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Sample records for cerebellar purkinje cell

  1. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusser, Michael; Gutkin, Boris S.; Roth, Arnd

    2016-01-01

    Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR). While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing. PMID:27541958

  2. Mapping the development of cerebellar Purkinje cells in zebrafish.

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    Hamling, Kyla R; Tobias, Zachary J C; Weissman, Tamily A

    2015-11-01

    The cells that comprise the cerebellum perform a complex integration of neural inputs to influence motor control and coordination. The functioning of this circuit depends upon Purkinje cells and other cerebellar neurons forming in the precise place and time during development. Zebrafish provide a useful platform for modeling disease and studying gene function, thus a quantitative metric of normal zebrafish cerebellar development is key for understanding how gene mutations affect the cerebellum. To begin to quantitatively measure cerebellar development in zebrafish, we have characterized the spatial and temporal patterning of Purkinje cells during the first 2 weeks of development. Differentiated Purkinje cells first emerged by 2.8 days post fertilization and were spatially patterned into separate dorsomedial and ventrolateral clusters that merged at around 4 days. Quantification of the Purkinje cell layer revealed that there was a logarithmic increase in both Purkinje cell number as well as overall volume during the first 2 weeks, while the entire region curved forward in an anterior, then ventral direction. Purkinje cell dendrites were positioned next to parallel fibers as early as 3.3 days, and Purkinje cell diameter decreased significantly from 3.3 to 14 days, possibly due to cytoplasmic reappropriation into maturing dendritic arbors. A nearest neighbor analysis showed that Purkinje cells moved slightly apart from each other from 3 to 14 days, perhaps spreading as the organized monolayer forms. This study establishes a quantitative spatiotemporal map of Purkinje cell development in zebrafish that provides an important metric for studies of cerebellar development and disease. PMID:25655100

  3. Purkinje cell apoptosis in arabian horses with cerebellar abiotrophy.

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    Blanco, A; Moyano, R; Vivo, J; Flores-Acuña, R; Molina, A; Blanco, C; Monterde, J G

    2006-08-01

    Purkinje cerebellar cells were studied in three Arabian horses aged between 6 and 8 months with clinical disorders in their movements, tremors and ataxia; the occurrence of apoptosis in this cell population was investigated by the (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) method. Both optical and electron microscopical images showed a scant number of Purkinje cells, most of them with morphological features of apoptosis such as condensation of the nucleus and cytoplasm as well as segregation and fragmentation of the nucleus into apoptotic bodies. The TUNEL technique revealed a substantial number (65%) of positive immunoreactive Purkinje cells. PMID:16901270

  4. Calbindin in cerebellar Purkinje cells is a critical determinant of the precision of motor coordination

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    Barski, J. J.; Hartmann, J.; Rose, C. R.; Hoebeek, F.; Morl, K.; Noll-Hussong, M; De Zeeuw, C.I.; Konnerth, A; Meyer, M.

    2003-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of Purkinje cell-parallel fiber synaptic transmission is a critical determinant of normal cerebellar function. Impairment of LTD through, for example, disruption of the metabotropic glutamate receptor-IP3-calcium signaling cascade in mutant mice results in severe deficits of both synaptic transmission and cerebellar motor control. Here, we demonstrate that selective genetic deletion of the calcium-binding protein calbindin D-28k (calbindin) from cerebellar Purkinje ...

  5. Cerebellar Purkinje cells incorporate immunoglobulins and immunotoxins in vitro: implications for human neurological disease and immunotherapeutics

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    Rose John W

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies reactive with intracellular neuronal proteins have been described in paraneoplastic and other autoimmune disorders. Because neurons have been thought impermeable to immunoglobulins, however, such antibodies have been considered unable to enter neurons and bind to their specific antigens during life. Cerebellar Purkinje cells - an important target in paraneoplastic and other autoimmune diseases - have been shown in experimental animals to incorporate a number of molecules from cerebrospinal fluid. IgG has also been detected in Purkinje cells studied post mortem. Despite the possible significance of these findings for human disease, immunoglobulin uptake by Purkinje cells has not been demonstrated in living tissue or studied systematically. Methods To assess Purkinje cell uptake of immunoglobulins, organotypic cultures of rat cerebellum incubated with rat IgGs, human IgG, fluorescein-conjugated IgG, and rat IgM were studied by confocal microscopy in real time and following fixation. An IgG-daunorubicin immunotoxin was used to determine whether conjugation of pharmacological agents to IgG could be used to achieve Purkinje cell-specific drug delivery. Results IgG uptake was detected in Purkinje cell processes after 4 hours of incubation and in Purkinje cell cytoplasm and nuclei by 24-48 hours. Uptake could be followed in real time using IgG-fluorochrome conjugates. Purkinje cells also incorporated IgM. Intracellular immunoglobulin did not affect Purkinje cell viability, and Purkinje cells cleared intracellular IgG or IgM within 24-48 hours after transfer to media lacking immunoglobulins. The IgG-daunomycin immunotoxin was also rapidly incorporated into Purkinje cells and caused extensive, cell-specific death within 8 hours. Purkinje cell death was not produced by unconjugated daunorubicin or control IgG. Conclusion Purkinje cells in rat organotypic cultures incorporate and clear host (rat and non

  6. Coexistence of dopamine-beta-hydroxylase and activated protein-2 alpha in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kejian Wang; Wei Li; Shanquan Sun; Zhongqin Ren; Guiqiong He

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Tyrosine hydroxylase and phenylethanolamine-n-methyl transferase expression coexist in Purkinje cells of the rat cerebellum.Numerous reports have also been published addressing whether dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) expression exists in cerebellar Purkinje cells.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the coexistence of DBH and activator protein-2α expression in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A cell morphological study was performed at the Institute of Neuroscience,Chongqing Medical University,China in May 2007.MATERIALS:Ten healthy Wistar rats,of either gender,aged 14 weeks,served as experimental animals.Rabbit anti-mouse DBH,goat anti-mouse activator protein-2α and rabbit anti-mouse β-actin (Santa Cruz Biotechnology,Inc.,USA),horseradish peroxidase-labeled goat anti-rabbit IgG,FITC-labeled mouse anti-rabbit IgG,and Cy3-labeled mouse anti-goat IgG (Boster,Wuhan,China),were used in this study.METHODS:Immunohistochemical staining was used to measure the expression of DBH or activator protein-2α,with double-label immunofluorescence being employed to determine coexpression of both,in the cerebellum of 5 randomly selected rats.Western blot assay was utilized to determine the expression of DBH and activator protein-2α in the cerebellum of the remaining 5 rats.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Expression,localization and coexistence of DBH and activator protein-2α in the cerebellum were measured separately.RESULTS:Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that cerebellar Purkinje cells stained positive for DBH and activator protein-2α.Western blot assay also demonstrated DBH and activator protein-2α expression in the cerebellum.Double-labeling immunofluorescence showed the coexistence of DBH and activator protein-2α in cerebellar Purkinje cells.CONCLUSION:Norepinephrine and activator protein-2α coexist in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells.

  7. Brief dendritic calcium signals initiate long-lasting synaptic depression in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

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    Konnerth, A.; Dreessen, J; Augustine, G J

    1992-01-01

    We have performed experiments designed to test the hypothesis that long-term depression (LTD) of excitatory synaptic transmission in the cerebellar cortex is caused by a rise in postsynaptic Ca concentration. These experiments combined measurements of synaptic efficacy, performed with the thin slice patch clamp technique, with fura-2 measurements of intracellular Ca concentration ([Ca]i) in single cerebellar Purkinje cells. Simultaneous activation of the climbing fiber and parallel fibers inn...

  8. Ethanol affects NMDA receptor signaling at climbing fiber-Purkinje cell synapses in mice and impairs cerebellar LTD

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    He, Qionger; Titley, Heather; Grasselli, Giorgio; Piochon, Claire; Hansel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol profoundly influences cerebellar circuit function and motor control. It has recently been demonstrated that functional N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are postsynaptically expressed at climbing fiber (CF) to Purkinje cell synapses in the adult cerebellum. Using whole cell patch-clamp recordings from mouse cerebellar slices, we examined whether ethanol can affect NMDA receptor signaling in mature Purkinje cells. NMDA receptor-mediated currents were isolated by bath application of...

  9. Motor dysfunction in cerebellar Purkinje cell-specific vesicular GABA transporter knockout mice

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    Mikiko eKayakabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian central nervous system and plays modulatory roles in neural development. The vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT is an essential molecule for GABAergic neurotransmission due to its role in vesicular GABA release. Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs are GABAergic projection neurons that are indispensable for cerebellar function. To elucidate the significance of VGAT in cerebellar PCs, we generated and characterized PC-specific VGAT knockout (L7-VGAT mice. VGAT mRNAs and proteins were specifically absent in the 40-week-old L7-VGAT PCs. The morphological charactereistics, such as lamination and foliation of the cerebellar cortex, of the L7-VGAT mice were similar to those of the control littermate mice. Moreover, the protein expression levels and patterns of pre- (calbindin and parvalbumin and postsynaptic (GABA-A receptor α1 subunit (GABAARα1 and gephyrin molecules between the L7-VGAT and control mice were similar in the deep cerebellar nuclei that receive PC projections. However, the L7-VGAT mice performed poorly in the accelerating rotarod test and displayed ataxic gait in the footprint test. The L7-VGAT mice also exhibited severer ataxia as VGAT deficits progressed. These results suggest that VGAT in cerebellar Purkinje cells is not essential for the rough maintenance of cerebellar structure, but does play an important role in motor coordination. The L7-VGAT mice are a novel model of ataxia without PC degeneration, and would also be useful for studying the role of Purkinje cells in cognition and emotion.

  10. Early-onset Purkinje cell dysfunction underlies cerebellar ataxia in peroxisomal multifunctional protein-2 deficiency.

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    De Munter, Stephanie; Verheijden, Simon; Vanderstuyft, Esther; Malheiro, Ana Rita; Brites, Pedro; Gall, David; Schiffmann, Serge N; Baes, Myriam

    2016-10-01

    The cerebellar pathologies in peroxisomal diseases underscore that these organelles are required for the normal development and maintenance of the cerebellum, but the mechanisms have not been resolved. Here we investigated the origins of the early-onset coordination impairment in a mouse model with neural selective deficiency of multifunctional protein-2, the central enzyme of peroxisomal β-oxidation. At the age of 4weeks, Nestin-Mfp2(-/-) mice showed impaired motor learning on the accelerating rotarod and underperformed on the balance beam test. The gross morphology of the cerebellum and Purkinje cell arborization were normal. However, electrophysiology revealed a reduced Purkinje cell firing rate, a decreased excitability and an increased membrane capacitance. The distribution of climbing and parallel fiber synapses on Purkinje cells was immature and was accompanied by an increased spine length. Despite normal myelination, Purkinje cell axon degeneration was evident from the occurrence of axonal swellings containing accumulated organelles. In conclusion, the electrical activity, axonal integrity and wiring of Purkinje cells are exquisitely dependent on intact peroxisomal β-oxidation in neural cells. PMID:27353294

  11. Alcohol impairs long-term depression at the cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse

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    Belmeguenai, A.; Botta, Paolo; Weber, John; Carta, Mario; De Ruiter, Martijn; De Zeeuw, Chris; Valenzuela, Fernando; Hansel, Christian

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAcute alcohol consumption causes deficits in motor coordination and gait, suggesting an involvement of cerebellar circuits, which play a role in the fine adjustment of movements and in motor learning. It has previously been shown that ethanol modulates inhibitory transmission in the cerebellum and affects synaptic transmission and plasticity at excitatory climbing fiber (CF) to Purkinje cell synapses. However, it has not been examined thus far how acute ethanol application affects...

  12. Purkinje cell-specific knockout of the protein phosphatase PP2B impairs potentiation and cerebellar motor learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schonewille (Martijn); A. Belmeguenai; S.K.E. Koekkoek (Bas); S.H. Houtman (Simone Hendrika); H.J. Boele (Henk-Jan); B.J. van Beugen (Boeke); Z. Gao (Zhenyu); A.M. Badura (Aleksandra); G. Ohtsuki (Gen); W.E. Amerika; E. Hosy; F.E. Hoebeek (Freek); Y. Elgersma (Ype); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCerebellar motor learning is required to obtain procedural skills. Studies have provided supportive evidence for a potential role of kinase-mediated long-term depression (LTD) at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapse in cerebellar learning. Recently, phosphatases have been implicat

  13. A new Purkinje cell antibody (anti-Ca associated with subacute cerebellar ataxia: immunological characterization

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    Horn Sigrun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a newly discovered serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF reactivity to Purkinje cells (PCs associated with subacute inflammatory cerebellar ataxia. The patient, a previously healthy 33-year-old lady, presented with severe limb and gait ataxia, dysarthria, and diplopia two weeks after she had recovered from a common cold. Immunohistochemical studies on mouse, rat, and monkey brain sections revealed binding of a high-titer (up to 1:10,000 IgG antibody to the cerebellar molecular layer, Purkinje cell (PC layer, and white matter. The antibody is highly specific for PCs and binds to the cytoplasm as well as to the inner side of the membrane of PC somata, dendrites and axons. It is produced by B cell clones within the CNS, belongs to the IgG1 subclass, and activates complement in vitro. Western blotting of primate cerebellum extract revealed binding of CSF and serum IgG to an 80-97 kDa protein. Extensive control studies were performed to rule out a broad panel of previously described paraneoplastic and non-paraneoplastic antibodies known to be associated with cerebellar ataxia. Screening of >9000 human full length proteins by means of a protein array and additional confirmatory experiments revealed Rho GTPase activating protein 26 (ARHGAP26, GRAF, oligophrenin-1-like protein as the target antigen. Preadsorption of the patient's serum with human ARHGAP26 but not preadsorption with other proteins resulted in complete loss of PC staining. Our findings suggest a role of autoimmunity against ARHGAP26 in the pathogenesis of subacute inflammatory cerebellar ataxia, and extend the panel of diagnostic markers for this devastating disease.

  14. Geranylgeranyltransferase I is essential for dendritic development of cerebellar Purkinje cells

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    Wu Kong-Yan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During cerebellar development, Purkinje cells (PCs form the most elaborate dendritic trees among neurons in the brain, but the mechanism regulating PC arborization remains largely unknown. Geranylgeranyltransferase I (GGT is a prenyltransferase that is responsible for lipid modification of several signaling proteins, such as Rho family small GTPase Rac1, which has been shown to be involved in neuronal morphogenesis. Here we show that GGT plays an important role in dendritic development of PCs. Results We found that GGT was abundantly expressed in the developing rat cerebellum, in particular molecular layer (ML, the region enriched with PC dendrites. Inhibition or down-regulation of GGT using small interference RNA (siRNA inhibited dendritic development of PCs. In contrast, up-regulation of GGT promoted dendritic arborization of PCs. Furthermore, neuronal depolarization induced by high K+ or treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF promoted membrane association of Rac1 and dendritic development of PCs in cultured cerebellar slices. The effect of BDNF or high K+ was inhibited by inhibition or down-regulation of GGT. Conclusion Our results indicate that GGT plays an important role in Purkinje cell development, and suggest a novel role of GGT in neuronal morphogenesis in vivo.

  15. A spiking network model of cerebellar Purkinje cells and molecular layer interneurons exhibiting irregular firing

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    William eLennon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While the anatomy of the cerebellar microcircuit is well studied, how it implements cerebellar function is not understood. A number of models have been proposed to describe this mechanism but few emphasize the role of the vast network Purkinje cells (PKJs form with the molecular layer interneurons (MLIs – the stellate and basket cells. We propose a model of the MLI-PKJ network composed of simple spiking neurons incorporating the major anatomical and physiological features. In computer simulations, the model reproduces the irregular firing patterns observed in PKJs and MLIs in vitro and a shift toward faster, more regular firing patterns when inhibitory synaptic currents are blocked. In the model, the time between PKJ spikes is shown to be proportional to the amount of feedforward inhibition from an MLI on average. The two key elements of the model are: (1 spontaneously active PKJs and MLIs due to an endogenous depolarizing current, and (2 adherence to known anatomical connectivity along a parasagittal strip of cerebellar cortex. We propose this model to extend previous spiking network models of the cerebellum and for further computational investigation into the role of irregular firing and MLIs in cerebellar learning and function.

  16. Ethanol modulates facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in cerebellar Purkinje cells in vivo in mice

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    Wu, Mao-Cheng; Bing, Yan-Hua; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Acute ethanol overdose can induce dysfunction of cerebellar motor regulation and cerebellar ataxia. In this study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on facial stimulation-evoked inhibitory synaptic responses in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) in urethane-anesthetized mice, using in vivo patch-clamp recordings. Under voltage-clamp conditions, ethanol (300 mM) decreased the amplitude, half-width, rise time and decay time of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in PCs. The ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was dose-dependent, with an IC50 of 148.5 mM. Notably, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents were significantly abrogated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonists, AM251 and O-2050, as well as by the CB1 agonist WIN55212-2. Moreover, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was prevented by cerebellar surface perfusion of the PKA inhibitors H-89 and Rp-cAMP, but not by intracellular administration of the PKA inhibitor PKI. Our present results indicate that ethanol inhibits the facial stimulation-evoked outward currents by activating presynaptic CB1 receptors via the PKA signaling pathway. These findings suggest that ethanol overdose impairs sensory information processing, at least in part, by inhibiting GABA release from molecular layer interneurons onto PCs. PMID:27489024

  17. Ethanol modulates facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in cerebellar Purkinje cells in vivo in mice.

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    Wu, Mao-Cheng; Bing, Yan-Hua; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Acute ethanol overdose can induce dysfunction of cerebellar motor regulation and cerebellar ataxia. In this study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on facial stimulation-evoked inhibitory synaptic responses in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) in urethane-anesthetized mice, using in vivo patch-clamp recordings. Under voltage-clamp conditions, ethanol (300 mM) decreased the amplitude, half-width, rise time and decay time of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in PCs. The ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was dose-dependent, with an IC50 of 148.5 mM. Notably, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents were significantly abrogated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonists, AM251 and O-2050, as well as by the CB1 agonist WIN55212-2. Moreover, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was prevented by cerebellar surface perfusion of the PKA inhibitors H-89 and Rp-cAMP, but not by intracellular administration of the PKA inhibitor PKI. Our present results indicate that ethanol inhibits the facial stimulation-evoked outward currents by activating presynaptic CB1 receptors via the PKA signaling pathway. These findings suggest that ethanol overdose impairs sensory information processing, at least in part, by inhibiting GABA release from molecular layer interneurons onto PCs. PMID:27489024

  18. Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation ameliorates motor function deterioration of spinocerebellar ataxia by rescuing cerebellar Purkinje cells

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    Ma Wei-Hsien

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA refers to a disease entity in which polyglutamine aggregates are over-produced in Purkinje cells (PCs of the cerebellum as well as other neurons in the central nervous system, and the formation of intracellular polyglutamine aggregates result in the loss of neurons as well as deterioration of motor functions. So far there is no effective neuroprotective treatment for this debilitating disease although numerous efforts have been made. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs possess multi-lineage differentiation potentials as well as immuno-modulatory properties, and are theoretically good candidates for SCA treatment. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether transplantation of human MSCs (hMSCs can rescue cerebellar PCs and ameliorate motor function deterioration in SCA in a pre-clinical animal model. Method Transgenic mice bearing poly-glutamine mutation in ataxin-2 gene (C57BL/6J SCA2 transgenic mice were serially transplanted with hMSCs intravenously or intracranially before and after the onset of motor function loss. Motor function of mice was evaluated by an accelerating protocol of rotarod test every 8 weeks. Immunohistochemical stain of whole brain sections was adopted to demonstrate the neuroprotective effect of hMSC transplantation on cerebellar PCs and engraftment of hMSCs into mice brain. Results Intravenous transplantation of hMSCs effectively improved rotarod performance of SCA2 transgenic mice and delayed the onset of motor function deterioration; while intracranial transplantation failed to achieve such neuroprotective effect. Immunohistochemistry revealed that intravenous transplantation was more effective in the preservation of the survival of cerebellar PCs and engraftment of hMSCs than intracranial injection, which was compatible to rotarod performance of transplanted mice. Conclusion Intravenous transplantation of hMSCs can indeed delay the onset as well as improve the motor

  19. Rapid development of Purkinje cell excitability, functional cerebellar circuit, and afferent sensory input to cerebellum in zebrafish

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    Jui-Yi Hsieh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The zebrafish has significant advantages for studying the morphological development of the brain. However, little is known about the functional development of the zebrafish brain. We used patch clamp electrophysiology in live animals to investigate the emergence of excitability in cerebellar Purkinje cells, functional maturation of the cerebellar circuit, and establishment of sensory input to the cerebellum. Purkinje cells are born at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf. By 4 dpf, Purkinje cells spontaneously fired action potentials in an irregular pattern. By 5 dpf, the frequency and regularity of tonic firing had increased significantly and most cells fired complex spikes in response to climbing fiber activation. Our data suggest that, as in mammals, Purkinje cells are initially innervated by multiple climbing fibers that are winnowed to a single input. To probe the development of functional sensory input to the cerebellum, we investigated the response of Purkinje cells to a visual stimulus consisting of a rapid change in light intensity. At 4 dpf, sudden darkness increased the rate of tonic firing, suggesting that afferent pathways carrying visual information are already active by this stage. By 5 dpf, visual stimuli also activated climbing fibers, increasing the frequency of complex spiking. Our results indicate that the electrical properties of zebrafish and mammalian Purkinje cells are highly conserved and suggest that the same ion channels, Nav1.6 and Kv3.3, underlie spontaneous pacemaking activity. Interestingly, functional development of the cerebellum is temporally correlated with the emergence of complex, visually-guided behaviors such as prey capture. Because of the rapid formation of an electrically-active cerebellum, optical transparency, and ease of genetic manipulation, the zebrafish has great potential for functionally mapping cerebellar afferent and efferent pathways and for investigating cerebellar control of motor behavior.

  20. A deficiency of ceramide biosynthesis causes cerebellar purkinje cell neurodegeneration and lipofuscin accumulation.

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    Lihong Zhao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids, lipids with a common sphingoid base (also termed long chain base backbone, play essential cellular structural and signaling functions. Alterations of sphingolipid levels have been implicated in many diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, it remains largely unclear whether sphingolipid changes in these diseases are pathological events or homeostatic responses. Furthermore, how changes in sphingolipid homeostasis shape the progression of aging and neurodegeneration remains to be clarified. We identified two mouse strains, flincher (fln and toppler (to, with spontaneous recessive mutations that cause cerebellar ataxia and Purkinje cell degeneration. Positional cloning demonstrated that these mutations reside in the Lass1 gene. Lass1 encodes (dihydroceramide synthase 1 (CerS1, which is highly expressed in neurons. Both fln and to mutations caused complete loss of CerS1 catalytic activity, which resulted in a reduction in sphingolipid biosynthesis in the brain and dramatic changes in steady-state levels of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases. In addition to Purkinje cell death, deficiency of CerS1 function also induced accumulation of lipofuscin with ubiquitylated proteins in many brain regions. Our results demonstrate clearly that ceramide biosynthesis deficiency can cause neurodegeneration and suggest a novel mechanism of lipofuscin formation, a common phenomenon that occurs during normal aging and in some neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Ectopic cerebellar cell migration causes maldevelopment of Purkinje cells and abnormal motor behaviour in Cxcr4 null mice.

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    Huang, Guo-Jen; Edwards, Andrew; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Lee, Yi-Shin; Peng, Lei; Era, Takumi; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Tsai, Ching-Yen; Nishikawa, Shin-Ichi; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Chen, Shu-Jen; Flint, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    SDF-1/CXCR4 signalling plays an important role in neuronal cell migration and brain development. However, the impact of CXCR4 deficiency in the postnatal mouse brain is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the importance of CXCR4 on cerebellar development and motor behaviour by conditional inactivation of Cxcr4 in the central nervous system. We found CXCR4 plays a key role in cerebellar development. Its loss leads to defects in Purkinje cell dentritogenesis and axonal projection in vivo but not in cell culture. Transcriptome analysis revealed the most significantly affected pathways in the Cxcr4 deficient developing cerebellum are involved in extra cellular matrix receptor interactions and focal adhesion. Consistent with functional impairment of the cerebellum, Cxcr4 knockout mice have poor coordination and balance performance in skilled motor tests. Together, these results suggest ectopic the migration of granule cells impairs development of Purkinje cells, causes gross cerebellar anatomical disruption and leads to behavioural motor defects in Cxcr4 null mice. PMID:24516532

  2. Ectopic cerebellar cell migration causes maldevelopment of Purkinje cells and abnormal motor behaviour in Cxcr4 null mice.

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    Guo-Jen Huang

    Full Text Available SDF-1/CXCR4 signalling plays an important role in neuronal cell migration and brain development. However, the impact of CXCR4 deficiency in the postnatal mouse brain is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the importance of CXCR4 on cerebellar development and motor behaviour by conditional inactivation of Cxcr4 in the central nervous system. We found CXCR4 plays a key role in cerebellar development. Its loss leads to defects in Purkinje cell dentritogenesis and axonal projection in vivo but not in cell culture. Transcriptome analysis revealed the most significantly affected pathways in the Cxcr4 deficient developing cerebellum are involved in extra cellular matrix receptor interactions and focal adhesion. Consistent with functional impairment of the cerebellum, Cxcr4 knockout mice have poor coordination and balance performance in skilled motor tests. Together, these results suggest ectopic the migration of granule cells impairs development of Purkinje cells, causes gross cerebellar anatomical disruption and leads to behavioural motor defects in Cxcr4 null mice.

  3. Ethanol affects NMDA receptor signaling at climbing fiber-Purkinje cell synapses in mice and impairs cerebellar LTD.

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    He, Qionger; Titley, Heather; Grasselli, Giorgio; Piochon, Claire; Hansel, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Ethanol profoundly influences cerebellar circuit function and motor control. It has recently been demonstrated that functional N-methyl-(D)-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are postsynaptically expressed at climbing fiber (CF) to Purkinje cell synapses in the adult cerebellum. Using whole cell patch-clamp recordings from mouse cerebellar slices, we examined whether ethanol can affect NMDA receptor signaling in mature Purkinje cells. NMDA receptor-mediated currents were isolated by bath application of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzol[f]quinoxaline (NBQX). The remaining (D)-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid ((D)-APV)-sensitive current was reduced by ethanol at concentrations as low as 10 mM. At a concentration of 50 mM ethanol, the blockade of (D)-APV-sensitive CF-excitatory postsynaptic currents was significantly stronger. Ethanol also altered the waveform of CF-evoked complex spikes by reducing the afterdepolarization. This effect was not seen when NMDA receptors were blocked by (D)-APV before ethanol wash-in. In contrast to CF synaptic transmission, parallel fiber (PF) synaptic inputs were not affected by ethanol. Finally, ethanol (10 mM) impaired long-term depression (LTD) at PF to Purkinje cell synapses as induced under control conditions by paired PF and CF activity. However, LTD induced by pairing PF stimulation with depolarizing voltage steps (substituting for CF activation) was not blocked by ethanol. These observations suggest that the sensitivity of cerebellar circuit function and plasticity to low concentrations of ethanol may be caused by an ethanol-mediated impairment of NMDA receptor signaling at CF synapses onto cerebellar Purkinje cells. PMID:23221414

  4. Autistic-Like Traits and Cerebellar Dysfunction in Purkinje Cell PTEN Knock-Out Mice.

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    Cupolillo, Dario; Hoxha, Eriola; Faralli, Alessio; De Luca, Annarita; Rossi, Ferdinando; Tempia, Filippo; Carulli, Daniela

    2016-05-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impaired social interaction, isolated areas of interest, and insistence on sameness. Mutations in Phosphatase and tensin homolog missing on chromosome 10 (PTEN) have been reported in individuals with ASDs. Recent evidence highlights a crucial role of the cerebellum in the etiopathogenesis of ASDs. In the present study we analyzed the specific contribution of cerebellar Purkinje cell (PC) PTEN loss to these disorders. Using the Cre-loxP recombination system, we generated conditional knockout mice in which PTEN inactivation was induced specifically in PCs. We investigated PC morphology and physiology as well as sociability, repetitive behavior, motor learning, and cognitive inflexibility of adult PC PTEN-mutant mice. Loss of PTEN in PCs results in autistic-like traits, including impaired sociability, repetitive behavior and deficits in motor learning. Mutant PCs appear hypertrophic and show structural abnormalities in dendrites and axons, decreased excitability, disrupted parallel fiber and climbing fiber synapses and late-onset cell death. Our results unveil new roles of PTEN in PC function and provide the first evidence of a link between the loss of PTEN in PCs and the genesis of ASD-like traits. PMID:26538449

  5. Anti-Yo Antibody Uptake and Interaction with Its Intracellular Target Antigen Causes Purkinje Cell Death in Rat Cerebellar Slice Cultures: A Possible Mechanism for Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration in Humans with Gynecological or Breast Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Greenlee, John E.; Clawson, Susan A; Hill, Kenneth E; Wood, Blair; Clardy, Stacey L.; Tsunoda, Ikuo; Carlson, Noel G.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Yo antibodies are immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies reactive with a 62 kDa Purkinje cell cytoplasmic protein. These antibodies are closely associated with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in the setting of gynecological and breast malignancies. We have previously demonstrated that incubation of rat cerebellar slice cultures with patient sera and cerebrospinal fluid containing anti-Yo antibodies resulted in Purkinje cell death. The present study addressed three fundamental quest...

  6. Effect of histamine on the electric activities of cerebellar Purkinje cell

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, L

    1999-01-01

    The effect of histamine (HA) on the electric activities of Purkinje cell (PC) is studied on the cerebellum slice. We find that: (1) HA's main effect on PC is excitative (72.9%); there are also a small amount of PC showing inhibitive (10.2%) or no (16.9%) response to HA. (2) Different from the conventional opinion, HA's excitative effect on PC is mutually conducted by H1 and H2 receptors; the antagonist for H1 receptor could weaken HA's excitative effect on PC, while the antagonist for H2 receptor could weaken or even block the excitative effect of HA on PC. (3) PC's reaction to HA is related to its intrinsic discharge frequency; there exists a frequency at which PC is highly sensitive to HA, and well above this frequency PC becomes stable against HA. These results indicate that the histaminergic afferent fibre can adjust PC's electric activities by releasing HA, and thereby influence the global function of the cerebellar cortex; and that just like the $\\gamma $ region of cerebrum, cerebellum may also have som...

  7. Cell-autonomous death of cerebellar purkinje neurons with autophagy in niemann-pick type C disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in either of two genes, npc1 and npc2. Cells lacking Npc1, which is a transmembrane protein related to the Hedgehog receptor Patched, or Npc2, which is a secreted cholesterol-binding protein, have aberrant organelle trafficking and accumulate large quantities of cholesterol and other lipids. Though the Npc proteins are produced by all cells, cerebellar Purkinje neurons are especially sensitive to loss of Npc function. Since Niemann-Pick type C disease involves circulating molecules such as sterols and steroids and a robust inflammatory response within the brain parenchyma, it is crucial to determine whether external factors affect the survival of Purkinje cells (PCs. We investigated the basis of neurodegeneration in chimeric mice that have functional npc1 in only some cells. Death of mutant npc1 cells was not prevented by neighboring wild-type cells, and wild-type PCs were not poisoned by surrounding mutant npc1 cells. PCs undergoing cell-autonomous degeneration have features consistent with autophagic cell death. Chimeric mice exhibited a remarkable delay and reduction of wasting and ataxia despite their substantial amount of mutant tissue and dying cells, revealing a robust mechanism that partially compensates for massive PC death.

  8. Cell-autonomous death of cerebellar purkinje neurons with autophagy in Niemann-Pick type C disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis C Ko

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in either of two genes, npc1 and npc2. Cells lacking Npc1, which is a transmembrane protein related to the Hedgehog receptor Patched, or Npc2, which is a secreted cholesterol-binding protein, have aberrant organelle trafficking and accumulate large quantities of cholesterol and other lipids. Though the Npc proteins are produced by all cells, cerebellar Purkinje neurons are especially sensitive to loss of Npc function. Since Niemann-Pick type C disease involves circulating molecules such as sterols and steroids and a robust inflammatory response within the brain parenchyma, it is crucial to determine whether external factors affect the survival of Purkinje cells (PCs. We investigated the basis of neurodegeneration in chimeric mice that have functional npc1 in only some cells. Death of mutant npc1 cells was not prevented by neighboring wild-type cells, and wild-type PCs were not poisoned by surrounding mutant npc1 cells. PCs undergoing cell-autonomous degeneration have features consistent with autophagic cell death. Chimeric mice exhibited a remarkable delay and reduction of wasting and ataxia despite their substantial amount of mutant tissue and dying cells, revealing a robust mechanism that partially compensates for massive PC death.

  9. Selective loss of Purkinje cells in a patient with anti-gliadin-antibody-positive autoimmune cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasegawa Akira

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The patient was an 84-year-old woman who had the onset of truncal ataxia at age 77 and a history of Basedow's disease. Her ataxic gait gradually deteriorated. She could not walk without support at age 81 and she was admitted to our hospital at age 83. Gaze-evoked nystagmus and dysarthria were observed. Mild ataxia was observed in all limbs. Her deep tendon reflex and sense of position were normal. IgA anti-gliadin antibody, IgG anti-gliadin antibody, anti-SS-A/Ro antibody, anti-SS-B/La antibody and anti-TPO antibody were positive. A conventional brain MRI did not show obvious cerebellar atrophy. However, MRI voxel based morphometry (VBM and SPECT-eZIS revealed cortical cerebellar atrophy and reduced cerebellar blood flow. IVIg treatment was performed and was moderately effective. After her death at age 85, the patient was autopsied. Neuropathological findings were as follows: selective loss of Purkinje cells; no apparent degenerative change in the efferent pathways, such as the dentate nuclei or vestibular nuclei; no prominent inflammatory reaction. From these findings, we diagnosed this case as autoimmune cerebellar atrophy associated with gluten ataxia. All 3 autopsies previously reported on gluten ataxia have noted infiltration of inflammatory cells in the cerebellum. In this case, we postulated that the infiltration of inflammatory cells was not found because the patient's condition was based on humoral immunity. The clinical conditions of gluten ataxia have not yet been properly elucidated, but are expected to be revealed as the number of autopsied cases increases.

  10. Dendritic Kv3.3 potassium channels in cerebellar purkinje cells regulate generation and spatial dynamics of dendritic Ca2+ spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagha, Edward; Manita, Satoshi; Ross, William N; Rudy, Bernardo

    2010-06-01

    Purkinje cell dendrites are excitable structures with intrinsic and synaptic conductances contributing to the generation and propagation of electrical activity. Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. However, the functional relevance of this dendritic distribution is not understood. Moreover, mutations in Kv3.3 cause movement disorders in mice and cerebellar atrophy and ataxia in humans, emphasizing the importance of understanding the role of these channels. In this study, we explore functional implications of this dendritic channel expression and compare Purkinje cell dendritic excitability in wild-type and Kv3.3 knockout mice. We demonstrate enhanced excitability of Purkinje cell dendrites in Kv3.3 knockout mice, despite normal resting membrane properties. Combined data from local application pharmacology, voltage clamp analysis of ionic currents, and assessment of dendritic Ca(2+) spike threshold in Purkinje cells suggest a role for Kv3.3 channels in opposing Ca(2+) spike initiation. To study the physiological relevance of altered dendritic excitability, we measured [Ca(2+)](i) changes throughout the dendritic tree in response to climbing fiber activation. Ca(2+) signals were specifically enhanced in distal dendrites of Kv3.3 knockout Purkinje cells, suggesting a role for dendritic Kv3.3 channels in regulating propagation of electrical activity and Ca(2+) influx in distal dendrites. These findings characterize unique roles of Kv3.3 channels in dendrites, with implications for synaptic integration, plasticity, and human disease. PMID:20357073

  11. Facial stimulation induces long-term depression at cerebellar molecular layer interneuron–Purkinje cell synapses in vivo in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Lai eQiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar long-term synaptic plasticity has been proposed to provide a cellular mechanism for motor learning. Numerous studies have demonstrated the induction and mechanisms of synaptic plasticity at parallel fiber–Purkinje cell (PF–PC, parallel fiber–molecular layer interneurons (PF–MLI and mossy fiber–granule cell (MF–GC synapses, but no study has investigated sensory stimulation-evoked synaptic plasticity at MLI–PC synapses in the cerebellar cortex of living animals. We studied the expression and mechanism of MLI–PC GABAergic synaptic plasticity induced by a train of facial stimulation in urethane-anesthetized mice by cell-attached recordings and pharmacological methods. We found that 1 Hz, but not a 2 Hz or 4 Hz, facial stimulation induced a long-term depression (LTD of GABAergic transmission at MLI–PC synapses, which was accompanied with a decrease in the stimulation-evoked pause of spike firing in PCs, but did not induce a significant change in the properties of the sensory-evoked spike events of MLIs. The MLI–PC GABAergic LTD could be prevented by blocking cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptors, and could be pharmacologically induced by a CB1 receptor agonist. Additionally, 1 Hz facial stimulation delivered in the presence of a metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1 antagonist, JNJ16259685, still induced the MLI–PC GABAergic LTD, whereas blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors during 1 Hz facial stimulation abolished the expression of MLI–PC GABAergic LTD. These results indicate that sensory stimulation can induce an endocannabinoid (eCB-dependent LTD of GABAergic transmission at MLI–PC synapses via activation of NMDA receptors in cerebellar cortical Crus II in vivo in mice. Our results suggest that the sensory stimulation-evoked MLI–PC GABAergic synaptic plasticity may play a critical role in motor learning in animals.

  12. Altered dendritic development of cerebellar Purkinje cells in slice cultures from protein kinase C gamma-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrenk, K; Kapfhammer, JP; Metzger, F

    2002-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a key molecule for the expression of long-term depression at the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse in the cerebellum, a well known model for synaptic plasticity, We have recently shown that activity of PKC also profoundly affects the dendritic morphology of Purkinje cell

  13. Short-term modulation of cerebellar Purkinje cell activity after spontaneous climbing fiber input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y; Miura, A; Fushiki, H; Kawasaki, T

    1992-12-01

    1. There are two opposite points of view concerning the way climbing fiber input in a Purkinje cell modifies simple spike (SS) activity transiently: depression versus enhancement of SS activity. The different groups of investigators favored one effect predominating over the other. In the decerebrate unanesthetized cat, we recorded spontaneous activity of single Purkinje cells and investigated time course of SS activity after the complex spike (CS). 2. In the peri-CS time histogram, there was a SS pause lasting, on average, 10.8 ms after onset of the CS in all of the 316 cells recorded. The pause was followed by a rapid increase in SS activity to a maximum, which was on average 175.6% of a pre-CS control level, and a gradual return to around the control level in the majority of the cells recorded (pause-facilitation type, 71.2%). The increase in SS activity was significant (P SS activity during the 20-100 ms was, on average, 163.7% of the control level. In some cells (pure-pause type, 25.3%), no significant changes were found (P > 0.01) in the post-pause SS firing. In contrast, only 3.5% of the cells (pause-reduction type) showed a significant (P 0.01) in the SS activity between pre-CS periods in all of the cells recorded, suggesting that the SS activity enhancement is not due to a coactivated mossy fiber input just preceding the activation of the climbing fiber input. 4. Analysis of the raster diagram revealed variability of individual SS responses after the CS. The probability of occurrence of the increase in SS number during a post-CS period of 0-100 ms with respect to that during a pre-CS period of -100-0 ms in individual raster traces was high (on average 78.2%), medium (57.3%), and low (36.3%) in the pause-facilitation, pure-pause, and pause-reduction types of the cell, respectively. 5. Nonsequential time histograms showing frequency distribution of the pause duration after the CS in individual raster traces and that showing interspike intervals of the SS were

  14. Synaptic responses evoked by tactile stimuli in Purkinje cells in mouse cerebellar cortex Crus II in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ping Chu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sensory stimuli evoke responses in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs via the mossy fiber-granule cell pathway. However, the properties of synaptic responses evoked by tactile stimulation in cerebellar PCs are unknown. The present study investigated the synaptic responses of PCs in response to an air-puff stimulation on the ipsilateral whisker pad in urethane-anesthetized mice. METHODS AND MAIN RESULTS: Thirty-three PCs were recorded from 48 urethane-anesthetized adult (6-8-week-old HA/ICR mice by somatic or dendritic patch-clamp recording and pharmacological methods. Tactile stimulation to the ipsilateral whisker pad was delivered by an air-puff through a 12-gauge stainless steel tube connected with a pressurized injection system. Under current-clamp conditions (I = 0, the air-puff stimulation evoked strong inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs in the somata of PCs. Application of SR95531, a specific GABA(A receptor antagonist, blocked IPSPs and revealed stimulation-evoked simple spike firing. Under voltage-clamp conditions, tactile stimulation evoked a sequence of transient inward currents followed by strong outward currents in the somata and dendrites in PCs. Application of SR95531 blocked outward currents and revealed excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs in somata and a temporal summation of parallel fiber EPSCs in PC dendrites. We also demonstrated that PCs respond to both the onset and offset of the air-puff stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicated that tactile stimulation induced asynchronous parallel fiber excitatory inputs onto the dendrites of PCs, and failed to evoke strong EPSCs and spike firing in PCs, but induced the rapid activation of strong GABA(A receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the somata and dendrites of PCs in the cerebellar cortex Crus II in urethane-anesthetized mice.

  15. Interaction between Purkinje cells and inhibitory interneurons may create adjustable output waveforms to generate timed cerebellar output.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hong

    Full Text Available We develop a new model that explains how the cerebellum may generate the timing in classical delay eyeblink conditioning. Recent studies show that both Purkinje cells (PCs and inhibitory interneurons (INs have parallel signal processing streams with two time scales: an AMPA receptor-mediated fast process and a metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR-mediated slow process. Moreover, one consistent finding is an increased excitability of PC dendrites (in Larsell's lobule HVI in animals when they acquire the classical delay eyeblink conditioning naturally, in contrast to in vitro studies, where learning involves long-term depression (LTD. Our model proposes that the delayed response comes from the slow dynamics of mGluR-mediated IP3 activation, and the ensuing calcium concentration change, and not from LTP/LTD. The conditioned stimulus (tone, arriving on the parallel fibers, triggers this slow activation in INs and PC spines. These excitatory (from PC spines and inhibitory (from INs signals then interact at the PC dendrites to generate variable waveforms of PC activation. When the unconditioned stimulus (puff, arriving on the climbing fibers, is coupled frequently with this slow activation the waveform is amplified (due to an increased excitability and leads to a timed pause in the PC population. The disinhibition of deep cerebellar nuclei by this timed pause causes the delayed conditioned response. This suggested PC-IN interaction emphasizes a richer role of the INs in learning and also conforms to the recent evidence that mGluR in the cerebellar cortex may participate in slow motor execution. We show that the suggested mechanism can endow the cerebellar cortex with the versatility to learn almost any temporal pattern, in addition to those that arise in classical conditioning.

  16. Activity of cerebellar Purkinje cells during fictitious scratch reflex in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshavsky YuI; Orlovsky, G N; Popova, L B

    1984-01-01

    The activity of Purkinje cells (PCs) was recorded in the anterior lobe (the vermis and pars intermedia) and in the paramedian lobule of the cerebellum during the fictitious scratch reflex in thalamic cats immobilized with Flaxedil. In the anterior lobe, the activity of many PCs was rhythmically modulated in relation to the scratch cycle: they generated bursts of impulses separated by periods of silence. Different PCs were active in different phases of the scratch cycle. In many cases the discharge modulation was irregular: the burst duration and the discharge rate in the burst varied considerably in subsequent cycles. The rhythmical activity of PCs was determined by modulation of the frequency of 'simple spikes' reflecting the mossy fiber input. Generation of 'complex spikes' reflecting the climbing fiber input in most PCs was not related with the scratch rhythm. In the paramedian lobule, rhythmical modulation of PCs was practically absent. Rhythmical modulation of PCs in immobilized cats is determined by signals coming from the central spinal mechanism of scratching via the ventral spinocerebellar tract (VSCT) and the spinoreticulocerebellar pathway (SRCP). Results of separate transections of these pathways demonstrated that the VSCT plays the crucial role in modulating the PCs. PMID:6692137

  17. Preferential Transport and Metabolism of Glucose in Bergmann Glia over Purkinje Cells: A Multiphoton Study of Cerebellar Slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.F.BARROS; R.COURJARET; P.JAKOBY; A.LOAIZA; C.LOHR; J.W.DEITMER

    2009-01-01

    了解不同类型的细胞如何处理葡萄糖有助于解释能量供应是如何是如何根据大脑能量需求来进行调整的.荧光追踪结合共聚焦显微镜技术已用于研究培养的脑细胞摄取葡萄糖的实时动态过程.本文采用这种技术利用多光子显微镜观察急性制备的大鼠小脑脑片.带荧光的葡萄糖类似物2NBDG和6NBDG在小脑皮质的分子层中的转运速度比其在蒲肯野细胞胞体和颗粒细胞中快若干倍.洗脱游离示踪剂后,可见大部分磷酸化示踪剂都位于Bergmann胶质细胞,用胶质细胞标记物sulforhodamine 101免疫染色后进一步确认这一结果.有效回收荧光光漂白后显示,2NBDG-P可通过Bergmann胶质细胞之间的缝隙连接沿着分子层水平扩散.本文的结果表明在急性小脑切片中,Bergmann胶质细胞对葡萄糖的转运能力和糖酵解率高于蒲肯野细胞若干倍.由于小脑主要由葡萄糖提供能量,蒲肯野神经元被认为比Bergmann胶质细胞更耗能量,这些结果表明,在胶质细胞和神经元之间存在类似乳酸的能量代谢物介导的环路.%Knowing how different cell types handle glucose should help to decipher how energy supply is adjusted to energy demand in the brain. Previously, the uptake of glucose by cultured brain cells was studied in real-time using fluorescent tracers and confocal microscopy. Here, we have adapted this technique to acute slices prepared from the rat cerebellum by means of multiphoton microscopy. The transport of the fluorescent glucose analogs 2NBDG and 6NBDG was several-fold faster in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex than in Purkinje cell somata and granule cells. After washout of free tracer, it became apparent that most phosphorylated tracer was located in Bergmann glia, which was confirmed by counterstaining with the glial marker sulforhodamine 101. The effective recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching showed that 2NBDG-P can diffuse

  18. Alcohol impairs long-term depression at the cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Belmeguenai; P. Botta (Paolo); J.T. Weber (John); M. Carta (Mario); M.M. de Ruiter (Martijn); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); C.F. Valenzuela (Fernando); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAcute alcohol consumption causes deficits in motor coordination and gait, suggesting an involvement of cerebellar circuits, which play a role in the fine adjustment of movements and in motor learning. It has previously been shown that ethanol modulates inhibitory transmission in the cere

  19. The inhibitory input to mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells is reciprocally modulated by Bergmann glial P2Y1 and AMPA receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Ramona; Jahn, Hannah M; Courjaret, Raphael; Messemer, Nanette; Kirchhoff, Frank; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2016-07-01

    Synaptic transmission has been shown to be modulated by glial functions, but the modes of specific glial action may vary in different neural circuits. We have tested the hypothesis, if Bergmann GLIA (BG) are involved in shaping neuronal communication in the mouse cerebellar cortex, using acutely isolated cerebellar slices of wild-type (WT) and of glia-specific receptor knockout mice. Activation of P2Y1 receptors by ADP (100 µM) or glutamatergic receptors by AMPA (0.3 µM) resulted in a robust, reversible and repeatable rise of evoked inhibitory input in Purkinje cells by 80% and 150%, respectively. The ADP-induced response was suppressed by prior application of AMPA, and the AMPA-induced response was suppressed by prior application of ADP. Genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade of either receptor restored the response to the other receptor agonist. Both ADP and AMPA responses were sensitive to Rose Bengal, which blocks vesicular glutamate uptake, and to the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5. Our results provide strong evidence that activation of both ADP and AMPA receptors, located on BGs, results in the release of glutamate, which in turn activates inhibitory interneurons via NMDA-type glutamate receptors. This infers that BG cells, by means of metabotropic signaling via their AMPA and P2Y1 receptors, which mutually suppress each other, would interdependently contribute to the fine-tuning of Purkinje cell activity in the cerebellar cortex. GLIA 2016. GLIA 2016;64:1265-1280. PMID:27144942

  20. Propofol facilitates excitatory inputs of cerebellar Purkinje cells by depressing molecular layer interneuron activity during sensory information processing in vivo in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan-Yuan; Jin, Ri; Jin, Wen-Zhe; Liu, Heng; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2015-10-21

    Propofol is a rapid-acting sedative-hypnotic medication that has been widely used for the induction and maintenance of anesthesia; it has specific actions on different areas of the brain, such as sensory information transmission in the somatosensory cortex. However, the effects of propofol on the properties of sensory stimulation-evoked responses in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) are currently unclear. In the present study, we studied the effects of propofol on facial stimulation-evoked responses in cerebellar PCs and molecular level interneurons (MLIs) in urethane-anesthetized mice using electrophysiological and pharmacological methods. Our results showed that cerebellar surface perfusion with propofol induced a decrease in the amplitude of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic component (P1) in a dose-dependent manner, but induced a significant increase in the amplitude of the excitatory response (N1). The IC50 of propofol-induced inhibition of P1 was 217.3 μM. In contrast, propofol (100 μM) depressed the spontaneous activity and tactile-evoked responses in MLIs. In addition, blocking GABA(A) receptor activity abolished the propofol (300 μM)-induced inhibition of the tactile-evoked inhibitory response and the increase in the sensory stimulation-evoked spike firing rate of PCs. These results indicated that propofol depressed the tactile stimulation-evoked spike firing of MLIs, resulting in a decrease in the amplitude of the tactile-evoked inhibitory response and an increase in the amplitude of the excitatory response in the cerebellar PCs of mice. Our results suggest that propofol modulates sensory information processing in cerebellar cortical PCs and MLIs through the activation of GABA(A) receptors. PMID:26317477

  1. Lack of Kinase Regulation of Canonical Transient Receptor Potential 3 (TRPC3) Channel-dependent Currents in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Charmaine; Glitsch, Maike D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: TRPC3 channels are inhibited by PKC and PKG, which also induce cerebellar LTD. We investigate if PKC- and PKG-mediated modulation of cerebellar TRPC3 channels contributes to cerebellar LTD.

  2. The postnatal development of cerebellar Purkinje cells in the Gottingen minipig estimated with a new stereological sampling technique--the vertical bar fractionator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsing, Jacob; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb; Nielsen, Rune; Hemmingsen, Ralf; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2006-01-01

    demonstrates that a pronounced postnatal neurogenesis in Purkinje cell number and perikaryon volume is part of the growth and development of the cerebellum in the Gottingen minipig. The Purkinje cells of the Gottingen minipig were found to be substantially large compared with human and represents the largest...

  3. Reassessment of long-term depression in cerebellar Purkinje cells in mice carrying mutated GluA2 C terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kazuhiko; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Ito, Masao

    2016-09-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission from parallel fibers (PFs) to a Purkinje cell (PC) in the cerebellum has been considered to be a core mechanism of motor learning. Recently, however, discrepancies between LTD and motor learning have been reported in mice with a mutation that targeted the expression of PF-PC LTD by blocking AMPA-subtype glutamate receptor internalization regulated via the phosphorylation of AMPA receptors. In these mice, motor learning behavior was normal, but no PF-PC LTD was observed. We reexamined slices obtained from these GluA2 K882A and GluA2 Δ7 knockin mutants at 3-6 mo of age. The conventional protocols of stimulation did not induce LTD in these mutant mice, as previously reported, but surprisingly, LTD was induced using certain modified protocols. Such modifications involved increases in the number of PF stimulation (from one to two or five), replacement of climbing fiber stimulation with somatic depolarization (50 ms), filling a patch pipette with a Cs(+)-based solution, or extension of the duration of conjunction. We also found that intracellular infusion of a selective PKCα inhibitor (Gö6976) blocked LTD induction in the mutants, as in WT, suggesting that functional compensation occurred downstream of PKCα. The possibility that LTD in the mutants was caused by changes in membrane resistance, access resistance, or presynaptic property was excluded. The present results demonstrate that LTD is inducible by intensified conjunctive stimulations even in K882A and Δ7 mutants, indicating no contradiction against the LTD hypothesis of motor learning. PMID:27551099

  4. The Secreted Protein C1QL1 and Its Receptor BAI3 Control the Synaptic Connectivity of Excitatory Inputs Converging on Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séverine M. Sigoillot

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Precise patterns of connectivity are established by different types of afferents on a given target neuron, leading to well-defined and non-overlapping synaptic territories. What regulates the specific characteristics of each type of synapse, in terms of number, morphology, and subcellular localization, remains to be understood. Here, we show that the signaling pathway formed by the secreted complement C1Q-related protein C1QL1 and its receptor, the adhesion-GPCR brain angiogenesis inhibitor 3 (BAI3, controls the stereotyped pattern of connectivity established by excitatory afferents on cerebellar Purkinje cells. The BAI3 receptor modulates synaptogenesis of both parallel fiber and climbing fiber afferents. The restricted and timely expression of its ligand C1QL1 in inferior olivary neurons ensures the establishment of the proper synaptic territory for climbing fibers. Given the broad expression of C1QL and BAI proteins in the developing mouse brain, our study reveals a general mechanism contributing to the formation of a functional brain.

  5. Subcellular structural plasticity caused by the absence of the fast Ca²⁺ buffer calbindin D-28k in recurrent collaterals of cerebellar Purkinje neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Orduz, David; Boom, Alain; Gall, David; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Schiffmann, Serge N; Schwaller, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Purkinje cells (PC) control spike timing of neighboring PC by their recurrent axon collaterals. These synapses underlie fast cerebellar oscillations and are characterized by a strong facilitation within a time window of

  6. Subcellular structural plasticity caused by the absence of the fast Ca2+ buffer calbindin D-28k in recurrent collaterals of cerebellar Purkinje neurons

    OpenAIRE

    David Orduz; Alain Boom; Beat Schwaller

    2014-01-01

    Purkinje cells (PC) control spike timing of neighboring PC by their recurrent axon collaterals. These synapses underlie fast cerebellar oscillations and are characterized by a strong facilitation within a time window of

  7. Dual Transgene Expression in Murine Cerebellar Purkinje Neurons by Viral Transduction In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch, Marie K.; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.; Ornitz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Viral-vector mediated gene transfer to cerebellar Purkinje neurons in vivo is a promising avenue for gene therapy of cerebellar ataxias and for genetic manipulation in functional studies of animal models of cerebellar disease. Here, we report the results of experiments designed to identify efficient methods for viral transduction of adult murine Purkinje neurons in vivo. For these analyses, several lentiviral and an adeno-associated virus (AAV), serotype 1, vector with various promoter combin...

  8. Purkinje cell NMDA receptors assume a key role in synaptic gain control in the mature cerebellum

    OpenAIRE

    Piochon, Claire; Levenes, Carole; Ohtsuki, Gen; Hansel, Christian

    2010-01-01

    textabstractA classic view in cerebellar physiology holds that Purkinje cells do not express functional NMDA receptors and that, therefore, postsynaptic NMDA receptors are not involved in the induction of long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje cell synapses. Recently, it has been demonstrated that functional NMDA receptors are postsynaptically expressed at climbing fiber (CF) to Purkinje cell synapses in mice, reaching full expression levels at ∼2 months after birth. He...

  9. Purkinje cell NMDA receptors assume a key role in synaptic gain control in the mature cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Piochon (Claire); C. Levenes (Carole); G. Ohtsuki (Gen); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractA classic view in cerebellar physiology holds that Purkinje cells do not express functional NMDA receptors and that, therefore, postsynaptic NMDA receptors are not involved in the induction of long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje cell synapses. Recently, it has b

  10. l-Serine and glycine serve as major astroglia-derived trophic factors for cerebellar Purkinje neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Furuya, Shigeki; Tabata, Toshihide; Mitoma, Junya; Yamada, Keiko; Yamasaki, Miwako; Makino, Asami; Yamamoto, Toshifumi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kano, Masanobu; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2000-01-01

    Glial cells support the survival and development of central neurons through the supply of trophic factors. Here we demonstrate that l-serine (l-Ser) and glycine (Gly) also are glia-derived trophic factors. These amino acids are released by astroglial cells and promote the survival, dendritogenesis, and electrophysiological development of cultured cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Although l-Ser and Gly are generally classified as nonessential amino acids, 3-phosphoglyce...

  11. Autophagy activation and enhanced mitophagy characterize the Purkinje cells of pcd mice prior to neuronal death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakrabarti Lisa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purkinje cells are a class of specialized neurons in the cerebellum, and are among the most metabolically active of all neurons, as they receive immense synaptic stimulation, and provide the only efferent output from the cerebellum. Degeneration of Purkinje cells is a common feature of inherited ataxias in humans and mice. To understand Purkinje neuron degeneration, investigators have turned to naturally occurring Purkinje cell degeneration phenotypes in mice to identify key regulatory proteins and cellular pathways. The Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd mouse is a recessive mutant characterized by complete and dramatic post-natal, cell autonomous Purkinje neuron degeneration and death. As the basis of Purkinje cell death in pcd is unresolved, and contradictory data has emerged for the role of autophagy in Purkinje cell degeneration, we studied the mechanism of Purkinje cell death in pcd mice. BAX null status did not suppress Purkinje neuron death in pcd mice, indicating that classic apoptosis is not responsible for Purkinje cell loss. Interestingly, LC3 Western blot analysis and GFP-LC3 immunostaining of degenerating pcd cerebellum revealed activation of the autophagy pathway. Ultrastructural studies confirmed increased autophagy pathway activity in Purkinje cells, and yielded evidence for mitophagy, in agreement with LC3 immunoblotting of cerebellar fractions. As p62 levels were decreased in pcd cerebellum, our findings suggest that pcd Purkinje cell neurons can execute effective autophagy. However, our results support a role for dysregulated autophagy activation in pcd, and suggest that increased or aberrant mitophagy contributes to the Purkinje cell degeneration in pcd mice.

  12. Possible role of pineal allopregnanolone in Purkinje cell survival

    OpenAIRE

    Haraguchi, Shogo; Hara, Sakurako; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Mita, Masatoshi; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    It is believed that neurosteroids are produced in the brain and other nervous systems. Here, we show that allopregnanolone (ALLO), a neurosteroid, is exceedingly produced in the pineal gland compared with the brain and that pineal ALLO acts on the Purkinje cell, a principal cerebellar neuron, to prevent apoptosis in the juvenile quail. We first demonstrated that the pineal gland is a major organ of neurosteroidogenesis. A series of experiments using molecular and biochemical techniques has fu...

  13. A signal processing analysis of Purkinje cells in vitro

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    Ze'ev R Abrams

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar Purkinje cells in vitro fire recurrent sequences of Sodium and Calcium spikes. Here, we analyze the Purkinje cell using harmonic analysis, and our experiments reveal that its output signal is comprised of three distinct frequency bands, which are combined using Amplitude and Frequency Modulation (AM/FM. We find that the three characteristic frequencies - Sodium, Calcium and Switching – occur in various combinations in all waveforms observed using whole-cell current clamp recordings. We found that the Calcium frequency can display a frequency doubling of its frequency mode, and the Switching frequency can act as a possible generator of pauses that are typically seen in Purkinje output recordings. Using a reversibly photo-switchable kainate receptor agonist, we demonstrate the external modulation of the Calcium and Switching frequencies. These experiments and Fourier analysis suggest that the Purkinje cell can be understood as a harmonic signal oscillator, enabling a higher level of interpretation of Purkinje signaling based on modern signal processing techniques.

  14. PCPP-260, PURKINJE CELL-SPECIFIC CYCLE AMP-REGULATED MEMBRANE PHOSPHOPROTEIN OF (M SUB R) 260,000

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study reports the existence of Purkinje cell-specific phosphoprotein, Mr260,000 (PCPP-260), a neuronal membrance phosphoprotein, in cerebellar Purkinje cells. PCPP-260, which on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis has an apparaent molecular mass ...

  15. The output signal of Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and circadian rhythmicity.

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    Jérôme Mordel

    Full Text Available Measurement of clock gene expression has recently provided evidence that the cerebellum, like the master clock in the SCN, contains a circadian oscillator. The cerebellar oscillator is involved in anticipation of mealtime and possibly resides in Purkinje cells. However, the rhythmic gene expression is likely transduced into a circadian cerebellar output signal to exert an effective control of neuronal brain circuits that are responsible for feeding behavior. Using electrophysiological recordings from acute and organotypic cerebellar slices, we tested the hypothesis whether Purkinje cells transmit a circadian modulated signal to their targets in the brain. Extracellular recordings from brain slices revealed the typical discharge pattern previously described in vivo in single cell recordings showing basically a tonic or a trimodal-like firing pattern. However, in acute sagittal cerebellar slices the average spike rate of randomly selected Purkinje cells did not exhibit significant circadian variations, irrespective of their specific firing pattern. Also, frequency and amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents and the amplitude of GABA- and glutamate-evoked currents did not vary with circadian time. Long-term recordings using multielectrode arrays (MEA allowed to monitor neuronal activity at multiple sites in organotypic cerebellar slices for several days to weeks. With this recording technique we observed oscillations of the firing rate of cerebellar neurons, presumably of Purkinje cells, with a period of about 24 hours which were stable for periods up to three days. The daily renewal of culture medium could induce circadian oscillations of the firing rate of Purkinje cells, a feature that is compatible with the behavior of slave oscillators. However, from the present results it appears that the circadian expression of cerebellar clock genes exerts only a weak influence on the electrical output of cerebellar neurons.

  16. Paeoniflorin inhibits functional responses of rat cerebellar Purkinje cells to acute hypoxia insult%芍药苷抑制大鼠小脑浦肯野细胞对急性缺氧的功能反应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任颖鸽; 谭晓丽; 陈静; 张静; 杜永平; 张月萍

    2015-01-01

    [ ABSTRACT] AIM:To investigate the effects of paeoniflorin ( Pae) on the functional responses induced by acute hypoxic insult in the rat cerebellar Purkinje cells ( PCs) .METHODS:The whole-cell patch clamp was used for the intra-cellular recording of PCs in the rat cerebellar slices to evaluate the changes of membrane potential, the excitability of PCs, and the parallel fibre ( PF)-PC excitatory postsynaptic currents ( EPSCs) upon acute hypoxic insult alone or with the pre-sence of Pae.RESULTS:PCs showed an initial hyperpolarization followed by brief depolarization and long lasting post-hy-poxia hyperpolarization after hypoxia exposure.Pae completely blocked hypoxia-induced hyperpolarization and decreased the amplitude and the duration of hypoxic depolarization.Hypoxia up-regulated the excitability of rat PCs.Pae didn’t show any significant effect on the hypoxia-induced hyperexcitability in PCs.Acute hypoxia induced long-term depression ( LTD) in rat cerebellar PF-PC EPSCs, and Pae partially reversed hypoxia-induced depression in PF-PC EPSCs.CONCLUSION:Pae significantly suppresses hypoxia-induced responses in rat PCs and probably increases the tolerance of rat PCs to acute hypoxia.%目的:研究芍药苷(paeoniflorin,Pae)对大鼠小脑浦肯野细胞(Purkinje cells,PCs)急性缺氧电生理反应的影响。方法:采用全细胞膜片钳记录法,记录大鼠小脑PCs膜电位、兴奋性和平行纤维( parallel fibre,PF)-PC兴奋性突触后电流(excitatory postsynaptic currents,EPSCs),观察急性缺氧和芍药苷对上述电生理功能的影响。结果:缺氧后PCs首先表现为短暂的超极化,继之以短暂的去极化和持续超极化,芍药苷完全阻断了PCs的缺氧性超极化,并使PCs缺氧性去极化的幅度减小,持续时间缩短;缺氧上调了PCs兴奋性,芍药苷对缺氧引起的PCs的高兴奋性无显著影响;急性缺氧引起了PF-PC EPSCs的长时程抑制( long

  17. Induction of early Purkinje cell dendritic differentiation by thyroid hormone requires RORα

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    Bois-Joyeux Brigitte

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The active form (T3 of thyroid hormone (TH controls critical aspects of cerebellar development, such as migration of postmitotic neurons and terminal dendritic differentiation of Purkinje cells. The effects of T3 on early dendritic differentiation are poorly understood. Results In this study, we have analyzed the influence of T3 on the progression of the early steps of Purkinje cell dendritic differentiation in postnatal day 0 organotypic cerebellar cultures. These steps include, successively, regression of immature neuritic processes, a stellate cell stage, and the extension of several long and mature perisomatic protrusions before the growth of the ultimate dendritic tree. We also studied the involvement of RORα, a nuclear receptor controlling early Purkinje cell dendritic differentiation. We show that T3 treatment leads to an accelerated progression of the early steps of dendritic differentiation in culture, together with an increased expression of RORα (mRNA and protein in both Purkinje cells and interneurons. Finally, we show that T3 failed to promote early dendritic differentiation in staggerer RORα-deficient Purkinje cells. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that T3 action on the early Purkinje cell dendritic differentiation process is mediated by RORα.

  18. Noradrenergic modulation of the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse in mouse cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippiello, Pellegrino; Hoxha, Eriola; Volpicelli, Floriana; Lo Duca, Giuseppina; Tempia, Filippo; Miniaci, Maria Concetta

    2015-02-01

    The signals arriving to Purkinje cells via parallel fibers are essential for all tasks in which the cerebellum is involved, including motor control, learning new motor skills and calibration of reflexes. Since learning also requires the activation of adrenergic receptors, we investigated the effects of adrenergic receptor agonists on the main plastic site of the cerebellar cortex, the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse. Here we show that noradrenaline serves as an endogenous ligand for both α1-and α2-adrenergic receptors to produce synaptic depression between parallel fibers and Purkinje cells. On the contrary, PF-EPSCs were potentiated by the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol. This short-term potentiation was postsynaptically expressed, required protein kinase A, and was mimicked by the β2-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol, suggesting that the β2-adrenoceptors mediate the noradrenergic facilitation of synaptic transmission between parallel fibers and Purkinje cells. Moreover, β-adrenoceptor activation lowered the threshold for cerebellar long-term potentiation induced by 1 Hz parallel fiber stimulation. The presence of both α and β adrenergic receptors on Purkinje cells suggests the existence of bidirectional mechanisms of regulation allowing the noradrenergic afferents to refine the signals arriving to Purkinje cells at particular arousal states or during learning. PMID:25218865

  19. EMERGENCE OF A 600-HZ BUZZ UP STATE PURKINJE CELL FIRING IN ALERT MICE

    OpenAIRE

    Cheron, G.; Prigogine, C.; CHERON, J.; MÁRQUEZ-RUIZ, J.; Traub, R.D.; B. Dan

    2014-01-01

    Purkinje cell (PC) firing represents the sole output from the cerebellar cortex onto the deep cerebellar and vestibular nuclei. Here, we explored the different modes of PC firing in alert mice by extracellular recording. We confirm the existence of a tonic and/or bursting and quiescent modes corresponding to UP and DOWN state, respectively. We demonstrate the existence of a novel 600-Hz buzz UP state of firing characterized by simple spikes (SS) of very small amplitude. Climbing fiber (CF) in...

  20. 电鱼小脑浦肯野细胞对急性缺氧的功能反应%Functional responses of mormyrid cerebellar Purkinje cells to acute hypoxia insult

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶; 师长宏; 成胜权; 李果; 谭小丽; 杜永平; 张月萍

    2013-01-01

    目的:通过研究急性缺氧对电鱼(mormyrid electric fish)小脑浦肯野细胞(Purkinje cell,PC)的功能影响,阐明缺氧耐受动物神经元在缺氧条件下的电生理特征.方法:采用全细胞膜片钳记录法,观察急性缺氧对电鱼小脑主神经元PC膜电位、兴奋性和平行纤维(parallel fiber,PF)-PC突触传递的影响.结果:(1)短暂缺氧使电鱼小脑PC膜电位发生迅速而持久的超极化,可持续30 min以上,同时伴随自发放电频率的显著下降.谷氨酸AMPA受体阻断剂CNQX不影响PC缺氧性超极化的产生,但可阻断缺氧性超极化的持续存在;而GABAA受体阻断剂Bicuculline则完全阻断缺氧性超极化的产生,并使膜电位在缺氧开始后发生短暂的去极化.(2)缺氧使PC诱发动作电位的阈值增高,频率减低,幅值减小.(3)急性缺氧使刺激PF诱发的PC兴奋性突触后电流(excitatory postsynaptic current,EPSC)呈现长时程增强(long term potentiation,LTP),同时使EPSC双脉冲增强现象(pair-pulse facilitation,PPF)显著衰减.CNQX逆转了PF EPSC的缺氧性LTP,表现为长时程抑制(Long Term Depression,LTD);而Bicuculline则使PF EPSC的缺氧性LTP增强.结论:耐缺氧动物电鱼小脑神经元的缺氧反应特征与哺乳类动物显著不同,AMPA受体和GABAA受体均参与电鱼小脑PC的缺氧性超极化和PF LTP的产生,表明维持GABA能突触和谷氨酸能突触活动的适度平衡,可能是电鱼以及其他耐缺氧动物脑保护机制的关键.%Objective: To evaluate the electrophysiological characteristics of neuron in anorexia tolerant animal under hypoxia condition by discovering the functional responses of Mormyrid cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) to acute hypoxia insult. Methods: The whole cell patch clamp was used for the intracellular recording from PCs of the mormyrid cerebellar slices to evaluate the changes of the membrane potential and the excitability of PCs and the PF-PC synaptic transmission induced by acute

  1. Estudo estereológico das células de Purkinje cerebelares submetidas à intoxicação alcoólica em ratos Wistar Stereologic study of the cerebellar Purkinje cells submitted to alcoholic intoxication in Wistar rats

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    Mara Ibis Rodrigues Apfel

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available MOTIVO DO ESTUDO: Analisar o efeito do álcool sobre as células de Purkinje de ratos. MÉTODO: Ratos Wistar receberam oralmente soluções alcoólicas em diferentes concentrações 4%, 12% e 24%. Os animais foram sacrificados com 4, 8 e 12 semanas e os cerebelos foram clivados em cortes aleatórios e uniformemente isotrópicos e incluídos em parafina. Cortes de 6µm (H & E foram analisados por estereologia. RESULTADOS: As diferenças entre a densidade por área e densidade de superfície das células de Purkinje de todos os grupos experimentais (E e os respectivos controles (C foram significativas. Com 12 semanas, a densidade volumétrica da célula de Purkinje diminuiu entre os grupos C e E nas concentrações de 4% e 12%, mas não para a concentração de 24%, provavelmente devido a menor ingestão de líquido pelos animais. CONCLUSÃO: O álcool exerceu efeito tóxico sobre o corpo celular da célula de Purkinje nas três concentrações estudadas a partir de 4 semanas.BACKGROUND: to analyze the effect of the alcohol on the cells of Purkinje. METHOD: Wistar rats received alcoholic solutions orally in different concentrations 4%, 12% and 24%. The animals were sacrificed with 4, 8 and 12 weeks and the cerebella were randomly cut and embedded in paraffin. Sections of 6µm (H&E were stereologically analyzed. RESULTS: The differences among the density for area and density of surface of the cells of Purkinje of all of the experimental groups (E and the respective controls (C were significant. With 12 weeks the cell of Purkinje volume density decreased among the groups C and E in the concentrations of 4% and 12%, but not for the concentration of 24%, probably due to smaller liquid ingestion by the animals. CONCLUSION: The alcohol has toxic effect on the Purkinje cellular body in the three studied concentrations from 4 weeks.

  2. Purkinje cell maturation participates in the control of oligodendrocyte differentiation: role of sonic hedgehog and vitronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouslama-Oueghlani, Lamia; Wehrlé, Rosine; Doulazmi, Mohamed; Chen, Xiao Ru; Jaudon, Fanny; Lemaigre-Dubreuil, Yolande; Rivals, Isabelle; Sotelo, Constantino; Dusart, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation is temporally regulated during development by multiple factors. Here, we investigated whether the timing of oligodendrocyte differentiation might be controlled by neuronal differentiation in cerebellar organotypic cultures. In these cultures, the slices taken from newborn mice show very few oligodendrocytes during the first week of culture (immature slices) whereas their number increases importantly during the second week (mature slices). First, we showed that mature cerebellar slices or their conditioned media stimulated oligodendrocyte differentiation in immature slices thus demonstrating the existence of diffusible factors controlling oligodendrocyte differentiation. Using conditioned media from different models of slice culture in which the number of Purkinje cells varies drastically, we showed that the effects of these differentiating factors were proportional to the number of Purkinje cells. To identify these diffusible factors, we first performed a transcriptome analysis with an Affymetrix array for cerebellar cortex and then real-time quantitative PCR on mRNAs extracted from fluorescent flow cytometry sorted (FACS) Purkinje cells of L7-GFP transgenic mice at different ages. These analyses revealed that during postnatal maturation, Purkinje cells down-regulate Sonic Hedgehog and up-regulate vitronectin. Then, we showed that Sonic Hedgehog stimulates the proliferation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and inhibits their differentiation. In contrast, vitronectin stimulates oligodendrocyte differentiation, whereas its inhibition with blocking antibodies abolishes the conditioned media effects. Altogether, these results suggest that Purkinje cells participate in controlling the timing of oligodendrocyte differentiation in the cerebellum through the developmentally regulated expression of diffusible molecules such as Sonic Hedgehog and vitronectin. PMID:23155445

  3. Purkinje cell maturation participates in the control of oligodendrocyte differentiation: role of sonic hedgehog and vitronectin.

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    Lamia Bouslama-Oueghlani

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte differentiation is temporally regulated during development by multiple factors. Here, we investigated whether the timing of oligodendrocyte differentiation might be controlled by neuronal differentiation in cerebellar organotypic cultures. In these cultures, the slices taken from newborn mice show very few oligodendrocytes during the first week of culture (immature slices whereas their number increases importantly during the second week (mature slices. First, we showed that mature cerebellar slices or their conditioned media stimulated oligodendrocyte differentiation in immature slices thus demonstrating the existence of diffusible factors controlling oligodendrocyte differentiation. Using conditioned media from different models of slice culture in which the number of Purkinje cells varies drastically, we showed that the effects of these differentiating factors were proportional to the number of Purkinje cells. To identify these diffusible factors, we first performed a transcriptome analysis with an Affymetrix array for cerebellar cortex and then real-time quantitative PCR on mRNAs extracted from fluorescent flow cytometry sorted (FACS Purkinje cells of L7-GFP transgenic mice at different ages. These analyses revealed that during postnatal maturation, Purkinje cells down-regulate Sonic Hedgehog and up-regulate vitronectin. Then, we showed that Sonic Hedgehog stimulates the proliferation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and inhibits their differentiation. In contrast, vitronectin stimulates oligodendrocyte differentiation, whereas its inhibition with blocking antibodies abolishes the conditioned media effects. Altogether, these results suggest that Purkinje cells participate in controlling the timing of oligodendrocyte differentiation in the cerebellum through the developmentally regulated expression of diffusible molecules such as Sonic Hedgehog and vitronectin.

  4. Investigating complex I deficiency in Purkinje cells and synapses in patients with mitochondrial disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysostomou, Alexia; Grady, John P.; Laude, Alex; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Doug M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Cerebellar ataxia is common in patients with mitochondrial disease, and despite previous neuropathological investigations demonstrating vulnerability of the olivocerebellar pathway in patients with mitochondrial disease, the exact neurodegenerative mechanisms are still not clear. We use quantitative quadruple immunofluorescence to enable precise quantification of mitochondrial respiratory chain protein expression in Purkinje cell bodies and their synaptic terminals in the dentate nucleus. Methods We investigated NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] 1 alpha subcomplex subunit 13 protein expression in 12 clinically and genetically defined patients with mitochondrial disease and ataxia and 10 age‐matched controls. Molecular genetic analysis was performed to determine heteroplasmy levels of mutated mitochondrial DNA in Purkinje cell bodies and inhibitory synapses. Results Our data reveal that complex I deficiency is present in both Purkinje cell bodies and their inhibitory synapses which surround dentate nucleus neurons. Inhibitory synapses are fewer and enlarged in patients which could represent a compensatory mechanism. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy demonstrated similarly high levels of mutated mitochondrial DNA in cell bodies and synapses. Conclusions This is the first study to use a validated quantitative immunofluorescence technique to determine complex I expression in neurons and presynaptic terminals, evaluating the distribution of respiratory chain deficiencies and assessing the degree of morphological abnormalities affecting synapses. Respiratory chain deficiencies detected in Purkinje cell bodies and their synapses and structural synaptic changes are likely to contribute to altered cerebellar circuitry and progression of ataxia. PMID:26337858

  5. A novel approach to non-biased systematic random sampling: A stereologic estimate of Purkinje cells in the human cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agashiwala, Rajiv M.; Louis, Elan D.; Hof, Patrick R.; Perl, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    Non-biased systematic sampling using the principles of stereology provides accurate quantitative estimates of objects within neuroanatomic structures. However, the basic principles of stereology are not optimally suited for counting objects that selectively exist within a limited but complex and convoluted portion of the sample, such as occurs when counting cerebellar Purkinje cells. In an effort to quantify Purkinje cells in association with certain neurodegenerative disorders, we developed a new method for stereologic sampling of the cerebellar cortex, involving calculating the volume of the cerebellar tissues, identifying and isolating the Purkinje cell layer and using this information to extrapolate non-biased systematic sampling data to estimate the total number of Purkinje cells in the tissues. Using this approach, we counted Purkinje cells in the right cerebella of four human male control specimens, aged 41, 67, 70 and 84 years, and estimated the total Purkinje cell number for the four entire cerebella to be 27.03, 19.74, 20.44 and 22.03 million cells, respectively. The precision of the method is seen when comparing the density of the cells within the tissue: 266,274, 173,166, 167,603 and 183,575 cells/cm3, respectively. Prior literature documents Purkinje cell counts ranging from 14.8 to 30.5 million cells. These data demonstrate the accuracy of our approach. Our novel approach, which offers an improvement over previous methodologies, is of value for quantitative work of this nature. This approach could be applied to morphometric studies of other similarly complex tissues as well. PMID:18725208

  6. A new approach for determining phase response curves reveals that Purkinje cells can act as perfect integrators.

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    Elena Phoka

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar Purkinje cells display complex intrinsic dynamics. They fire spontaneously, exhibit bistability, and via mutual network interactions are involved in the generation of high frequency oscillations and travelling waves of activity. To probe the dynamical properties of Purkinje cells we measured their phase response curves (PRCs. PRCs quantify the change in spike phase caused by a stimulus as a function of its temporal position within the interspike interval, and are widely used to predict neuronal responses to more complex stimulus patterns. Significant variability in the interspike interval during spontaneous firing can lead to PRCs with a low signal-to-noise ratio, requiring averaging over thousands of trials. We show using electrophysiological experiments and simulations that the PRC calculated in the traditional way by sampling the interspike interval with brief current pulses is biased. We introduce a corrected approach for calculating PRCs which eliminates this bias. Using our new approach, we show that Purkinje cell PRCs change qualitatively depending on the firing frequency of the cell. At high firing rates, Purkinje cells exhibit single-peaked, or monophasic PRCs. Surprisingly, at low firing rates, Purkinje cell PRCs are largely independent of phase, resembling PRCs of ideal non-leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. These results indicate that Purkinje cells can act as perfect integrators at low firing rates, and that the integration mode of Purkinje cells depends on their firing rate.

  7. Purkinje cell NMDA receptors assume a key role in synaptic gain control in the mature cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piochon, Claire; Levenes, Carole; Ohtsuki, Gen; Hansel, Christian

    2010-11-10

    A classic view in cerebellar physiology holds that Purkinje cells do not express functional NMDA receptors and that, therefore, postsynaptic NMDA receptors are not involved in the induction of long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje cell synapses. Recently, it has been demonstrated that functional NMDA receptors are postsynaptically expressed at climbing fiber (CF) to Purkinje cell synapses in mice, reaching full expression levels at ∼2 months after birth. Here, we show that in the mature mouse cerebellum LTD (induced by paired PF and CF activation), but not long-term potentiation (LTP; PF stimulation alone) at PF to Purkinje cell synapses is blocked by bath application of the NMDA receptor antagonist D-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (D-APV). A blockade of LTD, but not LTP, was also observed when the noncompetitive NMDA channel blocker MK-801 was added to the patch-pipette saline, suggesting that postsynaptically expressed NMDA receptors are required for LTD induction. Using confocal calcium imaging, we show that CF-evoked calcium transients in dendritic spines are reduced in the presence of D-APV. This observation confirms that NMDA receptor signaling occurs at CF synapses and suggests that NMDA receptor-mediated calcium transients at the CF input site might contribute to LTD induction. Finally, we performed dendritic patch-clamp recordings from rat Purkinje cells. Dendritically recorded CF responses were reduced when D-APV was bath applied. Together, these data suggest that the late developmental expression of postsynaptic NMDA receptors at CF synapses onto Purkinje cells is associated with a switch toward an NMDA receptor-dependent LTD induction mechanism. PMID:21068337

  8. Duration of Purkinje cell complex spikes increases with their firing frequency

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    Pascal Warnaar

    2015-04-01

    Climbing fiber (CF triggered complex spikes (CS are massive depolarization bursts in the cerebellar Purkinje cell, showing several high frequency spikelet components (±600 Hz. Since its early observations, the CS is known to vary in shape. In this study we describe CS waveforms, extracellularly recorded in awake primates (Macaca mulatta performing saccades. Every Purkinje cell analyzed showed a range of CS shapes with profoundly different duration and number of spikelets. The initial part of the CS was rather constant but the later part differed greatly, with a pronounced jitter of the last spikelets causing a large variation in total CS duration. Waveforms did not effect the following pause duration in the simple spike (SS train, nor were SS firing rates predictive of the waveform shapes or vice versa. The waveforms did not differ between experimental conditions nor was there a preferred sequential order of CS shapes throughout the recordings. Instead, part of their variability, the timing jitter of the CS’s last spikelets, strongly correlated with interval length to the preceding CS: shorter CS intervals resulted in later appearance of the last spikelets in the CS burst, and vice versa. A similar phenomenon was observed in rat Purkinje cells recorded in vitro upon repeated extracellular stimulation of CFs at different frequencies in slice experiments. All together these results strongly suggest that the variability in the timing of the last spikelet is due to CS frequency dependent changes in Purkinje cell excitability.

  9. Purkinje cell long-term depression is prevented by T-588, a neuroprotective compound that reduces cytosolic calcium release from intracellular stores

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Tatsuo; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2005-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of the parallel-fiber (PF) Purkinje synapse induced by four different experimental paradigms could be prevented in rat cerebellar slices by T-588, a neuroprotective compound. The paradigms consisted of pairing PF activation with climbing-fiber activation, direct depolarization, glutamic iontophoretic depolarization, or caffeine. In all cases, LTD was determined by patch-clamp recording of PF excitatory postsynaptic currents at the Purkinje cell somata. T-588 at 1 μM...

  10. Activation of a Temporal Memory in Purkinje Cells by the mGluR7 Receptor

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    Fredrik Johansson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar Purkinje cells can learn to respond to a conditioned stimulus with an adaptively timed pause in firing. This response was usually ascribed to long-term depression of parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses but has recently been shown to be due to a previously unknown form of learning involving an intrinsic cellular timing mechanism. Here, we investigate how these responses are elicited. They are resistant to blockade of GABAergic inhibition, suggesting that they are caused by glutamate release rather than by a changed balance between GABA and glutamate. We show that the responses are abolished by antagonists of the mGlu7 receptor but not significantly affected by other glutamate antagonists. These results support the existence of a distinct learning mechanism, different from changes in synaptic strength. They also demonstrate in vivo post-synaptic inhibition mediated by glutamate and show that the mGlu7 receptor is involved in activating intrinsic temporal memory.

  11. Systematic regional variations in Purkinje cell spiking patterns.

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    Jianqiang Xiao

    Full Text Available In contrast to the uniform anatomy of the cerebellar cortex, molecular and physiological studies indicate that significant differences exist between cortical regions, suggesting that the spiking activity of Purkinje cells (PCs in different regions could also show distinct characteristics. To investigate this possibility we obtained extracellular recordings from PCs in different zebrin bands in crus IIa and vermis lobules VIII and IX in anesthetized rats in order to compare PC firing characteristics between zebrin positive (Z+ and negative (Z- bands. In addition, we analyzed recordings from PCs in the A2 and C1 zones of several lobules in the posterior lobe, which largely contain Z+ and Z- PCs, respectively. In both datasets significant differences in simple spike (SS activity were observed between cortical regions. Specifically, Z- and C1 PCs had higher SS firing rates than Z+ and A2 PCs, respectively. The irregularity of SS firing (as assessed by measures of interspike interval distribution was greater in Z+ bands in both absolute and relative terms. The results regarding systematic variations in complex spike (CS activity were less consistent, suggesting that while real differences can exist, they may be sensitive to other factors than the cortical location of the PC. However, differences in the interactions between SSs and CSs, including the post-CS pause in SSs and post-pause modulation of SSs, were also consistently observed between bands. Similar, though less strong trends were observed in the zonal recordings. These systematic variations in spontaneous firing characteristics of PCs between zebrin bands in vivo, raises the possibility that fundamental differences in information encoding exist between cerebellar cortical regions.

  12. Encoding of action by the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzfeld, David J; Kojima, Yoshiko; Soetedjo, Robijanto; Shadmehr, Reza

    2015-10-15

    Execution of accurate eye movements depends critically on the cerebellum, suggesting that the major output neurons of the cerebellum, Purkinje cells, may predict motion of the eye. However, this encoding of action for rapid eye movements (saccades) has remained unclear: Purkinje cells show little consistent modulation with respect to saccade amplitude or direction, and critically, their discharge lasts longer than the duration of a saccade. Here we analysed Purkinje-cell discharge in the oculomotor vermis of behaving rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and found neurons that increased or decreased their activity during saccades. We estimated the combined effect of these two populations via their projections to the caudal fastigial nucleus, and uncovered a simple-spike population response that precisely predicted the real-time motion of the eye. When we organized the Purkinje cells according to each cell's complex-spike directional tuning, the simple-spike population response predicted both the real-time speed and direction of saccade multiplicatively via a gain field. This suggests that the cerebellum predicts the real-time motion of the eye during saccades via the combined inputs of Purkinje cells onto individual nucleus neurons. A gain-field encoding of simple spikes emerges if the Purkinje cells that project onto a nucleus neuron are not selected at random but share a common complex-spike property. PMID:26469054

  13. Dynamic distribution and stem cell characteristics of Sox1-expressing cells in the cerebellar cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joelle Alcock; Virginie Sottile

    2009-01-01

    Bergmann glia cells are a discrete radial glia population surrounding Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex. Al-though Bergmann glia are essential for the development and correct arborization of Purkinje cells, little is known about the regulation of this cell population after the developmental phase. In an effort to characterize this population at the molecular level, we have analyzed marker expression and established that adult Bergmann glia express Soxl, Sox2 and Sox9, a feature otherwise associated with neural stem cells (NSCs). In the present study, we have further analyzed the developmental pattern of Soxl-expressing cells in the developing cerebellum. We report that before be-coming restricted to the Purkinje cell layer, Soxl-positive cells are present throughout the immature tissue, and that these cells show characteristics of Bergmann glia progenitors. Our study shows that these progenitors express Soxl, Sox2 and Sox9, a signature maintained throughout cerebellar maturation into adulthood. When isolated in culture, the Soxl-expressing cerebellar population exhibited neurosphere-forming ability, NSC-marker characteristics, and demonstrated multipotency at the clonal level. Our results show that the Bergmann glia population expresses Soxl during cerebellar development, and that these cells can be isolated and show stem cell characteristics in vitro, sug-gesting that they could hold a broader potential than previously thought.

  14. Transplantation and Stem Cell Therapy for Cerebellar Degenerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendelin, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-based and regenerative therapy may become a hopeful treatment for neurodegenerative diseases including hereditary cerebellar degenerations. Neurotransplantation therapy mainly aims to substitute lost cells, but potential effects might include various mechanisms including nonspecific trophic effects and stimulation of endogenous regenerative processes and neural plasticity. Nevertheless, currently, there remain serious limitations. There is a wide spectrum of human hereditary cerebellar degenerations as well as numerous cerebellar mutant mouse strains that serve as models for the development of effective therapy. By now, transplantation has been shown to ameliorate cerebellar function, e.g. in Purkinje cell degeneration mice, Lurcher mutant mice and mouse models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and type 2 and Niemann-Pick disease type C. Despite the lack of direct comparative studies, it appears that there might be differences in graft development and functioning between various types of cerebellar degeneration. Investigation of the relation of graft development to specific morphological, microvascular or biochemical features of the diseased host tissue in various cerebellar degenerations may help to identify factors determining the fate of grafted cells and potential of their functional integration. PMID:26155762

  15. Climbing Fiber Signaling and Cerebellar Gain Control

    OpenAIRE

    Ohtsuki, Gen; Piochon, Claire; Hansel, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The physiology of climbing fiber signals in cerebellar Purkinje cells has been studied since the early days of electrophysiology. Both the climbing fiber-evoked complex spike and the role of climbing fiber activity in the induction of long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses have become hallmark features of cerebellar physiology. However, the key role of climbing fiber signaling in cerebellar motor learning has been challenged by recent reports of forms of synaptic ...

  16. Spatiotemporal Analysis of Purkinje Cell Degeneration Relative to Parasagittal Expression Domains in a Model of Neonatal Viral Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Brent L.; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2006-01-01

    Infection of newborn Lewis rats with Borna disease virus (neonatal Borna disease [NBD]) results in cerebellar damage without the cellular inflammation associated with infections in later life. Purkinje cell (PC) damage has been reported for several models of early-life viral infection, including NBD; however, the time course and distribution of PC pathology have not been investigated rigorously. This study examined the spatiotemporal relationship between PC death and zonal organization in NBD...

  17. Heat Shock Protein Beta-1 Modifies Anterior to Posterior Purkinje Cell Vulnerability in a Mouse Model of Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell’Orco, James M.; Qin, Zhaohui S.; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Shakkottai, Vikram G.; Lieberman, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Selective neuronal vulnerability is characteristic of most degenerative disorders of the CNS, yet mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly characterized. Many forms of cerebellar degeneration exhibit an anterior-to-posterior gradient of Purkinje cell loss including Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC) disease, a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive neurological deficits that often begin in childhood. Here, we sought to identify candidate genes underlying vulnerability of Purkinje cells in anterior cerebellar lobules using data freely available in the Allen Brain Atlas. This approach led to the identification of 16 candidate neuroprotective or susceptibility genes. We demonstrate that one candidate gene, heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1), promoted neuronal survival in cellular models of NPC disease through a mechanism that involved inhibition of apoptosis. Additionally, we show that over-expression of wild type HSPB1 or a phosphomimetic mutant in NPC mice slowed the progression of motor impairment and diminished cerebellar Purkinje cell loss. We confirmed the modulatory effect of Hspb1 on Purkinje cell degeneration in vivo, as knockdown by Hspb1 shRNA significantly enhanced neuron loss. These results suggest that strategies to promote HSPB1 activity may slow the rate of cerebellar degeneration in NPC disease and highlight the use of bioinformatics tools to uncover pathways leading to neuronal protection in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27152617

  18. Heat Shock Protein Beta-1 Modifies Anterior to Posterior Purkinje Cell Vulnerability in a Mouse Model of Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chan; Elrick, Matthew J; Dell'Orco, James M; Qin, Zhaohui S; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Shakkottai, Vikram G; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2016-05-01

    Selective neuronal vulnerability is characteristic of most degenerative disorders of the CNS, yet mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly characterized. Many forms of cerebellar degeneration exhibit an anterior-to-posterior gradient of Purkinje cell loss including Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC) disease, a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive neurological deficits that often begin in childhood. Here, we sought to identify candidate genes underlying vulnerability of Purkinje cells in anterior cerebellar lobules using data freely available in the Allen Brain Atlas. This approach led to the identification of 16 candidate neuroprotective or susceptibility genes. We demonstrate that one candidate gene, heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1), promoted neuronal survival in cellular models of NPC disease through a mechanism that involved inhibition of apoptosis. Additionally, we show that over-expression of wild type HSPB1 or a phosphomimetic mutant in NPC mice slowed the progression of motor impairment and diminished cerebellar Purkinje cell loss. We confirmed the modulatory effect of Hspb1 on Purkinje cell degeneration in vivo, as knockdown by Hspb1 shRNA significantly enhanced neuron loss. These results suggest that strategies to promote HSPB1 activity may slow the rate of cerebellar degeneration in NPC disease and highlight the use of bioinformatics tools to uncover pathways leading to neuronal protection in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27152617

  19. Heat Shock Protein Beta-1 Modifies Anterior to Posterior Purkinje Cell Vulnerability in a Mouse Model of Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Chung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Selective neuronal vulnerability is characteristic of most degenerative disorders of the CNS, yet mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly characterized. Many forms of cerebellar degeneration exhibit an anterior-to-posterior gradient of Purkinje cell loss including Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC disease, a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive neurological deficits that often begin in childhood. Here, we sought to identify candidate genes underlying vulnerability of Purkinje cells in anterior cerebellar lobules using data freely available in the Allen Brain Atlas. This approach led to the identification of 16 candidate neuroprotective or susceptibility genes. We demonstrate that one candidate gene, heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1, promoted neuronal survival in cellular models of NPC disease through a mechanism that involved inhibition of apoptosis. Additionally, we show that over-expression of wild type HSPB1 or a phosphomimetic mutant in NPC mice slowed the progression of motor impairment and diminished cerebellar Purkinje cell loss. We confirmed the modulatory effect of Hspb1 on Purkinje cell degeneration in vivo, as knockdown by Hspb1 shRNA significantly enhanced neuron loss. These results suggest that strategies to promote HSPB1 activity may slow the rate of cerebellar degeneration in NPC disease and highlight the use of bioinformatics tools to uncover pathways leading to neuronal protection in neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Sensory-Driven Enhancement of Calcium Signals in Individual Purkinje Cell Dendrites of Awake Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Najafi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Climbing fibers (CFs are thought to contribute to cerebellar plasticity and learning by triggering a large influx of dendritic calcium in the postsynaptic Purkinje cell (PC to signal the occurrence of an unexpected sensory event. However, CFs fire about once per second whether or not an event occurs, raising the question of how sensory-driven signals might be distinguished from a background of ongoing spontaneous activity. Here, we report that in PC dendrites of awake mice, CF-triggered calcium signals are enhanced when the trigger is a sensory event. In addition, we show that a large fraction of the total enhancement in each PC dendrite can be accounted for by an additional boost of calcium provided by sensory activation of a non-CF input. We suggest that sensory stimulation may modulate dendritic voltage and calcium concentration in PCs to increase the strength of plasticity signals during cerebellar learning.

  1. Treadmill exercise improves motor coordination through ameliorating Purkinje cell loss in amyloid beta23-35-induced Alzheimer's disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Min; Shin, Mal-Soon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Tae-Woon; Cho, Han-Sam; Kim, Chang-Ju; Jang, Myung-Soo; Kim, Tae-Wook; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Dong-Hee

    2014-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a most common age-related neurodegenerative disease. AD is characterized by a progressive loss of neurons causing cognitive dysfunction. The cerebellum is closely associated with integration of movement, including motor coordination, control, and equilibrium. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of tread-mill exercise on the survival of Purkinje neurons in relation with reactive astrocyte in the cerebellum using Aβ25-35-induced AD rats. AD was induced by a bilateral intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of Aβ25-35. The rats in the exercise groups were forced to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 min once a day for 4 weeks, starting 2 days after Aβ25-35 injection. In the present results, ICV injection of Aβ25-35 deteriorated motor coordination and balance. The number of calbindin-positive cells in the cerebellar vermis was decreased and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in the cerebellar vermis was increased in the Aβ25-35-induced AD rats. Treadmill exercise improved motor coordination and balance. Treadmill exercise increased the number of Purkinje neurons and suppressed GFAP expression in the cerebellar vermis. The present study demonstrated that treadmill exercises alleviated dysfunction of motor coordination and balance by reduction of Purkinje cell loss through suppressing reactive astrocytes in the cerebellum of AD rats. The present study provides the possibility that treadmill exercise might be an important therapeutic strategy for the symptom improvement of AD patients. PMID:25426461

  2. Parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synaptic impairment in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 27

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Tempia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetically inherited mutations in the fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14 gene lead to spinocerebellar ataxia type 27 (SCA27, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by severe heterogeneous motor and cognitive impairments. Consistently, genetic deletion of Fgf14 in Fgf14-/- mice recapitulates salient features of the SCA27 human disease. In vitro molecular studies in cultured neurons indicate that the FGF14F145S SCA27 allele acts as a dominant negative mutant suppressing the FGF14 wild type function and resulting in inhibition of voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels. To gain insights in the cerebellar deficits in the animal model of the human disease, we applied whole-cell voltage-clamp in the acute cerebellar slice preparation to examine the properties of parallel fibers (PF to Purkinje neuron synapses in Fgf14-/- mice and wild type littermates. We found that the AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents evoked by PF stimulation (PF-EPSCs were significantly reduced in Fgf14-/- animals, while short-term plasticity, measured as paired-pulse facilitation (PPF, was enhanced. Measuring Sr2+-induced release of quanta from stimulated synapses, we found that the size of the PF-EPSCs was unchanged, ruling out a postsynaptic deficit. This phenotype was corroborated by decreased expression of VGLUT1, a specific presynaptic marker at PF-Purkinje neuron synapses. We next examined the mGluR1 receptor-induced response (mGluR1-EPSC that under normal conditions requires a gradual build-up of glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft, and found no changes in these responses in Fgf14-/- mice. These results provide evidence of a critical role of FGF14 in maintaining presynaptic function at PF-Purkinje neuron synapses highlighting critical target mechanisms to recapitulate the complexity of the SCA27 disease.

  3. Distributed Cerebellar Motor Learning: A Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity Model

    OpenAIRE

    Luque, Niceto R.; Garrido, Jesús A.; Naveros, Francisco; Carrillo, Richard R.; D'Angelo, Egidio; Ros, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Deep cerebellar nuclei neurons receive both inhibitory (GABAergic) synaptic currents from Purkinje cells (within the cerebellar cortex) and excitatory (glutamatergic) synaptic currents from mossy fibers. Those two deep cerebellar nucleus inputs are thought to be also adaptive, embedding interesting properties in the framework of accurate movements. We show that distributed spike-timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms (STDP) located at different cerebellar sites (parallel fibers to Purkinje ce...

  4. Purkinje cell axonal anatomy: quantifying morphometric changes in essential tremor versus control brains

    OpenAIRE

    Babij, Rachel; Lee, Michelle; Cortés, Etty; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul G.; Faust, Phyllis L.; Louis, Elan D.

    2013-01-01

    Growing clinical, neuro-imaging and post-mortem data have implicated the cerebellum as playing an important role in the pathogenesis of essential tremor. Aside from a modest reduction of Purkinje cells in some post-mortem studies, Purkinje cell axonal swellings (torpedoes) are present to a greater degree in essential tremor cases than controls. Yet a detailed study of more subtle morphometric changes in the Purkinje cell axonal compartment has not been undertaken. We performed a detailed morp...

  5. Encoding of action by the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum

    OpenAIRE

    Herzfeld, David J.; Kojima, Yoshiko; Soetedjo, Robijanto; Shadmehr, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Summary Execution of accurate eye movements depends critically on the cerebellum 1,2,3 , suggesting that Purkinje cells (P-cells) may predict motion of the eye. Yet, this encoding has remained a long-standing puzzle: P-cells show little consistent modulation with respect to saccade amplitude 4,5 or direction 4 , and critically, their discharge lasts longer than duration of a saccade 6,7 . Here, we analyzed P-cell discharge in the oculomotor vermis of behaving monkeys 8,9 and found neurons tha...

  6. Mitigation of cerebellar neuropathy in globoid cell leukodystrophy mice by AAV-mediated gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dar-Shong; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Lee, Allan Yueh-Luen; Ho, Che-Sheng; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Wang, Tuen-Jen; Jian, Yuan-Ren; Hsu, Jui-Cheng; Huang, Zon-Darr; Lee, Tsung-Han; Chiang, Ming-Fu

    2015-10-15

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the enzyme galactocerebrosidase (GALC). The absence of GALC activity leads to the accumulation of the toxic substance psychosine and the preferential loss of myelinating cells in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Profound demyelination, astrogliosis and axonopathy are the hallmarks of the pathogenesis of GLD, and cerebellar ataxia is one of the dominant manifestations in adolescents and adults affected with GLD. To date, studies regarding cerebellar degeneration in GLD are limited. In this study, the efficacy of cerebellum-targeted gene therapy on the cerebellar neuropathology in twitcher mice (a murine model of GLD) has been validated. We observed degeneration of Purkinje cells, Bergmann glia, and granule cells in addition to astrocytosis and demyelination in the cerebellum of the twitcher mice. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dark cell degeneration and disintegration of the cellular composition of Purkinje cells in untreated twitcher mice. In addition, the expressions of neurotrophic factors CNTF, GDNF and IGF-I were up-regulated and the expression of BDNF was down-regulated. Intracerebellar-mediated gene therapy efficiently corrected enzymatic deficiency by direct transduction to Purkinje cells and cross-correction in other cell types in the cerebellum, leading to the amelioration of both neuroinflammation and demyelination. The population, dendritic territory, and axonal processes of Purkinje cells remained normal in the cerebellum of treated twitcher mice, where radial fibers of Bergmann glia spanned the molecular layer and collateral branches ensheathed the dendritic processes of Purkinje cells. Moreover, the aberrant expressions of neurotrophic factors were mitigated in the cerebellum of treated twitcher mice, indicating the preservation of cellular function in addition to maintaining the neuronal architecture. The life span of the

  7. Bergmann glia and the recognition molecule CHL1 organize GABAergic axons and direct innervation of Purkinje cell dendrites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Ango

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The geometric and subcellular organization of axon arbors distributes and regulates electrical signaling in neurons and networks, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. In rodent cerebellar cortex, stellate interneurons elaborate characteristic axon arbors that selectively innervate Purkinje cell dendrites and likely regulate dendritic integration. We used GFP BAC transgenic reporter mice to examine the cellular processes and molecular mechanisms underlying the development of stellate cell axons and their innervation pattern. We show that stellate axons are organized and guided towards Purkinje cell dendrites by an intermediate scaffold of Bergmann glial (BG fibers. The L1 family immunoglobulin protein Close Homologue of L1 (CHL1 is localized to apical BG fibers and stellate cells during the development of stellate axon arbors. In the absence of CHL1, stellate axons deviate from BG fibers and show aberrant branching and orientation. Furthermore, synapse formation between aberrant stellate axons and Purkinje dendrites is reduced and cannot be maintained, leading to progressive atrophy of axon terminals. These results establish BG fibers as a guiding scaffold and CHL1 a molecular signal in the organization of stellate axon arbors and in directing their dendritic innervation.

  8. Curcumin alters motor coordination but not total number of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum of adolescent male Wistar rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ginus Partadiredja; Sutarman; Taufik Nur Yahya; Christiana Tri Nuryana; Rina Susilowati

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:The present study aimed at investigating the effects of curcumin on the motor coordination and the estimate of the total number of cerebellar Purkinje cells of adolescent Wistar rats exposed to ethanol.METHODS:The total of 21 male Wistar rats aged 37 d old were divided into three groups,namely ethanol,ethanol-curcumin,and control groups.The ethanol group received 1.5 g/kg ethanol injected intraperitoneally and water given per oral; the ethanol-curcumin group received 1.5 g/kg ethanol injected intraperitoneally and curcumin extract given per oral; the control group received saline injection and oral water.The treatment was carried out daily for one month,after which the motor coordination performance of the rats was examined using revolving drum apparatus at test days 1,8,and 15.The rats were finally sacrificed and the cerebellum of the rats was further processed for stereological analysis.The estimate of the total number of Purkinje cells was calculated using physical fractionator method.RESULTS:The ethanol-curcumin group performed better than both ethanol and control groups in the motor coordination ability at day 8 of testing (P< 0.01).No Purkinje cell loss was observed as a result of one month intraperitoneal injection of ethanol.CONCLUSION:Curcumin may exert beneficial effects on the motor coordination of adolescent rats exposed to ethanol via undetermined hormetic mechanisms.

  9. SELECTIVE EFFECTS OF DATURA STRAMONIUM ON THE GRANULAR PARALLEL FIBRES AND PURKINJE CELLS OF THE CEREBELLUM IN WISTAR RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E. Ekanem

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Datura stramonium (DS is a tropical ubiquitous shrub which is often used to increase intoxication in some beverages and is also freely used as a hallucinogen. It is a depressant of the central nervous system, yet commonly smoked in like manner tobacco. The present study investigated changes induced by intoxication with DS on the purkinje cells and parallel fibres of the cerebellum in Wistar rats to further elucidate the effects of this drug on cerebellar structure. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on both male and female Wistar rats (200-250 g. They were placed into three batches and four groups were derived from each batch, with eight animals per group. Ethanolic dried seed extract of DS was diluted in normal saline and administered intraperitoneally (I.P. at a dose of 750mg/kg and given to the treatment groups: once in batch 1, twice in batch 2, twelve hourly and thrice in batch 3, eight hourly per day respectively for 4 weeks, while the control groups received an equivalent of normal saline. The rats were euthanized and sections of the cerebellum were histologically processed in all groups. Silver impregnation stain for degenerating axons and neurons was used to elucidate the actions of DS on purkinje cells and the parallel fibres of the cerebellum. Results: The result of IP administration of DS extract (750 mg/kg given three times daily to the treated rats showed significant histological changes, which included atrophy of the parallel fibres but no significant changes in the purkinje cells of the cerebellum. Conclusions: Intoxication of DS seed as a result of excessive ingestion may have a selective degenerative effect on the parallel fibres of the granule cells of the cerebellum while the purkinje cells are spared; the implication being motor dysfunction.

  10. Efficient differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into functional cerebellar-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erceg, Slaven; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Zipancic, Ivan; Lainez, Sergio; Roselló, Mireia Gárcia; Xiong, Chen; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Fernando Javier; Planells, Rosa; Alvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Bhattacharya, Shom Shanker; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2010-11-01

    The cerebellum has critical roles in motor and sensory learning and motor coordination. Many cerebellum-related disorders indicate cell therapy as a possible treatment of neural loss. Here we show that application of inductive signals involved in early patterning of the cerebellar region followed by application of different factors directs human embryonic stem cell differentiation into cerebellar-like cells such as granule neurons, Purkinje cells, interneuron, and glial cells. Neurons derived using our protocol showed a T-shaped polarity phenotype and express similar markers to the developed human cerebellum. Electrophysiological measurements confirmed functional electrical properties compatible with these cells. In vivo implantation of differentiated human embryonic stem cells transfected with MATH1-GFP construct into neonatal mice resulted in cell migration across the molecular and the Purkinje cell layers and settlement in the internal molecular layers. Our findings demonstrate that the universal mechanisms involved in the development of cerebellum can be efficiently recapitulated in vitro, which enables the design of new strategies for cell replacement therapy, to study early human development and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20521974

  11. Releasing dentate nucleus cells from Purkinje cell inhibition generates output from the cerebrocerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Ishikawa

    Full Text Available The cerebellum generates its vast amount of output to the cerebral cortex through the dentate nucleus (DN that is essential for precise limb movements in primates. Nuclear cells in DN generate burst activity prior to limb movement, and inactivation of DN results in cerebellar ataxia. The question is how DN cells become active under intensive inhibitory drive from Purkinje cells (PCs. There are two excitatory inputs to DN, mossy fiber and climbing fiber collaterals, but neither of them appears to have sufficient strength for generation of burst activity in DN. Therefore, we can assume two possible mechanisms: post-inhibitory rebound excitation and disinhibition. If rebound excitation works, phasic excitation of PCs and a concomitant inhibition of DN cells should precede the excitation of DN cells. On the other hand, if disinhibition plays a primary role, phasic suppression of PCs and activation of DN cells should be observed at the same timing. To examine these two hypotheses, we compared the activity patterns of PCs in the cerebrocerebellum and DN cells during step-tracking wrist movements in three Japanese monkeys. As a result, we found that the majority of wrist-movement-related PCs were suppressed prior to movement onset and the majority of wrist-movement-related DN cells showed concurrent burst activity without prior suppression. In a minority of PCs and DN cells, movement-related increases and decreases in activity, respectively, developed later. These activity patterns suggest that the initial burst activity in DN cells is generated by reduced inhibition from PCs, i.e., by disinhibition. Our results indicate that suppression of PCs, which has been considered secondary to facilitation, plays the primary role in generating outputs from DN. Our findings provide a new perspective on the mechanisms used by PCs to influence limb motor control and on the plastic changes that underlie motor learning in the cerebrocerebellum.

  12. STD-dependent and independent encoding of input irregularity as spike rate in a computational model of a cerebellar nucleus neuron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Luthman (Johannes); F.E. Hoebeek (Freek); R. Maex (Reinoud); N. Davey (Neil); R. Adams (Rod); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); V. Steuber (Volker)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractNeurons in the cerebellar nuclei (CN) receive inhibitory inputs from Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex and provide the major output from the cerebellum, but their computational function is not well understood. It has recently been shown that the spike activity of Purkinje cells is

  13. Subcellular structural plasticity caused by the absence of the fast Ca2+ buffer calbindin D-28k in recurrent collaterals of cerebellar Purkinje neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Orduz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purkinje cells (PC control spike timing of neighboring PC by their recurrent axon collaterals. These synapses underlie fast cerebellar oscillations and are characterized by a strong facilitation within a time window of <20 ms during paired-pulse protocols. PC express high levels of the fast Ca2+ buffer protein calbindin D-28k (CB. As expected from the absence of a fast Ca2+ buffer, presynaptic action potential-evoked [Ca2+]i transients were previously shown to be bigger in PC boutons of young (second postnatal week CB-/- mice, yet IPSC mean amplitudes remained unaltered in connected CB-/- PC. Since PC spine morphology is altered in adult CB-/- mice (longer necks, larger spine head volume, we summoned that morphological compensation/adaptation mechanisms might also be induced in CB-/- PC axon collaterals including boutons. In these mice, biocytin-filled PC reconstructions revealed that the number of axonal varicosities per PC axon collateral was augmented, mostly confined to the granule cell layer. Additionally, the volume of individual boutons was increased, evidenced from z-stacks of confocal images. EM analysis of PC-PC synapses revealed an enhancement in active zone (AZ length by approximately 23%, paralleled by a higher number of docked vesicles per AZ in CB-/- boutons. Moreover, synaptic cleft width was larger in CB-/- (23.8 ± 0.43 nm compared to wild type (21.17 ± 0.39 nm synapses. We propose that the morphological changes, i.e. the larger bouton volume, the enhanced AZ length and the higher number of docked vesicles, in combination with the increase in synaptic cleft width likely modifies the GABA release properties at this synapse in CB-/- mice. We view these changes as adaptation/homeostatic mechanisms to likely maintain (preserve characteristics of synaptic transmission in the absence of the fast Ca2+ buffer CB. Our study provides further evidence on the functioning of the Ca2+ homeostasome.

  14. Synchrony and neural coding in cerebellar circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L Person

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum regulates complex movements and is also implicated in cognitive tasks, and cerebellar dysfunction is consequently associated not only with movement disorders, but also with conditions like autism and dyslexia. How information is encoded by specific cerebellar firing patterns remains debated, however. A central question is how the cerebellar cortex transmits its integrated output to the cerebellar nuclei via GABAergic synapses from Purkinje neurons. Possible answers come from accumulating evidence that subsets of Purkinje cells synchronize their firing during behaviors that require the cerebellum. Consistent with models predicting that coherent activity of inhibitory networks has the capacity to dictate firing patterns of target neurons, recent experimental work supports the idea that inhibitory synchrony may regulate the response of cerebellar nuclear cells to Purkinje inputs, owing to the interplay between unusually fast inhibitory synaptic responses and high rates of intrinsic activity. Data from multiple laboratories lead to a working hypothesis that synchronous inhibitory input from Purkinje cells can set the timing and rate of action potentials produced by cerebellar nuclear cells, thereby relaying information out of the cerebellum. If so, then changing spatiotemporal patterns of Purkinje activity would allow different subsets of inhibitory neurons to control cerebellar output at different times. Here we explore the evidence for and against the idea that a synchrony code defines, at least in part, the input-output function between the cerebellar cortex and nuclei. We consider the literature on the existence of simple spike synchrony, convergence of Purkinje neurons onto nuclear neurons, and intrinsic properties of nuclear neurons that contribute to responses to inhibition. Finally, we discuss factors that may disrupt or modulate a synchrony code and describe the potential contributions of inhibitory synchrony to other motor

  15. Emergence of a 600-Hz buzz UP state Purkinje cell firing in alert mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheron, G; Prigogine, C; Cheron, J; Márquez-Ruiz, J; Traub, R D; Dan, B

    2014-03-28

    Purkinje cell (PC) firing represents the sole output from the cerebellar cortex onto the deep cerebellar and vestibular nuclei. Here, we explored the different modes of PC firing in alert mice by extracellular recording. We confirm the existence of a tonic and/or bursting and quiescent modes corresponding to UP and DOWN state, respectively. We demonstrate the existence of a novel 600-Hz buzz UP state of firing characterized by simple spikes (SS) of very small amplitude. Climbing fiber (CF) input is able to switch the 600-Hz buzz to the DOWN state, as for the classical UP-to-DOWN state transition. Conversely, the CF input can initiate a typical SS pattern terminating into 600-Hz buzz. The 600-Hz buzz was transiently suppressed by whisker pad stimulation demonstrating that it remained responsive to peripheral input. It must not be mistaken for a DOWN state or the sign of PC inhibition. Complex spike (CS) frequency was increased during the 600-Hz buzz, indicating that this PC output actively contributes to the cerebello-olivary loop by triggering a disinhibition of the inferior olive. During the 600-Hz buzz, the first depolarizing component of the CS was reduced and the second depolarizing component was suppressed. Consistent with our experimental observations, using a 559-compartment single-PC model - in which PC UP state (of about -43mV) was obtained by the combined action of large tonic AMPA conductances and counterbalancing GABAergic inhibition - removal of this inhibition produced the 600-Hz buzz; the simulated buzz frequency decreased following an artificial CS. PMID:24440752

  16. The volume of Purkinje cells decreases in the cerebellum of acrylamide-intoxicated rats, but no cells are lost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Tandrup, T; Braendgaard, H

    1994-01-01

    The effects of acrylamide intoxication on the numbers of granule and Purkinje cells and the volume of Purkinje cell perikarya have been evaluated with stereological methods. The analysis was carried out in the cerebella of rats that had received a dose of 33.3 mg/kg acrylamide, twice a week, for 7...

  17. Calcium is an intracellular mediator of the climbing fiber in induction of cerebellar long-term depression.

    OpenAIRE

    Sakurai, M.

    1990-01-01

    In cerebellar Purkinje cells, conjunctive stimulation of parallel fibers and the climbing fiber causes long-term depression of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell transmission. It has been postulated that calcium is an intracellular mediator of the climbing fiber to induce this synaptic modification. To directly test the hypothesis, a calcium-chelating agent, EGTA, was intracellularly injected into Purkinje cells. In these injected cells, conjunctive stimulation failed to induce depression. Instead,...

  18. GABAA Receptor Kinetics in the Cerebellar Nuclei: Evidence for Detection of Transmitter from Distant Release Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Pugh, Jason R.; Raman, Indira M.

    2004-01-01

    Neurons of the cerebellar nuclei receive GABAergic input from Purkinje cells. Purkinje boutons have several closely spaced presynaptic densities without GABA transporters, raising the possibility that neurotransmitter released by one presynaptic site diffuses to multiple postsynaptic sites. To test whether such local spillover may contribute to transmission, we studied gating of GABAA receptors at 31–33°C in cerebellar nuclear neurons acutely dissociated from mice. Currents were evoked by rap...

  19. Cell death in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum of senescence accelerated mouse (SAMP(8)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yonghong; Lee, Cleo C L; Lam, W P; Wai, Maria S M; Rudd, John A; Yew, David T

    2007-10-01

    The cerebella of SAMP(8) (accelerated aging mouse) and SAMR(1) controls were analyzed by Western Blotting of tyrosine hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase, as well as by TUNEL and histological silver staining. Both tyrosine hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase levels were higher in SAMR(1) than in SAMP(8). There was also an age-related decrease in enzyme levels in SAMP(8), with the reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase being more apparent. Concomitantly, there was an age-related increase of apoptosis in the medial neocerebellum and the vermis as revealed by TUNEL, with changes being significant in the SAMP(8) strain. Histologically, some Purkinje cells appeared to disappear during aging. Taken together, the data suggests that the aging SAMP(8) strain displays differential Purkinje cell death in the medial cerebellum and that some of the dying cells are likely to be catecholaminergic. PMID:17415677

  20. Oligodendrocyte ablation affects the coordinated interaction between granule and Purkinje neurons during cerebellum development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oligodendrocytes (OLs) are the glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS) classically known to be devoted to the formation of myelin sheaths around most axons of the vertebrate brain. We have addressed the role of these cells during cerebellar development, by ablating OLs in vivo. Previous analyses had indicated that OL ablation during the first six postnatal days results into a striking cerebellar phenotype, whose major features are a strong reduction of granule neurons and aberrant Purkinje cells development. These two cell types are highly interconnected during cerebellar development through the production of molecules that help their proliferation, differentiation and maintenance. In this article, we present data showing that OL ablation has major effects on the physiology of Purkinje (PC) and granule cells (GC). In particular, OL ablation results into a reduction of sonic hedgehog (Shh), Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), and Reelin (Rln) expression. These results indicate that absence of OLs profoundly alters the normal cerebellar developmental program

  1. Quantitative neuroanatomy of all Purkinje cells with light sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovico eSilvestri

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the cytoarchitecture of mammalian central nervous system on a brain-wide scale is becoming a compelling need in neuroscience. For example, realistic modeling of brain activity requires the definition of quantitative features of large neuronal populations in the whole brain. Quantitative anatomical maps will also be crucial to classify the cytoarchtitectonic abnormalities associated with neuronal pathologies in a high reproducible and reliable manner. In this paper, we apply recent advances in optical microscopy and image analysis to characterize the spatial distribution of Purkinje cells across the whole cerebellum. Light sheet microscopy was used to image with micron-scale resolution a fixed and cleared cerebellum of an L7-GFP transgenic mouse, in which all Purkinje cells are fluorescently labeled. A fast and scalable algorithm for fully automated cell identification was applied on the image to extract the position of all the fluorescent Purkinje cells. This vectorized representation of the cell population allows a thorough characterization of the complex three-dimensional distribution of the neurons, highlighting the presence of gaps inside the lamellar organization of Purkinje cells, whose density is believed to play a significant role in autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, clustering analysis of the localized somata permits dividing the whole cerebellum in groups of Purkinje cells with high spatial correlation, suggesting new possibilities of anatomical partition. The quantitative approach presented here can be extended to study the distribution of different types of cell in many brain regions and across the whole encephalon, providing a robust base for building realistic computational models of the brain, and for unbiased morphological tissue screening in presence of pathologies and/or drug treatments.

  2. Sonic hedgehog patterning during cerebellar development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Annarita; Cerrato, Valentina; Fucà, Elisa; Parmigiani, Elena; Buffo, Annalisa; Leto, Ketty

    2016-01-01

    The morphogenic factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) actively orchestrates many aspects of cerebellar development and maturation. During embryogenesis, Shh signaling is active in the ventricular germinal zone (VZ) and represents an essential signal for proliferation of VZ-derived progenitors. Later, Shh secreted by Purkinje cells sustains the amplification of postnatal neurogenic niches: the external granular layer and the prospective white matter, where excitatory granule cells and inhibitory interneurons are produced, respectively. Moreover, Shh signaling affects Bergmann glial differentiation and promotes cerebellar foliation during development. Here we review the most relevant functions of Shh during cerebellar ontogenesis, underlying its role in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26499980

  3. Proteomic studies of a single CNS synapse type: the parallel fiber/purkinje cell synapse.

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    Fekrije Selimi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Precise neuronal networks underlie normal brain function and require distinct classes of synaptic connections. Although it has been shown that certain individual proteins can localize to different classes of synapses, the biochemical composition of specific synapse types is not known. Here, we have used a combination of genetically engineered mice, affinity purification, and mass spectrometry to profile proteins at parallel fiber/Purkinje cell synapses. We identify approximately 60 candidate postsynaptic proteins that can be classified into 11 functional categories. Proteins involved in phospholipid metabolism and signaling, such as the protein kinase MRCKgamma, are major unrecognized components of this synapse type. We demonstrate that MRCKgamma can modulate maturation of dendritic spines in cultured cortical neurons, and that it is localized specifically to parallel fiber/Purkinje cell synapses in vivo. Our data identify a novel synapse-specific signaling pathway, and provide an approach for detailed investigations of the biochemical complexity of central nervous system synapse types.

  4. Restoring Cognitive Functions Using Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Techniques in Patients with Cerebellar Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    RChrisMiall

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted the possibility of modulating the excitability of cerebro–cerebellar circuits bi-directionally using transcranial electrical brain stimulation, in a manner akin to that observed using magnetic stimulation protocols. It has been proposed that cerebellar stimulation activates Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, leading to inhibition of the dentate nucleus, which exerts a tonic facilitatory drive onto motor and cognitive regions of cortex through a synaptic...

  5. Kv3.3b expression defines the shape of the complex spike in the Purkinje cell.

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    Ken Veys

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The complex spike (CS in cerebellar Purkinje Cells (PC is not an all-or-nothing phenomena as originally proposed, but shows variability depending on the spiking behavior of the Inferior Olive and intrinsic variability in the number and shape of spikelets. The spikelets are repolarised by a sole channel, Kv3.3b, which has been proposed to undergo developmental changes during the postnatal PC maturation. We address here the regulation of the intrinsic CS variability by the expression of inactivating Kv3.3 channels in PCs by combining patch-clamp recordings and single-cell PCR methods on the same neurons, using a technique that we recently optimized to correlate single cell transcription levels with membrane ion channel electrophysiology. We show that while the inactivating TEA sensitive Kv3.3 current peak intensity increases with postnatal age, the channel density does not, arguing against postnatal developmental changes of Kv3.3b expression. Real time PCR of Kv3.3b showed a high variability from cell to cell, correlated with the Kv3.3 current density and suggesting that there are no mechanisms regulating these currents beyond the mRNA pool. We show a significant correlation between normalized quantity of Kv3.3b mRNA and both the number of CS spikelets and their rate of voltage fluctuation, linking the intrinsic CS shape directly to the Kv3.3b mRNA pool. Comparing the observed cell-to-cell variance with studies on transcriptional noise suggests that fluctuations of the Kv3.3b mRNA pool are possibly not regulated but represent merely transcriptional noise, resulting in intrinsic variability of the CS.

  6. An MRI Study of Cerebellar Volume in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Weisenfeld, Neil I.; Peters, Jurriaan M.; Tsai, Peter T; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Dies, Kira A.; Sahin, Mustafa; Warfield, Simon K.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays an important role in motor learning and cognition, and structural cerebellar abnormalities have been associated with cognitive impairment. In tuberous sclerosis complex, neurological outcome is highly variable, and no consistent imaging or pathological determinant of cognition has been firmly established. The cerebellum calls for specific attention as mouse models of tuberous sclerosis complex have demonstrated a loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells and cases of human histol...

  7. Voltage-gated calcium channel autoimmune cerebellar degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKasson, Marilyn; Clawson, Susan A.; Hill, Kenneth E.; Wood, Blair; Carlson, Noel; Bromberg, Mark; Greenlee, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe response to treatment in a patient with autoantibodies against voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) who presented with autoimmune cerebellar degeneration and subsequently developed Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), and to study the effect of the patient's autoantibodies on Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures. Methods: Case report and study of rat cerebellar slice cultures incubated with patient VGCC autoantibodies. Results: A 53-year-old man developed progressive incoordination with ataxic speech. Laboratory evaluation revealed VGCC autoantibodies without other antineuronal autoantibodies. Whole-body PET scans 6 and 12 months after presentation detected no malignancy. The patient improved significantly with IV immunoglobulin G (IgG), prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil, but worsened after IV IgG was halted secondary to aseptic meningitis. He subsequently developed weakness with electrodiagnostic evidence of LEMS. The patient's IgG bound to Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures, followed by neuronal death. Reactivity of the patient's autoantibodies with VGCCs was confirmed by blocking studies with defined VGCC antibodies. Conclusions: Autoimmune cerebellar degeneration associated with VGCC autoantibodies may precede onset of LEMS and may improve with immunosuppressive treatment. Binding of anti-VGCC antibodies to Purkinje cells in cerebellar slice cultures may be followed by cell death. Patients with anti-VGCC autoantibodies may be at risk of irreversible neurologic injury over time, and treatment should be initiated early. PMID:27088118

  8. High ω3-polyunsaturated fatty acids in fat-1 mice prevent streptozotocin-induced Purkinje cell degeneration through BDNF-mediated autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Ho Bak; Enji Zhang; Min-Hee Yi; Do-Kyung Kim; Kyu Lim; Jwa-Jin Kim; Dong Woon Kim

    2015-01-01

    Loss of Purkinje cells has been implicated in the development of diabetic neuropathy, and this degeneration is characterized by impairment of autophagic processes. We evaluated whether fat-1 transgenic mice, a well-established animal model that endogenously synthesizes ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3-PUFA), are protected from Purkinje cell degeneration in streptozotocin (STZ)-treated model with fat-1 mice. STZ-treated fat-1 mice did not develop hyperglycemia, motor deficits, or Purkinje ce...

  9. Alterações quantitativas das células de purkinje na moléstia de chagas experimental no camundongo Quantitative study of Purkinje cells in the acute phase of experimental Chagas' disease

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    Edymar Jardim

    1967-09-01

    Full Text Available O autor estudou quantitativamente as células de Purkinje em cortes semi-seriados do cerebelo de camundongos inoculados experimentalmente com T. cruzi,tendo verificado considerável destruição neuronal na fase aguda da enfermidade.A quantitative study of Purkinje cells was done through semi-serial sections of cerebellum of mice experimentally innoculated by Trypanosoma cruzi. Avery marked neuronal destruction was found in the acute phase of Chagas' disease.

  10. Comparative sensitivity of rat cerebellar neurons to dysregulation of divalent cation homeostasis and cytotoxicity caused by methylmercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present study was to determine the relative effectiveness of methylmercury (MeHg) to alter divalent cation homeostasis and cause cell death in MeHg-resistant cerebellar Purkinje and MeHg-sensitive granule neurons. Application of 0.5-5 μM MeHg to Purkinje and granule cells grown in culture caused a concentration- and time-dependent biphasic increase in fura-2 fluorescence. At 0.5 and 1 μM MeHg, the elevations of fura-2 fluorescence induced by MeHg were biphasic in both cell types, but significantly delayed in Purkinje as compared to granule cells. Application of the heavy-metal chelator, TPEN, to Purkinje cells caused a precipitous decline in a proportion of the fura-2 fluorescence signal, indicating that MeHg causes release of Ca2+ and non-Ca2+ divalent cations. Purkinje cells were also more resistant than granule cells to the neurotoxic effects of MeHg. At 24.5 h after-application of 5 μM MeHg, 97.7% of Purkinje cells were viable. At 3 μM MeHg there was no detectable loss of Purkinje cell viability. In contrast, only 40.6% of cerebellar granule cells were alive 24.5 h after application of 3 μM MeHg. In conclusion, Purkinje neurons in primary cultures appear to be more resistant to MeHg-induced dysregulation of divalent cation homeostasis and subsequent cell death when compared to cerebellar granule cells. There is a significant component of non-Ca2+ divalent cation released by MeHg in Purkinje neurons

  11. 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase is expressed in dissociated rat cerebellar cells and included in the postsynaptic density fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun-Jung; Jung, Jae Seob; Jin, IngNyol; Moon, Il Soo

    2003-08-31

    We have shown by protein sequencing that the phosphotyrosine-containing 48 kDa protein band of the rat cerebellar postsynaptic density fraction (CBL-PSD) is 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase 2 (CNP2). Immunoblot analysis indicated that both CNP1 and CNP2 isoforms are present in the CBL-PSD fraction, whereas there is little CNP2 in the forebrain (FB)-PSD fraction. Both isoforms in the CBL-PSD fraction were tyrosine-phosphorylated to a basal extent. They were efficiently dissociated from the complexes in the PSD fraction by salt, but not by non-ionic detergents such as n-octyl glucoside (OG) and Triton X-100. Immunocytochemistry of dissociated cerebellar cultures revealed patchy CNP staining in oligodendrocytes (OLs), Purkinje cells (PCs), and unidentified PSD95-positive cells, but no staining in granule cells (GCs). Our results indicate that both CNP1 and CNP2 are expressed in cerian populations of cerebellar cells in addition to OL, and that they are associated with complexes that are co-isolated with the PSD. PMID:14503857

  12. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

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    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different.

  13. Developmental expression and differentiation-related neuron-specific splicing of metastasis suppressor 1 (Mtss1 in normal and transformed cerebellar cells

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    Baader Stephan L

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mtss1 encodes an actin-binding protein, dysregulated in a variety of tumors, that interacts with sonic hedgehog/Gli signaling in epidermal cells. Given the prime importance of this pathway for cerebellar development and tumorigenesis, we assessed expression of Mtss1 in the developing murine cerebellum and human medulloblastoma specimens. Results During development, Mtss1 is transiently expressed in granule cells, from the time point they cease to proliferate to their synaptic integration. It is also expressed by granule cell precursor-derived medulloblastomas. In the adult CNS, Mtss1 is found exclusively in cerebellar Purkinje cells. Neuronal differentiation is accompanied by a switch in Mtss1 splicing. Whereas immature granule cells express a Mtss1 variant observed also in peripheral tissues and comprising exon 12, this exon is replaced by a CNS-specific exon, 12a, in more mature granule cells and in adult Purkinje cells. Bioinformatic analysis of Mtss1 suggests that differential exon usage may affect interaction with Fyn and Src, two tyrosine kinases previously recognized as critical for cerebellar cell migration and histogenesis. Further, this approach led to the identification of two evolutionary conserved nuclear localization sequences. These overlap with the actin filament binding site of Mtss1, and one also harbors a potential PKA and PKC phosphorylation site. Conclusion Both the pattern of expression and splicing of Mtss1 is developmentally regulated in the murine cerebellum. These findings are discussed with a view on the potential role of Mtss1 for cytoskeletal dynamics in developing and mature cerebellar neurons.

  14. Prophylactic role of melatonin against radiation induced damage in mouse cerebellum with special reference to Purkinje cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisodia, Rashmi; Kumari, Seema; Verma, Rajesh Kumar; Bhatia, A L [Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302004 (India)

    2006-06-15

    Melatonin, a hormone with a proven antioxidative efficacy, crosses all morphophysiological barriers, including the blood-brain barrier, and distributes throughout the cell. The present study is an attempt to investigate the prophylactic influence of a chronic low level of melatonin against an acute radiation induced oxidative stress in the cerebellum of Swiss albino mice, with special reference to Purkinje cells. After 15 days of treatment the mice were sacrificed at various intervals from 1 to 30 days. Biochemical parameters included lipid peroxidation (LPO) and glutathione (GSH) levels as the endpoints. The quantitative study included alterations in number and volume of Purkinje cells. Swiss albino mice were orally administered a very low dose of melatonin (0.25 mg/mouse/day) for 15 consecutive days before single exposure to 4 Gy gamma radiation. Melatonin checked the augmented levels of LPO, by approximately 55%, by day 30 day post-exposure. Radiation induced depleted levels of GSH could be raised by 68.9% by day 30 post-exposure. Radiation exposure resulted in a reduction of the volume of Purkinje cells and their total number. The administration of melatonin significantly protected against the radiation induced decreases in Purkinje cell volume and number. Results indicate the antioxidative properties of melatonin resulting in its prophylactic property against radiation induced biochemical and cellular alterations in the cerebellum. The findings support the idea that melatonin may be used as an anti-irradiation drug due to its potent free radical scavenging and antioxidative efficacy.

  15. Silencing the Majority of Cerebellar Granule Cells Uncovers Their Essential Role in Motor Learning and Consolidation

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    Elisa Galliano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar granule cells (GCs account for more than half of all neurons in the CNS of vertebrates. Theoretical work has suggested that the abundance of GCs is advantageous for sparse coding during memory formation. Here, we minimized the output of the majority of GCs by selectively eliminating their CaV2.1 (P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, which mediate the bulk of their neurotransmitter release. This resulted in reduced GC output to Purkinje cells (PCs and stellate cells (SCs as well as in impaired long-term plasticity at GC-PC synapses. As a consequence modulation amplitude and regularity of simple spike (SS output were affected. Surprisingly, the overall motor performance was intact, whereas demanding motor learning and memory consolidation tasks were compromised. Our findings indicate that a minority of functionally intact GCs is sufficient for the maintenance of basic motor performance, whereas acquisition and stabilization of sophisticated memories require higher numbers of normal GCs controlling PC firing.

  16. Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes modulating neurotransmission at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses in rat cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, S A; Garthwaite, J; Batchelor, A M

    2001-07-01

    The actions of reportedly group-selective metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor agonists and antagonists on neurotransmission at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses in the rat cerebellum have been characterised using sharp microelectrode recording and an in vitro slice preparation. Application of the group I agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) or the group III selective agonist L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) depressed synaptic transmission in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner (EC(50)=18 and 5 microM, respectively). The depression produced by DHPG was unrelated to the depolarisation observed in some Purkinje cells. The group II agonist (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG IV, 1 microM) had no effect. The effects of DHPG were inhibited by the group I-selective antagonist 7-hydroxyiminocyclopropan[b]chromen-1a-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (CPCCOEt), but not by the group II/III antagonist alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG). The effect of L-AP4 was inhibited by MPPG, but not by the group I/II antagonist (S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG). By themselves, the antagonists did not affect the EPSPs, suggesting that neither receptor is activated during low frequency neurotransmission. It is concluded that, in addition to the excitatory role for group I receptors described previously, both group I and III (but not group II) mGlu receptors operate at this synapse to inhibit synaptic transmission. The specific receptor subtypes involved are likely to be mGlu1 and mGlu4. PMID:11445184

  17. Histopathological and Behavioral Assessment of Toxin-Produced Cerebellar Lesion: A Potent Model for Cell Transplantation Studies in The Cerebellum

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    Mohammad Amin Edalatmanesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available cognition, learning and memory functions. This study presents a permanent model of a toxin produced cerebellar lesion characterized according to contemporary motor and cognitive abnormalities. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, slow administration of quinolinic acid (QA, 5 μl of 200 μmol, 1 μl/minute in the right cerebellar hemisphere (lobule VI caused noticeable motor and cognitive disturbances along with cellular degeneration in all treated animals. We assessed behavioral and histopathological studies over ten weeks after QA treatment. The data were analyzed with ANOVA and the student’s t test. Results: The QA treated group showed marked motor learning deficits on the rotating rod test (p≤0.0001, locomotor asymmetry on the cylinder test (p≤0.0001, dysmetria on the beam balance test (p≤0.0001, abnormalities in neuromuscular strength on the hang wire test (p≤0.0001, spatial memory deficits in the Morris water maze (MWM, p≤0.001 and fear conditioned memory on the passive avoidance test (p≤0.01 over a ten-week period compared with the control animals. Histopathological analysis showed loss of Purkinje cells (p≤0.001 and granular cell density (p≤0.0001 in the lesioned hemisphere of the cerebellum. Conclusion: Results of the present study show that QA can remove numerous cells which respond to this toxin in hemispheric lobule VI and thus provide a potential model for functional and cell-based studies.

  18. Age-Dependent Decrease in Chaperone Activity Impairs MANF Expression, Leading to Purkinje Cell Degeneration in Inducible SCA17 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Su; Huang, Shanshan; Gaertig, Marta A.; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Although protein-misfolding-mediated neurodegenerative diseases have been linked to aging, how aging contributes to selective neurodegeneration remains unclear. We established spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA17) knockin mice that inducibly express one copy of mutant TATA box binding protein (TBP) at different ages by tamoxifen-mediated Cre recombination. We find that more mutant TBP accumulates in older mouse and that this accumulation correlates with age-related decreases in Hsc70 and chaperone activity. Consistently, older SCA17 mice experienced earlier neurological symptom onset and more severe Purkinje cell degeneration. Mutant TBP shows decreased association with XBP1s, resulting in the reduced transcription of mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF), which is enriched in Purkinje cells. Expression of Hsc70 improves the TBP-XBP1s interaction and MANF transcription, and overexpression of MANF ameliorates mutant TBP-mediated Purkinje cell degeneration via protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent signaling. These findings suggest that the age-related decline in chaperone activity affects polyglutamine protein function that is important for the viability of specific types of neurons. PMID:24462098

  19. Development of the cerebellar cortex in the mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangshu Cheng; Jin Du; Dongming Yu; Qiying Jiang; Yanqiu Hu; Lei Wang; Mingshan Li; Jinbo Deng

    2011-01-01

    The cerebellum is a highly conserved structure in the central nervous system of vertebrates, and is involved in the coordination of voluntary motor behavior. Supporting this function, the cerebellar cortex presents a layered structure which requires precise spatial and temporal coordination of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis events. The formation of the layered structure in the developing cerebellum remains unclear. The present study investigated the development of the cerebellar cortex. The results demonstrate that the primordium of the cerebellum comprises the ependymal, mantle, and marginal layers at embryonic day 12 (E12). Subsequently, the laminated cerebellar cortex undergoes cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, and at about postnatal day 0 (P0), the cerebellar cortex presents an external granular layer, a molecular layer, a Purkinje layer, and an internal granular layer. The external granular layer is thickest at P6/7 and disappears at P20. From P0 to P30, the internal granular cells and the Purkinje cells gradually differentiate and develop until maturity. Apoptotic neurons are evident in the layered structure in the developing cerebellar cortex. The external granular layer disappears gradually because of cell migration and apoptosis. The cells of the other layers primarily undergo differentiation, development, and apoptosis.

  20. Mitotic Events in Cerebellar Granule Progenitor Cells that Expand Cerebellar Surface Area Are Critical for Normal Cerebellar Cortical Lamination in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joshua C.; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-01-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereological principles. We demonstrate that during the proliferative phase of the external granule layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The topological constraints indicate that during proliferative phases, migration out of the EGL is balanced by self-renewal. Progenitor self-renewal must, therefore, include mitotic events yielding either 2 cells in the same layer to increase surface area (β-events) and mitotic events yielding 2 cells, with 1 cell in a superficial layer and 1 cell in a deeper layer (α-events). As the cerebellum grows, therefore, β-events lie upstream of α-events. Using a mathematical model constrained by the measurements of volume and surface area, we could quantify inter-mitotic times for β-events on a per-cell basis in post-natal mouse cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that loss of CCNA2, which decreases EGL proliferation and secondarily induces cerebellar cortical dyslamination, shows preserved α-type events. Thus, CCNA2-null cerebellar granule progenitor cells are capable of self-renewal of the EGL stem cell niche; this is concordant with prior findings of extensive apoptosis in CCNA2-null mice. Similar methodologies may provide another layer of depth to the interpretation of results from stereological studies. PMID:25668568

  1. Dissociation of locomotor and cerebellar deficits in a murine Angelman syndrome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, Caroline F; Schonewille, Martijn; Gao, Zhenyu; Aronica, Eleonora M A; Judson, Matthew C; Philpot, Benjamin D; Hoebeek, Freek E; van Woerden, Geeske M; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-11-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurological disorder that is associated with prominent movement and balance impairments that are widely considered to be due to defects of cerebellar origin. Here, using the cerebellar-specific vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) paradigm, we determined that cerebellar function is only mildly impaired in the Ube3am-/p+ mouse model of AS. VOR phase-reversal learning was singularly impaired in these animals and correlated with reduced tonic inhibition between Golgi cells and granule cells. Purkinje cell physiology, in contrast, was normal in AS mice as shown by synaptic plasticity and spontaneous firing properties that resembled those of controls. Accordingly, neither VOR phase-reversal learning nor locomotion was impaired following selective deletion of Ube3a in Purkinje cells. However, genetic normalization of αCaMKII inhibitory phosphorylation fully rescued locomotor deficits despite failing to improve cerebellar learning in AS mice, suggesting extracerebellar circuit involvement in locomotor learning. We confirmed this hypothesis through cerebellum-specific reinstatement of Ube3a, which ameliorated cerebellar learning deficits but did not rescue locomotor deficits. This double dissociation of locomotion and cerebellar phenotypes strongly suggests that the locomotor deficits of AS mice do not arise from impaired cerebellar cortex function. Our results provide important insights into the etiology of the motor deficits associated with AS. PMID:26485287

  2. Quantitative neuroanatomy of all Purkinje cells with light sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Paciscopi, Marco; Soda, Paolo; Biamonte, Filippo; Iannello, Giulio; Frasconi, Paolo; Pavone, Francesco S

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the cytoarchitecture of mammalian central nervous system on a brain-wide scale is becoming a compelling need in neuroscience. For example, realistic modeling of brain activity requires the definition of quantitative features of large neuronal populations in the whole brain. Quantitative anatomical maps will also be crucial to classify the cytoarchtitectonic abnormalities associated with neuronal pathologies in a high reproducible and reliable manner. In this paper, we apply recent advances in optical microscopy and image analysis to characterize the spatial distribution of Purkinje cells (PCs) across the whole cerebellum. Light sheet microscopy was used to image with micron-scale resolution a fixed and cleared cerebellum of an L7-GFP transgenic mouse, in which all PCs are fluorescently labeled. A fast and scalable algorithm for fully automated cell identification was applied on the image to extract the position of all the fluorescent PCs. This vectorized representation of the cell population allows a thorough characterization of the complex three-dimensional distribution of the neurons, highlighting the presence of gaps inside the lamellar organization of PCs, whose density is believed to play a significant role in autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, clustering analysis of the localized somata permits dividing the whole cerebellum in groups of PCs with high spatial correlation, suggesting new possibilities of anatomical partition. The quantitative approach presented here can be extended to study the distribution of different types of cell in many brain regions and across the whole encephalon, providing a robust base for building realistic computational models of the brain, and for unbiased morphological tissue screening in presence of pathologies and/or drug treatments. PMID:26074783

  3. Cerebellar Degeneration as a Rare Paraneoplastic Syndrome in a Child With Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramova, Boryana E; Hristova, Tanya; Yordanova, Maya; Vlahova, Irena; Muchinova, Albena; Bojinova, Veneta; Konstantinov, Dobrin

    2016-08-01

    We report a rare case of cerebellar degeneration as a paraneoplastic syndrome in an 8-year-old boy with Hodgkin lymphoma that presented during first-line treatment. Antibodies against Purkinje cells (anti-Tr antibodies) were detected in the serum of the patient. After successful treatment of the lymphoma, the cerebellar symptoms resolved partially. Childhood presentation of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is extremely rare, with only a few reports in the literature. For this reason, the description of all such cases contributes to the enrichment of the medical knowledge and will improve the diagnosis and the treatment of this complication. PMID:26599987

  4. A cerebellar learning model of vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation in wild-type and mutant mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clopath, Claudia; Badura, Aleksandra; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Brunel, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of cerebellar motor learning are still poorly understood. The standard Marr-Albus-Ito theory posits that learning involves plasticity at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses under control of the climbing fiber input, which provides an error signal as in classical supervised learni

  5. A role for protein phosphatases 1, 2A, and 2B in cerebellar long-term potentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Belmeguenai; C.R.W. Hansel (Christian)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractCerebellar parallel fiber (PF)-Purkinje cell (PC) synapses can undergo postsynaptically expressed long-term depression (LTD) or long-term potentiation (LTP). PF-LTD induction requires the coactivity of the PF and CF (climbing fiber) inputs to PCs and a concomitant calci

  6. Cerebellar control of gait and interlimb coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinueza Veloz, María Fernanda; Zhou, Kuikui; Bosman, Laurens W J; Potters, Jan-Willem; Negrello, Mario; Seepers, Robert M; Strydis, Christos; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic and intrinsic processing in Purkinje cells, interneurons and granule cells of the cerebellar cortex have been shown to underlie various relatively simple, single-joint, reflex types of motor learning, including eyeblink conditioning and adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex. However, to what extent these processes contribute to more complex, multi-joint motor behaviors, such as locomotion performance and adaptation during obstacle crossing, is not well understood. Here, we investigated these functions using the Erasmus Ladder in cell-specific mouse mutant lines that suffer from impaired Purkinje cell output (Pcd), Purkinje cell potentiation (L7-Pp2b), molecular layer interneuron output (L7-Δγ2), and granule cell output (α6-Cacna1a). We found that locomotion performance was severely impaired with small steps and long step times in Pcd and L7-Pp2b mice, whereas it was mildly altered in L7-Δγ2 and not significantly affected in α6-Cacna1a mice. Locomotion adaptation triggered by pairing obstacle appearances with preceding tones at fixed time intervals was impaired in all four mouse lines, in that they all showed inaccurate and inconsistent adaptive walking patterns. Furthermore, all mutants exhibited altered front-hind and left-right interlimb coordination during both performance and adaptation, and inconsistent walking stepping patterns while crossing obstacles. Instead, motivation and avoidance behavior were not compromised in any of the mutants during the Erasmus Ladder task. Our findings indicate that cell type-specific abnormalities in cerebellar microcircuitry can translate into pronounced impairments in locomotion performance and adaptation as well as interlimb coordination, highlighting the general role of the cerebellar cortex in spatiotemporal control of complex multi-joint movements. PMID:25139623

  7. Foxc1 dependent mesenchymal signalling drives embryonic cerebellar growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldipur, Parthiv; Gillies, Gwendolyn S; Janson, Olivia K; Chizhikov, Victor V; Mithal, Divakar S; Miller, Richard J; Millen, Kathleen J

    2014-01-01

    Loss of Foxc1 is associated with Dandy-Walker malformation, the most common human cerebellar malformation characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia and an enlarged posterior fossa and fourth ventricle. Although expressed in the mouse posterior fossa mesenchyme, loss of Foxc1 non-autonomously induces a rapid and devastating decrease in embryonic cerebellar ventricular zone radial glial proliferation and concurrent increase in cerebellar neuronal differentiation. Subsequent migration of cerebellar neurons is disrupted, associated with disordered radial glial morphology. In vitro, SDF1α, a direct Foxc1 target also expressed in the head mesenchyme, acts as a cerebellar radial glial mitogen and a chemoattractant for nascent Purkinje cells. Its receptor, Cxcr4, is expressed in cerebellar radial glial cells and conditional Cxcr4 ablation with Nes-Cre mimics the Foxc1−/− cerebellar phenotype. SDF1α also rescues the Foxc1−/− phenotype. Our data emphasizes that the head mesenchyme exerts a considerable influence on early embryonic brain development and its disruption contributes to neurodevelopmental disorders in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03962.001 PMID:25513817

  8. The 5-HT7 receptor triggers cerebellar long-term synaptic depression via PKC-MAPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippiello, Pellegrino; Hoxha, Eriola; Speranza, Luisa; Volpicelli, Floriana; Ferraro, Angela; Leopoldo, Marcello; Lacivita, Enza; Perrone-Capano, Carla; Tempia, Filippo; Miniaci, Maria Concetta

    2016-02-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7R) mediates important physiological effects of serotonin, such as memory and emotion, and is emerging as a therapeutic target for the treatment of cognitive disorders and depression. Although previous studies have revealed an expression of 5-HT7R in cerebellum, particularly at Purkinje cells, its functional role and signaling mechanisms have never been described. Using patch-clamp recordings in cerebellar slices of adult mice, we investigated the effects of a selective 5-HT7R agonist, LP-211, on the main plastic site of the cerebellar cortex, the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse. Here we show that 5-HT7R activation induces long-term depression of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse via a postsynaptic mechanism that involves the PKC-MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, a 5-HT7R antagonist abolished the expression of PF-LTD, produced by pairing parallel fiber stimulation with Purkinje cell depolarization; whereas, application of a 5-HT7R agonist impaired LTP induced by 1 Hz parallel fiber stimulation. Our results indicate for the first time that 5-HT7R exerts a fine regulation of cerebellar bidirectional synaptic plasticity that might be involved in cognitive processes and neuropsychiatric disorders involving the cerebellum. PMID:26482421

  9. Ablation of the mTORC2 component rictor in brain or Purkinje cells affects size and neuron morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Thomanetz, Venus; Angliker, Nico; Cloëtta, Dimitri; Lustenberger, Regula M.; Schweighauser, Manuel; Oliveri, Filippo; Suzuki, Noboru; Rüegg, Markus A

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) assembles into two distinct multi-protein complexes called mTORC1 and mTORC2. Whereas mTORC1 is known to regulate cell and organismal growth, the role of mTORC2 is less understood. We describe two mouse lines that are devoid of the mTORC2 component rictor in the entire central nervous system or in Purkinje cells. In both lines neurons were smaller and their morphology and function were strongly affected. The phenotypes were accompanied by loss of activ...

  10. Primary cerebellar extramedullary myeloid cell tumor mimicking oligodendroglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, D M; Wong, T T; Guo, W Y; Chang, K P; Yen, S H

    1997-10-01

    Extramedullary myeloid cell tumors (EMCTs) are tumors consisting of immature cells of the myeloid series that occur outside the bone marrow. Most of them are associated with acute myelogenous leukemia or other myeloproliferative disorders, and a small number occur as primary lesions, i.e., are not associated with hematological disorders. Occurrence inside the cranium is rare, and there has been only one case of primary EMCT involving the cerebellum reported in the literature. The case we report here is a blastic EMCT occurring in the cerebellum of a 3-year-old boy who had no signs of leukemia or any hematological disorder throughout the entire course. The cerebellar tumor was at first misdiagnosed as an "oligodendroglioma" because of the uniformity and "fried egg" artifact of the tumor cells. The tumor disappeared during chemotherapy consisting of 12 treatments. However, it recurred and metastasized to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shortly after the therapy was completed. A diagnosis of EMCT was suspected because of the presence of immature myeloid cells in the CSF, and was confirmed by anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-lysozyme immunoreactivity of the cerebellar tumor. The patient succumbed 1 year and 3 months after the first presentation of the disease. PMID:9341943

  11. Modulation of p53 and met expression by Krüppel-like factor 8 regulates zebrafish cerebellar development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Yuan; Lu, Yu-Fen; Liu, Yu-Hsiu; Lien, Huang-Wei; Huang, Chang-Jen; Wu, Jen-Leih; Hwang, Sheng-Ping L

    2015-09-01

    Krüppel-like factor 8 (Klf8) is a zinc-finger transcription factor implicated in cell proliferation, and cancer cell survival and invasion; however, little is known about its role in normal embryonic development. Here, we show that Klf8 is required for normal cerebellar development in zebrafish embryos. Morpholino knockdown of klf8 resulted in abnormal cerebellar primordium morphology and the induction of p53 in the brain region at 24 hours post-fertilization (hpf). Both p53-dependent reduction of cell proliferation and augmentation of apoptosis were observed in the cerebellar anlage of 24 hpf-klf8 morphants. In klf8 morphants, expression of ptf1a in the ventricular zone was decreased from 48 to 72 hpf; on the other hand, expression of atohla in the upper rhombic lip was unaffected. Consistent with this finding, Purkinje cell development was perturbed and granule cell number was reduced in 72 hpf-klf8 morphants; co-injection of p53 MO(sp) or klf8 mRNA substantially rescued development of cerebellar Purkinje cells in klf8 morphants. Hepatocyte growth factor/Met signaling is known to regulate cerebellar development in zebrafish and mouse. We observed decreased met expression in the tectum and rhombomere 1 of 24 hpf-klf8 morphants, which was largely rescued by co-injection with klf8 mRNA. Moreover, co-injection of met mRNA substantially rescued formation of Purkinje cells in klf8 morphants at 72 hpf. Together, these results demonstrate that Klf8 modulates expression of p53 and met to maintain ptf1a-expressing neuronal progenitors, which are required for the appropriate development of cerebellar Purkinje and granule cells in zebrafish embryos. PMID:25528982

  12. Alcohol Withdrawal and Cerebellar Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Marianna E

    2015-08-01

    Cerebellar disorders trigger the symptoms of movement problems, imbalance, incoordination, and frequent fall. Cerebellar disorders are shown in various CNS illnesses including a drinking disorder called alcoholism. Alcoholism is manifested as an inability to control drinking in spite of adverse consequences. Human and animal studies have shown that cerebellar symptoms persist even after complete abstinence from drinking. In particular, the abrupt termination (ethanol withdrawal) of long-term excessive ethanol consumption has shown to provoke a variety of neuronal and mitochondrial damage to the cerebellum. Upon ethanol withdrawal, excitatory neurotransmitter molecules such as glutamate are overly released in brain areas including cerebellum. This is particularly relevant to the cerebellar neuronal network as glutamate signals are projected to Purkinje neurons through granular cells that are the most populated neuronal type in CNS. This excitatory neuronal signal may be elevated by ethanol withdrawal stress, which promotes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and a decrease in a Ca(2+)-binding protein, both of which result in the excessive entry of Ca(2+) to the mitochondria. Subsequently, mitochondria undergo a prolonged opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the overproduction of harmful free radicals, impeding adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-generating function. This in turn provokes the leakage of mitochondrial molecule cytochrome c to the cytosol, which triggers a cascade of adverse cytosol reactions. Upstream to this pathway, cerebellum under the condition of ethanol withdrawal has shown aberrant gene modifications through altered DNA methylation, histone acetylation, or microRNA expression. Interplay between these events and molecules may result in functional damage to cerebellar mitochondria and consequent neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Mitochondria-targeting research may help develop a powerful new

  13. Expression and traffic of cellular prolyl oligopeptidase are regulated during cerebellar granule cell differentiation, maturation, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Baylach, M J; Felipo, V; Männistö, P T; García-Horsman, J A

    2008-10-15

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is an endopeptidase which cleaves short proline-containing neuropeptides, and it is involved in memory and learning. POP also has an intercellular function mediated through the inositol pathway, and has been involved in cell death. POP has been early considered as a housekeeping enzyme, but the recent research indicates that POP expression is regulated across tissues and intracellularly. In the brain, POP is exclusively expressed in neurons and most abundantly in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex, in the CA1 field neurons of hippocampus and in cerebellar Purkinje's cells. Intracellularly, POP is mainly present in the cytoplasm and some in intracellular membranes, like rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In this paper, we systematically studied the levels of expression of POP along the life of cerebellar granule cells (CGC) in culture and the distribution of POP within different intracellular compartments. We used the tight-binding inhibitor JTP-4819 covalently coupled with fluorescein (FJTP) as a tool to study the changes on expression and localization of POP protein. Our results indicate that POP activity levels are regulated during the life of the neurons. POP was found mainly in cytoplasm and neuronal projections, but at an early developmental phase significant amounts were found also in nuclei. Along the life of the neurons, POP activity fluctuated in 7-day cycles. In young neurons, the cytosolic POP activity was low but increased by maturation so that the activity peak coincided with full differentiation. Over aging, cytoplasmic POP was concentrated around nucleus, but the activity decreased with time. POP was also present in vesicles across the neuron. No major changes were seen in the nuclear or membrane bound POP over aging until activity disappeared upon neuronal death. This is the first time when POP was found in the nuclei of human neuronal cells. PMID:18718510

  14. Contribution of cerebellar sensorimotor adaptation to hippocampal spatial memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Passot

    Full Text Available Complementing its primary role in motor control, cerebellar learning has also a bottom-up influence on cognitive functions, where high-level representations build up from elementary sensorimotor memories. In this paper we examine the cerebellar contribution to both procedural and declarative components of spatial cognition. To do so, we model a functional interplay between the cerebellum and the hippocampal formation during goal-oriented navigation. We reinterpret and complete existing genetic behavioural observations by means of quantitative accounts that cross-link synaptic plasticity mechanisms, single cell and population coding properties, and behavioural responses. In contrast to earlier hypotheses positing only a purely procedural impact of cerebellar adaptation deficits, our results suggest a cerebellar involvement in high-level aspects of behaviour. In particular, we propose that cerebellar learning mechanisms may influence hippocampal place fields, by contributing to the path integration process. Our simulations predict differences in place-cell discharge properties between normal mice and L7-PKCI mutant mice lacking long-term depression at cerebellar parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. On the behavioural level, these results suggest that, by influencing the accuracy of hippocampal spatial codes, cerebellar deficits may impact the exploration-exploitation balance during spatial navigation.

  15. Mapping of the SCA23 locus involved in autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia to chromosome region 20p13-12.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, D S; van de Warrenburg, B P; Wesseling, P; Pearson, P L; Kremer, H P; Sinke, R J

    2004-01-01

    We report upon a Dutch autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) family, clinically characterized by a late-onset (>40 years), slowly progressive, isolated spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). Neuropathological examination in one affected subject showed neuronal loss in the Purkinje cell layer, dentate n

  16. Cerebellar and basal ganglion involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I.; Baskan, O.; Haliloglu, M.; Aydingoz, U. [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Sihhiye 06100, Ankara (Turkey)

    1999-06-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disease of unknown cause characterised by proliferation of histiocytic granulomas in tissues; the primary cerebral manifestation is diabetes insipidus caused by hypothalamic infiltration. We present a patient in whom, except for the absence of high signal on T 1 weighting in the posterior pituitary, consistent with central diabetes insipidus, MRI showed no evidence of hypothalamic involvement by histiocytosis, despite the long duration of the disease. However, there was bilateral, symmetrical involvement of the cerebellum and globus pallidus in addition to a calvarial lesion. High signal in the cerebellar white matter on T 2-weighted images may represent demyelination, gliosis and cell loss, as previously reported on pathologic examination. (orig.) With 5 figs., 22 refs.

  17. Cerebellar and basal ganglion involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disease of unknown cause characterised by proliferation of histiocytic granulomas in tissues; the primary cerebral manifestation is diabetes insipidus caused by hypothalamic infiltration. We present a patient in whom, except for the absence of high signal on T 1 weighting in the posterior pituitary, consistent with central diabetes insipidus, MRI showed no evidence of hypothalamic involvement by histiocytosis, despite the long duration of the disease. However, there was bilateral, symmetrical involvement of the cerebellum and globus pallidus in addition to a calvarial lesion. High signal in the cerebellar white matter on T 2-weighted images may represent demyelination, gliosis and cell loss, as previously reported on pathologic examination. (orig.)

  18. HSF1-deficiency affects gait coordination and cerebellar calbindin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenwerth, Marc; Estrada, Veronica; Stahr, Anna; Müller, Hans Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in cell homeostasis and protect against cell damage. They were previously identified as key players in different ataxia models. HSF1 is the main transcription factor for HSP activation. HSF1-deficient mice (HSF1-/-) are known to have deficiencies in motor control test. However, little is known about effects of HSF1-deficiency on locomotor, especially gait, coordination. Therefore, we compared HSF-deficient (HSF1-/-) mice and wildtype littermates using an automated gait analysis system for objective assessment of gait coordination. We found significant changes in gait parameters of HSF1-/- mice reminiscent of cerebellar ataxia. Immunohistochemical analyses of a cerebellum revealed co-localization of HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis of a potential interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Calbindin levels were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, respectively. While quantitative PCR revealed no differences in calbindin mRNA levels between HSF1+/+ and HSF1-/- mice, calbindin protein levels, however, were significantly decreased in a cerebellum of HSF1-/- mice. A pathway analysis supports the hypothesis of an interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin. In summary, the targeted deletion of HSF1 results in changes of locomotor function associated with changes in cerebellar calbindin protein levels. These findings suggest a role of HSF1 in regular Purkinje cell calcium homeostasis. PMID:27173427

  19. Excitatory Cerebellar Nucleocortical Circuit Provides Internal Amplification during Associative Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhenyu; Proietti-Onori, Martina; Lin, Zhanmin; Ten Brinke, Michiel M; Boele, Henk-Jan; Potters, Jan-Willem; Ruigrok, Tom J H; Hoebeek, Freek E; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2016-02-01

    Closed-loop circuitries between cortical and subcortical regions can facilitate precision of output patterns, but the role of such networks in the cerebellum remains to be elucidated. Here, we characterize the role of internal feedback from the cerebellar nuclei to the cerebellar cortex in classical eyeblink conditioning. We find that excitatory output neurons in the interposed nucleus provide efference-copy signals via mossy fibers to the cerebellar cortical zones that belong to the same module, triggering monosynaptic responses in granule and Golgi cells and indirectly inhibiting Purkinje cells. Upon conditioning, the local density of nucleocortical mossy fiber terminals significantly increases. Optogenetic activation and inhibition of nucleocortical fibers in conditioned animals increases and decreases the amplitude of learned eyeblink responses, respectively. Our data show that the excitatory nucleocortical closed-loop circuitry of the cerebellum relays a corollary discharge of premotor signals and suggests an amplifying role of this circuitry in controlling associative motor learning. PMID:26844836

  20. A cerebellar model for predictive motor control tested in a brain-based device

    OpenAIRE

    McKinstry, Jeffrey L.; Edelman, Gerald M.; Krichmar, Jeffrey L.

    2006-01-01

    The cerebellum is known to be critical for accurate adaptive control and motor learning. We propose here a mechanism by which the cerebellum may replace reflex control with predictive control. This mechanism is embedded in a learning rule (the delayed eligibility trace rule) in which synapses onto a Purkinje cell or onto a cell in the deep cerebellar nuclei become eligible for plasticity only after a fixed delay from the onset of suprathreshold presynaptic activity. To...

  1. Evolving Models of Pavlovian Conditioning: Cerebellar Cortical Dynamics in Awake Behaving Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel M. ten Brinke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three decades of electrophysiological research on cerebellar cortical activity underlying Pavlovian conditioning have expanded our understanding of motor learning in the brain. Purkinje cell simple spike suppression is considered to be crucial in the expression of conditional blink responses (CRs. However, trial-by-trial quantification of this link in awake behaving animals is lacking, and current hypotheses regarding the underlying plasticity mechanisms have diverged from the classical parallel fiber one to the Purkinje cell synapse LTD hypothesis. Here, we establish that acquired simple spike suppression, acquired conditioned stimulus (CS-related complex spike responses, and molecular layer interneuron (MLI activity predict the expression of CRs on a trial-by-trial basis using awake behaving mice. Additionally, we show that two independent transgenic mouse mutants with impaired MLI function exhibit motor learning deficits. Our findings suggest multiple cerebellar cortical plasticity mechanisms underlying simple spike suppression, and they implicate the broader involvement of the olivocerebellar module within the interstimulus interval.

  2. Transplantation of human induced cerebellar granular-like cells improves motor functions in a novel mouse model of cerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tongming; Tang, Hailiang; Shen, Yiwen; Tang, Qisheng; Chen, Luping; Wang, Zhifu; Zhou, Ping; Xu, Feng; Zhu, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-based reparative approaches have been applied to cerebellum-related disorders during the last two decades. Direct lineage reprogramming of human fibroblasts into functional granular neurons holds great promise for biomedical applications such as cerebellum regeneration and cellbased disease modeling. In the present study, we showed that a combination of Ascl1, Sox2 and OCT4, in a culture subsequently treated with secreted factors (BMP4, Wnt3a and FGF8b), was capable of converting human fibroblasts from the scalp tissue of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) into functional human induced cerebellar granular-like cells (hiCGCs). Morphological analysis, immunocytochemistry, gene expression and electrophysiological analysis were performed to identify the similarity of induced neuronal cells to human cerebellum granular cells. Our strategy improved the efficiency for hiCGCs induction, which gave the highest conversion efficiency 12.30±0.88%, and Ath1+/Tuj1+ double positive cells to 5.56±0.80%. We transplanted hiCGCs into the cerebellum of NmycTRE/TRE: tTS mice, a novel mouse model of cerebellar ataxia, and demonstrated that the hiCGCs were able to survive, migrate, proliferate and promote mild functional recovery after been grafted into cerebellum.

  3. In vivo analysis of inhibitory synaptic inputs and rebounds in deep cerebellar nuclear neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Bengtsson

    Full Text Available Neuronal function depends on the properties of the synaptic inputs the neuron receive and on its intrinsic responsive properties. However, the conditions for synaptic integration and activation of intrinsic responses may to a large extent depend on the level of background synaptic input. In this respect, the deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN neurons are of particular interest: they feature a massive background synaptic input and an intrinsic, postinhibitory rebound depolarization with profound effects on the synaptic integration. Using in vivo whole cell patch clamp recordings from DCN cells in the cat, we find that the background of Purkinje cell input provides a tonic inhibitory synaptic noise in the DCN cell. Under these conditions, individual Purkinje cells appear to have a near negligible influence on the DCN cell and clear-cut rebounds are difficult to induce. Peripheral input that drives the simple spike output of the afferent PCs to the DCN cell generates a relatively strong DCN cell inhibition, but do not induce rebounds. In contrast, synchronized climbing fiber activation, which leads to a synchronized input from a large number of Purkinje cells, can induce profound rebound responses. In light of what is known about climbing fiber activation under behaviour, the present findings suggest that DCN cell rebound responses may be an unusual event. Our results also suggest that cortical modulation of DCN cell output require a substantial co-modulation of a large proportion of the PCs that innervate the cell, which is a possible rationale for the existence of the cerebellar microcomplex.

  4. Control of cerebellar granule cell output by sensory-evoked Golgi cell inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Duguid, Ian; BRANCO, Tiago; Chadderton, Paul; Arlt, Charlotte; Powell, Kate; Häusser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how synaptic inhibition regulates sensory responses is a fundamental question in neuroscience. In cerebellar granule cells, sensory stimulation is thought to evoke an excitation–inhibition sequence driven by direct input from mossy fibers and followed by classical disynaptic feed-forward inhibition from nearby Golgi cells. We made, to our knowledge, the first voltage-clamp recordings of sensory-evoked inhibition in granule cells in vivo and show that, surprisingly, sensory-evoke...

  5. Long lasting cerebellar alterations after perinatal asphyxia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanille, Verónica; Saraceno, G Ezequiel; Rivière, Stéphanie; Logica, Tamara; Kölliker, Rodolfo; Capani, Francisco; Castilla, Rocío

    2015-07-01

    The developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to injury before, at and after birth. Among possible insults, hypoxia suffered as a consequence of perinatal asphyxia (PA) exhibits the highest incidence levels and the cerebellar circuitry appears to be particularly susceptible, as the cellular makeup and the quantity of inputs change quickly during days and weeks following birth. In this work, we have used a murine model to induce severe global PA in rats at the time of birth. Short-term cerebellar alterations within this PA model have been previously reported but whether such alterations remain in adulthood has not been conclusively determined yet. For this reason, and given the crucial cerebellar role in determining connectivity patterns in the brain, the aim of our work is to unveil long-term cerebellum histomorphology following a PA insult. Morphological and cytological neuronal changes and glial reaction in the cerebellar cortex were analyzed at postnatal 120 (P120) following injury performed at birth. As compared to control, PA animals exhibited: (1) an increase in molecular and granular thickness, both presenting lower cellular density; (2) a disarrayed Purkinje cell layer presenting a higher number of anomalous calbindin-stained cells. (3) focal swelling and marked fragmentation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) in Purkinje cell dendrites and, (4) an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in Bergmann cells and the granular layer. In conclusion, we demonstrate that PA produces long-term damage in cellular histomorphology in rat cerebellar cortex which could be involved in the pathogenesis of cognitive deficits observed in both animals and humans. PMID:26116983

  6. In the Rat Cerebellar Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Ordek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The changes of excitability in affected neural networks can be used as a marker to study the temporal course of traumatic brain injury (TBI. The cerebellum is an ideal platform to study brain injury mechanisms at the network level using the electrophysiological methods. Within its crystalline morphology, the cerebellar cortex contains highly organized topographical subunits that are defined by two main inputs, the climbing and mossy fibers. Here we demonstrate the use of cerebellar evoked potentials (EPs mediated through these afferent systems for monitoring the injury progression in a rat model of fluid percussion injury (FPI. A mechanical tap on the dorsal hand was used as a stimulus, and EPs were recorded from the paramedian lobule (PML of the posterior cerebellum via multi-electrode arrays (MEA. Post-injury evoked response amplitudes (EPAs were analyzed on a daily basis for one week and compared with pre-injury values. We found a trend of consistently decreasing EPAs in all nine animals, losing as much as 72±4% of baseline amplitudes measured before the injury. Notably, our results highlighted two particular time windows; the first 24 hours of injury in the acute period and day-3 to day-7 in the delayed period where the largest drops (~50% and 24% were observed in the EPAs. In addition, cross-correlations of spontaneous signals between electrode pairs declined (from 0.47±0.1 to 0.35±0.04, p<0.001 along with the EPAs throughout the week of injury. In support of the electrophysiological findings, immunohistochemical analysis at day-7 post-injury showed detectable Purkinje cell loss at low FPI pressures and more with the largest pressures used. Our results suggest that sensory evoked potentials recorded from the cerebellar surface can be a useful technique to monitor the course of cerebellar injury and identify the phases of injury progression even at mild levels.

  7. GDNF-induced cerebellar toxicity: A brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Matthias; Mohr, Erich; Fibiger, H Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant-methionyl human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is known for its neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects in rodent and primate models of Parkinson's disease (PD). When administered locally into the putamen of Parkinsonian subjects, early clinical studies showed its potential promise as a disease-modifying agent. However, the development of GDNF for the treatment of PD has been significantly clouded by findings of cerebellar toxicity after continuous intraputamenal high-dose administration in a 6-month treatment/3-month recovery toxicology study in rhesus monkeys. Specifically, multifocal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss affecting 1-21% of the cerebellar cortex was observed in 4 of 15 (26.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.5-52.4%) animals treated at the highest dose level tested (3000μg/month). No cerebellar toxicity was observed at lower doses (450 and 900μg/month) in the same study, or at similar or higher doses (up to 10,000μg/month) in subchronic or chronic toxicology studies testing intermittent intracerebroventricular administration. While seemingly associated with the use of GDNF, the pathogenesis of the cerebellar lesions has not been fully understood to date. This review integrates available information to evaluate potential pathogenic mechanisms and provide a consolidated assessment of the findings. While other explanations are considered, the existing evidence is most consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of GDNF into cerebrospinal fluid during chronic infusions into the putamen down-regulates GDNF receptors on Purkinje cells, and that subsequent acute withdrawal of GDNF generates the observed lesions. The implications of these findings for clinical studies with GDNF are discussed. PMID:26535469

  8. Calcium microdomains near R-type calcium channels control the induction of presynaptic LTP at parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses

    OpenAIRE

    Myoga, Michael H.; Regehr, Wade G.

    2011-01-01

    R-type calcium channels in postsynaptic spines signal through functional calcium microdomains to regulate a calcium-calmodulin sensitive potassium channel that in turn regulates postsynaptic hippocampal LTP. Here we ask whether R-type calcium channels in presynaptic terminals also signal through calcium microdomains to control presynaptic LTP. We focus on presynaptic LTP at parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses in the cerebellum (PF-LTP), which is mediated by calcium/calmodulin-stimulated ...

  9. Treadmill exercise ameliorates symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder through reducing Purkinje cell loss and astrocytic reaction in spontaneous hypertensive rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Hyo-Soon; Park, Mi-Sook; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Hyun-Bae; Kim, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurobehavioral disorder of cognition. We investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on Purkinje cell and astrocytic reaction in the cerebellum of the ADHD rat. Adult male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYR) weighing 210± 10 g were used. The animals were randomly divided into four groups (n= 15): control group, ADHD group, ADHD and methylphenidate (MPH)-treated group, ADHD and treadmill exercise group. The...

  10. Stereological study of the effects of maternal diabetes on cerebellar cortex development in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hami, Javad; Vafaei-Nezhad, Saeed; Ghaemi, Kazem; Sadeghi, Akram; Ivar, Ghasem; Shojae, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Mehran

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes during pregnancy is associated with the deficits in balance and motor coordination and altered social behaviors in offspring. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of maternal diabetes and insulin treatment on the cerebellar volume and morphogenesis of the cerebellar cortex of rat neonates during the first two postnatal weeks. Sprague Dawley female rats were maintained diabetic from a week before pregnancy through parturition. At the end of pregnancy, the male offspring euthanized on postnatal days (P) 0, 7, and 14. Cavalieri's principle and fractionator methods were used to estimate the cerebellar volume, the thickness and the number of cells in the different layers of the cerebellar cortex. In spite of P0, there was a significant reduction in the cerebellar volume and the thickness of the external granule, molecular, and internal granule layers between the diabetic and the control animals. In diabetic group, the granular and purkinje cell densities were increased at P0. Moreover, the number of granular and purkinje cells in the cerebellum of diabetic neonates was reduced in comparison with the control group at P7 and P14. There were no significant differences in either the volume and thickness or the number of cells in the different layers of the cerebellar cortex between the insulin-treated diabetic group and controls. Our data indicate that diabetes in pregnancy disrupts the morphogenesis of cerebellar cortex. This dysmorphogenesis may be part of the cascade of events through which diabetes during pregnancy affects motor coordination and social behaviors in offspring. PMID:26842601

  11. 4-aminopyridine reverses ataxia and cerebellar firing deficiency in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabal, Sriram; Chang, Hui Ho Vanessa; Cullen, Kathleen E; Watt, Alanna J

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is a devastating midlife-onset autosomal dominant motor control disease with no known treatment. Using a hyper-expanded polyglutamine (84Q) knock-in mouse, we found that cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision was degraded in heterozygous (SCA6(84Q/+)) mice at 19 months when motor deficits are observed. Similar alterations in firing precision and motor control were observed at disease onset at 7 months in homozygous (SCA6(84Q/84Q)) mice, as well as a reduction in firing rate. We further found that chronic administration of the FDA-approved drug 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), which targets potassium channels, alleviated motor coordination deficits and restored cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision to wildtype (WT) levels in SCA6(84Q/84Q) mice both in acute slices and in vivo. These results provide a novel therapeutic approach for treating ataxic symptoms associated with SCA6. PMID:27381005

  12. Measurement of GABAA receptor function in rat cultured cerebellar granule cells by the Cytosensor microphysiometer

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Maria J; Wood, Martyn D; Coldwell, Martyn C; Bristow, David R

    1997-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), acting via the GABAA receptor, increased the extracellular acidification rate of rat primary cultured cerebellar granule cells, measured by the Cytosensor microphysiometer.The optimal conditions for the measurement of GABAA receptor function in cerebellar granule cells by microphysiometry were: cells seeded at 9–12×105 cells/transwell cup and maintained in vitro for 8 days, GABA stimulation performed at 25°C, with a stimulation time of 33 s.GABA stimulated a concen...

  13. Ablation of the mTORC2 component rictor in brain or Purkinje cells affects size and neuron morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomanetz, Venus; Angliker, Nico; Cloëtta, Dimitri; Lustenberger, Regula M; Schweighauser, Manuel; Oliveri, Filippo; Suzuki, Noboru; Rüegg, Markus A

    2013-04-15

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) assembles into two distinct multi-protein complexes called mTORC1 and mTORC2. Whereas mTORC1 is known to regulate cell and organismal growth, the role of mTORC2 is less understood. We describe two mouse lines that are devoid of the mTORC2 component rictor in the entire central nervous system or in Purkinje cells. In both lines neurons were smaller and their morphology and function were strongly affected. The phenotypes were accompanied by loss of activation of Akt, PKC, and SGK1 without effects on mTORC1 activity. The striking decrease in the activation and expression of several PKC isoforms, the subsequent loss of activation of GAP-43 and MARCKS, and the established role of PKCs in spinocerebellar ataxia and in shaping the actin cytoskeleton strongly suggest that the morphological deficits observed in rictor-deficient neurons are mediated by PKCs. Together our experiments show that mTORC2 has a particularly important role in the brain and that it affects size, morphology, and function of neurons. PMID:23569215

  14. Defects in myelination, paranode organization and Purkinje cell innervation in the ether lipid-deficient mouse cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teigler, Andre; Komljenovic, Dorde; Draguhn, Andreas; Gorgas, Karin; Just, Wilhelm W

    2009-06-01

    Ether lipids (ELs), particularly plasmalogens, are essential constituents of the mammalian central nervous system. The physiological role of ELs, in vivo, however is still enigmatic. In the present study, we characterized a mouse model carrying a targeted deletion of the peroxisomal dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase gene that results in the complete lack of ELs. Investigating the cerebellum of these mice, we observed: (i) defects in foliation patterning and delay in precursor granule cell migration, (ii) defects in myelination and concomitant reduction in the level of myelin basic protein, (iii) disturbances in paranode organization by extending the Caspr distribution and disrupting axo-glial septate-like junctions, (iv) impaired innervation of Purkinje cells by both parallel fibers and climbing fibers and (v) formation of axon swellings by the accumulation of inositol-tris-phosphate receptor 1 containing smooth ER-like tubuli. Functionally, conduction velocity of myelinated axons in the corpus callosum was significantly reduced. Most of these phenotypes were already apparent at P20 but still persisted in 1-year-old animals. In summary, these data show that EL deficiency results in severe developmental and lasting structural alterations at the cellular and network level of the cerebellum, and reveal an important role of ELs for proper brain function. Common molecular mechanisms that may underlie these phenotypes are discussed. PMID:19270340

  15. Cerebellar stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Xin; Guan, Wuqiang; Yu, Yong-Chun; Fu, Yinghui, E-mail: fuyh@fudan.edu.cn

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • No new neurons and astrocytes are generated in adult mouse cerebellum. • Very few mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells exist, and most of them are quiescent. • Cell proliferation rate is diversified among cerebellar regions and decreases over time. - Abstract: Although previous studies implied that cerebellar stem cells exist in some adult mammals, little is known about whether these stem cells can produce new neurons and astrocytes. In this study by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, we found that there are abundant BrdU{sup +} cells in adult mouse cerebellum, and their quantity and density decreases significantly over time. We also found cell proliferation rate is diversified in different cerebellar regions. Among these BrdU{sup +} cells, very few are mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells, and the vast majority of cerebellar stem cells are quiescent. Data obtained by in vivo retrovirus injection indicate that stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse cerebellum. Instead, some cells labeled by retrovirus are Iba1{sup +} microglia. These results indicate that very few stem cells exist in adult mouse cerebellum, and none of these stem cells contribute to neurogenesis and astrogenesis under physiological condition.

  16. Cerebellar stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • No new neurons and astrocytes are generated in adult mouse cerebellum. • Very few mash1+ or nestin+ stem cells exist, and most of them are quiescent. • Cell proliferation rate is diversified among cerebellar regions and decreases over time. - Abstract: Although previous studies implied that cerebellar stem cells exist in some adult mammals, little is known about whether these stem cells can produce new neurons and astrocytes. In this study by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, we found that there are abundant BrdU+ cells in adult mouse cerebellum, and their quantity and density decreases significantly over time. We also found cell proliferation rate is diversified in different cerebellar regions. Among these BrdU+ cells, very few are mash1+ or nestin+ stem cells, and the vast majority of cerebellar stem cells are quiescent. Data obtained by in vivo retrovirus injection indicate that stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse cerebellum. Instead, some cells labeled by retrovirus are Iba1+ microglia. These results indicate that very few stem cells exist in adult mouse cerebellum, and none of these stem cells contribute to neurogenesis and astrogenesis under physiological condition

  17. Cytosolic PLA2(alpha) activation in Purkinje neurons and its role in AMPA-receptor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashimo, Masato; Hirabayashi, Tetsuya; Murayama, Toshihiko; Shimizu, Takao

    2008-09-15

    Cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha (cPLA(2)alpha) selectively releases arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids and has been proposed to be involved in the induction of long-term depression (LTD), a form of synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum. This enzyme requires two events for its full activation: Ca(2+)-dependent translocation from the cytosol to organelle membranes in order to access phospholipids as substrates, and phosphorylation by several kinases. However, the subcellular distribution and activation of cPLA(2)alpha in Purkinje cells and the role of arachidonic acid in cerebellar LTD have not been fully elucidated. In cultured Purkinje cells, stimulation of AMPA receptors, but not metabotropic glutamate receptors, triggered translocation of cPLA(2)alpha to the somatic and dendritic Golgi compartments. This translocation required Ca(2+) influx through P-type Ca(2+) channels. AMPA plus PMA, a chemical method for inducing LTD, released arachidonic acid via phosphorylation of cPLA(2)alpha. AMPA plus PMA induced a decrease in surface GluR2 for more than 2 hours. Interestingly, this reduction was occluded by a cPLA(2)alpha-specific inhibitor. Furthermore, PMA plus arachidonic acid caused the prolonged internalization of GluR2 without activating AMPA receptors. These results suggest that cPLA(2)alpha regulates the persistent decrease in the expression of AMPA receptors, underscoring the role of cPLA(2)alpha in cerebellar LTD. PMID:18713832

  18. The role of cortisol in chronic binge alcohol-induced cerebellar injury: Ovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Shannon E; Tress, Ursula; Lunde, Emilie R; Chen, Wei-Jung A; Cudd, Timothy A

    2013-02-01

    Women who drink alcohol during pregnancy are at high risk of giving birth to children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Previous reports from our laboratory have shown that third trimester equivalent binge alcohol exposure at a dose of 1.75 g/kg/day results in significant fetal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss in fetal sheep and that both maternal and fetal adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and cortisol levels are elevated in response to alcohol treatment. In this study, we hypothesized that repeated elevations in cortisol from chronic binge alcohol are responsible at least in part for fetal neuronal deficits. Animals were divided into four treatment groups: normal control, pair-fed saline control, alcohol and cortisol. The magnitude of elevation in cortisol in response to alcohol was mimicked in the cortisol group by infusing pregnant ewes with hydrocortisone for 6 h on each day of the experiment, and administering saline during the first hour in lieu of alcohol. The experiment was conducted on three consecutive days followed by four days without treatment beginning on gestational day (GD) 109 until GD 132. Peak maternal blood alcohol concentration in the alcohol group was 239 ± 7 mg/dl. The fetal brains were collected and processed for stereological cell counting on GD 133. The estimated total number of fetal cerebellar Purkinje cells, the reference volume and the Purkinje cell density were not altered in response to glucocorticoid infusion in the absence of alcohol. These results suggest that glucocorticoids independently during the third trimester equivalent may not produce fetal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss. However, the elevations in cortisol along with other changes induced by alcohol could together lead to brain injury seen in the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. PMID:23218665

  19. Acute ethanol exposure inhibits silencing of cerebellar Golgi cell firing induced by granule cell axon input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo eBotta

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Golgi cells (GoCs are specialized interneurons that provide inhibitory input to granule cells in the cerebellar cortex. GoCs are pacemaker neurons that spontaneously fire action potentials, triggering spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in granule cells and also contributing to the generation tonic GABAA receptor-mediated currents in granule cells. In turn, granule cell axons provide feedback glutamatergic input to GoCs. It has been shown that high frequency stimulation of granule cell axons induces a transient pause in GoC firing in a type 2-metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2-dependent manner. Here, we investigated the effect ethanol on the pause of GoC firing induced by high frequency stimulation of granule cell axons. GoC electrophysiological recordings were performed in parasagittal cerebellar vermis slices from postnatal day 23 to 26 rats. Loose-patch cell-attached recordings revealed that ethanol (40 mM reversibly decreases the pause duration. An antagonist of mGluR2 reduced the pause duration but did not affect the effect of ethanol. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings showed that currents evoked by an mGluR2 agonist were not significantly affected by ethanol. Perforated-patch experiments in which hyperpolarizing and depolarizing currents were injected into GoCs demonstrated that there is an inverse relationship between spontaneous firing and pause duration. Slight inhibition of the Na+/K+ pump mimicked the effect of ethanol on pause duration. In conclusion, ethanol reduces the granule cell axon-mediated feedback mechanism by reducing the input responsiveness of GoCs. This would result in a transient increase of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition of granule cells, limiting information flow at the input stage of the cerebellar cortex.

  20. Propofol effects on cerebellar long-term depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwan Young; Kim, Young Im; Kim, Se Hoon; Park, Hyung Seo; Park, Youn Joon; Ha, Myung Sook; Jin, Yunju; Kim, Dong Kwan

    2015-11-16

    Propofol is an intravenously administered anesthetic that induces γ-aminobutyric acid-mediated inhibition in the central nervous system. It has been implicated in prolonged movement disorders. Since the cerebellum is important for motor coordination and learning, we investigated the potential effects of propofol on cerebellar circuitry. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in Wister rat cerebellar slices, we demonstrated that propofol administration impaired long-term depression from the parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje cell (PC) synapses (PF-LTD). Also, propofol reduced metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1)-mediated and group I mGluR agonist-induced slow currents in PCs. These results suggest that the propofol-induced PF-LTD impairment may be related to an alteration in mGluR1 signaling, which is essential to motor learning. PMID:26455962

  1. N-methyl-D-aspartate promotes the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Jørgensen, Ole Steen; Hack, N

    1988-01-01

    Our previous studies on the survival-promoting influence of elevated concentrations of extracellular K+ ([K+]e) on cultured cerebellar granule cells led to the proposal that depolarization in vitro mimics the effect of the earliest afferent inputs received by the granule cells in vivo. This, in t...

  2. Integrated plasticity at inhibitory and excitatory synapses in the cerebellar circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eMapelli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The way long-term potentiation (LTP and depression (LTD are integrated within the different synapses of brain neuronal circuits is poorly understood. In order to progress beyond the identification of specific molecular mechanisms, a system in which multiple forms of plasticity can be correlated with large-scale neural processing is required. In this paper we take as an example the cerebellar network , in which extensive investigations have revealed LTP and LTD at several excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Cerebellar LTP and LTD occur in all three main cerebellar subcircuits (granular layer, molecular layer, deep cerebellar nuclei and correspondingly regulate the function of their three main neurons: granule cells (GrCs, Purkinje cells (PCs and deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN cells. All these neurons, in addition to be excited, are reached by feed-forward and feed-back inhibitory connections, in which LTP and LTD may either operate synergistically or homeostatically in order to control information flow through the circuit. Although the investigation of individual synaptic plasticities in vitro is essential to prove their existence and mechanisms, it is insufficient to generate a coherent view of their impact on network functioning in vivo. Recent computational models and cell-specific genetic mutations in mice are shedding light on how plasticity at multiple excitatory and inhibitory synapses might regulate neuronal activities in the cerebellar circuit and contribute to learning and memory and behavioral control.

  3. N-methyl-D-aspartate promotes the survival of cerebellar granule cells: pharmacological characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen;

    1989-01-01

    The survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture is promoted by chronic exposure to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The effect is due to the stimulation of 'conventional' NMDA receptor-ionophore complex: it is concentration dependent, voltage dependent and blocked by the selective antagonists D-2...

  4. Weaver mutant mouse cerebellar granule cells respond normally to chronic depolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Annette; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Hack, N;

    1997-01-01

    We studied the effects of chronic K(+)-induced membrane depolarization and treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) from weaver mutant mice and non-weaver litter-mates. The weaver mutation is a Gly-to-Ser substitution in a conserved region of the Girk2 G prote...

  5. Changes in the Responses of Purkinje Cells in the Floccular Complex of Monkeys After Motor Learning in Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements

    OpenAIRE

    Kahlon, Maninder; Lisberger, Stephen G.

    2000-01-01

    We followed simple- and complex-spike firing of Purkinje cells (PCs) in the floccular complex of the cerebellum through learned modifications of the pursuit eye movements of two monkeys. Learning was induced by double steps of target speed in which initially stationary targets move at a “learning” speed for 100 ms and then change to either a higher or lower speed in the same direction. In randomly interleaved control trials, targets moved at the learning speed in the opposite direction. When ...

  6. Transferences of Purkinje systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Harris

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The transferences of heterocentric astigmatic Purkinje systems are special: submatrices B and C, that is, the disjugacy and the divergence of the system, are symmetric and submatrix D (the divarication is the transpose of submatrix A (the dilation.  It is the primary purpose of this paper to provide a proof.  The paper also derives other relationships among the fundamental properties and compact expressions for the transference and optical axis locator of a Purkinje system. (S Afr Optom 2011 70(2 57-60

  7. Error detection and representation in the olivo-cerebellar system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Ito

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex spikes generated in a cerebellar Purkinje cell via a climbing fiber have been assumed to encode errors in the performance of neuronal circuits involving Purkinje cells. To reexamine this notion, in this review I analyzed structures of motor control systems involving the cerebellum. A dichotomy was found between the two types of error: sensory and motor errors play roles in the feedforward and feedback control conditions, respectively. To substantiate this dichotomy, here in this article I reviewed recent data on neuronal connections and signal contents of climbing fibers in the vestibuloocular reflex, optokinetic eye movement response, saccade, hand reaching, cursor tracking, as well as some other cases of motor control. In our studies, various sources of sensory and motor errors were located in the neuronal pathways leading to the inferior olive. We noted that during the course of evolution, control system structures involving the cerebellum changed rather radically from the prototype seen in the flocculonodular lobe and vermis to that applicable to the cerebellar hemisphere. Nevertheless, the dichotomy between sensory and motor errors is maintained.

  8. Rapid Onset of Motor Deficits in a Mouse Model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 Precedes Late Cerebellar Degeneration 1,2,3

    OpenAIRE

    Jayabal, Sriram; Ljungberg, Lovisa; Erwes, Thomas; Cormier, Alexander; Quilez, Sabrina; El Jaouhari, Sara; Watt, Alanna J

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal-dominant cerebellar ataxia that has been associated with loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Disease onset is typically at midlife, although it can vary widely from late teens to old age in SCA6 patients. Our study focused on an SCA6 knock-in mouse model with a hyper-expanded (84X) CAG repeat expansion that displays midlife-onset motor deficits at ∼7 months old, reminiscent of midlife-onset symptoms in SCA6 patients, although a deta...

  9. Two forms of cerebellar glial cells interact differently with neurons in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Specific interactions between neurons and glia dissociated from early postnatal mouse cerebellar tissue were studied in vitro by indirect immunocytochemical staining with antisera raised against purified glial filament protein, galactocerebroside, and the NILE glycoprotein. Two forms of cells were stained with antisera raised against purified glial filament protein. The first, characterized by a cell body 9 microns diam and processes 130-150 microns long, usually had two to three neurons asso...

  10. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya; Yoneda, Makoto; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto's encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Miller Fisher syndrome, ataxia associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Humoral mechanisms, cell-mediated immunity, inflammation, and vascular injuries contribute to the cerebellar deficits in immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias. PMID:25823827

  11. Cerebellar distribution of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and its receptor components calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity modifying protein 1 (RAMP1) in rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Salvatore, Christopher A;

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and experimental results have revealed a fundamental role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in primary headaches. CGRP is widely expressed in neurons both in the central nervous system (CNS) and in peripheral sensory nerves. In the CNS there is a wide distribution of CGRP...... modifying protein type 1 (RAMP1) have been developed. In the present study we therefore examined immunohistochemically the distribution of CGRP and its receptor components in the cerebellum. CGRP immunoreactivity was only found intracellularly in the cerebellar Purkinje cell bodies, whereas CLR and RAMP1...... were detected on the surface of the Purkinje cell bodies and in their processes. The elaborate dendritic tree of Purkinje cell fibers was distinctly visualized with the RAMP1 antibody. In addition, profoundly stained fibers spanning from the molecular layer into the medulla was observed with the RAMP1...

  12. Restoring cognitive functions using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques in patients with cerebellar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RChrisMiall

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have highlighted the possibility of modulating the excitability of cerebro-cerebellar circuits bi-directionally using transcranial electrical brain stimulation, in a manner akin to that observed using magnetic stimulation protocols. It has been proposed that cerebellar stimulation activates Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, leading to inhibition of the dentate nucleus, which exerts a tonic facilitatory drive onto motor and cognitive regions of cortex through a synaptic relay in the ventral-lateral thalamus. Some cerebellar deficits present with cognitive impairments if damage to non-motor regions of the cerebellum disrupts the coupling with cerebral cortical areas for thinking and reasoning. Indeed, white matter changes in the dentato-rubral tract correlate with cognitive assessments in patients with Friedreich ataxia, suggesting that this pathway is one component of the anatomical substrate supporting a cerebellar contribution to cognition. An understanding of the physiology of the cerebro-cerebellar pathway previously helped us to constrain our interpretation of results from two recent studies in which we showed cognitive enhancements in healthy participants during tests of arithmetic after electrical stimulation of the cerebellum, but only when task demands were high. Others studies have also shown how excitation of the prefrontal cortex can enhance performance in a variety of working memory tasks. Thus, future efforts might be guided towards neuro-enhancement in certain patient populations, using what is commonly termed 'non-invasive brain stimulation' as a cognitive rehabilitation tool to modulate cerebro-cerebellar circuits, or for stimulation over the cerebral cortex to compensate for decreased cerebellar drive to this region. This article will address these possibilities with a review of the relevant literature covering ataxias and cerebellar cognitive affective disorders, which are characterized by thalamo

  13. Cell Signaling and Neurotoxicity: 3H-Arachidonic acid release (Phospholipase A2) in cerebellar granule neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cell signaling is a complex process which controls basic cellular activities and coordinates actions to maintain normal cellular homeostasis. Alterations in signaling processes have been associated with neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and cerebellar ataxia, as well as, ...

  14. Localization of CGRP receptor components, CGRP, and receptor binding sites in human and rhesus cerebellar cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Salvatore, Christopher A; Gaspar, Renee C;

    2013-01-01

    receptor activity modifying protein 1 (RAMP1), was examined. In addition, expression of procalcitonin was studied. We observed high [(3)H]MK-3207 (CGRP receptor antagonist) binding densities in the molecular layer of rhesus cerebellar cortex; however, due to the limit of resolution of the autoradiographic....... Immunofluorescence revealed expression of CGRP, CLR, and RAMP1 in the Purkinje cells and in cells in the molecular layer. Procalcitonin was found in the same localization. Recent research in the biology of cerebellum indicates that it may have a role in nociception. For the first time we have identified CGRP and...

  15. Neuropathological features in a female fetus with OPHN1 deletion and cerebellar hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocas, Delphine; Alix, Eudeline; Michel, Jessica; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Labalme, Audrey; Guilbert, Hélène; Till, Marianne; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; de Haas, Pascale; Massardier, Jérôme; Portes, Vincent des; Edery, Patrick; Touraine, Renaud; Guibaud, Laurent; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Sanlaville, Damien

    2013-05-01

    We report the case of a 33-year-old pregnant woman. The third-trimester ultrasound scan during pregnancy revealed fetal bilateral ventricular dilatation, macrosomia and a transverse diameter of the cerebellum at the 30th centile. A brain MRI scan at 31 weeks of gestation led to a diagnosis of hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis without hemisphere abnormalities and a non compressive expansion of the cisterna magna. The fetal karyotype was 46,XX. The pregnancy was terminated and array-CGH analysis of the fetus identified a 238 kb de novo deletion on chromosome Xp12, encompassing part of OPHN1 gene. Further studies revealed a completely skewed pattern of X inactivation. OPHN1 is involved in X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) with cerebellar hypoplasia and encodes a Rho-GTPase-activating protein called oligophrenin-1, which is produced throughout the developing mouse brain and in the hippocampus and Purkinje cells of the cerebellum in adult mice. Neuropathological examination of the female fetus revealed cerebellar hypoplasia and the heterotopia of Purkinje cells at multiple sites in the white matter of the cerebellum. This condition mostly affects male fetuses in humans. We report here the first case of a de novo partial deletion of OPHN1, with radiological and neuropathological examination, in a female fetus. PMID:23416624

  16. Light and electron microscopic localization of GABAA-receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes using immunohistochemical techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, G H; Hösli, E; Belhage, B;

    1991-01-01

    GABAA-receptors were localized in explant cultures of rat cerebellum and in dissociated primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells and rat cerebellar astrocytes using the monoclonal antibody bd-17 directed against the beta-subunit of the GABAA/benzodiazepine/chloride channel complex. At the...... light microscope level specific staining of GABAA-receptors was localized in various types of neurones in explant cultures of rat cerebellum using the indirect peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) technique, whereas no specific staining was found in astrocytes. At the electron microscope level labeling of...... in dissociated primary cultures of cerebellar astrocytes....

  17. Advanced Small Cell Lung Cancer with Cerebellar Metastases – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Xiong Chong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Small cell lung cancer is an aggressive subtype of lung cancer whereby about one-third of cases are complicated with bra­in metastases. However, cerebellar metastases are uncommon and contribute to less than 10% of brain metastases. Case: We report a 76-year-old Malay male, an active smoker who presented with dyspnea and occasional cough with hemoptysis for one week. He also pre­sented with headache and constitutional symptoms of malignancy. Clinical examination suggested the presence of right upper chest patholo­gy and positive left cerebellar signs. His condition deteriorated two days later and he passed away after failed attempts at resuscitation. Chest radiograph showed right upper lobe collapse, and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed metastatic lesion in the left cerebellum extending to the right cerebellum. Post-mortem findings revealed small cell lung cancer with cerebellar metastases. Conclusion: Small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases deteriorate very rapidly, and the management is mainly supportive. Primary prevention through education is the best way to reduce the incidence of lung cancer. In addition, secondary prevention and screening should be undertaken at earlier stages of the disease, as some studies have shown that combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy improve prog­nosis of malignancies detected at early stage.

  18. Requirement for zebrafish ataxin-7 in differentiation of photoreceptors and cerebellar neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Yanicostas

    Full Text Available The expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ tract in the N-terminal region of ataxin-7 (atxn7 is the causative event in spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7, an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder mainly characterized by progressive, selective loss of rod-cone photoreceptors and cerebellar Purkinje and granule cells. The molecular and cellular processes underlying this restricted neuronal vulnerability, which contrasts with the broad expression pattern of atxn7, remains one of the most enigmatic features of SCA7, and more generally of all polyQ disorders. To gain insight into this specific neuronal vulnerability and achieve a better understanding of atxn7 function, we carried out a functional analysis of this protein in the teleost fish Danio rerio. We characterized the zebrafish atxn7 gene and its transcription pattern, and by making use of morpholino-oligonucleotide-mediated gene inactivation, we analysed the phenotypes induced following mild or severe zebrafish atxn7 depletion. Severe or nearly complete zebrafish atxn7 loss-of-function markedly impaired embryonic development, leading to both early embryonic lethality and severely deformed embryos. More importantly, in relation to SCA7, moderate depletion of the protein specifically, albeit partially, prevented the differentiation of both retina photoreceptors and cerebellar Purkinje and granule cells. In addition, [1-232] human atxn7 fragment rescued these phenotypes showing strong function conservation of this protein through evolution. The specific requirement for zebrafish atxn7 in the proper differentiation of cerebellar neurons provides, to our knowledge, the first in vivo evidence of a direct functional relationship between atxn7 and the differentiation of Purkinje and granule cells, the most crucial neurons affected in SCA7 and most other polyQ-mediated SCAs. These findings further suggest that altered protein function may play a role in the pathophysiology of the disease, an

  19. Roles for nitric oxide and arachidonic acid in the induction of heterosynaptic cerebellar LTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, T; Hartell, N A

    2001-01-22

    In cerebellar slices conjunctive pairing of parallel fibre (PF) stimulation with depolarization of Purkinje cells (PCs) induces a long-term depression (LTD) of PF synaptic transmission that spreads to unpaired PF inputs to the same cell. Inhibitors of NO synthase (7-nitro-indazole), soluble guanylate cyclase (ODQ) and PKG (KT5823) all prevented depression at each of two independent PF pathways to a single PC. Inhibition of NOS also unmasked a platelet activating factor (PAF)-mediated synaptic potentiation of possible presynaptic origin. LTD was also prevented by the phospholipase A2 inhibitor OBAA but was rescued by co-perfusion with arachidonic acid. We conclude that NO and diffusible products of phospholipase A2 metabolism are potential mediators of the spread of cerebellar plasticity at the single cell level. PMID:11201073

  20. Lack of connexin43-mediated Bergmann glial gap junctional coupling does not affect cerebellar long-term depression, motor coordination, or eyeblink conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Tanaka

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Bergmann glial cells are specialized astrocytes in the cerebellum. In the mature cerebellar molecular layer, Bergmann glial processes are closely associated with Purkinje cells, enclosing Purkinje cell dendritic synapses with a glial sheath. There is intensive gap junctional coupling between Bergmann glial processes, but their significance in cerebellar functions is not known. Connexin43 (Cx43, a major component of astrocytic gap junction channels, is abundantly expressed in Bergmann glial cells. To examine the role of Cx43-mediated gap junctions between Bergmann glial cells in cerebellar functions, we generated Cx43 conditional knockout mice with the S100b-Cre transgenic line (Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre, which exhibited a significant loss of Cx43 in the Bergmann glial cells and astrocytes in the cerebellum with a postnatal onset. The Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre mice had normal cerebellar architecture. Although gap junctional coupling between the Bergmann glial cells measured by spreading of microinjected Lucifer yellow was virtually abolished in Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre mice, electrophysiologic analysis revealed that cerebellar long-term depression could be induced and maintained normally in thier cerebellar slices. In addition, at the behavioral level, Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre mice had normal motor coordination in the rotarod task and normal conditioned eyelid response. Our findings suggest that Cx43-mediated gap junctional coupling between Bergmann glial cells is not necessary for the neuron-glia interactions required for cerebellum-dependent motor coordination and motor learning.

  1. FGF-2 signal promotes proliferation of cerebellar progenitor cells and their oligodendrocytic differentiation at early postnatal stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The origins and developmental regulation of cerebellar oligodendrocytes are largely unknown, although some hypotheses of embryonic origins have been suggested. Neural stem cells exist in the white matter of postnatal cerebellum, but it is unclear whether these neural stem cells generate oligodendrocytes at postnatal stages. We previously showed that cerebellar progenitor cells, including neural stem cells, widely express CD44 at around postnatal day 3. In the present study, we showed that CD44-positive cells prepared from the postnatal day 3 cerebellum gave rise to neurospheres, while CD44-negative cells prepared from the same cerebellum did not. These neurospheres differentiated mainly into oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, suggesting that CD44-positive neural stem/progenitor cells might generate oligodendrocytes in postnatal cerebellum. We cultured CD44-positive cells from the postnatal day 3 cerebellum in the presence of signaling molecules known as mitogens or inductive differentiation factors for oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Of these, only FGF-2 promoted survival and proliferation of CD44-positive cells, and these cells differentiated into O4+ oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, we examined the effect of FGF-2 on cerebellar oligodendrocyte development ex vivo. FGF-2 enhanced proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and increased the number of O4+ and CC1+ oligodendrocytes in slice cultures. These results suggest that CD44-positive cells might be a source of cerebellar oligodendrocytes and that FGF-2 plays important roles in their development at an early postnatal stage. - Highlights: • CD44 is expressed in cerebellar neural stem/progenitor cells at postnatal day 3 (P3). • FGF-2 promoted proliferation of CD44-positive progenitor cells from P3 cerebellum. • FGF-2 promoted oligodendrocytic differentiation of CD44-positive progenitor cells. • FGF-2 increased the number of oligodendrocytes in P3 cerebellar slice culture

  2. FGF-2 signal promotes proliferation of cerebellar progenitor cells and their oligodendrocytic differentiation at early postnatal stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naruse, Masae; Shibasaki, Koji; Ishizaki, Yasuki, E-mail: yasukiishizaki@gunma-u.ac.jp

    2015-08-07

    The origins and developmental regulation of cerebellar oligodendrocytes are largely unknown, although some hypotheses of embryonic origins have been suggested. Neural stem cells exist in the white matter of postnatal cerebellum, but it is unclear whether these neural stem cells generate oligodendrocytes at postnatal stages. We previously showed that cerebellar progenitor cells, including neural stem cells, widely express CD44 at around postnatal day 3. In the present study, we showed that CD44-positive cells prepared from the postnatal day 3 cerebellum gave rise to neurospheres, while CD44-negative cells prepared from the same cerebellum did not. These neurospheres differentiated mainly into oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, suggesting that CD44-positive neural stem/progenitor cells might generate oligodendrocytes in postnatal cerebellum. We cultured CD44-positive cells from the postnatal day 3 cerebellum in the presence of signaling molecules known as mitogens or inductive differentiation factors for oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Of these, only FGF-2 promoted survival and proliferation of CD44-positive cells, and these cells differentiated into O4+ oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, we examined the effect of FGF-2 on cerebellar oligodendrocyte development ex vivo. FGF-2 enhanced proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and increased the number of O4+ and CC1+ oligodendrocytes in slice cultures. These results suggest that CD44-positive cells might be a source of cerebellar oligodendrocytes and that FGF-2 plays important roles in their development at an early postnatal stage. - Highlights: • CD44 is expressed in cerebellar neural stem/progenitor cells at postnatal day 3 (P3). • FGF-2 promoted proliferation of CD44-positive progenitor cells from P3 cerebellum. • FGF-2 promoted oligodendrocytic differentiation of CD44-positive progenitor cells. • FGF-2 increased the number of oligodendrocytes in P3 cerebellar slice culture.

  3. The cerebellar Golgi cell and spatiotemporal organization of granular layer activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidio eD‘Angelo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar granular layer has been suggested to perform a complex spatiotemporal reconfiguration of incoming mossy fiber signals. Central to this role is the inhibitory action exerted by Golgi cells over granule cells: Golgi cells inhibit granule cells through double feedforward and feedback inhibitory loops and generate a broad lateral inhibition that extends beyond the afferent synaptic field. This characteristic connectivity has recently been investigated in great detail and been correlated with specific functional properties of the neuron. These include theta-frequency pacemaking, network entrainment into coherent oscillations and phase resetting. Important advances have also been made in terms of determining the membrane and synaptic properties of the neuron, and clarifying the mechanisms of activation by input bursts. Moreover, voltage sensitive dye imaging and multi-electrode array recordings, combined with mathematical simulations based on realistic computational models, have improved our understanding of the impact of Golgi cell activity on granular layer circuit computations. These investigations have highlighted the critical role of Golgi cells in: generating dense clusters of granule cell activity organized in center-surround structures, implementing combinatorial operations on multiple mossy fiber inputs, regulating transmission gain and cut-off frequency, controlling spike timing and burst transmission, and determining the sign, intensity and extension of long-term synaptic plasticity at the mossy fiber-granule cell relay. This review considers recent advances in the field, highlighting the functional implications of Golgi cells for granular layer network computation and indicating new challenges for cerebellar research.

  4. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with anti-Yo antibodies - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Anand; Opal, Puneet

    2016-08-01

    The ataxic syndrome associated with Anti-Yo antibody, or Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody type 1 (PCA1), is the most common variant of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). The typical presentation involves the subacute development of pancerebellar deficits with a clinical plateau within 6 months. The vast majority of cases have been reported in women with pelvic or breast tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain is often normal in the early stages, with cerebellar atrophy seen later. The underlying mechanism is believed to be an immunological reaction to cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2 (CDR2), a protein usually found in the cerebellum that is ectopically produced by tumor cells. Although both B- and T-cell abnormalities are seen, there is debate about the relative importance of the autoantibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the neuronal loss. Cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities, primarily elevated protein, lymphocytic pleocytosis, and oligoclonal bands, are common in the early stages. The low prevalence of this condition has not allowed for large-scale randomized controlled trials. Immunotherapies, such as steroids, intravenous immune globulins, and plasma exchange, have been extensively used in managing this condition, with limited success. Although some reports indicate benefit from antitumor therapies like surgery and chemotherapy, this has not been consistently observed. The prognosis for anti-Yo PCD is almost uniformly poor, with most patients left bedridden. Further studies are required to clarify the pathophysiology and provide evidence-based treatment options. PMID:27606347

  5. Genetic and pharmacological evidence implicates cathepsins in Niemann-Pick C cerebellar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chan; Puthanveetil, Prasanth; Ory, Daniel S; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2016-04-01

    Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC) disease, an autosomal recessive lipid trafficking disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the NPC1 gene, is characterized by progressive neurodegeneration resulting in cognitive impairment, ataxia and early death. Little is known about the cellular pathways leading to neuron loss. Here, we studied the effects of diminishing expression of cystatin B, an endogenous inhibitor of cathepsins B, H and L, on the development of NPC neuropathology. We show that decreased expression of cystatin B in patient fibroblasts enhances cathepsin activity. Deletion of the encoding Cstb gene in Npc1-deficient mice resulted in striking deleterious effects, particularly within the cerebellum where diffuse loss of Purkinje cells was observed in young mice. This severe pathology occurred through cell autonomous mechanisms that triggered Purkinje cell death. Moreover, our analyses demonstrated the mislocalization of lysosomal cathepsins within the cytosol of Npc1-deficient Purkinje cells. We provide evidence that this may be a consequence of damage to lysosomal membranes by reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the leakage of lysosomal contents that culminates in apoptotic cell death. Consistent with this notion, toxicity from ROS was attenuated in an NPC cell model by cystatin B over-expression or pharmacological inhibition of cathepsin B. The observation that Npc1 and Cstb deletion genetically interact to potently enhance the degenerative phenotype of the NPC cerebellum provides strong support for the notion that lysosomal membrane permeabilization contributes to cerebellar degeneration in NPC disease. PMID:26908626

  6. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 Protein Aggregates Cause Deficits in Motor Learning and Cerebellar Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Mark, Melanie D.; Krause, Martin; Boele, Henk-Jan; Kruse, Wolfgang; Pollok, Stefan; Kuner, Thomas; Dalkara, Deniz; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Herlitze, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is linked to poly-glutamine (polyQ) within the C terminus (CT) of the pore-forming subunits of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels (Cav2.1) and is characterized by CT protein aggregates found in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). One hypothesis regarding SCA6 disease is that a CT fragment of the Cav2.1 channel, which is detected specifically in cytosolic and nuclear fractions in SCA6 patients, is associated with the SCA6 pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we expres...

  7. TOTAL NUMBER: A BRIEF REVIEW OF ITS IMPORTANCE AND ITS USE IN ASSESSING CEREBELLAR DAMAGE IN THE RAT FOLLOWING EARLY POSTNATAL ALCOHOL EXPOSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth MA Napper

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the total number of structural components that make up the various neural networks within the central nervous system is fundamental to our understanding of its normal function and of dysfunction that may accompany injury and disease. This paper briefly reviews the methodology currently used to estimate number and discusses the importance of unbiased estimates of total number in determining changes in brain structure that may underlie dysfunction. An example from the olfactory bulb is used to demonstrate the potential invalidity of using estimates of total number of objects per single section. Exposure to alcohol during the early postnatal period results in motor dysfunction in adult rats. This paper presents data on the extent and magnitude of cell loss within the cerebellar network of the rat following alcohol exposure during postnatal days 4 to 9. High transient blood alcohol concentrations result in a Purkinje cell of 27% across the entire cerebellum but with regional variabiltiy, vermal lobule X has a 43% Purkinje cell deficit. This alcohol regimen also results in a neuronal loss of 28% and 25% within the deep cerebellar nucleus and inferior olivary nucleus respectively. Consistency of overall neuronal loss across diverse neuronal populations within the cerebellar network is discussed in the context of the maintenance of cerebellar connectivity.

  8. Adaptive robotic control driven by a versatile spiking cerebellar network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellato, Claudia; Antonietti, Alberto; Garrido, Jesus A; Carrillo, Richard R; Luque, Niceto R; Ros, Eduardo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in a large number of different neural processes, especially in associative learning and in fine motor control. To develop a comprehensive theory of sensorimotor learning and control, it is crucial to determine the neural basis of coding and plasticity embedded into the cerebellar neural circuit and how they are translated into behavioral outcomes in learning paradigms. Learning has to be inferred from the interaction of an embodied system with its real environment, and the same cerebellar principles derived from cell physiology have to be able to drive a variety of tasks of different nature, calling for complex timing and movement patterns. We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN) with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. Encoding and decoding strategies based on neuronal firing rates were applied. Adaptive motor control protocols with acquisition and extinction phases have been designed and tested, including an associative Pavlovian task (Eye blinking classical conditioning), a vestibulo-ocular task and a perturbed arm reaching task operating in closed-loop. The SNN processed in real-time mossy fiber inputs as arbitrary contextual signals, irrespective of whether they conveyed a tone, a vestibular stimulus or the position of a limb. A bidirectional long-term plasticity rule implemented at parallel fibers-Purkinje cell synapses modulated the output activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. In all tasks, the neurorobot learned to adjust timing and gain of the motor responses by tuning its output discharge. It succeeded in reproducing how human biological systems acquire, extinguish and express knowledge of a noisy and changing world. By varying stimuli and perturbations patterns, real-time control robustness and generalizability were validated. The implicit spiking dynamics of the cerebellar model fulfill timing, prediction and learning functions. PMID:25390365

  9. Electrophysiological, morphological and topological properties of two histochemically distinct subpopulations of cerebellar unipolar brush cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jin-Ah; Sekerková, Gabriella; Mugnaini, Enrico; Martina, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Unipolar brush cells (UBCs) are excitatory cerebellar granular layer interneurons whose brush-like dendrites receive one-to-one mossy fiber inputs. Subclasses of UBCs differ primarily by expressing metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 1α or calretinin. We used GENSAT Tg(Grp-EGFP) BAC-transgenic mice, which selectively express EGFP in mGluR1α-positive UBCs to compare the functional properties of the two subclasses. Compared to EGFP-negative UBCs, which include the calretinin-positive cells,...

  10. Contribution of plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase to cerebellar synapse function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helena; Huang; Raghavendra; Y; Nagaraja; Molly; L; Garside; Walther; Akemann; Thomas; Knpfel; Ruth; M; Empson

    2010-01-01

    The cerebellum expresses one of the highest levels of the plasma membrane Ca2+ATPase,isoform 2 in the mammalian brain.This highly efficient plasma membrane calcium transporter protein is enriched within the main output neurons of the cerebellar cortex;i.e. the Purkinje neurons(PNs) .Here we review recent evidence,including electrophysiological and calcium imaging approaches using the plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2(PMCA2) knockout mouse,to show that PMCA2 is critical for the physiological control of calcium at cerebellar synapses and cerebellar dependent behaviour.These studies have also revealed that deletionof PMCA2 throughout cerebellar development in the PMCA2 knockout mouse leads to permanent signalling and morphological alterations in the PN dendrites. Whilst these findings highlight the importance of PMCA2 during cerebellar synapse function and development,they also reveal some limitations in the use of the PMCA2 knockout mouse and the need for additional experimental approaches including cell-specific and reversible manipulation of PMCAs.

  11. Neuroprotective Effect of Carnosine on Primary Culture of Rat Cerebellar Cells under Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopachev, A V; Lopacheva, O M; Abaimov, D A; Koroleva, O V; Vladychenskaya, E A; Erukhimovich, A A; Fedorova, T N

    2016-05-01

    Dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is a natural antioxidant, but its protective effect under oxidative stress induced by neurotoxins is studied insufficiently. In this work, we show the neuroprotective effect of carnosine in primary cultures of rat cerebellar cells under oxidative stress induced by 1 mM 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride (AAPH), which directly generates free radicals both in the medium and in the cells, and 20 nM rotenone, which increases the amount of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In both models, adding 2 mM carnosine to the incubation medium decreased cell death calculated using fluorescence microscopy and enhanced cell viability estimated by the MTT assay. The antioxidant effect of carnosine inside cultured cells was demonstrated using the fluorescence probe dichlorofluorescein. Carnosine reduced by half the increase in the number of ROS in neurons induced by 20 nM rotenone. Using iron-induced chemiluminescence, we showed that preincubation of primary neuronal cultures with 2 mM carnosine prevents the decrease in endogenous antioxidant potential of cells induced by 1 mM AAPH and 20 nM rotenone. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we showed that a 10-min incubation of neuronal cultures with 2 mM carnosine leads to a 14.5-fold increase in carnosine content in cell lysates. Thus, carnosine is able to penetrate neurons and exerts an antioxidant effect. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of the peptide transporter PEPT2 in rat cerebellar cells, which suggests the possibility of carnosine transport into the cells. At the same time, Western blot analysis showed no carnosine-induced changes in the level of apoptosis regulating proteins of the Bcl-2 family and in the phosphorylation of MAP kinases, which suggests that carnosine could have minimal or no side effects on proliferation and apoptosis control systems in normal cells. PMID:27297901

  12. Glutamate-induced protein phosphorylation in cerebellar granule cells: role of protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eboli, M L; Mercanti, D; Ciotti, M T; Aquino, A; Castellani, L

    1994-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation in response to toxic doses of glutamate has been investigated in cerebellar granule cells. 32P-labelled cells have been stimulated with 100 microM glutamate for up to 20 min and analysed by one and two dimensional gel electrophoresis. A progressive incorporation of label is observed in two molecular species of about 80 and 43 kDa (PP80 and PP43) and acidic isoelectric point. Glutamate-stimulated phosphorylation is greatly reduced by antagonists of NMDA and non-NMDA glutamate receptors. The effect of glutamate is mimicked by phorbol esters and is markedly reduced by inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) such as staurosporine and calphostin C. PP80 has been identified by Western blot analysis as the PKC substrate MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate), while antibody to GAP-43 (growth associated protein-43), the nervous tissue-specific substrate of PKC, failed to recognize PP43. Our results suggest that PKC is responsible for the early phosphorylative events induced by toxic doses of glutamate in cerebellar granule cells. PMID:7891841

  13. Flavoprotein imaging in the cerebellar cortex in vivo: cellular and metabolic basis and insights into cerebellar function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wangcai; Chen, Gang; Ebner, Timothy J.

    2009-02-01

    Flavoprotein autofluorescence is an activity dependent intrinsic signal. Flavoproteins are involved in the electron transport chain and change their fluorescence according to the cellular redox state. We have been using flavoprotein autofluorescence in the cerebellum to examine properties of cerebellar circuits. Studies have also focused on understanding the cellular and metabolic origins of this intrinsic optical signal. Parallel fiber stimulation evokes a beamlike response intersected by bands of decreased fluorescence. The beam response is biphasic, with an early fluorescence increase (light phase) followed by a slower decrease (dark phase). We show this signal originates from flavoproteins as determined by its wavelength selectivity and sensitivity to blockers of the electron transport chain. Selectively blocking glutamate receptors abolished the on-beam light phase with the dark phase remaining intact. This demonstrates that the light phase is due to postsynaptic neuronal activation and suggests the dark phase is primarily due to glial activation. The bands of reduced fluorescence intersecting the beam are primarily neuronal in origin, mediated by GABAergic transmission, and due to the inhibitory action of molecular layer interneurons on Purkinje cells and the interneurons themselves. This parasagittally organized molecular layer inhibition differentially modulates the spatial pattern of cerebellar cortical activity. Flavoprotein imaging also reveals the functional architectures underlying the responses to inferior olive and peripheral whisker pad stimulation. Therefore, flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging is providing new insights into cerebellar cortical function and neurometabolic coupling.

  14. Age-related changes of structures in cerebellar cortex of cat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Changzheng Zhang; Tianmiao Hua; Zaiman Zhu; Xun Luo

    2006-03-01

    We studied the structures of the cerebellar cortex of young adult and old cats for age-related changes, which were statistically analysed. Nissl staining was used to visualize the cortical neurons. The immunohistochemical method was used to display glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive (IR) astrocytes and neurofilament-immunoreactive (NF-IR) neurons. Under the microscope, the thickness of the cerebellar cortex was measured; and the density of neurons in all the layers as well as that of GFAP-IR cells in the granular layer was analysed. Compared with young adult cats, the thickness of the molecular layer and total cerebellar cortex was significantly decreased in old cats, and that of the granular layer increased. The density of neurons in each layer was significantly lower in old cats than in young adult ones. Astrocytes in old cats were significantly denser than in young adult ones, and accompanied by evident hypertrophy of the cell bodies and enhanced immunoreaction of GFAP substance. Purkinje cells (PCs) in old cats showed much fewer NF-IR dendrites than those in young adults. The above findings indicate a loss of neurons and decrease in the number of dendrites of the PCs in the aged cerebellar cortex, which might underlie the functional decline of afferent efficacy and information integration in the senescent cerebellum. An age-dependent enhancement of activity of the astrocytes may exert a protective effect on neurons in the aged cerebellum.

  15. The survival of cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells is not dependent on elevated potassium-ion concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Hack, N; Balázs, R;

    1994-01-01

    The effects of K(+)-induced membrane depolarization were studied on the survival and biochemical parameters in mouse and rat cerebellar granule cells grown in micro-well cultures. Cell numbers were determined by estimating DNA content using the Hoechst 33258 fluorochrome binding assay. DNA from d...

  16. Temporal development of GABA agonist induced alterations in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, G H; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A;

    1987-01-01

    The temporal development of the effect of THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) on the ultrastructure composition and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells was investigated by quantitative electron microscopy (morphometric analysis) and GABA binding assays. It was...... exposed to THIP (150 microM) for 3 hr low affinity GABA receptors were induced. These findings show that the effect of THIP on the ultrastructure composition and GABA receptor expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells may be interrelated and moreover it is likely that the turn-over of GABA receptors...

  17. Bmi1 overexpression in the cerebellar granule cell lineage of mice affects cell proliferation and survival without initiating medulloblastoma formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hourinaz Behesti

    2013-01-01

    BMI1 is a potent inducer of neural stem cell self-renewal and neural progenitor cell proliferation during development and in adult tissue homeostasis. It is overexpressed in numerous human cancers – including medulloblastomas, in which its functional role is unclear. We generated transgenic mouse lines with targeted overexpression of Bmi1 in the cerebellar granule cell lineage, a cell type that has been shown to act as a cell of origin for medulloblastomas. Overexpression of Bmi1 in granule cell progenitors (GCPs led to a decrease in cerebellar size due to decreased GCP proliferation and repression of the expression of cyclin genes, whereas Bmi1 overexpression in postmitotic granule cells improved cell survival in response to stress by altering the expression of genes in the mitochondrial cell death pathway and of Myc and Lef-1. Although no medulloblastomas developed in ageing cohorts of transgenic mice, crosses with Trp53−/− mice resulted in a low incidence of medulloblastoma formation. Furthermore, analysis of a large collection of primary human medulloblastomas revealed that tumours with a BMI1high TP53low molecular profile are significantly enriched in Group 4 human medulloblastomas. Our data suggest that different levels and timing of Bmi1 overexpression yield distinct cellular outcomes within the same cellular lineage. Importantly, Bmi1 overexpression at the GCP stage does not induce tumour formation, suggesting that BMI1 overexpression in GCP-derived human medulloblastomas probably occurs during later stages of oncogenesis and might serve to enhance tumour cell survival.

  18. A role for protein phosphatases 1, 2A, and 2B in cerebellar long-term potentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Belmeguenai, A.; Hansel, Christian

    2005-01-01

    textabstractCerebellar parallel fiber (PF)-Purkinje cell (PC) synapses can undergo postsynaptically expressed long-term depression (LTD) or long-term potentiation (LTP). PF-LTD induction requires the coactivity of the PF and CF (climbing fiber) inputs to PCs and a concomitant calcium transient and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). PF-LTP can be induced by PF activity alone and requires a lower calcium transient for its induction than PF-LTD. The cellular events triggering PF-LTP induction...

  19. Properties of bilateral spinocerebellar activation of cerebellar cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontus eGeborek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to explore the cerebellar cortical inputs from two spinocerebellar pathways, the spinal border cell-component of the ventral spinocerebellar tract (SBC-VSCT and the dorsal spinocerebellar tract (DSCT, respectively, in the sublobule C1 of the cerebellar posterior lobe. The two pathways were activated by electrical stimulation of the contralateral lateral funiculus (coLF and the ipsilateral LF (iLF at lower thoracic levels. Most granule cells in sublobule C1 did not respond at all but part of the granule cell population displayed high-intensity responses to either coLF or iLF stimulation. As a rule, Golgi cells and Purkinje cell simple spikes responded to input from both LFs, although Golgi cells could be more selective. In addition, a small population of granule cells responded to input from both the coLF and the iLF. However, in these cases, similarities in the temporal topography and magnitude of the responses suggested that the same axons were stimulated from the two LFs, i.e. that the axons of individual spinocerebellar neurons could be present in both funiculi. This was also confirmed for a population of spinal neurons located within known locations of SBC-VSCT neurons and dorsal horn DSCT neurons. We conclude that bilateral spinocerebellar responses can occur in cerebellar granule cells, but the VSCT and DSCT systems that provide the input can also be organized bilaterally. The implications for the traditional functional separation of VSCT and DSCT systems and the issue whether granule cells primarily integrate functionally similar information or not are discussed.

  20. Alterations in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of Purkinje neurons in a rat model of hepatic encephalopathy: Relative preventing effect of PPARγ agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Iraj; Hajali, Vahid; Dehpour, Ahmadreza; Haghani, Masoud; Sheibani, Vahid; Shabani, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    Patients suffering from hepatic cirrhosis (HC) have been shown to have motor and cognitive impairments. The cerebellum, which controls coordinated and rapid movements, is a potential target for the deleterious effects of hyperammonemia induced by bile duct ligation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms of motor impairments observed in a rat model of HC and second objective of the current study was to evaluate the possible protective effect of pioglitazone (PIO) on these impairments. Male Wistar rats were used in the current study. Bile duct ligation (BDL) surgery was performed and pioglitazone administration was started two weeks after the surgery for the next four weeks. The effects of pioglitazone on BDL-induced electrophysiological changes of the Purkinje cerebellum neurons were evaluated by Whole-cell patch clamp recordings. Purkinje neurons from the BDL group exhibited significant changes in a number of electrophysiological properties and some alterations partially were counteracted by activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. Purkinje cells from BDL groups showed a significant increase in the spontaneous firing frequency followed by a decrease in the action potential duration of half-amplitude and spike interval. Chronic administration of pioglitazone could contract this effect of BDL on event frequency and interevent interval, though the difference with the sham group was still significant in the duration of action potential. Results of the current study raise the possibility that BDL may profoundly affect the intrinsic membrane properties of the cerebellar Purkinje neurons and PIO administration can counteract some of these effects. PMID:26704786

  1. Reappraisal of Bergmann glial cells as modulators of cerebellar circuit function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris I De Zeeuw

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Just as there is a huge morphological and functional diversity of neuron types specialized for specific aspects of information processing in the brain, astrocytes have equally distinct morphologies and functions that aid optimal functioning of the circuits in which they are embedded. One type of astrocyte, the Bergmann glial cell of the cerebellum, is a prime example of a highly diversified astrocyte type, the architecture of which is adapted to the cerebellar circuit and facilitates an impressive range of functions that optimize information processing in the adult brain. In this review we expand on the function of the Bergmann glial cell in the cerebellum to highlight the importance of astrocytes not only in housekeeping functions, but also in contributing to plasticity and information processing in the cerebellum.

  2. Stimulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor has a trophic effect on differentiating cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1988-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) supplementation of cerebellar cultures enriched in granule neurones (about 90%) prevented the extensive cell loss which occurs when cultivation takes place, in serum containing media, in the presence of 'low' K+ (5-15 mM). Estimation of tetanus toxin receptors and N-CA...

  3. Cerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and olivopontocerebellar degeneration, progressive degenerative disorders in which cerebellar degeneration is a key feature Friedreich’s ataxia, and other spinocerebellar ataxias, which are caused by ...

  4. [An acute severe heat stroke patient showing abnormal diffuse high intensity of the cerebellar cortex in diffusion weighted image: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Yusuke; Yasui, Keizo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Akira; Sobue, Gen

    2009-10-01

    A 47-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of general convulsion, loss of consciousness and hyperthermia. A diagnosis of acute heat stroke was made clinically and neuroradiologically. As the consciousness level ameliorated, he developed severe abulia and mutism, then cerebellar ataxic syndrome (viz. truncal ataxia, hypermetria, ataxic speech and nystagmus). An MRI (diffusion weighted image; DWI) disclosed abnormal diffuse high signal intensity of the cerebellar cortex with reduced apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Two months later after the onset, truncal ataxia and dysarthria significantly improved, while dysmetria of the extremities rather worsened. At that time, the abnormal signal intensity of the cerebellar cortex disappeared, and the cerebellum became atrophic. The cerebellar blood flow was significantly decreased on brain SPECT (99mTc-ECD). The abnormal DWI signal intensity of the cerebellar cortex in the present patient may represent the cytotoxic edema of Purkinje cells resulting from heat stroke-related hyperthermia It is essential to repeat MRI examination for cerebellar pathology and to obtain better insight into sequelae in patients with acute heat stroke. Protirelin tartrate seemed to be valid for improvement of abulia in the present patient. Further study is indicated. PMID:19999144

  5. 大剂量苯巴比妥对惊厥幼鼠浦肯野细胞电生理功能的影响%Effect of high-dose phenobarbital on electrophysiological characteristics of Purkinje cells in neonatal rats with seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭晓丽; 师长宏; 任颖鸽; 杜永平; 张月萍

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of single high-dose phenobarbital (PB) on the electrophysiological characteristics of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) in neonatal rats with seizures.METHODS:Seven-day-old Sprague-Daw-ley neonatal rats were randomly divided into control group , seizure group and PB group.Seizures were induced by pentet-razole (60 mg/kg, ip), and PB (120 mg/kg, ip) was applied to neonatal rats in PB group .The evoked action potential and excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) long-term depression (LTD) of the PCs were recorded by the technique of whole-cell patch clamp on the cerebellar slices .RESULTS:PB decreased the threshold of action potential in the PCs and increased the fire rate.During the first 15 min after stimulation, LTD was induced, and the inhibition of EPSC of the PCs was enhanced significantly by PB .CONCLUSION:Single high-dose PB increases the excitability of PCs and changes the synaptic functions of cerebellar PCs in the neonatal rats with seizures .%目的:研究单次大剂量苯巴比妥对惊厥幼鼠小脑浦肯野细胞(Purkinje cells, PCs)电生理功能的影响。方法:将健康新生7 d (P7) SD幼鼠随机分为正常对照组、惊厥模型组和苯巴比妥组。给予幼鼠腹腔注射戊四氮60 mg/kg制作惊厥模型。苯巴比妥按120 mg/kg一次性腹腔注射。采用全细胞膜片钳记录法在小脑脑片上记录小脑PCs动作电位及PCs兴奋性突触后电流(excitatory postsynaptic current , EPSC)的长时程抑制(long-term depression, LTD)。结果:(1)苯巴比妥组幼鼠小脑PCs诱发动作电位的阈值降低,频率增高。(2)苯巴比妥组幼鼠小脑PCs EPSC幅值在低频刺激后15 min内降低的幅度显著大于其它2组。结论:单次大剂量苯巴比妥增加了惊厥幼鼠小脑PCs的兴奋性,并改变了小脑PCs的突触功能。

  6. Electrophysiological, morphological, and topological properties of two histochemically distinct subpopulations of cerebellar unipolar brush cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Ah; Sekerková, Gabriella; Mugnaini, Enrico; Martina, Marco

    2012-12-01

    Unipolar brush cells (UBCs) are excitatory cerebellar granular layer interneurons whose brush-like dendrites receive one-to-one mossy fiber inputs. Subclasses of UBCs differ primarily by expressing metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 1α or calretinin. We used GENSAT Tg(Grp-EGFP) BAC transgenic mice, which selectively express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in mGluR1α-positive UBCs to compare the functional properties of the two subclasses. Compared to EGFP-negative UBCs, which include the calretinin-positive cells, EGFP-positive UBCs had smaller somata (area 48 vs 63 μm(2)), lower specific membrane resistance (6.4 vs. 13.7 KΩ cm(2)), were less prone to intrinsic firing, and showed more irregular firing (in cell-attached ~49 % were firing vs. ~88 %, and the CV was 0.53 vs. 0.32 for EGFP-negative cells). Some of these differences are attributable to higher density of background K(+) currents in EGFP-positive cells (at -120 mV, the barium-sensitive current was 94 vs. 37 pA in EGFP-negative cells); Ih, on the contrary, was more abundantly expressed in EGFP-negative cells (at -140 mV, it was -122 vs. -54 pA in EGFP-positive neurons); furthermore, while group II mGluR modulation of the background potassium current in EGFP-negative UBCs was maintained after intracellular dialysis, mGluR modulation in EGFP-positive UBCs was lost in whole-cell recordings. Finally, cell-attached firing was reversibly abolished by the GABA(B) activation in EGFP-positive, but not in EGFP-negative UBCs. Immunohistochemistry showed that EGFP-negative UBCs express GIRK2 at high density, while mGluR1α UBCs are GIRK2 negative, suggesting that GIRK2 mediates the mGluR-sensitive current in EGFP-negative UBCs. These data suggest that the two subclasses perform different functions in the cerebellar microcircuits. PMID:22528965

  7. The effect of hydroxylated PCBs on DCF-fluorescence and cell death in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonnum, F.; Dreiem, A.; Rykken, S. [Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (Norway); Lehmler, H.Y.; Robertson, L. [Univ. of Iowa (United States); Mariussen, E. [Norwegian Inst. for Air Research (Norway)

    2004-09-15

    We have previously investigated the effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on free radical formation and cell death in cerebellar granule cells. PCBs may be metabolised to hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (HO-PCBs) in the body. Therefore, we wanted to expand our study to include also the HO-PCBs. After hydroxylation, many of the PCBs are conjugated to either glucoronic acid or sulphate, which facilitates their excretion. Nevertheless, some of the HO-PCBs are retained in the body. The structures of some of the HO-PCBs show a certain similarity to the structure of the cathecholamines, and PCBs have been shown to affect the level of cathecholamines in the brain. Therefore, we compared the effect of some HO-PCBs with the effects of PCBs on some important physiological parameters in the brain. In the present communication we have compared the effects of PCB and HO-PCB on formation of DCF-fluorescence, which is used as a measure of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and cell death in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

  8. GABA agonist promoted formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells is restricted to early development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A;

    1988-01-01

    The ability of the GABA receptor agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) to promote formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells was tested using primary cultures of these neurons. Granule cells were exposed to THIP (150 microM) for 6 hr after......, respectively, 4, 7, 10 and 14 days in culture. It was found that THIP treatment of 4- and 7-day-old cultures led to formation of low affinity GABA receptors, whereas such receptors could not be detected after THIP treatment in the older cultures (10 and 14 days) in spite of the fact that these cultured granule...... cells expressed a high density of high affinity GABA receptors. It is concluded that the ability of THIP to promote formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells is restricted to an early developmental period....

  9. Effects of long-term hypothyroidism in the morphology and synaptic organization of cerebellar ectopic granule cells

    OpenAIRE

    Madeira, M. D.; Azevedo, F.P.; Paula-Barbosa, M M

    1988-01-01

    Abundant ectopic granule cells scattered in the cerebellar molecular layer have been observed in 30- day-old hypothyroid rats. Their morphological features indicate that they must be regarded as mature heterotopic cells arrested during their migration towards the granular layer. As their impoverished dendritic trees are identical to those seen in controls, it is unlikely that the lack of thyroid hormones played a major role in the deficient dendritic outgrowth....

  10. Somatostatin receptors are expressed by immature cerebellar granule cells: evidence for a direct inhibitory effect of somatostatin on neuroblast activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, B; Leroux, P.; Lamacz, M; Bodenant, C; Balazs, R.; Vaudry, H.

    1992-01-01

    Somatostatin and somatostatin receptors are transiently expressed in the immature rat cerebellar cortex but virtually undetectable in the cerebellum of adults. Although somatostatin binding sites have been visualized during the postnatal period in the external granule cell layer, the type of cell that expresses somatostatin receptors has never been identified; thus, the potential function of somatostatin in the developing cerebellum remains unknown. In the present study, we have taken advanta...

  11. Development of the cerebellar body in sharks: spatiotemporal relations of Pax6 expression, cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Moldes, Isabel; Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Carrera, Iván; Sueiro, Catalina; Candal, Eva; Mazan, Sylvie; Anadón, Ramón

    2008-02-20

    We have studied the patterns of cell proliferation, regional organization and differentiation in the cerebellar body of embryos and juveniles of two shark species by immunohistochemistry with antibodies against proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Pax6, reelin (RELN), GABA, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and calretinin (CR). The organization of Pax6-expressing cells was also studied by in situ hybridization. Our results reveal that a transient secondary matrix zone, the external germinal layer, is formed in sharks at early stages of cerebellar development and is the source of the earliest Pax6-expressing (granule) cells. Later in development, new granule Pax6-expressing cells arise from medial proliferation zones and accumulate medially in the granular eminences. The GABAergic components appear very early, and show clear regional differences. The medial proliferation zones remain active even in adults. Taken together, the proliferation and differentiation markers used in the present study highlight striking similarities during development between the cerebellar body of elasmobranchs and the cerebella of tetrapods. These results show the importance of elasmobranch models to reconstruct the evolutionary developmental history of the vertebrate cerebellum. PMID:18249069

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor induces post-lesion transcommissural growth of olivary axons that develop normal climbing fibers on mature Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Kirsty J; Sherrard, Rachel M

    2006-11-01

    In the adult mammalian central nervous system, reinnervation and recovery from trauma is limited. During development, however, post-lesion plasticity may generate alternate paths providing models to investigate factors that promote reinnervation to appropriate targets. Following unilateral transection of the neonatal rat olivocerebellar pathway, axons from the remaining inferior olive reinnervate the denervated hemicerebellum and develop climbing fiber arbors on Purkinje cells. However, the capacity to recreate this accurate target reinnervation in a mature system remains unknown. In rats lesioned on day 15 (P15) or 30 and treated with intracerebellar injection of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or vehicle 24 h later, the morphology and organisation of transcommissural olivocerebellar reinnervation was examined using neuronal tracing and immunohistochemistry. In all animals BDNF, but not vehicle, induced transcommissural olivocerebellar axonal growth into the denervated hemicerebellum. The distribution of reinnervating climbing fibers was not confined to the injection sites but extended throughout the denervated hemivermis and, less densely, up to 3.5 mm into the hemisphere. Transcommissural olivocerebellar axons were organised into parasagittal microzones that were almost symmetrical to those in the right hemicerebellum. Reinnervating climbing fiber arbors were predominantly normal, but in the P30-lesioned group 10% were either branched within the molecular layer forming a smaller secondary arbor or were less branched, and in the P15 lesion group the reinnervating arbors extended their terminals almost to the pial surface and were larger than control arbors (P < 0.02). These results show that BDNF can induce transcommissural olivocerebellar reinnervation, which resembles developmental neuroplasticity to promote appropriate target reinnervation in a mature environment. PMID:16790241

  13. Electrophysiological mapping of novel prefrontal - cerebellar pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Jones

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Whilst the cerebellum is predominantly considered a sensorimotor control structure, accumulating evidence suggests that it may also subserve non motor functions during cognition. However, this possibility is not universally accepted, not least because the nature and pattern of links between higher cortical structures and the cerebellum are poorly characterized. We have therefore used in vivo electrophysiological methods in anaesthetized rats to directly investigate connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex (prelimbic subdivision, PrL and the cerebellum. Stimulation of deep layers of PrL evoked distinct field potentials in the cerebellar cortex with a mean latency to peak of approximately 35ms. These responses showed a well-defined topography, and were maximal in lobule VII of the contralateral vermis (a known oculomotor centre; they were not attenuated by local anesthesia of the overlying M2 motor cortex, though M2 stimulation did evoke field potentials in lobule VII with a shorter latency. Single-unit recordings showed that prelimbic cortical stimulation elicits complex spikes in lobule VII Purkinje cells, indicating transmission via a previously undescribed cerebro-olivocerebellar pathway. Our results therefore establish a physiological basis for communication between PrL and the cerebellum. The role(s of this pathway remain to be resolved, but presumably relate to control of eye movements and/or distributed networks associated with integrated prefrontal cortical functions.

  14. Developmental features of rat cerebellar neural cells cultured in a chemically defined medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied some aspects of the differentiation of rat cerebellar neural cells obtained from 8-day postnatal animals and cultured in a serum-free, chemically defined medium (CDM). The ability of the cells to take up radioactive transmitter amino acids was analyzed autoradiographically. The L-glutamate analogue 3H-D-aspartate was taken up by astroglial cells, but not by granule neurons, even in late cultures (20 days in vitro). This is in agreement with the lack of depolarization-induced release of 3H-D-aspartate previously observed in this type of culture. In contrast, 3H-(GABA) was scarcely accumulated by glial-fibrillary-acidic-protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes, but taken up by glutamate-decarboxylase-positive inhibitory interneurons and was released in a Ca2+-dependent way upon depolarization: 3H-GABA evoked release progressively increased with time in culture. Interestingly, the expression of the vesicle-associated protein synapsin I was much reduced in granule cells cultured in CDM as compared to those maintained in the presence of serum. These data would indicate that in CDM the differentiation of granule neurons is not complete, while that of GABAergic neurons is not greatly affected. Whether the diminished differentiation of granule cells must be attributed only to serum deprivation or also to other differences in the composition of the culture medium remains to be established. 3H-GABA was avidly taken up also by a population of cells which were not recognized by antibodies raised against GFAP, glutamate decarboxylase, and microtubule-associated protein 2. These cells have been characterized as bipotential precursors of oligodendrocytes and of a subpopulation of astrocytes bearing a stellate shape and capable of high-affinity 3H-GABA uptake

  15. Cerebellar Hypoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorders that begin in early childhood, such as ataxia telangiectasia. In an infant or young child, symptoms of a disorder that features cerebellar hypoplasia might include floppy muscle tone, developmental or ...

  16. Expression of NR2B in cerebellar granule cells specifically facilitates effect of motor training on motor learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Jiao

    Full Text Available It is believed that gene/environment interaction (GEI plays a pivotal role in the development of motor skills, which are acquired via practicing or motor training. However, the underlying molecular/neuronal mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we reported that the expression of NR2B, a subunit of NMDA receptors, in cerebellar granule cells specifically enhanced the effect of voluntary motor training on motor learning in the mouse. Moreover, this effect was characterized as motor learning-specific and developmental stage-dependent, because neither emotional/spatial memory was affected nor was the enhanced motor learning observed when the motor training was conducted starting at the age of 3 months old in these transgenic mice. These results indicate that changes in the expression of gene(s that are involved in regulating synaptic plasticity in cerebellar granule cells may constitute a molecular basis for the cerebellum to be involved in the GEI by facilitating motor skill learning.

  17. Improved motor performance in Dyt1 ΔGAG heterozygous knock-in mice by cerebellar Purkinje-cell specific Dyt1 conditional knocking-out

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoi, Fumiaki; Dang, Mai Tu; Li, Yuqing

    2012-01-01

    Early-onset generalized torsion dystonia (dystonia 1) is an inherited movement disorder caused by mutations in DYT1 (TOR1A), which codes for torsinA. Most patients have a 3-base pair deletion (ΔGAG) in one allele of DYT1, corresponding to a loss of a glutamic acid residue (ΔE) in the C-terminal region of the protein. Functional alterations in basal ganglia circuits and the cerebellum have been reported in dystonia. Pharmacological manipulations or mutations in genes that result in functional ...

  18. Forward transport of proteins in the plasma membrane of migrating cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; She, Liang; Sui, Ya-nan; Yuan, Xiao-bing; Wen, Yunqing; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-12-18

    Directional flow of membrane components has been detected at the leading front of fibroblasts and the growth cone of neuronal processes, but whether there exists global directional flow of plasma membrane components over the entire migrating neuron remains largely unknown. By analyzing the trajectories of antibody-coated single quantum dots (QDs) bound to two membrane proteins, overexpressed myc-tagged synaptic vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP2 and endogenous neurotrophin receptor TrkB, we found that these two proteins exhibited net forward transport, which is superimposed upon Brownian motion, in both leading and trailing processes of migrating cerebellar granule cells in culture. Furthermore, no net directional transport of membrane proteins was observed in nonmigrating cells with either growing or stalling leading processes. Analysis of the correlation of motion direction between two QDs on the same process in migrating neurons also showed a higher frequency of correlated forward than rearward movements. Such correlated QD movements were markedly reduced in the presence of myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin,suggesting the involvement of myosin II-dependent active transport processes. Thus, a net forward transport of plasma membrane proteins exists in the leading and trailing processes of migrating neurons, in line with the translocation of the soma. PMID:23213239

  19. Mefenamic acid bi-directionally modulates the transient outward K+ current in rat cerebellar granule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on ion channels has been widely studied in several cell models, but less is known about their modulatory mechanisms. In this report, the effect of mefenamic acid on voltage-activated transient outward K+ current (IA) in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells was investigated. At a concentration of 5 μM to 100 μM, mefenamic acid reversibly inhibited IA in a dose-dependent manner. However, mefenamic acid at a concentration of 1 μM significantly increased the amplitude of IA to 113 ± 1.5% of the control. At more than 10 μM, mefenamic acid inhibited the amplitude of IA without any effect on activation or inactivation. In addition, a higher concentration of mefenamic acid induced a significant acceleration of recovery from inactivation with an increase of the peak amplitude elicited by the second test pulse. Intracellular application of mefenamic acid could significantly increase the amplitude of IA, but had no effect on the inhibition induced by extracellular mefenamic acid, implying that mefenamic acid may exert its effect from both inside and outside the ion channel. Furthermore, the activation of current induced by intracellular application of mefenamic acid was mimicked by other cyclooxygenase inhibitors and arachidonic acid. Our data demonstrate that mefenamic acid is able to bi-directionally modulate IA channels in neurons at different concentrations and by different methods of application, and two different mechanisms may be involved

  20. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide protects rat cerebellar granule neurons against ethanol-induced apoptotic cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Vaudry, David; Rousselle, Cécile; Basille, Magali; Falluel-Morel, Anthony; Pamantung, Tommy F.; Fontaine, Marc; Fournier, Alain; Vaudry, Hubert; Gonzalez, Bruno J

    2002-01-01

    Alcohol exposure during development can cause brain malformations and neurobehavioral abnormalities. In view of the teratogenicity of ethanol, identification of molecules that could counteract the neurotoxic effects of alcohol deserves high priority. Here, we report that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) can prevent the deleterious effect of ethanol on neuronal precursors. Exposure of cultured cerebellar granule cells to ethanol inhibited neurite outgrowth and provoke...

  1. Depletion of polyamines prevents the neurotrophic activity of the GABA-agonist THIP in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abraham, J H; Hansen, Gert Helge; Seiler, N; Schousboe, A

    1993-01-01

    Effects of polyamine depletion by alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) were studied on the GABA-agonist mediated enhancement of the morphological development of cultured rat cerebellar granule cells. An increase in the number of neurite extending cells and in the cytoplasmic density of organelles...... morphological development of the granule cell cultures. Thus, the number of neurite extending cells was reduced to 50% of the number in the control cultures upon culturing in the presence of DFMO alone or in combination with THIP. Moreover, the THIP mediated increase in the cytoplasmic density of rough...

  2. Model cerebellar granule cells can faithfully transmit modulated firing rate signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eRössert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A crucial assumption of many high-level system models of the cerebellum is that information in the granular layer is encoded in a linear manner. However, granule cells are known for their non-linear and resonant synaptic and intrinsic properties that could potentially impede linear signal transmission.In this modelling study we analyse how electrophysiological granule cell properties and spike sampling influence information coded by firing rate modulation, assuming no signal-related, i.e. uncorrelated inhibitory feedback (open-loop mode.A detailed one-compartment granule cell model was excited in simulation by either direct current or mossy-fibre synaptic inputs. Vestibular signals were represented as tonic inputs to the flocculus modulated at frequencies up to 20 Hz (approximate upper frequency limit of vestibular-ocular reflex, VOR. Model outputs were assessed using estimates of both the transfer function, and the fidelity of input-signal reconstruction measured as variance-accounted-for.The detailed granule cell model with realistic mossy-fibre synaptic inputs could transmit information faithfully and linearly in the frequency range of the vestibular-ocular reflex. This was achieved most simply if the model neurons had a firing rate at least twice the highest required frequency of modulation, but lower rates were also adequate provided a population of neurons was utilized, especially in combination with push-pull coding. The exact number of neurons required for faithful transmission depended on the precise values of firing rate and noise. The model neurons were also able to combine excitatory and inhibitory signals linearly, and could be replaced by a simpler (modified integrate-and-fire neuron in the case of high tonic firing rates.These findings suggest that granule cells can in principle code modulated firing-rate inputs in a linear manner, and are thus consistent with the high-level adaptive-filter model of the cerebellar microcircuit.

  3. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  4. Cerebellar nuclei neurons show only small excitatory responses to optogenetic olivary stimulation in transgenic mice: in vivo and in vitro studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huo eLu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To study the olivary input to the cerebellar nuclei (CN we used optogenetic stimulation in transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 in olivary neurons. We obtained in vivo extracellular Purkinje cell (PC and CN recordings in anesthetized mice while stimulating the contralateral inferior olive (IO with a blue laser (single pulse, 10 - 50 ms duration. Peri-stimulus histograms were constructed to show the spike rate changes after optical stimulation. Among 29 CN neurons recorded, 15 showed a decrease in spike rate of variable strength and duration, and only 1 showed a transient spiking response. These results suggest that direct olivary input to CN neurons is usually overridden by stronger Purkinje cell inhibition triggered by climbing fiber responses. To further investigate the direct input from the climbing fiber collaterals we also conducted whole cell recordings in brain slices, where we used local stimulation with blue light. Due to the expression of ChR2 in Purkinje cell axons as well as the IO in our transgenic line, strong inhibitory responses could be readily triggered with optical stimulation (13 of 15 neurons. After blocking this inhibition with GABAzine, only in 5 of 13 CN neurons weak excitatory responses were revealed. Therefore our in vitro results support the in vivo findings that the excitatory input to CN neurons from climbing fiber collaterals in adult mice is masked by the inhibition under normal conditions.

  5. Treadmill exercise improves motor coordination through ameliorating Purkinje cell loss in amyloid beta23-35-induced Alzheimer’s disease rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae-Min; Shin, Mal-Soon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Tae-Woon; Cho, Han-Sam; Kim, Chang-Ju; Jang, Myung-Soo; Kim, Tae-Wook; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Dong-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a most common age-related neurodegenerative disease. AD is characterized by a progressive loss of neurons causing cognitive dysfunction. The cerebellum is closely associated with integration of movement, including motor coordination, control, and equilibrium. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of tread-mill exercise on the survival of Purkinje neurons in relation with reactive astrocyte in the cerebellum using Aβ25–35–induced AD rats. AD was induced by a...

  6. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiping Zhang

    Full Text Available Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16 protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum.

  7. Genome-wide mRNA sequencing of a single canine cerebellar cortical degeneration case leads to the identification of a disease associated SPTBN2 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forman Oliver P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neonatal cerebellar cortical degeneration is a neurodegenerative disease described in several canine breeds including the Beagle. Affected Beagles are unable to ambulate normally from the onset of walking and the main pathological findings include Purkinje cell loss with swollen dendritic processes. Previous reports suggest an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The development of massively parallel sequencing techniques has presented the opportunity to investigate individual clinical cases using genome-wide sequencing approaches. We used genome-wide mRNA sequencing (mRNA-seq of cerebellum tissue from a single Beagle with neonatal cerebellar cortical degeneration as a method of candidate gene sequencing, with the aim of identifying the causal mutation. Results A four-week old Beagle dog presented with progressive signs of cerebellar ataxia and the owner elected euthanasia. Histopathology revealed findings consistent with cerebellar cortical degeneration. Genome-wide mRNA sequencing (mRNA-seq of RNA from cerebellum tissue was used as a method of candidate gene sequencing. After analysis of the canine orthologues of human spinocerebellar ataxia associated genes, we identified a homozygous 8 bp deletion in the β-III spectrin gene, SPTBN2, associated with spinocerebellar type 5 in humans. Genotype analysis of the sire, dam, ten clinically unaffected siblings, and an affected sibling from a previous litter, showed the mutation to fully segregate with the disorder. Previous studies have shown that β-III spectrin is critical for Purkinje cell development, and the absence of this protein can lead to cell damage through excitotoxicity, consistent with the observed Purkinje cell loss, degeneration of dendritic processes and associated neurological dysfunction in this Beagle. Conclusions An 8 bp deletion in the SPTBN2 gene encoding β-III spectrin is associated with neonatal cerebellar cortical degeneration in Beagle dogs

  8. The effects of black garlic (Allium sativum L.) ethanol extract on the estimated total number of Purkinje cells and motor coordination of male adolescent Wistar rats treated with monosodium glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminuddin, M; Partadiredja, G; Sari, D C R

    2015-03-01

    A number of studies have indicated that monosodium glutamate (MSG) might cause negative effects on the nervous system, including in the cerebellum. Garlic (Allium sativum) has long been known as a flavouring agent and a traditional remedy for various illnesses. The present study aimed at investigating the effects of garlic on the motor coordination and the number of Purkinje cells present in rats treated with MSG. A total of 25 male Wistar rats aged 4 to 5 weeks old were used in this study and were divided into five groups, namely a negative control (C-) group, which received 0.9 % NaCl solution, a positive control (C+) group, which received MSG, and three treated groups, which received 2 mg/g bw of MSG and 2.5 mg (T2.5), 5 mg (T5), or 10 mg (T10) of black garlic solution per oral administration (per 200 g bw), respectively. All treatments were carried out for 10 days. Upon the end of the treatment, the motor performance of all rats were tested using the rotarod apparatus. The rats were subsequently sacrificed, and the cerebella of the rats were processed for stereological analyses. It has been found that the number of Purkinje cells of the cerebella of all treated groups were significantly higher than that of the group treated with MSG only. No changes in motor coordination function were observed as a result of MSG treatment. PMID:24737450

  9. Distributed Circuit Plasticity: New Clues for the Cerebellar Mechanisms of Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Egidio; Mapelli, Lisa; Casellato, Claudia; Garrido, Jesus A; Luque, Niceto; Monaco, Jessica; Prestori, Francesca; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Ros, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The cerebellum is involved in learning and memory of sensory motor skills. However, the way this process takes place in local microcircuits is still unclear. The initial proposal, casted into the Motor Learning Theory, suggested that learning had to occur at the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse under supervision of climbing fibers. However, the uniqueness of this mechanism has been questioned, and multiple forms of long-term plasticity have been revealed at various locations in the cerebellar circuit, including synapses and neurons in the granular layer, molecular layer and deep-cerebellar nuclei. At present, more than 15 forms of plasticity have been reported. There has been a long debate on which plasticity is more relevant to specific aspects of learning, but this question turned out to be hard to answer using physiological analysis alone. Recent experiments and models making use of closed-loop robotic simulations are revealing a radically new view: one single form of plasticity is insufficient, while altogether, the different forms of plasticity can explain the multiplicity of properties characterizing cerebellar learning. These include multi-rate acquisition and extinction, reversibility, self-scalability, and generalization. Moreover, when the circuit embeds multiple forms of plasticity, it can easily cope with multiple behaviors endowing therefore the cerebellum with the properties needed to operate as an effective generalized forward controller. PMID:26304953

  10. Is Cerebellar Architecture Shaped by Sensory Ecology in the New Zealand Kiwi (Apteryx mantelli).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corfield, Jeremy R; Kolominsky, Jeffrey; Craciun, Iulia; Mulvany-Robbins, Bridget E; Wylie, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    Among some mammals and birds, the cerebellar architecture appears to be adapted to the animal's ecological niche, particularly their sensory ecology and behavior. This relationship is, however, not well understood. To explore this, we examined the expression of zebrin II (ZII) in the cerebellum of the kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), a fully nocturnal bird with auditory, tactile, and olfactory specializations and a reduced visual system. We predicted that the cerebellar architecture, particularly those regions receiving visual inputs and those that receive trigeminal afferents from their beak, would be modified in accordance with their unique way of life. The general stripe-and-transverse region architecture characteristic of birds is present in kiwi, with some differences. Folium IXcd was characterized by large ZII-positive stripes and all Purkinje cells in the flocculus were ZII positive, features that resemble those of small mammals and suggest a visual ecology unlike that of other birds. The central region in kiwi appeared reduced or modified, with folium IV containing ZII+/- stripes, unlike that of most birds, but similar to that of Chilean tinamous. It is possible that a reduced visual system has contributed to a small central region, although increased trigeminal input and flightlessness have undoubtedly played a role in shaping its architecture. Overall, like in mammals, the cerebellar architecture in kiwi and other birds may be substantially modified to serve a particular ecological niche, although we still require a larger comparative data set to fully understand this relationship. PMID:27192984

  11. [Cerebellar stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowski, Michał; Zimny, Anna; Paradowski, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar stroke belongs to a group of rare diseases of vascular origin. Cerebellum, supplied by three pairs of arteries (AICA, PICA, SCA) with many anastomoses between them is less susceptible for a stroke, especially ischemic one. Diagnosis of the stroke in this region is harder due to lower sensibility of commonly used CT of the head in case of stroke suspicion. The authors highlight clinical symptoms distinguishing between vascular territories or topographical locations of the stroke, diagnostic procedures, classical and surgical treatment, the most common misdiagnoses are also mentioned. The authors suggest a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm development, including rtPA treatment criteria for ischemic cerebellar stroke. PMID:26181157

  12. Proneurotrophin-3 promotes cell cycle withdrawal of developing cerebellar granule cell progenitors via the p75 neurotrophin receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Juan Pablo; Abercrombie, Elizabeth; Friedman, Wilma J

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cell progenitors (GCP) proliferate extensively in the external granule layer (EGL) of the developing cerebellum prior to differentiating and migrating. Mechanisms that regulate the appropriate timing of cell cycle withdrawal of these neuronal progenitors during brain development are not well defined. The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is highly expressed in the proliferating GCPs, but is downregulated once the cells leave the cell cycle. This receptor has primarily been characterized as a death receptor for its ability to induce neuronal apoptosis following injury. Here we demonstrate a novel function for p75NTR in regulating proper cell cycle exit of neuronal progenitors in the developing rat and mouse EGL, which is stimulated by proNT3. In the absence of p75NTR, GCPs continue to proliferate beyond their normal period, resulting in a larger cerebellum that persists into adulthood, with consequent motor deficits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16654.001 PMID:27434667

  13. Cerebellar abiotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBowes, R M; Leipold, H W; Turner-Beatty, M

    1987-08-01

    Cerebellar abiotrophy is a degenerative condition of Arabian horses that produces signs of head tremors and ataxia. Affected foals demonstrate clinical signs between the time of birth and 6 months of age. The condition is untreatable, although some animals have reportedly improved to varying degrees. The disease is believed to be inherited; however, definitive evidence is lacking at this time. PMID:3497695

  14. Casein Kinase 1δ Is an APC/CCdh1 Substrate that Regulates Cerebellar Granule Cell Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Penas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although casein kinase 1δ (CK1δ is at the center of multiple signaling pathways, its role in the expansion of CNS progenitor cells is unknown. Using mouse cerebellar granule cell progenitors (GCPs as a model for brain neurogenesis, we demonstrate that the loss of CK1δ or treatment of GCPs with a highly selective small molecule inhibits GCP expansion. In contrast, CK1δ overexpression increases GCP proliferation. Thus, CK1δ appears to regulate GCP neurogenesis. CK1δ is targeted for proteolysis via the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/CCdh1 ubiquitin ligase, and conditional deletion of the APC/CCdh1 activator Cdh1 in cerebellar GCPs results in higher levels of CK1δ. APC/CCdh1 also downregulates CK1δ during cell-cycle exit. Therefore, we conclude that APC/CCdh1 controls CK1δ levels to balance proliferation and cell-cycle exit in the developing CNS. Similar studies in medulloblastoma cells showed that CK1δ holds promise as a therapeutic target.

  15. Mitochondria and calcium flux as targets of neuroprotection caused by minocycline in cerebellar granule cells

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Martinez, Eva Maria; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Karachitos, Andonis; Bandez, Miguel J.; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco J.; Perez-Alvarez, Sergio; Mera, Raquel Maria Melero Fernandez De; Jordan, Maria J.; Aguirre, Norberto; Galindo, Maria F.; Villalobos, Carlos; Navarro, Ana; Kmita, Hanna; Jordán, Joaquín

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Minocycline, an antibiotic of the tetracycline family, has attracted considerable interest for its theoretical therapeutic applications in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanism of action underlying its effect remains elusive. Here we have studied the effect of minocycline under excitotoxic conditions. Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging studies in rat cerebellar granular neuron cultures using fura-2/AM and mitochondria-targeted aequorin revealed that mino...

  16. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase plays an important role in intermittent hypoxia-induced cell death in rat cerebellar granule cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Sheng-Chun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Episodic cessation of airflow during sleep in patients with sleep apnea syndrome results in intermittent hypoxia (IH. Our aim was to investigate the effects of IH on cerebellar granule cells and to identify the mechanism of IH-induced cell death. Methods Cerebellar granule cells were freshly prepared from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats. IH was created by culturing the cerebellar granule cells in the incubators with oscillating O2 concentration at 20% and 5% every 30 min for 1-4 days. The results of this study are based on image analysis using a confocal microscope and associated software. Cellular oxidative stress increased with increase in IH. In addition, the occurrence of cell death (apoptosis and necrosis increased as the duration of IH increased, but decreased in the presence of an iron chelator (phenanthroline or poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors [3-aminobenzamide (3-AB and DPQ]. The fluorescence of caspase-3 remained the same regardless of the duration of IH, and Western blots did not detect activation of caspase-3. However, IH increased the ratio of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF translocation to the nucleus, while PARP inhibitors (3-AB reduced this ratio. Results According to our findings, IH increased oxidative stress and subsequently leading to cell death. This effect was at least partially mediated by PARP activation, resulting in ATP depletion, calpain activation leading to AIF translocation to the nucleus. Conclusions We suggest that IH induces cell death in rat primary cerebellar granule cells by stimulating oxidative stress PARP-mediated calpain and AIF activation.

  17. A cerebellar model for predictive motor control tested in a brain-based device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinstry, Jeffrey L; Edelman, Gerald M; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2006-02-28

    The cerebellum is known to be critical for accurate adaptive control and motor learning. We propose here a mechanism by which the cerebellum may replace reflex control with predictive control. This mechanism is embedded in a learning rule (the delayed eligibility trace rule) in which synapses onto a Purkinje cell or onto a cell in the deep cerebellar nuclei become eligible for plasticity only after a fixed delay from the onset of suprathreshold presynaptic activity. To investigate the proposal that the cerebellum is a general-purpose predictive controller guided by a delayed eligibility trace rule, a computer model based on the anatomy and dynamics of the cerebellum was constructed. It contained components simulating cerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei, and it received input from a middle temporal visual area and the inferior olive. The model was incorporated in a real-world brain-based device (BBD) built on a Segway robotic platform that learned to traverse curved paths. The BBD learned which visual motion cues predicted impending collisions and used this experience to avoid path boundaries. During learning, the BBD adapted its velocity and turning rate to successfully traverse various curved paths. By examining neuronal activity and synaptic changes during this behavior, we found that the cerebellar circuit selectively responded to motion cues in specific receptive fields of simulated middle temporal visual areas. The system described here prompts several hypotheses about the relationship between perception and motor control and may be useful in the development of general-purpose motor learning systems for machines. PMID:16488974

  18. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls increase reactive oxygen species formation and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that bioaccumulate in the body, however, they can be metabolized to more water-soluble products. Although they are more readily excreted than the parent compounds, some of the metabolites are still hydrophobic and may be more available to target tissues, such as the brain. They can also cross the placenta and reach a developing foetus. Much less is known about the toxicity of PCB metabolites than about the parent compounds. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of eight hydroxylated (OH) PCB congeners (2'-OH PCB 3, 4-OH PCB 14, 4-OH PCB 34, 4'-OH PCB 35, 4-OH PCB 36, 4'-OH PCB 36, 4-OH PCB 39, and 4'-OH PCB 68) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and cell viability in rat cerebellar granule cells. We found that, similar to their parent compounds, OH-PCBs are potent ROS inducers with potency 4-OH PCB 14 < 4-OH PCB 36 < 4-OH PCB 34 < 4'-OH PCB 36 < 4'-OH PCB 68 < 4-OH PCB 39 < 4'-OH PCB 35. 4-OH PCB 36 was the most potent cell death inducer, and caused apoptotic or necrotic morphology depending on concentration. Inhibition of ERK1/2 kinase with U0126 reduced both cell death and ROS formation, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is involved in OH-PCB toxicity. The results indicate that the hydroxylation of PCBs may not constitute a detoxification reaction. Since OH-PCBs like their parent compounds are retained in the body and may be more widely distributed to sensitive tissues, it is important that not only the levels of the parent compounds but also the levels of their metabolites are taken into account during risk assessment of PCBs and related compounds.

  19. Light and electron microscopic localization of GABAA-receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes using immunohistochemical techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Hösli, E; Belhage, B;

    1991-01-01

    light microscope level specific staining of GABAA-receptors was localized in various types of neurones in explant cultures of rat cerebellum using the indirect peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) technique, whereas no specific staining was found in astrocytes. At the electron microscope level labeling of...... GABAA-receptors was observed in the plasma membrane of both the cell bodies and processes in dissociated primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells using an indirect preembedding immunogold staining technique which in contrast to the classical PAP technique allows quantitative estimations to be...... performed. Quantification of the labeling intensity revealed a higher concentration of GABAA-receptors per microns plasma membrane in the cell bodies than in the processes. In discrete areas an extremely high density of the GABAA-receptors was observed. No specific labeling of GABAA-receptors was observed...

  20. Selective stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptor subtypes and the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture: effect of kainic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1990-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture is promoted by treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate. Here we report on the influence of another glutamate analogue, kainic acid, which, in contrast to N-methyl-D-aspartate, is believed to stimulate transmitter rec...

  1. Automatic Detection of Purkinje Images' Horizontal Coordinates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Přečková, Petra

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2003), s. 47-59. ISSN 0301-5491 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : optometry * videometry * videooculography * purkinje image * position detection Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  2. Cerebellar Synaptic Plasticity and the Credit Assignment Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörntell, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism by which a learnt synaptic weight change can contribute to learning or adaptation of brain function is a type of credit assignment problem, which is a key issue for many parts of the brain. In the cerebellum, detailed knowledge not only of the local circuitry connectivity but also of the topography of different sources of afferent/external information makes this problem particularly tractable. In addition, multiple forms of synaptic plasticity and their general rules of induction have been identified. In this review, we will discuss the possible roles of synaptic and cellular plasticity at specific locations in contributing to behavioral changes. Focus will be on the parts of the cerebellum that are devoted to limb control, which constitute a large proportion of the cortex and where the knowledge of the external connectivity is particularly well known. From this perspective, a number of sites of synaptic plasticity appear to primarily have the function of balancing the overall level of activity in the cerebellar circuitry, whereas the locations at which synaptic plasticity leads to functional changes in terms of limb control are more limited. Specifically, the postsynaptic forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) at the parallel fiber synapses made on interneurons and Purkinje cells, respectively, are the types of plasticity that mediate the widest associative capacity and the tightest link between the synaptic change and the external functions that are to be controlled. PMID:25417189

  3. [EXPRESSION OF DOUBLECORTIN AND NeuN IN THE DEVELOPING CEREBELLAR NEURONS IN RAT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimatkin, S M; Karniushko, O A

    2016-01-01

    This work was performed on the offspring of 5 outbred female albino rats to give a comparative immunohistochemical evaluation of doublecortin (DCX) and NeuN expression in the neurons of the cerebellar cortex and nucleus interpositus in the early postnatal ontogenesis (postnatal days 2-15). DCX expression was detected in postmitotic neurons of the external granular layer and migrating neurons of the cerebellar cortex. At postnatal days 2 and 7 DCX expression in neocerebellum was higher than in paleocerebellum. NeuN expression was found to appear in migrating granule neurons, and reach the maximum in mature neurons of internal granular layer. DCX expression was not detected in Purkinje cells and in the nucleus interpositus of the cerebellum. In neurons of the nucleus interpositus the expression of NeuN progressively increased from postnatal days 2 to 15. Thus, a comparative immunohistochemical study of the dynamics of the expression of the pair of molecular markers studied proved to be an effective way of the assessment of the development of granular neurons of the cerebellum in early postnatal ontogenesis. PMID:27487661

  4. Circadian oscillations of molecular clock components in the cerebellar cortex of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten

    2012-01-01

    , recent studies have shown the presence of extrahypothalamic oscillators in other areas of the brain including the cerebellum. In the present study, the authors unravel the cerebellar molecular clock by analyzing clock gene expression in the cerebellum of the rat by use of radiochemical in situ...... hybridization and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The authors here show that all core clock genes, i.e., Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Clock, Arntl, and Nr1d1, as well as the clock-controlled gene Dbp, are expressed in the granular and Purkinje cell layers of the cerebellar cortex. Among these...... genes, Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Arntl, Nr1d1, and Dbp were found to exhibit circadian rhythms in a sequential temporal manner similar to that of the SCN, but with several hours of delay. The results of lesion studies indicate that the molecular oscillatory profiles of Per1, Per2, and Cry1 in the...

  5. Acute Ethanol Exposure Prevents PMA-mediated Augmentation of N-methyl-d-aspartate Receptor Function in Primary Cultured Cerebellar Granule Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Reneau, Jason; Reyland, Mary E.; Popp, R. Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Many intracellular proteins and signaling cascades contribute to the ethanol sensitivity of native N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). One putative protein is the serine / threonine kinase, Protein kinase C (PKC). The purpose of this study was to assess if PKC modulates the ethanol sensitivity of native NMDARs expressed in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). With the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we assessed if ethanol inhibition of NMDA-induced currents (INMDA) (100 μM...

  6. Cell-type-specific neuroanatomy of cliques of autism-related genes in the mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal eGrange

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Two cliques of genes identified computationally for their high co-expression in the mouse brain according to the Allen Brain Atlas, and for their enrichment in genes related to autism spectrum disorder, have recently been shown to be highly co-expressed in the cerebellar cortex, compared to what could be expected by chance. Moreover, the expression of these cliques of genes is not homogeneous across the cerebellar cortex, and it has been noted that their expression pattern seems to highlight the granular layer. However, this observation was only made by eye, and recent advances in computational neuroanatomy allow to rank cell types in the mouse brain (characterized by their transcriptome profiles according to the similarity between their spatial density profiles and the expression profiles of the cliques. We establish by Monte Carlo simulation that with probability at least 99%, the expression profiles of the two cliques are more similar to the density profile of granule cells than 99% of the expression of cliques containing the same number of genes (Purkinje cells also score above 99% in one of the cliques. Thresholding the expression profiles shows that the signal is more intense in the granular layer. Finally, we work out pairs of cell types whose combined expression profiles are more similar to the expression profiles of the cliquesthan any single cell type. These pairs predominantly consist of one cortical pyramidal cell and one cerebellar cell (whichcan be either a granule cell or a Purkinje cell.

  7. Cell-type-specific neuroanatomy of cliques of autism-related genes in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Pascal; Menashe, Idan; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Two cliques of genes identified computationally for their high co-expression in the mouse brain according to the Allen Brain Atlas, and for their enrichment in genes related to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), have recently been shown to be highly co-expressed in the cerebellar cortex, compared to what could be expected by chance. Moreover, the expression of these cliques of genes is not homogeneous across the cerebellar cortex, and it has been noted that their expression pattern seems to highlight the granular layer. However, this observation was only made by eye, and recent advances in computational neuroanatomy allow to rank cell types in the mouse brain (characterized by their transcriptome profiles) according to the similarity between their spatial density profiles and the spatial expression profiles of the cliques. We establish by Monte Carlo simulation that with probability at least 99%, the expression profiles of the two cliques are more similar to the density profile of granule cells than 99% of the expression of cliques containing the same number of genes (Purkinje cells also score above 99% in one of the cliques). Thresholding the expression profiles shows that the signal is more intense in the granular layer. Finally, we work out pairs of cell types whose combined expression profiles are more similar to the expression profiles of the cliques than any single cell type. These pairs predominantly consist of one cortical pyramidal cell and one cerebellar cell (which can be either a granule cell or a Purkinje cell). PMID:26074809

  8. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine L Dobson

    Full Text Available Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites-a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission.Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20 Wistar rats.Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine--intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling--had no impact on these effects.We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections.

  9. Endothelium in brain: Receptors, mitogenesis, and biosynthesis in glial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacCumber, M.W.; Ross, C.A.; Snyder, S.H. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-03-01

    The authors have explored the cellular loci of endothelin (ET) actions and formation in the brain, using cerebellar mutant mice was well as primary and continuous cell cultures. A glial role is favored by several observations: (1) mutant mice lacking neuronal Purkinje cells display normal ET receptor binding and enhanced stimulation by ET of inositolphospholipid turnover; (ii) in weaver mice lacking neuronal granule cells, ET stimulation of inositolphospholipid turnover is not significantly diminished; (iii) C{sub 6} glioma cells and primary cultures of cerebellar astroglia exhibit substantial ET receptor binding and ET-induced stimulation of inositolphospholipid turnover; (iv) ET promotes mitogenesis of C{sub 6} glioma cells and primary cerebellar astroglia; and (v) primary cultures of cerebellar astroglia contain ET mRNA. ET also appears to have a neuronal role, since it stimulates inositolphospholipid turnover in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells, and ET binding declines in granule cell-deficient mice. Thus, ET can be produced by glia and act upon both glia and neurons in a paracrine fashion.

  10. Low and high dietary folic acid levels perturb postnatal cerebellar morphology in growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partearroyo, Teresa; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Juliana; Peña-Melián, Ángel; Maestro-de-Las-Casas, Carmen; Úbeda, Natalia; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2016-06-01

    The brain is particularly sensitive to folate metabolic disturbances, because methyl groups are critical for brain functions. This study aimed to investigate the effects of different dietary levels of folic acid (FA) on postnatal cerebellar morphology, including the architecture and organisation of the various layers. A total of forty male OFA rats (a Sprague-Dawley strain), 5 weeks old, were classified into the following four dietary groups: FA deficient (0 mg/kg FA); FA supplemented (8 mg/kg FA); FA supra-supplemented (40 mg/kg FA); and control (2 mg/kg FA) (all n 10 per group). Rats were fed ad libitum for 30 d. The cerebellum was quickly removed and processed for histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Slides were immunostained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (to label Bergmann glia), calbindin (to label Purkinje cells) and NeuN (to label post-mitotic neurons). Microscopic analysis revealed two types of defect: partial disappearance of fissures and/or neuronal ectopia, primarily in supra-supplemented animals (incidence of 80 %, P≤0·01), but also in deficient and supplemented groups (incidence of 40 %, P≤0·05), compared with control animals. The primary fissure was predominantly affected, sometimes accompanied by defects in the secondary fissure. Our findings show that growing rats fed an FA-modified diet, including both deficient and supplemented diets, have an increased risk of disturbances in cerebellar corticogenesis. Defects caused by these diets may have functional consequences in later life. The present study is the first to demonstrate that cerebellar morphological defects can arise from deficient, as well as high, FA levels in the diet. PMID:27153204

  11. Robert Feulgen Prize Lecture. Grenzgänger: adult bone marrow cells populate the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priller, Josef

    2003-08-01

    While the brain has traditionally been considered a rather secluded site, recent studies suggest that adult bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells can generate glia and neurons in rodents and humans. Macrophages and microglia are the first to appear in the murine brain after transplantation of genetically marked BM cells. Within weeks after transplantation, some authors have found astrocytes and cells expressing neuronal antigens. We detected cerebellar Purkinje neurons and interneurons, such as basket cells, expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) 10-15 months after transplantation of GFP-labeled BM cells. The results push the boundaries of our classic view of lineage restriction. PMID:12898276

  12. Alteration of AMPA Receptor-Mediated Synaptic Transmission by Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 in Cerebellar Stellate Cells1 2 3

    OpenAIRE

    Maroteaux, Matthieu; Liu, Siqiong June

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The fluorescent dyes, Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 are commonly used to visualize dendritic structures and the localization of synapses, both of which are critical for the spatial and temporal integration of synaptic inputs. However, the effect of the dyes on synaptic transmission is not known. Here we investigated whether Alexa Fluor dyes alter the properties of synaptic currents mediated by two subtypes of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) at cerebellar stellate cell synapses. In naive mice, GluA...

  13. YB-1 is elevated in medulloblastoma and drives proliferation in Sonic hedgehog-dependent cerebellar granule neuron progenitor cells and medulloblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, A; Robitaille, M; Remke, M; Maier, C; Malhotra, A; Gregorieff, A; Wrana, J L; Taylor, M D; Angers, S; Kenney, A M

    2016-08-11

    Postnatal proliferation of cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNPs), proposed cells of origin for the SHH-associated subgroup of medulloblastoma, is driven by Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) in the developing cerebellum. Shh induces the oncogene Yes-associated protein (YAP), which drives IGF2 expression in CGNPs and mouse Shh-associated medulloblastomas. To determine how IGF2 expression is regulated downstream of YAP, we carried out an unbiased screen for transcriptional regulators bound to IGF2 promoters. We report that Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1), an onco-protein regulating transcription and translation, binds to IGF2 promoter P3. We observed that YB-1 is upregulated across human medulloblastoma subclasses as well as in other varieties of pediatric brain tumors. Utilizing the cerebellar progenitor model for the Shh subgroup of medulloblastoma in mice, we show for the first time that YB-1 is induced by Shh in CGNPs. Its expression is YAP-dependent and it is required for IGF2 expression in CGNPs. Finally, both gain-of function and loss-of-function experiments reveal that YB-1 activity is required for sustaining CGNP and medulloblastoma cell (MBC) proliferation. Collectively, our findings describe a novel role for YB-1 in driving proliferation in the developing cerebellum and MBCs and they identify the SHH:YAP:YB1:IGF2 axis as a powerful target for therapeutic intervention in medulloblastomas. PMID:26725322

  14. Cultures of Cerebellar Granule Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Parizad M. Bilimoria and Azad Bonni1 Corresponding author ([]()) ### INTRODUCTION Primary cultures of granule neurons from the post-natal rat cerebellum provide an excellent model system for molecular and cell biological studies of neuronal development and function. The cerebellar cortex, with its highly organized structure and few neuronal subtypes, offers a well-characterized neural circuitry. Many fundamental insight...

  15. Intoxicação por Solanum fastigiatum (Solanaceae em bovinos: epidemiologia, sinais clínicos e morfometria das lesões cerebelares Poisoning by Solanum fastigiatum (Solanaceae in cattle: epidemiology, clinical signs and morphometry of cerebellar lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel R. Rech

    2006-09-01

    , lesions were restricted to the cerebellum and consisted of partial or complete vacuolation of the perikaria of Purkinje neurons with occasional axonal spheroids in the granular cell layer and in the white matter of the cerebellum. In advanced cases there were extensive loss of cerebellar Purkinje neurons and proliferation of the Bergmann's glia. The morphometric evaluation of the numbers of Purkinje neurons and of the thickness of the cerebellar molecular layer indicated decreased numbers of Purkinje neurons with consequent decrease in the molecular layer thickness.

  16. A neural model of cortico-cerebellar interactions during attentive imitation and predictive learning of sequential handwriting movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossberg, S; Paine, R W

    2000-01-01

    Much sensory-motor behavior develops through imitation, as during the learning of handwriting by children. Such complex sequential acts are broken down into distinct motor control synergies, or muscle groups, whose activities overlap in time to generate continuous, curved movements that obey an inverse relation between curvature and speed. How are such complex movements learned through attentive imitation? Novel movements may be made as a series of distinct segments, but a practiced movement can be made smoothly, with a continuous, often bell-shaped, velocity profile. How does learning of complex movements transform reactive imitation into predictive, automatic performance? A neural model is developed which suggests how parietal and motor cortical mechanisms, such as difference vector encoding, interact with adaptively timed, predictive cerebellar learning during movement imitation and predictive performance. To initiate movement, visual attention shifts along the shape to be imitated and generates vector movement using motor cortical cells. During such an imitative movement, cerebellar Purkinje cells with a spectrum of delayed response profiles sample and learn the changing directional information and, in turn, send that learned information back to the cortex and eventually to the muscle synergies involved. If the imitative movement deviates from an attentional focus around a shape to be imitated, the visual system shifts attention, and may make an eye movement, back to the shape, thereby providing corrective directional information to the arm movement system. This imitative movement cycle repeats until the cortico-cerebellar system can accurately drive the movement based on memory alone. A cortical working memory buffer transiently stores the cerebellar output and releases it at a variable rate, allowing speed scaling of learned movements which is limited by the rate of cerebellar memory readout. Movements can be learned at variable speeds if the density of the

  17. Image-Based Structural Modeling of the Cardiac Purkinje Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R. Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Purkinje network is a specialized conduction system within the heart that ensures the proper activation of the ventricles to produce effective contraction. Its role during ventricular arrhythmias is less clear, but some experimental studies have suggested that the Purkinje network may significantly affect the genesis and maintenance of ventricular arrhythmias. Despite its importance, few structural models of the Purkinje network have been developed, primarily because current physical limitations prevent examination of the intact Purkinje network. In previous modeling efforts Purkinje-like structures have been developed through either automated or hand-drawn procedures, but these networks have been created according to general principles rather than based on real networks. To allow for greater realism in Purkinje structural models, we present a method for creating three-dimensional Purkinje networks based directly on imaging data. Our approach uses Purkinje network structures extracted from photographs of dissected ventricles and projects these flat networks onto realistic endocardial surfaces. Using this method, we create models for the combined ventricle-Purkinje system that can fully activate the ventricles through a stimulus delivered to the Purkinje network and can produce simulated activation sequences that match experimental observations. The combined models have the potential to help elucidate Purkinje network contributions during ventricular arrhythmias.

  18. Distinct early molecular responses to mutations causing vLINCL and JNCL presage ATP synthase subunit C accumulation in cerebellar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Cao

    Full Text Available Variant late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (vLINCL, caused by CLN6 mutation, and juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL, caused by CLN3 mutation, share clinical and pathological features, including lysosomal accumulation of mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit c, but the unrelated CLN6 and CLN3 genes may initiate disease via similar or distinct cellular processes. To gain insight into the NCL pathways, we established murine wild-type and CbCln6(nclf/nclf cerebellar cells and compared them to wild-type and CbCln3(Δex7/8/Δex7/8 cerebellar cells. CbCln6(nclf/nclf cells and CbCln3(Δex7/8/Δex7/8 cells both displayed abnormally elongated mitochondria and reduced cellular ATP levels and, as cells aged to confluence, exhibited accumulation of subunit c protein in Lamp 1-positive organelles. However, at sub-confluence, endoplasmic reticulum PDI immunostain was decreased only in CbCln6(nclf/nclf cells, while fluid-phase endocytosis and LysoTracker® labeled vesicles were decreased in both CbCln6(nclf/nclf and CbCln3(Δex7/8/Δex7/8 cells, though only the latter cells exhibited abnormal vesicle subcellular distribution. Furthermore, unbiased gene expression analyses revealed only partial overlap in the cerebellar cell genes and pathways that were altered by the Cln3(Δex7/8 and Cln6(nclf mutations. Thus, these data support the hypothesis that CLN6 and CLN3 mutations trigger distinct processes that converge on a shared pathway, which is responsible for proper subunit c protein turnover and neuronal cell survival.

  19. Alteration of AMPA Receptor-Mediated Synaptic Transmission by Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 in Cerebellar Stellate Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroteaux, Matthieu; Liu, Siqiong June

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescent dyes, Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 are commonly used to visualize dendritic structures and the localization of synapses, both of which are critical for the spatial and temporal integration of synaptic inputs. However, the effect of the dyes on synaptic transmission is not known. Here we investigated whether Alexa Fluor dyes alter the properties of synaptic currents mediated by two subtypes of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) at cerebellar stellate cell synapses. In naive mice, GluA2-lacking AMPAR-mediated synaptic currents displayed an inwardly rectifying current-voltage (I-V) relationship due to blockade by cytoplasmic spermine at depolarized potentials. We found that the inclusion of 100 µm Alexa Fluor dye, but not 10 µm, in the pipette solution led to a gradual increase in the amplitude of EPSCs at +40 mV and a change in the I-V relationship from inwardly rectifying to more linear. In mice exposed to an acute stress, AMPARs switched to GluA2-containing receptors, and 100 µm Alexa Fluor 594 did not alter the I-V relationship of synaptic currents. Therefore, a high concentration of Alexa Fluor dye changed the I-V relationship of EPSCs at GluA2-lacking AMPAR synapses. PMID:27280156

  20. An amplified promoter system for targeted expression of calcium indicator proteins in the cerebellar cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd eKuhn

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recording of identified neuronal network activity using genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs requires labeling that is cell type-specific and bright enough for the detection of functional signals. However, specificity and strong expression are often not achievable using the same promoter. Here we present a combinatorial approach for targeted expression and single-cell-level quantification in which a weak promoter is used to drive trans-amplification under a strong general promoter. We demonstrated this approach using recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs to deliver the sequence of the GECI D3cpv in the mouse cerebellar cortex. Direct expression under the human synapsin promoter (hSYN led to high levels of expression (50-100 µM in five interneuron types of the cerebellar cortex but not in Purkinje cells (PCs (≤10 μM, yielding sufficient contrast to allow functional signals to be recorded from somata and processes in awake animals using two-photon microscopy. When the hSYN promoter was used to drive expression of the tetracycline transactivator (tTA, a second rAAV containing the bidirectional TET promoter (Ptetbi could drive strong D3cpv expression in PCs (10-300 µM, enough to allow reliable complex spike detection in the dendritic arbor. An amplified approach should be of use in monitoring neural processing in selected cell types and boosting expression of optogenetic probes. Additionally, we overcome cell toxicity associated with rAAV injection and/or local GECI overexpression by combining the virus injection with systemic pre-injection of hyperosmotic D-mannitol, and by this double the time window for functional imaging.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of benzodiazepine-induced down-regulation of GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit protein in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, M. J.; Bristow, D. R.

    1996-01-01

    1. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment of rat cerebellar granule cells induced a transient down-regulation of the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor alpha 1 subunit protein, that was dose-dependent (1 nM-1 microM) and prevented by the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil (1 microM). After 2 days of treatment with 1 microM flunitrazepam the alpha 1 subunit protein was reduced by 41% compared to untreated cells, which returned to, and remained at, control cell levels from 4-12 days of treat...

  2. Homozygosity mapping and targeted genomic sequencing reveal the gene responsible for cerebellar hypoplasia and quadrupedal locomotion in a consanguineous kindred

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulsuner, Suleyman; Tekinay, Ayse Begum; Doerschner, Katja; Boyaci, Huseyin; Bilguvar, Kaya; Unal, Hilal; Ors, Aslihan; Onat, O. Emre; Atalar, Ergin; Basak, A. Nazli; Topaloglu, Haluk; Kansu, Tulay; Tan, Meliha; Tan, Uner; Gunel, Murat; Ozcelik, Tayfun

    2011-01-01

    The biological basis for the development of the cerebro-cerebellar structures required for posture and gait in humans is poorly understood. We investigated a large consanguineous family from Turkey exhibiting an extremely rare phenotype associated with quadrupedal locomotion, mental retardation, and cerebro-cerebellar hypoplasia, linked to a 7.1-Mb region of homozygosity on chromosome 17p13.1–13.3. Diffusion weighted imaging and fiber tractography of the patients' brains revealed morphological abnormalities in the cerebellum and corpus callosum, in particular atrophy of superior, middle, and inferior peduncles of the cerebellum. Structural magnetic resonance imaging showed additional morphometric abnormalities in several cortical areas, including the corpus callosum, precentral gyrus, and Brodmann areas BA6, BA44, and BA45. Targeted sequencing of the entire homozygous region in three affected individuals and two obligate carriers uncovered a private missense mutation, WDR81 p.P856L, which cosegregated with the condition in the extended family. The mutation lies in a highly conserved region of WDR81, flanked by an N-terminal BEACH domain and C-terminal WD40 beta-propeller domains. WDR81 is predicted to be a transmembrane protein. It is highly expressed in the cerebellum and corpus callosum, in particular in the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. WDR81 represents the third gene, after VLDLR and CA8, implicated in quadrupedal locomotion in humans. PMID:21885617

  3. Mice deficient in carbonic anhydrase type 8 exhibit motor dysfunctions and abnormal calcium dynamics in the somatic region of cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Matthew G; Weber, John T

    2015-06-01

    The waddles (wdl) mouse is characterized by a namesake "side-to-side" waddling gait due to a homozygous mutation of the Car8 gene. This mutation results in non-functional copies of the protein carbonic anhydrase type 8. Rota-rod testing was conducted to characterize the wdl mutations' effect on motor output. Results indicated that younger homozygotes outperformed their older cohorts, an effect not seen in previous studies. Heterozygotes, which were thought to be free of motor impairment, displayed motor learning deficiencies when compared with wild type performance. Acute cerebellar slices were then utilized for fluorescent calcium imaging experiments, which revealed significant alterations in cerebellar granule cell somatic calcium signaling when exposed to glutamate. The contribution of GABAergic signaling to these alterations was also verified using bath application of bicuculline. Changes in somatic calcium signals were found to be applicable to an in vivo scenario by comparing group responses to electrical stimulation of afferent mossy fiber projections. Finally, intracellular calcium store function was also found to be altered by the wdl mutation when slices were treated with thapsigargin. These findings, taken together with previous work on the wdl mouse, indicate a widespread disruption in cerebellar circuitry hampering proper neuronal communication. PMID:25721739

  4. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with bilateral middle cerebellar peduncle lesions confirmed by repeated CSF-JC virus tests and coexistence of JC virus granule cell neuronopathy. Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daisuke; Yasui, Keizo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Katsuno, Masahisa; Takahashi, Akira

    2016-07-28

    A 65 year-old woman with small lymphocytic leukemia presented with subacute cerebellar ataxia. Six months after rituximab chemotherapy, a cranial MRI revealed lesions in the bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles. Both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) JC virus (JCV)-DNA PCR test on three occasions and brain biopsy were negative. CSF tests were repeated. The fourth test performed 6 months after the onset showed positive JCV-DNA, and a definite diagnosis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) was made. Neuroimaging of cerebellar atrophy was considered to be coexistence of granule cell neuronopathy. Medication with mirtazapine and mefloquine was temporarily effective for several months. Little are known solitary bilateral MRI lesions of the middle cerebellar peduncle in PML. JCV-PCR test of CSF may be negative at an earlier stage of PML. Repeated CSF tests should be essential to confirming the diagnosis in such cases. PMID:27356732

  5. Serum and depolarizing agents cause acute neurotoxicity in cultured cerebellar granule cells: role of the glutamate receptor responsive to N-methyl-D-aspartate.

    OpenAIRE

    Schramm, M.; Eimerl, S; Costa, E

    1990-01-01

    The life span of neonatal rat cerebellar granule cells, grown in basal minimal Eagle's medium containing 10% (vol/vol) fetal calf serum, was extended to 21-30 days by weekly supplementation with glucose. Addition of 1% fetal calf serum to the culture at 14 days killed 85% of the cells within 1 hr. This lethal effect could be prevented by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists dibenzocyclohepteneimine (MK-801) and 3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonate (CPP). These findi...

  6. Ethanol Inhibits L1-mediated Neurite Outgrowth in Postnatal Rat Cerebellar Granule Cells

    OpenAIRE

    BEARER, CYNTHIA F.; Swick, Alan R.; O’Riordan, Mary Ann; Cheng, Guanghui

    1999-01-01

    The neuropathology of the effects of ethanol on the developing central nervous system are similar to those of patients with mutations in L1, a neural cell adhesion molecule. This observation suggests that inhibition of L1 plays a role in the pathogenesis of alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorders. Here we examine the effects of ethanol on L1 homophilic binding and on L1-mediated neurite outgrowth. Ethanol had no effect on cell adhesion or aggregation in a myeloma cell line expressing ful...

  7. Acute onset paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in a patient with small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia R

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A patient with small cell lung cancer presented with a rare presentation of an acute onset pancerebellar dysfunction. His clinical condition markedly improved following the surgical removal of the tumor and chemo- and radiotherapy.

  8. Stereological estimation of total cell numbers in the human cerebral and cerebellar cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walløe, Solveig; Pakkenberg, Bente; Fabricius, Katrine

    2014-01-01

    Our knowledge of the relationship between brain structure and cognitive function is still limited. Human brains and individual cortical areas vary considerably in size and shape. Studies of brain cell numbers have historically been based on biased methods, which did not always result in correct...

  9. The Etv1 transcription factor activity-dependently downregulates a set of genes controlling cell growth and differentiation in maturing cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazawa, Makoto; Abe, Haruka; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2016-05-13

    In the early postnatal period, cerebellar granule cells exhibit an activity-dependent downregulation of a set of immaturation genes involved in cell growth and migration and are shifted to establishment of a mature network formation. Through the use of a granule cell culture and both pharmacological and RNA interference (siRNA) analyses, the present investigation revealed that the downregulation of these immaturation genes is controlled by strikingly unified signaling mechanisms that operate sequentially through the stimulation of AMPA and NMDA receptors, tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) channels and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). This signaling cascade induces the Etv1 transcription factor, and knockdown of Etv1 by a siRNA technique prevented this activity-dependent downregulation of immaturation genes. Thus, taken into consideration the mechanism that controls the upregulation of maturation genes involved in synaptic formation, these results indicate that Etv1 orchestrates the activity-dependent regulation of both maturation and immaturation genes in developing granule cells and plays a key role in specifying the identity of mature granule cells in the cerebellum. PMID:27059140

  10. Motor dysfunction in the tottering mouse is linked to cerebellar spontaneous low frequency oscillations revealed by flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Popa, Laurentiu S.; Wang, Xinming; Gao, Wangcai; Barnes, Justin; Hendrix, Claudia M.; Hess, Ellen J.; Ebner, Timothy J.

    2009-02-01

    Flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging is developing into a powerful research tool to study neural activity, particularly in vivo. In this study we used this imaging technique to investigate the neuronal mechanism underlying the episodic movement disorder that is characteristic of the tottering (tg) mouse, a model of episodic ataxia type 2. Both EA2 and the tg mouse are caused by mutations in the gene encoding Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. These mutations result in a reduction in P/Q Ca2+ channel function. Both EA2 patients and tg mice have a characteristic phenotype consisting of transient motor attacks triggered by stress, caffeine or ethanol. The neural events underlying these episodes of dystonia are unknown. Flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging revealed spontaneous, transient, low frequency oscillations in the cerebellar cortex of the tg mouse. Lasting from 30 - 120 minutes, the oscillations originate in one area then spread to surrounding regions over 30 - 60 minutes. The oscillations are reduced by removing extracellular Ca2+ and blocking Cav 1.2/1.3 (L-type) Ca2+ channels. The oscillations are not affected by blocking AMPA receptors or by electrical stimulation of the parallel fiber - Purkinje cell circuit, suggesting the oscillations are generated intrinsically in the cerebellar cortex. Conversely, L-type Ca2+ agonists generate oscillations with similar properties. In the awake tg mouse, transcranial flavoprotein imaging revealed low frequency oscillations that are accentuated during caffeine induced attacks of dystonia. The oscillations increase during the attacks of dystonia and are coupled to oscillations in face and hindlimb EMG activity. These transient oscillations and the associated cerebellar dysfunction provide a novel mechanism by which an ion channel disorder results in episodic motor dysfunction.

  11. Expression of the GABA(A) receptor alpha6 subunit in cultured cerebellar granule cells is developmentally regulated by activation of GABA(A) receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, B X; Belhage, B; Hansen, G H;

    1997-01-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells, prepared from cerebella of 7-day-old rats and cultured for 4 or 8 days, were used to study the neurodifferentiative effect of a GABA(A) receptor agonist, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazol[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), on the expression of the alpha6 GABA...... suggest that THIP has a trophic effect on alpha6 subunit expression, and this effect occurs only at an early developmental stage. Moreover, this study presents further evidence for the role of GABA(A) agonists, and thus the neurotransmitter, GABA, in regulating the expression of GABA(A) receptor subunits...

  12. Restricted diffusion of calretinin in cerebellar granule cell dendrites implies Ca²⁺-dependent interactions via its EF-hand 5 domain

    OpenAIRE

    Arendt, Oliver; Schwaller, Beat; Brown, Edward B.; Eilers, Jens; Schmidt, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Ca²⁺-binding proteins (CaBPs) are important regulators of neuronal Ca²⁺ signaling, acting either as buffers that shape Ca²⁺ transients and Ca²⁺ diffusion and/or as Ca²⁺ sensors. The diffusional mobility represents a crucial functional parameter of CaBPs, describing their range-of-action and possible interactions with binding partners. Calretinin (CR) is a CaBP widely expressed in the nervous system with strong expression in cerebellar granule cells. It is involved in regulating excitability a...

  13. Differential distribution of GABAA receptor subunits in soma and processes of cerebellar granule cells: effects of maturation and a GABA agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elster, L; Hansen, Gert Helge; Belhage, B;

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the density of alpha 1 and beta 2/3 GABAA receptor subunits was performed at the electron microscope level after indirect pre-embedding immunogold labeling with subunit-specific antibodies of rat cerebellar granule cell cultures grown for 4 or 8 days and in the presence...... of receptors resulting in a single population of the latter neurons, a process enhanced by exposure to THIP. This may indicate that receptor development is a discontinuous process with individual neurons following different temporal patterns. In double-labeling experiments, a spatially close association...

  14. Characterization of two novel nuclear BTB/POZ domain zinc finger isoforms. Association with differentiation of hippocampal neurons, cerebellar granule cells, and macroglia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchelmore, Cathy; Kjaerulff, Karen M; Pedersen, Hans C;

    2002-01-01

    BTB/POZ (broad complex tramtrack bric-a-brac/poxvirus and zinc finger) zinc finger factors are a class of nuclear DNA-binding proteins involved in development, chromatin remodeling, and cancer. However, BTB/POZ domain zinc finger factors linked to development of the mammalian cerebral cortex......, cerebellum, and macroglia have not been described previously. We report here the isolation and characterization of two novel nuclear BTB/POZ domain zinc finger isoforms, designated HOF(L) and HOF(S), that are specifically expressed in early hippocampal neurons, cerebellar granule cells, and gliogenic...

  15. The long adventurous journey of rhombic lip cells in jawed vertebrates: a comparative developmental analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario F Wullimann

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes vertebrate rhombic lip and early cerebellar development covering classic approaches up to modern developmental genetics which identifies the relevant differential gene expression domains and their progeny. Most of this information is derived from amniotes. However, progress in anamniotes, particularly in the zebrafish, has recently been made. The current picture suggests that rhombic lip and cerebellar development in jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes share many characteristics. Regarding cerebellar development, these include a ptf1a expressing ventral cerebellar proliferation (VCP giving rise to Purkinje cells and other inhibitory cerebellar cell types, and an atoh1 expressing upper rhombic lip giving rise to an external granular layer (EGL, i.e., excitatory granule cells and an early ventral migration into the anterior rhombencephalon (cholinergic nuclei. As for the lower rhombic lip (LRL, gnathostome commonalities likely include the formation of precerebellar nuclei (mossy fiber origins and partially primary auditory nuclei (likely convergently evolved from the atoh1 expressing dorsal zone. The fate of the ptf1a expressing ventral LRL zone which gives rise to (excitatory cells of the inferior olive (climbing fiber origin and (inhibitory cells of cochlear nuclei in amniotes, has not been determined in anamniotes. Special for the zebrafish in comparison to amniotes is the predominant origin of anamniote excitatory deep cerebellar nuclei homologues (i.e., eurydendroid cells from ptf1a expressing VCP cells, the sequential activity of various atoh1 paralogues and the incomplete coverage of the subpial cerebellar plate with proliferative EGL cells. Nevertheless, the conclusion that a rhombic lip and its major derivatives evolved with gnathostome vertebrates only and are thus not an ancestral craniate character complex is supported by the absence of a cerebellum (and likely absence of its afferent and efferent nuclei in jawless

  16. GlyT2+ Neurons in the Lateral Cerebellar Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Uusisaari, Marylka; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) are a major hub in the cerebellar circuitry but the functional classification of their neurons is incomplete. We have previously characterized three cell groups in the lateral cerebellar nucleus: large non-GABAergic neurons and two groups of smaller neurons, one of which express green fluorescence protein (GFP) in a GAD67/GFP mouse line and is therefore GABAergic. However, as a substantial number of glycinergic and glycine/GABA co-expressing neurons have been ...

  17. PIXE maps of intracellular element distribution in cerebellar neurons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kranda, Karel; Havránek, Vladimír; Purkrtová, Z.; Vožeh, F.; Hájková, L.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 22, 1-2 (2012), s. 65-72. ISSN 0129-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/09/1189 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : MicroPIXE * 2D-mapping * cerebellum * mutant mice * Purkinje cells * cell death * metan concentration Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  18. Critical periods during the in situ repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in rat cerebellar neurons and 9L brain tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wierowski, J.V. (Univ. of Rochester Cancer Center, NY); Thomas, R.R.; Ritter, P.; Wheeler, K.T.

    1982-06-01

    The consequences of delivering a second 1250-rad dose at various times during and after the repair of DNA damage produced by an initial 1250-rad dose were assessed in intracerebral 9L tumor cells and rat cerebellar neurons by measuring the sedimentation properties of their DNA through alkaline sucrose gradients in zonal rotors with slow gradient reorienting capabilities.In cerebellar neurons, separating the two doses by 15 min resulted in an accumulation of DNA damage as expressed by an increase in the amount of DNA sedimenting >250 S over that obtained from unirradiated controls. Although not statistically different from unirradiated controls, a slight increase in the amount of fast-sedimenting neuronal DNA also occurred when a 1-hr interval between the two doses was investigated. At intervals of 2 hr or more, no such increase in fast-sedimenting neuronal DNA was observed. None of the periods between doses resulted in an accumulation of DNA damage in intracerebral 9L tumor cells. The accumulation of this type of DNA damage in neurons but not in tumor cells suggests that avoidance of a critical period in neuronal DNA repair may someday be an important concept in the design of brain tumor therapy schedules.

  19. Case of subacute cerebellar degeneration associated with pleocytosis and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Hiide; Anezaki, Toshiharu; Takashima, Noriko; Inuzuka, Takashi; Miyatake, Tadashi

    1988-02-01

    A 44 year old woman was healthy until January 3, 1986, when she had headache. On January 9, she developed gait ataxia and dysarthria. Cerebellar ataxia worsened rapidly. Aftar a week she could not sit without support and her consciousness was disturbed. Corticosteroid was administrated and consciousness proved alert, but cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria remained unchanged. The patient was found carcinoma of the lung in August 1986. Characteristic features of clinical and laboratory findings of this patient are acute progression, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis of 1,064/3 cells (860 mononuclear cell, 204 polymorphonuclear cell), and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning. Though the mechanism of acute cerebellar degeneration is still uncertained, inflammatory process was supported to exist in cerebellum of this case.

  20. GABA agonist induced changes in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells is linked to hyperpolarization of the neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1990-01-01

    GABA has been shown to exert a neurotrophic like activity by enhancing the morphological and functional maturation of neurons. Mechanisms involved in this effect of GABA are largely unknown but since GABA has been shown to mediate a hyperpolarizing action on neurons it can be assumed that this...... action might be important. In order to investigate this possibility, the ability to mimic the trophic actions of GABA of different agents known to influence the membrane potential or the GABA gated chloride channels was studied. Hence, GABA receptor expression as well as the ultrastructure of cerebellar...... granule cells were monitored after exposure of the cells in culture to either bromide, valinomycin or picrotoxin. It was found that cells which at early developmental stages (4 days in culture) were exposed to bromide or valinomycin expressed low affinity GABA receptors similar to cells treated with the...

  1. Nitric oxide regulates input specificity of long-term depression and context dependence of cerebellar learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Ogasawara

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that multiple internal models are acquired in the cerebellum and that these can be switched under a given context of behavior. It has been proposed that long-term depression (LTD of parallel fiber (PF-Purkinje cell (PC synapses forms the cellular basis of cerebellar learning, and that the presynaptically synthesized messenger nitric oxide (NO is a crucial "gatekeeper" for LTD. Because NO diffuses freely to neighboring synapses, this volume learning is not input-specific and brings into question the biological significance of LTD as the basic mechanism for efficient supervised learning. To better characterize the role of NO in cerebellar learning, we simulated the sequence of electrophysiological and biochemical events in PF-PC LTD by combining established simulation models of the electrophysiology, calcium dynamics, and signaling pathways of the PC. The results demonstrate that the local NO concentration is critical for induction of LTD and for its input specificity. Pre- and postsynaptic coincident firing is not sufficient for a PF-PC synapse to undergo LTD, and LTD is induced only when a sufficient amount of NO is provided by activation of the surrounding PFs. On the other hand, above-adequate levels of activity in nearby PFs cause accumulation of NO, which also allows LTD in neighboring synapses that were not directly stimulated, ruining input specificity. These findings lead us to propose the hypothesis that NO represents the relevance of a given context and enables context-dependent selection of internal models to be updated. We also predict sparse PF activity in vivo because, otherwise, input specificity would be lost.

  2. Cerebellar synaptogenesis is compromised in mouse models of DYT1 dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanni, Valentina; Puglisi, Francesca; Bonsi, Paola; Ponterio, Giulia; Maltese, Marta; Pisani, Antonio; Mandolesi, Georgia

    2015-09-01

    Early-onset torsion dystonia (DYT1) is an autosomal-dominant movement disorder characterized by sustained muscle contractions and abnormal posturing. It is caused by a three base-pair deletion (ΔGAG) in the gene encoding the AAA(+) protein torsinA, which gives rise to a loss of function mutation responsible of neuronal functional abnormalities. Symptoms typically appear during childhood, suggesting the presence of an early critical period of sensorimotor circuit susceptibility to torsinA dysfunction. Here, we identified in two different DYT1 mouse strains, heterozygous torsinA knockout mice (Tor1a+/-) and human ΔGAG mutant torsinA transgenic mice (hMT), the anatomical abnormalities in the cerebellum, during a critical age for synaptogenesis (postnatal day 14, P14). By means of immunofluorescence, confocal analysis and western blot quantification, we observed a reduced inhibitory input on Purkinje cells (PCs) as well as an unbalanced excitatory innervation; a significant reduction of the parallel fiber (PF) synaptic terminals and an increase of the climbing fiber (CF) inputs. Finally, in support of the in vivo results, we also provide evidence of an impaired PF synaptogenesis in a co-culture system. Of note, these alterations were rescued and in part over-compensated in the adult age in both mouse strains, suggesting that torsinA dysfunction can induce an altered maturation of cerebellar synaptic contacts. Altogether these results indicate that a loss of function of torsinA during cerebellar synaptogenesis induces important developmental alterations, that might contribute to the age-dependent susceptibility to develop dystonia in mutation carriers. PMID:26183317

  3. Ethanol intake-induced apoptosis in glial cells and axonal disorders in the cerebellar white matter of UChA rats (voluntary ethanol consumers).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Marcelo; Sauce, Rafael; Oliveira, Suelen Alves; de Almeida Chuffa, Luiz Gustavo; Stefanini, Maíra Aparecida; Lizarte Neto, Fermino Sanches; Takase, Luiz Fernando; Tirapelli, Luiz Fernando; Martinez, Francisco Eduardo

    2015-08-01

    Ethanol intake may cause alterations in cellular metabolism altering motricity, learning and cognition. The cerebellum is one of the most susceptible organs to ethanol-related disorders during development, and is associated with oxidative stress-induced apoptosis being crucial for pathogenic consequences. The UChA variety is a special strain of Wistar rat genetically selected and represents a rare model for the studies related to genetic, biochemical, physiological, nutritional, and pharmacological effects of ethanol. We evaluated the structure and apoptosis in the cerebellar white matter of UChA rats. There were two groups of 09 rats: a control group that did not consume ethanol, and an experimental group of UChA rats that consumed ethanol at 10% (v/v) (<2 g ethanol/kg body weight/day). At 120 days old, rats were anaesthetized followed by decapitation, and their cerebella were collected and fixed. Cerebellar sections were subjected to immunohistochemistry for Caspase-3 and XIAP and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The UChA group showed more glial cells immunoreactive for caspase-3 and less for XIAP than control group. Alcohol consumption affected myelin integrity. Severe ultrastructural damages in UChA group were observed such as disruption of the myelin sheath, disorganization and deformation of its components, and an increase in the interaxonal spaces. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that ethanol induced apoptosis in the glial cells and promoted an intense change in the myelin sheath of UChA rats, which may cause functional disorders. PMID:26072102

  4. A SEL1L mutation links a canine progressive early-onset cerebellar ataxia to the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisa Kyöstilä

    Full Text Available Inherited ataxias are characterized by degeneration of the cerebellar structures, which results in progressive motor incoordination. Hereditary ataxias occur in many species, including humans and dogs. Several mutations have been found in humans, but the genetic background has remained elusive in dogs. The Finnish Hound suffers from an early-onset progressive cerebellar ataxia. We have performed clinical, pathological, and genetic studies to describe the disease phenotype and to identify its genetic cause. Neurological examinations on ten affected dogs revealed rapidly progressing generalized cerebellar ataxia, tremors, and failure to thrive. Clinical signs were present by the age of 3 months, and cerebellar shrinkage was detectable through MRI. Pathological and histological examinations indicated cerebellum-restricted neurodegeneration. Marked loss of Purkinje cells was detected in the cerebellar cortex with secondary changes in other cortical layers. A genome-wide association study in a cohort of 31 dogs mapped the ataxia gene to a 1.5 Mb locus on canine chromosome 8 (p(raw = 1.1x10(-7, p(genome = 7.5x10(-4. Sequencing of a functional candidate gene, sel-1 suppressor of lin-12-like (SEL1L, revealed a homozygous missense mutation, c.1972T>C; p.Ser658Pro, in a highly conserved protein domain. The mutation segregated fully in the recessive pedigree, and a 10% carrier frequency was indicated in a population cohort. SEL1L is a component of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD machinery and has not been previously associated to inherited ataxias. Dysfunctional protein degradation is known to cause ER stress, and we found a significant increase in expression of nine ER stress responsive genes in the cerebellar cortex of affected dogs, supporting the pathogenicity of the mutation. Our study describes the first early-onset neurodegenerative ataxia mutation in dogs, establishes an ERAD-mediated neurodegenerative

  5. Cerebellar Ataxia and Coenzyme Q Deficiency through Loss of Unorthodox Kinase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefely, Jonathan A; Licitra, Floriana; Laredj, Leila; Reidenbach, Andrew G; Kemmerer, Zachary A; Grangeray, Anais; Jaeg-Ehret, Tiphaine; Minogue, Catherine E; Ulbrich, Arne; Hutchins, Paul D; Wilkerson, Emily M; Ruan, Zheng; Aydin, Deniz; Hebert, Alexander S; Guo, Xiao; Freiberger, Elyse C; Reutenauer, Laurence; Jochem, Adam; Chergova, Maya; Johnson, Isabel E; Lohman, Danielle C; Rush, Matthew J P; Kwiecien, Nicholas W; Singh, Pankaj K; Schlagowski, Anna I; Floyd, Brendan J; Forsman, Ulrika; Sindelar, Pavel J; Westphall, Michael S; Pierrel, Fabien; Zoll, Joffrey; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Kannan, Natarajan; Bingman, Craig A; Coon, Joshua J; Isope, Philippe; Puccio, Hélène; Pagliarini, David J

    2016-08-18

    The UbiB protein kinase-like (PKL) family is widespread, comprising one-quarter of microbial PKLs and five human homologs, yet its biochemical activities remain obscure. COQ8A (ADCK3) is a mammalian UbiB protein associated with ubiquinone (CoQ) biosynthesis and an ataxia (ARCA2) through unclear means. We show that mice lacking COQ8A develop a slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia linked to Purkinje cell dysfunction and mild exercise intolerance, recapitulating ARCA2. Interspecies biochemical analyses show that COQ8A and yeast Coq8p specifically stabilize a CoQ biosynthesis complex through unorthodox PKL functions. Although COQ8 was predicted to be a protein kinase, we demonstrate that it lacks canonical protein kinase activity in trans. Instead, COQ8 has ATPase activity and interacts with lipid CoQ intermediates, functions that are likely conserved across all domains of life. Collectively, our results lend insight into the molecular activities of the ancient UbiB family and elucidate the biochemical underpinnings of a human disease. PMID:27499294

  6. Cerebellar Expression of the Neurotrophin Receptor p75 in Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse

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    Maryam Rahimi Balaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutation in the lysosomal acid phosphatase 2 (Acp2 mouse (nax—naked-ataxia mutant mouse correlates with severe cerebellar defects including ataxia, reduced size and abnormal lobulation as well as Purkinje cell (Pc degeneration. Loss of Pcs in the nax cerebellum is compartmentalized and harmonized to the classic pattern of gene expression of the cerebellum in the wild type mouse. Usually, degeneration starts in the anterior and posterior zones and continues to the central and nodular zones of cerebellum. Studies have suggested that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (NTR plays a role in Pc degeneration; thus, in this study, we investigated the p75NTR pattern and protein expression in the cerebellum of the nax mutant mouse. Despite massive Pc degeneration that was observed in the nax mouse cerebellum, p75NTR pattern expression was similar to the HSP25 pattern in nax mice and comparable with wild type sibling cerebellum. In addition, immunoblot analysis of p75NTR protein expression did not show any significant difference between nax and wild type sibling (p > 0.5. In comparison with wild type counterparts, p75NTR pattern expression is aligned with the fundamental cytoarchitecture organization of the cerebellum and is unchanged in the nax mouse cerebellum despite the severe neurodevelopmental disorder accompanied with Pc degeneration.

  7. A Computational Model for the AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation Master Switch Regulating Cerebellar Long-Term Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Andrew R; Aricescu, A Radu; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Calinescu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    The expression of long-term depression (LTD) in cerebellar Purkinje cells results from the internalisation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) from the postsynaptic membrane. This process is regulated by a complex signalling pathway involving sustained protein kinase C (PKC) activation, inhibition of serine/threonine phosphatase, and an active protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTPMEG. In addition, two AMPAR-interacting proteins-glutamate receptor-interacting protein (GRIP) and protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1)-regulate the availability of AMPARs for trafficking between the postsynaptic membrane and the endosome. Here we present a new computational model of these overlapping signalling pathways. The model reveals how PTPMEG cooperates with PKC to drive LTD expression by facilitating the effect of PKC on the dissociation of AMPARs from GRIP and thus their availability for trafficking. Model simulations show that LTD expression is increased by serine/threonine phosphatase inhibition, and negatively regulated by Src-family tyrosine kinase activity, which restricts the dissociation of AMPARs from GRIP under basal conditions. We use the model to expose the dynamic balance between AMPAR internalisation and reinsertion, and the phosphorylation switch responsible for the perturbation of this balance and for the rapid plasticity initiation and regulation. Our model advances the understanding of PF-PC LTD regulation and induction, and provides a validated extensible platform for more detailed studies of this fundamental synaptic process. PMID:26807999

  8. A Computational Model for the AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation Master Switch Regulating Cerebellar Long-Term Depression.

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    Andrew R Gallimore

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of long-term depression (LTD in cerebellar Purkinje cells results from the internalisation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs from the postsynaptic membrane. This process is regulated by a complex signalling pathway involving sustained protein kinase C (PKC activation, inhibition of serine/threonine phosphatase, and an active protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTPMEG. In addition, two AMPAR-interacting proteins-glutamate receptor-interacting protein (GRIP and protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1-regulate the availability of AMPARs for trafficking between the postsynaptic membrane and the endosome. Here we present a new computational model of these overlapping signalling pathways. The model reveals how PTPMEG cooperates with PKC to drive LTD expression by facilitating the effect of PKC on the dissociation of AMPARs from GRIP and thus their availability for trafficking. Model simulations show that LTD expression is increased by serine/threonine phosphatase inhibition, and negatively regulated by Src-family tyrosine kinase activity, which restricts the dissociation of AMPARs from GRIP under basal conditions. We use the model to expose the dynamic balance between AMPAR internalisation and reinsertion, and the phosphorylation switch responsible for the perturbation of this balance and for the rapid plasticity initiation and regulation. Our model advances the understanding of PF-PC LTD regulation and induction, and provides a validated extensible platform for more detailed studies of this fundamental synaptic process.

  9. Deficiency of the miR-29a/b-1 cluster leads to ataxic features and cerebellar alterations in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulou, Aikaterini S; Serneels, Lutgarde; Achsel, Tilmann;

    2015-01-01

    impairment and ataxia. The different members of the miR-29 family are strongly expressed in neurons of the olfactory bulb, the hippocampus and in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. Morphological analysis showed that Purkinje cells are smaller and display less dendritic arborisation compared to their...

  10. Methylmercury disrupts the balance between phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated cofilin in primary cultures of mice cerebellar granule cells A proteomic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methylmercury is an environmental contaminant that is particularly toxic to the developing central nervous system; cerebellar granule neurons are especially vulnerable. Here, primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) were continuously exposed to methylmercury for up to 16 days in vitro (div). LC50 values were 508 ± 199, 345 ± 47, and 243 ± 45 nM after exposure for 6, 11, and 16 div, respectively. Proteins from cultured mouse CGCs were separated by 2DE. Seventy-one protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF PMF and MALDI-TOF/TOF sequencing. Prolonged exposure to a subcytotoxic concentration of methylmercury significantly increased non-phosphorylated cofilin both in cell protein extracts (1.4-fold; p < 0.01) and in mitochondrial-enriched fractions (1.7-fold; p < 0.01). The decrease in P-cofilin induced by methylmercury was concentration-dependent and occurred after different exposure times. The percentage of P-cofilin relative to total cofilin significantly decreased to 49 ± 13% vs. control cells after exposure to 300 nM methylmercury for 5 div. The balance between the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated form of cofilin regulates actin dynamics and facilitates actin filament turnover. Filamentous actin dynamics and reorganization are responsible of neuron shape change, migration, polarity formation, regulation of synaptic structures and function, and cell apoptosis. An alteration of the complex regulation of the cofilin phosphorylation/dephosphorylation pathway could be envisaged as an underlying mechanism compatible with reported signs of methylmercury-induced neurotoxicity.

  11. Localizing genes to cerebellar layers by classifying ISH images.

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    Lior Kirsch

    Full Text Available Gene expression controls how the brain develops and functions. Understanding control processes in the brain is particularly hard since they involve numerous types of neurons and glia, and very little is known about which genes are expressed in which cells and brain layers. Here we describe an approach to detect genes whose expression is primarily localized to a specific brain layer and apply it to the mouse cerebellum. We learn typical spatial patterns of expression from a few markers that are known to be localized to specific layers, and use these patterns to predict localization for new genes. We analyze images of in-situ hybridization (ISH experiments, which we represent using histograms of local binary patterns (LBP and train image classifiers and gene classifiers for four layers of the cerebellum: the Purkinje, granular, molecular and white matter layer. On held-out data, the layer classifiers achieve accuracy above 94% (AUC by representing each image at multiple scales and by combining multiple image scores into a single gene-level decision. When applied to the full mouse genome, the classifiers predict specific layer localization for hundreds of new genes in the Purkinje and granular layers. Many genes localized to the Purkinje layer are likely to be expressed in astrocytes, and many others are involved in lipid metabolism, possibly due to the unusual size of Purkinje cells.

  12. Differential Modulation of GABAA Receptors Underlies Postsynaptic Depolarization- and Purinoceptor-Mediated Enhancement of Cerebellar Inhibitory Transmission: A Non-Stationary Fluctuation Analysis Study.

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    Yumie Ono

    Full Text Available Cerebellar GABAergic inhibitory transmission between interneurons and Purkinje cells (PCs undergoes a long-lasting enhancement following different stimulations, such as brief depolarization or activation of purinergic receptors of postsynaptic PCs. The underlying mechanisms, however, are not completely understood. Using a peak-scaled non-stationary fluctuation analysis, we therefore aimed at characterizing changes in the electrophysiological properties of GABAA receptors in PCs of rat cerebellar cortex during depolarization-induced "rebound potentiation (RP" and purinoceptor-mediated long-term potentiation (PM-LTP, because both RP and PM-LTP likely depend on postsynaptic mechanisms. Stimulation-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs were recorded from PCs in neonatal rat cerebellar slices. Our analysis showed that postsynaptic membrane depolarization induced RP of eIPSCs in association with significant increase in the number of synaptic GABAA receptors without changing the channel conductance. By contrast, bath application of ATP induced PM-LTP of eIPSCs with a significant increase of the channel conductance of GABAA receptors without affecting the receptor number. Pretreatment with protein kinase A (PKA inhibitors, H-89 and cAMPS-Rp, completely abolished the PM-LTP. The CaMKII inhibitor KN-62 reported to abolish RP did not alter PM-LTP. These results suggest that the signaling mechanism underlying PM-LTP could involve ATP-induced phosphorylation of synaptic GABAA receptors, thereby resulting in upregulation of the channel conductance by stimulating adenylyl cyclase-PKA signaling cascade, possibly via activation of P2Y11 purinoceptor. Thus, our findings reveal that postsynaptic GABAA receptors at the interneuron-PC inhibitory synapses are under the control of two distinct forms of long-term potentiation linked with different second messenger cascades.

  13. RNA interference mitigates motor and neuropathological deficits in a cerebellar mouse model of Machado-Joseph disease.

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    Clévio Nóbrega

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease or Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 is a progressive fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by the polyglutamine-expanded protein ataxin-3. Recent studies demonstrate that RNA interference is a promising approach for the treatment of Machado-Joseph disease. However, whether gene silencing at an early time-point is able to prevent the appearance of motor behavior deficits typical of the disease when initiated before onset of the disease had not been explored. Here, using a lentiviral-mediated allele-specific silencing of mutant ataxin-3 in an early pre-symptomatic cerebellar mouse model of Machado-Joseph disease we show that this strategy hampers the development of the motor and neuropathological phenotypic characteristics of the disease. At the histological level, the RNA-specific silencing of mutant ataxin-3 decreased formation of mutant ataxin-3 aggregates, preserved Purkinje cell morphology and expression of neuronal markers while reducing cell death. Importantly, gene silencing prevented the development of impairments in balance, motor coordination, gait and hyperactivity observed in control mice. These data support the therapeutic potential of RNA interference for Machado-Joseph disease and constitute a proof of principle of the beneficial effects of early allele-specific silencing for therapy of this disease.

  14. Primary progressive cerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-two patients with primary progressive cerebellar ataxia were studied using MRI. This technique is better than CT in demonstrating atrophy of cerebellar structures as well as of brainstem and spinal cord. The differential diagnosis from other diseases particularly with multiple sclerosis is easier. The degree of ataxia correlated well with the degree of atrophy of cerebellum. However, we could not see any correlation between the degree of atrophy and the onset and duration of the disease and no certain specific aspects could be demonstrated in the different groups examined. (orig.)

  15. Cerebellar anatomy as applied to cerebellar microsurgical resections

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    Alejandro Ramos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To define the anatomy of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles, demonstrating the surgical application of anatomic landmarks in cerebellar resections. METHODS: Twenty cerebellar hemispheres were studied. RESULTS: The majority of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles had demonstrated constant relationship to other cerebellar structures, which provided landmarks for surgical approaching. The lateral border is separated from the midline by 19.5 mm in both hemispheres. The posterior border of the cortex is separated 23.3 mm from the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus; the lateral one is separated 26 mm from the lateral border of the nucleus; and the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus is separated 25.4 mm from the posterolateral angle formed by the junction of lateral and posterior borders of cerebellar hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS: Microsurgical anatomy has provided important landmarks that could be applied to cerebellar surgical resections.

  16. GABA-agonists induce the formation of low-affinity GABA-receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells via preexisting high affinity GABA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Meier, E; Schousboe, A

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of specific GABA-binding to membranes isolated from cerebellar granule cells, cultured for 12 days from dissociated cerebella of 7-day-old rats was studied using [3H]GABA as the ligand. The granule cells were cultured in the presence of the specific GABA receptor agonist 4, 5, 6, 7......-tetrahydroisoxazolo [5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP, 150 microM) or THIP plus the antagonist bicuculline methobromide (150 microM of each) or in the absence of the agonist or antagonist. Membranes isolated from granule cells cultured in a medium without the GABA agonist revealed a single binding site for GABA with a...... binding constant (KD) of 7.9 +/- 0.4 nM and a Bmax of 3.42 +/- 0.08 pmol X mg-1 protein. Membranes from cells cultured in the presence of THIP had two binding sites for GABA with KD-values of 6.8 +/- 0.9 nM and 476 +/- 311 nM, respectively. The corresponding Bmax values were 4.41 +/- 0.42 pmol X mg-1 and...

  17. Effect of benzene on the cerebellar structure and behavioral characteristics in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali; Rafati; Mahboobeh; Erfanizadeh; Ali; Noorafshan; Saied; Karbalay-Doust

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of benzene on rat’s cerebellum structure and behavioral characteristics, including anxiety and motor impairment.Methods: Twenty rats were randomly allocated into two groups orally receiving distilled water and benzene(200 mg/kg/day). A total of 10 rats were used at the beginning of benzene exposure. Two rats died during benzene treatment and 8 rats remained for evaluation of the behavioral test and finally 6 rats underwent histological assessment. At the end of the 4th week, motor function and anxiety were evaluated in rotarod test and elevated plus maze, respectively. Besides, the cerebellum was dissected for structural assessment using stereological methods.Results: Performance of the benzene-treated rats in fixed and accelerating speed rotarod was impaired and their riding time(endurance) was lower compared to the control group(P = 0.02). The benzene-treated rats also spent less time in the open arms and had fewer entrances to the open arms in comparison to the control group, indicating anxiety(P = 0.01). The total volume of the cerebellar hemisphere, its cortex, intracerebellar nuclei, total number of the Purkinje, Bergmann, Golgi, granule, neurons and glial cells of the molecular layer, and neurons and glial cells of the intracerebellar nuclei were reduced by 34%-76% in the benzene-treated rats in comparison to the distilled water group(P = 0.003). The most cell loss was seen in Bergmann glia. Conclusions: The structure of cerebellum altered after benzene treatment. In addition, motor impairment and anxiety could be seen in benzene-treated rats.

  18. Effect of benzene on the cerebellar structure and behavioral characteristics in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Rafati; Mahboobeh Erfanizadeh; Ali Noorafshan; Saied Karbalay-Doust

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of benzene on rat’s cerebellum structure and behavioral characteristics, including anxiety and motor impairment. Methods:Twenty rats were randomly allocated into two groups orally receiving distilled water and benzene (200 mg/kg/day). A total of 10 rats were used at the beginning of benzene exposure. Two rats died during benzene treatment and 8 rats remained for evaluation of the behavioral test and finally 6 rats underwent histological assessment. At the end of the 4th week, motor function and anxiety were evaluated in rotarod test and elevated plus maze, respectively. Besides, the cerebellum was dissected for structural assessment using stereological methods. Results:Performance of the benzene-treated rats in fixed and accelerating speed rotarod was impaired and their riding time (endurance) was lower compared to the control group (P=0.02). The benzene-treated rats also spent less time in the open arms and had fewer entrances to the open arms in comparison to the control group, indicating anxiety (P=0.01). The total volume of the cerebellar hemisphere, its cortex, intracerebellar nuclei, total number of the Purkinje, Bergmann, Golgi, granule, neurons and glial cells of the molecular layer, and neurons and glial cells of the intracerebellar nuclei were reduced by 34%-76%in the benzene-treated rats in comparison to the distilled water group (P=0.003). The most cell loss was seen in Bergmann glia. Conclusions:The structure of cerebellum altered after benzene treatment. In addition, motor impairment and anxiety could be seen in benzene-treated rats.

  19. Comparison of Individual and Combined Effects of Four Endocrine Disruptors on Estrogen Receptor Beta Transcription in Cerebellar Cell Culture: The Modulatory Role of Estradiol and Triiodo-Thyronine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocsak, Gergely; Kiss, David Sandor; Toth, Istvan; Goszleth, Greta; Bartha, Tibor; Frenyo, Laszlo V.; Horvath, Tamas L.; Zsarnovszky, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Humans and animals are continuously exposed to a number of environmental substances that act as endocrine disruptors (EDs). While a growing body of evidence is available to prove their adverse health effects, very little is known about the consequences of simultaneous exposure to a combination of such chemicals; Methods: Here, we used an in vitro model to demonstrate how exposure to bisphenol A, zearalenone, arsenic, and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, alone or in combination, affect estrogen receptor β (ERβ) mRNA expression in primary cerebellar cell cultures. Additionally, we also show the modulatory role of intrinsic biological factors, such as estradiol (E2), triiodo-thyronine (T3), and glial cells, as potential effect modulators; Results: Results show a wide diversity in ED effects on ERβ mRNA expression, and that the magnitude of these ED effects highly depends on the presence or absence of E2, T3, and glial cells; Conclusion: The observed potency of the EDs to influence ERβ mRNA expression, and the modulatory role of E2, T3, and the glia suggests that environmental ED effects may be masked as long as the hormonal milieu is physiological, but may tend to turn additive or superadditive in case of hormone deficiency. PMID:27338438

  20. Mapping of equine cerebellar abiotrophy to ECA2 and identification of a potential causative mutation affecting expression of MUTYH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Leah S; Cooper, Caitlin A; Famula, Thomas R; Murray, James D; Penedo, M Cecilia T

    2011-02-01

    Equine Cerebellar Abiotrophy (CA) is a neurological disease found in Arabian horses. CA is characterized by post-natal degeneration of the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. Signs of CA include ataxia, head tremors, and a lack of balance equilibrium. We have discovered a linkage of the CA phenotype to a microsatellite marker on ECA2 and identified a region of conserved homozygosity spanning approximately 142 kb. Complete sequencing of the four genes in this region identified one SNP found only in Arabian horses, located in exon 4 of TOE1 and approximately 1200 base pairs upstream of MUTYH, adjacent to a possible binding site for the transcription factor GATA2. qPCR analysis of cDNA from the cerebella of affected and unaffected horses suggested that MUTYH expression is down-regulated in affected horses. This SNP may therefore have a function effect on TOE1, or a regulatory effect on MUTYH by negatively affecting the binding affinity of GATA2. PMID:21126570

  1. Two new cases of anti-Ca (anti-ARHGAP26/GRAF autoantibody-associated cerebellar ataxia

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    Jarius Sven

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently, we discovered a novel serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF autoantibody (anti-Ca to Purkinje cells in a patient with autoimmune cerebellar ataxia (ACA and identified the RhoGTPase-activating protein 26 (ARHGAP26; alternative designations include GTPase regulator associated with focal adhesion kinase pp125, GRAF, and oligophrenin-1-like protein, OPHN1L as the target antigen. Here, we report on two new cases of ARHGAP26 autoantibody-positive ACA that were first diagnosed after publication of the index case study. While the index patient developed ACA following an episode of respiratory infection with still no evidence for malignancy 52 months after onset, neurological symptoms heralded ovarian cancer in one of the patients described here. Our finding of anti-Ca/anti-ARHGAP26 antibodies in two additional patients supports a role of autoimmunity against ARHGAP26 in the pathogenesis of ACA. Moreover, the finding of ovarian cancer in one of our patients suggests that anti-Ca/anti-ARHGAP26-positive ACA might be of paraneoplastic aetiology in some cases. In conclusion, testing for anti-Ca/anti-ARHGAP26 should be included in the diagnostic work-up of patients with ACA, and an underlying tumour should be considered in patients presenting with anti-Ca/ARHGAP26 antibody-positive ACA.

  2. Primate Cerebellar Granule Cells Exhibit a Tonic GABAAR Conductance that is not Affected by Alcohol: A Possible Cellular Substrate of the Low Level of Response Phenotype.

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    Claudia eMohr

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In many rodent brain regions, alcohol increases vesicular release of GABA, resulting in an increase in the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs and the magnitude of tonic GABAA receptor (GABAAR currents. A neglected issue in translating the rodent literature to humans is the possibility that phylogenetic differences alter the actions of alcohol. To address this issue we made voltage-clamp recordings from granule cells (GCs in cerebellar slices from the non-human primate, Macaca fascicularis. We found that similar to Sprague Dawley rats (SDRs, non-human primate (NHP GCs exhibit a tonic conductance generated by 6 subunit containing GABAARs, as evidenced by its blockade by the broad spectrum GABAAR antagonist, GABAzine (10M, inhibition by 6 selective antagonist, furosemide (100M, and enhancement by THDOC (10-20nM and THIP (500nM. In contrast to SDR GCs, in most NHP GCs (~60%, application of EtOH (25-105mM did not increase sIPSC frequency or the tonic GABAAR current. In a minority of cells (~40%, EtOH did increase sIPSC frequency and the tonic current. The relative lack of response to EtOH was associated with reduced expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, which we recently reported mediates EtOH-induced enhancement of vesicular GABA release in rats. The EtOH-induced increase in tonic GABAAR current was significantly smaller in NHPs than in SDRs, presumably due to less GABA release, because there were no obvious differences in the density of GABAARs or GABA transporters between SDR and NHP GCs. Thus, EtOH does not directly modulate 6 subunit GABAARs in NHPs. Instead, EtOH enhanced GABAergic transmission is mediated by enhanced GABA release. Further, SDR GC responses to alcohol are only representative of a subpopulation of NHP GCs. This suggests that the impact of EtOH on NHP cerebellar physiology will be reduced compared to SDRs, and will likely have different computational and behavioral

  3. A case of subacute cerebellar degeneration associated with pleocytosis and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 44 year old woman was healthy until January 3, 1986, when she had headache. On January 9, she developed gait ataxia and dysarthria. Cerebellar ataxia worsened rapidly. Aftar a week she could not sit without support and her consciousness was disturbed. Corticosteroid was administrated and consciousness proved alert, but cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria remained unchanged. The patient was found carcinoma of the lung in August 1986. Characteristic features of clinical and laboratory findings of this patient are acute progression, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis of 1,064/3 cells (860 mononuclear cell, 204 polymorphonuclear cell), and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning. Though the mechanism of acute cerebellar degeneration is still uncertained, inflammatory process was supported to exist in cerebellum of this case. (author)

  4. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias

    OpenAIRE

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S.; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Mi...

  5. Cerebellar Neuroblastoma in 2.5 Years Old Child

    OpenAIRE

    Pedram, Mohammad; Vafaie, Majid; Fekri, Kiavash; Haghi, Sabahat; Rashidi, Iran; Pirooti, Chia

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the third most common malignancy of childhood, after leukemia and brain tumors. Only 2% of all neuroblastoma occur in the brain. Primary cerebellar neuroblastoma is an specific subset of Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors (PNET). Meduloblastoma is a relatively common and well-established entity, consisting of primitive and multipotential cells that may exhibit some evidence of neuroblastic or gliad differentiation. But cerebellar neuroblastoma with ultrastractural evidence of s...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebellar Schistosomiasis mansoni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 15-year-old boy was admitted to hospital with a history of headache, dizziness, vomiting and double vision that started two weeks before. His parents denied any previous disease. During clinical examination he presented diplopia on lateral gaze to the left and horizontal nystagmus. No major neurological dysfunction was detected. He was well built, mentally responsive and perceptive. Laboratory findings revealed a leukocyte count of 10,000/mL, a normal red blood cell count and no eosinophilia. The magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the brain showed a left cerebellar lesion with mass effect compressing the surrounding tissues. Contrast-enhanced images showed a mass like structure and punctate nodules (Figures A and B: axial and coronal contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images showed the nodular - yellow arrows - enhancement pattern of a left cerebellar intraxial lesion). The lesion extended to the vermis and brachium pons and compressed the medulla. There was no hydrocephalus. He was taken to the operating room with the presumptive diagnosis of a neuroglial tumor, and submitted to a lateral suboccipital craniectomy. A brown, brittle tumoral mass without a clearly defined margin with the cerebellar tissue was removed. Microscopic examination revealed schistosomal granulomas in the productive phase in the cerebellum (Figure C). After surgery, treatment with praziquantel (50 mg/kg/dia, single dose) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) was offered and the patient improved quickly. Thirty days later he was seen again at the outpatient clinic: he was asymptomatic and with no neurological impairment. This is the eighth case of cerebellar involvement in schistosomiasis mansoni and the second report of a tumoral form of cerebellar schistosomiasis documented by magnetic resonance images. (author)

  7. [Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome secondary to a cerebellar tumour].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Carreras-Sáez, I; García-Peñas, J J; Fournier-Del Castillo, C; Villalobos-Reales, J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is characterized by disturbances of executive function, impaired spatial cognition, linguistic difficulties, and personality change. The case of an 11 year old boy is presented, with behavior problems, learning difficulties and social interaction problems. In the physical examination he had poor visual contact, immature behavior, reduced expressive language and global motor disability with gait dyspraxia, with no defined cerebellar motor signs. In the neuropsychological evaluation he has a full scale overall intellectual quotient of 84, with signs of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. A tumour affecting inferior cerebellar vermis was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging, which had not significantly grown during 5 years of follow up. The cerebellum participates in controlling cognitive and affective functions. Cerebellar pathology must be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cognitive or learning disorder with associated behavioral and emotional components. PMID:24954915

  8. Multiplicative gain modulation arising from inhibitory synaptic plasticity in the cerebellar nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Bampasakis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurons use the rate of action potentials to encode sensory variables. This makes the output rate as a function of input, also known as input-output (I–O relationship, a core computational function in neuronal processing. The introduction, or increase, of a modulatory input, can transform this function in multiple ways: additive transformations result in a shift, and multiplicative transformations in a change of slope of the I–O relationship. This slope change is known as gain modulation, and it can implement important forms of neural computation such as coordinate transformations. Gain modulation can be found in a wide range of brain systems, including the cerebellum, where it can be enabled by synaptic plasticity at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. We use a realistic, conductance based, multi-compartmental model of a cerebellar nucleus (CN neuron, to investigate the determinants of gain modulation mediated by synaptic plasticity. In particular, we are interested in the effect of short term depression (STD at the inhibitory synapse from Purkinje cells (PCs to CN neurons. Considering the inhibitory PC input as the driving input, we compare the I–O relationship of the CN neuron in the presence and absence of STD for 20 Hz of excitatory synaptic input from mossy fibers (MFs, and find that STD introduces a gain change, changing the slope of the I–O function. We then proceed to compare the transformation performed by the increase of the modulatory input from 20 to 50 Hz, in the presence and absence of STD. We find that the presence of STD in the inhibitory synapse introduces a multiplicative component in the transformation performed by the excitatory input, an effect that persists for different levels of STD, and various combinations of regularity and synchronicity in the input.

  9. The role of GABAC receptors in the regulation of cerebellar metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: GABAC (γ-aminobutyric acid) receptors are characterised by their insensitivity to the GABAA-selective antagonist, bicuculline and the GABAB-selective agonist, baclofen. These receptors are composed of a homo- or hetero-oligomeric assembly of novel subunits termed ρ1 and ρ2. The subunit ρ1 is located mainly in the retina, although it has been identified in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, whilst ρ2 is more widely expressed in the CNS (cerebellum, hippocampus and cortex). The functional role of these receptors has yet to be established. They may be involved in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle, modulation of excitatory neurotransmitter release and in the inhibition of pre-synaptic calcium currents. The present study investigated the potential role of GABAC receptors in guinea pig cerebellar tissue slice metabolism by analysing the fate of 13C from [3-13C]pyruvate by NMR spectroscopy, in the absence (control) and presence (20 μM) of the GABAC selective antagonist, (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methyl-phosphonic acid TPMPA). Net flux and fractional enrichment of Glu, GABA, Gln, Ala and Asp isotopomers was measured by NMR spectroscopy and the rate of efflux of amino acids into the buffer was estimated by HPLC. Net flux of 13C into Glu C3 and C4 significantly increased, but release of Glu into the buffer was decreased by TPMPA. There was no increase of net flux into Gln C4, and net flux into Ala C3 was decreased. These data suggest that TPMPA-sensitive GABAC receptors influence the release of neurotransmitter glutamate in the cerebellum

  10. Role of the Ink4a/Arf tumor suppressors in cerebellar development, stem cells and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk-Lingbeek, Merel Esmée

    2005-01-01

    In order to take proper cell fate decisions, cells have to guide their biochemical machinery through the appropriate decisions in both differentiation and proliferation. Especially for stem cells such decisions are critical as they have the capacity to self-renew, i.e. give rise to new daughter stem

  11. Oxidative injury in multiple sclerosis cerebellar grey matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Kevin; Redondo, Juliana; Hares, Kelly; Rice, Claire; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2016-07-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction is a significant contributor to disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). Both white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) injury occurs within MS cerebellum and, within GM, demyelination, inflammatory cell infiltration and neuronal injury contribute to on-going pathology. The precise nature of cerebellar GM injury is, however, unknown. Oxidative stress pathways with ultimate lipid peroxidation and cell membrane injury occur extensively in MS and the purpose of this study was to investigate these processes in MS cerebellar GM. Post-mortem human cerebellar GM from MS and control subjects was analysed immunohistochemically, followed by semi-quantitative analysis of markers of cellular injury, lipid peroxidation and anti-oxidant enzyme expression. We have shown evidence for reduction in myelin and neuronal markers in MS GM, coupled to an increase in expression of a microglial marker. We also show that the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal co-localises with myelin and its levels negatively correlate to myelin basic protein levels. Furthermore, superoxide dismutase (SOD1 and 2) enzymes, localised within cerebellar neurons, are up-regulated, yet the activation of subsequent enzymes responsible for the detoxification of hydrogen peroxide, catalase and glutathione peroxidase are relatively deficient. These studies provide evidence for oxidative injury in MS cerebellar GM and further help define disease mechanisms within the MS brain. PMID:27086975

  12. In vitro study of uptake and synthesis of creatine and its precursors by cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes suggests some hypotheses on the physiopathology of the inherited disorders of creatine metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carducci Claudia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of the inherited disorders of creatine (Cr synthesis and transport in the last few years disclosed the importance of blood Cr supply for the normal functioning of the brain. These putatively rare diseases share a common pathogenetic mechanism (the depletion of brain Cr and similar phenotypes characterized by mental retardation, language disturbances, seizures and movement disorders. In the effort to improve our knowledge on the mechanisms regulating Cr pool inside the nervous tissue, Cr transport and synthesis and related gene transcripts were explored in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes. Methods Cr uptake and synthesis were explored in vitro by incubating monotypic primary cultures of rat type I astrocytes and cerebellar granule cells with: a D3-Creatine (D3Cr and D3Cr plus β-guanidinopropionate (GPA, an inhibitor of Cr transporter, and b labelled precursors of Guanidinoacetate (GAA and Cr (Arginine, Arg; Glycine, Gly. Intracellular D3Cr and labelled GAA and Cr were assessed by ESI-MS/MS. Creatine transporter (CT1, L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT, and S-adenosylmethionine:guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT gene expression was assessed in the same cells by real time PCR. Results D3Cr signal was extremely high in cells incubated with this isotope (labelled/unlabelled Cr ratio reached about 10 and 122, respectively in cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes and was reduced by GPA. Labelled Arg and Gly were taken up by the cells and incorporated in GAA, whose concentration paralleled that of these precursors both in the extracellular medium and inside the cells (astrocytes. In contrast, the increase of labelled Cr was relatively much more limited since labelled Cr after precursors' supplementation did not exceed 2,7% (cerebellar granule cells and 21% (astrocytes of unlabelled Cr. Finally, AGAT, GAMT and SLC6A8 were expressed in both kind of cells. Conclusions Our

  13. The Role of Intermittent Hypoxia on the Proliferative Inhibition of Rat Cerebellar Astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chun Chiu

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea syndrome, characterized by intermittent hypoxia (IH, is linked with increased oxidative stress. This study investigates the mechanisms underlying IH and the effects of IH-induced oxidative stress on cerebellar astrocytes. Rat primary cerebellar astrocytes were kept in an incubator with an oscillating O2 concentration between 20% and 5% every 30 min for 1-4 days. Although the cell loss increased with the duration, the IH incubation didn't induce apoptosis or necrosis, but rather a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest of cerebellar astrocytes was noted. ROS accumulation was associated with cell loss during IH. PARP activation, resulting in p21 activation and cyclin D1 degradation was associated with cell cycle G0/G1 arrest of IH-treated cerebellar astrocytes. Our results suggest that IH induces cell loss by enhancing oxidative stress, PARP activation and cell cycle G0/G1 arrest in rat primary cerebellar astrocytes.

  14. Maternal mobile phone exposure adversely affects the electrophysiological properties of Purkinje neurons in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghani, M; Shabani, M; Moazzami, K

    2013-10-10

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) radiations emitted from mobile phones may cause structural damage to neurons. With the increased usage of mobile phones worldwide, concerns about their possible effects on the nervous system are rising. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the possible effects of prenatal EMF exposure on the cerebellum of offspring Wistar rats. Rats in the EMF group were exposed to 900-MHz pulse-EMF irradiation for 6h per day during all gestation period. Ten offspring per each group were evaluated for behavioral and electrophysiological evaluations. Cerebellum-related behavioral dysfunctions were analyzed using motor learning and cerebellum-dependent functional tasks (Accelerated Rotarod, Hanging and Open field tests). Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were used for electrophysiological evaluations. The results of the present study failed to show any behavioral abnormalities in rats exposed to chronic EMF radiation. However, whole-cell patch clamp recordings revealed decreased neuronal excitability of Purkinje cells in rats exposed to EMF. The most prominent changes included afterhyperpolarization amplitude, spike frequency, half width and first spike latency. In conclusion, the results of the present study show that prenatal EMF exposure results in altered electrophysiological properties of Purkinje neurons. However, these changes may not be severe enough to alter the cerebellum-dependent functional tasks. PMID:23906636

  15. Neuronal classification and marker gene identification via single-cell expression profiling of brainstem vestibular neurons subserving cerebellar learning

    OpenAIRE

    Kodama, Takashi; Guerrero, Shiloh; Shin, Minyoung; Moghadam, Seti; Faulstich, Michael; du Lac, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    Identification of marker genes expressed in specific cell types is essential for the genetic dissection of neural circuits. Here we report a new strategy for classifying heterogeneous populations of neurons into functionally distinct types and for identifying associated marker genes. Quantitative single-cell expression profiling of genes related to neurotransmitters and ion channels enables functional classification of neurons; transcript profiles for marker gene candidates identify molecular...

  16. Sleep disorders in cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Pedroso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias comprise a wide range of etiologies leading to central nervous system-related motor and non-motor symptoms. Recently, a large body of evidence has demonstrated a high frequency of non-motor manifestations in cerebellar ataxias, specially in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA. Among these non-motor dysfunctions, sleep disorders have been recognized, although still under or even misdiagnosed. In this review, we highlight the main sleep disorders related to cerebellar ataxias focusing on REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, restless legs syndrome (RLS, periodic limb movement in sleep (PLMS, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, insomnia and sleep apnea.

  17. Membrane trafficking and mitochondrial abnormalities precede subunit c deposition in a cerebellar cell model of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cattaneo Elena

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background JNCL is a recessively inherited, childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease most-commonly caused by a ~1 kb CLN3 mutation. The resulting loss of battenin activity leads to deposition of mitochondrial ATP synthase, subunit c and a specific loss of CNS neurons. We previously generated Cln3Δex7/8 knock-in mice, which replicate the common JNCL mutation, express mutant battenin and display JNCL-like pathology. Results To elucidate the consequences of the common JNCL mutation in neuronal cells, we used P4 knock-in mouse cerebella to establish conditionally immortalized CbCln3 wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous neuronal precursor cell lines, which can be differentiated into MAP-2 and NeuN-positive, neuron-like cells. Homozygous CbCln3Δex7/8 precursor cells express low levels of mutant battenin and, when aged at confluency, accumulate ATPase subunit c. Recessive phenotypes are also observed at sub-confluent growth; cathepsin D transport and processing are altered, although enzyme activity is not significantly affected, lysosomal size and distribution are altered, and endocytosis is reduced. In addition, mitochondria are abnormally elongated, cellular ATP levels are decreased, and survival following oxidative stress is reduced. Conclusions These findings reveal that battenin is required for intracellular membrane trafficking and mitochondrial function. Moreover, these deficiencies are likely to be early events in the JNCL disease process and may particularly impact neuronal survival.

  18. Interactive effects involving different classes of excitatory amino acid receptors and the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1990-01-01

    Differentiating granule cells develop survival requirements in culture which can be met by treatment with high K+ or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and, according to our recent findings, also with low concentrations of kainic acid (KA, 50 microM). We have now attempted to elucidate the mechanism(s) ...

  19. Comparison of PC12 and Cerebellar Granule Cell Cultures for Evaluating Neurite Outgrowth Using High Content Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of high-throughput assays for chemical screening and hazard identification is a pressing priority worldwide. One approach uses in vitro, cell-based assays which recapitulate biological events observed in vivo. Neurite outgrowth is one such critical cellular process un...

  20. Metastatic cerebellar tumor of papillary thyroid carcinoma mimicking cerebellar hemangioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ideguchi, Makoto; Nishizaki, Takafumi; Ikeda, Norio; Nakano, Shigeki; Okamura, Tomomi; Fujii, Natsumi; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Ikeda, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma generally (PTC) have a favorable prognosis. This metastasis is rare in the central nervous system. Brain metastasis has a relatively poor prognosis. We present a rare case of cerebellar metastasis, one that mimics a solid type cerebellar hemangioblastoma and because of which it was very hard to reach accurate preoperative diagnosis. Accurate diagnosis was challenging because of the similar imaging and histopathological findings for ...

  1. Cerebellar Malformations and Cognitive Disdorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The behavioral developmental profile of 27 children and adults (17 males and 10 females with congenital cerebellar malformations was determined in a clinical, neuroradiological and neuropsychological study at the Scientific Institute 'E Medea', University of Milano, Italy.

  2. Cognition and Emotion in Cerebellar Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT... Cognition and Emotion in Cerebellar Disorders Are problems in the areas of cognition and ... active investigation. Why is this important for the ataxia patient? Cerebellar patients and families generally find it helpful to ...

  3. Familial cerebellar ataxia and diabetes insipidus.

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, I C; O'Malley, B P; Young, I D

    1988-01-01

    Two sisters are reported who both developed partial cranial diabetes insipidus in their 4th decade, followed by progressive cerebellar ataxia. This appears to be the first report of cerebellar ataxia and diabetes insipidus occurring together as a genetic entity.

  4. Haemangioblastoma, Histological and immunohistological study of an enigmatic cerebellar tumour

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz-Sánchez, F. F.; Rossi, M L; Rodríguez-Prados, S.; Nakamura, N; Hughes, J T; Coakham, H. B.

    1990-01-01

    Paraffin-embedded blocks of 36 cerebellar haemangioblastomas were reacted with a panel of antibodies including glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, epithelial membrane antigen, cytokeratin, Factor VIII, a neuroendocrine marker and with Ulex europaeus. agglutinin The main histological features, apart from the characteristic large abnormal vessels, were a prominent reticulin network, a cystic architecture and cellular and nuclear polymorphism. Two cell type...

  5. Hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage and cerebellar hemorrhage caused by cryptic angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of 44 patients with hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage and nine patients with cerebellar hemorrhage caused by small angiomas is described. Hypertensive hemorrhage occurred most frequently in the patients in their seventies, whereas the onset of angioma-caused hemorrhage was often seen below the age of 40. Clinical syndromes of cerebellar hemorrhages can be categorized into three basic types: the vertigo syndrome, cerebellar dysfunction syndrome and brain stem compression syndrome. Patients with small (>= 2 cm in diameter in CT scans) and medium-sized (2 cm = 3 cm) hematomas deteriorated into unresponsive conditions and developed signs of brain stem compression. Surgical mortality was 32% in the hypertensive group, while it was 0% in the angioma group. Mortality as well as morbidity in both groups was strongly influenced by the preoperative status of consciousness. Our results suggest that substantial improvement could be obtained in the overall outcome of this disease by emergency craniectomy and removal of hematomas in all patients with large hematomas regardless of the levels of consciousness and regardless of the causes of bleeding. Furthermore, when clinical information and CT findings are suggestive of a ''cryptic'' angioma as the causative lesion, posterior fossa surgery may be indicated to extirpate the lesion, even if the hematoma is small. (author)

  6. Defects in the CAPN1 gene result in alterations in cerebellar development and in cerebellar ataxia in mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yubin; Hersheson, Joshua; Lopez, Dulce; Hamad, Monia Ben; Liu, Yan; Lee, Ka-Hung; Pinto, Vanessa; Seinfeld, Jeff; Wiethoff, Sarah; Sun, Jiandong; Amouri, Rim; Hentati, Faycal; Baudry, Neema; Tran, Jennifer; Singleton, Andrew B; Coutelier, Marie; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Durr, Alexandra; Bi, Xiaoning; Houlden, Henry; Baudry, Michel

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous CAPN1 null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knock-out (KO) mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1 mediated cleavage of PH domain and Leucine rich repeat Protein Phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1), which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis, and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans. PMID:27320912

  7. Gene expression as a sensitive endpoint to evaluate cell differentiation and maturation of the developing central nervous system in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) exposed to pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major advantage of primary neuronal cultures for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing is their ability to replicate the crucial stages of neurodevelopment. In our studies using primary culture of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) we have evaluated whether the gene expression relevant to the most critical developmental processes such as neuronal differentiation (NF-68 and NF-200) and functional maturation (NMDA and GABAA receptors), proliferation and differentiation of astrocytes (GFAP and S100β) as well as the presence of neural precursor cells (nestin and Sox10) could be used as an endpoint for in vitro DNT. The expression of these genes was assessed after exposure to various pesticides (paraquat parathion, dichlorvos, pentachlorophenol and cycloheximide) that could induce developmental neurotoxicity through different mechanisms. All studied pesticides significantly modified the expression of selected genes, related to the different stages of neuronal and/or glial cell development and maturation. The most significant changes were observed after exposure to paraquat and parathion (i.e. down-regulation of mRNA expression of NF-68 and NF-200, NMDA and GABAA receptors). Similarly, dichlorvos affected mainly neurons (decreased mRNA expression of NF-68 and GABAA receptors) whereas cycloheximide had an effect on neurons and astrocytes, as significant decreases in the mRNA expression of both neurofilaments (NF-68 and NF-200) and the astrocyte marker (S100β) were observed. Our results suggest that toxicity induced by pesticides that target multiple pathways of neurodevelopment can be identified by studying expression of genes that are involved in different stages of cell development and maturation, and that gene expression could be used as a sensitive endpoint for initial screening to identify the compounds with the potential to cause developmental neurotoxicity

  8. Cerebellar arteriovenous malformations in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, P.D. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Acad. Dept. of Radiol.; Blaser, S.; Armstrong, D.; Chuang, S.; Harwood-Nash, D. [Division of Neuroradiology, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Humphreys, R.P. [Division of Neurosurgery, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    1998-05-01

    We review the presentation, imaging findings and outcome in 18 children with cerebellar arteriovenous malformations (AVM). This group is of particular interest because of the reported poor outcome despite modern imaging and neurosurgical techniques. All children had CT and 15 underwent catheter angiography at presentation. Several of the children in the latter part of the study had MRI. Of the 18 children, 17 presented with a ruptured AVM producing intracranial haemorrhage. The remaining child presented with temporal lobe epilepsy and was shown to have temporal, vermian and cerebellar hemisphere AVM. This child had other stigmata of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. Three other children had pre-existing abnormalities of possible relevance. One had a vascular malformation of the cheek and mandible, one a documented chromosomal abnormality and another a midline cleft upper lip and palate. Six of the 17 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM died within 7 days of the ictus. Vascular pathology other than an AVM was found in 10 of the 14 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM who had angiography: 4 intranidal aneurysms, 5 venous aneurysms and 2 cases of venous outflow obstruction (one child having both an aneurysm and obstruction). The severity of clinical presentation was directly related to the size of the acute haematoma, which was a reasonable predictor of outcome. (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 tabs., 23 refs.

  9. Cerebellar arteriovenous malformations in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the presentation, imaging findings and outcome in 18 children with cerebellar arteriovenous malformations (AVM). This group is of particular interest because of the reported poor outcome despite modern imaging and neurosurgical techniques. All children had CT and 15 underwent catheter angiography at presentation. Several of the children in the latter part of the study had MRI. Of the 18 children, 17 presented with a ruptured AVM producing intracranial haemorrhage. The remaining child presented with temporal lobe epilepsy and was shown to have temporal, vermian and cerebellar hemisphere AVM. This child had other stigmata of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. Three other children had pre-existing abnormalities of possible relevance. One had a vascular malformation of the cheek and mandible, one a documented chromosomal abnormality and another a midline cleft upper lip and palate. Six of the 17 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM died within 7 days of the ictus. Vascular pathology other than an AVM was found in 10 of the 14 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM who had angiography: 4 intranidal aneurysms, 5 venous aneurysms and 2 cases of venous outflow obstruction (one child having both an aneurysm and obstruction). The severity of clinical presentation was directly related to the size of the acute haematoma, which was a reasonable predictor of outcome. (orig.)

  10. Language Impairment in Cerebellar Ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, Judith; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Oostveen, Judith; Knuijt, Simone; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Kremer, Berry (H. ) P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several studies have suggested that language impairment can be observed in patients with cerebellar pathology. The aim of this study was to investigate language performance in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Methods: We assessed speech and language in 29 SCA6 patients

  11. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  12. Electrophysiological effects of haloperidol on isolated rabbit Purkinje fibers and guinea pigs papillary muscles under normal and simulated ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong YAN; Lu-feng CHENG; Hong-yan SONG; Subat TURDI; Parhat KERRAM

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Overdoses of haloperidol are associated with major ventricular arrhythmias,cardiac conduction block, and sudden death. The aim of this experiment was to study the effect of haloperidol on the action potentials in cardiac Purkinje fibers and papillary muscles under normal and simulated ischemia conditions in rabbits and guinea pigs. Methods: Using the standard intracellular microelectrode technique, we examined the effects of haloperidol on the action potential param-eters [action potential amplitude (APA), phase 0 maximum upstroke velocity (Vmax),action potential amplitude at 90% of repolarization (APD90), and effective refrac-tory period (ERP)] in rabbit cardiac Purkinje fibers and guinea pig cardiac papillary cells, in which both tissues were under simulated ischemic conditions. Results: Under ischemic conditions, different concentrations of haloperidol depressed APA and prolonged APD90 in a concentration-dependent manner in rabbit Purkinje fibers. Haloperidol (3 μmol/L) significantly depressed APA and prolonged APD90,and from 1 μmol/L, haloperidol showed significant depression on Vmax; ERP was not significantly affected. In guinea pig cardiac papillary muscles, the thresholds of significant reduction in APA, Vmax, EPR, and APD90 were 10, 0.3, 1, and 1 μmol/L, respectively, for haloperidol. Conclusion: Compared with cardiac con-ductive tissues, papillary muscles were more sensitive to ischemic conditions. Under ischemia, haloperidol prolonged ERP and APD90 in a concentration-depen-dent manner and precipitated the decrease in Vmax induced by ischemia. The shortening of ERP and APD90 in papillary muscle action potentials may be inhibi-ted by haloperidol.

  13. Cerebellar ataxia and functional genomics : Identifying the routes to cerebellar neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C J L M; Verbeek, D S

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by atrophy of the cerebellum leading to motor dysfunction, balance problems, and limb and gait ataxia. These include among others, the dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias, recessive cerebellar ataxias such as Fried

  14. Cerebellar ataxia of early onset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight cases of childhood cerebellar ataxia were reported. All these cases showed chronic cerebellar ataxia with early onset, and the other diseases of cerebellum such as infections, neoplasms and storage diseases were excluded by clinical symptoms and laboratory findings including blood counts, blood chemistry, lactate, pyruvate, ceruloplasmine, urinalysis, serum immunoglobulins, amino acid analysis in blood and urine, CSF analysis, leukocyte lysosomal enzymes, MCV, EMG, EEG and brain X-CT. Two pairs of siblings were included in this study. The clinical diagnosis were cerebellar type (5), spinocerebellar type (1), one Marinesco-Sjoegren syndrome and undetermined type (1). The age of onset was 1 to 5 years. The chief complaint was motor developmental delay in 6 cases; among them 5 patients could walk alone at the ages of 2 to 3 years'. Mental retardation was observed in 7 cases and epilepsy in 2. TRH was effective in 5 cases. The MRI study revealed that the area of medial sagittal slice of the cerebellum was reduced significantly in all cases and also that of pons was reduced in 5 cases. Different from typical adult onset spinocerebellar degenerations, most of the present cases have achieved slow developmental milestones and the clinical course was not progressive. Genetic factors are suspected in the pathogenesis of this disease in some cases. (author)

  15. Cerebellar hemangioblastoma: magnetic resonance findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To characterize the results of magnetic resonance imaging in cerebellar hemangioblastoma. This retrospective study deals with seven cases of histologically-confirmed cerebellar hemangioblastoma after surgery. Another patient, diagnosed as having Von Hippel-Lindau disease, also developed this lesions, but the finding was not histologically confirmed. In all, there were 2 women and 6 men. Three of these patients presented Von Hippel-Lindaus disease. All were studied on a 0.5 T imager with T1, T2 and PD-weighted spin-echo axial planes; T1-weighted sequences were repeated after intravenous gadolinium administration. According to their aspects, the lesions were divided into three groups as follows: cyst containing a mural nodule (n=3)solid tumor (n=3) and cavitated tumor (n=1). In one patient, the lesion was initially solid and was found to present cavitation two years later. Abnormal vascularization was observed in all the tumors except for two small solid tumors, and the findings were not clear in one of the cysts containing a mural nodule. In the differential diagnosis it may be difficult to rule out other tumors, such as cystic astrocytoma. However, magnetic resonance imaging, together with the clinical data, is of diagnostic value in the three morphological types of cerebellar hemangioblastoma. (Author) 15 refs

  16. Crossed cerebral - cerebellar diaschisis : MRI evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty A

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available MRI, done later in life, in two patients with infantile hemiplegia syndrome showed significant volume loss in the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the side of the affected cerebrum. The cerebellar volume loss seemed to correlate with the degree of volume loss in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. These observations provide morphological evidence of the phenomenon of crossed cerebral-cerebellar diaschisis (CCD. Functional neuroimaging studies in support of the concept of CCD has been critically reviewed.

  17. Cerebellar medulloblastoma presenting with skeletal metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Barai Sukanta; Bandopadhayaya G; Julka P; Dhanapathi H; Haloi A; Seith A

    2004-01-01

    Medulloblastomas are highly malignant brain tumours, but only rarely produce skeletal metastases. No case of medulloblastoma has been documented to have produced skeletal metastases prior to craniotomy or shunt surgery. A 21-year-old male presented with pain in the hip and lower back with difficulty in walking of 3 months′ duration. Signs of cerebellar dysfunction were present hence a diagnosis of cerebellar neoplasm or skeletal tuberculosis with cerebellar abscess formation was consid...

  18. High frequency switched-mode stimulation can evoke postsynaptic responses in cerebellar principal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn Van Dongen

    2015-03-01

    These findings are subsequently verified using in vitro experiments in which the response of a Purkinje cell is measured due to a stimulation signal in the molecular layer of the cerebellum of a mouse. For this purpose a stimulator circuit is developed that is able to produce a monophasic high frequency switched-mode stimulation signal. The results confirm the modeling by showing that switched-mode stimulation is able to induce similar responses in the Purkinje cell as classical stimulation using a constant current source. This conclusion opens up possibilities for novel stimulation designs that can improve the performance of the stimulator circuitry. Care has to be taken to avoid losses in the system due to the higher operating frequency.

  19. Vitamin E is essential for Purkinje neuron integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Ulatowski, L.; Parker, R.; Warrier, G.; Sultana, R.; Butterfield, D.A.; Manor, D.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) is an essential dietary antioxidant with important neuroprotective functions. Alpha-tocopherol deficiency manifests primarily in neurological pathologies, notably cerebellar dysfunctions such as spinocerebellar ataxia. To study the roles of α-tocopherol in the cerebellum, we used the Ttpa-/- mice which lack the tocopherol transfer protein (TTP) and are a faithful model of vitamin E deficiency and oxidative stress. When fed vitamin E deficient diet, Ttpa-/- mice ha...

  20. Crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion in brain perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinnouchi, Seishi; Nagamachi, Shigeki; Nishii, Ryuuichi; Futami, Shigemi; Tamura, Shozo [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan); Kawai, Keiichi

    2000-10-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis is a well-known brain SPECT finding in stroke patients. Few reports, however, have described supratentorial and contralateral cerebellar hyperperfusion (crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion, CCH). We assessed the incidence of CCH in 33 patients with cerebral hyperperfusion. Brain SPECT showed CCH in five patients out of 20 epilepsy and three of 13 patients with acute encephalitis. These eight patients with CCH had recent epileptic attack. CCH was found in ECD SPECT as well as HM-PAO. The contralateral cerebellar activity correlated with the cerebral activity in patients with CCH. CCH would have a relation with supratentrial hyperfunction in epilepsy and acute encephalitis. (author)

  1. Cerebellar Hemangioblastoma in a Patient with von Hippel-Lindau Disease : A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Abd. Hamid, D.; Abdullah, J; Ariff, AR.; M. Muhamad; Madhavan, M.

    2000-01-01

    A 23 year-old Chinese woman presented with symptoms of increased intracranial pressure due to obstructive hydrocephalus as a sequel to a mass effect from cerebellar haemangioblastoma. She underwent removal of the right cerebellar haemangioblastoma and ventriculo-peritoneal shunting. She also had bilateral retinal haemangioblastoma, left renal carcinoma, renal and pancreatic cysts without phaeochromocytoma. A left partial nephrectomy was performed for renal cell carcinoma followed by radiother...

  2. Acute cerebellar ataxia and infectious mononucleosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wadhwa, N. K.; Ghose, R R

    1983-01-01

    A 28-year-old man, who presented with acute cerebellar ataxia, was found to have haematological features of infectious mononucleosis. There was serological evidence of recent infection with Epstein-Barr virus. It is speculated that cerebellar dysfunction results from virus-induced inflammatory changes within the central nervous system.

  3. Metronidazole-Induced Cerebellar Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Sabat, Shyam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy.

  4. Metronidazole-induced cerebellar toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agarwal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy.

  5. Cerebellar stroke-manifesting as mania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Jagadesan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed.

  6. Cellular and molecular basis of cerebellar development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Salvador; Andreu, Abraham; Mecklenburg, Nora; Echevarria, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering, and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification, and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function. PMID:23805080

  7. Asymptomatic cerebellar atrophy after acute enteroviral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaszil, Edina; Kamondi, Anita; Csillik, Anita; Velkey, Imre; Szirmai, Imre

    2005-07-01

    We report on a 13-year-old male who had acute enteroviral encephalitis causing cerebellar symptoms at the age of 10 years. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no abnormalities. Clinically he appeared to be recovered completely after 6 months. Twenty-three months after the recovery, MRI was performed because he presented with slight lower-limb and truncal ataxia experienced as lack of foot coordination while playing football or riding a bicycle. MRI demonstrated severe cerebellar atrophy. Clinically he recovered completely in 10 days. Only sophisticated electrophysiological methods revealed cerebellar dysfunction. The case provides evidence for the plasticity of cerebellar regulatory structures involved in the coordination of fine movements. It seems that in childhood the slow, isolated disintegration of cerebellar systems can be compensated for by upper thalamic or telencephalic connections, in a similar way to a congenital deficit of the cerebellum. PMID:15991870

  8. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cerebellar Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador eMartinez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function.

  9. Long-Term Follow-Up Clinical Courses of Cerebellar Hemangioblastoma in von Hippel-Lindau Disease : Two Case Reports and a Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Bong Jin; Kim, Tae Sung; Lim, Young Jin

    2010-01-01

    Although cerebellar hemangioblastomas are histopathologically benign, they yield a degree of malignant clinical behavior in long-term follow-up. We present two cases of long-term progression of renal cell carcinoma, which had been diagnosed as renal cysts during treatment for cerebellar hemangioblastoma. A 14-year-old male with von Hippel-Lindau disease was admitted for a cerebellar hemangioblastoma with multiple spinal hemangioblastomas and a renal cyst. After primary total resection of the ...

  10. A case of human immunodeficiency virus infection with cerebellar ataxia that suggested by an association with autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Shigeto; Kondo, Takayuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakagawa, Tomokazu; Matsumoto, Sadayuki

    2016-04-28

    We report a case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that showed subacute progressive cerebellar ataxia without HIV encephalopathy or other encephalopathies, including progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy or encephalitis of other human herpes virus (HHV) infections. A 43-year-old man exhibited unsteady gait. Neurological examination disclosed ataxia of the trunk and lower extremities. Personality change and dementia were absent. Magnetic resonance imaging did not reveal any abnormal finding, including of the cerebellum. The serum HIV-1-RNA was 1.2 × 10(5) copies/ml, and the absolute CD4 lymphocyte count was 141 cells/ml. Remarkably, the serum anti-Yo antibody, as an anti-cerebellar antibody of paraneoplastic syndrome, and anti-gliadin antibody, associated with celiac disease or gluten ataxia, were positive. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunoglobulin G index was 1.2 (ataxia, cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy might manifest as autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. As regards the association of HIV infection and autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, a previous report suggested that anti-gliadin antibody was detected in about 30% of HIV-infected children, though there is no reference to an association with cerebellar ataxia. Moreover, to our knowledge, detection of anti-Yo antibody in an HIV-infected patient with cerebellar ataxia has not been reported. These findings suggest that, although it is extremely rare, clinicians need to consider HIV infection in a patient exhibiting autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. PMID:27010096

  11. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in Hodgkin′s lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinit Suri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD is a rare disorder presenting typically with acute or subacute severe cerebellar ataxia. PCD is most commonly associated with small cell lung cancer followed by adenocarcinoma of breast and ovary, and Hogdkin′s lymphoma. We report a case of a 54-year-old male with acute-onset pancerebellar syndrome with underlying Hodgkin′s lymphoma. A high index of suspicion of PCD resulted in arriving at an early diagnosis of underlying Hodgkin′s disease. The patient was managed with six cycles of chemotherapy, which resulted in clinical stabilization and reversal of magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities. Antitumor therapy appears to have a significant impact on reversing PCD and hence early diagnosis and intervention for the primary remains the corner stone in stabilizing the neurological condition.

  12. Cerebellar contributions to verbal working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Simon P; Davis, Nick J; Morgan, Helen M; Bracewell, R Martyn

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing evidence for a cerebellar role in working memory. Clinical research has shown that working memory impairments after cerebellar damage and neuroimaging studies have revealed task-specific activation in the cerebellum during working memory processing. A lateralisation of cerebellar function within working memory has been proposed with the right hemisphere making the greater contribution to verbal processing and the left hemisphere for visuospatial tasks. We used continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) to examine whether differences in post-stimulation performance could be observed based on the cerebellar hemisphere stimulated and the type of data presented. We observed that participants were significantly less accurate on a verbal version of a Sternberg task after stimulation to the right cerebellar hemisphere when compared to left hemisphere stimulation. Performance on a visual Sternberg task was unaffected by stimulation of either hemisphere. We discuss our results in the context of prior studies that have used cerebellar stimulation to investigate working memory and highlight the cerebellar role in phonological encoding. PMID:24338673

  13. Pediatric Neurocutaneous Syndromes with Cerebellar Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Neurocutaneous syndromes encompasses a broad group of genetic disorders with different clinical, genetic, and pathologic features that share developmental lesions of the skin as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Cerebellar involvement has been shown in numerous types of neurocutaneous syndrome. It may help or be needed for the diagnosis and to explain the cognitive and behavioral phenotype of affected children. This article describes various types of neurocutaneous syndrome with cerebellar involvement. For each neurocutaneous disease or syndrome, clinical features, genetic, neuroimaging findings, and the potential role of the cerebellar involvement is discussed. PMID:27423801

  14. CT findings in cerebellar hemangioblastomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, E.; Albert, F.

    1982-02-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in 16 personal cases of cerebellar hemangioblastomas are presented. Accordings to other reports in the literature, three-quarters of the tumours were cystic, containing a small mural nodule, whereas the others were predominantly solid. By CT scan the cystic tumours were always identified as roundish or oval space-occupying lesions, sharply demarcated from the surrounding tissue. The solid portion of these tumours, projecting into the cystic part, was delineated more precisely by contrast enhancement, but sometimes escaped identification. On the contrary, even after contrast enhancement the predominantly solid tumours could not be clearly identified as hemangioblastomas. Calcification could not be demonstrated. Additional angiographic investigations were imperative in order to establish the diagnosis, besides visualizing further hypervascular nodules of hemangioblastoma, which CT scanning failed to reveal.

  15. Cerebellar mutism syndrome and its relation to cerebellar cognitive and affective function: Review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yildiz Ozlem

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors of the cerebellum and brainstem account for half of all brain tumors in children. The realization that cerebellar lesions produce clinically relevant intellectual disability makes it important to determine whether neuropsychological abnormalities occur in long-term survivors of pediatric cerebellar tumors. Little is known about the neurobehavioral sequale resulting specifically from the resection of these tumors in this population. We therefore reviewed neuropsychological findings associated with postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome and discuss the further implications for cerebellar cognitive function.

  16. Improved computing scheme for measuring eye alignment with Purkinje images I and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, J C; Backes, A; Pongs, U M; Kirschkamp, T; Dunne, M C

    1997-09-01

    This study introduces an improved computing scheme for determining eye rotation from Purkinje images I and IV. The original computing scheme systematically underestimated eye rotation. Paraxial raytracing calculations revealed that this error resulted from failure to account for the fact that Purkinje images I and IV fall at different distances behind the cornea. The error could be overcome with a correction factor derived from paraxial raytracing calculations. A series of experiments were carried out to test the validity of this correlation factor, involving exact raytracing calculations as well as measurements on physical model eyes and human eyes. The influence on the correction factor of ocular surface asphericity, accommodation, age and ocular component variations were examined. The new method was also compared to Hirschberg's technique, which makes use of Purkinje image I alone, as a means of screening for strabismus. PMID:9390370

  17. Cerebellar Involvement in Ataxia and Generalized Epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Kros (Lieke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The work described in this thesis was performed in order to elucidate the role of different cerebellar modules in ataxia and generalized epilepsy using various techniques including in vivo electrophysiology, optogenetics, pharmacological interventions, immunohistology a

  18. Cerebellar mutism: review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudrunardottir, Thora; Sehested, Astrid; Juhler, Marianne;

    2011-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a common complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. This article reviews current status with respect to incidence, anatomical substrate, pathophysiology, risk factors, surgical considerations, treatment options, prognosis and prevention....

  19. Oral administration of PF-01247324, a subtype-selective Nav1.8 blocker, reverses cerebellar deficits in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon D Shields

    Full Text Available Cerebellar symptoms significantly diminish quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. We previously showed that sodium channel Nav1.8, although normally restricted to peripheral somatosensory neurons, is upregulated in the cerebellum in MS, and that Nav1.8 expression is linked to ataxia and MS-like symptoms in mice. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular administration of the Nav1.8 blocker A-803467 temporarily reversed electrophysiological and behavioral manifestations of disease in a mouse MS model; unfortunately A-803467 is not orally bioavailable, diminishing the potential for translation to human patients. In the present study, we assessed the effect of per os (p.o. dosing of a new orally bioavailable Nav1.8-selective blocker, PF-01247324, in transgenic mice expressing Nav1.8 in Purkinje neurons, and in wildtype mice in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model. PF-01247324 was administered by oral gavage at 1000 mg/kg; control groups received an equal volume of vehicle. Behavioral assays of motor coordination, grip strength, and ataxia were performed. We observed significant improvements in motor coordination and cerebellar-like symptoms in mice that received PF-01247324 compared to control littermates that received vehicle. These preclinical proof-of-concept data suggest that PF-01247324, its derivatives, or other Nav1.8-selective blockers merit further study for providing symptomatic therapy for cerebellar dysfunction in MS and related disorders.

  20. Bilateral Cerebellar Cortical Dysplasia without Other Malformations: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jung Seok; Ahn Kook Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Lee, Sun Jin; Park, Jeong Mi [Catholic University Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Recent advances in MRI have revealed congenital brain malformations and subtle developmental abnormalities of the cerebral and cerebellar cortical architecture. Typical cerebellar cortical dysplasia as a newly categorized cerebellar malformation, has been seen in patients with Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy. Cerebellar cortical dysplasia occurs at the embryonic stage and is often observed in healthy newborns. It is also incidentally and initially detected in adults without symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, cerebellar dysplasia without any related disorders is very rare. We describe the MRI findings in one patient with disorganized foliation of both cerebellar hemispheres without a related disorder or syndrome

  1. Developmental disorders of the brain can be caused by PCBs; low doses of hydroxy-PCBs disrupt thyroid hormone-dependent dendrite formation from Purkinje neurons in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Y.; Kimura-Kuroda, J. [Tokyo Metropol. Inst. for Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, I. [CREST/ JST, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Exposure to some environmental chemicals during the perinatal period causes developmental disorders of the brain. Cognitive impairment and hyperactivity in infants were reported in Taiwan, known as Yu-cheng incidents caused by the accidental contamination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Together with recent experimental data, Kuroda proposes a hypothesis that spatio-temporal disruptions of developing neuronal circuits by PCB exposure can cause the comobidity of learning disorders (LD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autsm with the co-exposure to other environmental chemicals. PCBs and hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs) have similar chemical structures to thyroid hormones (TH), thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). TH deficiency in the perinatal period causes cretinism children with severe cognitive and mental retardation. In primate model, Rice demonstrates that postnatal exposure to PCBs can dramatically influence later behavioral function. Epidemiological studies also indicate the possible developmental neurotoxicity of PCBs accumulated in human bodies. However, the precise underlying mechanisms and which types of PCB or OH-PCB with such effects have yet to be elucidated. It is important to establish a simple, reproducible, and sensitive in vitro assay for determining the effects of PCBs and OH-PCBs on the development of the central nervous system. Recently Iwasaki et al. established a reporter assay system and disclosed that low doses of PCBs potentially interfere TH-dependent gene expressions. This is the first demonstration that PCBs and OH-PCBs directly affect TH-receptor (TR)-mediated gene expressions crucial to the brain development, through unique mechanism. We also have demonstrated TH-dependent development of Purkinje neurons in vitro using a serum-free chemically defined medium. The degree of dendritic development of Purkinje cells is TH dose-dependent and exhibits high sensitivity in the pM order. Therefore, in the present study

  2. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration [PCD]) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis

  3. Oculomotor studies of cerebellar function in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, Caralynn V; Minshew, Nancy J; Luna, Beatriz; Takarae, Yukari; Sweeney, John A

    2005-11-15

    Histopathological, neuroimaging and genetic findings indicate cerebellar abnormalities in autism, but the extent of neurophysiological dysfunction associated with those findings has not been systematically examined. Suppression of intrusive saccades (square wave jerks) and the ability to sustain eccentric gaze, two phenomena requiring intact cerebellar function, were examined in 52 high-functioning individuals with autism and 52 age- and IQ-matched healthy subjects during visual fixation of static central and peripheral targets. Rates of intrusive saccades were not increased in autism during visual fixation, and foveopetal ocular drift was also not increased when subjects held an eccentric gaze. The absence of gross disturbances of visual fixation associated with cerebellar disease in individuals with autism, such as increased square wave jerk rates and foveopetal drift when holding eccentric gaze, indicates that the functional integrity of cerebellar--brainstem networks devoted to oculomotor control is preserved in autism despite reported anatomic variations. However, increased amplitude of intrusive saccades and reduced latency of target refixation after intrusive saccades were observed in individuals with autism, especially when subjects maintained fixation of remembered target locations without sensory guidance. The atypical metrics of intrusive saccades that were observed may be attributable to faulty functional connectivity in cortico-cerebellar networks. PMID:16214219

  4. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-06-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD)) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARCA1 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 ( ARCA1 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  6. Role of aspartyl-(asparaginyl-β-hydroxylase mediated notch signaling in cerebellar development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Ming

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspartyl-(Asparaginyl-β-Hydroxylase (AAH is a hydroxylating enzyme that promotes cell motility by enhancing Notch-Jagged-HES-1 signaling. Ethanol impaired cerebellar neuron migration during development is associated with reduced expression of AAH. Methods To further characterize the role of AAH in relation to cerebellar development, structure, and function, we utilized an in vivo model of early postnatal (P2 intracerebro-ventricular gene delivery to silence AAH with small interfering RNA (siAAH, or over-express it with recombinant plasmid DNA (pAAH. On P20, we assessed cerebellar motor function by rotarod testing. Cerebella harvested on P21 were used to measure AAH, genes/proteins that mediate AAH's downstream signaling, i.e. Notch-1, Jagged-1, and HES-1, and immunoreactivity corresponding to neuronal and glial elements. Results The findings demonstrated that: 1 siAAH transfection impaired motor performance and blunted cerebellar foliation, and decreased expression of neuronal and glial specific genes; 2 pAAH transfection enhanced motor performance and increased expression of neuronal and glial cytoskeletal proteins; and 3 alterations in AAH expression produced similar shifts in Notch-1, Jagged-1, and HES-1 protein or gene expression. Conclusions The results support our hypothesis that AAH is an important mediator of cerebellar development and function, and link AAH expression to Notch signaling pathways in the developing brain.

  7. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  8. Anomalous Cerebellar Anatomy in Chinese Children with Dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ying-Hui; Yang, Yang; Chen, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Bi, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children ...

  9. Cerebellar contribution to feedforward control of locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanda Pisotta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is an important contributor to feedforward control mechanisms of the central nervous system, and sequencing—the process that allows spatial and temporal relationships between events to be recognized—has been implicated as the fundamental cerebellar mode of operation. By adopting such a mode and because of cerebellar activity patterns are sensitive to a variety of sensorimotor-related tasks, the cerebellum is believed to support motor and cognitive functions that are encoded in the frontal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. In this model, the cerebellum is hypothesized to make predictions about the consequences of a motor or cognitive command that originates from the cortex to prepare the entire system to cope with ongoing changes. In this framework, cerebellar predictive mechanisms for locomotion are addressed, focusing on sensorial and motoric sequencing. The hypothesis that sequence recognition is the mechanism by which the cerebellum functions in gait control is presented and discussed.

  10. Cerebellar contribution to feedforward control of locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisotta, Iolanda; Molinari, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is an important contributor to feedforward control mechanisms of the central nervous system, and sequencing-the process that allows spatial and temporal relationships between events to be recognized-has been implicated as the fundamental cerebellar mode of operation. By adopting such a mode and because cerebellar activity patterns are sensitive to a variety of sensorimotor-related tasks, the cerebellum is believed to support motor and cognitive functions that are encoded in the frontal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. In this model, the cerebellum is hypothesized to make predictions about the consequences of a motor or cognitive command that originates from the cortex to prepare the entire system to cope with ongoing changes. In this framework, cerebellar predictive mechanisms for locomotion are addressed, focusing on sensorial and motoric sequencing. The hypothesis that sequence recognition is the mechanism by which the cerebellum functions in gait control is presented and discussed. PMID:25009490

  11. CT and MR imaging of acute cerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adult female showed mild cerebellar ataxia and CSF pleocytosis following an acute infection of the upper respiratory tract, and was diagnosed as having acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA). CT and MR appearances in the acute stage revealed moderate swelling of the cerebellum and bilaterally increased signal intensity in the cerebellar cortex. (orig.)

  12. Effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis and intracellular transport on the gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist-induced functional differentiation of cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Meier, E; Schousboe, A

    1990-01-01

    membrane preparations. This indicates that the low-affinity receptors were not located in the plasma membrane. This is in good agreement with the corresponding morphological findings, that monensin treatment led to an intense vacuolization of the Golgi apparatus, thereby preventing intracellular transport......The effect of inhibitors of protein synthesis (actinomycin D, cycloheximide), proteases (leupeptin), and intracellular transport (colchicine, monensin) on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist [4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP)]-induced changes in morphological...... transport as well as the protease inhibitor did not affect this parameter. However, studies of effects of GABA on transmitter release from monensin-treated cultures showed that transmitter release could not be inhibited by GABA in these cells in spite of the presence of low-affinity GABA receptors in the...

  13. A rare case of tubercular cerebellar abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanjari K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tubercular brain abscess are uncommon and tubercular cerebellar abscess are rarely reported. Most of these cases occur in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of multiple cerebellar abscesses in a 55-year-old HIV seronegative non-diabetic female, who complained of headache, neck pain and unsteadiness of gait since two months. She had been on treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis, diagnosed earlier. Diagnosis was made by CT scan of brain and confirmed by bacteriological examination of drained pus obtained by suboccipital craniotomy. The patient showed signs of recovery.

  14. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis in ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meneghetti, G; Vorstrup, S; Mickey, B; Lindewald, H; Lassen, N A

    1984-01-01

    Seventy measurements of CBF were performed in 12 stroke patients by 133Xe inhalation and a rapidly rotating single photon emission computerized tomograph. CBF was measured every other day during the acute phase and at 2- and 6-month follow-up visits. A persistent contralateral cerebellar blood flow...... is concluded from this serial study that crossed cerebellar diaschisis is a common finding in completed stroke. It is probably caused by disconnection of the corticopontine pathways, a disconnection that tends to persist. The phenomenon is in fact less variable than the stroke-related CBF changes in...

  15. NMDAR1 mRNA expression and glutamate receptor stimulated increase in cytosolic calcium concentration in rat and mouse cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, H S; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1996-01-01

    concentration of mRNA for the obligatory NMDA receptor subunit, NMDAR1, and (b) the glutamate/NMDA stimulated increase in cytosolic Ca(2+)-ion concentration in cultures at physiological or elevated K(+)-ion concentration. The expression of NMDAR1 mRNA was measured by competitive PCR of reversely transcribed m......RNA and was normalized to that of the constitutively expressed H3.3 histone mRNA. The glutamate and NMDA stimulated increase in cytosolic Ca(2+)-ion concentration was measured using the fluorescent Ca(2+)-chelator Fluo3. In contrast to the hypothesis, we found NMDAR1 mRNA expression to be lower in mouse...... than in rat granule cells cultured for 4 days at physiological K(+)-ion concentration. However, the NMDA stimulated increase in cytosolic Ca(2+)-ion concentration did not differ in 4-day rat and mouse cultures. Although the glutamate-stimulated increase in cytosolic Ca(2+)-ion concentration in 2-day...

  16. The Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome and Its Relation to Cerebellar Cognitive Function and the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Karin S.; Khademian, Zarir P.; Keating, Robert F.; Packer, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS), consisting of diminished speech output, hypotonia, ataxia, and emotional lability, occurs after surgery in up to 25% of patients with medulloblastoma and occasionally after removal of other posterior fossa tumors. Although the mutism is transient, speech rarely normalizes and the syndrome is…

  17. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  18. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  19. Electropharmacological effects of berberine on canine cardiac Purkinje fibres and ventricular muscle and atrial muscle of the rabbit.

    OpenAIRE

    Riccioppo Neto, F.

    1993-01-01

    1. Conventional microelectrode techniques were used for intracellular recordings of the transmembrane electrical potentials, the effects of berberine were studied on canine cardiac Purkinje and ventricular muscle fibres and on rabbit atrial fibres. 2. Berberine (3-30 microM) increased in a concentration-dependent manner, the action potential duration (APD) in canine Purkinje and ventricular muscle without affecting other parameters of the action potential. 3. The berberine-induced enlargement...

  20. Cerebellar motor dysfunction in schizophrenia and psychosis risk: the importance of regional cerebellar analysis approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Bernard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Motor abnormalities in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis are well documented. An accumulating body of work has also highlighted motor abnormalities related to cerebellar dysfunction in schizophrenia including eye-blink conditioning, timing, postural control, and motor learning. We have also recently found evidence for motor dysfunction in individuals at ultra high-risk for psychosis (1–3. This is particularly relevant as the cerebellum is thought to be central to the cognitive dysmetria model of schizophrenia, and these overt motor signs may point to more general cerebellar dysfunction in the etiology of psychotic disorders. While studies have provided evidence indicative of motor cerebellar dysfunction in at-risk populations and in schizophrenia, findings with respect to the cerebellum have been mixed. One factor potentially contributing to these mixed results is the whole-structure approach taken when investigating the cerebellum. In non-human primates there are distinct closed-loop circuits between the cerebellum, thalamus, and brain with motor and non-motor cortical regions. Recent human neuroimaging has supported this finding and indicates that there is a cerebellar functional topography (4, and this information is being missed with whole-structure approaches. Here, we review cerebellar motor dysfunction in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis. We also discuss cerebellar abnormalities in psychosis, and the cerebellar functional topography. Because of the segregated functional regions of the cerebellum, we propose that it is important to look at the structure regionally in order to better understand its role in motor dysfunction in these populations. This is analogous to approaches taken with the basal ganglia, where each region is considered separately. Such an approach is necessary to better understand cerebellar pathophysiology on a macro-structural level with respect to the

  1. Ultrasonically detectable cerebellar haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Lisa Kenyon

    2011-07-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of cerebellar haemorrhage (CBH) on routine cranial ultrasound (cUS) imaging in infants of ≤32 weeks gestation, and to investigate how extremely preterm infants with CBH differ from those with severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH).

  2. Cerebellar dysregulation and heterogeneity of mood disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Tobe EH

    2014-01-01

    Edward H Tobe Department of Psychiatry, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Camden, NJ, USA Abstract: This paper discusses diverse studies to consider the hypothesis that cerebellar pathology supports the heterogeneous metabolic pathologies of mood disorders. The evidence presented includes studies selected from the following areas of scientific research: magnetic resonance imaging, histology, clinical syndromes, comparative anatomy, neuronal connections, and mitochondrial dysfunctio...

  3. Cerebellar liponeurocytoma: a case-report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Sreedhar Babu

    Full Text Available Cerebellar liponeurocytoma is a rare cerebellar neoplasm of adults with advanced neuronal / neurocytic and focal lipomatous differentiation, a low proliferative potential and a favorable clinical prognosis corresponding to World Health Organization grade I or II. Only a few cases have been described in the literature (approximately 20 cases by different names. A 48-years old female, presented with history of headache and dizziness associated with neck pain; restricted neck movements, drop attacks and occasional regurgitation of food since one year. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a right cerebellar mass lesion. Gross total resec- tion of the tumour was accomplished through a suboccipital craniotomy. The excised tissue was diagnosed as cerebellar liponeurocytoma, a rare entity, based on histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry. The morphological appearance of this neoplasm can be confused with that of oligodendroglioma, neurocytoma, ependymoma, medulloblastoma, solid hemangioblastoma and metastatic carcinomas etc., with unpredictable prognosis, which require postoperative radiotherapy, hence the importance of accurately diagnosing this rare neoplasm. This tumour should be added to the differential diagnosis of mass lesions of the posterior fossa.

  4. Improving cerebellar segmentation with statistical fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multiatlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non- Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  5. Evaluation of intraocular lens implant location in the eyeball basing on the Purkinje images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwik, A.; Siedlecki, D.; Zajac, M.

    2012-01-01

    Intraocular lens (IOL) is an artificial implant substituting natural crystalline lens which is non-transparent due to cataract. Incorrect location of the IOL in the eyeball (e.g. its shift or tilt) causes significant deterioration of patient's vision. The analysis of Purkinje images (i.e. reflections from successive refracting surfaces in the eye) enables to determine the real IOL location and thus helps in evaluating the retinal image quality. The experimental setup for Purkinje images recording consists of illuminator, composed of a number of infrared LEDs, telecentric lens and detector (CCD camera). Analysis of mutual position of particular reflections enables to evaluate the lens location in respect to the corneal axis. The actual measurements are realized on artificial eye model, what allows to estimate the precision of the algorithm applied in the calculations. In the future the experimental set-up will be adapted to measure the eyes of real patients.

  6. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit scheme...

  7. ROLE OF PURKINJE FIBERS IN MAINTENANCE ANDTERMINATION OF LONG-DURATION VENTRICULARFIBRILLATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金奇; 沈卫峰; 吴立群

    2011-01-01

    Long-duration ventricular fibrillation (LDVF) often occurring out-of-hospital has been presented several minutes before electrical shocks. It is important to understand the mechanism by which LDVF is maintained and defibrillated. Purkinje fibers (PFs) have been demonstrated to play a key role in the onset of certain types of ventricular fibrillation. In this review, we discuss the electrophysiological difference between PFs and working myocardium, and the role of the PFs in the maintenance and termination o...

  8. PATTERN FORMATION DURING DEVELOPMENT OF THE EMBRYONIC CEREBELLUM

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Hawkes

    2012-01-01

    The patterning of the embryonic cerebellum is vital to establish the elaborate zone and stripe architecture of the adult. This review considers early stages in cerebellar Purkinje cell patterning, from the organization of the ventricular zone to the development of Purkinje cell clusters – the precursors of the adult stripes.

  9. Pattern formation during development of the embryonic cerebellum

    OpenAIRE

    Dastjerdi, F. V.; Consalez, G G; Hawkes, R

    2012-01-01

    The patterning of the embryonic cerebellum is vital to establish the elaborate zone and stripe architecture of the adult. This review considers early stages in cerebellar Purkinje cell patterning, from the organization of the ventricular zone to the development of Purkinje cell clusters—the precursors of the adult stripes.

  10. The gene encoding the mouse contactin-1 axonal glycoprotein is regulated by the collier/Olf1/EBF family early B-Cell factor 2 transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzoca, Antonella; Picocci, Sabrina; Corsi, Patrizia; Arbia, Stefania; Croci, Laura; Consalez, G Giacomo; Gennarini, Gianfranco

    2015-12-01

    The Contactin-1 axonal glycoprotein (formerly F3/Contactin) plays a relevant role in cerebellar ontogenesis, as shown in Contactin-1 KO-mice and in transgenic mice misexpressing the corresponding cDNA from a heterologous promoter. Likewise, null mutant mice for the Collier/Olf1/Early B-cell family transcription factor EBF2, in which Purkinje neuron development is primarily affected, exhibit abnormalities in cerebellar corticogenesis. Here, to evaluate the contribution to the Ebf2 null phenotype of changes in the profile of Contactin-1, we study its expression in Ebf2 null mice. In addition, we explore the activation profile of the Cntn1 gene promoter upon transferring the Ebf2 mutation to transgenic mice expressing an enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter under control of Cntn1 gene regulatory sequences. In Ebf2 null mice, Contactin-1 protein expression and Cntn1 gene promoter activity are both downregulated during embryonic and early postnatal cerebellar development, both in the rostral and caudal folia, while in the latter an upregulation is observed at postnatal day 8. In vitro, vectors driving EBF1,2,3 transcription factors from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter transactivate a Cntn1-Choline acetyltransferse (CAT) promoter-reporter construct in cotransfection assays and, accordingly, by chromatin immunoprecipitation, we show that the Cntn1 gene 5' flanking region is bound by the EBF2 transcription factor, consistent with the evidence that this region bears the cognate deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) consensus sequences. These data indicate that Contactin-1 expression is dependent upon EBF factors, suggesting that the Cntn1 gene belongs to the expanding regulatory cascade driven by these transcriptional regulators so that changes in its activation may contribute to the phenotype of Ebf2 null mutant mice. PMID:25820347

  11. Links from complex spikes to local plasticity and motor learning in the cerebellum of awake-behaving monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Medina, Javier F.; Lisberger, Stephen G.

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis of cerebellar learning proposes that complex spikes in Purkinje cells engage mechanisms of plasticity in the cerebellar cortex; in turn, changes in the cerebellum depress the simple spike response of Purkinje cells to a given stimulus and cause the adaptive modification of a motor behavior. Although many elements of this hypothesis have been supported by prior experiments, the links between complex spikes, simple spike plasticity, and behavior have not yet been examined simulta...

  12. An update on Spino-cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banashree Mondal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dominantly inherited ataxias, also known as Spino-cerebellar ataxias (SCAs, are rapidly expanding entities. New mutations are being identified at remarkable regularity. Recent awareness of molecular abnormalities in SCAs has addressed some of the long sought questions, but gaps in knowledge still exist. Three major categories of SCAs, according to molecular mechanisms, have evolved over recent few years: Polyglutamate expansion ataxia, non-coding zone repeat ataxia, and ataxia due to conventional mutation. Using the fulcrum of these mechanisms, the article provides an update of SCAs. Shared and specific clinical features, genetic abnormalities, and possible links between molecular abnormalities and cerebellar degeneration have been discussed. Emphasis has been placed on the mechanisms of polyglutamate toxicity.

  13. Isolated rhomboencephalosynapsis – a rare cerebellar anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhomboencephalosynapsis (RES, RS) is a unique entity usually recognized in infancy based on neuroimaging. Cerebellar fusion and absence of cerebellar vermis is often associated with supratentorial findings. Since now there are about 50 cases described worldwide, with approximately 36 patients diagnosed by MRI. The authors present the first in Poland case of this uncommon malformation and review the literature. The authors describe a 28-month-old-girl with microcephaly and proper psychomotor development. The family history was unrelevant. Based on MRI the congenital malformation of posterior fossa-rhombencephalosynapsis was confirmed Presented patient is a typical example of MRI usefulness especially in patients with RES. RES symptoms are mild and that is why the diagnosis is usually made only in adulthood

  14. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P;

    2004-01-01

    identified in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the...... significantly relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations.......Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...

  15. Cerebellar ataxia as presenting feature of hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwal, Suman Kumar; Kotwal, Shalija; Gupta, Rohan; Singh, Jang Bhadur; Mahajan, Annil

    2016-04-01

    Symptoms and signs of the hypothyroidism vary in relation to the magnitude and acuteness of the thyroid hormone deficiency. The usual clinical features are constipation, fatigue, cold intolerance and weight gain. Rarely it can present with neurologic problems like reversible cerebellar ataxia, dementia, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis and coma. Hypothyroidism should be suspected in all cases of ataxia, as it is easily treatable. A 40 year-old male presented with the history facial puffiness, hoarseness of voice and gait-ataxia. Investigations revealed frank primary hypothyroidism. Anti-TPO antibody was positive. Thyroxine was started and patient improved completely within eight weeks. Hypothyroidism can present with ataxia as presenting feature. Hypothyroidism should be considered in all cases of cerebellar ataxia as it is a reversible cause of ataxia. PMID:26886095

  16. CT in autosomal dominant and idiopathic cerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signs of atrophy on cranial CT were investigated in 35 patients diagnosed as suffering from autosomal dominant (n=21) or idiopathic (n=14) cerebellar ataxia. Thirteen patients with a pure cerebellar syndrome were examined after at least 4 years of disease (mean duration 10.5 years) and were classified as cerebellar atrophy (CA). Twenty-two patients with additional non-cerebellar signs were classified as olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA). Four (30%) of the patients with CA had atrophy of the brain stem in addition. Of the 22 patients with OPCA, 9 (40%) had atrophy of the cerebellum only. In patients with CA or OPCA correlation of clinical signs with severity of atrophy on CT was poor. Atrophy on CT often fails to differentiate autosomal dominant or idiopathic cerebellar ataxias in CA or OPCA: Patients with CA can also have atrophy of the brain stem and patients with OPCA do not necessarily show brain stem atrophy. (orig.)

  17. Moving, sensing and learning with cerebellar damage

    OpenAIRE

    Bastian, Amy J.

    2011-01-01

    The cerebellum is a subcortical brain structure that is essential for learning and controlling movement. Recent work shows that the cerebellum also plays a role in certain perceptual abilities, beyond what would be expected secondary to poor movement control. This review covers these and other recent advances, focusing on how cerebellar damage affects human abilities ranging from sensory perception to movement control and motor learning.

  18. Cerebellar and cerebral atrophy in trichothiodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Sargent, Michael A.; Poskitt, Kenneth J. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Prendiville, Julie S. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Division of Paediatric Dermatology, Department of Paediatrics, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    Trichothiodystrophy is a rare neuroectodermal disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance that is characterized by brittle hair, nail dysplasia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and gonadal failure. We describe a female patient whose cranial MRI revealed almost total lack of myelination in the supratentorial white matter, which is similar to the previously described cases. In addition, there was progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, which has not been well documented in association with trichothiodystrophy. (orig.)

  19. PMPCA mutations cause abnormal mitochondrial protein processing in patients with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobling, Rebekah K; Assoum, Mirna; Gakh, Oleksandr; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian A; Mignot, Cyril; Roze, Emmanuel; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Lévy, Nicolas; Prasad, Chitra; Paton, Tara; Paterson, Andrew D; Roslin, Nicole M; Marshall, Christian R; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Roëckel-Trevisiol, Nathalie; Scherer, Stephen W; Rouleau, Guy A; Mégarbané, André; Isaya, Grazia; Delague, Valérie; Yoon, Grace

    2015-06-01

    Non-progressive cerebellar ataxias are a rare group of disorders that comprise approximately 10% of static infantile encephalopathies. We report the identification of mutations in PMPCA in 17 patients from four families affected with cerebellar ataxia, including the large Lebanese family previously described with autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia and short stature of Norman type and localized to chromosome 9q34 (OMIM #213200). All patients present with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, and the majority have intellectual disability of variable severity. PMPCA encodes α-MPP, the alpha subunit of mitochondrial processing peptidase, the primary enzyme responsible for the maturation of the vast majority of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins, which is necessary for life at the cellular level. Analysis of lymphoblastoid cells and fibroblasts from patients homozygous for the PMPCA p.Ala377Thr mutation and carriers demonstrate that the mutation impacts both the level of the alpha subunit encoded by PMPCA and the function of mitochondrial processing peptidase. In particular, this mutation impacts the maturation process of frataxin, the protein which is depleted in Friedreich ataxia. This study represents the first time that defects in PMPCA and mitochondrial processing peptidase have been described in association with a disease phenotype in humans. PMID:25808372

  20. [Diagnostic and treatment of hypertensive cerebellar hematomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, V V; Dash'ian, V G; Murashko, A A; Burov, S A

    2009-01-01

    Authors analyzed the results of treatment of 56 patients with hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhages (volume 0,5-41 cm3). Brain stem symptoms were found in 45 (80%) of patients. The dislocation of brain stem was observed in 38 (68%) cases, occlusive hydrocephaly - in 22 (39%), intraventricular hemorrhage - in 26 (46%). Severity of state depended on character of disease course, presence of stem symptoms, awakening level, volume and localization of cerebellar hematoma, development of intraventricular hemorrhage, occlusive hydrocephaly and dislocation of brain stem. Thirty-six patients were operated. After the neurosurgical intervention, 22 (61%) patients were discharged without or with the minimal neurological deficit, 1 (3%) with marked disability and 13 (36%) patients died. In conclusion, the removal of hematoma is recommended in dislocation of brain stem and disturbance of consiousnes: the ventricular drainage - in occlusive hydrocephaly developed as a consequence of hemotamponade of IV ventricular. The surgical treatment is not recommended to patients with cerebellar hematomas with the volume less than 7 cm3. PMID:19491806

  1. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    D'Mello, Anila M.; Stoodley, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and...

  2. Sensory mechanisms of balance control in cerebellar disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bunn, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    A wealth of evidence exists to suggest that the cerebellum has an important role in the integration of vestibular, proprioceptive and visual sensory signals. Human bipedal balance depends on sensory integration and balance impairment is a common feature of cerebellar disease. I test the hypothesis that disrupted sensori-motor processing is responsible for balance impairment in cerebellar disease. Balance control in subjects with pure cerebellar disease (SCA6) was compared with matched healthy...

  3. Lacunar thalamic stroke with pure cerebellar and proprioceptive deficits.

    OpenAIRE

    Gutrecht, J A; Zamani, A A; D N Pandya

    1992-01-01

    Case reports of two patients with cerebellar ataxia and proprioceptive sensory loss are presented. MRI of the brain revealed lesions of the ventroposterior part of the thalamus. These patients illustrate clinically the anatomical independence of cerebellar and sensory pathways in the thalamus. We suggest that the ataxic deficit is caused by interruption of cerebellar outflow pathways in the thalamus and not secondary to sensory deafferentation.

  4. Ondansetron, a 5-HT3 antagonist, improves cerebellar tremor.

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, G P; Lesaux, J; Vandervoort, P.; Macewan, L; Ebers, G C

    1997-01-01

    It has been previously shown that ondansetron, a 5-HT3 antagonist, can ameliorate vertigo in patients with acute brainstem disorders. A coincidental benefit was the improvement of cerebellar tremor in some patients with both vertigo and tremor. To further evaluate this effect, a placebo controlled, double blind, crossover study was conducted of a single dose of intravenous ondansetron in 20 patients with cerebellar tremor caused by multiple sclerosis, cerebellar degeneration, or drug toxicity...

  5. A coupled 3D-1D numerical monodomain solver for cardiac electrical activation in the myocardium with detailed Purkinje network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Christian; Lange, Matthias; Palamara, Simone; Lassila, Toni; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2016-03-01

    We present a model for the electrophysiology in the heart to handle the electrical propagation through the Purkinje system and in the myocardium, with two-way coupling at the Purkinje-muscle junctions. In both the subproblems the monodomain model is considered, whereas at the junctions a resistor element is included that induces an orthodromic propagation delay from the Purkinje network towards the heart muscle. We prove a sufficient condition for convergence of a fixed-point iterative algorithm to the numerical solution of the coupled problem. Numerical comparison of activation patterns is made with two different combinations of models for the coupled Purkinje network/myocardium system, the eikonal/eikonal and the monodomain/monodomain models. Test cases are investigated for both physiological and pathological activation of a model left ventricle. Finally, we prove the reliability of the monodomain/monodomain coupling on a realistic scenario. Our results underlie the importance of using physiologically realistic Purkinje-trees with propagation solved using the monodomain model for simulating cardiac activation.

  6. Unilateral absence of cerebellar hemisphere: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a 38-year-old woman with absence of right cerebellar hemisphere incidentally discovered by MR imaging. No cerebellar abnormality was detected on neurological examination. Tissue probably representing dysgenetic cerebellar tissue with no corticomedullary differentiation was present, connected to the right superior cerebellar peduncle. Ipsilateral enlargement of the pons and cerebral peduncle were additional findings. Although the terms ''aplasia'' or ''agenesis'' have been used to describe this entity, intrauterine destruction is the presumed pathogenetic mechanism in our case, and therefore these terms have been avoided. Asymmetry of pons and mesencephalon may be related to compensatory reorganisation or to the impairment of sequential development of nuclei and neural tracts. (orig.)

  7. Exome sequencing reveals a novel CWF19L1 mutation associated with intellectual disability and cerebellar atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Christina; Kaufmann, Lilian; Seitz, Angelika; Paramasivam, Nagarajan; Granzow, Martin; Karch, Stephanie; Fischer, Christine; Hinderhofer, Katrin; Gdynia, Georg; Elsässer, Michael; Pinkert, Stefan; Schlesner, Matthias; Bartram, Claus R; Moog, Ute

    2016-06-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) with cerebellar ataxia comprises a genetically heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders. We identified a homozygous frameshift mutation in CWF19L1 (c.467delC; p.(P156Hfs*33)) by a combination of linkage analysis and Whole Exome Sequencing in a consanguineous Turkish family with a 9-year-old boy affected by early onset cerebellar ataxia and mild ID. Serial MRI showed mildly progressive cerebellar atrophy. Absent C19L1 protein expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines strongly suggested that c.467delC is a disease-causing alteration. One further pregnancy of the mother had been terminated at 22 weeks of gestation because of a small cerebellum and agenesis of corpus callosum. The homozygous CWF19L1 variant was also present in the fetus. Postmortem examination of the fetus in addition showed unilateral hexadactyly and vertebral malformations. These features have not been reported and may represent an expansion of the CWF19L1-related phenotypic spectrum, but could also be due to another, possibly autosomal recessive disorder. The exact function of the evolutionarily highly conserved C19L1 protein is unknown. So far, homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in CWF19L1 have been identified in two Turkish siblings and a Dutch girl, respectively, affected by cerebellar ataxia and ID. A zebrafish model showed that CWF19L1 loss-of-function mutations result in abnormal cerebellar morphology and movement disorders. Our report corroborates that loss-of-function mutations in CWF19Ll lead to early onset cerebellar ataxia and (progressive) cerebellar atrophy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27016154

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebellar Schistosomiasis mansoni; Ressonancia magnetica na esquistossomose mansoni cerebelar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Bruno Perocco; Costa Junior, Leodante Batista da [Hospital da Baleia, Belo Horizonte, MG (BRazil). Servico de Neurocirurgia; Lambertucci, Jose Roberto [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Servico de Doencas Infecciosas e Parasitarias

    2003-10-01

    A 15-year-old boy was admitted to hospital with a history of headache, dizziness, vomiting and double vision that started two weeks before. His parents denied any previous disease. During clinical examination he presented diplopia on lateral gaze to the left and horizontal nystagmus. No major neurological dysfunction was detected. He was well built, mentally responsive and perceptive. Laboratory findings revealed a leukocyte count of 10,000/mL, a normal red blood cell count and no eosinophilia. The magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the brain showed a left cerebellar lesion with mass effect compressing the surrounding tissues. Contrast-enhanced images showed a mass like structure and punctate nodules (Figures A and B: axial and coronal contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images showed the nodular - yellow arrows - enhancement pattern of a left cerebellar intraxial lesion). The lesion extended to the vermis and brachium pons and compressed the medulla. There was no hydrocephalus. He was taken to the operating room with the presumptive diagnosis of a neuroglial tumor, and submitted to a lateral suboccipital craniectomy. A brown, brittle tumoral mass without a clearly defined margin with the cerebellar tissue was removed. Microscopic examination revealed schistosomal granulomas in the productive phase in the cerebellum (Figure C). After surgery, treatment with praziquantel (50 mg/kg/dia, single dose) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) was offered and the patient improved quickly. Thirty days later he was seen again at the outpatient clinic: he was asymptomatic and with no neurological impairment. This is the eighth case of cerebellar involvement in schistosomiasis mansoni and the second report of a tumoral form of cerebellar schistosomiasis documented by magnetic resonance images. (author)

  9. Why do we have Purkinje fibers deep in our heart?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedmera, David; Gourdie, R. G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl.1 (2014), S9-S18. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/1308; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-12412S Grant ostatní: Univerzita Karlova(CZ) PRVOUK-P35/LF1/5 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cardiac conduction system * specialized tracts * gap junctions * Connexin Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  10. Sub-Lethal Dose of Shiga toxin 2 from Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Affects Balance and Cerebellar Cythoarquitecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana eD’Alessio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli may damage the central nervous system before or concomitantly to manifested hemolytic uremic syndrome symptoms. The cerebellum is frequently damaged during this syndrome, however the deleterious effects of Shiga toxin 2 has never been integrally reported by ultrastructural, physiological and behavioral means. The aim of this study was to determine the cerebellar compromise after intravenous administration of a sub-lethal dose of Shiga toxin 2 by measuring the cerebellar blood brain barrier permeability, behavioral task of cerebellar functionality (inclined plane test, and ultrastructural analysis (transmission electron microscope. Intravenous administration of vehicle (control group, sub-lethal dose of 0.5 ηg and 1 ηg of Stx2 per mouse were tested for behavioral and ultrastructural studies. A set of three independent experiments were performed for each study (n=6. Blood–Brain Barrier resulted damaged and consequently its permeability was significantly increased. Lower scores obtained in the inclined plane task denoted poor cerebellar functionality in comparison to their controls. The most significant lower score was obtained after 5 days of 1ηg of toxin administration. Transmission electron microscope micrographs from the Stx2-treated groups showed neurons with a progressive neurodegenerative condition in a dose dependent manner. As sub-lethal intravenous Shiga toxin 2 altered the blood brain barrier permeability in the cerebellum the toxin penetrated the cerebellar parenchyma and produced cell damaged with significant functional implications in the test balance.

  11. Sub-Lethal Dose of Shiga Toxin 2 from Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Affects Balance and Cerebellar Cytoarchitecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Alipio; Cangelosi, Adriana; Geoghegan, Patricia A.; Tironi-Farinati, Carla; Brener, Gabriela J.; Goldstein, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli may damage the central nervous system before or concomitantly to manifested hemolytic–uremic syndrome symptoms. The cerebellum is frequently damaged during this syndrome, however, the deleterious effects of Shiga toxin 2 has never been integrally reported by ultrastructural, physiological and behavioral means. The aim of this study was to determine the cerebellar compromise after intravenous administration of a sub-lethal dose of Shiga toxin 2 by measuring the cerebellar blood–brain barrier permeability, behavioral task of cerebellar functionality (inclined plane test), and ultrastructural analysis (transmission electron microscope). Intravenous administration of vehicle (control group), sub-lethal dose of 0.5 and 1 ηg of Stx2 per mouse were tested for behavioral and ultrastructural studies. A set of three independent experiments were performed for each study (n = 6). Blood–brain barrier resulted damaged and consequently its permeability was significantly increased. Lower scores obtained in the inclined plane task denoted poor cerebellar functionality in comparison to their controls. The most significant lower score was obtained after 5 days of 1 ηg of toxin administration. Transmission electron microscope micrographs from the Stx2-treated groups showed neurons with a progressive neurodegenerative condition in a dose dependent manner. As sub-lethal intravenous Shiga toxin 2 altered the blood brain barrier permeability in the cerebellum the toxin penetrated the cerebellar parenchyma and produced cell damaged with significant functional implications in the test balance. PMID:26904009

  12. [Cerebellar Control of Ocular Movements: Application to the Topographical Diagnosis of Cerebellar Lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Genjiro

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade, substantial information on cerebellar oculomotor control has been provided by the use of sophisticated neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, and imaging techniques. We now know that an intact cerebellum is a prerequisite for normal oculomotor performance. This review clarifies the current knowledge on structure-function correlations of the cerebellum in relation to ocular movements and allows them to be applied to topographical diagnosis of cerebellar lesions. The cerebellar regions most closely related to oculomotor function are: (1) the flocculus/paraflocculus for VOR suppression, cancellation, smooth pursuit eye movement and gaze-holding, (2) the nodulus/ventral uvula for velocity storage and low frequency prolonged vestibular response, and (3) the dorsal oculomotor vermis (declive VI, folium VII) and the posterior portion of the fastigial nucleus (fastigial oculomotor region) for saccades and smooth pursuit initiation. Symptomatically, defects in the flocculus/parflocculus cause saccadic pursuit, downbeat nystagmus, and impairments to visual suppression of the VOR. Lesions of the nodulus/uvula reveal as periodic alternating nystagmus. Lesions of the oculomotor vermis and the fastigial nucleus can induce saccadic dysmetria, while fastigial nucleus lesions may also cause ocular flutter/opsoclonus. A detailed knowledge of cerebellar anatomy and the physiology of eye movements enables localization of lesions to specific areas of the cerebellum. PMID:27001776

  13. Acute cerebellar ataxia with human parvovirus B19 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Y; Ueno, T.; Komatsu, H.; Takada, H.; Nunoue, T.

    1999-01-01

    A 2 year old boy developed acute cerebellar ataxia in association with erythema infectiosum. During the disease, genomic DNA and antibodies against human parvovirus B19 were detected in serum but not in cerebrospinal fluid. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cerebellar ataxia might occur due to transient vascular reaction in the cerebellum during infection.



  14. Cerebellar involvement in metabolic disorders: a pattern-recognition approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inborn errors of metabolism can affect the cerebellum during development, maturation and later during life. We have established criteria for pattern recognition of cerebellar abnormalities in metabolic disorders. The abnormalities can be divided into four major groups: cerebellar hypoplasia (CH), hyperplasia, cerebellar atrophy (CA), cerebellar white matter abnormalities (WMA) or swelling, and involvement of the dentate nuclei (DN) or cerebellar cortex. CH can be an isolated typical finding, as in adenylsuccinase deficiency, but is also occasionally seen in many other disorders. Differentiation from CH and CA is often difficult, as in carbohydrate deficient glycoprotein syndrome or 2-l-hydroxyglutaric acidaemia. In cases of atrophy the relationship of cerebellar to cerebral atrophy is important. WMA may be diffuse or patchy, frequently predominantly around the DN. Severe swelling of white matter is present during metabolic crisis in maple syrup urine disease. The DN can be affected by metabolite deposition, necrosis, calcification or demyelination. Involvement of cerebellar cortex is seen in infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy. Changes in DN and cerebellar cortex are rather typical and therefore most helpful; additional features should be sought as they are useful in narrowing down the differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. Pre- and Postnatal Neuroimaging of Congenital Cerebellar Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-02-01

    The human cerebellum has a protracted development that makes it vulnerable to a broad spectrum of developmental disorders including malformations and disruptions. Starting from 19 to 20 weeks of gestation, prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reliably study the developing cerebellum. Pre- and postnatal neuroimaging plays a key role in the diagnostic work-up of congenital cerebellar abnormalities. Diagnostic criteria for cerebellar malformations and disruptions are based mostly on neuroimaging findings. The diagnosis of a Dandy-Walker malformation is based on the presence of hypoplasia, elevation, and counterclockwise upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis and cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, which extends posteriorly filling out the posterior fossa. For the diagnosis of Joubert syndrome, the presence of the molar tooth sign (thickened, elongated, and horizontally orientated superior cerebellar peduncles and an abnormally deep interpeduncular fossa) is needed. The diagnostic criteria of rhombencephalosynapsis include a complete or partial absence of the cerebellar vermis and continuity of the cerebellar hemispheres across the midline. Unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia is defined by the complete aplasia or hypoplasia of one cerebellar hemisphere. Familiarity with these diagnostic criteria as well as the broad spectrum of additional neuroimaging findings is important for a correct pre- and postnatal diagnosis. A correct diagnosis is essential for management, prognosis, and counseling of the affected children and their family. PMID:26166429

  16. Reduced contralateral hemispheric flow measured by SPECT in cerebellar lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sönmezoğlu, K; Sperling, B; Henriksen, T; Tfelt-Hansen, P; Lassen, N A

    1993-01-01

    Four patients with clinical signs of cerebellar stroke were studied twice by SPECT using 99mTc-HMPAO as a tracer for cerebral blood flow (CBF). When first scanned 6 to 22 days after onset, all had a region of very low CBF in the symptomatic cerebellar hemisphere, and a mild to moderate CBF reduct...

  17. Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme presenting as a cerebellopontine angle mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Jindal

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a highly malignant brain tumour, which is exceedingly rare and such tumour presenting as cerebellopontine angle (CPA mass is even rarer. We here discuss the case of a 15-year-old girl who had cerebellar GBM presenting as CPA mass that resembled meningioma on CT scan and was managed successfully with minimal problems.

  18. Drug-induced cerebellar ataxia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Kerstens, F.G.; Maas, R.P.P.W.M.; Harmark, L.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cerebellar ataxia can be induced by a large number of drugs. We here conducted a systemic review of the drugs that can lead to cerebellar ataxia as an adverse drug reaction (ADR). METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search in Pubmed (1966 to January 2014) and EMB

  19. A Case of Adrenoleukodystrophy Presenting as Progressive Cerebellar Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seunguk Jung

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD is a hereditary neurological disorder affecting the nervous system and adrenal cortex. The phenotype of X-ALD ranges from the rapidly progressive cerebral form to milder adrenomyeloneuropathy. However, cerebellar manifestations are rare. We report a case of adrenoleukodystrophy presenting as progressive cerebellar dysfunction resembling olivopontocerebellar degeneration, with a review of the literature

  20. Time estimation in Parkinson's disease and degenerative cerebellar disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beudel, Martijin; Galama, Sjoukje; Leenders, Klaus L.; de Jong, Bauke M.

    2008-01-01

    With functional MRI, we recently identified fronto-cerebellar activations in predicting time to reach a target and basal ganglia activation in velocity estimation, that is, small interval assessment. We now tested these functions in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and degenerative cerebellar

  1. Nuclear Factor I and Cerebellar Granule Neuron Development: An Intrinsic–Extrinsic Interplay

    OpenAIRE

    Kilpatrick, Daniel L.; Wang, Wei; Gronostajski, Richard; Litwack, E. David

    2012-01-01

    Granule neurons have a central role in cerebellar function via their synaptic interactions with other neuronal cell types both within and outside this structure. Establishment of these synaptic connections and its control is therefore essential to their function. Both intrinsic as well as environmental mechanisms are required for neuronal development and formation of neuronal circuits, and a key but poorly understood question is how these various events are coordinated and integrated in matur...

  2. Serotonergic modulation and its influence on signal processing at cellular level in deep cerebellar nuclei neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Meng-Larn

    2007-01-01

    Deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) neurons generate the final output of cerebellum and receive abundant modulatory serotonergic inputs from brainstem neurons. The aim of this present study was to elucidate the influence of serotonin on signal processing performed by DCN neurons. Since signal processing is determined by the interplay between intrinsic and synaptic properties, the impact of serotonin on intrinsic as well as synaptic properties was investigated. To this end whole-cell patch clamp reco...

  3. Cellular viability effects of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition on cerebellar neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Lueneberg Kathia; Domínguez Guadalupe; Arias-Carrión Oscar; Palomero-Rivero Marcela; Millán-Aldaco Diana; Morán. Julio; Drucker-Colín René; Murillo-Rodríguez Eric

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The endocannabinoid anandamide (ANA) participates in the control of cell death inducing the formation of apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the ANA degrading enzyme, the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), would induce cellular death. Experiments were performed in cerebellar granule neurons cultured with the FAAH inhibitor, URB597 (25, 50 or 100 nM) as well as endogenous lipids such as oleoylethanolamide (OEA) or palmitoylethanolamide...

  4. SMAD4 is essential for generating subtypes of neurons during cerebellar development

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Marie; Antoine, Michelle; Hébert, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebellum development involves the coordinated production of multiple neuronal cell types. The cerebellar primordium contains two germinative zones, the rhombic lip (RL) and the ventricular zone (VZ), which generate the different types of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons, respectively. What regulates the specification and production of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons as well as the subtypes for each of these two broad classes remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate with condition...

  5. Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    OpenAIRE

    Mattos João Paulo; Marenco Horacio Armando; Campos José Maria; Faria Andréa Vasconcellos; Queiroz Luciano de Souza; Borges Guilherme; Oliveira Evandro de

    2006-01-01

    Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a rare tumor. This is the third case published in Brazilian literature and, the last one has been described more than 15 years ago. The aggressive behavior of GBM prompts for fast treatment, which can be hampered by the fact that the diagnosis of GBM requires a high degree of suspicion. We describe a case of GBM in a 46 years old man. In conjunction, we present a literature review including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studi...

  6. Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattos João Paulo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor. This is the third case published in Brazilian literature and, the last one has been described more than 15 years ago. The aggressive behavior of GBM prompts for fast treatment, which can be hampered by the fact that the diagnosis of GBM requires a high degree of suspicion. We describe a case of GBM in a 46 years old man. In conjunction, we present a literature review including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options and the behavior of such malignant tumor.

  7. Unusual paraneoplastic syndromes of breast carcinoma: a combination of cerebellar degeneration and Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Romics, L

    2011-06-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological disorders are rare complications of breast carcinoma. Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome (LEMS) is most commonly associated with small cell lung cancer. However, a combination of LEMS and subacute cerebellar degeneration as paraneoplastic syndromes is extremely rare, and has never been described in association with breast cancer.

  8. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevik, Belma [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)], E-mail: belmac@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  9. Computed tomographic features of cerebellar hemangioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Lan; Ko, Young Tae; Kim, Ho Kyun [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-06-15

    Computed tomographic and angiographic findings of 6 proven cerebellar Hemangiotoma seen in this hospital during last 2 years were analyzed. The results were as follows: 1. Except one 14 years old female, all of them wee 37 to 48 years old males. 2. The operative findings of the tumors were 3 cystic tumors with mural nodules and 3 solid tumors. Computed tomographic findings were: 3. Of three cases of cystic cerebellar hemangiotomas, 2 cases revealed characteristic CT findings such as; a. In precontrast study, a well defined round lower density containing one isodense nodule in its periphery was seen in each case. The absorption coefficiency of each lower density was around 5 EMI unit. b. In post contrast study, the nodules were enhanced densely and homogeneously white the lower densities remain unchanged. 4. Of three cases of solid cerebella hemangiotoma, 2 cases revealed isodense mass suggested by mass effect such as displaced 4th ventricle and peripheral edema in precontrast study, while the remaining case revealed ill defined slightly high density with peripheral edema. In postcontrast study, the 2 isodense masses showed well circumscribed homogenous enhancement with central slight lower density in one of them, while high density mass revealed no enhancement at all. 5. The vertebral angiography performed in 5 cases revealed high vascular tumors with feeding arteries, draining veins and increased circulation time. 6. The tumor blushing seen in vertebral angiography was correlated to the postcontrast enhancement of solid tumors and mural nodules in cystic hemangioblastoma.

  10. Modeling learning in brain stem and cerebellar sites responsible for VOR plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, K. J.; Didier, A. J.; Baker, J. F.; Peterson, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    A simple model of vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) function was used to analyze several hypotheses currently held concerning the characteristics of VOR plasticity. The network included a direct vestibular pathway and an indirect path via the cerebellum. An optimization analysis of this model suggests that regulation of brain stem sites is critical for the proper modification of VOR gain. A more physiologically plausible learning rule was also applied to this network. Analysis of these simulation results suggests that the preferred error correction signal controlling gain modification of the VOR is the direct output of the accessory optic system (AOS) to the vestibular nuclei vs. a signal relayed through the cerebellum via floccular Purkinje cells. The potential anatomical and physiological basis for this conclusion is discussed, in relation to our current understanding of the latency of the adapted VOR response.

  11. Neural correlates of impaired emotional face recognition in cerebellar lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamaszek, Michael; Kirkby, Kenneth C; D'Agata, Fedrico; Olbrich, Sebastian; Langner, Sönke; Steele, Christopher; Sehm, Bernhard; Busse, Stefan; Kessler, Christof; Hamm, Alfons

    2015-07-10

    Clinical and neuroimaging data indicate a cerebellar contribution to emotional processing, which may account for affective-behavioral disturbances in patients with cerebellar lesions. We studied the neurophysiology of cerebellar involvement in recognition of emotional facial expression. Participants comprised eight patients with discrete ischemic cerebellar lesions and eight control patients without any cerebrovascular stroke. Event-related potentials (ERP) were used to measure responses to faces from the Karolinska Directed Emotional Faces Database (KDEF), interspersed in a stream of images with salient contents. Images of faces augmented N170 in both groups, but increased late positive potential (LPP) only in control patients without brain lesions. Dipole analysis revealed altered activation patterns for negative emotions in patients with cerebellar lesions, including activation of the left inferior prefrontal area to images of faces showing fear, contralateral to controls. Correlation analysis indicated that lesions of cerebellar area Crus I contribute to ERP deviations. Overall, our results implicate the cerebellum in integrating emotional information at different higher order stages, suggesting distinct cerebellar contributions to the proposed large-scale cerebral network of emotional face recognition. PMID:25912431

  12. Anti-Yo and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies presenting in carcinoma of the uterus with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panegyres Peter K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is a rare non-metastatic manifestation of malignancy. In this report, to the best of our knowledge we describe for the first time a diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration several months prior to the diagnosis of clear carcinoma of the uterus. Case presentation A 75-year-old Caucasian woman manifested a rapidly progressive cerebellar syndrome with nystagmus, past-pointing, dysdiadochokinesis, dysarthria, truncal ataxia and titubation. The paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration was associated with anti-Yo and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. 14-3-3 protein was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid. She was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin prior to laparotomy, hysterectomy and bilateral salpingoophorectomy. Our patient has survived for three years following diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of an association of clear cell carcinoma of the uterus and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with both anti-Yo and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. The findings imply that both antibodies contributed to the fulminating paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration observed in our patient, and this was of such severity it resulted in the release of 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, a marker of neuronal death.

  13. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis in putaminal hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolic depression in the contralateral cerebellar hemisphere caused by a supratentorial lesion is called crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD). In order to investigate diaschisis based on the location and extension of lesions, time course and prognosis, 31 patients with putaminal hemorrhage were examined by the Xe-133 clearance method (67 studies in all). They consisted of 20 males and 11 females, from 40 to 77 years old (mean: 57.1±8.9). Small hematomas (mean volume: 16.1±8.4 ml) in 18 patients were treated nonsurgically, whereas medium and large hematomas (mean volume: 57.5±29.9 ml) in 13 patients were treated by craniotomy for evacuation. rCBF was measured using a BI 1400 rCBF Analyzer and CCD was considered positive when the percentage difference in cerebellar blood flow was 10.1% (mean +2SD) greater than obtained in 21 normal controls. CCD was observed in 10 patients (55.6%) in the non-surgical group and in 9 patients (69.2%) in the surgical group. In the non-surgical group, CCD was positive in 5 of the 7 cases (71.4%) involving the posterior limb of the internal capsule and in 7 of the 11 cases (63.6%) involving the corona radiata. The surgical group was divided into three types based on the time course of CCD after surgery, i.e., type A: persistent CCD found two months later, type B: postoperative CCD had resolved two months later, and type C: no CCD observed after surgery. Mean hematoma volume was significantly greater in type A (79.0±19.8 ml) than in type B (44.6±8.5 ml) or type C (30.7±3.7 ml) (p<0.05). Type A had a poorer outcome than the other two types. In conclusion, putaminal hemorrhage induced CCD when the corticopontocerebellar pathway was involved in anatomical and/or functional change. It appeared that his pathway was irreversibly affected in patients who showed persistent CCD and poor outcome. The time course of CCD may be helpful in making a prognosis. (author)

  14. Variant PTA Terminating in Cerebellar Artery, Associated with Multiple Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong Uk Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent trigeminal artery (PTA is one of the remnant fetal anastomoses between the carotid artery and basilar artery. PTAs are classified according to angiographic appearance and various connection. Among them, those directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries are rare subtype. In addition, aneurysms of the PTA are unusual in the literature and have not previously accompanied this subtype of PTA connecting cerebellar artery. We present the first case of an aneurysm of the PTA which is directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries and combined with multiple aneurysms.

  15. Variant PTA Terminating in Cerebellar Artery, Associated with Multiple Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yeong Uk; Kim, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is one of the remnant fetal anastomoses between the carotid artery and basilar artery. PTAs are classified according to angiographic appearance and various connection. Among them, those directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries are rare subtype. In addition, aneurysms of the PTA are unusual in the literature and have not previously accompanied this subtype of PTA connecting cerebellar artery. We present the first case of an aneurysm of the PTA which is directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries and combined with multiple aneurysms. PMID:27446623

  16. Consensus Paper: Revisiting the Symptoms and Signs of Cerebellar Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodranghien, Florian; Bastian, Amy; Casali, Carlo; Hallett, Mark; Louis, Elan D; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter; Nowak, Dennis A; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Serrao, Mariano; Steiner, Katharina Marie; Strupp, Michael; Tilikete, Caroline; Timmann, Dagmar; van Dun, Kim

    2016-06-01

    The cerebellum is involved in sensorimotor operations, cognitive tasks and affective processes. Here, we revisit the concept of the cerebellar syndrome in the light of recent advances in our understanding of cerebellar operations. The key symptoms and signs of cerebellar dysfunction, often grouped under the generic term of ataxia, are discussed. Vertigo, dizziness, and imbalance are associated with lesions of the vestibulo-cerebellar, vestibulo-spinal, or cerebellar ocular motor systems. The cerebellum plays a major role in the online to long-term control of eye movements (control of calibration, reduction of eye instability, maintenance of ocular alignment). Ocular instability, nystagmus, saccadic intrusions, impaired smooth pursuit, impaired vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and ocular misalignment are at the core of oculomotor cerebellar deficits. As a motor speech disorder, ataxic dysarthria is highly suggestive of cerebellar pathology. Regarding motor control of limbs, hypotonia, a- or dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetria, grasping deficits and various tremor phenomenologies are observed in cerebellar disorders to varying degrees. There is clear evidence that the cerebellum participates in force perception and proprioceptive sense during active movements. Gait is staggering with a wide base, and tandem gait is very often impaired in cerebellar disorders. In terms of cognitive and affective operations, impairments are found in executive functions, visual-spatial processing, linguistic function, and affective regulation (Schmahmann's syndrome). Nonmotor linguistic deficits including disruption of articulatory and graphomotor planning, language dynamics, verbal fluency, phonological, and semantic word retrieval, expressive and receptive syntax, and various aspects of reading and writing may be impaired after cerebellar damage. The cerebellum is organized into (a) a primary sensorimotor region in the anterior lobe and adjacent part of lobule VI, (b) a second sensorimotor

  17. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Sun Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes.

  18. A case of cerebellar hemangioblastoma with rhabdoid features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomono, Ayako; Hara, Shigeo; Hirose, Takanori; Itoh, Tomoo

    2015-04-01

    We present an unusual case of cerebellar hemangioblastoma characterized by rhabdoid features. The patient was a 35-year-old Japanese man with occipital neuralgia and exacerbating blurred vision. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a left posterior cranial fossa tumor, which was isointense on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images with marked homogeneous enhancement. Histology of the surgically resected tumor showed cellular-type hemangioblastoma with extensive proliferation of rhabdoid cells Immunohistochemistry analysis showed tumor cells positive for inhibin A, CD56, vimentin, INI-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor; negative for PAX8, CD10, epithelial membrane antigen, cytokeratin, (AE1/3), alpha-smooth muscle actin and D2-40; and had focal positivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100. The Ki-67 labeling index was hemangioblastoma with focal rhabdoid features. After a 14-month follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence. This is the first report of hemangioblastoma with rhabdoid features in the central nervous system. In addition, we discuss the possible pathogenesis. PMID:24880233

  19. Cerebellar blood flow in methylmercury poisoning (Minamata disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We looked at regional cerebellar blood flow in patients with Minamata disease (MD) using technetium-99 m ethyl cysteinate dimer (99m-Tc-ECD). We carried out single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on 15 patients with MD (eight men, seven women, aged 51-78 years, mean 70.5 years) and 11 control subjects (eight men, three women, aged 62-80 years, mean 72.5 years). Regional blood flow was measured in the superior, middle, and inferior portions of the cerebellar hemispheres, and the frontal, temporal and occipital cerebral lobes. The degree of cerebellar atrophy was assessed on MRI. There were significant differences in regional blood flow in all parts of the cerebellum between patients and control, but no significant decrease was observed in the cerebrum. Blood flow was lower in the inferior cerebellum than in the other parts. Even in patients without cerebellar atrophy, flow was significantly decreased regional blood flow in the inferior part. (orig.)

  20. Anomalous Cerebellar Anatomy in Chinese Children with Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying-Hui; Yang, Yang; Chen, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Bi, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children with dyslexia. In the present study, using voxel-based morphometry, we found decreased gray matter volume in the left cerebellum in Chinese children with dyslexia relative to age-matched controls. The positive correlation between reading performance and regional gray matter volume suggests that the abnormal structure in the left cerebellum is responsible for reading disability in Chinese children with dyslexia. PMID:27047403

  1. Cerebellar infarct patterns: The SMART-Medea study

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    Laurens J.L. De Cocker, MD

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Small cerebellar infarcts proved to be much more common than larger infarcts, and preferentially involved the cortex. Small cortical infarcts predominantly involved the posterior lobes, showed sparing of subcortical white matter and occurred in characteristic topographic patterns.

  2. Anomalous Cerebellar Anatomy in Chinese Children with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Chen, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Bi, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children with dyslexia. In the present study, using voxel-based morphometry, we found decreased gray matter volume in the left cerebellum in Chinese children with dyslexia relative to age-matched controls. The positive correlation between reading performance and regional gray matter volume suggests that the abnormal structure in the left cerebellum is responsible for reading disability in Chinese children with dyslexia. PMID:27047403

  3. Anomalous cerebellar anatomy in Chinese children with dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hui eYang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia (DD claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children with dyslexia. In the present study, using voxel-based morphometry, we found decreased gray matter volume in the left cerebellum in Chinese children with dyslexia relative to age-matched controls. The positive correlation between reading performance and regional gray matter volume suggests that the abnormal structure in the left cerebellum is responsible for reading disability in Chinese children with dyslexia.

  4. Bilateral cerebellar activation in unilaterally challenged essential tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Broersma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results expand on previous findings of bilateral cerebellar involvement in ET. We have identified specific areas in the bilateral somatomotor regions of the cerebellum: lobules V, VI and VIII.

  5. Cerebellar Hemangioblastoma and Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Six pediatric patients with cerebellar hemangioblastoma were screened for germline or somatic mutations of the von Hippel-Landau gene, in a study at Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA.

  6. Adult-onset cerebellar Ataxia: a clinical and genetic Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Brusse (Esther)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCerebellar ataxias represent a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. Two main categories are distinguished: hereditary and sporadic ataxias. Sporadic ataxias may be symptomatic or idiopathic. The clinical classification of hereditary ataxias is nowadays being replaced by an

  7. Unilateral absence of cerebellar hemisphere: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdogan, N.; Ozturk, O. [Department of Radiology, Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine, Kayseri (Turkey); Kocakoc, E. [Department of Radiology, Women' s Hospital, Sivas (Turkey); Bekar, D. [Department of Neurology, City Hospital, Sivas (Turkey)

    2002-01-01

    We describe a 38-year-old woman with absence of right cerebellar hemisphere incidentally discovered by MR imaging. No cerebellar abnormality was detected on neurological examination. Tissue probably representing dysgenetic cerebellar tissue with no corticomedullary differentiation was present, connected to the right superior cerebellar peduncle. Ipsilateral enlargement of the pons and cerebral peduncle were additional findings. Although the terms ''aplasia'' or ''agenesis'' have been used to describe this entity, intrauterine destruction is the presumed pathogenetic mechanism in our case, and therefore these terms have been avoided. Asymmetry of pons and mesencephalon may be related to compensatory reorganisation or to the impairment of sequential development of nuclei and neural tracts. (orig.)

  8. Anticipatory cerebellar responses during somatosensory omission in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesche, C D; Karhu, J J

    2000-03-01

    The traditional view of cerebellum is a structure that modifies and synchronizes elements of motor performance. Recent evidence indicates that human cerebellum is involved in a wide range of nonmotor sensory and cognitive functions. A common feature in these diverse motor and nonmotor tasks may be the capacity of cerebellar neuronal circuits to process and anticipate sensory input with high temporal acuity. We present evidence supporting this hypothesis from measurements of the magnetic field at the scalp evoked by neuronal population activity in human cerebellum. Intermittent electrical stimulation of the finger and the median nerve elicited stimulus-locked cerebellar responses with oscillatory components at 6-12 Hz and 25-35 Hz. Sustained oscillatory activity followed random stimulus omissions, with initiation of cerebellar responses prior to the next overt stimulus. These responses indexed processing of temporal features of somatosensory input independent of motor performance or response. The refractory behavior of the responses suggested that a neuronal trace of the temporal pattern of somatosensory stimulation remained in cerebellar circuits for 2-4 s. The cerebellar activity elicited by violation of an established temporal pattern was enhanced when attention was directed to somatosensory stimuli, in concordance with recent imaging studies suggesting participation of cerebellum in attentional networks. The attentional enhancement of the cerebellar responses supports the salience of cerebellar activity in the processing of purely somatosensory input. The short-term maintenance of cerebellar templates for predictable sensory input may reflect a physiological substrate for fine-grained temporal tuning and optimization of performance in large-scale sensory and integrative systems. PMID:10739364

  9. Deep Learning for Cerebellar Ataxia Classification and Functional Score Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhen; Zhong, Shenghua; Carass, Aaron; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia is a progressive neuro-degenerative disease that has multiple genetic versions, each with a characteristic pattern of anatomical degeneration that yields distinctive motor and cognitive problems. Studying this pattern of degeneration can help with the diagnosis of disease subtypes, evaluation of disease stage, and treatment planning. In this work, we propose a learning framework using MR image data for discriminating a set of cerebellar ataxia types and predicting a disease ...

  10. Cerebellar contributions to neurological soft signs in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirjak, Dusan; Thomann, Philipp A; Kubera, Katharina M; Stieltjes, Bram; Wolf, Robert C

    2016-02-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) are frequently found in psychiatric disorders of significant neurodevelopmental origin, e.g., in patients with schizophrenia and autism. Yet NSS are also present in healthy individuals suggesting a neurodevelopmental signature of motor function, probably as a continuum between health and disease. So far, little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying these motor phenomena in healthy persons, and it is even less known whether the cerebellum contributes to NSS expression. Thirty-seven healthy young adults (mean age = 23 years) were studied using high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and "resting-state" functional MRI at three Tesla. NSS levels were measured using the "Heidelberg Scale." Cerebellar gray matter volume was investigated using cerebellum-optimized voxel-based analysis methods. Cerebellar function was assessed using regional homogeneity (ReHo), a measure of local network strength. The relationship between cerebellar structure and function and NSS was analyzed using regression models. There was no significant relationship between cerebellar volume and NSS (p < 0.005, uncorrected for height, p < 0.05 corrected for spatial extent). Positive associations with cerebellar lobule VI activity were found for the "motor coordination" and "hard signs" NSS domains. A negative relationship was found between lobule VI activity and "complex motor task" domain (p < 0.005, uncorrected for height, p < 0.05 corrected for spatial extent). The data indicate that in healthy young adults, distinct NSS domains are related to cerebellar activity, specifically with activity of cerebellar subregions with known cortical somatomotor projections. In contrast, cerebellar volume is not predictive of NSS in healthy persons. PMID:25708455

  11. Oxidative Stress in Autism: Elevated Cerebellar 3-nitrotyrosine Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Sajdel-Sulkowska

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that oxidative stress and/or mercury compounds play an important role in the pathophysiology of autism. This study compared for the first time the cerebellar levels of the oxidative stress marker 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT, mercury (Hg and the antioxidant selenium (Se levels between control and autistic subjects. Tissue homogenates were prepared in the presence of protease inhibitors from the frozen cerebellar tissue of control (n=10; mean age, 15.5 years; mean PMI, 15.5 hours and autistic (n=9; mean age 12.1 years; mean PMI, 19.3 hours subjects. The concentration of cerebellar 3-NT, determined by ELISA, in controls ranged from 13.69 to 49.04 pmol g-1 of tissue; the concentration of 3-NT in autistic cases ranged from 3.91 to 333.03 pmol g-1 of tissue. Mean cerebellar 3-NT was elevated in autism by 68.9% and the increase was statistically significant (p=0.045. Cerebellar Hg, measured by atomic absorption spectrometry ranged from 0.9 to 35 pmol g-1 tissue in controls (n=10 and from 3.2 to 80.7 pmol g-1 tissue in autistic cases (n=9; the 68.2% increase in cerebellar Hg was not statistically significant. However, there was a positive correlation between cerebellar 3-NT and Hg levels (r=0.7961, p=0.0001. A small decrease in cerebellar Se levels in autism, measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy, was not statistically significant but was accompanied by a 42.9% reduction in the molar ratio of Se to Hg in the autistic cerebellum. While preliminary, the results of the present study add elevated oxidative stress markers in brain to the growing body of data reflecting greater oxidative stress in autism.

  12. Cerebellar medulloblastoma in a 65 year old Indian male.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiswal A

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available A case of cerebellar medulloblastoma in a 65 year old male is reported. Cerebellar medulloblastoma is classically seen during childhood, and less than 25% of these tumours are found in adults below 40 years of age. Rarely, cases are reported above the age of 40 years. So far only three cases have been reported in patients aged above 64 years and none of these case reports are from India.

  13. The Clinical Differentiation of Cerebellar Infarction from Common Vertigo Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, James A.; Viirre, Erik

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes the emergency department approach to diagnosing cerebellar infarction in the patient presenting with vertigo. Vertigo is defined and identification of a vertigo syndrome is discussed. The differentiation of common vertigo syndromes such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere’s disease, migrainous vertigo, and vestibular neuritis is summarized. Confirmation of a peripheral vertigo syndrome substantially lowers the likelihood of cerebellar infarction, as do ind...

  14. Verbal Memory Impairments in Children after Cerebellar Tumor Resection

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    Matthew P. Kirschen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate cerebellar lobular contributions to specific cognitive deficits observed after cerebellar tumor resection. Verbal working memory (VWM tasks were administered to children following surgical resection of cerebellar pilocytic astrocytomas and age-matched controls. Anatomical MRI scans were used to quantify the extent of cerebellar lobular damage from each patient's resection. Patients exhibited significantly reduced digit span for auditory but not visual stimuli, relative to controls, and damage to left hemispheral lobule VIII was significantly correlated with this deficit. Patients also showed reduced effects of articulatory suppression and this was correlated with damage to the vermis and hemispheral lobule IV/V bilaterally. Phonological similarity and recency effects did not differ overall between patients and controls, but outlier patients with abnormal phonological similarity effects to either auditory or visual stimuli were found to have damage to hemispheral lobule VIII/VIIB on the left and right, respectively. We postulate that damage to left hemispheral lobule VIII may interfere with encoding of auditory stimuli into the phonological store. These data corroborate neuroimaging studies showing focal cerebellar activation during VWM paradigms, and thereby allow us to predict with greater accuracy which specific neurocognitive processes will be affected by a cerebellar tumor resection.

  15. Abnormal cerebellar volume in acute and remitted major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depping, Malte S; Wolf, Nadine D; Vasic, Nenad; Sambataro, Fabio; Hirjak, Dusan; Thomann, Philipp A; Wolf, Robert C

    2016-11-01

    Abnormal cortical volume is well-documented in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), but cerebellar findings have been heterogeneous. It is unclear whether abnormal cerebellar structure relates to disease state or medication. In this study, using structural MRI, we investigated cerebellar volume in clinically acute (with and without psychotropic treatment) and remitted MDD patients. High-resolution structural MRI data at 3T were obtained from acute medicated (n=29), acute unmedicated (n=14) and remitted patients (n=16). Data from 29 healthy controls were used for comparison purposes. Cerebellar volume was investigated using cerebellum-optimized voxel-based analysis methods. Patients with an acute MDD episode showed increased volume of left cerebellar area IX, and this was true for both medicated and unmedicated individuals (pbrain functional network with known relevance to core depressive symptom expression, exhibits abnormal volume in patients independent of clinical severity or medication. Thus, the data imply a possible trait marker of the disorder. However, given bilaterality and an association with clinical scores at least in remitted patients, the current findings raise the possibility that cerebellar volume may be reflective of successful treatment as well. PMID:27321187

  16. Relationship between the cerebellar function and cerebellar atrophy in Minamata disease. Investigations using body balance analyzer and MR imaging method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okajima, Toru [Johnan Hospital, Minami, Kumamoto (Japan); Ikeda, Osamu; Sannomiya, Kunihiro; Korogi, Yukinori; Uchino, Makoto

    1995-11-01

    Interrelations between the cerebellar function and cerebellar atrophy were studied in the cases with Minamata disease and spinocerebellar degeneration and in the healthy subjects. For evaluation of the cerebellar function, the statokinesigraph (SKG) was recorded and the shifting length (L-SKG) and moving area (A-SKG) of postural sway were obtained using body balance analyzer. Cerebellar atrophy was evaluated by the rostrocaudal and ventrodorsal diameters of whole vermis and the total area of upper and lower parts (area-UL) of vermis on the midsagittal plane of MR imaging. It was disclosed that there was significant correlation between the L-SKG and the measurement of rostrocaudal diameter as well as the area-UL of vermis through the patients with Minamata disease and the healthy subjects. When added the patients with spinocerebellar degeneration, the significant correlation was not obtainable probably because of the progressive processes of the disease. (author).

  17. A case of slowly progressive anti-Yo-associated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration successfully treated with antitumor and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboguchi, Shintaro; Yajima, Ryuji; Higuchi, You; Ishikawa, Masanori; Kawachi, Izumi; Koyama, Yu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo

    2016-07-28

    We report a case of slowly progressive anti-Yo-associated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) with breast cancer in a 54-year-old woman. The symptoms of limb and truncal ataxia, and dysarthria gradually progressed during the course of 1 year, and the modified Rankin scale (mRS) score was 2. A mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection was performed for the breast cancer. No malignant cells were found on histopathological examination of the lymph node. Combination chemotherapy with adriamycin and cyclophosphamide (AC) prevented neurologic deterioration. However, subsequent treatment with trastuzumab and paclitaxel did not prevent progression of the symptoms (mRS score 3). Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed atrophy of the cerebellar hemispheres without brain stem atrophy. Anti-Yo antibody was detected in the serum, which led to a diagnosis of anti-Yo-associated PCD. We resected an enlarged axillary lymph node, which was found on computed tomography. The histopathological analysis of the lymph node revealed foreign body granuloma, which suggested an association with necrotic malignant tissue. Following additional tegafur-uracil therapy and two courses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), the cerebellar signs and symptoms gradually improved (mRS score 2). The clinical course shows that PCD can present as a slowly progressive cerebellar symptom. We propose an active treatment for anti-Yo-associated PCD consisting of tumor resection, combined chemotherapy, and IVIg. PMID:27356731

  18. Cerebellar control of postural scaling and central set in stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, F B; Diener, H C

    1994-08-01

    1. The effects of cerebellar deficits in humans on scaling the magnitude of automatic postural responses based on sensory feedback and on predictive central set was investigated. Electromyographic (EMG) and surface reactive torques were compared in patients with anterior lobe cerebellar disorders and in normal healthy adults exposed to blocks of four velocities and five amplitudes of surface translations during stance. Correlations between the earliest postural responses (integrated EMG and initial rate of change of torque) and translation velocity provided a measure of postural magnitude scaling using sensory information from the current displacement. Correlations of responses with translation amplitude provided a measure of scaling dependent on predictive central set based on sequential experience with previous like displacements because the earliest postural responses occurred before completion of the displacements and because scaling to displacement amplitude disappeared when amplitudes were randomized in normal subjects. 2. Responses of cerebellar patients to forward body sway induced by backward surface displacements were hypermetric, that is, surface-reactive torque responses were two to three times larger than normal with longer muscle bursts resulting in overshooting of initial posture. Despite this postural hypermetria, the absolute and relative latencies of agonist muscle bursts at the ankle, knee, and hip were normal in cerebellar patients. 3. Although they were hypermetric, the earliest postural responses of cerebellar patients were scaled normally to platform displacement velocities using somatosensory feedback. Cerebellar patients, however, were unable to scale initial postural response magnitude to expected displacement amplitudes based on prior experience using central set. Randomization of displacement amplitudes eliminated the set effect of amplitude on initial responses in normal subjects, but responses to randomized and blocked trials were not

  19. Prion pathogenesis is faithfully reproduced in cerebellar organotypic slice cultures.

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    Jeppe Falsig

    Full Text Available Prions cause neurodegeneration in vivo, yet prion-infected cultured cells do not show cytotoxicity. This has hampered mechanistic studies of prion-induced neurodegeneration. Here we report that prion-infected cultured organotypic cerebellar slices (COCS experienced progressive spongiform neurodegeneration closely reproducing prion disease, with three different prion strains giving rise to three distinct patterns of prion protein deposition. Neurodegeneration did not occur when PrP was genetically removed from neurons, and a comprehensive pharmacological screen indicated that neurodegeneration was abrogated by compounds known to antagonize prion replication. Prion infection of COCS and mice led to enhanced fodrin cleavage, suggesting the involvement of calpains or caspases in pathogenesis. Accordingly, neurotoxicity and fodrin cleavage were prevented by calpain inhibitors but not by caspase inhibitors, whereas prion replication proceeded unimpeded. Hence calpain inhibition can uncouple prion replication from its neurotoxic sequelae. These data validate COCS as a powerful model system that faithfully reproduces most morphological hallmarks of prion infections. The exquisite accessibility of COCS to pharmacological manipulations was instrumental in recognizing the role of calpains in neurotoxicity, and significantly extends the collection of tools necessary for rigorously dissecting prion pathogenesis.

  20. Electrical stimulation of cerebellar fastigial nucleus protects rat brain, in vitro, from staurosporine-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, P; Qian, L; Glickstein, S B; Golanov, E V; Pickel, V M; Reis, D J

    2001-10-01

    Electrical stimulation of the cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) elicits a prolonged ( approximately 10 days) and substantial (50-80%) protection against ischemic and excitotoxic injuries. The mechanism(s) of protection are unknown. We investigated whether FN stimulation directly protects brain cells against apoptotic cell death in an in vitro rat brain slice culture model. Rats were electrically stimulated in FN or, as control, the cerebellar dentate nucleus (DN). Coronal slices through the forebrain were explanted, exposed to staurosporine, harvested, and analyzed for caspase-3 activity by a fluorescence assay. FN, but not DN, stimulation significantly reduced staurosporine-induced caspase-3 activity by 39 +/- 7% at 3 h, 31 +/- 3% at 6 h and 26 +/- 4% at 10 h of incubation. Immunocytochemistry revealed FN-specific reductions in activated caspase-3 mainly in glial-like cells throughout the forebrain. FN stimulation also results in a 56.5% reduction in cytochrome c release upon staurosporine incubation. We conclude that neuroprotection elicited from FN stimulation can directly modify the sensitivity of brain cells to apoptotic stimuli and thereby suppress staurosporine induced apoptosis in adult rat brain slices. This model indicates that neuroprotection can be studied in vitro and provides new insight into the potential role of glial cells in ischemic protection of neurons induced by FN stimulation. PMID:11677261

  1. Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome CCAS – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starowicz-Filip, Anna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the study was to describe a case of the patient with cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome CCAS, characterize the role of cerebellum in the regulation of cognitive functions and present theprocedure of neuropsychological diagnosis useful in indicating the specific cognitive and emotional problems in patients with cerebellar damage.Case report. A 41- year old man with an ischemic cerebellar stroke of its right hemisphere manifested the neuropsychological symptoms typical for the frontal damage: euphoric mood, disorganized behavior,lack of criticism and mental plasticity, tendency to shorten the personal distance, problems with mistake correction. In neuropsychological diagnosis we used following methods: Raven Progressive Matrices Test, Mini Mental Stage Examination (MMSE, Trail Making Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Stroop Interference Test, Word Fluency Test, Auditory Verbal Learning Test by Łuria, Benton Visual Retention Test, Digit Span.Results. Analyzing the obtained results we observed the significant decrease of all executive functions: planning, abstract thinking, cognitive flexibility, adaptation to new situations as well as memory impairments and changes in emotional and behavioral state similar to frontal syndrome. The whole of impairments including the typical cerebellar symptoms (ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria,hypotonia create the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome CCAS with leading role of dysexecutive syndrome.Conclusions. The cerebellum takes part in the regulation of cognitive functions. The cerebellar damages can imitate the emotional- cognitive problems of patients after frontal damages what additionally stress the functional link between these two brain structures. Patient’s with cerebellar damages should have neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric diagnosis and care.

  2. A cerebellar neuroprosthetic system: computational architecture and in vivo experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PaulF.M.J.Verschure

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Emulating the input-output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuro-prosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model's inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuro-prosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step towards replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuro-prosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuro-prosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step towards the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term

  3. Cerebellar Hemangioblastoma: Four Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgi Bakaris

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioblastoma (HB is a benign, slow-growing, highly vascular tumour of not well defined histological origin. These tumors make up about 1 to 2 percent of all intracranial neoplasms and occur primarily in the posterior fossa. Hemangioblastomas can occur sporadically but in about 20% to 30% cases, it is associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease. Four cases of cerebellar haemangioblastoma, not associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease (sporadic haemangioblastomas, were presented and reviewed the relevant literature.Four hemangioblastomas of the central nervous system were examined with haematoxylin and eosin (H and E, reticulin stain and with a panel of antibodies including CD34, vimentin, NSE, S-100, CD99, CD56, GFAP, cytoceratin, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, CD10. Of the 4 patients in this study 1 was male and 3 were female. Their ages ranged from 46 years to 60 years with a mean age of 54.75 years. All of them were as cystic nodules about 2-3 cm in diameter. In the histopathological examination, the tumors sections showed large and vacuolated stromal cells and numerous arborizing capillary-size blood vessels. Some tumors showed atypical nuclei. Vimentin was strongly positive both stromal cells and blood veessels in all tumors. In 4 cases of HB, some stromal cells were positive for NSE and CD99. Three tumors were positive for S-100 and CD56, two tumors were focally positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. CD34 immunostaining highlighted the arborizing and complex vascular network, whereas the tumor stromal cells were negative. The stromal cells were negative for epithelial markers such as cytokeratin, EMA and CD10. Ki-67 index was less than 1% of the tumor cells. Hemangioblastoma, a rare, benign tumors of uncertain histogenesis, is characterized histologically by the presence of vacuolated, lipid containing cells and a well developed, fine capillary network. The main histological differential diagnosis of HB is metastatic

  4. MR imaging of solid cerebellar tumors in adult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Yu, In Kyu [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choo, Sung Wook; Byun, Hong Sik [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyu Ho; Kim, Ki Jun [Catholic University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-15

    The solid variety of cerebellar tumors in adult is relatively uncommon. This study is to describe the characteristic MR findings of various solid cerebellar tumors in adult. Twenty three cerebellar solid tumors from 22 consecutive patients over age of 15 with surgical confirmations were retrospectively evaluated with MR findings. Histologic diagnosis included hemangioblastoma (n = 6), metastasis (n = 6), high-grade astrocytoma (n = 3), and medulloblastoma (n = 8). The MR findings were reviewed with attention of the size, the signal intensity of the tumors, pattern of enhancement, tumoral margin, degree of peritumoral edema, signal void vascular structures within and/or around the tumor, and location in relation to attachment to the pial surface of the tumor. Solid hemangioblastomas consistently showed slightly low or iso signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high intensity on T2-weighted images, dense homogeneous enhancement, and signal void vessels within and/or around the mass. Metastatic tumors showed various findings with predominantly low or iso signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Medulloblastomas was midline and/or paramidline in location, and had larger mass formation. High-grade astrocytomas revealed nonspecific MR findings with no signal void vessels. Hemangioblastoma, metastasis, malignant astrocytoma, and medulloblastoma should be included in differential diagnosis of solid cerebellar tumors in adult. Dense homogeneous enhancement and signal void vessels are characteristic of hemangioblastoma. The signal intensity of the tumor, and presence of signal void vessels, location and enhancement pattern can be some value in differential diagnosis of solid cerebellar tumors in adult.

  5. Emotions and their cognitive control in children with cerebellar tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopyan, Talar; Laughlin, Suzanne; Dennis, Maureen

    2010-11-01

    A constellation of deficits, termed the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS), has been reported following acquired cerebellar lesions. We studied emotion identification and the cognitive control of emotion in children treated for acquired tumors of the cerebellum. Participants were 37 children (7-16 years) treated for cerebellar tumors (19 benign astrocytomas (AST), 18 malignant medulloblastomas (MB), and 37 matched controls (CON). The Emotion Identification Task investigated recognition of happy and sad emotions in music. In two cognitive control tasks, we investigated whether children could identify emotion in situations in which the emotion in the music and the emotion in the lyrics was either congruent or incongruent. Children with cerebellar tumors identified emotion as accurately and quickly as controls (p > .05), although there was a significant interaction of emotions and group (p sad emotions, and both cerebellar tumor groups were impaired in the cognitive control of emotions (p emotion rather than emotion identification provides some support for a model of the CCAS as a disorder, not so much of emotion as of the regulation of emotion by cognition. PMID:20887648

  6. Does cerebellar neuronal integrity relate to cognitive ability?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) allows the non-invasive measurement of metabolite levels in the brain. One of these is N-acetylaspartate (NA), a molecule found solely in neurones, synthesised there by mitochondria. This compound can be considered as a marker of 1) neuronal density and 2) neuronal mitochondria function. We recently completed a joint MRS and neuropsychological investigation of Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), a rare (1/20,000) autosomal dominant disorder caused by a deletion which includes the elastin locus and LIM-kinase. The syndrome has an associated behavioural and cognitive profile which includes hyperactivity, hyperacusis and excessive sociability. Spatial skills are severely affected, while verbal skills are left relatively intact Our investigation showed loss of NA from the cerebellum in WBS compared with normal controls, with the subject population as a whole displaying a continuum of cerebellar NA concentration. Ability at cognitive tests, including the Weschler IQ scale and various verbal and spatial tests, was shown to correlate significantly and positively with the concentration of NA in the cerebellum. This finding can be interpreted in one of two ways: 1. Our sampling of cerebellar metabolite levels represents a 'global' sampling of total brain neuronal density and, as such, is independent of cerebellar integrity. 2. Cerebellar neuronal integrity is associated with performance at cognitive tests. If the latter interpretation is shown to be the case, it will have important implications for our current understanding of cerebellar function. Copyright (1998) Australian Neuroscience Society

  7. Evaluation of Morphological Plasticity in the Cerebella of Basketball Players with MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Park, In Sung; Han, Jong Woo; Lee, Kea Joo; Lee, Nam Joon; Lee, Won Teak; Park, Kyung Ah; Rhyu, Im Joo

    2006-01-01

    Cerebellum is a key structure involved in motor learning and coordination. In animal models, motor skill learning increased the volume of molecular layer and the number of synapses on Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the analogous change of cerebellar volume occurs in human population who learn specialized motor skills and practice them intensively for a long time. Magnetic resonance image (MRI)-based cerebellar volumetry was performed i...

  8. From mice to men: lessons from mutant ataxic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Cendelin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Ataxic mutant mice can be used to represent models of cerebellar degenerative disorders. They serve for investigation of cerebellar function, pathogenesis of degenerative processes as well as of therapeutic approaches. Lurcher, Hot-foot, Purkinje cell degeneration, Nervous, Staggerer, Weaver, Reeler, and Scrambler mouse models and mouse models of SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, SCA7, SCA23, DRPLA, Niemann-Pick disease and Friedreich ataxia are reviewed with special regard to cerebellar pathology, pat...

  9. Internal carotid-cerebellar artery anastomosis. So-called persistent trigeminal artery variant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanohata, Kazunori; Maehara, Tadayuki; Noda, Masanobu; Katoh, Hiromi

    1987-09-01

    Five cases of internal carotid-cerebellar artery anastomosis are presented. These anomalous vessels are identical to the so-called persistent trigeminal artery variant (PTAV). In our cases, two superior cerebellar arteries (SCAs), two anterior inferior cerebellar arteries (AICAs) and one posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) arose from the precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. We discuss the embryolgical and neuroradiological aspects of this anomaly.

  10. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor deletion in cerebellar granule neuron precursors impairs neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Daniel P; Adham, Zachariah O; Thompson, Bryan; Genestine, Matthieu; Cherry, Jonathan; Olschowka, John A; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel; Opanashuk, Lisa A

    2016-05-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated member of the basic-helix-loop-helix/PER-ARNT-SIM(PAS) transcription factor superfamily that also mediates the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Increasing evidence suggests that AhR influences the development of many tissues, including the central nervous system. Our previous studies suggest that sustained AhR activation by TCDD and/or AhR deletion disrupts cerebellar granule neuron precursor (GNP) development. In the current study, to determine whether endogenous AhR controls GNP development in a cell-autonomous manner, we created a GNP-specific AhR deletion mouse, AhR(fx/fx) /Math1(CRE/+) (AhR CKO). Selective AhR deletion in GNPs produced abnormalities in proliferation and differentiation. Specifically, fewer GNPs were engaged in S-phase, as demonstrated by ∼25% reductions in thymidine (in vitro) and Bromodeoxyuridine (in vivo) incorporation. Furthermore, total granule neuron numbers in the internal granule layer at PND21 and PND60 were diminished in AhR conditional knockout (CKO) mice compared with controls. Conversely, differentiation was enhanced, including ∼40% increase in neurite outgrowth and 50% increase in GABARα6 receptor expression in deletion mutants. Our results suggest that AhR activity plays a role in regulating granule neuron number and differentiation, possibly by coordinating this GNP developmental transition. These studies provide novel insights for understanding the normal roles of AhR signaling during cerebellar granule cell neurogenesis and may have important implications for the effects of environmental factors in cerebellar dysgenesis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 533-550, 2016. PMID:26243376

  11. Modulation of GABAA receptors in Cerebellar Granule Neurons by Ethanol: A Review of Genetic and Electrophysiological Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Botta, Paolo; Radcliffe, Richard A.; Carta, Mario; Mameli, Manuel; Daly, Erin; Floyd, Kirsten L.; Deitrich, Richard A.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2007-01-01

    Cerebellar granule neurons receive inhibitory input from Golgi cells in the form of phasic and tonic currents that are mediated by postsynaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors, respectively. Extrasynaptic receptors are thought to contain α6βxδ subunits. Here we review studies on ethanol (EtOH) modulation of these receptors, which have yielded contradictory results. Although studies with recombinant receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes indicate that α6β3δ receptors are potently enhanced by...

  12. Cerebellar Alterations and Gait Defects as Therapeutic Outcome Measures for Enzyme Replacement Therapy in α-Mannosidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Damme, Markus; Stroobants, Stijn; Walkley, Steven U.; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; D'Hooge, Rudi; Fogh, Jens; Saftig, Paul; Lübke, Torben; Blanz, Judith

    2011-01-01

    α-Mannosidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disease with accumulation of undegraded mannosyl-linked oligosaccharides in cells throughout the body, most notably in the CNS. This leads to a broad spectrum of neurological manifestations, including progressive intellectual impairment, disturbed motor functions and cerebellar atrophy. To develop therapeutic outcome measures for enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) that could be used for human patients, a gene knockout model of α-mannosidosis in mice wa...

  13. Cerebellar networks with the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostan, Andreea C; Dum, Richard P; Strick, Peter L

    2013-05-01

    The dominant view of cerebellar function has been that it is exclusively concerned with motor control and coordination. Recent findings from neuroanatomical, behavioral, and imaging studies have profoundly changed this view. Neuroanatomical studies using virus transneuronal tracers have demonstrated that cerebellar output reaches vast areas of the neocortex, including regions of prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex. Furthermore, it has recently become clear that the cerebellum is reciprocally connected with the basal ganglia, which suggests that the two subcortical structures are part of a densely interconnected network. Taken together, these findings elucidate the neuroanatomical substrate for cerebellar involvement in non-motor functions mediated by the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex, as well as in processes traditionally associated with the basal ganglia. PMID:23579055

  14. An unusual cause of adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Ramshekhar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of sporadic adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism. A 40-year-old unmarried man presented with progressive ataxia and dysarthria along with complaints of non-development of secondary sexual characteristics and erectile dysfunction. There were complaints of intermittent diarrhea. Clinical examination revealed a pan-cerebellar syndrome with features of hypoandrogenism. No eye movement abnormalities were evident. There were signs of malabsorption. Investigations confirmed the presence of auto-antibodies found in celiac disease, and a duodenal biopsy confirmed the same. Hypoandrogenism was postulated to be due to hypergonadotropic hypogonadism which has been mentioned in a few patients of celiac disease. However, the pattern seen in our patient was of a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. This is probably secondary to an autoimmune hypophysitis seen in some patients in the absence of other clinical manifestations. Autoantibody testing should be a diagnostic necessity in any adult with a sporadic cerebellar ataxia.

  15. File list: DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 DNase-seq Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... SRX685882,SRX685880,SRX685883,SRX685885,SRX685877,SRX685878 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... SRX685885,SRX685882,SRX685880 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  18. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Unclassified Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Unclassified Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... SRX685885,SRX685882,SRX685880 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Histone Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Unclassified Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 DNase-seq Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... SRX685885,SRX685882,SRX685880 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Histone Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  8. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 DNase-seq Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... SRX685885,SRX685882,SRX685880 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Unclassified Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Histone Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  11. File list: DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 DNase-seq Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... SRX685885,SRX685878,SRX685882,SRX685877,SRX685880,SRX685883 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Histone Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... SRX685882,SRX685880,SRX685883,SRX685885,SRX685877,SRX685878 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  15. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... SRX685885,SRX685878,SRX685882,SRX685877,SRX685880,SRX685883 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  18. Hemorrhagic cerebellar anaplastic glioma appearing 12 years after prophylactic cranial radiotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation-induced cerebellar glioma is extremely rare, and the etiology of such a tumor is unknown. We report a rare case of hemorrhagic cerebellar anaplastic glioma occurring 12 years after prophylactic cranial radiotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia. We discuss the etiologies of the radiation-induced hemorrhagic cerebellar glioma as a secondary malignancy after radiotherapy. (author)

  19. Cerebellar atrophy in an epileptic child: is it due to phenytoin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahuja S

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available A four and half year old epileptic child on phenytoin therapy since one year presented with signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Serum phenytoin level was high (33 mcg/ml and computerised tomographic scan of the brain showed severe generalised cerebellar atrophy. The cerebellar signs represented drug over dosage and toxicity and persisted long after omission of phenytoin.

  20. Back to front: cerebellar connections and interactions with the prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Watson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Although recent neuroanatomical evidence has demonstrated closed-loop connectivity between prefrontal cortex and the cerebellum, the physiology of cerebello-cerebral circuits and the extent to which cerebellar output modulates neuronal activity in neocortex during behavior remain relatively unexplored. We show that electrical stimulation of the contralateral cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN in awake, behaving rats evokes distinct local field potential (LFP responses (onset latency ~13 ms in the prelimbic (PrL subdivision of the medial prefrontal cortex. Trains of FN stimulation evoke heterogeneous patterns of response in putative pyramidal cells in frontal and prefrontal regions in both urethane-anaesthetized and awake, behaving rats. However, the majority of cells showed decreased firing rates during stimulation and subsequent rebound increases; more than 90% of cells showed significant changes in response. Simultaneous recording of on-going LFP activity from FN and PrL while rats were at rest or actively exploring an open field arena revealed significant network coherence restricted to the theta frequency range (5-10 Hz. Granger causality analysis indicated that this coherence was significantly directed from cerebellum to PrL during active locomotion. Our results demonstrate the presence of a cerebello-prefrontal pathway in rat and reveal behaviorally dependent coordinated network activity between the two structures, which could facilitate transfer of sensorimotor information into ongoing neocortical processing during goal directed behaviors.