上的基因有18条,其中表达上调的基因有12条,表达下调的基因有6条.高剂量组与低剂量组及对照组比较,表达上调的基因有Ndufa4、Ndufa6、Gpx3、Adil、Rrm2b,表达下调的基因有Spr、Hsd17b11、Ogfod1、Ndufab1.与对照组比较,染砷组中Cyp51、Phgdh、Dhrs4、Prdx4、Aldh1a、1810063805Rik、Glrx表达上调,Prdx2、1110020P15 Rik表达下调.结论 As2O3对小鼠小脑的氧化还原相关酶基因表达谱具有明显的影响,提示这些小脑氧化还原相关酶基因很可能是砷的神经毒作用的靶点.

  9. Periaqueductal Grey Stimulation Induced Panic-Like Behaviour Is Accompanied by Deactivation of the Deep Cerebellar Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Moers-Hornikx, Véronique M. P.; Vles, Johan S. H.; Lim, Lee Wei; AYYILDIZ, Mustafa; Kaplan, Sűleyman; Gavilanes, Antonio W. D.; Hoogland, Govert; STEINBUSCH, Harry W.M.; Temel, Yasin

    2010-01-01

    Until recently, the cerebellum was primarily considered to be a structure involved in motor behaviour. New anatomical and clinical evidence has shown that the cerebellum is also involved in higher cognitive functions and non-motor behavioural changes. Functional imaging in patients with anxiety disorders and in cholecystokinin tetrapeptide-induced panic-attacks shows activation changes in the cerebellum. Deep brain stimulation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal grey (dlPAG) and the ventromedi...

  10. Steroids, sex and the cerebellar cortex: implications for human disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, Shannon L.; McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2008-01-01

    Neurosteroids play an important role in the development of the cerebellum. In particular, estradiol and progesterone appear capable of inducing increases in dendritic spine density during development, and there is evidence that both are synthesized de novo in the cerebellum during critical developmental periods. In normal neonates and adults, there are few differences in the cerebellum between the sexes and most studies indicate that hormone and receptor levels also do not differ significantl...

  11. Implications of functional anatomy on information processing in the deep cerebellar nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, Gilad A.; Dana Cohen

    2009-01-01

    The cerebellum has been implicated as a major player in producing temporal acuity. Theories of cerebellar timing typically emphasize the role of the cerebellar cortex while overlooking the role of the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) that provide the sole output of the cerebellum. Here we review anatomical and electrophysiological studies to shed light on the DCN’s ability to support temporal pattern generation in the cerebellum. Specifically, we examine data on the structure of the DCN, th...

  12. Implications of Functional Anatomy on Information Processing in the Deep Cerebellar Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Baumel, Yuval; Jacobson, Gilad A.; Cohen, Dana

    2009-01-01

    The cerebellum has been implicated as a major player in producing temporal acuity. Theories of cerebellar timing typically emphasize the role of the cerebellar cortex while overlooking the role of the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) that provide the sole output of the cerebellum. Here we review anatomical and electrophysiological studies to shed light on the DCN's ability to support temporal pattern generation in the cerebellum. Specifically, we examine data on the structure of the DCN, the biop...

  13. Macro- and Microscopic Structural Features of the Cerebellar Dentate Nucleus in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Shyian, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    Since ancient times the study of one part of the brain - the cerebellum - has attracted the attention of many researchers, however, neither anatomy of the cerebellum, nor its function remain fully studied. The nuclei of the cerebellum, including the dentate nucleus are not sufficiently studied. The structural features of the cerebellar dentate nucleus of human in ontogenesis and its topographic and anatomic location are important not only for anatomists, physiologists, but also for clinicians...

  14. Resting state cortico-cerebellar functional connectivity networks: A comparison of anatomical and self-organizing map approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Bernard

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum plays a role in a wide variety of complex behaviors. In order to better understand the role of the cerebellum in human behavior, it is important to know how this structure interacts with cortical and other subcortical regions of the brain. To date, several studies have investigated the cerebellum using resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI; Buckner et al., 2011; Krienen & Buckner, 2009; O’Reilly et al., 2009. However, none of this work has taken an anatomically-driven approach. Furthermore, though detailed maps of cerebral cortex and cerebellum networks have been proposed using different network solutions based on the cerebral cortex (Buckner et al., 2011, it remains unknown whether or not an anatomical lobular breakdown best encompasses the networks of the cerebellum. Here, we used fcMRI to create an anatomically-driven cerebellar connectivity atlas. Timecourses were extracted from the lobules of the right hemisphere and vermis. We found distinct networks for the individual lobules with a clear division into motor and non-motor regions. We also used a self-organizing map algorithm to parcellate the cerebellum. This allowed us to investigate redundancy and independence of the anatomically identified cerebellar networks. We found that while anatomical boundaries in the anterior cerebellum provide functional subdivisions of a larger motor grouping defined using our self-organizing map algorithm, in the posterior cerebellum, the lobules were made up of sub-regions associated with distinct functional networks. Together, our results indicate that the lobular boundaries of the human cerebellum are not indicative of functional boundaries, though anatomical divisions can be useful, as is the case of the anterior cerebellum. Additionally, driving the analyses from the cerebellum is key to determining the complete picture of functional connectivity within the structure.

  15. Impaired cerebellar functional connectivity in schizophrenia patients and their healthy siblings

    OpenAIRE

    Guusje eCollin; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Haijma, Sander V.; Wiepke eCahn; Kahn, Rene S.; van den Heuvel, Martijn P.

    2011-01-01

    The long-standing notion of schizophrenia as a disorder of connectivity is supported by emerging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies, suggesting impairments of both structural and functional connectivity in schizophrenia. However, investigations are generally restricted to supratentorial brain regions, thereby excluding the cerebellum. As increasing evidence suggests that the cerebellum contributes to cognitive and affective processing, aberrant connectivity in schizophrenia may include...

  16. Automated cerebellar segmentation: Validation and application to detect smaller volumes in children prenatally exposed to alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie A. Cardenas

    2014-01-01

    Discussion: These results demonstrate excellent reliability and validity of automated cerebellar volume and mid-sagittal area measurements, compared to manual measurements. These data also illustrate that this new technology for automatically delineating the cerebellum leads to conclusions regarding the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the cerebellum consistent with prior studies that used labor intensive manual delineation, even with a very small sample.

  17. Neural Circuitry and Plasticity Mechanisms Underlying Delay Eyeblink Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, John H.; Steinmetz, Adam B.

    2011-01-01

    Pavlovian eyeblink conditioning has been used extensively as a model system for examining the neural mechanisms underlying associative learning. Delay eyeblink conditioning depends on the intermediate cerebellum ipsilateral to the conditioned eye. Evidence favors a two-site plasticity model within the cerebellum with long-term depression of…

  18. Differential Simple Spike Activity in Alert Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Zhou (Haibo)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The cerebellum is the part of the brain that is located posterior in the skull on top of the brain stem, and is known to contain more than half the proportion of neurons in the entire brain. The cerebellum is generally not considered to be the location where motor comma

  19. Circadian oscillations of molecular clock components in the cerebellar cortex of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten

    2012-01-01

    , recent studies have shown the presence of extrahypothalamic oscillators in other areas of the brain including the cerebellum. In the present study, the authors unravel the cerebellar molecular clock by analyzing clock gene expression in the cerebellum of the rat by use of radiochemical in situ...

  20. Cerebellar Expression of the Neurotrophin Receptor p75 in Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rahimi Balaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutation in the lysosomal acid phosphatase 2 (Acp2 mouse (nax—naked-ataxia mutant mouse correlates with severe cerebellar defects including ataxia, reduced size and abnormal lobulation as well as Purkinje cell (Pc degeneration. Loss of Pcs in the nax cerebellum is compartmentalized and harmonized to the classic pattern of gene expression of the cerebellum in the wild type mouse. Usually, degeneration starts in the anterior and posterior zones and continues to the central and nodular zones of cerebellum. Studies have suggested that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (NTR plays a role in Pc degeneration; thus, in this study, we investigated the p75NTR pattern and protein expression in the cerebellum of the nax mutant mouse. Despite massive Pc degeneration that was observed in the nax mouse cerebellum, p75NTR pattern expression was similar to the HSP25 pattern in nax mice and comparable with wild type sibling cerebellum. In addition, immunoblot analysis of p75NTR protein expression did not show any significant difference between nax and wild type sibling (p > 0.5. In comparison with wild type counterparts, p75NTR pattern expression is aligned with the fundamental cytoarchitecture organization of the cerebellum and is unchanged in the nax mouse cerebellum despite the severe neurodevelopmental disorder accompanied with Pc degeneration.

  1. Clinical, neuroradiological and genetic findings in pontocerebellar hypoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namavar, Yasmin; Barth, Peter G; Kasher, Paul R; van Ruissen, Fred; Brockmann, Knut; Bernert, Günther; Writzl, Karin; Ventura, Karen; Cheng, Edith Y; Ferriero, Donna M; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Eggens, Veerle R C; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; De Meirleir, Linda; King, Mary; Graham, John M; von Moers, Arpad; Knoers, Nine; Sztriha, Laszlo; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Dobyns, William B; Baas, Frank; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Sival, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasia is a group of autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorders with prenatal onset. The common characteristics are cerebellar hypoplasia with variable atrophy of the cerebellum and the ventral pons. Supratentorial involvement is reflected by variable neocortical atrophy, ve

  2. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... us the capacity to remember numerous pieces of information. The 3 major components of the brain are ... communication between the cortex and lower central nervous system centers. The cerebellum is located near the base ...

  3. Sleep disturbances in chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.W.; Westeneng, H.J.; Hal, M.A. van; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Overeem, S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) is a relatively common mitochondrial disorder. In addition to extraocular muscle weakness, various other organs can typically be affected, including laryngeal and limb muscles, cerebrum, cerebellum, and peripheral nerves. Given this mul

  4. Brain Basics: Know Your Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sound, sight, and touch. The Cerebral Cortex Coating the surface of the cerebrum and the cerebellum ... is associated with a shortage of acetylcholine. GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) is called an inhibitory neurotransmitter because ...

  5. HETEROGENEOUS RECEPTOR-BINDING OF CLASSICAL QUATERNARY MUSCARINIC ANTAGONISTS .1. BOVINE TISSUE DISTRIBUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROFFEL, AF; ENSING, K; INTHOUT, WG; DEZEEUW, RA; ZAAGSMA, J

    1991-01-01

    In competition experiments with the teritiary radioligand [H-3]dexetimide, classical quaternary muscarinic antagonists like ipratropium bromide and N-methylscopolamine bromide distinguished two muscarinic binding sites in bovine brain (total brain minus cerebellum) membranes, in contrast to their te

  6. Cooperation between the Hic1 and Ptch1 tumor suppressors in medulloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs, Kimberly J.; Corcoran-Schwartz, Ian M.; Zhang, Wei; Harcke, Thomas; Devereux, Wendy L.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Watkins, D. Neil

    2008-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is an embryonal tumor thought to arise from the granule cell precursors (GCPs) of the cerebellum. PATCHED (PTCH), an inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling, is the best-characterized tumor suppressor in medulloblastoma. However,

  7. What we do not know about cerebellar systems neuroscience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Voogd (Jan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractOur knowledge of the modular organization of the cerebellum and the sphere of influence of these modules still presents large gaps. Here I will review these gaps against our present anatomical and physiological knowledge of these systems.

  8. Experiment list: SRX685870 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lance, and learn motor skills. 64161152,0.0,70.9,0 GSM1486383: P7 Cerebellum DNase-seq Rep 3; Mus musculus; ...cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain ba

  9. Experiment list: SRX685874 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lance, and learn motor skills. 178723963,0.2,27.3,907 GSM1486387: P60 Cerebellum DNase-seq Rep 1; Mus muscul...cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain ba

  10. Experiment list: SRX685873 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lance, and learn motor skills. 200858891,0.0,11.0,0 GSM1486386: P14 Cerebellum DNase-seq Rep 3; Mus musculus...cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain ba

  11. Experiment list: SRX685869 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lance, and learn motor skills. 59999511,0.0,67.3,0 GSM1486382: P7 Cerebellum DNase-seq Rep 2; Mus musculus; ...cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain ba

  12. Experiment list: SRX685871 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lance, and learn motor skills. 160531350,0.0,11.8,0 GSM1486384: P14 Cerebellum DNase-seq Rep 1; Mus musculus...cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain ba

  13. Experiment list: SRX019014 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available alance, and learn motor skills. 9282155,68.0,41.3,5377 GSM427095: Sirt1 cerebellum ChIPseq source_name=cereb... cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain b

  14. Experiment list: SRX685868 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lance, and learn motor skills. 68545959,0.0,55.7,0 GSM1486381: P7 Cerebellum DNase-seq Rep 1; Mus musculus; ...cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain ba

  15. Experiment list: SRX062949 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lance, and learn motor skills. 57796523,71.5,23.1,31524 GSM722663: RenLab-CTCF-cerebellum source_name=Mouse ...cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain ba

  16. Experiment list: SRX685875 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lance, and learn motor skills. 181337188,0.0,0.0,0 GSM1486388: P60 Cerebellum DNase-seq Rep 2; Mus musculus;...cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain ba

  17. Experiment list: SRX191022 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lance, and learn motor skills. 100382126,90.2,25.2,70896 GSM1014164: UW DnaseSeq Cerebellum adult-8wks C57BL...cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain ba

  18. Experiment list: SRX685876 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lance, and learn motor skills. 204608825,0.1,13.2,123 GSM1486389: P60 Cerebellum DNase-seq Rep 3; Mus muscul...cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain ba

  19. Experiment list: SRX685872 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lance, and learn motor skills. 186106893,0.2,27.1,1943 GSM1486385: P14 Cerebellum DNase-seq Rep 2; Mus muscu...cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain ba

  20. Experiment list: SRX143851 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lance, and learn motor skills. 57796523,71.5,23.1,31516 GSM918759: LICR ChipSeq Cerebellum CTCF adult-8wks s...cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain ba

  1. Disease: H00076 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gion: cerebral cortex, cerebellum, basal ganglia Microscopic lesion: accumulate of DNA lesions, tigroid-type...cision repair cross complementing, group 6 (mutation) [HSA:2074] [KO:K10841] Prodarsan (Phase I) Affected re

  2. Bilateral cerebellar activation in unilaterally challenged essential tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Broersma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results expand on previous findings of bilateral cerebellar involvement in ET. We have identified specific areas in the bilateral somatomotor regions of the cerebellum: lobules V, VI and VIII.

  3. Cerebellar ataxia and functional genomics : Identifying the routes to cerebellar neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C J L M; Verbeek, D S

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by atrophy of the cerebellum leading to motor dysfunction, balance problems, and limb and gait ataxia. These include among others, the dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias, recessive cerebellar ataxias such as Fried

  4. Involvement of the crebellum in sequential finger movement learning: Evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yihong; DI Haibo; YUAN Yi; REN Jin'ge; YU Wei; ZHANG Zhaoqi; GAO Jiahong; WENG Xuchu; CHEN Yizhang

    2005-01-01

    Whether the cerebellum is involved in voluntary motor learning or motor performance is the subject of a new debate. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we examined cerebellar activation in eight volunteers before and after an extended period of training. Activation volume on both sides of cerebellum after learning was significantly reduced compared to that before learning even under the same motor frequency. Remarkably, while motor frequency for the training sequence was significantly higher than the control sequence after 41 d of learning, activation in the cerebellum for both sequences, with respect to activation loci and volumes, was very similar. These results suggest that the cerebellum was involved in motor learning but not motor performance. Changes of cerebellar activation from training thus appear to be associated with learning but not with improvement on task performance.

  5. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

  6. Vanishing White Matter Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... coma. Ovary dysgenesis: defective development of the ovaries. Cerebellar ataxia: loss of muscle coordination as a result of abnormal functioning of the cerebellum (a part of the brain). Optic atrophy (variably ...

  7. Dual task effect on postural control in patients with degenerative cerebellar disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobi, H.; Alfes, J.; Minnerop, Martina; Konczak, J; Klockgether, T; Timmann, D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The cerebellum plays an important role for balance control and the coordination of voluntary movements. Beyond that there is growing evidence that the cerebellum is also involved in cognitive functions. How ataxic motor symptoms are influenced by simultaneous performance of a cognitive task, however, has rarely been assessed and some of the findings are contradictory. We assessed stance in 20 patients with adult onset degenerative almost purely cerebellar disorders and 20 healthy c...

  8. Treadmill exercise improves motor coordination through ameliorating Purkinje cell loss in amyloid beta23-35-induced Alzheimer’s disease rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae-Min; Shin, Mal-Soon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Tae-Woon; Cho, Han-Sam; Kim, Chang-Ju; Jang, Myung-Soo; Kim, Tae-Wook; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Dong-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a most common age-related neurodegenerative disease. AD is characterized by a progressive loss of neurons causing cognitive dysfunction. The cerebellum is closely associated with integration of movement, including motor coordination, control, and equilibrium. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of tread-mill exercise on the survival of Purkinje neurons in relation with reactive astrocyte in the cerebellum using Aβ25–35–induced AD rats. AD was induced by a...

  9. Architecture and development of olivocerebellar circuit topography

    OpenAIRE

    Reeber, Stacey L.; White, Joshua J.; George-Jones, Nicholas A.; Sillitoe, Roy V.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum has a simple tri-laminar structure that is comprised of relatively few cell types. Yet, its internal micro-circuitry is anatomically, biochemically, and functionally complex. The most striking feature of cerebellar circuit complexity is its compartmentalized topography. Each cell type within the cerebellar cortex is organized into an exquisite map; molecular expression patterns, dendrite projections, and axon terminal fields divide the medial-lateral axis of the cerebellum into...

  10. Alteration in forward model prediction of sensory outcome of motor action in focal hand dystonia

    OpenAIRE

    André Lee; Matthias Karst

    2013-01-01

    Focal hand dystonia in musicians is a movement disorder affecting highly trained movements. Rather than being a pure motor disorder related to movement execution only, movement planning, error prediction and sensorimotor integration are also impaired. Internal models, of which two types, forward and inverse models have been described and most likely processed in the cerebellum, are known to be involved in these tasks. Recent results indicate that the cerebellum may be involved in the pathophy...

  11. MyoD is a tumor suppressor gene in Medulloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Dey, Joyoti; Dubuc, Adrian M.; Pedro, Kyle D.; Thirstrup, Derek; Mecham, Brig; Northcott, Paul A.; Wu, Xiaochong; Shih, David; Tapscott, Stephen J.; LeBlanc, Michael; Taylor, Michael D.; Olson, James M.

    2013-01-01

    While medulloblastoma, a pediatric tumor of the cerebellum, is characterized by aberrations in developmental pathways, the majority of genetic determinants remain unknown. An unbiased Sleeping Beauty transposon screen revealed MyoD as a putative medulloblastoma tumor suppressor. This was unexpected, as MyoD is a muscle differentiation factor and not previously known to be expressed in cerebellum or medulloblastoma. In response to deletion of one allele of MyoD, two other Sonic hedgehog-driven...

  12. The role of the membrane cytoskeleton cross-linker ezrin in medulloblastoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Osawa, Hirokatsu; Smith, Christian A.; Ra, Young Shin; Kongkham, Paul; Rutka, James T.

    2009-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant brain tumor that occurs predominantly in children. The molecular pathogenesis of medulloblastoma is under investigation. Previously, we used complementary DNA micro-array analysis to compare patterns of gene expression in medulloblastoma samples versus normal cerebellum. The cytoskeletal protein ezrin was found to be overexpressed in medulloblastoma compared with normal cerebellum, an observation that was further validated by immunohistochemistry and real...

  13. High membrane protein oxidation in the human cerebral cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Matthias Granold; Bernd Moosmann; Irina Staib-Lasarzik; Thomas Arendt; Adriana del Rey; Kristin Engelhard; Christian Behl; Parvana Hajieva

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be one of the main mediators of neuronal damage in human neurodegenerative disease. Still, the dissection of causal relationships has turned out to be remarkably difficult. Here, we have analyzed global protein oxidation in terms of carbonylation of membrane proteins and cytoplasmic proteins in three different mammalian species: aged human cortex and cerebellum from patients with or without Alzheimer's disease, mouse cortex and cerebellum from young and old anim...

  14. Von hippel-lindaus disease: Report of three cases and review of the literature Doença de von Hippel-Lindau: relato de três casos e revisão da literatura

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz F. Bleggi-Torres; Lúcia de Noranha; J. Fillus Neto; José E. Queiroz Telles; Luiz E. Madalozzo

    1995-01-01

    The authors present the autopsy findings of two related patients and the biopsy findings of a thrid member of the family. The oldest member was 34 years old at death and on postmortem examination he had haemangioblastomas in the retina, cerebellum, medulla and spinal cord. Other findings were renal cell carcinoma, phaechromocytoma, cysts of kidney and pancreas, hydromyelia and atypical meningiomas. His brother died when 30 years old. The autopsy revealed haemangioblastomas of cerebellum, rena...

  15. Differential contributions of the superior and inferior parietal cortex to feedback versus feedforward control of tools

    OpenAIRE

    Macuga, Kristen L.; Frey, Scott H.

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the superior and/or inferior parietal lobules (SPL, IPL) (Sirigu et al., 1996) or cerebellum (Grealy and Lee, 2011) can selectively disrupt motor imagery, motivating the hypothesis that these regions participate in predictive (i.e., feedforward) control. If so, then the SPL, IPL, and cerebellum should show greater activity as the demands on feedforward control increase from visually-guided execution (closed-loop) to execution without visual feedback (open-loop) to motor imagery. Usi...

  16. Imaging Spectrum of Cerebellar Pathologies: A Pictorial Essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cerebellum is a crucial structure of hindbrain which helps in maintaining motor tone, posture, gait and also coordinates skilled voluntary movements including eye movements. Cerebellar abnormalities have different spectrum, presenting symptoms and prognosis as compared to supratentorial structures and brainstem. This article intends to review the various pathological processes involving the cerebellum along with their imaging features on MR, which are must to know for all radiologists, neurologists and neurosurgeons for their prompt diagnosis and management

  17. A closer look at visually guided saccades in autism and Asperger’s disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Beth Johnson; Lynette Millist

    2012-01-01

    Motor impairments have been found to be a significant clinical feature associated with autism and Asperger’s disorder (AD) in addition to core symptoms of communication and social cognition deficits. Motor deficits in high-functioning autism (HFA) and AD may differentiate these disorders, particularly with respect to the role of the cerebellum in motor functioning. Current neuroimaging and behavioural evidence suggests greater disruption of the cerebellum in HFA than AD. Investigations of ocu...

  18. Clinical and morphopathological characteristics of an enzootic occurrence of acute coenurosis (Coenurus cerebralis) in a sheep herd

    OpenAIRE

    Farjani Kish, GH.; Khodakaram-Tafti, A.; Hajimohammadi, A.; Ahmadi, N.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, 30 sheep from a flock suddenly showed acute neurological symptoms associated with more than 30 % mortality. At necropsy, thickening associated with congestion and turbidity of meningeal membranes particularly on cerebellum, focal to multifocal necrotic areas and whitish spots measuring 1 to 3 cm in diameter were observed in the cortex of cerebrum and cerebellum. Grossly, numerous white tracts were also observed in the myocardium. Histopathologically, the cross sections of coenu...

  19. Multiple solid pilocytic astrocytomas in cerebleiium with neurofibromatosis type: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seo Young; Kim, Myung Soon; Kim, Young Ju [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju Severance Christian Hospital, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Pilocytic astrocytoma usually has a classic imaging manifestation of a solitary, cyst-like mass with a strong contrast-enhancing mural nodule. There is only one published report so far of multiple solid and cyst type pilocytic astrocytomas in the cerebellum in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patient from the United States in 2007. We report a case of pilocytic astrocytoma presenting with only solid, multiple pilocytic astrocytomas in the cerebellum in NF1 patient.

  20. Somatostatin receptors are expressed by immature cerebellar granule cells: evidence for a direct inhibitory effect of somatostatin on neuroblast activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, B; Leroux, P.; Lamacz, M; Bodenant, C; Balazs, R.; Vaudry, H.

    1992-01-01

    Somatostatin and somatostatin receptors are transiently expressed in the immature rat cerebellar cortex but virtually undetectable in the cerebellum of adults. Although somatostatin binding sites have been visualized during the postnatal period in the external granule cell layer, the type of cell that expresses somatostatin receptors has never been identified; thus, the potential function of somatostatin in the developing cerebellum remains unknown. In the present study, we have taken advanta...

  1. Taltirelin improves motor ataxia independently of monoamine levels in rolling mouse nagoya, a model of spinocerebellar atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tomoka; Honda, Motoko; Kimura, Satoko; Tanabe, Mitsuo; Oda, Sen-ichi; Ono, Hideki

    2005-12-01

    To examine the relationship between motor ataxia and monoamine levels in the central nervous system, the contents and concentrations of noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) in the cerebellum, brain stem and spinal cord were measured in rolling mouse Nagoya (RMN), a murine model of spinocerebellar atrophy. The tissue weight of the cerebellum and spinal cord, but not that of the brain stem was significantly lower in RMN than in the control group. In RMN, the NA content of the brain stem and spinal cord, but not the cerebellum were decreased relative to the control, and the concentration of NA in the spinal cord was also lower, but not significant. The DA and 5-HT contents in each tissue did not differ from those of the control, but the concentrations of monoamines, except for DA, were elevated in the brain stem and spinal cord in RMN. In particular, the concentrations of NA, DA and 5-HT in the cerebellum were significantly increased in RMN. Repeated administration of tartilerin hydrate, an analog of thyrotropin-releasing hormone, improved the ataxia of RMN, and elicited no obvious changes in either monoamine content or concentration of cerebellum, brain stem and spinal cord. These results indicate that the concentration of DA, as well as NA and 5-HT, increased in the RMN cerebellum, and that tartilerin improves the motor function of these mice via mechanisms other than changes in the levels of NA, DA and 5-HT in the central nervous system.

  2. Cerebella segmentation on MR images of pediatric patients with medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Zu Y.; Ji, Qing; Glass, John; Gajjar, Amar; Reddick, Wilburn E.

    2005-04-01

    In this study, an automated method has been developed to identify the cerebellum from T1-weighted MR brain images of patients with medulloblastoma. A new objective function that is similar to Gibbs free energy in classic physics was defined; and the brain structure delineation was viewed as a process of minimizing Gibbs free energy. We used a rigid-body registration and an active contour (snake) method to minimize the Gibbs free energy in this study. The method was applied to 20 patient data sets to generate cerebellum images and volumetric results. The generated cerebellum images were compared with two manually drawn results. Strong correlations were found between the automatically and manually generated volumetric results, the correlation coefficients with each of manual results were 0.971 and 0.974, respectively. The average Jaccard similarities with each of two manual results were 0.89 and 0.88, respectively. The average Kappa indexes with each of two manual results were 0.94 and 0.93, respectively. These results showed this method was both robust and accurate for cerebellum segmentation. The method may be applied to various research and clinical investigation in which cerebellum segmentation and quantitative MR measurement of cerebellum are needed.

  3. Resting-state cerebellar-cerebral networks are differently affected in first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia patients and unaffected siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Chen, Jindong; Wu, Renrong; Zhang, Zhikun; Yu, Miaoyu; Xiao, Changqing; Zhao, Jingping

    2015-11-26

    Dysconnectivity hypothesis posits that schizophrenia is a disorder with dysconnectivity of the cortico-cerebellar-thalamic-cortical circuit (CCTCC). However, it remains unclear to the changes of the cerebral connectivity with the cerebellum in schizophrenia patients and unaffected siblings. Forty-nine patients with first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia patients, 46 unaffected siblings of schizophrenia patients and 46 healthy controls participated in the study. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity approach was employed to analyze the data. Compared with the controls, the patients and the siblings share increased default-mode network (DMN) seed - right Crus II connectivity. The patients have decreased right dorsal attention network (DAN) seed - bilateral cerebellum 4,5 connectivity relative to the controls. By contrast, the siblings exhibit increased FC between the right DAN seed and the right cerebellum 6 and right cerebellum 4,5 compared to the controls. No other abnormal connectivities (executive control network and salience network) are observed in the patients/siblings relative to the controls. There are no correlations between abnormal cerebellar-cerebral connectivities and clinical variables. Cerebellar-cerebral connectivity of brain networks within the cerebellum are differently affected in first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia patients and unaffected siblings. Increased DMN connectivity with the cerebellum may serve as potential endophenotype for schizophrenia.

  4. Deficits in reflexive covert attention following cerebellar injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striemer, Christopher L; Cantelmi, David; Cusimano, Michael D; Danckert, James A; Schweizer, Tom A

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally the cerebellum has been known for its important role in coordinating motor output. Over the past 15 years numerous studies have indicated that the cerebellum plays a role in a variety of cognitive functions including working memory, language, perceptual functions, and emotion. In addition, recent work suggests that regions of the cerebellum involved in eye movements also play a role in controlling covert visual attention. Here we investigated whether regions of the cerebellum that are not strictly tied to the control of eye movements might also contribute to covert attention. To address this question we examined the effects of circumscribed cerebellar lesions on reflexive covert attention in a group of patients (n = 11) without any gross motor or oculomotor deficits, and compared their performance to a group of age-matched controls (n = 11). Results indicated that the traditional RT advantage for validly cued targets was significantly smaller at the shortest (50 ms) SOA for cerebellar patients compared to controls. Critically, a lesion overlap analysis indicated that this deficit in the rapid deployment of attention was linked to damage in Crus I and Crus II of the lateral cerebellum. Importantly, both cerebellar regions have connections to non-motor regions of the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices-regions important for controlling visuospatial attention. Together, these data provide converging evidence that both lateral and midline regions of the cerebellum play an important role in the control of reflexive covert visual attention. PMID:26300756

  5. Deficits in reflexive covert attention following cerebellar injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher eStriemer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally the cerebellum has been known for its important role in coordinating motor output. Over the past fifteen years numerous studies have indicated that the cerebellum plays a role in a variety of cognitive functions including working memory, language, perceptual functions, and emotion. In addition, recent work suggests that regions of the cerebellum involved in eye movements also play a role in controlling covert visual attention. Here we investigated whether regions of the cerebellum that are not strictly tied to the control of eye movements might also contribute to covert attention. To address this question we examined the effects of circumscribed cerebellar lesions on reflexive covert attention in a group of patients (n=11 without any gross motor or oculomotor deficits, and compared their performance to a group of age-matched controls (n=11. Results indicated that the traditional RT advantage for validly cued targets was significantly smaller at the shortest (50ms SOA for cerebellar patients compared to controls. Critically, a lesion overlap analysis indicated that this deficit in the rapid deployment of attention was linked to damage in Crus I and Crus II of the lateral cerebellum. Importantly, both cerebellar regions have connections to non-motor regions of the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices – regions important for controlling visuospatial attention. Together, these data provide converging evidence that both lateral and midline regions of the cerebellum play an important role in the control of reflexive covert visual attention.

  6. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P.; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J.; Edwards, Dylan J.; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M.; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R. Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A.; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S. Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar–motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar–thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions. PMID:25406224

  7. Effects of attention and perceptual uncertainty on cerebellar activity during visual motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Oliver; Mattingley, Jason B

    2014-02-01

    Recent clinical and neuroimaging studies have revealed that the human cerebellum plays a role in visual motion perception, but the nature of its contribution to this function is not understood. Some reports suggest that the cerebellum might facilitate motion perception by aiding attentive tracking of visual objects. Others have identified a particular role for the cerebellum in discriminating motion signals in perceptually uncertain conditions. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine the degree to which cerebellar involvement in visual motion perception can be explained by a role in sustained attentive tracking of moving stimuli in contrast to a role in visual motion discrimination. While holding the visual displays constant, we manipulated attention by having participants attend covertly to a field of random-dot motion or a colored spot at fixation. Perceptual uncertainty was manipulated by varying the percentage of signal dots contained within the random-dot arrays. We found that attention to motion under high perceptual uncertainty was associated with strong activity in left cerebellar lobules VI and VII. By contrast, attending to motion under low perceptual uncertainty did not cause differential activation in the cerebellum. We found no evidence to support the suggestion that the cerebellum is involved in simple attentive tracking of salient moving objects. Instead, our results indicate that specific subregions of the cerebellum are involved in facilitating the detection and discrimination of task-relevant moving objects under conditions of high perceptual uncertainty. We conclude that the cerebellum aids motion perception under conditions of high perceptual demand. PMID:23982589

  8. Aberrant cerebellar connectivity in motor and association networks in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann K. Shinn

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a devastating illness characterized by disturbances in multiple domains. The cerebellum is involved in both motor and non-motor functions, and the cognitive dysmetria and dysmetria of thought models propose that abnormalities of the cerebellum may contribute to schizophrenia signs and symptoms. The cerebellum and cerebral cortex are reciprocally connected via a modular, closed-loop network architecture, but few schizophrenia neuroimaging studies have taken into account the topographical and functional heterogeneity of the cerebellum. In this study, using a previously defined 17-network cerebral cortical parcellation system as the basis for our functional connectivity seeds, we systematically investigated connectivity abnormalities within the cerebellum of 44 schizophrenia patients and 28 healthy control participants. We found selective alterations in cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity. Specifically, schizophrenia patients showed decreased cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity in higher level association networks (ventral attention, salience, control, and default mode networks relative to healthy control participants. Schizophrenia patients also showed increased cerebro-cerebellar connectivity in somatomotor and default mode networks, with the latter showing no overlap with the regions found to be hypoconnected within the same default mode network. Finally, we found evidence to suggest that somatomotor and default mode networks may be inappropriately linked in schizophrenia. The relationship of these dysconnectivities to schizophrenia symptoms, such as neurological soft signs and altered sense of agency, is discussed. We conclude that the cerebellum ought to be considered for analysis in all future studies of network abnormalities in SZ, and further suggest the cerebellum as a potential target for further elucidation, and possibly treatment, of the underlying mechanisms and network abnormalities producing symptoms of

  9. Thyroid hormone promotes transient nerve growth factor synthesis in rat cerebellar neuroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrasse, S; Jehan, F; Confort, C; Brachet, P; Clos, J

    1992-01-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellum from 5-day-old rats indicated that proliferating neuroblasts synthesize and release nerve growth factor (NGF). Since NGF promotes DNA synthesis in these cells, our findings demonstrate that the early developing cerebellum is a suitable physiological model for studying the autocrine mitogenic action of NGF. Thyroid deficiency led to a greater reduction in the NGF content of the cerebellum than of the olfactory bulbs or hippocampus. Cerebellar NGF mRNA was also very sensitive to hormone deprivation. Physiological amounts of thyroid hormone stimulated both the mitotic activity and NGF production of cultured cerebellar neuroblasts. A lack of thyroid hormone is known to markedly alter cell formation in the cerebellum where postnatal neurogenesis is highly significant, in contrast to the olfactory bulbs and hippocampus. Taken together, these results suggest that the hormonal control of cell formation in the cerebellum is, at least partly, mediated by the autocrine mitogenic action of NGF. The thyroid hormone could temporally regulate the transient NGF synthesis by cerebellar neuroblasts directly and/or through its ontogenetic action, and hence all the NGF-dependent trophic effects. PMID:1295750

  10. Regulation of five tubulin isotypes by thyroid hormone during brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniello, F; Couchie, D; Gripois, D; Nunez, J

    1991-11-01

    Nucleic acid probes derived from the 3' noncoding region of five tubulin cDNAs were used to study the effects of thyroid hormone deficiency on the expression of the mRNAs encoding two alpha (alpha 1 and alpha 2)- and three beta (beta 2, beta 4, and beta 5)-tubulin isotypes in the developing cerebral hemispheres and cerebellum. The content of alpha 1, which markedly declines during development in both brain regions, is maintained at high levels in the hypothyroid cerebellum, whereas it is decreased in the cerebral hemispheres. The alpha 2 level also declines during development and is decreased in both regions by thyroid hormone deficiency, but only during the two first postnatal weeks. Thyroid hormone deficiency slightly increases at all stages the beta 2 level in the cerebellum, whereas a decrease is observed at early stages in the cerebral hemispheres. The beta 5 level seems to be independent of thyroid hormone in the cerebral hemispheres, whereas it decreases at early stages in the hypothyroid cerebellum. Finally, the expression of the brain-specific beta 4 isotype is markedly depressed by thyroid hormone deficiency, particularly in the cerebellum. These data suggest that the genes encoding the tubulin isotypes are, directly or not, differently regulated by thyroid hormone during brain development. This might contribute to abnormal neurite outgrowth seen in the hypothyroid brain and therefore to impairment in brain functions produced by thyroid hormone deficiency. PMID:1717658

  11. Coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Herculano-Houzel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available While larger brains possess concertedly larger cerebral cortices and cerebella, the relative size of the cerebral cortex increases with brain size, but relative cerebellar size does not. In the absence of data on numbers of neurons in these structures, this discrepancy has been used to dispute the hypothesis that the cerebral cortex and cerebellum function and have evolved in concert and to support a trend towards neocorticalization in evolution. However, the rationale for interpreting changes in absolute and relative size of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum relies on the assumption that they reflect absolute and relative numbers of neurons in these structures across all species – an assumption that our recent studies have shown to be flawed. Here I show for the first time that the numbers of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum are directly correlated across 19 mammalian species of 4 different orders, including humans, and increase concertedly in a similar fashion both within and across the orders Eulipotyphla (Insectivora, Rodentia, Scandentia and Primata, such that on average a ratio of 3.6 neurons in the cerebellum to every neuron in the cerebral cortex is maintained across species. This coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons provides direct evidence in favor of concerted function, scaling and evolution of these brain structures, and suggests that the common notion that equates cognitive advancement with neocortical expansion should be revisited to consider in its stead the coordinated scaling of neocortex and cerebellum as a functional ensemble.

  12. Thyroid hormone promotes transient nerve growth factor synthesis in rat cerebellar neuroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrasse, S; Jehan, F; Confort, C; Brachet, P; Clos, J

    1992-01-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellum from 5-day-old rats indicated that proliferating neuroblasts synthesize and release nerve growth factor (NGF). Since NGF promotes DNA synthesis in these cells, our findings demonstrate that the early developing cerebellum is a suitable physiological model for studying the autocrine mitogenic action of NGF. Thyroid deficiency led to a greater reduction in the NGF content of the cerebellum than of the olfactory bulbs or hippocampus. Cerebellar NGF mRNA was also very sensitive to hormone deprivation. Physiological amounts of thyroid hormone stimulated both the mitotic activity and NGF production of cultured cerebellar neuroblasts. A lack of thyroid hormone is known to markedly alter cell formation in the cerebellum where postnatal neurogenesis is highly significant, in contrast to the olfactory bulbs and hippocampus. Taken together, these results suggest that the hormonal control of cell formation in the cerebellum is, at least partly, mediated by the autocrine mitogenic action of NGF. The thyroid hormone could temporally regulate the transient NGF synthesis by cerebellar neuroblasts directly and/or through its ontogenetic action, and hence all the NGF-dependent trophic effects.

  13. Reappraisal of Bergmann glial cells as modulators of cerebellar circuit function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris I De Zeeuw

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Just as there is a huge morphological and functional diversity of neuron types specialized for specific aspects of information processing in the brain, astrocytes have equally distinct morphologies and functions that aid optimal functioning of the circuits in which they are embedded. One type of astrocyte, the Bergmann glial cell of the cerebellum, is a prime example of a highly diversified astrocyte type, the architecture of which is adapted to the cerebellar circuit and facilitates an impressive range of functions that optimize information processing in the adult brain. In this review we expand on the function of the Bergmann glial cell in the cerebellum to highlight the importance of astrocytes not only in housekeeping functions, but also in contributing to plasticity and information processing in the cerebellum.

  14. Possibilities of computer tomography in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer tomography was performed in 41 patients with multiple sclerosis, the average age of patients being 40.8 years. Native examinations were made of 17 patients, examinations with contrast medium of 19, both methods were used in the examination of 5 patients. In 26 patients, i.e. in almost two-thirds, cerebral atrophy was found, in 11 of a severe type. In 9 patients atrophy affected only the hemispheres, in 16 also the stem and cerebellum. The stem and cerebellum only were affected in 1 patient. Hypodense foci were found in 21 patients, i.e. more than half of those examined. In 9 there were multiple foci. In most of the 19 examined patients the hypodense changes were in the hemispheres and only in 2 in the cerebellum and brain stem. No hyperdense changes were detected. The value and possibilities are discussed of examinations by computer tomography multiple sclerosis. (author)

  15. Astrocyte-targeted expression of interleukin-3 and interferon-alpha causes region-specific changes in metallothionein expression in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giralt, M; Carrasco, J; Penkowa, M;

    2001-01-01

    , Aicardi-Goutières syndrome, and some viral encephalopathies including HIV leukoencephalopathy. In this report we show that the metallothionein-I+II (MT-I+II) isoforms were upregulated in the brain of both GFAP-IL3 and GFAP-IFNalpha mice in accordance with the site and amount of expression of the cytokines...... and granular layers of the cerebellum, as well as in its white matter tracts. In contrast to the cerebellum and brain stem, MT-I+II were downregulated by IL-3 in the hippocampus and the remaining brain in the older mice. In situ hybridization for MT-III RNA revealed a modest increase in the cerebellum, which...

  16. Biogenic amines in brain areas of rats and response to varying dose levels of whole body gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The levels of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxy-indole acetic acid (5-HIAA) were examined in the brain areas:cortex,: cerebellum, striatum and pons in rats exposed to whole body gamma-irradiation at the dose levels 6.5 and 10 Gy. The data obtained indicated that: 6.5 Gy induced in all brain areas, a slight increase in 5-HT concomitant with significant decrease in NE, DA levels, besides a significant increase in 5-HTAA in cerebellum and pons. After the dose 10 Gy the maximum excitation of 5-HT level was in striatum whereas declines in NE, DA were recorded in all brain areas. 5-HIAA displayed significant increase in cerebellum and pons and maximum decline in the cortex. 4 tab

  17. Serial changes of humor comprehension for four-frame comic Manga: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Mariko; Yaoi, Ken; Minamoto, Takehiro; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2014-07-25

    Serial changes of humor comprehension evoked by a well organized four-frame comic Manga were investigated by fMRI in each step of humor comprehension. The neural substrates underlying the amusing effects in response to funny and mixed order manga were compared. In accordance with the time course of the four frames, fMRI activations changed serially. Beginning with the second frame (development scene), activation of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) was observed, followed by activations in the temporal and frontal areas during viewing of the third frame (turn scene). For the fourth frame (punch line), strong increased activations were confirmed in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and cerebellum. Interestingly, distinguishable activation differences in the cerebellum between funny and non-funny conditions were also found for the fourth frame. These findings suggest that humor comprehension evokes activation that initiates in the TPJ and expands to the MPFC and cerebellum at the convergence level.

  18. Short latency cerebellar modulation of the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christopher H; Fremont, Rachel; Arteaga-Bracho, Eduardo E; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2014-12-01

    The graceful, purposeful motion of our body is an engineering feat that remains unparalleled in robotic devices using advanced artificial intelligence. Much of the information required for complex movements is generated by the cerebellum and the basal ganglia in conjunction with the cortex. Cerebellum and basal ganglia have been thought to communicate with each other only through slow, multi-synaptic cortical loops, begging the question as to how they coordinate their outputs in real time. We found that the cerebellum rapidly modulates the activity of the striatum via a disynaptic pathway in mice. Under physiological conditions, this short latency pathway was capable of facilitating optimal motor control by allowing the basal ganglia to incorporate time-sensitive cerebellar information and by guiding the sign of cortico-striatal plasticity. Conversely, under pathological condition, this pathway relayed aberrant cerebellar activity to the basal ganglia to cause dystonia. PMID:25402853

  19. Serial changes of humor comprehension for four-frame comic Manga: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Mariko; Yaoi, Ken; Minamoto, Takehiro; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Serial changes of humor comprehension evoked by a well organized four-frame comic Manga were investigated by fMRI in each step of humor comprehension. The neural substrates underlying the amusing effects in response to funny and mixed order manga were compared. In accordance with the time course of the four frames, fMRI activations changed serially. Beginning with the second frame (development scene), activation of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) was observed, followed by activations in the temporal and frontal areas during viewing of the third frame (turn scene). For the fourth frame (punch line), strong increased activations were confirmed in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and cerebellum. Interestingly, distinguishable activation differences in the cerebellum between funny and non-funny conditions were also found for the fourth frame. These findings suggest that humor comprehension evokes activation that initiates in the TPJ and expands to the MPFC and cerebellum at the convergence level. PMID:25059843

  20. Anti-Purkinje cell antibody as a biological marker in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarelli, Francesca; Donfrancesco, Renato; Nativio, Paola; Pascale, Esterina; Di Trani, Michela; Patti, Anna Maria; Vulcano, Antonella; Gozzo, Paolo; Villa, Maria Pia

    2013-05-15

    An autoimmune hypothesis has been suggested for several disorders in childhood. The aim of the study was to clarify the role of the cerebellum in ADHD and to evaluate the possible association between anti-Yo antibodies and ADHD. The presence/absence of antibodies was tested by indirect immunofluorescence assay on 30 combined subtype ADHD children, on 19 children with other psychiatric disorders (Oppositional-defiant and Conduct Disorders, Dyslexia) and 27 healthy controls. Results showed a significant positive response to the anti-Yo antibody immunoreactivity in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum of ADHD children, compared with the control group and the psychiatric non-ADHD children. This association points to an immune dysregulation and the involvement of the cerebellum in ADHD. PMID:23510584

  1. Cerebellar Development and Plasticity: Perspectives for Motor Coordination Strategies, for Motor Skills, and for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Swinny

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the mammalian cerebellum ranges from motor coordination, sensory-motor integration, motor learning, and timing to nonmotor functions such as cognition. In terms of motor function, the development of the cerebellum is of particular interest because animal studies show that the development of the cerebellar cortical circuitry closely parallels motor coordination. Ultrastructural analysis of the morphological development of the cerebellar circuitry, coupled with the temporal and spatial identification of the neurochemical substrates expressed during development, will help to elucidate their roles in the establishment of the cerebellar circuitry and hence motor activity. Furthermore, the convenience of a number of naturally occurring mouse mutations has allowed a functional dissection of the various cellular elements that make up the cerebellar circuitry. This understanding will also help in the approach to possible therapies of pathologies arising during development because tile cerebellum is especially prone to such perturbation because of its late development.

  2. FGF-2 signal promotes proliferation of cerebellar progenitor cells and their oligodendrocytic differentiation at early postnatal stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naruse, Masae; Shibasaki, Koji; Ishizaki, Yasuki, E-mail: yasukiishizaki@gunma-u.ac.jp

    2015-08-07

    The origins and developmental regulation of cerebellar oligodendrocytes are largely unknown, although some hypotheses of embryonic origins have been suggested. Neural stem cells exist in the white matter of postnatal cerebellum, but it is unclear whether these neural stem cells generate oligodendrocytes at postnatal stages. We previously showed that cerebellar progenitor cells, including neural stem cells, widely express CD44 at around postnatal day 3. In the present study, we showed that CD44-positive cells prepared from the postnatal day 3 cerebellum gave rise to neurospheres, while CD44-negative cells prepared from the same cerebellum did not. These neurospheres differentiated mainly into oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, suggesting that CD44-positive neural stem/progenitor cells might generate oligodendrocytes in postnatal cerebellum. We cultured CD44-positive cells from the postnatal day 3 cerebellum in the presence of signaling molecules known as mitogens or inductive differentiation factors for oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Of these, only FGF-2 promoted survival and proliferation of CD44-positive cells, and these cells differentiated into O4+ oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, we examined the effect of FGF-2 on cerebellar oligodendrocyte development ex vivo. FGF-2 enhanced proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and increased the number of O4+ and CC1+ oligodendrocytes in slice cultures. These results suggest that CD44-positive cells might be a source of cerebellar oligodendrocytes and that FGF-2 plays important roles in their development at an early postnatal stage. - Highlights: • CD44 is expressed in cerebellar neural stem/progenitor cells at postnatal day 3 (P3). • FGF-2 promoted proliferation of CD44-positive progenitor cells from P3 cerebellum. • FGF-2 promoted oligodendrocytic differentiation of CD44-positive progenitor cells. • FGF-2 increased the number of oligodendrocytes in P3 cerebellar slice culture.

  3. Imaging opiate receptors with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Wong, D.F.; Links, J.M.; Burns, H.D.; Kuhar, M.J.; Snyder, S.H.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Opiate receptors exist in the mammalian brain and are thought to meditate the diverse pharmacological actions of the opiates, such as analgesia, euphoria, and sedation. The 4-carbomethoxyl derivatives of fentanyl, such as lofentanil and R31833 (4-carbomethoxyfentanyl) bind to the opiate receptor with high affinity. C-11 R31833 was synthesized by reacting C-11 methyl iodide with the appropriate carboxylate. Male ICR mice were injected intravenously with C-11 R31833 (5..mu..g/kg), killed 30 minutes later, and the brains rapidly dissected. The thalami, striata, and cerebral cortex are rich in opiate receptors, but the cerebellum contains a very low concentration of opiate receptors. The thalamus/cerebellum and striatum/cerebellum activity ratios, calculated per mg of wet tissue, were 4.1 and 5.2 respectively. Coinjection of 5mg/kg naloxone reduced the ratios to 1.1, which indicates that the preferential localization of C-11 R31833 in the thalami and striata is due to binding to opiate is due to binding to opiate receptors. A 22 kg anesthetized male baboon was imaged using the NeuroECAT after injection of 18.9 mCi of C-11 R13833 (0.50 ..mu..g/kg, specific activity 616 Ci/mmole at time of injection). From 15-70 minutes after injection preferential accumulation of activity could be seen in the thalami, caudate nuclei, and cerebral cortex and, conversely, low activity was demonstrated in the cerebellum. At one hour postinjection the maximum measured caudate/cerebellum activity ratio per pixel was 2.9. For the NeuroECAT the recovery coefficient for the baboon caudate is ca. 0.2-0.3, and therefore the actual caudate/cerebellum ratio is ca. 10-15.

  4. Mice lacking the transcription factor SHOX2 display impaired cerebellar development and deficits in motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, Jessica M; McAllister, Brendan B; Dyck, Richard H; Percival, Christopher J; Kurrasch, Deborah M; Cobb, John

    2015-03-01

    Purkinje cells of the developing cerebellum secrete the morphogen sonic hedgehog (SHH), which is required to maintain the proliferative state of granule cell precursors (GCPs) prior to their differentiation and migration to form the internal granule layer (IGL). Despite a wealth of knowledge regarding the function of SHH during cerebellar development, the upstream regulators of Shh expression during this process remain largely unknown. Here we report that the murine short stature homeobox 2 (Shox2) gene is required for normal Shh expression in dorsal-residing Purkinje cells. Using two different Cre drivers, we show that elimination of Shox2 in the brain results in developmental defects in the inferior colliculus and cerebellum. Specifically, loss of Shox2 in the cerebellum results in precocious differentiation and migration of GCPs from the external granule layer (EGL) to the IGL. This correlates with premature bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) expression in granule cells of the dorsal cerebellum. The size of the neonatal cerebellum is reduced in Shox2-mutant animals, which is consistent with a reduction in the number of GCPs present in the EGL, and could account for the smaller vermis and thinner IGL present in adult Shox2mutants. Shox2-mutant mice also display reduced exploratory activity, altered gait and impaired motor coordination. Our findings are the first to show a role for Shox2 in brain development. We provide evidence that Shox2 plays an important role during cerebellar development, perhaps to maintain the proper balance of Shh and Bmp expression levels in the dorsal vermis, and demonstrate that in the absence of Shox2, mice display both cerebellar impairments and deficits in motor coordination, ultimately highlighting the importance of Shox2 in the cerebellum.

  5. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and single photon emission CT in patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikuta, Naomi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-04-01

    Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) and single photon emission CT (SPECT), the cerebellum of patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) and of age-matched control subjects was studied. A spectrum was collected from a 27 cm{sup 3} (3 x 3 x 3 cm) voxel in the cerebellum containing white and gray matters in order to measure the distribution and relative signal intensities of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cre) and choline (Cho). In the cerebellum of the patients with OPCA, mean NAA/Cre ratios for OPCA patients were significantly decreased compared with normal control subjects (OPCA, 1.01{+-}0.247; controls, 1.526{+-}0.144: p<0.001). Mean NAA/Cho ratios for OPCA patients were slightly decreased (OPCA, 1.285{+-}0.228; controls 1.702{+-}0.469: p<0.06). Cho/Cre ratios valued in the cerebellum of OPCA patients were not significantly different from those in normal controls (OPCA, 0.793{+-}0.186; controls, 0.946{+-}0.219). The ratio of RI count in the cerebellum to that in the occipital lobe was significantly decreased in OPCA patients (OPCA, 0.947{+-}0.096; controls, 1.06{+-}0.063: p<0.01). Cerebellar signs were assessed including gait ataxia, limb ataxia, dysarthria, saccadic pursuit, and nystagmus separately or in combination. In patients with more severe ataxic gait and dysarthria, MRS revealed slightly lowered NAA/Cre ratio. There was no significant correlation between NAA/Cre ratio and severity of other clinical signs. The MRS and SPECT findings give a confirmative evidence of hypofunction in cerebellum of patients with OPCA. (author)

  6. The role of stem cells and progenitors in the genesis of medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J

    2014-10-01

    Cancer results from dysregulation of growth and survival pathways in normal stem cells and progenitors. Identifying the cells from which a tumor arises can facilitate the development of animal models and point to novel targets for therapy. Medulloblastoma is an aggressive tumor of the cerebellum that occurs predominantly in children. Recent genomic studies suggest that medulloblastoma consists of 4 major subgroups, each with distinct mutations and signaling pathway deregulations, and each potentially arising from distinct populations of stem cells and progenitors. Here we review the major types of progenitor cells in the cerebellum and discuss their role in the genesis of medulloblastoma.

  7. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis on F-18 FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaschisis is the inhibition of function produced by focal disturbances in a portion of the brain at a distance from original site of injury. Many studies using brain SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) have demonstrated crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) in patients with cerebral cortical infarct. We report a case of cerebrovascular accident involving the left middle cerebral artery territory. PET/CT performed one month after stroke showed hypometabolism in the left cerebral hemisphere with hypometabolism of the contralateral cerebellum. The finding of diminished glucose metabolism in the contralateral cerebellum represents CCD

  8. Fahr's Disease Presenting with Dementia at Onset: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Spadaro, Letteria; Marra, Angela; Bramanti, Placido

    2014-01-01

    Fahr's disease (FD) is characterized by sporadic or familiar idiopathic calcification of the basal ganglia, dentate nuclei of the cerebellum, and centrum semiovale, mainly presenting with movement disorder, dementia, and behavioral abnormalities. We described a rare case of Fahr's disease presenting at onset only with behavioral and neuropsychological alterations, whose diagnosis was supposed only after a brain CT, which showed extensive bilateral calcifications in the dentate nuclei of the cerebellum and basal ganglia. Since the onset of Fahr's disease may be a dysexecutive syndrome with behavioral abnormalities, the clinical and radiological features are really important to do the appropriate diagnosis. PMID:24803731

  9. Experiment list: SRX017082 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM. 17122381,50.7,18.6,13918 GSM462190: RNAPII source_name=Whole... Brain || tissue=Whole Brain || strain=C57BL/6 || age=9 weeks || chip antibody=RNA Polymera

  10. Increased excitability and altered action potential waveform in cerebellar granule neurons of the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Maria M; Garden, Claire L P

    2012-07-17

    Down syndrome (DS) is characterized by intellectual disability and impaired motor control. Lack of coordinated movement, poor balance, and unclear speech imply dysfunction of the cerebellum, which is known to be reduced in volume in DS. The principal cause of the smaller cerebellum is a diminished number of granule cells (GCs). These neurons form the 'input layer' of the cerebellar cortex, where sensorimotor information carried by incoming mossy fibers is transformed before it is conveyed to Purkinje cells and inhibitory interneurons. However, it is not known how processing of this information is affected in the hypogranular cerebellum that characterizes DS. Here we explore the possibility that the electrical properties of the surviving GCs are changed. We find that in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, GCs have a higher input resistance at voltages approaching the threshold for firing, which causes them to be more excitable. In addition, they fire narrower and larger amplitude action potentials. These subtly modified electrical properties may result in atypical transfer of information at the input layer of the cerebellum.

  11. Cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia in a child with a partial monosomy for the short arm of chromosome 5 and partial trisomy for the short arm of chromosome 10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, W F M; Hofstee, Y; Drejer, G F; Beverstock, G C; Oosterwijk, J C

    1995-01-01

    A child with hypoplasia of the cerebellum and brainstem in association with an unbalanced translocation, resulting in a partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 and a partial trisomy of the short arm of chromosome 10, is described. A balanced translocation was present in his mother and mate

  12. Cultures of Cerebellar Granule Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Parizad M. Bilimoria and Azad Bonni1 Corresponding author ([]()) ### INTRODUCTION Primary cultures of granule neurons from the post-natal rat cerebellum provide an excellent model system for molecular and cell biological studies of neuronal development and function. The cerebellar cortex, with its highly organized structure and few neuronal subtypes, offers a well-characterized neural circuitry. Many fundamental insight...

  13. An anti-NH2-terminal antibody localizes NBCn1 to heart endothelia and skeletal and vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkier, Helle Hasager; Nielsen, Søren; Prætorius, Jeppe

    2006-01-01

    by using anti-COOH-terminal antibodies. Hence an antibody was developed against the NH2-terminus of NBCn1 and was validated by peptide recognition and immunoblotting on positive control tissues and by binding of an approximately 180-kDa protein in the rat kidney, cerebrum, cerebellum, and duodenum...

  14. STD-dependent and independent encoding of input irregularity as spike rate in a computational model of a cerebellar nucleus neuron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Luthman (Johannes); F.E. Hoebeek (Freek); R. Maex (Reinoud); N. Davey (Neil); R. Adams (Rod); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); V. Steuber (Volker)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractNeurons in the cerebellar nuclei (CN) receive inhibitory inputs from Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex and provide the major output from the cerebellum, but their computational function is not well understood. It has recently been shown that the spike activity of Purkinje cells is

  15. Acute cerebellar ataxia with human parvovirus B19 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Y; Ueno, T.; Komatsu, H.; Takada, H.; Nunoue, T.

    1999-01-01

    A 2 year old boy developed acute cerebellar ataxia in association with erythema infectiosum. During the disease, genomic DNA and antibodies against human parvovirus B19 were detected in serum but not in cerebrospinal fluid. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cerebellar ataxia might occur due to transient vascular reaction in the cerebellum during infection.



  16. Cerebellar stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Xin; Guan, Wuqiang; Yu, Yong-Chun; Fu, Yinghui, E-mail: fuyh@fudan.edu.cn

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • No new neurons and astrocytes are generated in adult mouse cerebellum. • Very few mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells exist, and most of them are quiescent. • Cell proliferation rate is diversified among cerebellar regions and decreases over time. - Abstract: Although previous studies implied that cerebellar stem cells exist in some adult mammals, little is known about whether these stem cells can produce new neurons and astrocytes. In this study by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, we found that there are abundant BrdU{sup +} cells in adult mouse cerebellum, and their quantity and density decreases significantly over time. We also found cell proliferation rate is diversified in different cerebellar regions. Among these BrdU{sup +} cells, very few are mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells, and the vast majority of cerebellar stem cells are quiescent. Data obtained by in vivo retrovirus injection indicate that stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse cerebellum. Instead, some cells labeled by retrovirus are Iba1{sup +} microglia. These results indicate that very few stem cells exist in adult mouse cerebellum, and none of these stem cells contribute to neurogenesis and astrogenesis under physiological condition.

  17. Efficient differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into functional cerebellar-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erceg, Slaven; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Zipancic, Ivan; Lainez, Sergio; Roselló, Mireia Gárcia; Xiong, Chen; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Fernando Javier; Planells, Rosa; Alvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Bhattacharya, Shom Shanker; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2010-11-01

    The cerebellum has critical roles in motor and sensory learning and motor coordination. Many cerebellum-related disorders indicate cell therapy as a possible treatment of neural loss. Here we show that application of inductive signals involved in early patterning of the cerebellar region followed by application of different factors directs human embryonic stem cell differentiation into cerebellar-like cells such as granule neurons, Purkinje cells, interneuron, and glial cells. Neurons derived using our protocol showed a T-shaped polarity phenotype and express similar markers to the developed human cerebellum. Electrophysiological measurements confirmed functional electrical properties compatible with these cells. In vivo implantation of differentiated human embryonic stem cells transfected with MATH1-GFP construct into neonatal mice resulted in cell migration across the molecular and the Purkinje cell layers and settlement in the internal molecular layers. Our findings demonstrate that the universal mechanisms involved in the development of cerebellum can be efficiently recapitulated in vitro, which enables the design of new strategies for cell replacement therapy, to study early human development and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20521974

  18. New attenuation correction for the HRRT using transmission scatter correction and total variation regularization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibomana, Merence; Keller, Sune Høgild; Svarer, Claus;

    2009-01-01

    In the standard software for the Siemens HRRT PET scanner the most commonly used segmentation in the μ-map reconstruction for human brain scans is MAP-TR. Problems with bias in the lower cerebellum and pons in HRRT brain images have been reported. The main source of the problem is poor bone / sof...

  19. Attenuation correction for the HRRT PET-scanner using transmission scatter correction and total variation regularization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H; Svarer, Claus; Sibomana, Merence

    2013-01-01

    In the standard software for the Siemens high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) positron emission tomography (PET) scanner the most commonly used segmentation in the μ -map reconstruction for human brain scans is maximum a posteriori for transmission (MAP-TR). Bias in the lower cerebellum and ...

  20. Aprataxin localizes to mitochondria and preserves mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sykora, Peter; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A;

    2011-01-01

    are expressed in the human brain, with highest production in the cerebellum. Depletion of aprataxin in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and primary skeletal muscle myoblasts results in mitochondrial dysfunction, which is revealed by reduced citrate synthase activity and mtDNA copy number. Moreover, mt...