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Sample records for cerebellar hemorrhage complicated

  1. Hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage and cerebellar hemorrhage caused by cryptic angioma

    Yoshida, Shinichi; Sano, Keiji; Kwak, Suyong; Saito, Isamu.

    1981-01-01

    A series of 44 patients with hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage and nine patients with cerebellar hemorrhage caused by small angiomas is described. Hypertensive hemorrhage occurred most frequently in the patients in their seventies, whereas the onset of angioma-caused hemorrhage was often seen below the age of 40. Clinical syndromes of cerebellar hemorrhages can be categorized into three basic types: the vertigo syndrome, cerebellar dysfunction syndrome and brain stem compression syndrome. Patients with small (>= 2 cm in diameter in CT scans) and medium-sized (2 cm = 3 cm) hematomas deteriorated into unresponsive conditions and developed signs of brain stem compression. Surgical mortality was 32% in the hypertensive group, while it was 0% in the angioma group. Mortality as well as morbidity in both groups was strongly influenced by the preoperative status of consciousness. Our results suggest that substantial improvement could be obtained in the overall outcome of this disease by emergency craniectomy and removal of hematomas in all patients with large hematomas regardless of the levels of consciousness and regardless of the causes of bleeding. Furthermore, when clinical information and CT findings are suggestive of a ''cryptic'' angioma as the causative lesion, posterior fossa surgery may be indicated to extirpate the lesion, even if the hematoma is small. (author)

  2. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    Cevik, Belma; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  3. Computed tomography in hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage

    Nose, T; Maki, Y; Ono, Y; Yoshizawa, T; Tsuboi, K [Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1981-11-01

    Fourteen cases of cerebellar hemorrhage were analysed from the point of CT-scan, and the following results were obtained. 1. The number of cases of cerebellar hemorrhage forms 4.4% of that of total intracranial hemorrhage. 2. Most of the cerebellar hematomas extend upward. Downward extension is rare. 3. In acute dead cases hematomas are 5 cm or more in diameter and lie over bilateral hemispheres with the extension to third or fourth ventricles in CT-scans. 4. Slowly progressive cases are detriorated by the secondary hydrocephalus. 5. In mild cases hematomas are 3cm or less in diameter on CT-scans and the hematoma evacuation is not indicated for these cases. 6. The shunt operation alone is sufficient for the life saving of the slowly progressive cases, but the hematoma evacuation is indicated in these cases if the functional prognosis is taken into consideration. 7. Immediate hematoma evacuation together with the ventricular drainage is considered to be effective for the life saving of the acute fulminant cases.

  4. Computed tomography in hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage

    Nose, Tadao; Maki, Yutaka; Ono, Yukio; Yoshizawa, Takashi; Tsuboi, Kohji

    1981-01-01

    Fourteen cases of cerebellar hemorrhage were analysed from the point of CT-scan, and the following results were obtained. 1. The number of cases of cerebellar hemorrhage forms 4.4% of that of total intracranial hemorrhage. 2. Most of the cerebellar hematomas extend upward. Downward extension is rare. 3. In acute dead cases hematomas are 5 cm or more in diameter and lie over bilateral hemispheres with the extension to third or fourth ventricles in CT-scans. 4. Slowly progressive cases are detriorated by the secondary hydrocephalus. 5. In mild cases hematomas are 3cm or less in diameter on CT-scans and the mematoma evacuation is not indicated for these cases. 6. The shunt operation alone is sufficient for the life saving of the slowly progressive cases, but the hematoma evacuation is indicated in these cases if the functional prognosis is taken into consideration. 7. Immediate hematoma evacuation togather with the ventricular dranage is considered to be effective for the life saving of the acute fulminant cases. (author)

  5. Congenital Cerebellar Mixed Germ Cell Tumor Presenting with Hemorrhage in a Newborn

    Kim, Sung Mok; Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, So Young; Park, Won Soon; Jang, Yun Sil; Shin, Hyung Jin; Suh, Yeon Lim

    2008-01-01

    We report here on a neonate with congenital cerebellar mixed germ cell tumor, and this initially presented as cerebellar hemorrhage. Postnatal cranial ultrasonography revealed an echogenic cerebellar mass that exhibited the signal characteristics of hemorrhage rather than tumor on MR images. The short-term follow-up images also suggested a resolving cerebellar hemorrhage. One month later, the neonate developed vomiting. A second set of MR images demonstrated an enlarged mass that exhibited changed signal intensity at the same site, which suggested a neoplasm. Histological examination after the surgical resection revealed a mixed germ cell tumor

  6. Crossed cerebellar and cerebral cortical diaschisis in basal ganglia hemorrhage

    Lim, Joon Seok; Ryu, Young Hoon; Kim, Hee Joung; Kim, Byung Moon; Lee, Jong Doo; Lee, Byung Hee

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phenomenon of diaschisis in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex in patients with pure basal ganglia hemorrhage using cerebral blood flow SPECT. Twelve patients with pure basal ganglia hemorrhage were studied with Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT. Asymmetric index (AI) was calculated in the cerebellum and cerebral cortical regions as | C R -C L |/ (C R -C L ) x 200, where C R and C L are the mean reconstructed counts for the right and left ROIs, respectively. Hypoperfusion was considered to be present when AI was greater than mean + 2 SD of 20 control subjects. Mean AI of the cerebellum and cerebral cortical regions in patients with pure basal ganglia hemorrhage was significantly higher than normal controls (p<0.05): Cerebellum (18.68±8.94 vs 4.35±0.94, mean ±SD), thalamus (31.91±10.61 vs 2.57±1.45), basal ganglia (35.94±16.15 vs 4.34±2.08), parietal (18.94±10.69 vs 3.24±0.87), frontal (13.60±10.8 vs 4.02±2.04) and temporal cortex (18.92±11.95 vs 5.13±1.69). Ten of the 12 patients had significant hypoperfusion in the contralateral cerebellum. Hypoperfusion was also shown in the ipsilateral thalamus (n=12), ipsilateral parietal (n=12), frontal (n=6) and temporal cortex (n=10). Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) and cortical diaschisis may frequently occur in patients with pure basal ganglia hemorrhage, suggesting that CCD can develop without the interruption of corticopontocerebellar pathway

  7. Symptomatic hemorrhagic complications associated with dural substitutes

    Po-Yuan Chen

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The increased risk of hemorrhagic complications associated with craniotomy is modified by choice of dural replacement. Our results could assist clinicians in their decision-making with respect to the optimal timing for synthetic dural substitutes in patients with tumor infiltration of the patient's dura, severe brain swelling in traumatic brain injury, or a result of shrinkage from exposure and electrocautery.

  8. Cerebellar hemorrhage provoked by combined use of nattokinase and aspirin in a patient with cerebral microbleeds.

    Chang, Yung-Yee; Liu, Jia-Shou; Lai, Shung-Lon; Wu, Hsiu-Shan; Lan, Min-Yu

    2008-01-01

    Nattokinase is used as a health-promoting medicine for preventing thrombosis due to its fibrinolytic activity. Cerebral microbleed is remnant of blood extravasations from the damaged vessels related to cerebral microangiopathies. We report a patient, having used aspirin for secondary stroke prevention, who had an acute cerebellar hemorrhage after taking nattokinase 400 mg daily for 7 consecutive days. In addition to the hemorrhagic lesion, multiple microbleeds were demonstrated on brain MR images. We suggest that nattokinase may increase risk of intracerebral hemorrhage in patients who have bleeding-prone cerebral microangiopathy and are receiving other antithrombotic agent at the same time.

  9. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Complicated by Cerebral Hemorrhage during Acyclovir Therapy.

    Harada, Yukinori; Hara, Yuuta

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) can be complicated by adverse events in the acute phase. We herein present the case of a 71-year-old woman with HSE complicated by cerebral hemorrhage. She presented with acute deterioration of consciousness and fever and was diagnosed with HSE based on the detection of herpes simplex virus-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid by a polymerase chain reaction. The cerebral hemorrhage developed during acyclovir therapy; however, its diagnosis was delayed for 2 days. After the conservative treatment of the cerebral hemorrhage, the patient made a near-complete recovery. Cerebral hemorrhage should be considered as an acute-phase complication of HSE.

  10. Statins and risk of poststroke hemorrhagic complications

    MacIsaac, Rachael L.; Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H.; Siegerink, Bob; Bath, Philip M.; Endres, Matthias; Lees, Kennedy R.; Nolte, Christian H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether statin treatment before or after acute ischemic stroke (AIS) affects the risk of acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), postacute ICH, and mortality within 90 days. Methods: Data were sought from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive, an international repository of clinical trials data. Using propensity score matching, we retrospectively compared patients with prior statin treatment and newly initiated statin within 3 days after AIS to patients without statin exposure. Outcomes of interest were acute symptomatic ICH (sICH), any acute ICH, postacute ICH, and mortality during follow-up of 3 months. Results: A total of 8,535 patients (mean age 70 years, 54% male, median baseline NIH Stroke Scale score 13) were analyzed. After propensity score matching, prior statin use was not strongly associated with sICH (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83–2.14) or any ICH (adjusted OR 1.35, 95% CI 0.92–1.98). There was no evidence of an interaction between prior statin use and thrombolysis. New initiation of statins was not associated with postacute ICH (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.60, 95% CI 0.70–3.65). There was a signal towards lower 90-day mortality in patients with prior statin use (adjusted HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.70–1.00) and especially early initiation of statins (adjusted HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.46–0.97). Conclusions: Statin use prior to AIS was not associated with early hemorrhagic complications, irrespective of treatment with thrombolysis. New initiation of statin treatment early after AIS did not affect risk of postacute ICH, but might be associated with reduced mortality. PMID:27016519

  11. Surgical Treatment for Occipital Condyle Fracture, C1 Dislocation, and Cerebellar Contusion with Hemorrhage after Blunt Head Trauma

    Shigeo Ueda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Occipital condyle fractures (OCFs have been treated as rare traumatic injuries, but the number of reported OCFs has gradually increased because of the popularization of computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The patient in this report presented with OCFs and C1 dislocation, along with traumatic cerebellar hemorrhage, which led to craniovertebral junction instability. This case was also an extremely rare clinical condition in which the patient presented with traumatic lower cranial nerve palsy secondary to OCFs. When the patient was transferred to our hospital, the occipital bone remained defective extensively due to surgical treatment of cerebellar hemorrhage. For this reason, concurrent cranioplasty was performed with resin in order to fix the occipital bone plate strongly. The resin-made occipital bone was used to secure a titanium plate and screws enabled us to perform posterior fusion of the craniovertebral junction. Although the patient wore a halo vest for 3 months after surgery, lower cranial nerve symptoms, including not only neck pain but also paralysis of the throat and larynx, improved postoperatively. No complications were detected during outpatient follow-up, which continued for 5 years postoperatively.

  12. Intracerebral hemorrhage complicating viral hepatitis A | Belfquih ...

    HVA IgM. Eight 8 weeks after, she developed hemorrhagic syndrome coupled with fever associated and persistent jaundice. The blood count showed aregenerative pancytopenia secondary to aplastic anemia confirmed by bone marrow biopsy.

  13. Risk factors for medical complications of acute hemorrhagic stroke

    Jangala Mohan Sidhartha

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: Our study has assessed that hypertension followed by diabetes mellitus are the major risk factors for medical complications of hemorrhagic stroke. Female mortality rate was more when compared to males.

  14. Concurrence of Crossed Cerebellar Diaschisis and Parakinesia Brachialis Oscitans in a Patient with Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Yung-Tsan Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD is defined as a reduction in blood flow in the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the supratentorial focal lesion. The phenomenon termed parakinesia brachialis oscitans (PBO in which stroke patients experience involuntary stretching of the hemiplegic arm during yawning is rarely reported. The concurrence of CCD and PBO has never been described. A 52-year-old man had putaminal hemorrhage and demonstrated no significant recovery in his left hemiplegia after intensive rehabilitation, but his gait improved gradually. Two months after the stroke, the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT showed CCD. Four months after the stroke, the patient noticed PBO. The follow-up SPECT showed persistent CCD and the patient’s arm was still plegic. The frequency and intensity of PBO have increased with time since the stroke. We speculate that the two phenomena CCD and PBO might share similar neuroanatomical pathways and be valuable for predicting clinical recovery after stroke.

  15. Pheochromocytoma complicated by intracerebral hemorrhage - a case report

    Nogueira, Aline Silva; Marchiori, Edson; Almeida, Fabiola Assuncao de; Martins, Renata Romano; Sales, Anderson Ribeiro; Santos, Tereza Cristina C.R.S. dos; Reis, Simone Teixeira; Silveira, Sonia Marcelino T. da

    1999-01-01

    The authors report a case of pheochromocytoma that was complicated by intracerebral hemorrhage in a 17-year-old female patient. Computed tomography showed a solid mass, heterogeneous, on the right adrenal. The patient underwent a right adrenalectomy. She is being observed by our out-patients clinic, presenting normal blood pressure levels and a left hemiparesis. (author)

  16. Low-grade intraventricular hemorrhage disrupts cerebellar white matter in preterm infants: evidence from diffusion tensor imaging

    Morita, Takashi; Morimoto, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Tatsuji; Morioka, Shigemi; Kidowaki, Satoshi; Moroto, Masaharu; Yamashita, Satoshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Chiyonobu, Tomohiro; Tokuda, Sachiko; Hosoi, Hajime [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan); Yamada, Kei [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Recent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have demonstrated that leakage of hemosiderin into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is caused by high-grade intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), can affect cerebellar development in preterm born infants. However, a direct effect of low-grade IVH on cerebellar development is unknown. Thus, we evaluated the cerebellar and cerebral white matter (WM) of preterm infants with low-grade IVH. Using DTI tractography performed at term-equivalent age, we analyzed 42 infants who were born less than 30 weeks gestational age (GA) at birth (22 with low-grade IVH, 20 without). These infants were divided into two birth groups depending on GA, and we then compared the presence and absence of IVH which was diagnosed by cerebral ultrasound (CUS) within 10 days after birth or conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at term-equivalent age in each group. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) at the superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP), middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP), motor tract, and sensory tract were measured. In the SCP, preterm born infants with IVH had lower FA values compared with infants without IVH. In particular, younger preterm birth with IVH had lower FA values in the SCP and motor tract and higher ADC values in the MCP. Low-grade IVH impaired cerebellar and cerebral WM, especially in the SCP. Moreover, younger preterm infants exhibited greater disruptions to cerebellar WM and the motor tract than infants of older preterm birth. (orig.)

  17. Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome and Other Complications After Surgery in the Posterior Fossa in Adults

    Wibroe, Morten; Rochat, Per; Juhler, Marianne

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS) is rarely described in adults; however, data on self-assessed linguistic complications after posterior fossa surgery do not exist. METHODS: Through a prospective single-center study, data on 59 tumor operations in the posterior fossa were collected pre...

  18. A rare complication of spinal anesthesia: Intracranial subdural hemorrhage

    Cengiz Kaplan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal (subarachnoid anesthesia (SA is a widely used general-purpose anesthesia. Postdural Puncture Headaches (PDPHs represent one of the principal complications of spinal anesthesia. A 21-year-old man underwent inguinal herniorrhaphy and orchiectomy using spinal anesthesia. Postoperatively, our patient started to have a headache with nausea. The patient received symptomatic therapy, but the severe headache persisted even in the supine position, with his vital signs and neurological examination being normal. Cranial MRI showed a bilateral subdural hematoma from his frontal to temporal region. A postdural puncture headache is a frequent complication after spinal anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as an intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(1.000: 54-56

  19. Hemorrhagic Shock as Complication of Intramural Intestinal Bleeding

    Asma Ben Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mural intestinal hematoma (MIH is an uncommon complication of anticoagulant therapy. Hemorrhagic shock has been rarely reported as a revealing modality. Results. We report two cases of shock induced by mural intestinal hematoma in patients under oral anticoagulant for aortic prosthetic valve and atrial fibrillation. Patients were admitted to the ICU for gastrointestinal tract bleeding associated with hemodynamic instability. After resuscitation, an abdominal CT scan has confirmed the diagnosis showing an extensive hematoma. Medical treatment was sufficient and there was no need for surgery. Conclusion. Gastrointestinal bleeding associated with shock in patients treated by oral anticoagulant should alert physicians to research a probable MIH. Urgent diagnosis and appropriate medical treatment can avoid surgical interventions.

  20. Intracranial hemorrhage complicating thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction

    Uglietta, J.P.; Boyko, O.B.; O'Connor, C.M.; Aldrich, H.; Massey, E.W.; Heinz, E.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the incidence and types of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in 1,696 patients treated with thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Thirteen of 1,696 patients experienced ICH, and their nonenhanced brain CT scans were reviewed. Their mean age was 62 years (range, 53-74 years), and nine of 13 were male. Six patients received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), four streptokinase, two urokinase, and one tPA and urokinase. The hemorrhages were classified according to CT location: intraparenchymal (IPH), subarachnoid (SAH), subdural (SDH), and intraventricular (IVH). The incidence of ICH was 0.76%. There were 31 hemorrhages in 13 patients. Twelve hemorrhages were IPH, 10 were SDH, seven were SAH, and two were IVH. Excluding IVH, 24 of 29 hemorrhages (83%) were supratentorial

  1. Dasatinib-induced hemorrhagic colitis complicated with cytomegalovirus infection

    Aya Nakaya

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A 69-year-old man with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia was initially treated with 100 mg dasatinib once a day. Despite a major molecular response within 9 months, he developed hemorrhagic colitis 32 months after starting dasatinib. Colonoscopy identified multiple hemorrhagic ulcers in the transverse colon. The pathological findings indicated cytomegalovirus infection. Dasatinib was stopped and he was started on ganciclovir. Three months later, colonoscopy confirmed the disappearance of the hemorrhagic ulcers. Dasatinib is a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia. As a multi-kinase inhibitor that acts on SRC-family kinases, its broader off-target kinase-inhibitory activity may account for the adverse events of dasatinib. Although gastrointestinal bleeding is common in patients taking dasatinib, the combination of cytomegalovirus infection and hemorrhagic colitis in the absence of systemic immunodeficiency is rare. Based on this case of dasatinibinduced hemorrhagic colitis with cytomegalovirus infection, we describe a possible mechanism and effective treatment.

  2. Spontaneous adrenal pheochromocytoma rupture complicated by intraperitoneal hemorrhage and shock

    Kwasnik Edward

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MEN2A is a hereditary syndrome characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma, hyperparathyroidism, and pheochromocytoma. Classically patients with a pheochromocytoma initially present with the triad of paroxysmal headaches, palpitations, and diaphoresis accompanied by marked hypertension. However, although reported as a rare presentation, spontaneous hemorrhage within a pheochromocytoma can present as an abdominal catastrophe. Unrecognized, this transformation can rapidly result in death. We report the only documented case of a thirty eight year old gentleman with MEN2A who presented to a community hospital with hemorrhagic shock and peritonitis secondary to an unrecognized hemorrhagic pheochromocytoma. The clinical course is notable for an inability to localize the source of hemorrhage during an initial damage control laparotomy that stabilized the patient sufficiently to allow emergent transfer to our facility, re-exploration for continued hemorrhage and abdominal compartment syndrome, and ultimately angiographic embolization of the left adrenal artery for control of the bleeding. Following recovery from his critical illness and appropriate medical management for pheochromocytoma, he returned for interval bilateral adrenal gland resection, from which his recovery was unremarkable. Our review of the literature highlights the high mortality associated with the undertaking of an operative intervention in the face of an unrecognized functional pheochromocytoma. This reinforces the need for maintaining a high index of suspicion for pheochromocytoma in similar cases. Our case also demonstrates the need for a mutimodal treatment approach that will often be required in these cases.

  3. Whole-brain 320-detector row dynamic volume CT perfusion detected crossed cerebellar diaschisis after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

    Fu, Jun; Chen, Wei-jian; Wang, Mei-hao; Li, Jian-ce; Zhang, Qian; Xia, Neng-zhi; Yang, Yun-jun; Wu, Gui-yun; Cheng, Jing-liang; Zhang, Yong; Zhuge, Qichuan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of 320-detector row CT used to detect crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) in patients with unilateral supratentorial spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH). We investigated 62 of 156 patients with unilateral supratentorial SICH using 320-detector row CT scanning. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), cerebral blood volume (rCBV), mean transit time (rMTT), and time to peak (rTTP) levels were measured in different regions of interest (ROIs) that were manually outlined on computed tomography perfusion (CTP) for the cerebrum, including normal-appearing brain tissue that surrounded the perilesional low-density area (NA) and the perihematomal low-density area (PA) in all patients and the cerebellum (ipsilateral and contralateral) in CCD-positive patients. Of 62 cases, a total of 14 met the criteria for CCD due to cerebellar perfusion asymmetry on CTP maps. In the quantitative analysis, significant differences were found in the perfusion parameters between the contralateral and ipsilateral cerebellum in CCD-positive cases. No significant differences were found between the CCD-positive group and the CCD-negative group according to the hematoma volume, NIHSS scores, and cerebral perfusion abnormality (each P > 0.05). The correlation analysis of the degree of NA, PA perfusion abnormality, and the degree of CCD severity showed negative and significant linear correlations (R, -0.66∝-0.56; P < 0.05). 320-detector row CT is a robust and practicable method for the comprehensive primary imaging work-up of CCD in unilateral supratentorial SICH patients. (orig.)

  4. Whole-brain 320-detector row dynamic volume CT perfusion detected crossed cerebellar diaschisis after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

    Fu, Jun; Chen, Wei-jian; Wang, Mei-hao; Li, Jian-ce; Zhang, Qian; Xia, Neng-zhi; Yang, Yun-jun [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou (China); Wu, Gui-yun [Cleveland Clinics Foundation, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Imaging Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cheng, Jing-liang; Zhang, Yong [Zhengzhou University, Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou (China); Zhuge, Qichuan [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou (China)

    2014-11-09

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of 320-detector row CT used to detect crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) in patients with unilateral supratentorial spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH). We investigated 62 of 156 patients with unilateral supratentorial SICH using 320-detector row CT scanning. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), cerebral blood volume (rCBV), mean transit time (rMTT), and time to peak (rTTP) levels were measured in different regions of interest (ROIs) that were manually outlined on computed tomography perfusion (CTP) for the cerebrum, including normal-appearing brain tissue that surrounded the perilesional low-density area (NA) and the perihematomal low-density area (PA) in all patients and the cerebellum (ipsilateral and contralateral) in CCD-positive patients. Of 62 cases, a total of 14 met the criteria for CCD due to cerebellar perfusion asymmetry on CTP maps. In the quantitative analysis, significant differences were found in the perfusion parameters between the contralateral and ipsilateral cerebellum in CCD-positive cases. No significant differences were found between the CCD-positive group and the CCD-negative group according to the hematoma volume, NIHSS scores, and cerebral perfusion abnormality (each P > 0.05). The correlation analysis of the degree of NA, PA perfusion abnormality, and the degree of CCD severity showed negative and significant linear correlations (R, -0.66∝-0.56; P < 0.05). 320-detector row CT is a robust and practicable method for the comprehensive primary imaging work-up of CCD in unilateral supratentorial SICH patients. (orig.)

  5. Acute gingival bleeding as a complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Saif Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is mosquito borne disease caused by dengue virus (DENV of Flaviviridae family. The clinical manifestations range from fever to severe hemorrhage, shock and death. Here, we report a case of 20-year-old male patient undergoing orthodontic treatment presenting with acute gingival bleeding with a history of fever, weakness, backache, retro orbital pain and ecchymosis over his right arm. The hematological investigations revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia and positive dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen and also positive immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies for DENV. Patient was diagnosed as a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever and was immediately referred for appropriate management. This case report emphasizes the importance of taking correct and thorough medical history.

  6. [Application of antihelicobacter therapy in patients, suffering pyloroduodenal zone ulcers, complicated by hemorrhage].

    Iaroshenko, K O

    2012-02-01

    There were examined 113 patients, suffering pyloroduodenal zone ulcers, complicated by an acute hemorrhage. H. pylori was revealed in 108 (96%) patients. To escape a false-negative results a serological method was applied, which was used to determine a content of IgG antibodies to H. pylori with the help of diagnostic panel GastroPanel (Biohit PLc firm, Finland). The H. pylori presence in patients must be considered as a risk factor for the early recurrent hemorrhage occurrence. A timely conducted examination, determination of H. pylori and timely prescription of antihelicobacter therapy promote the improvement of the treatment results in patients, suffering gastroduodenal ulcers, complicated by an acute hemorrhage due to reduction of the occurrence rate of early recurrence of hemorrhage.

  7. Hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications in patients with myeloproliferative diseases

    Carla Valladares Vignal

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To correlate the incidence of hemorrhage and thrombosis to bleeding time (BT and platelet aggregation in 27 consecutive patients with myeloproliferative diseases (MPD. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Public tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Eighteen patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML, 5 with polycytemia vera (PV, 2 with essential thrombocytemia (ET and 2 with idiopathic myelofibrosis (MF. Duke's BT and epinephrine-induced platelet aggregation were performed on the patients and on 10 healthy individuals. RESULTS: Eleven patients presented symptoms (41 %: 9 with hemorrhage (33% and 5 with thrombosis (19%.There were less symptomatic patients in the CML group (28% than in the other MPD (67%, without statistical significance (Fisher, p=0.06. Duke's BT was longer in symptomatic patients (Mann-Whitney, p<0.05. Platelet aggregation was abnormal in 7 patients (26% and 71% of them were symptomatic (Fisher, p = 0.07. CONCLUSIONS: The high incidence of bleeding and thrombosis in patients with MPD was related to prolonged BT, but not to platelet aggregation abnormalities.

  8. Hemorrhagic Complications of Percutaneous Cryoablation for Renal Tumors: Results from a 7-year Prospective Study

    Kakarala, Bharat; Frangakis, Constantine E.; Rodriguez, Ron; Georgiades, Christos S.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeCryoablation of renal tumors is assumed to have a higher risk of hemorrhagic complications compared to other ablative modalities. Our purpose was to establish the exact risk and to identify hemorrhagic risk factors.Materials and MethodsThis IRB approved, 7-year prospective study included 261 renal cryoablations. Procedures were under conscious sedation and CT guidance. Pre- and postablation CT was obtained, and hemorrhagic complications were CTCAE tabulated. Age, gender, tumor size, histology, and probes number were tested based on averages or proportions using their exact permutation distribution. “High-risk” subgroups (those exceeding the thresholds of all variables) were tested for each variable alone, and for all combinations of variable threshold values. We compared the subgroup with the best PPV using one variable, with the subgroup with the best PPV using all variables (McNemmar test).ResultsThe hemorrhagic complication rate was 3.5 %. Four patients required transfusions, two required emergent angiograms, one required both a transfusion and angiogram, and two required bladder irrigation for outlet obstruction. Perirenal space hemorrhage was more clinically significant than elsewhere. Univariate risks were tumor size >2 cm, number of probes >2, and malignant histology (P = 0.005, 0.002, and 0.033, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that patients >55 years with malignant tumors >2 cm requiring 2 or more probes yielded the highest PPV (7.5 %).ConclusionsAlthough older patients (>55 years old) with larger (>2 cm), malignant tumors have an increased risk of hemorrhagic complications, the low PPV does not support the routine use of embolization. Percutaneous cryoablation has a 3.5 % risk of significant hemorrhage, similar to that reported for other types of renal ablative modalities.

  9. Hemorrhagic Complications of Percutaneous Cryoablation for Renal Tumors: Results from a 7-year Prospective Study

    Kakarala, Bharat, E-mail: bkakara1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: bharat.kakarala@gmail.com [Johns Hopkins University, Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States); Frangakis, Constantine E., E-mail: cfrangak@jhsph.edu [Johns Hopkins University, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Rodriguez, Ron, E-mail: rodriguezr32@uthscsa.edu [University of Texas Health Science Center, Urologic Surgery (United States); Georgiades, Christos S., E-mail: g-christos@hotmail.com [Johns Hopkins University (United States)

    2016-11-15

    PurposeCryoablation of renal tumors is assumed to have a higher risk of hemorrhagic complications compared to other ablative modalities. Our purpose was to establish the exact risk and to identify hemorrhagic risk factors.Materials and MethodsThis IRB approved, 7-year prospective study included 261 renal cryoablations. Procedures were under conscious sedation and CT guidance. Pre- and postablation CT was obtained, and hemorrhagic complications were CTCAE tabulated. Age, gender, tumor size, histology, and probes number were tested based on averages or proportions using their exact permutation distribution. “High-risk” subgroups (those exceeding the thresholds of all variables) were tested for each variable alone, and for all combinations of variable threshold values. We compared the subgroup with the best PPV using one variable, with the subgroup with the best PPV using all variables (McNemmar test).ResultsThe hemorrhagic complication rate was 3.5 %. Four patients required transfusions, two required emergent angiograms, one required both a transfusion and angiogram, and two required bladder irrigation for outlet obstruction. Perirenal space hemorrhage was more clinically significant than elsewhere. Univariate risks were tumor size >2 cm, number of probes >2, and malignant histology (P = 0.005, 0.002, and 0.033, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that patients >55 years with malignant tumors >2 cm requiring 2 or more probes yielded the highest PPV (7.5 %).ConclusionsAlthough older patients (>55 years old) with larger (>2 cm), malignant tumors have an increased risk of hemorrhagic complications, the low PPV does not support the routine use of embolization. Percutaneous cryoablation has a 3.5 % risk of significant hemorrhage, similar to that reported for other types of renal ablative modalities.

  10. Pulmonary hemorrhage complicating radiofrequency ablation, from mild hemoptysis to life-threatening pattern

    Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A.; Naguib, Nagy N.N.; Mack, Martin; Abskharon, John E.; Vogl, Thomas J. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    To assess risk factors and the extent of pulmonary hemorrhage complicating radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of pulmonary neoplasms. This retrospective study involved 248 ablation sessions for lung tumors (20 primary lesions and 228 metastatic lesions) in 164 patients (mean age 59.7 years, SD: 10.2). Both unipolar and bipolar radiofrequency systems were used under CT fluoroscopic guidance. Extent and underlying factors associated with development of pulmonary hemorrhage were analyzed. Incidence of intra-parenchymal pulmonary hemorrhage, pleural effusion, and hemoptysis were 17.7% (44/248 sessions), 4% (8/248 sessions), and 16.1% (40/248 sessions), respectively. Death because of massive bleeding occurred in one session (0.4%). Significant risk factors associated with intra-parenchymal hemorrhage included: lesions of <1.5 cm diameter (P = 0.007); basal and middle lung zone lesions (P = 0.026); increased needle track distance traversing the lung parenchyma >2.5 cm (P = 0.0017); traversing pulmonary vessels in the track of ablation (P < 0.001); and the use of multi-tined electrodes (P = 0.004). Concomitant incidence of pulmonary hemorrhage and pneumothorax was 29.2% (14/48 sessions). While typically safe, RFA of pulmonary neoplasms can result in pulmonary hemorrhage ranging from mild to life-threatening. Management of this complication is mainly preventive through adequate patient selection for ablation therapy and exclusion of technically avoidable risk factors. (orig.)

  11. [Clinical observation and related factors analysis of neonatal asphyxia complicated with retinal hemorrhage].

    Pu, Q L; Zhou, Q Y; Liu, J; Li, P; Huang, H F; Jiang, H Q

    2017-05-11

    Objective: To observe and analyze related factors of neonatal asphyxia complicated with retinal hemorrhage. Methods: It was a retrospective case series. Seven hundred and twenty-one cases with neonatal asphyxia after 72 hours of birth were enrolled in this study. Fundus examination was performed on these newborns using the third generation wide-angle digital retina imaging system (RetCamⅢ), and the bleeding level was divided into level I, level Ⅱ and level Ⅲ. The conditions of the newborn and the mother during pregnancy were correlatively analyzed. The other factors were also analyzed including delivery mode, birth weight, gestational age, gender, grade of neonatal asphyxia, scalp hematoma, intracranial hemorrhage, fetal intrauterine distress, mother's age and antenatal complications. Single factor χ(2) test and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to screen and judge risk factors causing retinal hemorrhage related to neonatal asphyxia. Results: In 721 cases of neonatal asphyxia, retinal hemorrhage was found in 204 newborns (28.29%). The hemorrhage was at level Ⅰ in 77 cases (37.75%) , at level Ⅱ in 38 cases (18.63%) and at level Ⅲ in 89 cases (43.63%) . Four cases also had vitreous hemorrhage. Asphyxia was mild in 673 infants (93.34%) and severe in 48 infants (6.66%). The difference in the degree of retinal hemorrhage between the patients with mild and severe asphyxia was significant (χ(2)=22.336, P= 0.000). When asphyxia was aggravated, the degree of retinal hemorrhage increased. Relative factors analysis showed that delivery mode (χ(2)=158.643, Pneonatal asphyxia (χ(2)=19.809, Phemorrhage. Logistic regression analysis indicated that grade of neonatal asphyxia and delivery mode were risk factors of retinal hemorrhage in neonatal asphyxia ( OR= 0.304, 0.085). Conclusion: The incidence of retinal hemorrhage in neonatal asphyxia was 28.29%. The degree of neonatal asphyxia and delivery mode may play roles in the occurrence of retinal

  12. Intraventricular Hemorrhage after Epidural Blood Patching: An Unusual Complication

    Mohammad Sorour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present two cases of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH believed to be a result of epidural blood patching. The first was a 71-year-old woman who had new onset of nontraumatic IVH on computed tomography (CT scan after undergoing an epidural blood patch (EBP. This amount of intraventricular blood was deemed an incidental finding since it was of very small volume to account for her overall symptoms. The second patient, a 29-year-old woman, was found to have nontraumatic IVH three days after undergoing an EBP. This was seen on CT scan of the head for workup of pressure-like headaches, nausea, vomiting, and absence seizures. Conservative management was followed in both instances. Serial CT scan of the head in our first patient displayed complete resolution of her IVH. The second patient did not have follow-up CT scans because her overall clinical picture had improved significantly. This highlights a potential sequel of EBP that may be observed on CT scan of the head. In the event that IVH is detected, signs and symptoms of hydrocephalus should be closely monitored with the consideration for a future workup if warranted by the clinical picture.

  13. Emergency Peripartum Hysterectomy as Postpartum Hemorrhage Treatment: Incidence, Risk factors, and Complications

    Meena Pradhan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the research was to investigate incidence, risk factors, and complications associated with emergency peripartum hysterectomy, the ultimate treatment method for intractable postpartum hemorrhage. Methods: This is a single center case-control study conducted in Chongqing city in central China from 1st January 2007 to 31st December 2012 for emergency peripartum hysterectomy performed as a treatment of postpartum hemorrhage both in caesarean and vaginal delivery cases. While the study group included emergency peripartum hysterectomy (n=61 due to intractable postpartum hemorrhage, the control group included no hysterectomy (n=333 during the same study period. Results: We found 61 cases recorded for emergency peripartum hysterectomy for intractable postpartum hemorrhage. Incidence of peripartum hysterectomy was 2.2 per 1000 deliveries. Emergency peripartum hysterectomy as treatment of intractable postpartum hemorrhage include the followings: (i blood loss 1000-2000 ml, crude odd ratio (OR =18.48 (95% CI 5.1-65.7, adjusted odd ratio (AOR = 9.1 (95% CI 2.2-37.7; (ii blood loss >2000 ml, OR = 152 (95% CI 43.7-528.4, AOR = 45.3 (95% CI 11.6-176.9; (iii previous caesarean section, OR = 5.5 (95% CI 2.9-9.7, AOR = 3.7(95% CI 1.4-9.9; (iv uterine atony, OR = 11.9 (95% CI 5.8-24.6, AOR = 7.5 (95% CI 1.8-30.2; (v placenta previa, OR = 2.04 (95% CI 1.1-3.5, AOR = none. Conclusions: Emergency peripartum hysterectomy is the last resort as treatment of intractable severe postpartum hemorrhage. Our study depicts that severe post partum hemorrhage, further dreaded complex events for emergency peripartum hysterectomy, has significant association with placental factors, previous caesarean section, and uterine atony. Pathologically, placenta accreta remained the most leading cause of hysterectomy. Keywords: caesarean section; hemorrhage; peripartum hysterectomy; placenta previa.

  14. Isolated abducens nerve palsy associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a localizing sign of ruptured posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms.

    Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Winkler, Ethan A; Lasker, George F; Yue, John K; Lawton, Michael T

    2018-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Compressive cranial nerve syndromes can be useful bedside clues to the diagnosis of an enlarging intracranial aneurysm and can also guide subsequent evaluation, as with an acute oculomotor nerve (cranial nerve [CN] III) palsy that is presumed to be a posterior communicating artery aneurysm and a surgical emergency until proven otherwise. The CN VI has a short cisternal segment from the pontomedullary sulcus to Dorello's canal, remote from most PICA aneurysms but in the hemodynamic pathway of a rupturing PICA aneurysm that projects toward Dorello's canal. The authors describe a cranial nerve syndrome for posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms that associates subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and an isolated abducens nerve (CN VI) palsy. METHODS Clinical and radiological data from 106 surgical patients with PICA aneurysms (66 ruptured and 40 unruptured) were retrospectively reviewed. Data from a group of 174 patients with other aneurysmal SAH (aSAH) were analyzed in a similar manner to control for nonspecific effects of SAH. Univariate statistical analysis compared incidence and risk factors associated with CN VI palsy in subarachnoid hemorrhage. RESULTS Overall, 13 (4.6%) of 280 patients had CN VI palsy at presentation, and all of them had ruptured aneurysms (representing 13 [5.4%] of the 240 cases of ruptured aneurysms). CN VI palsies were observed in 12 patients with ruptured PICA aneurysms (12/66 [18.1%]) and 1 patient with other aSAH (1/174 [0.1%], p < 0.0001). PICA aneurysm location in ruptured aneurysms was an independent predictor for CN VI palsy on multivariate analysis (p = 0.001). PICA aneurysm size was not significantly different in patients with or without CN VI palsy (average size 4.4 mm and 5.2 mm, respectively). Within the PICA aneurysm cohort, modified Fisher grade (p = 0.011) and presence of a thick cisternal SAH (modified Fisher Grades 3 and 4) (p = 0.003) were predictors of CN VI palsy. In all patients with ruptured PICA

  15. Hemorrhagic Cardiac Tamponade: Rare Complication of Radiofrequency Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Loh, Kok Beng; Bux, Shaik Ismail; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Mokhtar, Raja Amin Raja; Mohamed, Rosmawati [Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2012-09-15

    Local treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been widely used in clinical practice due to its minimal invasiveness and high rate of cure. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is widely used because its treatment effectiveness. However, some serious complications can arise from percutaneous RFA. We present here a rare case of hemorrhagic cardiac tamponade secondary to an anterior cardiac vein (right marginal vein) injury during RFA for treatment of HCC.

  16. Delayed treatment with ADAMTS13 ameliorates cerebral ischemic injury without hemorrhagic complication.

    Nakano, Takafumi; Irie, Keiichi; Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Sano, Kazunori; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Yamashita, Yuta; Satho, Tomomitsu; Fujioka, Masayuki; Muroi, Carl; Matsuo, Koichi; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Futagami, Kojiro; Mishima, Kenichi

    2015-10-22

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke. However, delayed tPA treatment increases the risk of cerebral hemorrhage and can result in exacerbation of nerve injury. ADAMTS13, a von Willebrand factor (VWF) cleaving protease, has a protective effect against ischemic brain injury and may reduce bleeding risk by cleaving VWF. We examined whether ADAMTS13 has a longer therapeutic time window in ischemic stroke than tPA in mice subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). ADAMTS13 (0.1mg/kg) or tPA (10mg/kg) was administered i.v., immediately after reperfusion of after 2-h or 4-h MCAO for comparison of the therapeutic time windows in ischemic stroke. Infarct volume, hemorrhagic volume, plasma high-mobility group box1 (HMGB1) levels and cerebral blood flow were measured 24h after MCAO. Both ADAMTS13 and tPA improved the infarct volume without hemorrhagic complications in 2-h MCAO mice. On the other hand, ADAMTS13 reduced the infarct volume and plasma HMGB1 levels, and improved cerebral blood flow without hemorrhagic complications in 4-h MCAO mice, but tPA was not effective and these animals showed massive intracerebral hemorrhage. These results indicated that ADAMTS13 has a longer therapeutic time window in ischemic stroke than tPA, and ADAMTS13 may be useful as a new therapeutic agent for ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgical Management of Severe Spontaneous Hemorrhage of the Abdominal Wall Complicating Acenocoumarol Treatment

    Orestis Ioannidis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acenocoumarol is a vitamin K antagonist that is used for the treatment of acquired and congenital, both arterial and venous, thrombotic diseases. Its use is complicated by the narrow therapeutic range. Bleeding following oral anticoagulation, despite rare, remains the major complication. Most cases of hemorrhagic episodes usually require short hospitalization and transfusion, while surgical drainage of the hematoma is not recommended. However, in cases that conservative treatment isn’t successful, surgical intervention remains an option. We present a case of severe spontaneous bleeding of the rectus abdominis muscle which was successfully managed surgically.

  18. Hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    Park, Kyung Soon; Diwanji, Sanket R; Kim, Hyung Keun; Song, Eun Kyoo; Yoon, Taek Rim

    2009-08-01

    Iliopsoas bursitis has been increasingly recognized as a complication of total hip arthroplasty and is usually associated with polyethylene wear. Here, the authors report a case of hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating an otherwise well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic arthroplasty performed by minimal invasive modified 2-incision technique. The bursitis in turn resulted in femoral nerve palsy and femoral vein compression. In this report, there was no evidence to support that the bursitis was due to an inflammatory response to ceramic wear particles or any other wear particles originating from the total hip arthroplasty.

  19. Severe bleeding complications other than intracranial hemorrhage in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: a case series and review of the literature.

    Winkelhorst, Dian; Kamphuis, Marije M; de Kloet, Liselotte C; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; Oepkes, Dick; Lopriore, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    The most feared bleeding complication in fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is an intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). However, FNAIT may also lead to other severe bleeding problems. The aim was to analyze this spectrum and evaluate the occurrence of severe hemorrhages other than ICH in fetuses or neonates with FNAIT. A retrospective chart analysis of cases of FNAIT presenting with severe bleeding complications other than ICH at our institution from 1990 to 2015 was conducted. Additionally, a review of the literature was performed to identify case reports and case series on FNAIT presenting with extracranial hemorrhage. Of 25 fetuses or neonates with severe bleeding due to FNAIT, three had isolated severe internal organ hemorrhage other than ICH, two pulmonary hemorrhages and one gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Two of these three neonates died due to this bleeding. Eighteen cases of extracranial bleeding complications as a first presentation of FNAIT were found in the literature, including ocular, gastrointestinal, spinal cord, pulmonary, renal, subgaleal, and genitourinary hemorrhages. Bleeding complications other than ICH may be more extensive, and the presentation of FNAIT may have a greater spectrum than previously described. A high index of suspicion on the possible diagnosis of FNAIT with any bleeding complication in a fetus or neonate may enable adequate diagnostics, adequate treatment, and appropriate follow-up in future pregnancies, as is especially relevant for FNAIT. © 2016 AABB.

  20. Anterior pituitary lobe atrophy as late complication of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

    Jovanović Dragan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS is acute infective multisystemic disease followed by febrility, hemorrhages and acute renal insufficiency. Bleeding in the anterior pituitary lobe leading to tissue necrosis occurs in acute stage of severe clinical forms of HFRS, while atrophy of the anterior pituitary lobe with diminution of the gland function occurs after recovery stage. Case report. We presented a patient with the development of chronic renal insufficiency and hypopituitarism as complication that had been diagnosed six years after Hantavirus infection. Magnetic resonance of the pituitary gland revealed atrophy and empty sella turcica. Conclusion. Regarding frequency of this viral infection and its endemic character in some parts of our country partial and/or complete loss of pituitary function should be considered during the late stage of HFRS.

  1. Hemorrhagic intra splenic pseudocyst as a complication of chronic pancreatitis in acute phase - a case report

    Almeida, Fabiola Assuncao de; Marchiori, Edson; Mello, Walter de Assis; Nogueira, Aline Silva; Sales, Anderson Ribeiro; Martins, Renata Romano; Santos, Tereza Cristina C.R.S. dos

    1999-01-01

    The authors report a case of hemorrhagic intra splenic pseudocyst as a complication of chronic pancreatitis in acute phase. A 43-year-old woman, chronic alcoholic, who had pancreatitis 5 years ago, with symptoms of strong abdominal pain in the epigastrium, nausea and fever. Abdominal sonography showed a lesion contiguous to the spleen and computed tomography demonstrated an heterogeneous lesion of not well defined limits, in the lateral and posterior parts of the spleen. The patient was submitted to Roux-Y cystojejunostomy, he does not present any symptoms at the moment, and is undergoing clinical control. (author)

  2. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Postpartum Hemorrhage: Indications, Technique, Results, and Complications

    Soyer, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.soyer@lrb.aphp.fr; Dohan, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.dohan@lrb.aphp.fr; Dautry, Raphael, E-mail: raphael-dautry@yahoo.fr; Guerrache, Youcef, E-mail: docyoucef05@yahoo.fr [Hôpital Lariboisière-AP-HP, Department of Abdominal and Interventional Imaging (France); Ricbourg, Aude, E-mail: aude.ricbourg@lrb.aphp.fr [Hôpital Lariboisière-AP-HP, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (France); Gayat, Etienne, E-mail: etienne.gayat@lrb.aphp.fr [Diderot-Paris 7, Université-Sorbonne Paris-Cité (France); Boudiaf, Mourad, E-mail: mourad.boudiaf@lrb.aphp.fr; Sirol, Marc, E-mail: marc.sirol@lrb.aphp.fr; Ledref, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.ledref@lrb.aphp.fr [Hôpital Lariboisière-AP-HP, Department of Abdominal and Interventional Imaging (France)

    2015-10-15

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a potentially life-threatening condition, which needs multidisciplinary management. Uterine atony represents up to 80 % of all causes of PPH. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) has now a well-established role in the management of severe PPH. TAE allows stopping the bleeding in 90 % of women with severe PHH, obviating surgery. Pledgets of gelatin sponge as torpedoes are commonly used for safe TAE, and coils, glue, and microspheres have been primarily used in specific situations such as arterial rupture, pseudoaneurysm, and arteriovenous fistula. TAE is a minimally invasive procedure with a low rate of complications, which preserves future fertility. Knowledge of causes of PPH, potential risks, and limitations of TAE is essential for a timely decision, optimizing TAE, preventing irreversible complications, avoiding hysterectomy, and ultimately preserving fertility.

  3. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Postpartum Hemorrhage: Indications, Technique, Results, and Complications

    Soyer, Philippe; Dohan, Anthony; Dautry, Raphael; Guerrache, Youcef; Ricbourg, Aude; Gayat, Etienne; Boudiaf, Mourad; Sirol, Marc; Ledref, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a potentially life-threatening condition, which needs multidisciplinary management. Uterine atony represents up to 80 % of all causes of PPH. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) has now a well-established role in the management of severe PPH. TAE allows stopping the bleeding in 90 % of women with severe PHH, obviating surgery. Pledgets of gelatin sponge as torpedoes are commonly used for safe TAE, and coils, glue, and microspheres have been primarily used in specific situations such as arterial rupture, pseudoaneurysm, and arteriovenous fistula. TAE is a minimally invasive procedure with a low rate of complications, which preserves future fertility. Knowledge of causes of PPH, potential risks, and limitations of TAE is essential for a timely decision, optimizing TAE, preventing irreversible complications, avoiding hysterectomy, and ultimately preserving fertility

  4. Cerebellar and brainstem infarction as a complication of CT-guided transforaminal cervical nerve root block

    Suresh, S. [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Berman, J. [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Anaesthetic Department, London (United Kingdom); Connell, David A. [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    A 60-year-old man with a 4-year history of intractable neck pain and radicular pain in the C5 nerve root distribution presented to our department for a CT-guided transforaminal left C5 nerve root block. He had had a similar procedure on the right 2 months previously, and had significant improvement of his symptoms with considerable pain relief. On this occasion he was again accepted for the procedure after the risks and potential complications had been explained. Under CT guidance, a 25G spinal needle was introduced and after confirmation of the position of the needle, steroid was injected. Immediately the patient became unresponsive, and later developed a MR-proven infarct affecting the left vertebral artery (VA) territory. This is the first report of a major complication of a cervical root injection under CT guidance reported in the literature. We present this case report and the literature review of the potential complications of this procedure. (orig.)

  5. Cerebellar and brainstem infarction as a complication of CT-guided transforaminal cervical nerve root block

    Suresh, S.; Berman, J.; Connell, David A.

    2007-01-01

    A 60-year-old man with a 4-year history of intractable neck pain and radicular pain in the C5 nerve root distribution presented to our department for a CT-guided transforaminal left C5 nerve root block. He had had a similar procedure on the right 2 months previously, and had significant improvement of his symptoms with considerable pain relief. On this occasion he was again accepted for the procedure after the risks and potential complications had been explained. Under CT guidance, a 25G spinal needle was introduced and after confirmation of the position of the needle, steroid was injected. Immediately the patient became unresponsive, and later developed a MR-proven infarct affecting the left vertebral artery (VA) territory. This is the first report of a major complication of a cervical root injection under CT guidance reported in the literature. We present this case report and the literature review of the potential complications of this procedure. (orig.)

  6. Impact of Hyponatremia on Morbidity, Mortality, and Complications After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Systematic Review.

    Mapa, Ben; Taylor, Blake E S; Appelboom, Geoffrey; Bruce, Eliza M; Claassen, Jan; Connolly, E Sander

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a common metabolic disturbance after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and it may worsen outcomes. This review aims to characterize the effect of hyponatremia on morbidity and mortality after SAH. We sought to determine the prevalence of hyponatremia after SAH, including in subgroups, as well as its effect on mortality and certain outcome measures, including degree of disability and duration of hospitalization. A search of terms "hyponatremia" and "subarachnoid hemorrhage" was performed on PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, and EMBASE. Studies were included if they reported prevalence of hyponatremia and if they discussed outcomes such as mortality, duration of stay, functional outcomes (e.g., Glasgow Outcomes Scale), or incidence of complications in patients with aneurysmal SAH. Two independent researchers assessed the titles and abstracts and reviewed articles for inclusion. Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of at least mild hyponatremia was 859 of 2387 (36%) of patients. Hyponatremia was associated with vasospasm and duration of hospitalization, but it did not influence mortality. Hyponatremia is common after SAH, and there is evidence that it is associated with certain poorer outcomes. Larger, prospective studies are needed to assess these findings and provide further evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Tonic-clonic activity at subarachnoid hemorrhage onset: impact on complications and outcome.

    Gian Marco De Marchis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Tonic-clonic activity (TCA at onset complicates 3% to 21% of cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. The impact of onset TCA on in-hospital complications, including seizures, remains unclear. One study associated onset TCA with poor clinical outcome at 6 weeks after SAH, but to our knowledge no other studies have confirmed this relationship. This study aims to assess the impact of onset TCA on in-hospital complications, poor functional outcome, mortality, and epilepsy at 3 months. METHODS: Analysis of a prospective study cohort of 1479 SAH patients admitted to Columbia University Medical Center between 1996 and 2012. TCA within 6 hours of hemorrhage onset was identified based on accounts of emergency care providers or family witnesses. RESULTS: TCA at onset was described in 170 patients (11%. Patients with onset TCA were younger (P = 0.002, presented more often with poor clinical grade (55% vs. 26%, P<0.001 and had larger amounts of cisternal, intraventricular, and intracerebral blood than those without onset TCA (all, P<0.001. After adjusting for known confounders, onset TCA was significantly associated with in-hospital seizures (OR 3.80, 95%-CI: 2.43-5.96, P<0.001, in-hospital pneumonia (OR 1.56, 95%-CI: 1.06-2.31, p = 0.02, and delayed cerebral ischemia (OR 1.77, 95%-CI: 1.21-2.58, P = 0.003. At 3 months, however, onset TCA was not associated with poor functional outcome, mortality, and epilepsy after adjusting for age, admission clinical grade, and cisternal blood volume. CONCLUSIONS: Onset TCA is not a rare event as it complicates 11% of cases of SAH. New and clinically relevant findings are the association of onset TCA with in-hospital seizures, pneumonia and delayed cerebral ischemia. Despite the increased risk of in-hospital complications, onset TCA is not associated with disability, mortality, and epilepsy at 3 months.

  8. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as complication of phenylephrine injection for the treatment of ischemic priapism in a sickle cell disease patient.

    Davila, Hugo H; Parker, Justin; Webster, J Christopher; Lockhart, Jorge L; Carrion, Rafael E

    2008-04-01

    Ischemic priapism (IP) is a urologic condition, which necessitates prompt management. Intracavernosal injection of phenylephrine is a usual treatment modality utilized for the management of these patients. Aim. We present a case of subarachnoid hemorrhage following intracavernosal injection of phenylephrine for IP in a patient with sickle cell disease. We analyzed the degree of subarachnoid hemorrhage in our patient after intracavernosal injection of phenylephrine. The patient had an acute rise in blood pressure during corporal irrigation. This was followed by the onset of severe headache. Computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed the diagnosis of a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with intracavernosal injection of phenylephrine. Result. A 23-year-old African American male with a history of sickle cell disease presented with a painful penile erection. The patient was started on intravenous fluids, oxygen by nasal canula, and analgesic medication. After this, a blood gas was obtained from his left corpora cavernosa. This was followed by normal saline irrigation and injection of phenylephrine. The patient complained of a sudden, severe "terrible headache" immediately following the last injection, and noncontrast CT scan of the head was obtained and a subarachnoid hemorrhage was noted. The patient was admitted for observation and no significant changes were noted. Intracavernosal injection of phenylephrine for the management of IP can be associated with several possible complications. We present our single case complicated with the formation of a subarachnoid hemorrhage. The patient was treated conservatively and had no long-term neurologic sequelae. Davila HH, Parker J, Webster JC, Lockhart JL, and Carrion RE. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as complication of phenylephrine injection for the treatment of ischemic priapism in a sickle cell disease patient.

  9. Pheochromocytoma complicated by intracerebral hemorrhage - a case report; Feocromocitoma complicado com acidente vascular encefalico hemorragico - relato de um caso

    Nogueira, Aline Silva; Marchiori, Edson; Almeida, Fabiola Assuncao de; Martins, Renata Romano; Sales, Anderson Ribeiro; Santos, Tereza Cristina C.R.S. dos; Reis, Simone Teixeira [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Silveira, Sonia Marcelino T. da

    1999-06-01

    The authors report a case of pheochromocytoma that was complicated by intracerebral hemorrhage in a 17-year-old female patient. Computed tomography showed a solid mass, heterogeneous, on the right adrenal. The patient underwent a right adrenalectomy. She is being observed by our out-patients clinic, presenting normal blood pressure levels and a left hemiparesis. (author)

  10. A case of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever complicated with acute pancreatitis.

    Bastug, Aliye; Kayaaslan, Bircan; But, Ayse; Aslaner, Halide; Sertcelik, Ahmet; Akinci, Esragul; Onguru, Pinar; Yetkin, Meltem Arzu; Bodur, Hurrem

    2014-11-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tick-borne disease characterized by nonspecific symptoms like fever, myalgia, severe headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. It can result in various complications during the course of the disease due to the diffuse endothelial injury involved in the pathogenesis of CCHF. Here we present a patient with CCHF complicated by acute pancreatitis, including pleural and intra-abdominal effusions. A 70-year-old patient was referred to our hospital from an endemic area with the suspicion of CCHF. The physical examination of the patient revealed high fever (38°C), somnolence, and petechial eruption. The diagnosis of case was confirmed with positive reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The viral load of the patient was 4×10(9) copies/mL. On the fifth day of admission, upper abdominal pain, scleral ichter, and abdominal distention developed. The patient had abdominal tenderness with guarding. The laboratory tests revealed an amylase level of 1740 U/L (28-100), lipase level of 583 U/L (13-60), and total bilirubin level of 3.75 mg/dL (<0.3). The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was confirmed with radiological findings. Until now, atypical presentations of CCHF have been reported in some case reports, but not acute pancreatitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of acute pancreatitis in the literature seen in the course of CCHF.

  11. Agitation After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Frequent Omen of Hospital Complications Associated with Worse Outcomes.

    Reznik, Michael E; Schmidt, J Michael; Mahta, Ali; Agarwal, Sachin; Roh, David J; Park, Soojin; Frey, Hans Peter; Claassen, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Agitated delirium is frequent following acute brain injury, but data are limited in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We examined incidence, risk factors, and consequences of agitation in these patients in a single-center retrospective study. We identified all patients treated with antipsychotics or dexmedetomidine from a prospective observational cohort of patients with spontaneous SAH. Agitation was confirmed by chart review. Outcomes were assessed at 12 months using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS), and Lawton IADL (Instrumental Activities of Daily Living) scores. Independent predictors were identified using logistic regression. From 309 SAH patients admitted between January 2011 and December 2015, 52 (17 %) developed agitation, frequently in the first 72 h (50 %) and in patients with Hunt-Hess grades 3-4 (12 % of grades 1-2, 28 % of grades 3-4, 8 % of grade 5). There was also a significant association between agitation and a history of cocaine use or prior psychiatric diagnosis. Agitated patients were more likely to develop multiple hospital complications; and in half of these patients, complications were diagnosed within 24 h of agitation onset. Agitation was associated with IADL impairment at 12 months (Lawton >8; p = 0.03, OR 2.7, 95 % CI, 1.1-6.8) in non-comatose patients (Hunt-Hess 1-4), but not with functional outcome (mRS >3), cognitive impairment (TICS ≤30), or ICU/hospital length of stay after controlling for other predictors. Agitation occurs frequently after SAH, especially in non-comatose patients with higher clinical grades. It is associated with the development of multiple hospital complications and may have an independent impact on long-term outcomes.

  12. [Mucosal changes in the periulcer zone and endocrine system in patients with gastroduodenal ulcer, complicated by hemorrhage].

    Trofimov, M V

    2014-07-01

    Examination of patients, suffering gastroduodenal ulcer, complicated by hemorrhage, was conducted, using clinical, microbiological, immunohistochemical methods and chromatomassspectrography. Enhanced activity of inducible NO-synthase, contamination of periulcer zone with microorganisms Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus beta-haemoliticus, enhancement of contents of catecholamines and serotonin in the blood serum were revealed. These changes are most expressed in severe blood loss, unstable local endoscopic hemostasis, high risk of a recurrent hemorrhage occurrence. The data obtained permit to prognosticate severity of a pathologic process course and to improve the treatment programe.

  13. Incidence, risk factors, and prognosis of gastrointestinal hemorrhage complicating acute renal failure.

    Fiaccadori, E; Maggiore, U; Clima, B; Melfa, L; Rotelli, C; Borghetti, A

    2001-04-01

    Few prospective data are currently available on acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage (AGIH) as a complication of acute renal failure (ARF). The aim of the present study was to define incidence, sources, risk factors, and outcome of AGIH in patients with ARF. We performed a prospective study on an inception cohort of 514 patients admitted for ARF to a nephrology intermediate care unit. Data on clinical risk factors for bleeding, frequency of occurrence of AGIH, length of hospital stay, and in-hospital mortality were collected. Independent predictors of AGIH were identified. The relative odds of death and the relative increase in length of hospital stay associated with AGIH were calculated after adjusting for baseline comorbidities. Sixty-nine patients out of 514 [13.4% (95% CI, 10.6 to 16.7)] had AGIH as a complication of ARF; 59 were upper AGIH. Forty patients had clinically important bleeding. Erosions and/or ulcers accounted for 71% of cases of upper AGIH. Independent baseline predictors of AGIH were represented by severity of illness [odds ratio 1.45 (95% CI, 1.05 to 2.01) for every 10 point increase in APACHE II score], low platelet count [<50,000 mm3; 3.71 (1.70 to 8.11)], noncirrhotic chronic hepatic disease [2.22 (1.09 to 4.55)], liver cirrhosis [3.38 (1.50 to 7.60)], de novo ARF [2.77 (1.30 to 5.90)], and severe ARF [2.07 (1.10 to 3.88)]. In-hospital mortality was 63.8% in patients with AGIH and 34.2% in the other patients; after adjusting for baseline confounders, AGIH remained significantly associated with an increase in both mortality [2.57 (1.30 to 5.09), P = 0.006] and length of hospital stay [37% (1 to 87%), P = 0.047]. AGIH and clinically important bleeding are frequent complications of ARF. In this clinical condition, AGIH is more often due to upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is associated with a significantly increased risk of death and length of hospital stay. Both renal and extrarenal risk factors are related to the occurrence of AGIH.

  14. Race/Ethnic differences in the risk of hemorrhagic complications among patients with ischemic stroke receiving thrombolytic therapy.

    Mehta, Rajendra H; Cox, Margueritte; Smith, Eric E; Xian, Ying; Bhatt, Deepak L; Fonarow, Gregg C; Peterson, Eric D

    2014-08-01

    Race/ethnic-related differences in safety of intravenous thrombolytic therapy have been shown in patients with myocardial infarction, but not studied in ischemic stroke. Using data from the Get With The Guidelines (GWTG)-Stroke program (n=54 334), we evaluated differences in risk-adjusted bleeding rates (any, symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage [sICH], serious life-threatening [excluding sICH], or other) and mortality in white (n=40 411), black (n=8243), Hispanic (n=4257), and Asian (n=1523) patients receiving intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) for acute ischemic stroke. Compared with white patients, overall adjusted hemorrhagic complications after tPA were higher in black (odds ratio, 1.14, 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.28) and Asian (odds ratio, 1.36, 95% confidence interval, 1.14-1.61) patients. Overall adjusted bleeding complications in Hispanics were similar to those of whites. Increased risk of overall bleeding in Asians was related to higher risk of adjusted sICH (odds ratio, 1.47, 95% confidence interval, 1.19-1.82), whereas in blacks, it was related to higher risk of other bleeding. No significant race-related difference was noted in risk of serious or life-threatening bleeding or in overall mortality or death in patients with sICH or any hemorrhagic complications. In patients with stroke receiving tPA, hemorrhagic complications were slightly higher in blacks and Asians, but not in Hispanics compared with whites. Asians also faced significantly higher risk for sICH relative to other race/ethnic groups. Future studies are needed to evaluate whether reduction in tPA dose similar to that used in many Asian countries could improve the safety of tPA therapy in Asians in the United States with acute ischemic strokes while maintaining efficacy. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. [Clinical efficacy and safety of uterine artery chemoembolization in abnormal placental implantation complicated with postpartum hemorrhage].

    Chen, Yao-ting; Xu, Lin-feng; Sun, Hong-liang; Li, Hui-qing; Hu, Ren-mei; Tan, Qi-yin

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the safety and clinical efficacy of uterime artery chemoembolization in postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) caused by abnormal placental implantation. Between December 2006 and September 2009, there were 23 cases of abnormal placental implantation with PPH in our hospital, among which 9 presented with continuous small amount of vaginal bleeding and 14 with acute excessive bleeding. The average bleeding time was (8+/-6) d and the mean blood loss was (980+/-660) ml. Abnormal placental implantation was confirmed by color Doppler ultrasound (CD-US) in all cases, the internal iliac artery angiography was performed to identify the uterine artery and bilateral uterine artery chemoembolization (UACE) with methotrexate (MTX) and gelfoam particles to the distal end of uterine artery was conducted after. CD-US rechecked all patients within 48 h after UACE and those patients with blurred margins between placenta and uterus and abnormal blood flow (>1 cmx1 cm) received ultrasonic-guided per vagina MTX multipoint injections. All cases were followed up for 3-26 months (average 12 months) to observe vaginal bleeding, placenta tissue discharge, serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), uterine involution, menses, and side-effects or complications. (1) Curative effect: These 23 cases underwent 24 procedures of UACE successfully and vaginal bleeding ceased at an average of (3.5+/-1.3) min after UACE. Reduced blood flow in the placental implantation area was detected under CD-US after UACE. Among the 23 patients, wterine curettage was required in 16 cases due to retained placenta tissues with the mean blood loss of (40+/-28) ml during the operation, 2 underwent subtotal hysterectomy and confirmed to be placenta percreta by pathology examination, and placenta tissues were spontaneously discharged completely in 5 cases. Totally, 91% of the patients (21/23) reserved their uterus. (2) FOLLOW-UP: the serum hCG reduced to normal within 1-13 d after the placenta tissue were evacuated

  16. Severe bilateral adrenal hemorrhages in  a  newborn complicated by persistent adrenal insufficiency

    Nicholas R Zessis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral adrenal hemorrhages rarely occur during the neonatal period and are often associated with traumatic vaginal deliveries. However, the adrenal gland has highly regenerative capabilities and adrenal insufficiency typically resolves over time. We evaluated a newborn female after experiencing fetal macrosomia and a traumatic vaginal delivery. She developed acidosis and acute renal injury. Large adrenal hemorrhages were noted bilaterally on ultrasound, and she was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency based on characteristic electrolyte changes and a low cortisol (4.2 μg/dL. On follow-up testing, this patient was unable to be weaned off of hydrocortisone or fludrocortisone despite resolution of hemorrhages on ultrasound. Providers should consider bilateral adrenal hemorrhage when evaluating critically ill neonates after a traumatic delivery. In extreme cases, this may be a persistent process.

  17. Severe bilateral adrenal hemorrhages in a newborn complicated by persistent adrenal insufficiency

    Zessis, Nicholas R; Nicholas, Jennifer L; Stone, Stephen I

    2018-01-01

    Summary Bilateral adrenal hemorrhages rarely occur during the neonatal period and are often associated with traumatic vaginal deliveries. However, the adrenal gland has highly regenerative capabilities and adrenal insufficiency typically resolves over time. We evaluated a newborn female after experiencing fetal macrosomia and a traumatic vaginal delivery. She developed acidosis and acute renal injury. Large adrenal hemorrhages were noted bilaterally on ultrasound, and she was diagnosed with a...

  18. [Case report: Aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage -- complicated course due to coincidental manifestation of an inverted Tako-Tsubo-cardiomyopathy].

    Zech, Nina; Kieninger, Martin; Seemann, Milena; Künzig, Holger; Bele, Sylvia; Dietl, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    We report the case of a patient who suffered a serious subarachnoid hemorrhage with a cardialaffection and development of an inverted Tako-Tsubo-cardiomyopathy. To avoid apparent cerebral ischemia due to severe cerebral vasospasm after exhaustion of conservative therapeutic options a temporarily endovascular therapy with continuous intra-arterial application of Nimodipine was necessary. In the overall protracted and complicated course the special challenge were the therapeutic efforts to avoid apparent cerebral ischemia in context to the significant cardial affection. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Severe Renal Hemorrhage in a Pregnant Woman Complicated with Antiphospholipid Syndrome: A Case Report

    Shohei Kawaguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease with thrombotic tendency. Consensus guidelines for pregnancy with antiphospholipid syndrome recommend low-dose aspirin combined with unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin because antiphospholipid syndrome causes habitual abortion. We report a 36-year-old pregnant woman diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome receiving anticoagulation treatment. The patient developed left abdominal pain and gross hematuria at week 20 of pregnancy. An initial diagnosis of left ureteral calculus was made. Subsequently abdominal-pelvic computed tomography was required for diagnosis because of the appearance of severe contralateral pain. Computed tomography revealed serious renal hemorrhage, and ureteral stent placement and pain control by patient-controlled analgesia were required. After treatment, continuance of pregnancy was possible and vaginal delivery was performed safely. This is the first case report of serious renal hemorrhage in a pregnant woman with antiphospholipid syndrome receiving anticoagulation treatment and is an instructive case for urological and obstetrical practitioners.

  20. Acute Lung Injury Complicating Blood Transfusion in Post-Partum Hemorrhage: Incidence and Risk Factors

    Teofili, Luciana; Bianchi, Maria; Zanfini, Bruno A.; Catarci, Stefano; Sicuranza, Rossella; Spartano, Serena; Zini, Gina; Draisci, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    Background. We retrospectively investigated the incidence and risk factors for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) among patients transfused for post-partum hemorrhage (PPH).  Methods. We identified a series of 71 consecutive patients with PPH requiring the urgent transfusion of three or more red blood cell (RBC) units, with or without fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and platelet (PLT) transfusion. Clinical records were then retrieved and examined for respiratory distress events. Accor...

  1. Impact of collateral circulation on early outcome and risk of hemorrhagic complications after systemic thrombolysis.

    Brunner, Freimuth; Tomandl, Bernd; Hanken, Katrin; Hildebrandt, Helmut; Kastrup, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    In stroke patients, collateral flow can rapidly be assessed on computed tomography angiography (CTA). In this study, the impact of baseline collaterals on early outcome and risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhages after systemic thrombolysis in patients with proximal arterial occlusions within the anterior circulation were analyzed. Collateralization scores were determined on the CT angiography source images (0 = absent; 1 ≤ 50%, 2 > 50% but collateral filling) of patients with distal intracranial carotid artery and/or M1 segment occlusions treated from 2008 to December 2011. A collateral score of 0 to 1 was designated as poor and 2 to 3 as good collateral vessel status. Outcome variables included in hospital mortality, favorable outcome at discharge (modified Rankin score ≤ 2), and rates of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage based on the European-Australasian Acute Stroke Study II definition. Among 246 subjects (mean age of 74 years; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale N at admission 14), 205 patients (83%) had good collaterals, whereas 41 patients (17%) had poor collaterals, respectively. Patients with poor collaterals had significantly higher rates of in-hospital mortality (41% vs. 12%, P collaterals. The grade of collateralization was independently associated with in-hospital mortality (P collaterals have a poor early functional outcome and high rates of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage after systemic thrombolysis. Since similar findings have also been reported after endovascular therapy, strategies to improve collateral blood flow should be assessed in this patient population. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  2. Pulmonary aspergillosis and central nervous system hemorrhage as complications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with corticosteroids.

    Cleri, Dennis J; Moser, Robert L; Villota, Francisco J; Wang, Yue; Husain, Syed A; Nadeem, Shahzinah; Anjari, Tarek; Sajed, Mohammad

    2003-06-01

    Warm, active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is the most common form of hemolytic anemia not related to drug therapy. Mortality in adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is related to the inability to successfully treat patients' underlying disease, or the infectious complications of splenectomy and prolonged steroid therapy. Predisposing factors for invasive aspergillosis are neutropenia and steroid therapy. We present a fatal case of aspergillosis complicating a nonneutropenic case of warm active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with prolonged steroid therapy.

  3. Dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated with acute liver failure: a case report.

    Dalugama, Chamara; Gawarammana, Indika Bandara

    2017-12-08

    Dengue is a common arboviral infection with a clinically diverse spectrum of presentations. Although hepatic dysfunction is commonly identified in patients will dengue illness, acute liver failure is rare. The etiopathogenesis of hepatic dysfunction is multifactorial and related to direct viral invasion of hepatocytes, immunological factors and hypoxia particularly in cases of shock in dengue hemorrhagic fever. Ideal management of dengue-related hepatic dysfunction and acute liver failure is still debated. We report a 53-year-old Sri Lankan Sinhalese male with serologically confirmed dengue fever presenting with evidence of plasma leakage developing acute liver failure evidenced by deranged liver functions, coagulopathy and altered sensorium. In addition to the 'standard care', the patient was managed with intravenous N-acetyl cysteine and blood transfusions even in the absence of bleeding or dropping packed cell volume (PCV), targeting a higher PCV in anticipation of better oxygenation at tissue level. He made a full recovery with no sequential infections. N-acetyl cysteine and packed cell transfusion aiming at a higher PCV to maintain adequate tissue perfusion during shock may be beneficial in acute liver failure due to dengue virus. Large randomized trials should be carried out to establish the efficacy of these treatment strategies to support these observations and change the current practice.

  4. Brainstem and cerebellar changes after cerebrovascular accidents: magnetic resonance imaging

    Uchino, A.; Takase, Y.; Nomiyama, K.; Egashira, R.; Kudo, S.

    2006-01-01

    We illustrate the various types of secondary degeneration in the brainstem and/or cerebellum detected on magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained after cerebrovascular accidents. The changes include: (a) ipsilateral nigral degeneration after striatal infarction; (b) Wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract in the brainstem after supratentorial pyramidal tract or motor cortex injury; (c) Wallerian degeneration of the corticopontine tract in the brainstem after frontal lobe infarction; (d) ipsilateral brainstem atrophy and crossed cerebellar atrophy due to an extensive supratentorial lesion; (e) ipsilateral superior cerebellar peduncle atrophy, contralateral rubral degeneration, contralateral inferior olivary degeneration and ipsilateral cerebellar atrophy after dentate nucleus hemorrhage; (f) ipsilateral inferior olivary degeneration after pontine tegmentum hemorrhage; (g) bilateral wallerian degeneration of the pontocerebellar tracts after ventromedial pontine infarction or basis pontis hemorrhage; and (h) ipsilateral cerebellar atrophy after middle cerebellar peduncle hemorrhage. (orig.)

  5. Brainstem and cerebellar changes after cerebrovascular accidents: magnetic resonance imaging

    Uchino, A.; Takase, Y.; Nomiyama, K.; Egashira, R.; Kudo, S. [Saga Medical School, Department of Radiology, Saga (Japan)

    2006-03-15

    We illustrate the various types of secondary degeneration in the brainstem and/or cerebellum detected on magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained after cerebrovascular accidents. The changes include: (a) ipsilateral nigral degeneration after striatal infarction; (b) Wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract in the brainstem after supratentorial pyramidal tract or motor cortex injury; (c) Wallerian degeneration of the corticopontine tract in the brainstem after frontal lobe infarction; (d) ipsilateral brainstem atrophy and crossed cerebellar atrophy due to an extensive supratentorial lesion; (e) ipsilateral superior cerebellar peduncle atrophy, contralateral rubral degeneration, contralateral inferior olivary degeneration and ipsilateral cerebellar atrophy after dentate nucleus hemorrhage; (f) ipsilateral inferior olivary degeneration after pontine tegmentum hemorrhage; (g) bilateral wallerian degeneration of the pontocerebellar tracts after ventromedial pontine infarction or basis pontis hemorrhage; and (h) ipsilateral cerebellar atrophy after middle cerebellar peduncle hemorrhage. (orig.)

  6. Complications from office sclerotherapy for epistaxis due to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT or Osler-Weber-Rendu).

    Hanks, John E; Hunter, David; Goding, George S; Boyer, Holly C

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and evaluate adverse clinical outcomes following office-based sclerotherapy using sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STS) for epistaxis due to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasias (HHT or Osler-Weber-Rendu). A retrospective chart review of 36 adult patients treated with STS sclerotherapy for severe and/or recurrent epistaxis due to HHT was performed. A total of 153 separate treatment sessions were analyzed. Each patient underwent an average of 4.3 sessions with an average of 7 intralesional injections per session. Bleeding during the procedure was experienced by 8 patients with a maximum reported blood loss of 200 mL in 1 patient, but less than 50 mL in all others. Seven patients reported some postinjection pain, which included nasal, cheek, and eye pain. Nasal congestion, sneezing, and vasovagal responses were each noted to occur 2 times. No complications of postprocedural visual loss, deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolus, transient ischemic attack (TIA)/stroke, or anaphylaxis were encountered. Conventional therapies used in the management of HHT-related epistaxis, such as laser coagulation, septodermoplasty, selective arterial embolization, and Young's occlusion each have specific associated complications, including worsened epistaxis, septal perforation, foul odor, nasal crusting, and compromised nasal breathing. STS is a safe office-based treatment option for HHT-mediated epistaxis that is associated with exceedingly few of the aforementioned serious sequelae. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  7. Infarction of the entire corpus callosum as a complication in subarachnoid hemorrhage: A case report

    Satoru Takahashi, M.D.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The corpus callosum is the major commissural pathway connecting the cerebral hemispheres. This pathway receives its blood supply from anterior communicating artery, pericallosal artery, and posterior pericallosal artery. However, in some cases, the entire corpus callosum is supplied by median callosal artery; thus, occlusion of this artery can lead to infarction of the entire corpus callosum. Few reports have described this type of infarction, and no reports after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH exist. Here, we report on a 42-year-old female who was diagnosed with SAH after two aneurysms were discovered in bifurcation of left anterior cerebral artery (A1-A2. After successful clipping was performed, the patient was alert and had no neurological deficits; moreover, the computed tomography images that were acquired after the operation showed no evidence of infarction. Nine days after admittance to the hospital, drowsiness and weakness of the left limbs with brain swelling appeared and decompressive hemi-craniectomy was performed. Diagnostic cerebral angiography revealed vasospasms in both anterior and middle cerebral arteries, thus fasudil hydrochloride was administered intra-arterially. While blood flow in all arteries improved, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging detected infarction along the entire length of the corpus callosum and in the medial region of the right frontal lobe. We believe this infarction was due to secondary ischemia of median callosal artery. This case reminded us of the anatomical variation wherein median callosal artery is the sole blood supply line for the corpus callosum and demonstrated that infarction of the entire corpus callosum is possible.

  8. Acute lung injury complicating blood transfusion in post-partum hemorrhage: incidence and risk factors.

    Teofili, Luciana; Bianchi, Maria; Zanfini, Bruno A; Catarci, Stefano; Sicuranza, Rossella; Spartano, Serena; Zini, Gina; Draisci, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the incidence and risk factors for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) among patients transfused for post-partum hemorrhage (PPH). We identified a series of 71 consecutive patients with PPH requiring the urgent transfusion of three or more red blood cell (RBC) units, with or without transfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and/or platelets (PLT). Clinical records were then retrieved and examined for respiratory distress events. According to the 2004 consensus definition, cases of new-onset hypoxemia, within 6 hours after transfusion, with bilateral pulmonary changes, in the absence of cardiogenic pulmonary edema were identified as TRALI. If an alternative risk factor for acute lung injury was present, possible TRALI was diagnosed. Thirteen cases of TRALI and 1 case of possible TRALI were identified (overall incidence 19.7%). At univariate analysis, patients with TRALI received higher number of RBC, PLT and FFP units and had a longer postpartum hospitalization. Among the diseases occurring in pregnancy- and various pre-existing comorbidities, only gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia, significantly increased the risk to develop TRALI (p = 0.006). At multivariate analysis including both transfusion- and patient-related risk factors, pregnancy-related, hypertensive disorders were confirmed to be the only predictors for TRALI, with an odds ratio of 27.7 ( 95% CI 1.27-604.3, p=0.034). Patients suffering from PPH represent a high-risk population for TRALI. The patients with gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia, not receiving anti-hypertensive therapy, have the highest risk. Therefore, a careful monitoring of these patients after transfusions is recommended.

  9. Cerebellar Degeneration

    ... FARA) National Ataxia Foundation (NAF) National Multiple Sclerosis Society See all related organizations Publications Degeneración cerebelosa Order NINDS Publications Definition Cerebellar degeneration is a process in which neurons ( ...

  10. Cerebellar injury in preterm infants.

    Tam, Emily W Y

    2018-01-01

    Although preterm birth is best known to result in adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes through injury of the supratentorial structures, including intraventricular hemorrhage and periventricular leukomalacia, the cerebellum has become increasingly recognized as an important target for injury and adverse motor and cognitive outcomes. Undergoing the most dramatic growth during the preterm period, the cerebellum is vulnerable to large and small hemorrhages, as well as hypoplasia resulting from a number of potentially modifiable risk factors. These factors include contact with intraventricular blood, crossed cerebrocerebellar diaschisis, postnatal glucocorticoid exposure, pain and opioid exposure, nutrition and somatic growth, cardiorespiratory factors, and socioeconomic status. Strategies targeting these factors may result in prevention of the motor and cognitive deficits seen after cerebellar hemorrhage or hypoplasia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    ... Home » Patients & Families » About Stroke » Intracerebral Hemorrhage Intracerebral Hemorrhage What is a Stroke? Ischemic Stroke Intracerebral Hemorrhage Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Pediatric Stroke Warning Signs Stroke Statistics ...

  12. [Clinical effect of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation combined with pulmonary surfactant in treatment of neonatal severe meconium aspiration syndrome complicated by pulmonary hemorrhage].

    Huang, Jing; Lin, Xin-Zhu; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-11-01

    To study the clinical effect and safety of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) combined with pulmonary surfactant (PS) in the treatment of neonatal severe meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) complicated by neonatal pulmonary hemorrhage (NPH). A total of 48 children with severe MAS complicated by NPH were enrolled, and a retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical effects of HFOV+PS (trial group, 25 children) and HFOV alone (control group, 23 children). The blood gas parameters, oxygenation index (OI), PaO 2 /FiO 2 (P/F) value, duration of pulmonary hemorrhage, ventilation time, length of hospital stay, incidence of complications, and outcome were compared between the two groups. At 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after treatment, the trial group had significantly better PaO 2 , OI, and P/F value than the control group (Phemorrhage (P0.05). HFOV combined with PS can better improve oxygenation function and shorten the duration of NPH and ventilation time. Meanwhile, it does not increase the incidence of adverse events. Therefore, it is a safe and effective therapy.

  13. Cerebellar mutism: review of the literature

    Gudrunardottir, Thora; Sehested, Astrid; Juhler, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a common complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. This article reviews current status with respect to incidence, anatomical substrate, pathophysiology, risk factors, surgical considerations, treatment options, prognosis and prevention....

  14. Cerebellar mutism: review of the literature

    Gudrunardottir, Thora; Sehested, Astrid; Juhler, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a common complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. This article reviews current status with respect to incidence, anatomical substrate, pathophysiology, risk factors, surgical considerations, treatment options, prognosis and prevention.......Cerebellar mutism is a common complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. This article reviews current status with respect to incidence, anatomical substrate, pathophysiology, risk factors, surgical considerations, treatment options, prognosis and prevention....

  15. Risk factor analysis of pulmonary hemorrhage complicating CT-guided lung biopsy in coaxial and non-coaxial core biopsy techniques in 650 patients

    Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A., E-mail: nour410@hotmail.com [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johan Wolfgang Goethe – University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Department, Cairo University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Alsubhi, Mohammed [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johan Wolfgang Goethe – University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Naguib, Nagy N. [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johan Wolfgang Goethe – University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Department, Alexandria University Hospital, Alexandria (Egypt); Lehnert, Thomas; Emam, Ahmed; Beeres, Martin; Bodelle, Boris; Koitka, Karen; Vogl, Thomas J.; Jacobi, Volkmar [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johan Wolfgang Goethe – University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk factors involved in the development of pulmonary hemorrhage complicating CT-guided biopsy of pulmonary lesions in coaxial and non-coaxial techniques. Materials and methods: Retrospective study included CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsies in 650 consecutive patients (407 males, 243 females; mean age 54.6 years, SD: 5.2) from November 2008 to June 2013. Patients were classified according to lung biopsy technique in coaxial group (318 lesions) and non-coaxial group (332 lesions). Exclusion criteria for biopsy were: lesions <5 mm in diameter, uncorrectable coagulopathy, positive-pressure ventilation, severe respiratory compromise, pulmonary arterial hypertension or refusal of the procedure. Risk factors for pulmonary hemorrhage complicating lung biopsy were classified into: (a) patient's related risk factors, (b) lesion's related risk factors and (d) technical risk factors. Radiological assessments were performed by two radiologists in consensus. Mann–Whitney U test and Fisher's exact tests for statistical analysis. p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Incidence of pulmonary hemorrhage was 19.6% (65/332) in non-coaxial group and 22.3% (71/318) in coaxial group. The difference in incidence between both groups was statistically insignificant (p = 0.27). Hemoptysis developed in 5.4% (18/332) and in 6.3% (20/318) in the non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively. Traversing pulmonary vessels in the needle biopsy track was a significant risk factor of the development pulmonary hemorrhage (incidence: 55.4% (36/65, p = 0.0003) in the non-coaxial group and 57.7% (41/71, p = 0.0013) in coaxial group). Other significant risk factors included: lesions of less than 2 cm (p value of 0.01 and 0.02 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively), basal and middle zonal lesions in comparison to upper zonal lung lesions (p = 0.002 and 0.03 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively), increased lesion

  16. Risk factor analysis of pulmonary hemorrhage complicating CT-guided lung biopsy in coaxial and non-coaxial core biopsy techniques in 650 patients

    Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A.; Alsubhi, Mohammed; Naguib, Nagy N.; Lehnert, Thomas; Emam, Ahmed; Beeres, Martin; Bodelle, Boris; Koitka, Karen; Vogl, Thomas J.; Jacobi, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk factors involved in the development of pulmonary hemorrhage complicating CT-guided biopsy of pulmonary lesions in coaxial and non-coaxial techniques. Materials and methods: Retrospective study included CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsies in 650 consecutive patients (407 males, 243 females; mean age 54.6 years, SD: 5.2) from November 2008 to June 2013. Patients were classified according to lung biopsy technique in coaxial group (318 lesions) and non-coaxial group (332 lesions). Exclusion criteria for biopsy were: lesions <5 mm in diameter, uncorrectable coagulopathy, positive-pressure ventilation, severe respiratory compromise, pulmonary arterial hypertension or refusal of the procedure. Risk factors for pulmonary hemorrhage complicating lung biopsy were classified into: (a) patient's related risk factors, (b) lesion's related risk factors and (d) technical risk factors. Radiological assessments were performed by two radiologists in consensus. Mann–Whitney U test and Fisher's exact tests for statistical analysis. p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Incidence of pulmonary hemorrhage was 19.6% (65/332) in non-coaxial group and 22.3% (71/318) in coaxial group. The difference in incidence between both groups was statistically insignificant (p = 0.27). Hemoptysis developed in 5.4% (18/332) and in 6.3% (20/318) in the non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively. Traversing pulmonary vessels in the needle biopsy track was a significant risk factor of the development pulmonary hemorrhage (incidence: 55.4% (36/65, p = 0.0003) in the non-coaxial group and 57.7% (41/71, p = 0.0013) in coaxial group). Other significant risk factors included: lesions of less than 2 cm (p value of 0.01 and 0.02 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively), basal and middle zonal lesions in comparison to upper zonal lung lesions (p = 0.002 and 0.03 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively), increased lesion

  17. High-density lipoprotein-based therapy reduces the hemorrhagic complications associated with tissue plasminogen activator treatment in experimental stroke.

    Lapergue, Bertrand; Dang, Bao Quoc; Desilles, Jean-Philippe; Ortiz-Munoz, Guadalupe; Delbosc, Sandrine; Loyau, Stéphane; Louedec, Liliane; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Mazighi, Mikael; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Meilhac, Olivier; Amarenco, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    We have previously reported that intravenous injection of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) was neuroprotective in an embolic stroke model. We hypothesized that HDL vasculoprotective actions on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may decrease hemorrhagic transformation-associated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration in acute stroke. We used tPA alone or in combination with HDLs in vivo in 2 models of focal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) (embolic and 4-hour monofilament MCAO) and in vitro in a model of BBB. Sprague-Dawley rats were submitted to MCAO, n=12 per group. The rats were then randomly injected with tPA (10 mg/kg) or saline with or without human plasma purified-HDL (10 mg/kg). The therapeutic effects of HDL and BBB integrity were assessed blindly 24 hours later. The integrity of the BBB was also tested using an in vitro model of human cerebral endothelial cells under oxygen-glucose deprivation. tPA-treated groups had significantly higher mortality and rate of hemorrhagic transformation at 24 hours in both MCAO models. Cotreatment with HDL significantly reduced stroke-induced mortality versus tPA alone (by 42% in filament MCAO, P=0.009; by 73% in embolic MCAO, P=0.05) and tPA-induced intracerebral parenchymal hematoma (by 92% in filament MCAO, by 100% in embolic MCAO; Phemorrhagic transformation in rat models of MCAO. Both in vivo and in vitro results support the vasculoprotective action of HDLs on BBB under ischemic conditions.

  18. Questioning the cerebellar doctrine

    Galliano, Elisa; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2014-01-01

    The basic principles of cerebellar function were originally described by Flourens, Cajal, and Marr/Albus/Ito, and they constitute the pillars of what can be considered to be the classic cerebellar doctrine. In their concepts, the main cerebellar function is to control motor behavior, Purkinje cells

  19. Splinter hemorrhages

    Fingernail hemorrhage ... Splinter hemorrhages look like thin, red to reddish-brown lines of blood under the nails. They run in the direction of nail growth. They are named splinter hemorrhages because they look like a splinter under the ...

  20. Remote Supratentorial Hemorrhage After Posterior Fossa Surgery: A Brief Case Report

    Moscote-Salazar Luis Rafael

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The supratentorial hemorrhage after posterior fossa surgery is an unusual but delicate complication that carries high mortality and morbidity. A 50 year old woman presented vertigo 6 months of evolution, which worsened in the last 2 months accompanied by ataxia. She showed left cerebellar signs, had no focal motor or sensory deficits. A brain MRI identified cerebellopontine angle lesion with mass effect. The patient was treated on suboccipital craniectomy and resection of right posterior fossa tumor, the histopathological diagnosis was consistent with typical meningioma. (WHO Class I.

  1. Intracranial hemorrhage of the mature newborn infant

    Takemine, Hisao

    1983-01-01

    Concerning four mature newborn infants with intracranial hemorrhage diagnosed by CT, the labour course, treatment, and prognoses were discussed. Of intracranial hemorrhage, 70.7% was small hemorrhage along the cerebellar tentorium and the falx cerebri, 12.2% subdural hemorrhage in the posterior cranial fossa, and 9.8% subdural hemorrhage in the fornex. Intraventricular or extradural hemorrhage was rarely found. The prognosis is determined by severeness of neurotic symptoms due to cerebral hypoxia. Subdural hemorrhage of the posterior cranial fossa resulted in cerebral palsy in one fifth of the cases, and in slight enlargement of the ventricle in three fifths. Subdural hematoma left porencephaly in one fourth of the patients, but the remaining recovered to normal. (Ueda, J.)

  2. Hemorragia alveolar como complicación del uso de trombolíticos Alveolar hemorrhage as a complication of thrombolytic therapy

    Alejandra González

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La trombolisis se usa como estrategia de reperfusión coronaria en el infarto agudo de miocardio. El sangrado es su principal complicación; la mayoría ocurre en los sitios de accesos venosos y es leve, pero también pueden presentarse hemorragia gastrointestinal, retroperitoneal, genitourinaria, pulmonar y a nivel del sistema nervioso central, episodios estos generalmente de mayor gravedad y a veces fatales. Se describe aquí el caso de un paciente que recibió terapia trombolítica con estreptoquinasa como tratamiento por un infarto de miocardio, y que posteriormente desarrolló insuficiencia respiratoria aguda, infiltrados pulmonares bilaterales, caída del hematocrito y aumento de la difusión de monóxido de carbono, cuadro compatible con diagnóstico de hemorragia alveolar.Coronary thrombolysis is used as a strategy for coronary reperfusion for acute myocardial infarction. Bleeding is the main complication described. Although most of these events occur at sites of vascular access and are mild, in some cases gastrointestinal, retroperitoneal, genitourinary, lung and central nervous system bleeding may occur. These episodes are usually serious and sometimes fatal. The following report describes the case of a patient who received thrombolytic therapy with streptokinase as a treatment for myocardial infarction. Subsequently he developed acute respiratory failure, bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and fall of hematocrit compatible with diagnosis of alveolar hemorrhage.

  3. Arterial spin-labeling MR imaging of cerebral hemorrhages

    Noguchi, Tomoyuki; Nishihara, Masashi; Egashira, Yoshiaki; Azama, Shinya; Hirai, Tetsuyoshi; Kitano, Isao; Irie, Hiroyuki; Yakushiji, Yusuke; Kawashima, Masatou

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the characteristics of brain perfusion measured by arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (ASL-MRI) in cerebral hemorrhages. Brain blood flow values (CBF-ASL values) for cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres and segmented cerebral regions were measured by ASL-MRI in 19 putaminal hemorrhage patients and 20 thalamic hemorrhage patients in acute or subacute stages. We assessed the lateralities of CBF-ASL values and the relationships between CBF-ASL values and other imaging findings and clinical manifestations. Both the 19 putaminal hemorrhage patients and the 20 thalamic hemorrhage patients had significantly low CBF-ASL values of the contralateral cerebellum in subacute stage, suggesting that ASL-MRI might delineate crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD). Ipsilateral low CBF-ASL values were observed in frontal lobes and thalami with a putaminal hemorrhage and lentiform nuclei, temporal lobes, and parietal lobes with a thalamic hemorrhage, suggesting that ASL-MRI showed the ipsilateral cerebral diaschisis (ICD). In the putaminal hemorrhage patients, the hematoma volume negatively affected both the bilateral cerebellar and cerebral hemispheric CBF-ASL values. In the thalamic hemorrhage patients, a concomitant intraventricular hemorrhage caused low cerebral hemispheric CBF-ASL values. The use of ASL-MRI is sensitive to the perfusion abnormalities and could thus be helpful to estimate functional abnormalities in cerebral hemorrhage patients. (orig.)

  4. Arterial spin-labeling MR imaging of cerebral hemorrhages

    Noguchi, Tomoyuki [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Saga University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Saga (Japan); Nishihara, Masashi; Egashira, Yoshiaki; Azama, Shinya; Hirai, Tetsuyoshi; Kitano, Isao; Irie, Hiroyuki [Saga University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Saga (Japan); Yakushiji, Yusuke [Saga University, Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Saga (Japan); Kawashima, Masatou [Saga University, Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Saga (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to identify the characteristics of brain perfusion measured by arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (ASL-MRI) in cerebral hemorrhages. Brain blood flow values (CBF-ASL values) for cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres and segmented cerebral regions were measured by ASL-MRI in 19 putaminal hemorrhage patients and 20 thalamic hemorrhage patients in acute or subacute stages. We assessed the lateralities of CBF-ASL values and the relationships between CBF-ASL values and other imaging findings and clinical manifestations. Both the 19 putaminal hemorrhage patients and the 20 thalamic hemorrhage patients had significantly low CBF-ASL values of the contralateral cerebellum in subacute stage, suggesting that ASL-MRI might delineate crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD). Ipsilateral low CBF-ASL values were observed in frontal lobes and thalami with a putaminal hemorrhage and lentiform nuclei, temporal lobes, and parietal lobes with a thalamic hemorrhage, suggesting that ASL-MRI showed the ipsilateral cerebral diaschisis (ICD). In the putaminal hemorrhage patients, the hematoma volume negatively affected both the bilateral cerebellar and cerebral hemispheric CBF-ASL values. In the thalamic hemorrhage patients, a concomitant intraventricular hemorrhage caused low cerebral hemispheric CBF-ASL values. The use of ASL-MRI is sensitive to the perfusion abnormalities and could thus be helpful to estimate functional abnormalities in cerebral hemorrhage patients. (orig.)

  5. Chronic subdural hematoma of the posterior fossa associated with cerebellar hemorrhage: report of rare disease with MRI findings Hematoma subdural crônico de fossa posterior associado a hemorragia cerebelar espontânea: relato de doença rara com achados de RNM

    Leodante B. Costa Jr

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic subdural hematoma of the posterior fossa is an uncommon entity, and spontaneous lesions are very rarely described, occurring mostly during anticoagulation therapy. The association of the posterior fossa chronic subdural hematoma with spontaneous parenchymal hemorrhage without anticoagulation therapy was never related in the literature, to our knowledge. We describe a case of a 64 year-old woman who suffered a spontaneous cerebellar hemorrhage, treated conservatively, and presented 1 month later with a chronic subdural posterior fossa hematoma.Hematomas subdurais da fossa posterior são lesões raras, mais comumente relacionadas com traumas graves. A ocorrência de hematomas subdurais crônicos na fossa posterior é muito rara, sendo descritos 15 casos até o momento, boa parte relacionada ao uso de anticoagulantes. Em nossa revisão da literatura, não pudemos encontrar nenhum relato da associação entre hematoma subdural crônico da fossa posterior e hemorragia cerebelar espontânea. Relatamos o caso de paciente de 64 anos com hematoma intraparenquimatoso cerebelar tratado conservadoramente e hematoma subdural crônico, tratado cirurgicamente, cerca de 1 mês após o acidente vascular cerebelar.

  6. Questioning the cerebellar doctrine.

    Galliano, Elisa; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2014-01-01

    The basic principles of cerebellar function were originally described by Flourens, Cajal, and Marr/Albus/Ito, and they constitute the pillars of what can be considered to be the classic cerebellar doctrine. In their concepts, the main cerebellar function is to control motor behavior, Purkinje cells are the only cortical neuron receiving and integrating inputs from climbing fiber and mossy-parallel fiber pathways, and plastic modification at the parallel fiber synapses onto Purkinje cells constitutes the substrate of motor learning. Yet, because of recent technical advances and new angles of investigation, all pillars of the cerebellar doctrine now face regular re-examination. In this review, after summarizing the classic concepts and recent disputes, we attempt to synthesize an integrated view and propose a revisited version of the cerebellar doctrine. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The dilemma of complicated shunt valves: How to identify patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage who will benefit from a simple valve?

    Christian von der Brelie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sophisticated shunt valves provide the possibility of pressure adjustment and antisiphon control but have a higher probability of valve dysfunction especially in a posthemorrhagic setting. The aim of the present study is to analyze the clinical outcome of patients with shunt dependent posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in order to identify patients who would benefit from a simple differential pressure valve. Methods: From 2000 to 2013, 547 patients with aneurysmatic SAH were treated at our institution, 114 underwent ventricular shunt placement (21.1%. 47 patients with available pre- and post-operative computed tomography scans, and an available follow-up of minimum 6 months were included. In order to measure the survival time which a nonprogrammable differential pressure valve would have had in an individual patient we defined the initial equalized shunt survival time (IESS. IESS is the time until surgical revisions of fixed differential pressure or flow-regulated valves for the treatment of over- or under-drainage as well as re-programming of adjustable valves due to over- or under-drainage. Results: Twenty patients were treated with fixed differential pressure valves, 15 patients were treated with flow-regulated valves, and 12 underwent ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunt placement with differential pressure valves assisted by a gravitational unit. Patients who reacted with remarkable changes of the ventricular width after the insertion of external ventricular drainage (EVD, before shunt placement, showed a significantly longer IESS. Conclusions: Decline of the ventricular width after EVD placement was a predictor for successful VP shunt therapy in the later course of disease. Possibly, this could allow identifying patients who benefit from a simple differential pressure valve or a flow-regulated valve, and thus could possibly avoid valve-associated complications of a programmable valve in the

  8. Hemorrhagic brain metastases

    Takahashi, Motoichiro; Takekawa, S.D.; Suzuki, Kenzo

    1986-01-01

    Tumor hemorrhage on computed tomography (CT) was found in 14 patients with brain metastases (7 % of two hundred patients with brain metastases), from April 1979 to July 1983. Primary foci of these lesions were the lung (6 patients), breast (2), kidney (2), uterus (2), colon (1) and adrenal gland (1). ''Stroke'' syndrome was the initial presenting symptom in 3 patients; neurological focal sign or symptoms of increased intracranial pressure in the remaining patients. CT demonstrated peritumoral hemorrhage in all patients with solid mass, intratumoral hemorrhage in a few patients and also cerebral or ventricular hemorrhage, which was fatal complication, in 2 patients (colon and breast cancers). A cystic mass with fluid-blood level was noted in a patient with breast cancer. Several predisposing factors including chemotherapy, thrombocytopenia, radiotherapy or combination of these were recognized in 8 patients. Of these, chemotherapy was the most causative factor of tumor hemorrhage. Brain irradiation for hemorrhagic brain metastases was effective for prolongation of mean survival time of these patients as follows; 10 months in irradiated group, whereas 1.5 months in non-irradiated group. (author)

  9. Preretinal hemorrhage

    Eduardo Felippe

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A case of Valsalva hemorrhagic retinopathy treated with Nd:YAGlaser indescribed. The patient presented decreased visual acuityafter coughing, and a preretinal hemorrhage was diagnosed in theposterior pole; puncturing the posterior hyaloid face was performedwith Nd:Yag laser. Rapid hemorrhage absorption was observedafter the therapy proposed and visual acuity was recovered. Nd:Yaglaser proved to be safe and efficient in the management of preretinalhemorrhage.

  10. Postpartum complications

    Kronthal, A.J.; Kuhlman, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the CT findings of major postpartum complications and determine what role CT plays in their evaluation. The CT scans of nine patients with major postpartum complications were retrospectively reviewed. Patients had been referred to CT for evaluation of postpartum fever, abdominal pain, and elevated results of liver function tests. Complications identified at CT included hepatic infarctions (n = 2), endometritis (n = 2), postoperative wound abscess (n = 1), massive abdominal hemorrhage (n = 1), septic thrombophlebitis (n = 1), and renal vein thrombosis (n = 1). CT findings of hepatic infarction included wedge-shaped areas of decreased enhancement conforming to a vascular distribution

  11. Spontaneous muscle hematomas in a patient with Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Jency Maria Koshy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and Dengue shock syndrome manifest in various forms, ranging from petechial skin hemorrhage to life threatening cerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and genitourinary hemorrhages. However it is very rare to have muscle hematomas in DHF. We report a rare case of spontaneous Iliopsoas hematoma complicating Dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  12. Cerebellar anatomy as applied to cerebellar microsurgical resections

    Alejandro Ramos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To define the anatomy of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles, demonstrating the surgical application of anatomic landmarks in cerebellar resections. METHODS: Twenty cerebellar hemispheres were studied. RESULTS: The majority of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles had demonstrated constant relationship to other cerebellar structures, which provided landmarks for surgical approaching. The lateral border is separated from the midline by 19.5 mm in both hemispheres. The posterior border of the cortex is separated 23.3 mm from the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus; the lateral one is separated 26 mm from the lateral border of the nucleus; and the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus is separated 25.4 mm from the posterolateral angle formed by the junction of lateral and posterior borders of cerebellar hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS: Microsurgical anatomy has provided important landmarks that could be applied to cerebellar surgical resections.

  13. Crossed cerebellar atrophy in cases with cerebrovascular disease

    Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo; Iwabuchi, Sadamu.

    1989-01-01

    Crossed cerebellar atrophy (CCA) was investigated by X-ray CT to establish the incidence, mechanism, and the relation to cerebral lesions in 130 cases of unilateral supratentorial cerebrovascular diseases. The 130 cases consisted of 83 males and 47 females with cerebral infarction (65 cases) and cerebral hemorrhage (65 cases). The patients' average age was 57.6 years. Crossed cerebellar atrophy was demonstrated in 8 cases (6.2%), 6 of whom had massive cerebral infarction in the middle cerebral artery area (9.2% of the 65 cases of cerebral infarction. The six cases of CCA caused by cerebral infarction had lesions in the frontal and temporal lobes. Two had a cerebral hemorrhage in the putamen and in the thalamus, respectively, accounting for 3.1% of the 65 cases of cerebral hemorrhage. Of the 2 cases, one had putaminal hemorrhage, and the other had thalamic hemorrhage. Cerebrovascular stroke had occured in these patients with CCA more than 2 months previously. In 5 of the 8 cases of CCA, atrophy was present in the basis pedunculi and the basis pontis on the side of the cerebral lesion. However, neither dilation nor deformity of the fourth ventricle was present in any of the patients, suggesting that none of the CCA patients had atrophy of the dentate nucleus. The CCA patients had massive cerebral lesion in the frontal and temporal lobes or atrophy of the basis pedunculi and basis pontis, suggesting the presence of the transsynaptic degeneration of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway. In the case of the thalamic hemorrhage, who had not hemorrhagic lesion in the frontal and temporal lobes, atrophy of the basis peduncli and basis pontis was not observed. Though dilation or deformity of the fourth ventricle is not observed in this case, presence of the degeneration of the dentate-rubro-thalamic pathway cannot be denied. CCA seems to be caused by both the transsynaptic degeneration of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway and the dentate-rubro-thalamic pathway. (J.P.N.)

  14. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy

    Hanyu, Haruo; Tomonaga, Masanori; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Shimada, Hiroyuki.

    1985-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy was studied clinicopathologically, with special attention given to the CT images. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy is characterized, by a lobar-type hemorrhage involving the cortex, with direct extension into the subarachnoid space. Multiple hemorrhages are frequent, and cortical infarctions are present as complications in elderly patients without risk factors. CT scans taken in 5 cases demonstrated lobar hemorrhages in superficial locations, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently, with surrounding edema and mass effect. A subarachnoid extension of the hemorrhage through the superficial cortex, proven pathologically in all cases, was noted by CT in 4 of the 5 cases. However, cortical infarction was not detected by CT in any case. Therefore, CT is of value in the diagnosis of cerebral hemorrhage due to amyloid angiopathy based on distinctive findings such as a lobar hemorrhage in superficial regions, with extension into the subarachnoid space, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently. (author)

  15. Imaging of Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Hakimi, Ryan; Garg, Ankur

    2016-10-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke comprises approximately 15% to 20% of all strokes. This article provides readers with an understanding of the indications and significance of various neuroimaging techniques available for patients presenting with hemorrhagic strokes of distinct causes. The most common initial neuroimaging study is a noncontrast head CT, which allows for the identification of hemorrhage. Once an intracranial hemorrhage has been identified, the pattern of blood and the patient's medical history, neurologic examination, and laboratory studies lead the practitioner to pursue further neuroimaging studies to guide the medical, surgical, and interventional management. Given that hemorrhagic stroke constitutes a heterogeneous collection of diagnoses, the subsequent neuroimaging pathway necessary to better evaluate and care for these patients is variable based on the etiology.With an increasing incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation associated with the aging population and the introduction of three new direct factor Xa inhibitors and one direct thrombin inhibitor to complement vitamin K antagonists, oral anticoagulant use continues to increase. Patients on oral anticoagulants have a sevenfold to tenfold increased risk for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Furthermore, patients who have an ICH associated with oral anticoagulant use have a higher mortality rate than those with primary ICH. Despite the reduced incidence of hypertension-related ICH over the past decade, it is expected that the incidence of ICH will continue to increase. Neuroimaging studies are integral to the identification of hemorrhagic stroke, determination of the underlying etiology, prevention of hematoma expansion, treatment of acute complications, and treatment of the underlying etiology, if indicated. Neuroimaging is essential for prognostication and thus directly impacts patient care.

  16. Subconjunctival hemorrhage

    ... the eyes Viral infection Certain eye surgeries or injuries A subconjunctival hemorrhage is common in newborn infants. In this case, the condition is thought to be caused by the pressure changes across the infant's body during childbirth.

  17. Intracranial Hemorrhage

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a life-threatening condition, the outcome of which can be improved by intensive care. Intracranial hemorrhage may be spontaneous, precipitated by an underlying vascular malformation, induced by trauma, or related to therapeutic anticoagulation. The goals of critical care are to assess the proximate cause, minimize the risks of hemorrhage expansion through blood pressure control and correction of coagulopathy, and obliterate vascular lesions with a high risk of acute rebleeding. Simple bedside scales and interpretation of computed tomography scans assess the severity of neurological injury. Myocardial stunning and pulmonary edema related to neurological injury should be anticipated, and can usually be managed. Fever (often not from infection) is common and can be effectively treated, although therapeutic cooling has not been shown to improve outcomes after intracranial hemorrhage. Most functional and cognitive recovery takes place weeks to months after discharge; expected levels of functional independence (no disability, disability but independence with a device, dependence) may guide conversations with patient representatives. Goals of care impact mortality, with do-not-resuscitate status increasing the predicted mortality for any level of severity of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Future directions include refining the use of bedside neuromonitoring (electroencephalogram, invasive monitors), novel approaches to reduce intracranial hemorrhage expansion, minimizing vasospasm, and refining the assessment of quality of life to guide rehabilitation and therapy. PMID:22167847

  18. Falls and cerebellar ataxia

    I. V. Damulin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the main causes of falls. Whatever their cause is, falls may lead to severe maladjustment in everyday life. In nearly 1 out of 10 cases, they are accompanied by severe injuries, including fractures (most commonly those of the proximal femur and humerus, hands, pelvic bones, and vertebrae, subdural hematoma, and severe soft tissue and head injuries. This process is emphasized to be multifactorial. Particular emphasis is laid on the involvement of the cerebellum and its associations, which may be accompanied by falls. This is clinically manifested mainly by gait disorders. Walking is a result of an interaction of three related functions (locomotion, maintenance of balance and adaptive reactions. In addition to synergies related to locomotion and balance maintenance, standing at rest and walking are influenced bythe following factors: postural and environmental information (proprioceptive, vestibular, and visual, the capacity to interpret and integrate this information, the ability of the musculoskeletal system to make movements, and the capability to optimally modulate these movements in view of the specific situation and the ability to choose and adapt synergy in terms of external factors and the capacities and purposes of an individual. The clinical signs of damage to the cerebellum and its associations are considered in detail. These structures are emphasized to be involved not only in movements, but also in cognitive functions. The major symptoms that permit cerebellar dysfunction to be diagnosed are given. Symptoms in cerebellar injuries are generally most pronounced when suddenly changing the direction of movements or attempting to start walking immediately after a dramatic rise. The magnitude of ataxia also increases in a patient who tries to decrease the step size. Falling tendencies or bending to one side (in other symptoms characteristic of cerebellar diseases suggest injury of the corresponding

  19. Cerebellar abiotrophy in a miniature schnauzer

    Berry, Michelle L.; Blas-Machado, Uriel

    2003-01-01

    A 3.5-month-old miniature schnauzer was presented for signs of progressive cerebellar ataxia. Necropsy revealed cerebellar abiotrophy. This is the first reported case of cerebellar abiotrophy in a purebred miniature schnauzer.

  20. Cerebellar abiotrophy in a miniature schnauzer.

    Berry, Michelle L; Blas-Machado, Uriel

    2003-08-01

    A 3.5-month-old miniature schnauzer was presented for signs of progressive cerebellar ataxia. Necropsy revealed cerebellar abiotrophy. This is the first reported case of cerebellar abiotrophy in a purebred miniature schnauzer.

  1. An observational study of complications in chickenpox with special reference to unusual complications in an apex infectious disease hospital, Kolkata, India

    A K Kole

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chickenpox can cause serious complications and even death in persons without any risk factors. Aims: To observe the different complications with special reference to unusual complications of chickenpox and their outcomes. Materials and Methods: The present study was a prospective observational study where 300 patients suffering from chickenpox were evaluated with special reference to unusual complications and outcomes. Results: The usual complications of chickenpox commonly observed were acute hepatitis in 30 (10% and cerebellar ataxia in 22 patients (7.3%, whereas common unusual complications were acute pancreatitis in 45 (15%, hemorrhagic rash in 10 (3.3%, Guillain-Barrι syndrome in 4 (1.3%, disseminated intravascular coagulation in 4 (1.3%, necrotizing fasciitis in 4 (1.3%, and acute renal failure in 3 patients (1%. It had been observed that most of these unusual complications occurred in patients without any risk factor. A total of 18 patients (6% died in this study and of them 12 patients (4% died due to unusual complications. Conclusions: Compulsory childhood varicella vaccination including vaccination of risk groups and susceptible individuals are all essential to reduce the incidence of chickenpox, associated complications, and subsequent death.

  2. Napsin A and Thyroid Transcription Factor-1-Positive Cerebellar Tumor with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation

    Taiji Kuwata

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a very rare case of cerebellar metastasis of unknown origin, in which a primary lung adenocarcinoma was diagnosed by pathological examination of a cerebellar metastatic tumor, using immunohistochemical markers and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation of primary lung cancer. A 69-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of a hemorrhagic cerebellar tumor and multiple small brain tumors. She underwent cerebellar tumor resection. On pathological examination, the tumor was diagnosed as adenocarcinoma. However, the primary tumor site was unidentifiable even with several imaging inspections. On immunohistochemical analysis, the resected tumor was positive for napsin A and thyroid transcription factor-1. In addition, an EGFR mutation was detected in the tumor. Therefore, primary lung cancer was diagnosed and the patient was started on gefitinib (250 mg/day therapy.

  3. Toxic agents causing cerebellar ataxias.

    Manto, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum is particularly vulnerable to intoxication and poisoning, especially so the cerebellar cortex and Purkinje neurons. In humans, the most common cause of a toxic lesion to the cerebellar circuitry is alcohol related, but the cerebellum is also a main target of drug exposure (such as anticonvulsants, antineoplastics, lithium salts, calcineurin inhibitors), drug abuse and addiction (such as cocaine, heroin, phencyclidine), and environmental toxins (such as mercury, lead, manganese, toluene/benzene derivatives). Although data for the prevalence and incidence of cerebellar lesions related to intoxication and poisoning are still unknown in many cases, clinicians should keep in mind the list of agents that may cause cerebellar deficits, since toxin-induced cerebellar ataxias are not rare in daily practice. Moreover, the patient's status may require immediate therapies when the intoxication is life-threatening. 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset)

    Ban, Sadahiko; Ogata, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Nakao, Satoshi; Mizue, Hidenari; Kobayashi, Yutaka.

    1982-01-01

    1. We have reviewed 34 cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset, 23 mature and 11 premature infants) experienced in 10-year period from 1971 to 1980, with special reference to gestational age, birth weight, type of delivery, presence or absence of asphyxia, symptoms and cause of death. 2. Regarding 9 autopsied cases and 7 cases diagnosed by CT-scan, 10 mature infants composed of 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 2 intraventricular hemorrhages, 2 subdural hematomas, 2 intracerebral and 1 subependymal hemorrhage; 6 premature infants consisted of 4 subependymal hemorrhages with ventricular rupture and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhages. Most of them presented with respiratory distress, vomiting and convulsive seizures which developed within 5 days after birth. 3. Poor outcome including death amounted 49% of mature and 63% of premature infants. Along with degree of intracranial hematoma, prematurity and pulmonary complication were felt to be important prognostic factors. 4. Introduction of CT-scan led to prompt diagnosis and treatment, thus lowering mortality rate of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages. (author)

  5. Previously undiagnosed hemophilia patient with intracerebral hemorrhage

    Eray Atalay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial bleeding in hemophilia patients is a rare but a mortal complication. Diagnosis of hemophilia in adulthood is an uncommon occurrence. In this case report an adult patient with intracranial hemorrhage is presented.

  6. Sleep disorders in cerebellar ataxias

    José L. Pedroso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias comprise a wide range of etiologies leading to central nervous system-related motor and non-motor symptoms. Recently, a large body of evidence has demonstrated a high frequency of non-motor manifestations in cerebellar ataxias, specially in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA. Among these non-motor dysfunctions, sleep disorders have been recognized, although still under or even misdiagnosed. In this review, we highlight the main sleep disorders related to cerebellar ataxias focusing on REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, restless legs syndrome (RLS, periodic limb movement in sleep (PLMS, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, insomnia and sleep apnea.

  7. Reperfusion hemorrhage following superior mesenteric artery stenting.

    Moore, Michael

    2012-02-03

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement is now an established treatment option for chronic mesenteric ischemia and is associated with low mortality and morbidity rates. We present a case of reperfusion hemorrhage complicating endovascular repair of superior mesenteric artery stenosis. Although a recognized complication following repair of carotid stenosis, hemorrhage has not previously been reported following mesenteric endovascular reperfusion. We describe both spontaneous cessation of bleeding and treatment with coil embolization.

  8. Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Bilt, I.A.C. van der

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage(aSAH) is a devastating neurological disease. During the course of the aSAH several neurological and medical complications may occur. Cardiac abnormalities after aSAH are observed often and resemble stress cardiomyopathy or Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(Broken Heart

  9. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

    ... control blood pressure Medicine to prevent artery spasms Painkillers and anti-anxiety medicines to relieve headache and ... Other complications include: Complications of surgery Medicine side effects Seizures Stroke When to Contact a Medical Professional ...

  10. Post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage

    Heidemann, Christian; Wallén, Mia; Aakesson, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage (PTH) is a relatively common and potentially life-threatening complication. The objective of this study was to examine the rate of PTH and identify risk factors. A retrospective cohort study was carried out including all tonsillectomies (430 patients) performed...... as surgical technique" [relative risk (RR) = 5.3], "peritonsillar abscess as indication for surgery" (RR = 0.3) and "age equal to or above 15 years at the time of surgery" (RR = 5.4). It is concluded that patient age, PTA as indication for surgery and the use of coblation significantly affect the occurrence...

  11. Complex partial seizures: cerebellar metabolism

    Theodore, W.H.; Fishbein, D.; Deitz, M.; Baldwin, P.

    1987-07-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) with (/sup 18/F)2-deoxyglucose to study cerebellar glucose metabolism (LCMRglu) and the effect of phenytoin (PHT) in 42 patients with complex partial seizures (CPS), and 12 normal controls. Mean +/- SD patient LCMRglu was 6.9 +/- 1.8 mg glucose/100 g/min (left = right), significantly lower than control values of 8.5 +/- 1.8 (left, p less than 0.006), and 8.3 +/- 1.6 (right, p less than 0.02). Only four patients had cerebellar atrophy on CT/MRI; cerebellar LCMRglu in these was 5.5 +/- 1.5 (p = 0.054 vs. total patient sample). Patients with unilateral temporal hypometabolism or EEG foci did not have lateralized cerebellar hypometabolism. Patients receiving phenytoin (PHT) at the time of scan and patients with less than 5 years total PHT exposure had lower LCMRglu, but the differences were not significant. There were weak inverse correlations between PHT level and cerebellar LCMRglu in patients receiving PHT (r = -0.36; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1), as well as between length of illness and LCMRglu (r = -0.22; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1). Patients with complex partial seizures have cerebellar hypometabolism that is bilateral and due only in part to the effect of PHT.

  12. [Renal hemorrhage after ESWL: From small hematoma to renal blowout].

    Panach-Navarrete, Jorge; Palmero Martí, Jose Luis; Ganau Ituren, Amparo; Pastor Lence, Juan Carlos; Benedicto Redón, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    To report two cases of renal hemorrhage after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) and their therapeutic management. Description of the clinical cases, together with the diagnosis and therapeutic management of these complications. We present two cases of patients with renal hemorrhage after ESWL, which were performed without immediate complications. One of the cases, after detecting an important laceration of the renal parenchyma, needed two embolization sessions for its short-term resolution; however, the patient finally passed away due to the complications derived from hemorrhage. The other case was solved through conservative management. Even though hemorrhage is an infrequent complication after ESWL, it should be suspected when the patient presents compatible clinical symptoms, since even though most cases are resolved in a conservative manner, on some occasions specific treatments for the hemorrhage are necessary. Old age and the presence of vascular comorbidities seem to be related to a higher risk of hemorrhage after ESWL.

  13. Cerebral microbleeds and intracerebral hemorrhages in patients on maintenance hemodialysis

    Watanabe, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are important causes of death in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Recently, it has become clear that the presence of cerebral microbleeds (MBs) on T2 * -weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is closely related to intracerebral hemorrhages. This study investigated the incidence of MBs in chronic dialysis patients and prospective hemorrhagic complications of chronic dialysis patients with old intracerebral hemorrhages. Eighty patients (34 males, 46 females) with chronic renal failure, whose mean age was 62.9±11.4 years, were examined by MRI. The mean duration of hemodialysis was 7.8±6.3 years. MBs were found in 28 patients (35%) by T2 * -weighted MRI. Old intracerebral hemorrhages were seen in seven of the patients, and MBs were found in five (71%) of these seven patients. The frequency of old intracerebral hemorrhages was significantly higher in patients with MBs than in those without (p=0.048), and the numbers of MBs were significantly larger in patients with old intracerebral hemorrhages than in those without (p=0.0065). Three of the seven patients with old intracerebral hemorrhages had new hemorrhagic complications (two intracerebral hemorrhages and one cerebral microbleed) within a year. These intracerebral hemorrhages occurred in areas without MBs on the first T2 * -weighted MRI. T2 * -weighted MRI is useful for the detection of MBs, which may be a predictor of intracerebral hemorrhage. When a patient has a large number of MBs and old intracerebral hemorrhages, the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage undoubtedly increases. (author)

  14. Stereotactic biopsy of cerebellar lesions: straight versus oblique frame positioning.

    Quick-Weller, Johanna; Brawanski, Nina; Dinc, Nazife; Behmanesh, Bedjahn; Kammerer, Sara; Dubinski, Daniel; Seifert, Volker; Marquardt, Gerhard; Weise, Lutz

    2017-10-26

    Biospies of brain lesions with unknown entity are an everyday procedure among many neurosurgical departments. Biopsies can be performed frame-guided or frameless. However, cerebellar lesions are a special entity with a more complex approach. All biopsies in this study were performed stereotactically frame guided. Therefore, only biopsies of cerebellar lesions were included in this study. We compared whether the frame was attached straight versus oblique and we focused on diagnostic yield and complication rate. We evaluated 20 patients who underwent the procedure between 2009 and 2017. Median age was 56.5 years. 12 (60%) Patients showed a left sided lesion, 6 (30%) showed a lesion in the right cerebellum and 2 (10%) patients showed a midline lesion. The stereotactic frame was mounted oblique in 12 (60%) patients and straight in 8 (40%) patients. Postoperative CT scan showed small, clinically silent blood collection in two (10%) of the patients, one (5%) patient showed haemorrhage, which caused a hydrocephalus. He received an external ventricular drain. In both patients with small haemorrhage the frame was positioned straight, while in the patient who showed a larger haemorrhage the frame was mounted oblique. In all patients a final histopathological diagnosis was established. Cerebellar lesions of unknown entity can be accessed transcerebellar either with the stereotactic frame mounted straight or oblique. Also for cerebellar lesions the procedure shows a high diagnostic yield with a low rate of severe complications, which need further treatment.

  15. Managing aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: It takes a team.

    de Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Turkel-Parrella, David; Duggal, Abhijit; Murphy, Amanda; McCredie, Victoria; Marotta, Thomas R

    2015-03-01

    Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage are at high risk of complications, including rebleeding, delayed cerebral ischemia, cerebral infarction, and death. This review presents a practical approach for managing this condition and its complications. Copyright © 2015 Cleveland Clinic.

  16. A case report for fatal Churg-Strauss syndrome complications: first reported death due to rapid progression of prominently huge hepatic capsular hematoma and multi-system organ hemorrhage

    Qian, Jiejing; Tong, Hongyan; Chen, Feifei; Mai, Wenyuan; Lou, Yinjun; Jin, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a rare disease that has an extremely low incidence rate. CSS prognosis is good, in general; and there are no reports of multiple-organ hemorrhage in CSS. We report a unique case of CSS, wherein, an elderly man experienced multiple organ hemorrhage -- a particularly huge hematoma under the capsule of the liver and poor prognosis. PMID:25419420

  17. [Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome secondary to a cerebellar tumour].

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Carreras-Sáez, I; García-Peñas, J J; Fournier-Del Castillo, C; Villalobos-Reales, J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is characterized by disturbances of executive function, impaired spatial cognition, linguistic difficulties, and personality change. The case of an 11 year old boy is presented, with behavior problems, learning difficulties and social interaction problems. In the physical examination he had poor visual contact, immature behavior, reduced expressive language and global motor disability with gait dyspraxia, with no defined cerebellar motor signs. In the neuropsychological evaluation he has a full scale overall intellectual quotient of 84, with signs of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. A tumour affecting inferior cerebellar vermis was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging, which had not significantly grown during 5 years of follow up. The cerebellum participates in controlling cognitive and affective functions. Cerebellar pathology must be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cognitive or learning disorder with associated behavioral and emotional components. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Differences in Neuropeptide Y Secretion Between Intracerebral Hemorrhage and Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Schebesch, Karl-M; Bründl, Elisabeth; Schödel, Petra; Hochreiter, Andreas; Scheitzach, Judith; Bele, Sylvia; Brawanski, Alexander; Störr, Eva-M; Lohmeier, Anette; Proescholdt, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most potent endogenous vasoconstrictors, and its contribution to the multifactorial cascade of cerebral vasospasm due to nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is not yet fully understood. This experimental study compared the hemorrhage-specific course of NPY secretion into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and into plasma between 2 groups: patients with SAH and patients with basal ganglia hemorrhage (BGH) or cerebellar hemorrhage (CH) over the first 10 days after hemorrhage. Seventy-nine patients were prospectively included: SAH patients (n=66) (historic population) and intracerebral hemorrhage patients (n=13). All patients received an external ventricular drain within 24 hours of the onset of bleeding. CSF and plasma were drawn daily from day 1 to day 10. The levels of NPY were determined by means of competitive enzyme immunoassay. The CSF samples of 29 patients (historic population) who had undergone spinal anesthesia due to orthopedic surgery served as the control group. NPY levels in CSF were significantly higher in the 2 hemorrhage groups than in the control group. However, the 2 hemorrhage groups showed significant differences in NPY levels in CSF (SAH mean, 0.842 ng/mL vs. BGH/CH mean, 0.250 ng/mL; P<0.001) as well as in the course of NPY secretion into CSF over the 10-day period. NPY levels in plasma did not differ significantly among SAH, BGH/CH, and controls. Our findings support the hypothesis that excessive release of NPY into CSF but not into plasma is specific to aneurysmal SAH in the acute period of 10 days after hemorrhage. In BGH/CH, CSF levels of NPY were also increased, but the range was much lower.

  19. Subdural and Cerebellar Hematomas Which Developed after Spinal Surgery: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Ufuk Utku

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar hemorrhage following a spinal surgery is extremely rare; however, considering the localization, it can cause major clinical manifestations. While it is considered that these types of bleedings occur secondary to a venous infarct, the pathogenesis is still unclear. A 57-year-old male patient who underwent a laminectomy by exposing T12-L5 and had pedicle screws placed for ankylosing spondylitis developed a CSF leak due to a 2 mm dural tear. A hemorrhage with parallel streaks on the left cerebellar hemisphere was seen in CT scan, and a thin subdural hematoma at right frontotemporal region was seen on cranial MRI, performed after the patient developed intense headache, nausea, vomiting, and stiff neck in the early postoperative period. In this paper, a case of cerebellar and subdural hematomas following a spinal surgery is discussed with its clinical and radiologic findings.

  20. Cerebellar Lesions of Uremic Encephalopathy on MRI in Hemodialyzed Diabetic Patient: A Case Report

    Kil, Min Chul; Lee, Seung Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Cho, Bum Sang; Kang, Min Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Chungbuk National Universty Hospital, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Uremic encephalopathy (UE) is a well-known complication of uremia, but its pathophysiology remains unknown. It is widely reported that in UE, the bilateral basal ganglia (BG) shows hyperintensities on T2/fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but cerebellar lesions are extremely rare, with to the best of our knowledge, only one case reported to date. We describe the findings from computed tomography and MRI for typical BG and cerebellar vermis lesions.

  1. Cerebellar Lesions of Uremic Encephalopathy on MRI in Hemodialyzed Diabetic Patient: A Case Report

    Kil, Min Chul; Lee, Seung Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Cho, Bum Sang; Kang, Min Ho

    2012-01-01

    Uremic encephalopathy (UE) is a well-known complication of uremia, but its pathophysiology remains unknown. It is widely reported that in UE, the bilateral basal ganglia (BG) shows hyperintensities on T2/fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but cerebellar lesions are extremely rare, with to the best of our knowledge, only one case reported to date. We describe the findings from computed tomography and MRI for typical BG and cerebellar vermis lesions.

  2. Tumour type and size are high risk factors for the syndrome of "cerebellar" mutism and subsequent dysarthria

    C.E. Catsman-Berrevoets (Coriene); H.R. van Dongen (Hugo); D. Paz y Geuze (Daniel); P.F. Paquier; M.H. Lequin (Maarten); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: "Cerebellar mutis" and subsequent dysarthria (MSD) is a documented complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. In this prospective study the following risk factors for MSD were assessed: type, size and site of the tumour; hydrocephalus at

  3. Fatal hemorrhage in irr[iated esophageal cancer patients

    Nemoto, Kenji; Takai, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Kakuto, Yoshihisa; Ariga, Hisanori; Matsushita, Haruo; Wada, Hitoshi; Yamada, Shogo

    1998-01-01

    Between 1980 and 1994, 423 patients with esophageal cancer were given curative r[iation therapy. Of these patients, 31 died of massive hemorrhage and were used as the subjects of analysis in this study. The incidence of massive hemorrhage in all patients was 7% (31/423). In the 31 patients who died of massive hemorrhage, 27 h[ local tumors and two h[ no tumors at hemorrhage (two unknown cases). The mean time interval from the start of r[iation to hemorrhage was 9.2 months. In 9 autopsy cases the origin of hemorrhage was a tear of the aorta in 5 cases, necrotic local tumor in 3 cases and esophageal ulcer in 1 case. The positive risk factors for this complication seemed to be excess total dose, infection, metallic stent, and tracheoesophageal fistula. Chest pain or sentinel hemorrhage proceeding to massive hemorrhage was observed in about half of the patients. (orig.)

  4. Crossed cerebellar atrophy in children: a neurologic sequela of extreme prematurity

    Rollins, N.K.; Wen, T.S.; Dominguez, R.

    1995-01-01

    We retrospectively identified eight children, aged 8 months to 13 years, in whom cerebellar atrophy associated with cerebral injury was diagnosed on MR or CT, and reviewed their past medical history, neurologic findings, and neuroimaging studies. Seven patients were born extremely premature, EGA 25-28 weeks, and had severe perinatal intracranial hemorrhage. Neurologic problems include severe developmental delay in seven, spastic paresis in six, and seizures in five. Neuroimaging showed severe unilaterial holohemispheric atrophy in four, bilateral asymmetric holohemispheric atrophy in two, and left temporoparietal atrophy in one. Cerebellar atrophy was unilateral in five and bilateral but asymmetric in two. Gliosis of the atrophic cerebellum occurred in one patient. Sequential neuroimaging in one patient showed evolution of crossed cerebellar atrophy at 8 months of age. The final patient, a term infant, had an idiopathic perinatal left cerebral infarct. (orig./MG)

  5. Characteristics of Hemorrhagic Stroke following Spine and Joint Surgeries.

    Yang, Fei; Zhao, Jianning; Xu, Haidong

    2017-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke can occur after spine and joint surgeries such as laminectomy, lumbar spinal fusion, tumor resection, and total joint arthroplasty. Although this kind of stroke rarely happens, it may cause severe consequences and high mortality rates. Typical clinical symptoms of hemorrhagic stroke after spine and joint surgeries include headache, vomiting, consciousness disturbance, and mental disorders. It can happen several hours after surgeries. Most bleeding sites are located in cerebellar hemisphere and temporal lobe. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage caused by surgeries may be the key to intracranial hemorrhages happening. Early diagnosis and treatments are very important for patients to prevent the further progression of intracranial hemorrhages. Several patients need a hematoma evacuation and their prognosis is not optimistic.

  6. Characteristics of Hemorrhagic Stroke following Spine and Joint Surgeries

    Fei Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic stroke can occur after spine and joint surgeries such as laminectomy, lumbar spinal fusion, tumor resection, and total joint arthroplasty. Although this kind of stroke rarely happens, it may cause severe consequences and high mortality rates. Typical clinical symptoms of hemorrhagic stroke after spine and joint surgeries include headache, vomiting, consciousness disturbance, and mental disorders. It can happen several hours after surgeries. Most bleeding sites are located in cerebellar hemisphere and temporal lobe. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage caused by surgeries may be the key to intracranial hemorrhages happening. Early diagnosis and treatments are very important for patients to prevent the further progression of intracranial hemorrhages. Several patients need a hematoma evacuation and their prognosis is not optimistic.

  7. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm

    Kim, Pyo Nyun; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Byoung Ho; Kim, Ki Jung

    1990-01-01

    CT scans were analysed retrospectively in 130 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm to evaluate the relationship of the locations of aneurysms and the patterns of hemorrhage. Hemorrhage corresponded to the site of aneurysmal origin in a general way and in more specific ways to anterior communicating and middle cerebral artery aneurysms when there was parenchymal or cisternal hemorrhage. In anterior communicating artery aneurysm, SAH in the interhemispheric fissure, both sylvian fissures, and basal cistern was usually noted and intracerebral hemorrhage in anteroinferior frontal lobe was sometimes associated. In cases of middle cerebral artery aneurysm, hemorrhage in the ipsilateral sylvian fissure, interhemispheric fissure, and ipsilateral basal cistern was usual. Intracerebral hemorrhage in lateral temporal lobe was sometimes associated. Posterior communicating artery aneurysm demonstrated SAH in the ipsilateral basal cistern or in entire cisternal spaces specifically, so with higher incidence of involvement of the quadrigeminal and superior cerebellar cistern than anterior cerebral or middle cerebral artery aneurysm. We suggest the locations of aneurysm might be predicted with patterns of SAH and / or associated intracerebral hemorrhage with CT

  8. Cerebellar Herniation after Lumbar Puncture in Galactosemic Newborn

    Salih Kalay

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral edema resulting in elevated intracranial pressure is a well-known complication of galactosemia. Lumbar puncture was performed for the diagnosis of clinically suspected bacterial meningitis. Herniation of cerebral tissue through the foramen magnum is not a common problem in neonatal intensive care units because of the open fontanelle in infants. We present the case of a 3-week-old infant with galactosemia who presented with signs of cerebellar herniation after lumbar puncture.

  9. Superior cerebellar aneurysm causing subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 17-year-old with alagille syndrome.

    O'Connell, David

    2012-04-01

    Alagille syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterised by mutation in Jagged1 gene. Intracranial aneurysms may be seen in this condition and may present as subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe the first case of superior cerebellar aneurysm rupture causing WFNS grade 1 subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 17-year-old girl. The clinical condition and management of this rare occurrence is discussed with a review of literature.

  10. Intranasal Fentanyl Intoxication Leading to Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage.

    Ruzycki, Shannon; Yarema, Mark; Dunham, Michael; Sadrzadeh, Hossein; Tremblay, Alain

    2016-06-01

    Increasing rates of opioid abuse, particularly fentanyl, may lead to more presentations of unusual effects of opioid toxicity. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a rare complication of fentanyl overdose. A 45-year-old male presented in hypoxic respiratory failure secondary to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage requiring intubation. Comprehensive drug screening detected fentanyl without exposure to cocaine. Further history upon the patient's recovery revealed exposure to snorted fentanyl powder immediately prior to presentation. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a potential, though rare, presentation of opioid intoxication. Recognition of less common complications of opioid abuse such as diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is important in proper management of overdoses.

  11. Management of Postoperative Complications Following Splenectomy

    Qu, Yikun; Ren, Shiyan; Li, Chunmin; Qian, Songyi; Liu, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Complications of post-splenectomy, especially intra-abdominal hemorrhage can be fatal, with delayed or inadequate treatment having a high mortality rate. The objective of this study was to investigate the cause, prompt diagnosis, and outcome of the fatal complications after splenectomy with a focus on early diagnosis and management of hemorrhage after splenectomy. The medical files of patients who underwent splenectomy between January 1990 and March 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. The cause, characteristics, management, and outcome in patients with post-splenectomy hemorrhage were analyzed. Fourteen of 604 patients (1.19%) undergoing splenectomy had intraperitoneal hemorrhage: reoperation was performed in 13 patients, and 3 patients died after reoperation, giving the hospital a mortality rate of 21.43%; whereas, 590 of 604 patients (98%) had no hemorrhage following splenectomy, and the mortality rate (0.34%) in this group was significantly lower (P splenectomy, including pneumonia pancreatitis, gastric fistula, gastric flatulence, and thrombocytosis, in patients with postoperative hemorrhage were significantly higher than those without hemorrhage (P splenectomy, 14 patients with post-splenectomy hemorrhage were grouped into two groups: splenic trauma (n = 9, group I) and portal hypertension (n = 5, group II). The median interval between splenectomy and diagnosis of hemorrhage was 15.5 hours (range, 7.25–19.5 hours). No differences were found between groups I and II in terms of incidence of postoperative hemorrhage, time of hemorrhage after splenectomy, volume of hemorrhage, and mortality of hemorrhage, except transfusion. Intra-abdominal hemorrhage after splenectomy is associated with higher hospital mortality rate and complications. Early massive intraperitoneal hemorrhage is often preceded by earlier sentinel bleeding; careful clinical inquiry and ultrasonography are the mainstays of early diagnosis. PMID:23438277

  12. Ultrasound diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage in meningococcemia

    Sarnaik, A.P.; Sanfilippo, D.J.K.; Slovis, T.L.; Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit; Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI

    1988-01-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a well-described complication of the neonatal period, anticoagulant therapy, and overwhelming bacterial infection especially with N. meningitis. Until recently the diagnosis of acute AH was based predominantly on autopsy findings. Ultrasound and computed tomography examinations have been successfully used for antemortem detection of AH in neonates and anticoagulated patients. We report two patients with fulminant meningococcal infection who demonstrated bilateral adrenal hemorrhages on ultrasonography. (orig.)

  13. Cerebellar arteriovenous malformations in children

    Griffiths, P.D. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Acad. Dept. of Radiol.; Blaser, S.; Armstrong, D.; Chuang, S.; Harwood-Nash, D. [Division of Neuroradiology, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Humphreys, R.P. [Division of Neurosurgery, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    1998-05-01

    We review the presentation, imaging findings and outcome in 18 children with cerebellar arteriovenous malformations (AVM). This group is of particular interest because of the reported poor outcome despite modern imaging and neurosurgical techniques. All children had CT and 15 underwent catheter angiography at presentation. Several of the children in the latter part of the study had MRI. Of the 18 children, 17 presented with a ruptured AVM producing intracranial haemorrhage. The remaining child presented with temporal lobe epilepsy and was shown to have temporal, vermian and cerebellar hemisphere AVM. This child had other stigmata of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. Three other children had pre-existing abnormalities of possible relevance. One had a vascular malformation of the cheek and mandible, one a documented chromosomal abnormality and another a midline cleft upper lip and palate. Six of the 17 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM died within 7 days of the ictus. Vascular pathology other than an AVM was found in 10 of the 14 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM who had angiography: 4 intranidal aneurysms, 5 venous aneurysms and 2 cases of venous outflow obstruction (one child having both an aneurysm and obstruction). The severity of clinical presentation was directly related to the size of the acute haematoma, which was a reasonable predictor of outcome. (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 tabs., 23 refs.

  14. Language Impairment in Cerebellar Ataxia

    van Gaalen, Judith; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Oostveen, Judith; Knuijt, Simone; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Kremer, Berry (H. ) P. H.

    Background: Several studies have suggested that language impairment can be observed in patients with cerebellar pathology. The aim of this study was to investigate language performance in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Methods: We assessed speech and language in 29 SCA6 patients

  15. Cerebellar arteriovenous malformations in children

    Griffiths, P.D.; Humphreys, R.P.

    1998-01-01

    We review the presentation, imaging findings and outcome in 18 children with cerebellar arteriovenous malformations (AVM). This group is of particular interest because of the reported poor outcome despite modern imaging and neurosurgical techniques. All children had CT and 15 underwent catheter angiography at presentation. Several of the children in the latter part of the study had MRI. Of the 18 children, 17 presented with a ruptured AVM producing intracranial haemorrhage. The remaining child presented with temporal lobe epilepsy and was shown to have temporal, vermian and cerebellar hemisphere AVM. This child had other stigmata of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. Three other children had pre-existing abnormalities of possible relevance. One had a vascular malformation of the cheek and mandible, one a documented chromosomal abnormality and another a midline cleft upper lip and palate. Six of the 17 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM died within 7 days of the ictus. Vascular pathology other than an AVM was found in 10 of the 14 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM who had angiography: 4 intranidal aneurysms, 5 venous aneurysms and 2 cases of venous outflow obstruction (one child having both an aneurysm and obstruction). The severity of clinical presentation was directly related to the size of the acute haematoma, which was a reasonable predictor of outcome. (orig.)

  16. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  17. Aneurisma da artéria cerebelar ântero-inferior: relato de caso Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report

    Juan Oscar Alarcón Adorno

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Os aneurismas intracranianos do sistema vértebro-basilar representam cerca de 5 a 10% de todos os aneurismas cerebrais. Os aneurismas da artéria cerebelar ântero-inferior (AICA são considerados raros, podendo causar síndrome do ângulo ponto cerebelar, com ou sem hemorragia subaracnóidea. Desde 1948, foram descritos poucos casos na literatura. Apresentamos o caso de uma paciente, de 33 anos, na qual, após investigação de quadro de hemorragia subaracnóidea, diagnosticou-se aneurisma sacular da AICA esquerda. Foi submetida a clipagem do aneurisma, com ótimo resultado pós operatório.The intracranial aneurysms of the posterior circulation have been reported between 5 and 10% of all cerebral aneurysms and the aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA are considered rare, can cause cerebello pontine angle (CPA syndrome with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Since 1948 few cases were described in the literature. We report on a 33 year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to sacular aneurysm of the left AICA. She was submitted to clipage of the aneurysm without complications.

  18. Embolization for gastrointestinal hemorrhages

    Kraemer, S.C.; Goerich, J.; Rilinger, N.; Aschoff, A.J.; Vogel, J.; Brambs, H.J.; Siech, M.

    2000-01-01

    Retrospective evaluation of interventional embolization therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage over a long-term observation period from 1989 to 1997. Included in the study were 35 patients (age range 18-89 years) with gastrointestinal bleeding (GI) referred for radiological intervention either primarily or following unsuccessful endoscopy or surgery. Sources of GI bleeding included gastric and duodenal ulcers (n = 7), diverticula (n = 3), erosion of the intestinal wall secondary to malignancy (n = 6), vascular malformations (n = 4), and hemorrhoids (n = 2), as well as from postoperative (n = 6), posttraumatic (n = 2), postinflammatory (n = 4) or unknown (n = 1) causes. Ethibloc (12 cases) or metal coils (14 cases) were predominantly used as embolisates. In addition, combinations of tissue adhesive and gelfoam particles and of coils and Ethibloc were used (six cases). Finally, polyvinyl alcohol particles, a coated stent, and an arterial wire dissection were utilized in one case each. Bleeding was stopped completely in 29 of 35 cases (83 %). In one case (3 %) the source of bleeding was recognized but the corresponding vessel could not be catheterized. In five other cases (14 %) there was partial success with reduced, though still persistent, bleeding. The rate of complications was 14 %, including four instances of intestinal ischemia with fatal outcome in the first years, and, later, one partial infarction of the spleen without serious consequences. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage can be controlled in a high percentage of patients, including the seriously ill and those who had previously undergone surgery, with the use of minimally invasive interventional techniques. The availability of minicoils instead of fluid embolization agents has reduced the risk of serious complications. (orig.)

  19. Embolization for gastrointestinal hemorrhages

    Kraemer, S.C.; Goerich, J.; Rilinger, N.; Aschoff, A.J.; Vogel, J.; Brambs, H.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Ulm (Germany); Siech, M. [Dept. of Abdominal Surgery, University of Ulm (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    Retrospective evaluation of interventional embolization therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage over a long-term observation period from 1989 to 1997. Included in the study were 35 patients (age range 18-89 years) with gastrointestinal bleeding (GI) referred for radiological intervention either primarily or following unsuccessful endoscopy or surgery. Sources of GI bleeding included gastric and duodenal ulcers (n = 7), diverticula (n = 3), erosion of the intestinal wall secondary to malignancy (n = 6), vascular malformations (n = 4), and hemorrhoids (n = 2), as well as from postoperative (n = 6), posttraumatic (n = 2), postinflammatory (n = 4) or unknown (n = 1) causes. Ethibloc (12 cases) or metal coils (14 cases) were predominantly used as embolisates. In addition, combinations of tissue adhesive and gelfoam particles and of coils and Ethibloc were used (six cases). Finally, polyvinyl alcohol particles, a coated stent, and an arterial wire dissection were utilized in one case each. Bleeding was stopped completely in 29 of 35 cases (83 %). In one case (3 %) the source of bleeding was recognized but the corresponding vessel could not be catheterized. In five other cases (14 %) there was partial success with reduced, though still persistent, bleeding. The rate of complications was 14 %, including four instances of intestinal ischemia with fatal outcome in the first years, and, later, one partial infarction of the spleen without serious consequences. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage can be controlled in a high percentage of patients, including the seriously ill and those who had previously undergone surgery, with the use of minimally invasive interventional techniques. The availability of minicoils instead of fluid embolization agents has reduced the risk of serious complications. (orig.)

  20. Incidence of Intraventricular Hemorrhage and Post Hemorrhagic Hydrocephalus in Preterm Infants

    Negar Sajjadian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "nGerminal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH is the most common variety of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage and is characteristics of the premature infant. The importance of the lesion relates not only to its high incidence but to their attendant complications (IC: hydrocephalus. Brain sonography is the procedure of choice in diagnosis of germinal matrix- intraventricular hemorrhage and hydrocephalus. In this study we have used brain sonography for detection of intraventricular hemorrhage and post hemorrhagic hydrocephalus and their incidences. The studied population was consisted of premature neonate (birth weight equal or less than 1500g and gestational age equal or less than 37 weeks who admitted in Mofid Hospital NICU (Tehran, Iran during a one year period. For all neonate (including criteria brain sonography in first week of life was done and in presence of IVH, serial Brain sonography was done weekly for detection of hydrocephalus. A total of 57 neonate entered the study. Intraventicular-germinal matrix hemorrhage was seen in 64.4% (35 patients. Forty percent of patients with intraventricular-germinal matrix hemorrhage had grade I, 11% grade II, 25.7% grade III, 2.8% grade VI. Hydrocephalus was detected in 20 percent of patients who had intraventricular-germinal matrix hemorrhage. That incidence of IVH in our study in comparison with other area and situation is higher. Hydrocephaly had direct relation with severity of IVH. This shows that with control of risk factor of IVH, we can control Post hemorrhagic hydrocephalus.

  1. Visuomotor learning in cerebellar patients.

    Timmann, D; Shimansky, Y; Larson, P S; Wunderlich, D A; Stelmach, G E; Bloedel, J R

    1996-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to demonstrate that patients with pathology affecting substantial regions of the cerebellum can improve their performance in a series of two-dimensional tracing tasks, thus supporting the view that this type of motor behavior can be acquired even when the integrity of this structure is compromised. Eight patients with chronic, isolated cerebellar lesions and eight age- and sex-matched healthy controls were tested. Three patients had mild, five had moderate upper limb ataxia. The experiment was divided into two parts. In the first, subjects traced an irregularly shaped outline over 20 consecutive trials ('Trace 1' task). Next, subjects were asked to redraw the object without any underlying template as a guide ('Memory 1' task). In the second part of the study, subjects were asked to trace a different, irregularly shaped outline over 20 consecutive trials ('Trace 2' task). Next, they were required to redraw it by memory with its axis rotated 90 degrees ('Memory 2' task). In each of the memory tasks the template was placed over the drawn image after each trial and shown to the subjects. The error of performance was determined by calculating three different measurements, each focused on different aspects of the task. Based on these measurements, the cerebellar patients showed improvement in both memory tasks. In the 'Memory 1' task the calculated error decreased significantly for the patients with mild ataxia. In the 'Memory 2' task all cerebellar patients improved their performance substantially enough to reduce significantly the magnitude of all three error measurements. The experiments demonstrate that patients with cerebellar lesions are capable of improving substantially their performance of a complex motor task involving the recall of memorized shapes and the visuomotor control of a tracing movement.

  2. Intracerebral hemorrhage (image)

    Intracerebral hemorrhage may be caused by trauma (brain injury) or abnormalities of the blood vessels (aneurysm or angioma), but it is most commonly associated with high blood pressure (hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage).

  3. Cerebellar ataxia of early onset

    Yamashita, Sumimasa; Miyake, Shota; Yamada, Michiko; Iwamoto, Hiroko; Yamada, Kazuhiko.

    1989-01-01

    Eight cases of childhood cerebellar ataxia were reported. All these cases showed chronic cerebellar ataxia with early onset, and the other diseases of cerebellum such as infections, neoplasms and storage diseases were excluded by clinical symptoms and laboratory findings including blood counts, blood chemistry, lactate, pyruvate, ceruloplasmine, urinalysis, serum immunoglobulins, amino acid analysis in blood and urine, CSF analysis, leukocyte lysosomal enzymes, MCV, EMG, EEG and brain X-CT. Two pairs of siblings were included in this study. The clinical diagnosis were cerebellar type (5), spinocerebellar type (1), one Marinesco-Sjoegren syndrome and undetermined type (1). The age of onset was 1 to 5 years. The chief complaint was motor developmental delay in 6 cases; among them 5 patients could walk alone at the ages of 2 to 3 years'. Mental retardation was observed in 7 cases and epilepsy in 2. TRH was effective in 5 cases. The MRI study revealed that the area of medial sagittal slice of the cerebellum was reduced significantly in all cases and also that of pons was reduced in 5 cases. Different from typical adult onset spinocerebellar degenerations, most of the present cases have achieved slow developmental milestones and the clinical course was not progressive. Genetic factors are suspected in the pathogenesis of this disease in some cases. (author)

  4. CT in pontine hemorrhage

    Iwasaki, Yasuo; Kinoshita, Masao; Ikeda, Ken; Sasaki, Atsushi.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical and CT findings in 10 patients with primary pontine hemorrhage were reviewed. All patients were hypertensive. Pontine hemorrhage can be divided into 3 groups from the viewpoint of location of hematomas. These are the tegmentobasilar type, tegmental type and basilar type. The tegmentobasilar type produces characteristic clinical features for pontine hemorrhage and poor prognosis, otherwise, another two types produce atypical clinical features for pontine hemorrhage and good prognosis. (author)

  5. Cerebellar mutism--report of four cases.

    Ozimek, A; Richter, S; Hein-Kropp, C; Schoch, B; Gorissen, B; Kaiser, O; Gizewski, E; Ziegler, W; Timmann, D

    2004-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the manifestations of mutism after surgery in children with cerebellar tumors. Speech impairment following cerebellar mutism in children was investigated based on standardized acoustic speech parameters and perceptual criteria. Mutistic and non-mutistic children after cerebellar surgery as well as orthopedic controls were tested pre-and postoperatively. Speech impairment was compared with the localization of cerebellar lesions (i. e. affected lobules and nuclei). Whereas both control groups showed no abnormalities in speech and behavior, the mutistic group could be divided into children with dysarthria in post mutistic phase and children with mainly behavioral disturbances. In the mutistic children involvement of dentate and fastigial nuclei tended to be more frequent and extended than in the nonmutistic cerebellar children. Cerebellar mutism is a complex phenomenon of at least two types. Dysarthric symptoms during resolution of mutism support the anarthria hypothesis, while mainly behavioral changes suggest an explanation independent from speech motor control.

  6. Impaired fibrinolysis in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    Gorp, E. van; Setiati, T.E.; Mairuhu, A.T.; Suharti, C.; Cate, H.H.; Dolmans, W.M.V.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Hack, C.E.; Brandjes, D.P.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms contributing to bleeding complications in dengue hemorrhagic fever were studied by investigating the pattern of activation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems in 50 children with severe dengue hemorrhagic fever. Thirteen patients (26%) died, and activation of coagulation was

  7. Impaired fibrinolysis in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever

    van Gorp, Eric C. M.; Setiati, Tatty E.; Mairuhu, Albert T. A.; Suharti, Catharina; Cate Ht, Hugo ten; Dolmans, Wil M. V.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Hack, C. Erik; Brandjes, Dees P. M.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms contributing to bleeding complications in dengue hemorrhagic fever were studied by investigating the pattern of activation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems in 50 children with severe dengue hemorrhagic fever. Thirteen patients (26%) died, and activation of coagulation was

  8. Hemorrhagic Retinopathy after Spondylosis Surgery and Seizure.

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Francis, Andrew W; Setlur, Vikram; Chang, Peter; Mieler, William F; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-08-01

    To report bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy in an adult female subject after lumbar spinal surgery and seizure. A 38-year-old woman presented with bilateral blurry vision and spots in the visual field. The patient had lumbar spondylosis surgery that was complicated by a dural tear with persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak. Visual symptoms started immediately after witnessed seizure-like activity. At presentation, visual acuity was 20/100 and 20/25 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination demonstrated bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy with subhyaloid, intraretinal, and subretinal involvement. At 4-month follow-up, visual acuity improved to 20/60 and 20/20 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination and fundus photography showed resolution of retinal hemorrhages in both eyes. The first case of bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy after lumbar spondylosis surgery and witnessed seizure in an adult was reported. Ophthalmic examination may be warranted after episodes of seizure in adults.

  9. Potentialities of embolization of life threatening hemorrhages

    Moskvichev, V.G.

    1985-01-01

    The author analysed experience in the embolization of the abdominal vessels in 79 patients with diseases and lesions of the peritoneal cavity and retroperitoneal space accompanied by life threatening hemorrhage. In 51 cases embolization was used as an independent method of hemorrhage arrest and in 28 cases for patients' preoperative preparation. A hemostatic sponge combined with a superselective administration of 150-200 ml of aminocaproic acid was used as an emboilizing material. Complications attributed to embolization were noted in 5 patients: pancreatitis, subdiaphragmatic abscess, paranephritis, ischemia of the gluteal soft tissues, sciatic neuritis. An analysis has shown that urgent embolization of the abdominal vessels in diseases and lesions of the organs of the peritoneal cavity and retroperitoneal space accompanied by massive hemorrhage, can be used as an independent method for hemorrhage arrest

  10. Massive cerebellar infarction: a neurosurgical approach

    Salazar Luis Rafael Moscote

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar infarction is a challenge for the neurosurgeon. The rapid recognition will crucial to avoid devastating consequences. The massive cerebellar infarction has pseudotumoral behavior, should affect at least one third of the volume of the cerebellum. The irrigation of the cerebellum presents anatomical diversity, favoring the appearance of atypical infarcts. The neurosurgical management is critical for massive cerebellar infarction. We present a review of the literature.

  11. Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Computed Tomographic Characteristics and Outcome

    Aimara de la Caridad Vergara Santos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: strokes are the third leading cause of death among adults and 10-15 % of them are due to spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Objective: to characterize spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage through computed tomography scan and its outcome. Methods: a case series study was conducted comprising patients diagnosed with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage admitted to the Arnaldo Milián Castro Provincial University Hospital in Villa Clara from January 2009 to January 2010. Tomographic variables of interest were derived from evaluation of spontaneous intracerebral hematomas. Results: fifty-nine cases of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage were studied, 23 were located in lobar regions, 4 had severe midline shift, and 2 showed volume greater than 80 ml. Eight out of eleven with extension into the ventricular system had an unfavorable outcome. Among those with thalamic hemorrhage, patients with diameter larger than 4cm and extension into the ventricular system died. Patients with putaminal hemorrhage larger than 4 cm and posterior fossa hematoma with hydrocephalus had a poor outcome, as well as most individuals (55 with other mass effects. Most lobar hematomas (14 out of 23 had a satisfactory outcome, unlike cerebellar and brainstem hematomas. Conclusions: tomographic variables that had a negative impact on the outcome were: volume greater than 80 ml, severe midline shift, diameter larger than 4 cm, extension into the ventricular system, hydrocephalus, other signs of mass effect and brainstem location.

  12. Dysphonia and vocal fold telangiectasia in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Chang, Joseph; Yung, Katherine C

    2014-11-01

    This case report is the first documentation of dysphonia and vocal fold telangiectasia as a complication of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Case report of a 40-year-old man with HHT presenting with 2 years of worsening hoarseness. Hoarseness corresponded with a period of anticoagulation. Endoscopy revealed vocal fold scarring, vocal fold telangiectasias, and plica ventricular is suggestive of previous submucosal vocal fold hemorrhage and subsequent counterproductive compensation with ventricular phonation. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia may present as dysphonia with vocal fold telangiectasias and place patients at risk of vocal fold hemorrhage. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. A postmortem correlation of computer tomography and ultrasound scans of periventricular hemorrhage in preterm infants

    Fukuda, Seiichi; Hashimoto, Takeo; Yamashita, Yushiro; Nishimi, Toshihiro; Utsunomiya, Hidetsuna; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Okudera, Toshio

    1988-01-01

    From January 1984 through September 1987, ultrasound scanning (US), computed tomography (CT), and autopy have been performed in 80 consecutive premature infants. Intracranial lesions consisted of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH, n = 61), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, n = 63), cerebellar hemorrhage (n = 5), hydrocephalus (n = 8), periventricular leukoencephalomalacia (n = 20), and anoxic encephalopathy (n = 40). Using autopsy findings as the standard, both US and CT had an accuracy of 80 % or more in detecting subependymal hemorrhage (SEH), IVH, dilated ventricle, and parenchymal hemorrhage ; however, both imaging modalities showed a high false negative for SAH (77 % for US vs 55 % for CT). Accuracy of US and CT was 82 % vs 72 % for SEH, and 72 % vs 85 % for IVH. High false positive and false negative rates, in spite of 80 % or more accuracy of imaging modalities, warrant further studies to obtain higher accuracy in the diagnosis of intracranial lesions. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Postmortem correlation of computer tomography and ultrasound scans of periventricular hemorrhage in preterm infants

    Fukuda, Seiichi; Hashimoto, Takeo; Yamashita, Yushiro; Nishimi, Toshihiro; Utsunomiya, Hidetsuna; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Okudera, Toshio

    1988-08-01

    From January 1984 through September 1987, ultrasound scanning (US), computed tomography (CT), and autopy have been performed in 80 consecutive premature infants. Intracranial lesions consisted of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH, n = 61), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, n = 63), cerebellar hemorrhage (n = 5), hydrocephalus (n = 8), periventricular leukoencephalomalacia (n = 20), and anoxic encephalopathy (n = 40). Using autopsy findings as the standard, both US and CT had an accuracy of 80 % or more in detecting subependymal hemorrhage (SEH), IVH, dilated ventricle, and parenchymal hemorrhage ; however, both imaging modalities showed a high false negative for SAH (77 % for US vs 55 % for CT). Accuracy of US and CT was 82 % vs 72 % for SEH, and 72 % vs 85 % for IVH. High false positive and false negative rates, in spite of 80 % or more accuracy of imaging modalities, warrant further studies to obtain higher accuracy in the diagnosis of intracranial lesions. (Namekawa, K.).

  15. Cerebellar atrophy in epileptic patients

    Taneva, N.

    1991-01-01

    52 patients with epileptic seizures of different form, frequency and duration who had received long term treatment with anticonvulsive drugs were examined on Siretom 2000, a brain scanner of II generation. 6 standard incisions were made in all patients in the area of cerebellum, side ventricules and high convexity. Additional scanning with an incision width of 5 mm was made when pathological changes were detected. There were found 3 cases of cerebellar atrophy, 3 - cerebral atrophy, 1 - combined atrophy and 4 - with other changes. It was difficult to establish any relation between the rerebellar atrophy and the type of anticonvulsant used because treatment had usually been complex. 1 fig., 1 tab., 4 refs

  16. Learning of Sensory Sequences in Cerebellar Patients

    Frings, Markus; Boenisch, Raoul; Gerwig, Marcus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Timmann, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    A possible role of the cerebellum in detecting and recognizing event sequences has been proposed. The present study sought to determine whether patients with cerebellar lesions are impaired in the acquisition and discrimination of sequences of sensory stimuli of different modalities. A group of 26 cerebellar patients and 26 controls matched for…

  17. Management of Agitation Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Is There a Role for Beta-Blockers?

    Ibrahim, Fayaz; Viswanathan, Ramaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States. About 20% of the stroke is hemorrhagic and about 50% of these is due to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A troublesome neuropsychiatric complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage is agitation/aggression. Case Presentation. A 45-year-old man with no prior psychiatric history, sustained subarachnoid hemorrhage. After initial stabilization for 2 days, he underwent craniotomy and clipping of anterior cerebral...

  18. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cerebellar Development

    Salvador eMartinez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function.

  19. The bihemispheric posterior inferior cerebellar artery

    Cullen, Sean P.; Ozanne, Augustin; Alvarez, Hortensia; Lasjaunias, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Rarely, a solitary posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) will supply both cerebellar hemispheres. We report four cases of this variant. We present a retrospective review of clinical information and imaging of patients undergoing angiography at our institution to identify patients with a bihemispheric PICA. There were four patients: three males and one female. One patient presented with a ruptured arteriovenous malformation, and one with a ruptured aneurysm. Two patients had normal angiograms. The bihemispheric PICA was an incidental finding in all cases. The bihemispheric vessel arose from the dominant left vertebral artery, and the contralateral posterior inferior cerebellar artery was absent or hypoplastic. In all cases, contralateral cerebellar supply arose from a continuation of the ipsilateral PICA distal to the choroidal point and which crossed the midline dorsal to the vermis. We conclude that the PICA may supply both cerebellar hemispheres. This rare anatomic variant should be considered when evaluating patients with posterior fossa neurovascular disease. (orig.)

  20. Freehand technique for putaminal hemorrhage. Technical note

    Yokosuka, Kimihiko; Uno, Masaaki; Hirano, Kazuhiro; Toi, Hiroyuki; Matsuzaki, Kazuhito; Matsubara, Shunji

    2011-01-01

    We designed a new endoscopic surgical procedure for putaminal hemorrhage (freehand technique) and evaluated its effectiveness and safety in patients with putaminal hemorrhage. Computed tomography (CT) data sets from 40 healthy patients were used. The CT data were transformed into three-dimensional images using AZE VirtualPlace Plus. The nasion and external auditory foramen were the intraoperative reference points. The median point from medial of the globus pallidus to the insula was the target point. The location of the burr hole point was 80-125 mm above and 27.5 mm lateral to the nasion, and the direction was parallel to the midline and a line drawn from the burr hole to the ipsilateral external auditory foramen. This point was used for 15 patients with putaminal hemorrhage. In all cases, only one puncture was required, and there were no complications. The median surgical time was 91.7 minutes, and the median hematoma removal rate was 95.9%. No recurrent bleeding or operative complications occurred. The freehand technique is a simple and safe technique for patients with putaminal hemorrhage. We believe that this technique of endoscopic hematoma evacuation may provide a less-invasive method for treating patients with putaminal hemorrhage. (author)

  1. Multiple hemorrhages in brain after spine surgery supra- and infra-tentorial components together

    Baran Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after cranial and spinal surgeries is a well-documented entity, so far concomitant supra- and infra-tentorial hemorrhage after spine surgery has rarely been reported in the literature. A 57-year-old woman presented with intractable low back pain and severely impaired mobility. One year ago, she underwent lumbar laminectomy and fusion with posterior spinal instrumentation between L2 and S1. She developed adjacent segment disease at the upper level of the instrumented vertebra. She had a revision surgery and underwent posterior laminectomy and fusion with bilateral transpedicular instrumentation between T10 and S1. She had severe headache, somnolence, and left hemiparesia 48 h after the surgery. Her emergent head computed tomography depicted intra-parenchymal hemorrhage in the right parietal lobe accompanying with subarachnoid hemorrhage, bilateral symmetrical cerebellar hemorrhages and pneumocephalus. She was treated nonsurgically and she got better despite some residual deficits. Symptoms including constant headache, nausea, vomiting, impaired consciousness, new onset seizure, and focal neurological deficit after spine surgeries should raise suspicion for intracranial intra-parenchymal hemorrhage.

  2. Fetomaternal hemorrhage during external cephalic version.

    Boucher, Marc; Marquette, Gerald P; Varin, Jocelyne; Champagne, Josette; Bujold, Emmanuel

    2008-07-01

    To estimate the frequency and volume of fetomaternal hemorrhage during external cephalic version for term breech singleton fetuses and to identify risk factors involved with this complication. A prospective observational study was performed including all patients undergoing a trial of external cephalic version for a breech presentation of at least 36 weeks of gestation between 1987 and 2001 in our center. A search for fetal erythrocytes using the standard Kleihauer-Betke test was obtained before and after each external cephalic version. The frequency and volume of fetomaternal hemorrhage were calculated. Putative risk factors for fetomaternal hemorrhage were evaluated by chi(2) test and Mann-Whitney U test. A Kleihauer-Betke test result was available before and after 1,311 trials of external cephalic version. The Kleihauer-Betke test was positive in 67 (5.1%) before the procedure. Of the 1,244 women with a negative Kleihauer-Betke test before external cephalic version, 30 (2.4%) had a positive Kleihauer-Betke test after the procedure. Ten (0.8%) had an estimated fetomaternal hemorrhage greater than 1 mL, and one (0.08%) had an estimated fetomaternal hemorrhage greater than 30 mL. The risk of fetomaternal hemorrhage was not influenced by parity, gestational age, body mass index, number of attempts at version, placental location, or amniotic fluid index. The risk of detectable fetomaternal hemorrhage during external cephalic version was 2.4%, with fetomaternal hemorrhage more than 30 mL in less than 0.1% of cases. These data suggest that the performance of a Kleihauer-Betke test is unwarranted in uneventful external cephalic version and that in Rh-negative women, no further Rh immune globulin is necessary other than the routine 300-microgram dose at 28 weeks of gestation and postpartum. II.

  3. Frequency and determinants for hemorrhagic transformation of posterior cerebral stroke : Posterior ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic transformation.

    Valentino, Francesca; Gentile, Luana; Terruso, Valeria; Mastrilli, Sergio; Aridon, Paolo; Ragonese, Paolo; Sarno, Caterina; Savettieri, Giovanni; D'Amelio, Marco

    2017-11-13

    hemorrhagic transformation is a threatening ischemic stroke complication. Frequency of hemorrhagic transformation differs greatly among studies, and its risk factors have been usually studied in patients with anterior ischemic stroke who received thrombolytic therapy. We evaluated, in a hospital-based series of patients with posterior ischemic stroke not treated with thrombolysis, frequency and risk factors of hemorrhagic transformation. Patients with posterior circulation stroke were seen in our Department during the period January 2004 to December 2009. Demographic and clinical information were collected. We estimated risk for spontaneous hemorrhagic transformation by means of uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses. 119 consecutive patients were included (73 males, 61.3%). Hemorrhagic transformation was observed in 7 patients (5.9%). Only clinical worsening was significantly associated with hemorrhagic transformation (OR 6.8, 95% CI 1.3-34.5). Our findings indicate that patients with posterior have a low risk of spontaneous hemorrhagic transformation, suggesting that these patients might have greater advantage from intravenous thrombolysis.

  4. Evaluation of Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Pediatric Intracerebral hemorrhage

    Kleinman, Jonathan T; Beslow, Lauren A; Engelmann, Kyle; Smith, Sabrina E; Licht, Daniel J; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies of pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage have investigated isolated intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We investigated whether detailed assessment of intraventricular hemorrhage enhanced outcome prediction after intracerebral hemorrhage. We prospectively enrolled 46 children, full-term to 17 years, median age 2.7 years with spontaneous intraparenchymal hemorrhage and/or intraventricular hemorrhage. Outcome was assessed with the King’s Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury. Twenty-si...

  5. Rhythmic finger tapping reveals cerebellar dysfunction in essential tremor

    Buijink, A. W. G.; Broersma, M.; van der Stouwe, A. M. M.; van Wingen, G. A.; Groot, P. F. C.; Speelman, J. D.; Maurits, N. M.; van Rootselaar, A. F.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar circuits are hypothesized to play a central role in the pathogenesis of essential tremor. Rhythmic finger tapping is known to strongly engage the cerebellar motor circuitry. We characterize cerebellar and, more specifically, dentate nucleus function, and neural correlates of cerebellar

  6. Etiology, Localization and Prognosis in Cerebellar Infarctions

    Yavuz Yücel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovasculer disease are the most frequent disease of the brain. Cerebellar infarct remains % 1.5-4.2 of these diseases. Etiological factors, lesion localization, symptoms and findings and relationship with prognosis of our patients with cerebellar infarct were investigated in our study. For this purpose, 32 patients were evaluated who were admitted to the Dicle University Medical School Department of Neurology in 1995-2001 hospitalized with the diagnosis of clinically and radiological confirmed cerebellar infarction.All of patients in the study group, 21 (%65.6 were male and 11 (%34.3 female. Age of overall patients ranged between 40 and 75 years with a mean of 57.8±10.2 years. Atherothrombotic infarct was the most frequent reason at the etiologic clinical classification. The most frequently found localization was the posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarct (%50. The leading two risk factors were hypertension (%78.1 and cigarette smoking (%50. The most common sign and symptoms were vertigo (%93.7, vomiting (%75, headache (%68.7 and cerebellar dysfunction findings (%50. The mean duration of hospitalization was 16.3±7.6 days. Overall mortality rate was found to be % 6.2. Finally, the most remarkable risk factors at cerebellar infarct patients are hypertension and atherosclerosis at etiology. We are considering that, controlling of these factors will reduce the appearance frequency of cerebellar infarcts.

  7. Origin, lineage and function of cerebellar glia.

    Buffo, Annalisa; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2013-10-01

    The glial cells of the cerebellum, and particularly astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, are characterized by a remarkable phenotypic variety, in which highly peculiar morphological features are associated with specific functional features, unique among the glial cells of the entire CNS. Here, we provide a critical report about the present knowledge of the development of cerebellar glia, including lineage relationships between cerebellar neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, the origins and the genesis of the repertoire of glial types, and the processes underlying their acquisition of mature morphological and functional traits. In parallel, we describe and discuss some fundamental roles played by specific categories of glial cells during cerebellar development. In particular, we propose that Bergmann glia exerts a crucial scaffolding activity that, together with the organizing function of Purkinje cells, is necessary to achieve the normal pattern of foliation and layering of the cerebellar cortex. Moreover, we discuss some of the functional tasks of cerebellar astrocytes and oligodendrocytes that are distinctive of cerebellar glia throughout the CNS. Notably, we report about the regulation of synaptic signalling in the molecular and granular layer mediated by Bergmann glia and parenchymal astrocytes, and the functional interaction between oligodendrocyte precursor cells and neurons. On the whole, this review provides an extensive overview of the available literature and some novel insights about the origin and differentiation of the variety of cerebellar glial cells and their function in the developing and mature cerebellum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Memory transfer in cerebellar motor learning].

    Nagao, Soichi

    2012-01-01

    Most of our motor skills are acquired through learning. Experiments of gain adaptation of ocular reflexes have consistently suggested that the memory of adaptation is initially formed in the cerebellar cortex, and is transferred to the cerebellar (vestibular) nuclei for consolidation to long-term memory after repetitions of training. We have recently developed a new system to evaluate the motor learning in human subjects using prism adaptation of hand reaching movement, by referring to the prism adaptation of dart throwing of Martin et al. (1996). In our system, the subject views the small target presented in the touch-panel screen, and touches it with his/her finger without direct visual feedback. After 15-30 trials of touching wearing prisms, an adaptation occurs in healthy subjects: they became able to touch the target correctly. Meanwhile, such an adaptation was impaired in patients of cerebellar disease. We have proposed a model of human prism adaptation that the memory of adaptation is initially encoded in the cerebellar cortex, and is later transferred to the cerebellar nuclei after repetitions of training. The memory in the cerebellar cortex may be formed and extinguished independently of the memory maintained in the cerebellar nuclei, and these two memories work cooperatively.

  9. Complications of shoulder dystocia.

    Dajani, Nafisa K; Magann, Everett F

    2014-06-01

    Complications of shoulder dystocia are divided into fetal and maternal. Fetal brachial plexus injury (BPI) is the most common fetal complication occurring in 4-40% of cases. BPI has also been reported in abdominal deliveries and in deliveries not complicated by shoulder dystocia. Fractures of the fetal humerus and clavicle occur in about 10.6% of cases of shoulder dystocia and usually heal with no sequel. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury is reported in 0.5-23% of cases of shoulder dystocia. The risk correlates with the duration of head-to-body delivery and is especially increased when the duration is >5 min. Fetal death is rare and is reported in 0.4% of cases. Maternal complications of shoulder dystocia include post-partum hemorrhage, vaginal lacerations, anal tears, and uterine rupture. The psychological stress impact of shoulder dystocia is under-recognized and deserves counseling prior to home discharge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cerebral Cavernous Malformation and Hemorrhage

    ... Text Size: SMALL • LARGE Cerebral Cavernous Angioma and Hemorrhage By Jack Hoch; Reviewed by Dr. Issam Awad ... for years, the mechanism by which these lesions hemorrhage remains poorly understood. Hemorrhage Types Since cavernous angiomas ...

  11. Delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage : the role of coagulation and fibrinolysis

    Vergouwen, M.D.I.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are at risk to develop complications, especially within the first two weeks after the hemorrhage. Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a complication which occurs in about 30% of SAH patients, leading to symptoms such as aphasia, hemiparesis, or

  12. Computed tomography in alcoholic cerebellar atrophy

    Haubek, A; Lee, K [Hvidovre Hospital Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Radiology; Municipal Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Neurology)

    1979-01-01

    This is a controlled CT evaluation of the infratentorial region in 41 male alcoholics under age 35. Criteria for the presence of atrophy are outlined. Twelve patients had cerebellar atrophy. Vermian atrophy was present in all. Atrophy of the cerebellar hemispheres was demonstrated in eight patients as well. The results are statistically significant when compared to an age-matched group of 40 non-alcoholic males among whom two cases of vermian atrophy were found. There were clinical signs of alcoholic cerebellar atrophy in one patient only. The disparity between the clinical and the radiological data are discussed with reference to previous pneumoencephalographic findings. (orig.) 891 AJ/orig. 892 MKO.

  13. Acute Cerebellar Ataxia Induced by Nivolumab

    Kawamura, Reina; Nagata, Eiichiro; Mukai, Masako; Ohnuki, Yoichi; Matsuzaki, Tomohiko; Ohiwa, Kana; Nakagawa, Tomoki; Kohno, Mitsutomo; Masuda, Ryota; Iwazaki, Masayuki; Takizawa, Shunya

    2017-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman with adenocarcinoma of the lung and lymph node metastasis experienced nystagmus and cerebellar ataxia 2 weeks after initiating nivolumab therapy. An evaluation for several autoimmune-related antibodies and paraneoplastic syndrome yielded negative results. We eventually diagnosed the patient with nivolumab-induced acute cerebellar ataxia, after excluding other potential conditions. Her ataxic gait and nystagmus resolved shortly after intravenous steroid pulse therapy followed by the administration of decreasing doses of oral steroids. Nivolumab, an immune checkpoint inhibitor, is known to induce various neurological adverse events. However, this is the first report of acute cerebellar ataxia associated with nivolumab treatment. PMID:29249765

  14. Treating viral hemorrhagic fever.

    Mairuhu, A.T.; Brandjes, D.P.; Gorp, E. van

    2003-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are illnesses associated with a number of geographically restricted, mostly tropical areas. Over recent decades a number of new hemorrhagic fever viruses have emerged. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of these diseases have improved our initial supportive

  15. Hemorrhagic prepatellar bursitis

    Donahue, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Turkel, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Mnaymneh, W. [Dept. of Orthopedics, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Ghandur-Mnaymneh, L. [Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Simple prepatellar bursitis is easily diagnosed both clinically and by MRI. MRI shows the typical T1 and T2 lengthening of fluid within the bursa. However, because of complex MRI appearance of hemorrhage, chronic hemorrhagic bursitis and the size of the prepatellar mass the clinical and MRI appearance can be very different. (orig.)

  16. Degenerative cerebellar diseases and differential diagnoses

    Reith, W.; Roumia, S.; Dietrich, P.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar syndromes result in distinct clinical symptoms, such as ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria, intention tremor and eye movement disorders. In addition to the medical history and clinical examination, imaging is particularly important to differentiate other diseases, such as hydrocephalus and multi-infarct dementia from degenerative cerebellar diseases. Degenerative diseases with cerebellar involvement include Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy as well as other diseases including spinocerebellar ataxia. In addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging investigations are also helpful for the differentiation. Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted sequences can sometimes show a signal increase in the pons as a sign of degeneration of pontine neurons and transverse fibers in the basilar part of the pons. The imaging is particularly necessary to exclude other diseases, such as normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), multi-infarct dementia and cerebellar lesions. (orig.) [de

  17. [Degenerative cerebellar diseases and differential diagnoses].

    Reith, W; Roumia, S; Dietrich, P

    2016-11-01

    Cerebellar syndromes result in distinct clinical symptoms, such as ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria, intention tremor and eye movement disorders. In addition to the medical history and clinical examination, imaging is particularly important to differentiate other diseases, such as hydrocephalus and multi-infarct dementia from degenerative cerebellar diseases. Degenerative diseases with cerebellar involvement include Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy as well as other diseases including spinocerebellar ataxia. In addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging investigations are also helpful for the differentiation. Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted sequences can sometimes show a signal increase in the pons as a sign of degeneration of pontine neurons and transverse fibers in the basilar part of the pons. The imaging is particularly necessary to exclude other diseases, such as normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), multi-infarct dementia and cerebellar lesions.

  18. Neuroprotective effects of thymoquinone against cerebellar ...

    cerebellum mainly functions to coordinate motor functions and control ... development of the brain and life-long cognitive function [2]. ... and serial equidistant sections of the right cerebellar ... Cells outside of the left vertical and bottom bars ...

  19. Non-neoplastic gliotic cerebellar cysts

    Weisberg, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical and CT findings in 3 patients with non-neoplastic gliotic cerebellar cyst are described. CT does not permit accurate preoperative differentiation of these lesions from neoplastic disorders. (orig.)

  20. Cerebellar leukoencephalopathy: most likely histiocytosis-related

    van der Knaap, M.S.; Arts, W.F.M.; Garbern, J.Y.; Hedlund, G.; Winkler, F.; Barbosa, C.; King, M.D.; Bjornstad, A.; Hussain, N.; Beyer, M.K.; Gomez, C.; Patterson, M.C.; Grattan-Smith, P.; Timmons, M.; van der Valk, P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Histiocytosis, both Langerhans and non-Langerhans cell type, can be associated with cerebellar white matter abnormalities, thought to be paraneoplastic. The associated clinical picture consists of ataxia, spasticity, and cognitive decline. Hormonal dysfunction is frequent. MRI shows

  1. Cerebellar medulloblastoma presenting with skeletal metastasis

    Barai Sukanta

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastomas are highly malignant brain tumours, but only rarely produce skeletal metastases. No case of medulloblastoma has been documented to have produced skeletal metastases prior to craniotomy or shunt surgery. A 21-year-old male presented with pain in the hip and lower back with difficulty in walking of 3 months′ duration. Signs of cerebellar dysfunction were present hence a diagnosis of cerebellar neoplasm or skeletal tuberculosis with cerebellar abscess formation was considered. MRI of brain revealed a lesion in the cerebellum suggestive of medulloblastoma. Bone scan revealed multiple sites of skeletal metastases excluding the lumbar vertebrae. MRI of lumbar spine and hip revealed metastases to all lumbar vertebrae and both hips. Computed tomography-guided biopsy was obtained from the L3 vertebra, which revealed metastatic deposits from medulloblastoma. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology showed the presence of medulloblastoma cells. A final diagnosis of cerebellar medulloblastoma with skeletal metastases was made. He underwent craniotomy and histopathology confirmed medulloblastoma.

  2. Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration

    ... and conducts a broad range of basic and clinical research on cerebellar and spinocerebellar degeneration, including work aimed at finding the cause(s) of ataxias and ways to ... Publications Definition Ataxia ...

  3. Bilateral putaminal hemorrhage related to methanol poisoning: a complication of hemodialysis? Case report Hemorragia putaminal bilateral em intoxicação por metanol: uma complicação de hemodiálise? Relato de caso

    Miguel Giudicissi Filho

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available A case of acute methanol intoxication is presented, in which bilateral putaminal hemorrhage developed after hemodialysis. Even though the patient was initially comatose and profoundly acidotic, favorable outcome was achieved, with long-term neurologic impairments essentially restricted to mild crural paraparesis, retrograde amnesia, and marked visual deficit. A comparative literature review is evaluated.Um caso de intoxicação aguda por metanol é relatado, no qual o paciente desenvolveu hemorragia putaminal bilateral após hemodiálise. Muito embora o paciente se encontrasse inicialmente comatoso e profundamente acidótico, a recuperação foi favorável, com comprometimento neurológico a longo prazo essencialmente restrito a paraparesia crural discreta, amnésia retrógrada e déficit visual acentuado. Uma revisão comparativa da literatura é avaliada.

  4. Acute Cerebellar Ataxia Induced by Nivolumab

    Kawamura, Reina; Nagata, Eiichiro; Mukai, Masako; Ohnuki, Yoichi; Matsuzaki, Tomohiko; Ohiwa, Kana; Nakagawa, Tomoki; Kohno, Mitsutomo; Masuda, Ryota; Iwazaki, Masayuki; Takizawa, Shunya

    2017-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman with adenocarcinoma of the lung and lymph node metastasis experienced nystagmus and cerebellar ataxia 2 weeks after initiating nivolumab therapy. An evaluation for several autoimmune-related antibodies and paraneoplastic syndrome yielded negative results. We eventually diagnosed the patient with nivolumab-induced acute cerebellar ataxia, after excluding other potential conditions. Her ataxic gait and nystagmus resolved shortly after intravenous steroid pulse therapy follow...

  5. Hemorrhagic Transformation of Scrub Typhus Encephalitis: A Rare Entity.

    Kim, H-C; Yoon, K-W; Yoo, D-S; Cho, C-S

    2015-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement of scrub typhus infection is well known. Most CNS involvement of scrub typhus infection present as meningitis or encephalitis. We report on a patient suffering from hemorrhagic transformation of intracranial lesions caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. A 53-year-old female farmer who was infected by scrub typhus was treated with doxycycline and recovered from the systemic illness. However, headache persisted. Brain radiologic studies revealed acute intracranial hemorrhage and enhancing lesion, which implied a CNS involvement. Hemorrhagic transformation of encephalitis by scrub typhus is very rare complication and to our best knowledge, this is the first report of hemorrhagic transformation of scrub typhus encephalitis. Clinician should consider the possibility of hemorrhagic transformation of encephalitis in cases of scrub typhus infection.

  6. Intracranial Hemorrhage Revealing Pseudohypoparathyroidism as a Cause of Fahr Syndrome

    Abhijit Swami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudohypoparathyroidism is an infrequently encountered disease. It is one of the causes of Fahr syndrome which also is a rare clinical entity caused by multiple diseases. A 4-year-old man hospitalized for sudden onset left hemiparesis and hypertension was diagnosed to have right thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage on plain CT scan of the head which also revealed co-existent extensive intracranial calcifications involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum bilaterally. General physical examination revealed features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy, goitre, hypertension, left hemiparesis, and signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Laboratory findings suggested hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia along with high TSH, low FT4, low FT3, and high anti-TPO antibody. Though bilateral intracranial calcifications are usually encountered as an incidental radiological finding in the CT scan of brain, in this case, the patient admitted for thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage was on investigation for associated intracranial calcification, and goitre was also found to have coexisting pseudohypoparathyroidism and autoimmune hypothyroidism.

  7. [Selective embolization to treat obstetric hemorrhage].

    Ferrer Puchol, M D; Lanciego, C; Esteban, E; Ciampi, J J; Edo, M A; Ferragud, S

    2014-01-01

    To describe cases of obstetric hemorrhage that have called for selective intra-arterial embolization and the different embolization techniques used. To assess the clinical outcomes and postprocedural fertility. We studied 27 women with obstetric hemorrhage. In 24 patients, embolization was performed by catheterizing both uterine arteries and in 2 patients only one uterine artery was catheterized (pseudoaneurysm). The materials used for embolization consisted of Spongostan in 17/27, particles in 9/27, and coils in 1/27. Clinical follow-up included an analysis of early and late complications and of postprocedural fertility. Hemorrhage was classified as primary (25/27) or secondary (2/27). The cause of bleeding was vaginal delivery (20), cesarean sections (5), abortion (1), and cervical ectopic pregnancy (1). The initial technical success rate was 100% and the clinical success rate was 92.6% (25 of the 27 patients). Bleeding ceased and the outcome was satisfactory in 25 patients. During clinical follow-up ranging from one to seven years, 23 patients had normal menstruation and 6 patients completed 7 full-term pregnancies. Intra-arterial embolization for obstetric hemorrhage leads to good outcomes and few complications and it preserves fertility. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Pediatric Intracerebral hemorrhage

    Kleinman, Jonathan T; Beslow, Lauren A; Engelmann, Kyle; Smith, Sabrina E; Licht, Daniel J; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage have investigated isolated intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We investigated whether detailed assessment of intraventricular hemorrhage enhanced outcome prediction after intracerebral hemorrhage. We prospectively enrolled 46 children, full-term to 17 years, median age 2.7 years with spontaneous intraparenchymal hemorrhage and/or intraventricular hemorrhage. Outcome was assessed with the King’s Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury. Twenty-six (57%) had intraparenchymal hemorrhage, 10 (22%) had pure intraventricular hemorrhage, and 10 (22%) had both. There were 2 deaths, both with intraparenchymal hemorrhage + intraventricular hemorrhage volume ≥4% of total brain volume. Presence of intraventricular hemorrhage was not associated with poor outcome, but hydrocephalus showed a trend (p=0.09) toward poor outcome. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, combined intraparenchymal hemorrhage + intraventricular hemorrhage volume also showed a trend toward better outcome prediction than intraparenchymal hemorrhage volume alone. Although not an independent outcome predictor, future studies should assess intraventricular hemorrhage qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:22068828

  9. Changes in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuit in type 2 diabetes.

    Fang, Peng; An, Jie; Tan, Xin; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Qiu, Shijun; Hu, Dewen

    2017-04-01

    Currently, 422 million adults suffer from diabetes worldwide, leading to tremendous disabilities and a great burden to families and society. Functional and structural MRIs have demonstrated that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) exhibit abnormalities in brain regions in the cerebral cortex. However, the changes of cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients remains unclear. In the current study, diffusion tensor imaging deterministic tractography and statistical analysis were employed to investigate abnormal cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients. This is the first study to investigate the altered cerebellar anatomical connectivity in T2DM patients. Decreased anatomical connections were found in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuits of T2DM patients, providing valuable new insights into the potential neuro-pathophysiology of diabetes-related motor and cognitive deficits. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Bilateral Cerebellar Cortical Dysplasia without Other Malformations: A Case Report

    Oh, Jung Seok; Ahn Kook Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Lee, Sun Jin; Park, Jeong Mi [Catholic University Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Recent advances in MRI have revealed congenital brain malformations and subtle developmental abnormalities of the cerebral and cerebellar cortical architecture. Typical cerebellar cortical dysplasia as a newly categorized cerebellar malformation, has been seen in patients with Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy. Cerebellar cortical dysplasia occurs at the embryonic stage and is often observed in healthy newborns. It is also incidentally and initially detected in adults without symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, cerebellar dysplasia without any related disorders is very rare. We describe the MRI findings in one patient with disorganized foliation of both cerebellar hemispheres without a related disorder or syndrome

  11. Heat stress presenting with encephalopathy and MRI findings of diffuse cerebral injury and hemorrhage.

    Guerrero, Waldo R; Varghese, Shaun; Savitz, Sean; Wu, Tzu Ching

    2013-06-17

    Heat stress results in multiorgan failure and CNS injury. There a few case reports in the literature on the neurological consequences of heat stress. We describe a patient with heat stress presenting with encephalopathy and bilateral cerebral, cerebellar, and thalamic lesions and intraventricular hemorrhage on MRI. Heat stress should be in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with encephalopathy and elevated serum inflammatory markers especially if the history suggests a preceding episode of hyperthermia.

  12. Mortality after hemorrhagic stroke

    González-Pérez, Antonio; Gaist, David; Wallander, Mari-Ann

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate short-term case fatality and long-term mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) using data from The Health Improvement Network database. METHODS: Thirty-day case fatality was stratified by age, sex, and calendar year after ICH...... = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: More than one-third of individuals die in the first month after hemorrhagic stroke, and patients younger than 50 years are more likely to die after ICH than SAH. Short-term case fatality has decreased over time. Patients who survive hemorrhagic stroke have a continuing elevated......, 54.6% for 80-89 years; SAH: 20.3% for 20-49 years, 56.7% for 80-89 years; both p-trend stroke patients...

  13. Interventional radiological treatment in complications of pancreatitis

    Memis, Ahmet E-mail: ahmemis@yahoo.com; Parildar, Mustafa

    2002-09-01

    Percutaneous interventional therapy plays an important role in treating complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis. With the development of cross-sectional imaging and advanced interventional techniques, percutaneous drainage has become the preferred treatment for pancreatic fluid collections such as acute collections, pseudocysts and abscesses. Abscess and pancreatic hemorrhage are the most life threatening complications of pancreatitis. Massive hemorrhage is rare but frequently lethal. As a rule, bleeding complications of pancreatitis require prompt diagnosis and an aggressive surgical approach. In unstable patients with a severely bleeding pseudoaneurysm, hemostasis can be obtained by occlusion with mechanical devices.

  14. Interventional radiological treatment in complications of pancreatitis

    Memis, Ahmet; Parildar, Mustafa

    2002-01-01

    Percutaneous interventional therapy plays an important role in treating complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis. With the development of cross-sectional imaging and advanced interventional techniques, percutaneous drainage has become the preferred treatment for pancreatic fluid collections such as acute collections, pseudocysts and abscesses. Abscess and pancreatic hemorrhage are the most life threatening complications of pancreatitis. Massive hemorrhage is rare but frequently lethal. As a rule, bleeding complications of pancreatitis require prompt diagnosis and an aggressive surgical approach. In unstable patients with a severely bleeding pseudoaneurysm, hemostasis can be obtained by occlusion with mechanical devices

  15. Recurrent Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Schmidt, Linnea Boegeskov; Goertz, Sanne; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a disease with high mortality and a substantial risk of recurrence. However, the recurrence risk is poorly documented and the knowledge of potential predictors for recurrence among co-morbidities and medicine with antithrombotic effect is limited....... OBJECTIVES: 1) To estimate the short- and long-term cumulative risks of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). 2) To investigate associations between typical comorbid diseases, surgical treatment, use of medicine with antithrombotic effects, including antithrombotic treatment (ATT), selective serotonin...

  16. Asymptomatic endoalveolar hemorrhage in a young male

    Alain Kafyeke

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a young male affected by granulomatosis with polyangiitis presenting with non-specific complaints and complicated by the occurrence of a diffuse endoalveolar hemorrhage characterized by atypical clinical and radiological features. The importance of a rapid and aggressive diagnostic and therapeutic approach has to be strongly underlined. Available data regarding prevalence, clinical and radiological characteristics and treatment of this uncommon manifestation have also been hereby reviewed.

  17. [Hemorrhagic syndrome after transfusion of incompatible blood].

    Fedorova, Z D; Bsryshev, B A; Khanin, A Z; Chuslov, A G

    1979-11-01

    The patients were observed by a reanimation-hematological team of the Leningrad emergency service. It has been established that the hemorrhagic syndrome is the main one deterimining the unity of pathogenesis and clinical picture of the hemotransfusional complication. Phase character of the changes in the homeostasis system during the transfusion of incompatible blood was noted. The express diagnosis of the disorders and a scheme of the sequence of administration of hemostatic drugs are proposed. Mortality among such patients was reduced.

  18. Successful neuropsychological rehabilitation in a patient with Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome.

    Ruffieux, N; Colombo, F; Gentaz, E; Annoni, J-M; Chouiter, L; Roulin Hefti, S; Ruffieux, A; Bihl, T

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this case study was to describe the neuropsychological rehabilitation of a 16-year-old patient who presented a Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome (CCAS) following a bilateral cerebellar hemorrhage. The patient presented severe and diffuse cognitive deficits, massive behavioral disorders, and emotion regulation difficulties. The cognitive rehabilitation was performed in the chronic phase (one year after the onset of the hemorrhage) using a transdisciplinary neurobehavioral approach based on the patient's favorite interest (soccer). A significant behavioral and cognitive improvement was observed. The patient became progressively independent in all activities of daily living and was discharged home. The Functional Independence Measure at discharge was 124/126 (vs. 37/126 at entry). The patient was able to complete his schooling despite the mild cognitive and behavioral sequelae. This first description of the use of neurobehavioral therapy in a case of chronic CCAS suggests that (a) major clinical improvement can occur more than one year after the onset of the CCAS, showing the importance of long-term and intensive neurorehabilitation; and (b) when the cerebellum cannot properly play its regulator role in cognition, neuropsychological intervention through a behavioral and cognitive approach can be of great help by acting as an external modulator to help the patient regain control over himself.

  19. CT and MRI diagnosis of traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage

    Wu Shike; Zhang Yalin; Xu Derong; Zou Gaowei; Chen Dan; He Sujun; Zhou Lichao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze CT and MRI features of traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage and investigate the diagnostic value. Methods: 21 cases with traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage diagnosed by clinic, CT and MRI in our hospital were collected in this study Plain CT scan were immediately performed in 21 cases after injury, plain MR scan were performed in 1 to 3 days. 12 cases of them underwent diffusion weighted imagine (DWI). The CT and MRI findings were retrospectively summarized. Results: 8 cases were found with simple traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage. Complexity of basal ganglia hemorrhage occurred in 13 cases, 6 cases combined with subdural hemorrhage, 3 cases with epidural hematoma, 2 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage, 6 cases with brain contusion and laceration in other locations, 4 cases with skull fracture. 26 lesions of basal ganglia hematoma were showed in 21 cases, 14 lesions of pallidum hemorrhage in 11 cases confirmed by MR could not be distinguished from calcification at the fast CT scan. 5 more lesions of brain contusion and laceration and 4 more lesions of brain white matter laceration were found by MR. Conclusion: CT in combination with MRI can diagnose traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage and its complications early, comprehensively and accurately, which plays an important role in the clinical therapy selection and prognosis evaluation. (authors)

  20. [A case of Churg-Strauss syndrome with subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    Ito, Miiko; Kato, Naoki; Su, Ching-Chan; Kayama, Takamasa

    2014-03-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a vasculitis syndromes and is only rarely complicated by subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the current report, we describe a case of CSS with subarachnoid hemorrhage, which showed a favorable outcome following conservative treatment. A 68-year-old man with CSS on maintenance steroid therapy underwent MRI/A during tinnitus aggravation, and showed dilation of the left middle cerebral artery and stenosis of the peripheral area of the right vertebral artery. After 2 months, he presented sudden pain in the occipitocervical area, and CT revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage. Intracranial 3D CT-A and MRI/A showed the development of a protrusion at the base of the left anterior cerebral artery. Although both findings suggested cerebral artery dissection, the source of hemorrhage could not be identified. The 2009 Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke recommends early diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhagic cerebral artery dissection because of the high risk of re-bleeding. However, considering the risks of vasculitis aggravation, development of systemic complications, and recurrence, conservative treatment was selected. In addition, owing to the risk of complications associated with the frequent use of iodinated contrast agents and angiography procedures, patient was followed up using MRI. His course was favorable, and he was discharged despite mild right abducens paralysis. When patients with hemorrhagic cerebral artery dissection have a history of allergic diseases, CCS should be considered; conservative treatment consisting of rest, strict blood pressure control, and steroid therapy may be the most appropriate option for certain patients.

  1. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration [PCD]) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis

  2. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Carette, Marie-France; Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  3. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  4. Unusual paraneoplastic syndromes of breast carcinoma: a combination of cerebellar degeneration and Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome.

    Romics, L

    2011-06-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological disorders are rare complications of breast carcinoma. Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome (LEMS) is most commonly associated with small cell lung cancer. However, a combination of LEMS and subacute cerebellar degeneration as paraneoplastic syndromes is extremely rare, and has never been described in association with breast cancer.

  5. Intrahepatic and adrenal hemorrhage as a rare cause of neonatal anemia.

    Akin, Mustafa Ali; Coban, Dilek; Doganay, Selim; Durak, Zehra; Kurtoglu, Selim

    2011-05-01

    Vaginal delivery of the macrosomic fetus may result in hemorrhage of intra-abdominal organs. Mostly affected organs are the liver and adrenal glands. Hemorrhage of liver is usually occurs as a subcapsular hemorrhage and it is clinically presented an abdominal mass without symptoms of anemia. But intraparenchymal hemorrhage of liver is very rare and there is no sign of abdominal mass. However, in contrast to subcapsular hemorrhage, symptoms of anemia are rapidly developed in newborns. A macrosomic newborn by vaginal delivery at term. Within 6 h after delivery, the patient showed pallor without tachycardia and hypotension. In laboratory studies, hemoglobin level failed from 14 g/dL to 10 g/dL within 6 h. Physical examination revealed no signs of abdominal mass. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage in the sixth segment of liver and right adrenal hemorrhage were detected on the ultrasonographic scan. Hepatic function tests were normal in the whole follow-up period, and hemorrhage resolved within two weeks. Following months after discharge, adrenal hemorrhage also resolved without any complication. Hepatic hemorrhages, causing hemorrhagic anemia in neonates, usually occur in subcapsular form. Intraparenchymal hepatic hemorrhage should especially be considered in those newborns, which are rapidly developed symptoms of anemia without any abdominal mass.

  6. Swallowing difficulties for cerebellar stroke may recover beyond three years.

    Périé, S; Wajeman, S; Vivant, R; St Guily, J L

    1999-01-01

    Swallowing disorders after stroke or skull base surgery can be life threatening. Although late recovery can occur, it remains poorly documented. We report a case of a 54-year-old woman with dysphagia resulting from a cerebellar stroke with hemorrhage that was evacuated through craniotomy. Swallowing difficulties were assessed by a videoendoscopic swallowing study. She presented with disruption of swallow initiation and impairment of the pharyngeal stage, resulting in hypopharyngeal stasis and penetration with aspiration. Supportive swallowing therapy was conducted with careful reeducation to assist initiation of the pharyngeal stage as well as development of compensatory postural technique. Initial improvement was very slow but became rapidly progressive from the 31st month after the stroke. By the 34th month, oral feeding was possible without aspiration. This case demonstrates that improvement in swallowing function can be expected even 3 years after stroke or skull base surgery. Determination of predictive factors for late functional recovery is of great importance and should be the focus of further investigation.

  7. [Study of cerebellar infarction with isolated vertigo].

    Utsumi, Ai; Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kimura, Yu; Koizuka, Izumi; Tsukuda, Mamoru

    2010-07-01

    Isolated vertigo is generally attributed to labyrinthine disease, but may also signal otherwise asymptomatic cerebellar infarction. Of 309 subjects admitted between April 2004 and March 2009 for the single symptom of acute vertigo initially thought to be labyrinthine, four were found to have cerebellar infarction of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery area (PICA). All were over 60 years old and had risk factors including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, arrhythmia, and/or hyperlipidemia. Two had trunk ataxia, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showing infarction within a few days. The other two could walk without apparent trunk ataxia, however, it took 4 to 7 days to find the infarction, mainly through neurological, neurootological, and MRI findings. Neurologically, astasia, dysbasia or trunk ataxia were important signs. Neurootologically, nystagmus and electronystagmographic testing involving eye tracking, saccade, and optokinetic patttens were useful.

  8. Cerebellar contribution to feedforward control of locomotion.

    Pisotta, Iolanda; Molinari, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is an important contributor to feedforward control mechanisms of the central nervous system, and sequencing-the process that allows spatial and temporal relationships between events to be recognized-has been implicated as the fundamental cerebellar mode of operation. By adopting such a mode and because cerebellar activity patterns are sensitive to a variety of sensorimotor-related tasks, the cerebellum is believed to support motor and cognitive functions that are encoded in the frontal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. In this model, the cerebellum is hypothesized to make predictions about the consequences of a motor or cognitive command that originates from the cortex to prepare the entire system to cope with ongoing changes. In this framework, cerebellar predictive mechanisms for locomotion are addressed, focusing on sensorial and motoric sequencing. The hypothesis that sequence recognition is the mechanism by which the cerebellum functions in gait control is presented and discussed.

  9. Rhythmic finger tapping reveals cerebellar dysfunction in essential tremor

    Buijink, A. W. G.; Broersma, M.; van der Stouwe, A. M. M.; van Wingen, G. A.; Groot, P. F. C.; Speelman, J. D.; Maurits, N. M.; van Rootselaar, A. F.

    Introduction: Cerebellar circuits are hypothesized to play a central role in the pathogenesis of essential tremor. Rhythmic finger tapping is known to strongly engage the cerebellar motor circuitry. We characterize cerebellar and, more specifically, dentate nucleus function, and neural correlates of

  10. CT and MR imaging of acute cerebellar ataxia

    Shoji, H.; Hirai, S.; Ishikawa, K.; Aramaki, M.; Sato, Y.; Abe, T.; Kojima, K.

    1991-01-01

    An adult female showed mild cerebellar ataxia and CSF pleocytosis following an acute infection of the upper respiratory tract, and was diagnosed as having acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA). CT and MR appearances in the acute stage revealed moderate swelling of the cerebellum and bilaterally increased signal intensity in the cerebellar cortex. (orig.)

  11. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis in ischemic stroke

    Meneghetti, G; Vorstrup, S; Mickey, B

    1984-01-01

    Seventy measurements of CBF were performed in 12 stroke patients by 133Xe inhalation and a rapidly rotating single photon emission computerized tomograph. CBF was measured every other day during the acute phase and at 2- and 6-month follow-up visits. A persistent contralateral cerebellar blood flow....... It is concluded from this serial study that crossed cerebellar diaschisis is a common finding in completed stroke. It is probably caused by disconnection of the corticopontine pathways, a disconnection that tends to persist. The phenomenon is in fact less variable than the stroke-related CBF changes...

  12. 泮托拉唑针剂联合硫糖铝治疗消化性溃疡并出血40例疗效分析%Analysis of Clinical Efficacy of Pantoprazole Combined with Sucralfate on 40 Cases with Peptic UIcer Complicated with Hemorrhage

    贺新国

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨泮托拉唑针剂联合硫糖铝治疗消化性溃疡并出血的临床疗效.方法:选择我院2008年9月~2010年9月消化性溃疡合并出血患者80例.将上述患者随机分为两组,观察组和对照组.两组患者均给予相应对症治疗.观察组给予泮托拉唑、云南白药粉剂、硫糖铝.对照组给予奥美托唑、云南白药粉剂,硫糖铝.观察两组患者止血和溃疡愈合情况.结果:观察组止血总有效率为97.5%,对照组为82.5%,两组止血效果总有效率比较,差异有统计学意义(P(0.05);观察组溃疡愈合总有效率为95.0%,对照组溃疡愈合总有效率为80.0%,两组溃疡总有效率比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:泮托拉唑针剂联合硫糖铝治疗消化性溃疡并出血临床效果显著,止血效果迅速,溃疡愈合率高,值得借鉴.%Objective:To explore the clinical efficacy of Pantoprazole combined with sucralfate on peptic ulcer complicated with hemorrhage.Methods:80 cases with peptic ulcer complicated with hemorrhage were selected from September,2008 to September,2010 and divided into observation group and control group.Symptomatic treatment were administered in two groups,pantoprazole, Yunnan White Drug Powder and sucralfate were given to observation group,omeprazole, Yunnan White Drug Powder and sucralfate were given to control group .Hem ostasis and ulcer healing were observed in two groups.Results :the total effective rate of hemostasis in observation group was 97.5%,and the total effective rate of hemostasis incontrol group was 82.5%,the total effective rate of hemostasis in two groups compared,there was statistical difference(P<0.05).The total effective rate of ulcer healing in observation group was 95.0%,and the total effective rate of ulcer healing incontrol group was 80.0%,the total effective rate of ulcer healing in two groups compared,there was statistical difference(P<0.05).Conclusion:Pantoprazole combined with sucralfate on peptic

  13. Tamponade of presacral hemorrhage with hemostatic sponges fixed to the sacrum with endoscopic helical tackers: report of two cases.

    Vurst, T.J. van der; Bodegom, M.E.; Rakic, S.

    2004-01-01

    Presacral venous hemorrhage is a severe complication in low rectal surgery. This complication was encountered in 5 of 165 patients (3 percent) who underwent a presacral dissection for rectal mobilization. Conventional hemostatic measures often are ineffective to arrest this hemorrhage, and a number

  14. Neurological complications of alcoholism

    I. I. Nikiforov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nervous system lesions associated with chronic alcohol intoxication are common in clinical practice. They lead to aggravated alcoholic disease, its more frequent recurrences, and intensified pathological craving for alcohol. Neurological pathology in turn occurs with frequent exacerbations. The interaction of diseases, age, and medical  pathomorphism modifies the clinical presentation and course of the  major pathology, as well as comorbidity, the nature and severity of  complications, worsens quality of life in a patient, and makes the  diagnostic and treatment process difficult. The paper discusses the  classification, clinical variants, biochemical and molecular biological  aspects of various complications of alcoholic disease. It considers its  most common form, in particular alcoholic polyneuropathy, as well as its rarer variants, such as hemorrhagic encephalopathy with a subacute course (Gayet–Wernicke encephalopathy.

  15. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia

    Batts, William N.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) is one of the most important viral diseases of finfish worldwide. In the past, VHS was thought to affect mainly rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reared at freshwater facilities in Western Europe where it was known by various names including Egtved disease and infectious kidney swelling and liver degeneration (Wolf 1988). Today, VHS is known as an important source of mortality for cultured and wild fish in freshwater and marine environments in several regions of the northern hemisphere (Dixon 1999; Gagné et al. 2007; Kim and Faisal 2011; Lumsden et al. 2007; Marty et al. 1998, 2003; Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005b; Smail 1999; Takano et al. 2001). Viral hemorrhagic septicemia is caused by the fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a member of the genus Novirhabdovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae

  16. Microcatheter embolization of hemorrhages

    Seppaenen, Seppo K.; Leppaenen, Martti J.; Pimenoff, Georg; Seppaenen, Janne M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of embolotherapy using microcatheters in patients with hemorrhage from various locations. Methods. Among 29 patients there were 13 with severe epistaxis, 7 with gastrointestinal bleeding, 4 with hemorrhage in the kidney, 4 with bleeding in pelvic organs and 1 with bleeding in the shoulder region. In all cases, a Tracker-18 or Tracker-10 microcatheter was advanced coaxially through a 4.1 Fr guiding catheter in order to reach the bleeding site as distally as possible. Polyvinyl alcohol microparticles and/or platinum microcoils were used as embolic material. Results. The bleeding was stopped in 90% (26 of 29) of cases. In 66% of cases the treatment was curative, in 7% preoperative, and in 17% palliative. There were 3 clinical failures. Conclusion. Microcatheter embolization is an effective and safe means of managing different kinds of hemorrhage of various causes from a variety of sites

  17. Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007301.htm Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) of the newborn is bleeding into the ...

  18. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever.

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is an often-fatal disease caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family, genus Ebolavirus. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease are nonspecific, often progressing on to a severe hemorrhagic illness. Special Operations Forces Medical Providers should be aware of this disease, which occurs in sporadic outbreaks throughout Africa. Treatment at the present time is mainly supportive. Special care should be taken to prevent contact with bodily fluids of those infected, which can transmit the virus to caregivers. 2014.

  19. Radiation-induced cerebellar chondrosarcoma. Case report

    Bernstein, M.; Perrin, R.G.; Platts, M.E.; Simpson, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    The authors report a case of chondrosarcoma arising in the cerebellum 16 years after treatment of a cerebellar malignant astrocytoma by subtotal resection and irradiation. It is thought that the chondrosarcoma arising within the intracranial cavity was a probable consequence of previous ionizing radiation

  20. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells.

    Anatoly Buchin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR. While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing.

  1. Cerebellar Plasticity in Health and Disease

    M.P.H. Coesmans (Michiel)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe cerebellum helps fine-tuning movements by evaluating disparities between intention and action, in order to adjust the execution of movements ‘online’, and to keep movements calibrated in the long term. The cerebellar capacity to store information, which provides the ‘memory’ needed

  2. Cerebellar malformations alter regional cerebral development.

    Bolduc, Marie-Eve; Du Plessis, Adre J; Evans, Alan; Guizard, Nicolas; Zhang, Xun; Robertson, Richard L; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare total and regional cerebral volumes in children with isolated cerebellar malformations (CBMs) with those in typically developing children, and to examine the extent to which cerebellar volumetric reductions are associated with total and regional cerebral volumes. This is a case-control study of children diagnosed with isolated CBMs. Each child was matched on age and sex to two typically developing children. Using advanced three-dimensional volumetric magnetic resonance imaging, the cerebrum was segmented into tissue classes and partitioned into eight regions. Analysis of variance was used to compare cerebral volumes between children with CBMs and control children, and linear regressions to examine the impact of cerebellar volume reduction on cerebral volumes. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at a mean age of 27 months in 20 children (10 males, 10 females) with CBMs and 40 typically developing children. Children with CBMs showed significantly smaller deep grey matter nuclei (p developing children. Greater cerebellar volumetric reduction in children with CBMs was associated with decreased total cerebral volume and deep grey matter nuclei (p = 0.02), subgenual white/grey matter (p = 0.001), midtemporal white (p = 0.02) and grey matter (p = 0.01), and parieto-occipital grey matter (p = 0.004). CBMs are associated with impaired regional cerebral growth, suggesting deactivation of principal cerebello-cerebral pathways. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2011 Mac Keith Press.

  3. Improving cerebellar segmentation with statistical fusion

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multiatlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non- Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  4. Ultrasonically detectable cerebellar haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    McCarthy, Lisa Kenyon

    2011-07-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of cerebellar haemorrhage (CBH) on routine cranial ultrasound (cUS) imaging in infants of ≤32 weeks gestation, and to investigate how extremely preterm infants with CBH differ from those with severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH).

  5. Ultra-early tranexamic acid after subarachnoid hemorrhage (ULTRA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Germans, Menno R.; Post, René; Coert, Bert A.; Rinkel, Gabriël J. E.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Verbaan, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    A frequent complication in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is recurrent bleeding from the aneurysm. The risk is highest within the first 6 hours after the initial hemorrhage. Securing the aneurysm within this timeframe is difficult owing to logistical delays. The rate of recurrent

  6. Hemorrhage is the most common cause of neonatal mortality in patients with sacrococcygeal teratoma

    Kremer, Marijke E. B.; Wellens, Lianne M.; Derikx, Joep P. M.; van Baren, Robertine; Heij, Hugo A.; Wijnen, Marc H. W. A.; Wijnen, René M. H.; van der Zee, David C.; van Heurn, L. W. Ernest

    2016-01-01

    A small percentage of neonates with sacrococcygeal teratoma die shortly after birth from hemorrhagic complications. The incidence of and risk factors associated with hemorrhagic mortality are unknown. In this multicenter study we determined the incidence of early death in neonates born with SCT and

  7. Hemorrhage is the most common cause of neonatal mortality in patients with sacrococcygeal teratoma

    Kremer, Marijke E B; Wellens, Lianne M; Derikx, Joep P M; van Baren, Robertine; Heij, Hugo A; Wijnen, Marc H W A; Wijnen, René M H; van der Zee, David C; van Heurn, L W Ernest

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A small percentage of neonates with sacrococcygeal teratoma die shortly after birth from hemorrhagic complications. The incidence of and risk factors associated with hemorrhagic mortality are unknown. In this multicenter study we determined the incidence of early death in neonates born

  8. Cerebellar Hypoplasia and Dysmorphia in Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    Toelle, Sandra P; Poretti, Andrea; Weber, Peter; Seute, Tatjana; Bromberg, Jacoline E C; Scheer, Ianina; Boltshauser, Eugen

    2015-12-01

    Unidentified bright objects (UBO) and tumors are well-known cerebellar abnormalities in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Literature reports on malformative cerebellar anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), however, are scant. We retrospectively studied the clinical and neuroimaging findings of 5 patients with NF1 (4 females, age 6 to 29 years at last follow-up) and cerebellar anomalies. Cerebellar symptoms on neurological examination were mild or even not evident whereas learning disabilities were more or less pronounced in four patients. Two patients had cerebellar hypoplasia (diffusely enlarged cerebellar interfoliar spaces) and three cerebellar dysmorphias involving mainly one cerebellar hemisphere. In NF1, malformative cerebellar anomalies are rare (estimated prevalence of about 1%), but most likely underestimated and easily overlooked, because physicians tend to focus on more prevalent, obvious, and well-known findings such as optic pathway gliomas, other tumors, and UBO. This kind of cerebellar anomaly in NF1 has most likely a malformative origin, but the exact pathogenesis is unknown. The individual clinical significance is difficult to determine. We suggest that cerebellar anomalies should be systematically evaluated in neuroimaging studies of NF1 patients.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebellar Schistosomiasis mansoni

    Braga, Bruno Perocco; Costa Junior, Leodante Batista da; Lambertucci, Jose Roberto

    2003-01-01

    A 15-year-old boy was admitted to hospital with a history of headache, dizziness, vomiting and double vision that started two weeks before. His parents denied any previous disease. During clinical examination he presented diplopia on lateral gaze to the left and horizontal nystagmus. No major neurological dysfunction was detected. He was well built, mentally responsive and perceptive. Laboratory findings revealed a leukocyte count of 10,000/mL, a normal red blood cell count and no eosinophilia. The magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the brain showed a left cerebellar lesion with mass effect compressing the surrounding tissues. Contrast-enhanced images showed a mass like structure and punctate nodules (Figures A and B: axial and coronal contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images showed the nodular - yellow arrows - enhancement pattern of a left cerebellar intraxial lesion). The lesion extended to the vermis and brachium pons and compressed the medulla. There was no hydrocephalus. He was taken to the operating room with the presumptive diagnosis of a neuroglial tumor, and submitted to a lateral suboccipital craniectomy. A brown, brittle tumoral mass without a clearly defined margin with the cerebellar tissue was removed. Microscopic examination revealed schistosomal granulomas in the productive phase in the cerebellum (Figure C). After surgery, treatment with praziquantel (50 mg/kg/dia, single dose) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) was offered and the patient improved quickly. Thirty days later he was seen again at the outpatient clinic: he was asymptomatic and with no neurological impairment. This is the eighth case of cerebellar involvement in schistosomiasis mansoni and the second report of a tumoral form of cerebellar schistosomiasis documented by magnetic resonance images. (author)

  10. Management of gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    Hilsden, R. J.; Shaffer, E. A.

    1995-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a common problem that requires prompt recognition and management to prevent serious morbidity and mortality. Management goals are stabilization of the patient with vigorous fluid resuscitation followed by investigation and definitive treatment of the bleeding source. Endoscopy is often the initial diagnostic test and allows therapeutic measures to be performed at the same time.

  11. Subarachnoid mesencephalic hemorrhage

    Oviedo, Soledad; De Luca, Silvina; Ceciliano, Alejandro; Mondello, Eduardo; Oviedo, Jorge D.; Lopardo Villarino, Guzman; Eyheremendy, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    The case of a 57 y.o. male who has had severe headache of sudden onset without neck stiffness or other signs of neurological foci was reported. Initial CT scan showed perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain MRI and digital angiography were performed later and bleeding was interpreted as a result of an abnormal hemodynamic status developed by cerebral venous thrombosis. (author)

  12. Hemorrhage and vascular abnormalities

    Bradley, W.G.

    1990-01-01

    While many brain lesions have a similar appearance on MRI and CT, this is not true of hemorrhage. On CT, acute hemorrhage becomes hyperdense within an hour as the clot forms. This lasts for several days and then fades to isodensity and eventually hypodensity. On MRI, hemorrhage less than 12 to 24 hours old may not be distinguishable from vasogenic edema. Its appearance subsequently is an evolving pattern of variable signal intensity which depends on the specific form of hemoglobin which is present, or whether the red cells are intact or lysed, on the operating field strength, on the type of signal (that is, spin echo or gradient echo), and on contrast (that is, T 1 - or T 2 -weighing). The appearance of hemorrhage also depends on the compartment of the brain involved---subarachnoid, subdural, or intraparenchymal. Finally, for parenchymal hematomas, different zones may be defined from the inner core to the outer rim which all vary in appearance depending on field strength and imaging technique

  13. Massive antenatal fetomaternal hemorrhage

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Koldkjaer, Ole; Berkowicz, Adela

    2005-01-01

    Massive fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH) can lead to life-threatening anemia. Quantification based on flow cytometry with anti-hemoglobin F (HbF) is applicable in all cases but underestimation of large fetal bleeds has been reported. A large FMH from an ABO-compatible fetus allows an estimation...

  14. Neurogenic stunned myocardium following hemorrhagic cerebral contusion

    Deleu, D.; Miyares, F.; Kettern, M.; Kumar, S.; Hassens, Y.; Salim, K.

    2007-01-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium NSM is a well-known complication of subarachnoidal hemorrhage, but has been reported rarely in association with other central nervous system disorders. A case of NSM is described in a patient with hemorrhagic brain contusion associated with cerebral edema. An 18-year-old man was admitted with severe cranial trauma following a car roll-over. Six days after admission, he developed findings suggestive for NSM. The troponin T and creatine kinase-MB level were elevated and echocardiogram showed apical and inferoposterior hypokinesis and diffuse left ventricular akinesis with severely reduced ejection fraction 18%. Invasive measurements confirmed low cardiac output. His cardiac function resolved completely within 6 days after decompressive craniotomy. This case supports the presumed unifying role of the increased intracranial pressure, probably triggering a vigorous sympathetic outflow hyperactivity leading to NSM. (author)

  15. Troponin elevation in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Ioannis N. Mavridis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Troponin (tr elevation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients is often difficult to be appropriately assessed by clinicians, causing even disagreements regarding its management between neurosurgeons and cardiologists. The purpose of this article was to review the literature regarding the clinical interpretation of tr elevation in SAH. We searched for articles in PubMed using the key words: “troponin elevation” and “subarachnoid hemorrhage”. All of them, as well as relative neurosurgical books, were used for this review. Some type of cardiovascular abnormality develops in most SAH patients. Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a frequent SAH complication, due to catecholamine surge which induces cardiac injury, as evidenced by increased serum tr levels, electrocardiographic (ECG changes and cardiac wall motion abnormalities. Tr elevation, usually modest, is an early and specific marker for cardiac involvement after SAH and its levels peak about two days after SAH. Cardiac tr elevation predictors include poor clinical grade, intraventricular hemorrhage, loss of consciousness at ictus, global cerebral edema, female sex, large body surface area, lower systolic blood pressure, higher heart rate and prolonged Q-Tc interval. Elevated tr levels are associated with disability and death (especially tr >1 μg/L, worse neurological grade, systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction, pulmonary congestion, longer intensive care unit stay and incidence of vasospasm. Tr elevation is a common finding in SAH patients and constitutes a rightful cause of worry about the patients' cardiac function and prognosis. It should be therefore early detected, carefully monitored and appropriately managed by clinicians.

  16. Brain hemorrhage associated with maintenance hemodialysis. CT analysis of 19 cases

    Kawahata, Nobuya

    1994-01-01

    The CT findings of 19 hemodialyzed patients with brain hemorrhage (BH) were evaluated. The 30-day mortality rate was 78.9%. The lesion locations in the 19 cases with BH were putaminal hemorrhage in 8 patients, putaminothalamic (mixed) hemorrhage in 7, thalamic hemorrhage in one, subcortical hemorrhage in one, and cerebellar hemorrhage in one. In the remaining patient, the bleeding was confined to the ventricular system. One remarkable CT finding was the formation of a massive hematoma in most cases. In some cases, the hematoma occupied the greater part of one cerebral hemisphere. Oral anticoagulants and/or antiplatelet drugs, and intravenous heparinization could produce massive accumulations of blood in the brain parenchyma. The second major finding was the low CT absorption values of the hematoma at the acute stage, as compared to that of hypertensive BH. This decreased absorption density resulted from a low hemoglobin concentration in the hematoma itself due to the severe anemia occurring in patients on long-term maintenance hemodialysis. (author)

  17. Anabolic steroid abuse causing recurrent hepatic adenomas and hemorrhage

    Martin, Nicole M; Dayyeh, Barham K Abu; Chung, Raymond T

    2008-01-01

    Anabolic steroid abuse is common among athletes and is associated with a number of medical complications. We describe a case of a 27-year-old male bodybuilder with multiple hepatic adenomas induced by anabolic steroids. He initially presented with tumor hemorrhage and was treated with left lateral hepatic segmentectomy. Regression of the remaining tumors was observed with cessation of steroid use. However, 3 years and a half after his initial hepatic segmentectomy, he presented with recurrent tumor enlargement and intraperitoneal hemorrhage in the setting of steroid abuse relapse. Given his limited hepatic reserve, he was conservatively managed with embolization of the right accessory hepatic artery. This is the first reported case of hepatic adenoma re-growth with recidivistic steroid abuse, complicated by life-threatening hemorrhage. While athletes and bodybuilders are often aware of the legal and social ramifications of steroid abuse, they should continue to be counseled about its serious medical risks. PMID:18680242

  18. Anabolic steroid abuse causing recurrent hepatic adenomas and hemorrhage.

    Martin, Nicole M; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Chung, Raymond T

    2008-07-28

    Anabolic steroid abuse is common among athletes and is associated with a number of medical complications. We describe a case of a 27-year-old male bodybuilder with multiple hepatic adenomas induced by anabolic steroids. He initially presented with tumor hemorrhage and was treated with left lateral hepatic segmentectomy. Regression of the remaining tumors was observed with cessation of steroid use. However, 3 years and a half after his initial hepatic segmentectomy, he presented with recurrent tumor enlargement and intraperitoneal hemorrhage in the setting of steroid abuse relapse. Given his limited hepatic reserve, he was conservatively managed with embolization of the right accessory hepatic artery. This is the first reported case of hepatic adenoma re-growth with recidivistic steroid abuse, complicated by life-threatening hemorrhage. While athletes and bodybuilders are often aware of the legal and social ramifications of steroid abuse, they should continue to be counseled about its serious medical risks.

  19. Hemorrhagic Stroke Associated with Pulmonary Edema and Catastrophic Cardiac Failure

    Jiun-Chang Lee

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral arteriovenous fistula (AVF is a vascular malformation that is rare in the pediatric population. Older children with cerebral AVF tend to present with neurologic problems related to intracranial venous hypertension or intracranial hemorrhage. Cardiac and pulmonary complications following acute neurologic injury such as subarachnoid hemorrhage are common in adults, but are rarely reported in children. However, complications have been reported in cases of enterovirus 71 rhombencephalitis in infants and children and can cause high morbidity and mortality. Here, we report a 14-year-old boy who presented with cardiac failure associated with pulmonary edema following cerebral hemorrhagic stroke due to AVF. After aggressive investigation and management, we intervened before significant hypoxia and hypotension developed, potentially reducing the risk of long-term adverse neurologic consequences in this patient.

  20. Bilateral lateral ventricular subependymoma with extensive multiplicity presenting with hemorrhage.

    Moinuddin, F M; Ikbar Khairunnisa, Novita; Hirano, Hirofumi; Hanada, Tomoko; Hiraki, Tsubasa; Kirishima, Mari; Kamimura, Kiyohisa; Arita, Kazunori

    2018-02-01

    This 48-year-old-man who had undergone right thyroid lobectomy for undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma nine years earlier developed generalized seizures. His cerebrospinal fluid was xanthochromic with elevation of total protein. Computed tomography (CT) showed mixed-density bilateral ventricular masses. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multiple nodules in both lateral ventricles; they were heterogeneously enhanced by gadolinium. Diffuse hyperintensity in the right medial temporal lobe and bilateral subependymal area was noted on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. Susceptibility-weighted imaging showed low intensity in the masses and cerebellar sulci suggesting hemorrhage and hemosiderin deposition. The preoperative diagnosis was disseminated malignant tumor with recurring hemorrhage. Histological examination of biopsy specimens showed clusters of cells with small uniform nuclei embedded in a dense fibrillary matrix of glial cells and microcystic degeneration. Pseudo-rosettes indicating ependymoma were absent. Microhemorrhages and hemosiderin deposits were noted. Immunohistochemically, the background fibrillary matrix and neoplastic cells were positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein. Mutated isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 was negative. The MIB-1 index was 1.5%. The tumor was pathologically diagnosed as subependymoma containing microhemorrhages and hemosiderin deposits. The extensive multiplicity and hemorrhage encountered in this case have rarely been reported in patients with subependymoma.

  1. "Neurologic complications in Hemophilia: A study in 214 cases "

    Ghaffarpoor M

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hemorrhage and entrapment neuropathy are the most serious and disabling complications in hemophilia.The occurance of these neurological complications was studied in 214 hemophiliac patients during a 3 month period. Nine patients (4.2% suffered intracranial hemorrhage (One epidural and others intracerebral. All of intracranial hemorrhage patients had the sevee form of disease (<1% factor VIII or IX. 6 out of 9 intracranial hemorrhage cases mentioned a history of head trauma. Entrapment neuropathy was presen in 10 patients (femoral neuropathy 5, ulnar n. 3, radial n. 1 median n. 1 all of entropament neuropathy patients described a history of trauma to the extremities. Eight patients in the latter group had severe disease and two patients had moderate disease (1-5%. The proportion of intracranial hemorrhage following head trauma (20% in this series was greater than other studies. In conclusion, early diagnostic evaluation and replacement therapy may be beneficial in hemophilic patients with trauma.

  2. CT angiography spot sign in intracerebral hemorrhage predicts active bleeding during surgery.

    Brouwers, H Bart; Raffeld, Miriam R; van Nieuwenhuizen, Koen M; Falcone, Guido J; Ayres, Alison M; McNamara, Kristen A; Schwab, Kristin; Romero, Javier M; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Viswanathan, Anand; Greenberg, Steven M; Ogilvy, Christopher S; van der Zwan, Albert; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Goldstein, Joshua N; Klijn, Catharina J M; Rosand, Jonathan

    2014-09-02

    To determine whether the CT angiography (CTA) spot sign marks bleeding complications during and after surgery for spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). In a 2-center study of consecutive spontaneous ICH patients who underwent CTA followed by surgical hematoma evacuation, 2 experienced readers (blinded to clinical and surgical data) reviewed CTAs for spot sign presence. Blinded raters assessed active intraoperative and postoperative bleeding. The association between spot sign and active intraoperative bleeding, postoperative rebleeding, and residual ICH volumes was evaluated using univariable and multivariable logistic regression. A total of 95 patients met inclusion criteria: 44 lobar, 17 deep, 33 cerebellar, and 1 brainstem ICH; ≥1 spot sign was identified in 32 patients (34%). The spot sign was the only independent marker of active bleeding during surgery (odds ratio [OR] 3.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-9.0). Spot sign (OR 4.1; 95% CI 1.1-17), female sex (OR 6.9; 95% CI 1.7-37), and antiplatelet use (OR 4.6; 95% CI 1.2-21) were predictive of postoperative rebleeding. Larger residual hematomas and postoperative rebleeding were associated with higher discharge case fatality (OR 3.4; 95% CI 1.1-11) and a trend toward increased case fatality at 3 months (OR 2.9; 95% CI 0.9-8.8). The CTA spot sign is associated with more intraoperative bleeding, more postoperative rebleeding, and larger residual ICH volumes in patients undergoing hematoma evacuation for spontaneous ICH. The spot sign may therefore be useful to select patients for future surgical trials. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  3. Internal iliac artery embolotherapy for primary postpartum hemorrhage

    Chen Weijun; Mei Haibing; He Zhongwei; Li Meimei

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of internal iliac artery embolotherapy (IIAE) for primary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). Methods: 9 cases of PPH were treated with IIAE. Results: Selective catheterization and embolotherapy were successful in 9 cases of PPH, with only one case of left lower extremity arterial thrombosis. No serious complications occurred in others. Conclusions: IIAE is a quick, safe, effective technique for PPH

  4. Embolization for hemorrhage of liver metastases from choriocarcinoma

    Lok, C. A. R.; Reekers, J. A.; Westermann, A. M.; van der Velden, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Because gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is highly sensitive to chemotherapy, life-threatening hemorrhage from metastases can occur especially early after starting therapy. Cases. Two cases of post-term choriocarcinoma with liver metastases complicated by profuse life-threatening

  5. Hemorrhagic abscess in a patient with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Casado-Naranjo, I.; Lopez-Trigo, J.; Ferrandiz, A.; Cervello, A.; Navarro, V.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is frequent among patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The common computed tomography appearance of this complication is multiple low density area with ring enhancement. We describe a very rare picture of cerebral toxoplasmosis, this is multiple hemorrhagic toxoplasmic abscess. (orig.)

  6. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a young woman with systemic lupus ...

    Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage (DAH) is rarely reported complication of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). A young woman diagnosed SLE, with a previously normal plain chest radiograph, developed acute onset cough, dyspnoea and hemoptysis. The repeat urgent chest radiograph revealed alveolar opacities. The triad ...

  7. Pulmonary alveolar hemorrhage mimicking a pneumopathy: a rare ...

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a rare complication. The diagnosis is difficult and can mimic by clinical and radiological features other diagnosis as pneumopathy. We herein report the case of a 63-year-old female admitted to the hospital for ST elevation myocardial infarction.

  8. A toolbox to visually explore cerebellar shape changes in cerebellar disease and dysfunction

    Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Yang, Zhen; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum plays an important role in motor control and is also involved in cognitive processes. Cerebellar function is specialized by location, although the exact topographic functional relationship is not fully understood. The spinocerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that cause regional atrophy in the cerebellum, yielding distinct motor and cognitive problems. The ability to study the region-specific atrophy patterns can provide insight into the problem of relating cerebellar function to location. In an effort to study these structural change patterns, we developed a toolbox in MATLAB to provide researchers a unique way to visually explore the correlation between cerebellar lobule shape changes and function loss, with a rich set of visualization and analysis modules. In this paper, we outline the functions and highlight the utility of the toolbox. The toolbox takes as input landmark shape representations of subjects' cerebellar substructures. A principal component analysis is used for dimension reduction. Following this, a linear discriminant analysis and a regression analysis can be performed to find the discriminant direction associated with a specific disease type, or the regression line of a specific functional measure can be generated. The characteristic structural change pattern of a disease type or of a functional score is visualized by sampling points on the discriminant or regression line. The sampled points are used to reconstruct synthetic cerebellar lobule shapes. We showed a few case studies highlighting the utility of the toolbox and we compare the analysis results with the literature.

  9. A toolbox to visually explore cerebellar shape changes in cerebellar disease and dysfunction.

    Abulnaga, S Mazdak; Yang, Zhen; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M; Onyike, Chiadi U; Ying, Sarah H; Prince, Jerry L

    2016-02-27

    The cerebellum plays an important role in motor control and is also involved in cognitive processes. Cerebellar function is specialized by location, although the exact topographic functional relationship is not fully understood. The spinocerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that cause regional atrophy in the cerebellum, yielding distinct motor and cognitive problems. The ability to study the region-specific atrophy patterns can provide insight into the problem of relating cerebellar function to location. In an effort to study these structural change patterns, we developed a toolbox in MATLAB to provide researchers a unique way to visually explore the correlation between cerebellar lobule shape changes and function loss, with a rich set of visualization and analysis modules. In this paper, we outline the functions and highlight the utility of the toolbox. The toolbox takes as input landmark shape representations of subjects' cerebellar substructures. A principal component analysis is used for dimension reduction. Following this, a linear discriminant analysis and a regression analysis can be performed to find the discriminant direction associated with a specific disease type, or the regression line of a specific functional measure can be generated. The characteristic structural change pattern of a disease type or of a functional score is visualized by sampling points on the discriminant or regression line. The sampled points are used to reconstruct synthetic cerebellar lobule shapes. We showed a few case studies highlighting the utility of the toolbox and we compare the analysis results with the literature.

  10. Isolated rhomboencephalosynapsis – a rare cerebellar anomaly

    Paprocka, Justyna; Jamroz, Ewa; Ścieszka, Ewa; Kluczewska, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    Rhomboencephalosynapsis (RES, RS) is a unique entity usually recognized in infancy based on neuroimaging. Cerebellar fusion and absence of cerebellar vermis is often associated with supratentorial findings. Since now there are about 50 cases described worldwide, with approximately 36 patients diagnosed by MRI. The authors present the first in Poland case of this uncommon malformation and review the literature. The authors describe a 28-month-old-girl with microcephaly and proper psychomotor development. The family history was unrelevant. Based on MRI the congenital malformation of posterior fossa-rhombencephalosynapsis was confirmed Presented patient is a typical example of MRI usefulness especially in patients with RES. RES symptoms are mild and that is why the diagnosis is usually made only in adulthood

  11. Cerebellar interaction with the acoustic reflex.

    Jastreboff, P J

    1981-01-01

    The involvement of the cerebellar vermis in the acoustic reflex was analyzed in 12 cats, decerebrated or in pentobarbital anesthesia. Anatomical data suggested the existence of a connection of lobules VIII with the ventral cochlear nucleus. Single cell recording and evoked potential techniques demonstrated the existence of the acoustic projection to lobulus VIII. Electrical stimulation of this area changed the tension of the middle ear muscle and caused evoked potential responses in the caudal part of the ventral cochlear nucleus. Electrical stimulation of the motor nucleus of the facial nerve evoked a slow wave in the recording taken from the surrounding of the cochlear round window. A hypothesis is proposed which postulates the involvement of the acoustic reflex in space localization of acoustic stimuli and the action of cerebellar vermis in order to assure the stability and plasticity of the acoustic reflex arc.

  12. Analysis of angiography findings in cerebral arteriovenous malformations: Correlation with hemorrhage

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Kim, Hyung Jin; Jung, Jin Myung; Ha, Choong Kun; Chung, Sung Hoon [Gyeongsang National University College of Medicine, Chinju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    Intracerebral hemorrhage is the most serious complication of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM). To identify angiographic characteristics of AVM which correlate with a history of hemorrhage, we retrospectively analyzed angiographic findings of 25 patients with AVM. Nine characteristic were evaluated; these include nidus size, location, arterial aneurysm, intranidal aneurysm, angiomatous change, venous drainage pattern, venous stenosis, delayed drainage and venous ectasia. The characteristic were correlated with hemorrhage,which was seen in 18 (72%) patients on CT or MR images. Venous stenosis (P<0.5) and delaved venous drainage (P<0.5) well correlated with a history of hemorrhage. Arterial aneurysm and intranidal aneurysm also had a tendency hemorrhage although they did not prove to be statistically significant. Detailed analysis of angiographic finding of AVM is important for recognition of characteristic which are related to hemorrhage and may contribute to establishing a prognosis and treatment planning.

  13. Clinical value of arteriography in postpartum hemorrhage by transcatheter arterial embolization

    Wang Kai; Jiang Guomin; Zhao Jinwei; Huang Wenhua; Liu Yizhi; Jin Yonghai

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the arterial supply in postpartum hemorrhage and to evaluate the clinical value of arteriography in transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for treating postpartum hemorrhage. Methods: The arteriography of 37 patients with postpartum hemorrhage was analyzed. TAE were performed after the bleeding artery was identified. Post TAE angiography was performed to confirm the success of embolization. Results: The bleeding artery in atonic uterus and abnormal placenta was the uterine artery. The bleeding artery in birth canal laceration is mainly non-uterine artery. Postpartum hemorrhage was successfully controlled in all 37 patients without sever complication of TAE. Conclusion: Arteriography in postpartum hemorrhage can demonstrate the bleeding artery and is potential collaterals allowing adequate embolization without complication. (authors)

  14. Cerebellar and cerebral atrophy in trichothiodystrophy

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Sargent, Michael A.; Poskitt, Kenneth J. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Prendiville, Julie S. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Division of Paediatric Dermatology, Department of Paediatrics, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    Trichothiodystrophy is a rare neuroectodermal disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance that is characterized by brittle hair, nail dysplasia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and gonadal failure. We describe a female patient whose cranial MRI revealed almost total lack of myelination in the supratentorial white matter, which is similar to the previously described cases. In addition, there was progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, which has not been well documented in association with trichothiodystrophy. (orig.)

  15. Neonatal Brain Hemorrhage (NBH) of Prematurity: Translational Mechanisms of the Vascular-Neural Network

    Lekic, Tim; Klebe, Damon; Poblete, Roy; Krafft, Paul R.; Rolland, William B.; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal brain hemorrhage (NBH) of prematurity is an unfortunate consequence of preterm birth. Complications result in shunt dependence and long-term structural changes such as post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus, periventricular leukomalacia, gliosis, and neurological dysfunction. Several animal models are available to study this condition, and many basic mechanisms, etiological factors, and outcome consequences, are becoming understood. NBH is an important clinical condition, of which treatment may potentially circumvent shunt complication, and improve functional recovery (cerebral palsy, and cognitive impairments). This review highlights key pathophysiological findings of the neonatal vascular-neural network in the context of molecular mechanisms targeting the post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus affecting this vulnerable infant population. PMID:25620100

  16. Brain abscesses and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Vives, Daniel A.; Bauni, Carlos E.; Mendoza, Monica E.

    2003-01-01

    Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a generalized familial angiodysplastic disorder. The neurological manifestations of this entity are due to Central Nervous System vascular lesions or to complications of other visceral lesions such as pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae. This report describes two patients (males, 40 and 61 years old), with brain abscesses associated with HHT. The CT, MRI and Angiographic findings as well as the therapeutic approach are analyzed. Patients with brain abscess of unknown origin must be evaluated for the presence of lung vascular malformation in association with HHT. (author)

  17. Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis presenting as intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Wigger, Olivier; Windecker, Stephan; Bloechlinger, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis is a rare cause of valvular heart disease, most commonly associated with advanced malignancy. The morbidity of this kind of endocarditis lies in its tendency to embolize, while the valve function is usually preserved. The central nervous system is the most common site of embolization, leading to ischemic stroke. We report a case of nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis complicated by intracerebral hemorrhage as the first manifestation of adenocarcinoma of the lung. The endocarditis led to severe aortic regurgitation. In view of the advanced stage of lung cancer, the patient refused further therapy. He passed away 3 weeks after first diagnosis of the adenocarcinoma.

  18. Cerebellar transcranial static magnetic field stimulation transiently reduces cerebellar brain inhibition.

    Matsugi, Akiyoshi; Okada, Y

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) delivered using a compact cylindrical NdFeB magnet over the cerebellum modulates the excitability of the cerebellum and contralateral primary motor cortex, as measured using cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI), motor evoked potentials (MEPs), and resting motor threshold (rMT). These parameters were measured before tSMS or sham stimulation and immediately, 5 minutes and 10 minutes after stimulation. There were no significant changes in CBI, MEPs or rMT over time in the sham stimulation condition, and no changes in MEPs or rMT in the tSMS condition. However, CBI was significantly decreased immediately after tSMS as compared to that before and 5 minutes after tSMS. Our results suggest that tSMS delivered to the cerebellar hemisphere transiently reduces cerebellar inhibitory output but does not affect the excitability of the contralateral motor cortex.

  19. Remote Hemorrhage after Burr Hole Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    Kim, Chang Hyeun; Song, Geun Sung; Kim, Young Ha; Kim, Young Soo; Sung, Soon Ki; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2017-10-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and symptomatic subdural hygroma are common diseases that require neurosurgical management. Burr hole trephination is the most popular surgical treatment for CSDH and subdural hygroma because of a low recurrence rate and low morbidity compared with craniotomy with membranectomy, and twist-drill craniotomy. Many reports suggest that placing a catheter in the subdural space for drainage can further reduce the rate of recurrence; however, complications associated with this type of drainage include acute subdural hematoma, cortical injury, and infection. Remote hemorrhage due to overdrainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is another possible complication of burr hole trephination with catheter drainage that has rarely been reported. Here, we present 2 cases of remote hemorrhages following burr hole trephination with catheter drainage for the treatment of CSDH and symptomatic subdural hygroma. One patient developed intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the contralateral hemisphere, while another patient developed remote hemorrhage 3 days after the procedure due to the sudden drainage of a large amount of subdural fluid over a 24-hour period. These findings suggest that catheter drainage should be carefully monitored to avoid overdrainage of CSF after burr hole trephination.

  20. Post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus: Recent advances and new therapeutic insights.

    Chen, Qianwei; Feng, Zhou; Tan, Qiang; Guo, Jing; Tang, Jun; Tan, Liang; Feng, Hua; Chen, Zhi

    2017-04-15

    Post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH), also referred to as progressive ventricular dilatation, is caused by disturbances in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow or absorption following hemorrhage in the brain. As one of the most serious complications of neonatal/adult intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and traumatic brain injury (TBI), PHH is associated with increased morbidity and disability of these events. Common sequelae of PHH include neurocognitive impairment, motor dysfunction, and growth impairment. Non-surgical measures to reduce increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in PHH have shown little success and most patients will ultimately require surgical management, such as external ventricular drainage and shunting which mostly by inserting a CSF drainage shunt. Unfortunately, shunt complications are common and the optimum time for intervention is unclear. To date, there remains no comprehensive strategy for PHH management and it becomes imperative that to explore new therapeutic targets and methods for PHH. Over past decades, increasing evidence have indicated that hemorrhage-derived blood and subsequent metabolic products may play a key role in the development of IVH-, SAH- and TBI-associated PHH. Several intervention strategies have recently been evaluated and cross-referenced. In this review, we summarized and discussed the common aspects of hydrocephalus following IVH, SAH and TBI, relevant experimental animal models, clinical translation of in vivo experiments, and potential preventive and therapeutic targets for PHH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder

    Anila M. D'Mello

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. In contrast, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD.

  2. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder.

    D'Mello, Anila M; Stoodley, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD.

  3. Neurologic Complications of Transplantation.

    Dhar, Rajat

    2018-02-01

    Neurologic disturbances including encephalopathy, seizures, and focal deficits complicate the course 10-30% of patients undergoing organ or stem cell transplantation. While much or this morbidity is multifactorial and often associated with extra-cerebral dysfunction (e.g., graft dysfunction, metabolic derangements), immunosuppressive drugs also contribute significantly. This can either be through direct toxicity (e.g., posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome from calcineurin inhibitors such as tacrolimus in the acute postoperative period) or by facilitating opportunistic infections in the months after transplantation. Other neurologic syndromes such as akinetic mutism and osmotic demyelination may also occur. While much of this neurologic dysfunction may be reversible if related to metabolic factors or drug toxicity (and the etiology is recognized and reversed), cases of multifocal cerebral infarction, hemorrhage, or infection may have poor outcomes. As transplant patients survive longer, delayed infections (such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy) and post-transplant malignancies are increasingly reported.

  4. MR of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Spickler, E.; Lufkin, R.; Frazee, J.; Lylyk, P.; Vinuela, F.; Bentson, J.; Dion, J.

    1987-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced in four Macaca nemestrina monkeys using the technique of Frazee. CT and MR imaging was performed immediately after the procedure and at frequent intervals up to 2 weeks after hemorrhage. The imaging studies were compared with clinical evaluations and pathologic specimens of all animals. Additional human clinical CT/MR studies of subarachnoid hemorrhage were also studied. Acute hemorrhage was recognized on MR images as an increase in signal in the region of clot compared with surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. This most likely reflects T1 shortening due to proton binding rather than a pure paramagnetic effect. While CT is sensitive to the hemoglobin protein in acute hemorrhage, the superior resolution of MR of the basal cisterns results in equal or better definition of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage on MR studies in many cases

  5. Various phases of intracerebral hemorrhage

    Kino, Masao; Anno, Izumi; Yano, Yuhiko; Anno, Yasuro.

    1980-01-01

    Cases of intracerebral hemorrhage except typical putamen thalamic hemorrhage were reported. It is not difficult to diagnose typical attacks of cerebral apoplexy in patients older than 40 years with hypertension by CT. When the condition of the onset is not typical, cerebral infarction must be considered. Though conservative treatment is performed for severe cerebral hemorrhage and cerbral infarction, there is no specific medicine curing these diseases completely. On the contrary, the risk that the administration of fibrinolysis activators and STA-MCA anastomosis may induce cerebral hemorrhage is stressed. Not a few patients with cerebral apoplexy accompanied by small hemorrhagic focuses have been found, especially since CT was used widely. However, treatment for this disease has many inconsistencies. From above-mentioned facts, we recognize excellent roles of CT in an application of surgery for cerebral hemorrhage of early stage, and we, general radiologists, are under an obligation to advise most adequate theraphy for each patient. (Tsunoda, M.)

  6. Airway Complications of Total Artificial Heart.

    Pathak, Vikas; Donovan, Colin; Malhotra, Rajiv

    2017-02-01

    The total artificial heart is the mechanical device which is used as a bridge to the heart transplant in patients with biventricular failure. Due to the mechanical nature of the device, patients receiving total artificial heart (TAH) require to be on anticoagulation therapy. Hemorrhage and coagulopathy are few of the known complications of TAH.

  7. Cerebro-Cerebellar Functional Connectivity is Associated with Cerebellar Excitation-Inhibition Balance in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Hegarty, John P; Weber, Dylan J; Cirstea, Carmen M; Beversdorf, David Q

    2018-05-23

    Atypical functional connectivity (FC) and an imbalance of excitation-to-inhibition (E/I) have been previously reported in cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The current investigation used resting state fMRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) to examine the relationships between E/I (glutamate + glutamine/GABA) and FC of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterolateral cerebellar hemisphere from 14 adolescents/adults with ASD and 12 age/sex/IQ-matched controls. In this pilot sample, cerebro-cerebellar FC was positively associated with cerebellar E/I and listening comprehension abilities in individuals with ASD but not controls. Additionally, a subgroup of individuals with ASD and low FC (n = 5) exhibited reduced E/I and impaired listening comprehension. Thus, altered functional coherence of cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD may be related with a cerebellar E/I imbalance.

  8. Towards a Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications

    2011-10-01

    such as endothelin Table 1. Long-Term Complications of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)  Retinopathy Results in retinal edema, hemorrhage and loss of...fact, people with type 1 diabetes who retain a low but detectable level of C-peptide are less prone to develop microvascular complications of the eyes...induced apoptosis of pericytes in early diabetic retinopathy . J Ophthalmol 2010:746978 33. Zhao X, Carnevale KA, Cathcart MK (2003) Human monocytes use

  9. Non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Bashir, Asma; Mikkelsen, Ronni; Sørensen, Leif

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Repeat imaging in patients with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (NASAH) remains controversial. We aim to report our experience with NASAH with different hemorrhage patterns, and to investigate the need for further diagnostic workup to determine the underlying cause of hemorrhage. M...... adequate with absence of hematoma and vasospasm. In contrast, a follow-up DSA should be mandatory for confirming or excluding vascular pathology in case of nPMSAH in order to prevent rebleeding....

  10. Hemorrhagic Aspects of Gaucher Disease

    Hanna Rsenbaum

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease (GD is an inherited lysosomal disorder, originating from deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase. Normally, GCase hydrolyzes glucocerebroside (GC to glucose and ceramide; however, impaired activity of this enzyme leads to the accumulation of GC in macrophages, termed “Gaucher cells.” Gaucher disease is associated with hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, skeletal complications and in some forms involves the central nervous system. Coagulation abnormalities are common among GD patients due to impaired production and chronic consumption of coagulation factors. Bleeding phenomena are variable (as are other symptoms of GD and include mucosal and surgical hemorrhages. Four main etiological factors account for the hemostatic defect in GD: thrombocytopenia, abnormal platelet function, reduced production of coagulation factors, and activation of fibrinolysis. Thrombocytopenia relates not only to hypersplenism and decreased megakaryopoiesis by the infiltrated bone marrow but also to immune thrombocytopenia. Autoimmunity, especially the induction of platelet antibody production, might cause persistent thrombocytopenia. Enzyme replacement therapy reverses only part of the impaired coagulation system in Gaucher disease. Other therapeutic and supportive measures should be considered to prevent and/or treat bleeding in GD. Gaucher patients should be evaluated routinely for coagulation abnormalities especially prior to surgery and dental and obstetric procedures.

  11. [Hemorrhagic adrenal pseudocyst: case report].

    Basile, G; Buffone, A; Cicciarella, G; di Mari, P; Cirino, E

    2004-01-01

    Adrenal cysts are usually asymptomatic; they are usually identified occasionally during ultrasound or C.T. scans (incidentaloma). Among adrenal cysts the most common types are epithelial cysts and pseudocysts. Intracystic haemorrhage is one of the possible complications of adrenal pseudocysts. We report a case of a young woman with right superior abdominal pain, fever and acute anemia. A C.T. scan showed a 10 cm. mass between the liver and the right kidney. To be sure of the nature of this mass also M.R., urography and C.T.-guided biopsy were carried out. This latter only let us make the final diagnosis of hemorrhagic adrenal pseudocyst. Thereafter, a laparotomic right adrenalectomy was performed, with full recovery of the patient. Adrenal cysts may cause differential diagnostic problems with masses of contiguous organs like kidney, liver and gallbladder. For this reason, ultrasound and C.T. scans may not be sufficient and must be completed by M.R., urography and/or C.T.-guided biopsy. Intracystic hamorrhage, spontaneous or post-traumatic, may cause to the patient acute anemia which, as soon as the diagnosis is confirmed, indicates surgery. The operation usually is a laparotomic adrenalectomy, since the laparoscopic approach is not sufficient to control large masses with active bleeding inside.

  12. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and acute hepatitis: a case report

    Maria Paula Gomes Mourão

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is the world's most important viral hemorrhagic fever disease, the most geographically wide-spread of the arthropod-born viruses, and it causes a wide clinical spectrum of disease. We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by acute hepatitis. The initial picture of classical dengue fever was followed by painful liver enlargement, vomiting, hematemesis, epistaxis and diarrhea. Severe liver injury was detected by laboratory investigation, according to a syndromic surveillance protocol, expressed in a self-limiting pattern and the patient had a complete recovery. The serological tests for hepatitis and yellow fever viruses were negative. MAC-ELISA for dengue was positive.

  13. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and acute hepatitis: a case report.

    Mourão, Maria Paula Gomes; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães de; Bastos, Michele de Souza; Albuquerque, Bernardino Cláudio de; Alecrim, Wilson Duarte

    2004-12-01

    Dengue fever is the world's most important viral hemorrhagic fever disease, the most geographically wide-spread of the arthropod-born viruses, and it causes a wide clinical spectrum of disease. We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by acute hepatitis. The initial picture of classical dengue fever was followed by painful liver enlargement, vomiting, hematemesis, epistaxis and diarrhea. Severe liver injury was detected by laboratory investigation, according to a syndromic surveillance protocol, expressed in a self-limiting pattern and the patient had a complete recovery. The serological tests for hepatitis and yellow fever viruses were negative. MAC-ELISA for dengue was positive.

  14. Renal Artery Embolization of Perirenal Hematoma in Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: A Case Report

    Choi, Hee Seok; Lee, Yong Seok; Lim, Ji Hyon; Kim, Kyung Soo; Yoon, Yup [Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae Cheol [Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is an acute viral disease characterized by fever, hemorrhage and renal failure. Among the various hemorrhagic complications of HFRS, spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma are very rare findings. We report here on a case of HFRS complicated by massive perirenal hematoma, and this was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is an acute infectious disease caused by hantavirus. HFRS is clinically characterized by fever, renal failure and hemorrhage in organs such as lung, kidney, spleen and the pituitary gland. Renal medullary hemorrhage is a well-known complication in the kidney, but spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma in HFRS is rare, and patients showing continuous bleeding and massive perirenal hematoma have often been surgically treated. We report here on a case of HFRS complicated by massive perirenal hematoma, and the patient was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization. In summary, spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma is a rare complication of HFRS. We report here on a case of HFRS that caused massive perirenal hematoma, and this was treated with superselective renal artery embolization.

  15. Renal Artery Embolization of Perirenal Hematoma in Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: A Case Report

    Choi, Hee Seok; Lee, Yong Seok; Lim, Ji Hyon; Kim, Kyung Soo; Yoon, Yup; Hwang, Jae Cheol

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is an acute viral disease characterized by fever, hemorrhage and renal failure. Among the various hemorrhagic complications of HFRS, spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma are very rare findings. We report here on a case of HFRS complicated by massive perirenal hematoma, and this was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is an acute infectious disease caused by hantavirus. HFRS is clinically characterized by fever, renal failure and hemorrhage in organs such as lung, kidney, spleen and the pituitary gland. Renal medullary hemorrhage is a well-known complication in the kidney, but spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma in HFRS is rare, and patients showing continuous bleeding and massive perirenal hematoma have often been surgically treated. We report here on a case of HFRS complicated by massive perirenal hematoma, and the patient was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization. In summary, spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma is a rare complication of HFRS. We report here on a case of HFRS that caused massive perirenal hematoma, and this was treated with superselective renal artery embolization

  16. Perimesencephalic hemorrhage: a nonaneurysmal and benign form of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    van Gijn, J.; van Dongen, K. J.; Vermeulen, M.; Hijdra, A.

    1985-01-01

    We studied 28 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and normal angiograms. On early CT (within 5 days) in 13 cases, blood was seen mainly or only in the cisterns around the midbrain. This pattern of hemorrhage was found in only 1 of 92 patients with a ruptured aneurysm. None of the unexplained

  17. Subconjunctival Hemorrhage (Broken Blood Vessel in Eye)

    Subconjunctival hemorrhage (broken blood vessel in eye) Overview A subconjunctival hemorrhage (sub-kun-JUNK-tih-vul HEM-uh-ruj) ... may not even realize you have a subconjunctival hemorrhage until you look in the mirror and notice ...

  18. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F: A rare cause of cerebellar ataxia with chorea.

    Carré, G; Marelli, C; Anheim, M; Geny, C; Renaud, M; Rezvani, H R; Koenig, M; Guissart, C; Tranchant, C

    2017-05-15

    The complementation group F of Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP-F) is rare in the Caucasian population, and usually devoid of neurological symptoms. We report two cases, both Caucasian, who exhibited progressive cerebellar ataxia, chorea, a mild subcortical frontal cognitive impairment, and in one case severe polyneuropathy. Brain MRI demonstrated cerebellar (2/2) and cortical (1/2) atrophy. Both patients had only mild sunburn sensitivity and no skin cancer. Mini-exome sequencing approach revealed in ERCC4, two heterozygous mutations, one of which was never described (c.580-584+1delCCAAGG, exon 3), in the first case, and an already reported homozygous mutation, in the second case. These cases emphasize that XP-F is a rare cause of recessive cerebellar ataxia and can in some cases clinically mimic Huntington's disease due to chorea and executive impairment. The association of ataxia, chorea, and sun hypersensitivity are major guidance for the diagnosis, which should not be missed, in order to prevent skin neoplastic complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Skin Complications

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Skin Complications Diabetes can affect every part of the ... lipoidica diabeticorum, diabetic blisters, and eruptive xanthomatosis. General Skin Conditions Bacterial Infections Several kinds of bacterial infections ...

  20. Diphtheria Complications

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diphtheria Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Diphtheria Home About Diphtheria Causes and Transmission Symptoms Complications ...

  1. Circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Schievink, W. I.; Karemaker, J. M.; Hageman, L. M.; van der Werf, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were investigated in a group of 500 consecutive patients admitted to a neurosurgical center. Subarachnoid hemorrhage occurred during stressful events in 42.8% of the patients, during nonstrenuous activities in 34.4%, and during rest or

  2. Anosmia After Perimesencephalic Nonaneurysmal Hemorrhage

    Greebe, Paut; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Algra, Ale

    Background and Purpose-Anosmia frequently occurs after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage not only after clipping, but also after endovascular coiling. Thus, at least in part, anosmia is caused by the hemorrhage itself and not only by surgical treatment. However, it is unknown whether anosmia is

  3. Computed Tomography of Interacerebral Hemorrhage

    Kim, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Jong Beum; Lee, Yong Chul; Lee, Kwan Seh; Park, Soo Soung

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate and reliable method for the diagnosis of intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage. The precise anatomic extent of the nematoma, associated cerebral edema, ventricular deformity and displacement, and hydrocephalus are all readily assessed. Aside from head trauma, the principal cause of intracerebral hematoma is hypertensive vascular disease. Although hematomas from various causes may present similar CT appearances frequently the correct etiology may be suggested by consideration of patient's age, clinical history, and the location of the hematoma. The analytical study was performed in 180 cases of intracerebral hemorrhages by CT from October 1981 to January 1983. The results were as follows; 1. The most prevalent age group was 6th decade (37.2%). Male was prevalent to female at the ration of 1.6 to 1. 2. The most common symptom and sign was mental disturbance (48.7%), motor weakness (23%), headache (10.6%), nausea and vomiting (9.8%). 3. The causes of hemorrhage were hypertension (53.9%), head trauma (30.6%), aneurysm (6.1%) and A-V malformation (7.2%). 4. The frequent locations of hemorrhage were basal ganglia and thalamus (40.4%), lobes (35%), ventricles (21.8%). 5. The distribution of hemorrhage was intracerebral hemorrhage (65.6%), intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage (30.3%), intraventricular hemorrhage (4.4%).

  4. Mathematical models of human cerebellar development in the fetal period.

    Dudek, Krzysztof; Nowakowska-Kotas, Marta; Kędzia, Alicja

    2018-04-01

    The evaluation of cerebellar growth in the fetal period forms a part of a widely used examination to identify any features of abnormalities in early stages of human development. It is well known that the development of anatomical structures, including the cerebellum, does not always follow a linear model of growth. The aim of the study was to analyse a variety of mathematical models of human cerebellar development in fetal life to determine their adequacy. The study comprised 101 fetuses (48 males and 53 females) between the 15th and 28th weeks of fetal life. The cerebellum was exposed and measurements of the vermis and hemispheres were performed, together with statistical analyses. The mathematical model parameters of fetal growth were assessed for crown-rump length (CRL) increases, transverse cerebellar diameter and ventrodorsal dimensions of the cerebellar vermis in the transverse plane, and rostrocaudal dimensions of the cerebellar vermis and hemispheres in the frontal plane. A variety of mathematical models were applied, including linear and non-linear functions. Taking into consideration the variance between models and measurements, as well as correlation parameters, the exponential and Gompertz models proved to be the most suitable for modelling cerebellar growth in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. However, the linear model gave a satisfactory approximation of cerebellar growth, especially in older fetuses. The proposed models of fetal cerebellar growth constructed on the basis of anatomical examination and objective mathematical calculations could be useful in the estimation of fetal development. © 2018 Anatomical Society.

  5. Postural responses to multidirectional stance perturbations in cerebellar ataxia

    Bakker, Maaike; Allum, John H J; Visser, Jasper E; Grüneberg, Christian; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Kremer, H P H; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    Previous studies of patients with focal cerebellar damage underscored the importance of the cerebellum for balance control. These studies were restricted to postural control in the pitch plane, and focused mainly on leg muscle responses. Here, we examined the effect of degenerative cerebellar

  6. Cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation modulates verbal working memory.

    Boehringer, Andreas; Macher, Katja; Dukart, Juergen; Villringer, Arno; Pleger, Burkhard

    2013-07-01

    Neuroimaging studies show cerebellar activations in a wide range of cognitive tasks and patients with cerebellar lesions often present cognitive deficits suggesting a cerebellar role in higher-order cognition. We used cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), known to inhibit neuronal excitability, over the cerebellum to investigate if cathodal tDCS impairs verbal working memory, an important higher-order cognitive faculty. We tested verbal working memory as measured by forward and backward digit spans in 40 healthy young participants before and after applying cathodal tDCS (2 mA, stimulation duration 25 min) to the right cerebellum using a randomized, sham-controlled, double-blind, cross-over design. In addition, we tested the effect of cerebellar tDCS on word reading, finger tapping and a visually cued sensorimotor task. In line with lower digit spans in patients with cerebellar lesions, cerebellar tDCS reduced forward digit spans and blocked the practice dependent increase in backward digit spans. No effects of tDCS on word reading, finger tapping or the visually cued sensorimotor task were found. Our results support the view that the cerebellum contributes to verbal working memory as measured by forward and backward digit spans. Moreover, the induction of reversible "virtual cerebellar lesions" in healthy individuals by means of tDCS may improve our understanding of the mechanistic basis of verbal working memory deficits in patients with cerebellar lesions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Distinct Critical Cerebellar Subregions for Components of Verbal Working Memory

    Cooper, Freya E.; Grube, Manon; Von Kriegstein, Katharina; Kumar, Sukhbinder; English, Philip; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    A role for the cerebellum in cognition has been proposed based on studies suggesting a profile of cognitive deficits due to cerebellar stroke. Such studies are limited in the determination of the detailed organisation of cerebellar subregions that are critical for different aspects of cognition. In this study we examined the correlation between…

  8. Rhythmic finger tapping reveals cerebellar dysfunction in essential tremor.

    Buijink, A W G; Broersma, M; van der Stouwe, A M M; van Wingen, G A; Groot, P F C; Speelman, J D; Maurits, N M; van Rootselaar, A F

    2015-04-01

    Cerebellar circuits are hypothesized to play a central role in the pathogenesis of essential tremor. Rhythmic finger tapping is known to strongly engage the cerebellar motor circuitry. We characterize cerebellar and, more specifically, dentate nucleus function, and neural correlates of cerebellar output in essential tremor during rhythmic finger tapping employing functional MRI. Thirty-one propranolol-sensitive essential tremor patients with upper limb tremor and 29 healthy controls were measured. T2*-weighted EPI sequences were acquired. The task consisted of alternating rest and finger tapping blocks. A whole-brain and region-of-interest analysis was performed, the latter focusing on the cerebellar cortex, dentate nucleus and inferior olive nucleus. Activations were also related to tremor severity. In patients, dentate activation correlated positively with tremor severity as measured by the tremor rating scale part A. Patients had reduced activation in widespread cerebellar cortical regions, and additionally in the inferior olive nucleus, and parietal and frontal cortex, compared to controls. The increase in dentate activation with tremor severity supports involvement of the dentate nucleus in essential tremor. Cortical and cerebellar changes during a motor timing task in essential tremor might point to widespread changes in cerebellar output in essential tremor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Postural responses to multidirectional stance perturbations in cerebellar ataxia

    Bakker, Maaike; Allum, John H J; Visser, Jasper E; Grüneberg, Christian; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Kremer, H P H; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies of patients with focal cerebellar damage underscored the importance of the cerebellum for balance control. These studies were restricted to postural control in the pitch plane, and focused mainly on leg muscle responses. Here, we examined the effect of degenerative cerebellar

  10. Time estimation in Parkinson's disease and degenerative cerebellar disease

    Beudel, Martijin; Galama, Sjoukje; Leenders, Klaus L.; de Jong, Bauke M.

    2008-01-01

    With functional MRI, we recently identified fronto-cerebellar activations in predicting time to reach a target and basal ganglia activation in velocity estimation, that is, small interval assessment. We now tested these functions in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and degenerative cerebellar

  11. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vertebral artery disease

    Cocker, Laurens J.L. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kliniek Sint-Jan Radiologie, Brussels (Belgium); Compter, A.; Kappelle, L.J.; Worp, H.B. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Luijten, P.R.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-09-15

    Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are a newly recognised entity associated with atherothromboembolic cerebrovascular disease and worse physical functioning. We aimed to investigate the relationship of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia and with vascular risk factors. We evaluated the MR images of 46 patients with a recent vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke and a symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis ≥50 % from the Vertebral Artery Stenting Trial (VAST) for the presence of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities ≤1.5 cm. At inclusion in VAST, data were obtained on age, sex, history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, and vascular risk factors. Adjusted risk ratios were calculated with Poisson regression analyses for the relation between cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vascular risk factors. Sixteen out of 46 (35 %) patients showed cerebellar cortical infarct cavities on the initial MRI, and only one of these 16 patients was known with a previous vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke. In patients with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia, risk factor profiles of patients with cerebellar cortical infarct cavities were not different from patients without these cavities. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are seen on MRI in as much as one third of patients with recently symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis. Since patients usually have no prior history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, cerebellar cortical infarct cavities should be added to the spectrum of common incidental brain infarcts visible on routine MRI. (orig.)

  12. Humor and laughter in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    Frank, B; Propson, B; Göricke, S; Jacobi, H; Wild, B; Timmann, D

    2012-06-01

    Humor is a complex behavior which includes cognitive, affective and motor responses. Based on observations of affective changes in patients with cerebellar lesions, the cerebellum may support cerebral and brainstem areas involved in understanding and appreciation of humorous stimuli and expression of laughter. The aim of the present study was to examine if humor appreciation, perception of humorous stimuli, and the succeeding facial reaction differ between patients with cerebellar degeneration and healthy controls. Twenty-three adults with pure cerebellar degeneration were compared with 23 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy control subjects. No significant difference in humor appreciation and perception of humorous stimuli could be found between groups using the 3 Witz-Dimensionen Test, a validated test asking for funniness and aversiveness of jokes and cartoons. Furthermore, while observing jokes, humorous cartoons, and video sketches, facial expressions of subjects were videotaped and afterwards analysed using the Facial Action Coding System. Using depression as a covariate, the number, and to a lesser degree, the duration of facial expressions during laughter were reduced in cerebellar patients compared to healthy controls. In sum, appreciation of humor appears to be largely preserved in patients with chronic cerebellar degeneration. Cerebellar circuits may contribute to the expression of laughter. Findings add to the literature that non-motor disorders in patients with chronic cerebellar disease are generally mild, but do not exclude that more marked disorders may show up in acute cerebellar disease and/or in more specific tests of humor appreciation.

  13. Cerebellar involvement in metabolic disorders: a pattern-recognition approach

    Steinlin, M.; Boltshauser, E.; Blaser, S.

    1998-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism can affect the cerebellum during development, maturation and later during life. We have established criteria for pattern recognition of cerebellar abnormalities in metabolic disorders. The abnormalities can be divided into four major groups: cerebellar hypoplasia (CH), hyperplasia, cerebellar atrophy (CA), cerebellar white matter abnormalities (WMA) or swelling, and involvement of the dentate nuclei (DN) or cerebellar cortex. CH can be an isolated typical finding, as in adenylsuccinase deficiency, but is also occasionally seen in many other disorders. Differentiation from CH and CA is often difficult, as in carbohydrate deficient glycoprotein syndrome or 2-l-hydroxyglutaric acidaemia. In cases of atrophy the relationship of cerebellar to cerebral atrophy is important. WMA may be diffuse or patchy, frequently predominantly around the DN. Severe swelling of white matter is present during metabolic crisis in maple syrup urine disease. The DN can be affected by metabolite deposition, necrosis, calcification or demyelination. Involvement of cerebellar cortex is seen in infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy. Changes in DN and cerebellar cortex are rather typical and therefore most helpful; additional features should be sought as they are useful in narrowing down the differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  14. Reduced contralateral hemispheric flow measured by SPECT in cerebellar lesions

    Sönmezoğlu, K; Sperling, B; Henriksen, T

    1993-01-01

    Four patients with clinical signs of cerebellar stroke were studied twice by SPECT using 99mTc-HMPAO as a tracer for cerebral blood flow (CBF). When first scanned 6 to 22 days after onset, all had a region of very low CBF in the symptomatic cerebellar hemisphere, and a mild to moderate CBF reduct...

  15. The Cerebellum and Language: Evidence from Patients with Cerebellar Degeneration

    Stoodley, Catherine J.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and imaging studies suggest that the cerebellum is involved in language tasks, but the extent to which slowed language production in cerebellar patients contributes to their poor performance on these tasks is not clear. We explored this relationship in 18 patients with cerebellar degeneration and 16 healthy controls who completed measures…

  16. New evidence for the cerebellar involvement in personality traits

    Eleonora ePicerni

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the recognition of its role in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum has been involved in cognitive, emotional and even personality domains. This study investigated the relationships between cerebellar macro- and micro-structural variations and temperamental traits measured by Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI. High resolution T1-weighted and Diffusion Tensor Images of 100 healthy subjects aged 18-59 years were acquired by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance scanner. In multiple regression analyses, cerebellar Gray Matter (GM or White Matter (WM volumes, GM Mean Diffusivity (MD, and WM Fractional Anisotropy (FA were used as dependent variables, TCI scores as regressors, gender, age, and education years as covariates. Novelty Seeking scores were associated positively with the cerebellar GM volumes and FA, and negatively with MD. No significant association between Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence or Persistence scores and cerebellar structural measures was found. The present data put toward a cerebellar involvement in the management of novelty.

  17. Peliosis Hepatis with Hemorrhagic Necrosis and Rupture: a Case Report with Emphasis on the Multi-Detector CT Findings

    Kim, Eun-A; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Jeon, Se-Jung; Cai, Quan-Yu; Lee, Young-Whan; Yoon, Seong Eon; Yoon, Ki-Jung; Juhng, Seon-Kwan

    2007-01-01

    We report here on an uncommon case of peliosis hepatis with hemorrhagic necrosis that was complicated by massive intrahepatic bleeding and rupture, and treated by emergent right lobectomy. We demonstrate the imaging findings, with emphasis on the triphasic, contrast-enhanced multidetector CT findings, as well as reporting the clinical outcome in a case of peliosis hepatis with fatal hemorrhage.

  18. Contribution of Somatic and Dendritic SK Channels in the Firing Rate of Deep Cerebellar Nuclei: Implication in Cerebellar Ataxia

    Samira Abbasi

    2016-01-01

    Discussion: Therefore, inhibition of SK channel in DCN can cause cerebellar ataxia, and SK channel openers can have a therapeutic effect on cerebellar ataxia. In addition, the location of SK channels could be important in therapeutic goals. Dendritic SK channels can be a more effective target compared to somatic SK channels

  19. Disorganized foliation of unilateral cerebellar hemisphere as cerebellar cortical dysplasia in patients with recurrent seizures: A case report

    Baek, Hye Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    We present a rare case of abnormal foliation for one cerebellar hemisphere on MR imaging, showing vertically-oriented folia. Foliation of contralateral cerebellar hemisphere and other structures in the posterior fossa were normal, and the patient has no neurologic deficits. This rare and unique abnormality is considered a kind of developmental error of the cerebellum.

  20. Insights into cerebellar development and medulloblastoma.

    Bihannic, Laure; Ayrault, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar development is an extensive process that begins during early embryonic stages and persists more than one year after birth in human. Therefore, the cerebellum is susceptible to acquire various developmental abnormalities leading to numerous diseases such as medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric malignant brain tumor. One third of the patients with medulloblastoma are incurable and survivors have a poor quality of life due to the aggressiveness of the broad-spectrum treatments. Within the past few years, it has been highlighted that medulloblastoma is a heterogeneous disease that is divided in four molecular subgroups. This recent advance in the field, combined with the development of associated preclinical models for each subgroup, should enable, in the future, the discovery and use of targeted therapy in clinical treatments for each subtype of medulloblastoma. In this review, we first aim to show how deregulation of cerebellar development can lead to medulloblastoma formation and then to present the advances in the molecular subgrouping of medulloblastoma and the associated preclinical models. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. A case of repeated intracerebral hemorrhages secondary to ventriculoperitoneal shunt

    Jinbing Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ventriculoperitoneal shunt is a routinely performed treatment in neurosurgical department. Intracerebral hemorrhage, as a complication after shunt catheterization, is really rare but with high mortality. In this study, we reported a case of a 74-year-old man who suffered from repeated intracerebral hemorrhage after ventriculoperitoneal shunt. The first hemorrhage happened 63 h after the 1st surgery, and most hematomas were located in the ipsilateral occipital lobe and intraventricles, along the ventricular catheter. Fresh blood clot casts blocked the external ventricular draining catheter, which was inserted into the right front horn during the 3rd surgery, indicating new intraventricular bleeding happened. A large hematoma in ipsilateral frontal lobe was detected on the 3rd day after the removal of external ventricular draining catheter. Different hemorrhagic locations and time points were encountered on the same case. We discussed the possible causes of repeated hemorrhage for this case, and the pre-operative preparation including risk evaluation in future clinical work.

  2. [Twin pregnancy as the risk factor for neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage].

    Wieczorek, Aleksandra I; Krasomski, Grzegorz

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to find the perinatal risk factors of intravenricular hemorrhage in twin neonates. A retrospective analysis of 203 twin pregnancies and deliveries between 2003 and 2009 was performed. Then data according birth state and neonatal complications in 406 twins were analyzed. Twin outcome was compared with the outcome of 105 singletons born at the same time and at the same gestational age as twins. Intraventricular hemorrhage was diagnosed in 116/406 (29%) of twins. IVH was found two times more often in the analyzed group than in singletons born at the same gestational age (29% vs. 18%, p = 0,03). In 96% I and II grade hemorrhage was diagnosed and in 4% III and IV grade hemorrhage in the Papille scale was found. 1) Intraventricular hemorrhage is found more often in twins than in singleton neonates born at the same gestational age. 2) IVH in twins correlate with preterm birth and low birth weight. IVH occur more often in twins with birth weight discordance and with too small maternal weight gain.

  3. Treatment of Nonvariceal Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage by Transcatheter Embolization

    Ali, Muhammad; Ul Haq, Tanveer; Salam, Basit; Beg, Madiha; Sayani, Raza; Azeemuddin, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the sensitivity of mesenteric angiography, technical success of hemostasis, clinical success rate, and complications of transcatheter embolization for the treatment of acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Material and Methods. A retrospective review of 200 consecutive patients who underwent mesenteric arteriography for acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage between February 2004 and February 2011 was done. Results. Of 200 angiographic studies, 114 correctly revealed the bleeding site with mesenteric angiography. 47 (41%) patients had upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and 67 (59%) patients had lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Out of these 114, in 112 patients (98%) technical success was achieved with immediate cessation of bleeding. 81 patients could be followed for one month. Clinical success was achieved in 72 out of these 81 patients (89%). Seven patients rebled. 2 patients developed bowel ischemia. Four patients underwent surgery for bowel ischemia or rebleeding. Conclusion. The use of therapeutic transcatheter embolization for treatment of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is highly successful and relatively safe with 98% technical success and 2.4% postembolization ischemia in our series. In 89% of cases it was definitive without any further intervention

  4. Treatment of Non variceal Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage by Transcatheter Embolization

    Ali, M.; Ul Haq, T.; Salam, B.; Beg, M.; Sayani, R.; Azeemuddin, M.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the sensitivity of mesenteric angiography, technical success of hemostasis, clinical success rate, and complications of transcatheter embolization for the treatment of acute non variceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Material and Methods. A retrospective review of 200 consecutive patients who underwent mesenteric arteriography for acute non variceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage between February 2004 and February 2011 was done. Results. Of 200 angiographic studies, 114 correctly revealed the bleeding site with mesenteric angiography. 47 (41%) patients had upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and 67 (59%) patients had lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Out of these 114, in 112 patients (98%) technical success was achieved with immediate cessation of bleeding. 81 patients could be followed for one month. Clinical success was achieved in 72 out of these 81 patients (89%). Seven patients rebled. 2 patients developed bowel ischemia. Four patients underwent surgery for bowel ischemia or rebleeding. Conclusion. The use of therapeutic transcatheter embolization for treatment of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is highly successful and relatively safe with 98% technical success and 2.4% post embolization ischemia in our series. In 89% of cases it was definitive without any further intervention.

  5. Brain Perfusion Changes in Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Mititelu, R.; Mazilu, C.; Ghita, S.; Rimbu, A.; Marinescu, G.; Codorean, I.; Bajenaru, O.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: Despite the latest advances in medical treatment and neuro critical care, patients suffering spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) still have a very poor prognosis, with a greater mortality and larger neurological deficits at the survivors than for ischemic stroke. Many authors have shown that there are many mechanisms involved in the pathology of SICH: edema, ischemia, inflammation, apoptosis. All of these factors are affecting brain tissue surrounding hematoma and are responsible of the progressive neurological deterioration; most of these damages are not revealed by anatomical imaging techniques. The aim of our study was to asses the role of brain perfusion SPECT in demonstrating perfusion changes in SICH patients. Method: 17 SICH pts were studied. All pts underwent same day CT and brain SPECT with 99mTcHMPAO, 24h-5d from onset of stroke. Results: 14/17 pts showed a larger perfusion defect than expected after CT. In 2 pts hematoma diameter was comparable on CT and SPECT; 1pt had quasinormal aspect of SPECT study. In pts with larger defects, SPECT revealed a large cold spot with similar size compared with CT, and a surrounding hypo perfused area. 6/17 pts revealed cortical hyper perfusion adjacent to hypo perfused area and corresponding to a normal-appearing brain tissue on CT. In 3 pts we found crossed cerebellar diaskisis.In 2 pts we found cortical hypo perfused area in the contralateral cortex, with normal appearing brain tissue on CT. Conclusions: Brain perfusion SPECT revealed different types of perfusion changes in the brain tissue surrounding hematoma. These areas contain viable brain tissue that may be a target for future ne uroprotective strategies. Further studies are definitely required to demonstrate prognostic significance of these changes, but we can conclude that brain perfusion SPECT can play an important role in SICH, by early demonstrating functional changes responsible of clinical deterioration, thus allowing prompt

  6. Complications of laryngeal framework surgery (phonosurgery).

    Tucker, H M; Wanamaker, J; Trott, M; Hicks, D

    1993-05-01

    The rising popularity of surgery involving the laryngeal framework (surgical medialization of immobile vocal folds, vocal fold tightening, pitch variation, etc.) has resulted in increasing case experience. Little has appeared in the literature regarding complications or long-term results of this type of surgery. Several years' experience in a major referral center with various types of laryngeal framework surgery has led to a small number of complications. These have included late extrusion of the prosthesis and delayed hemorrhage. A review of these complications and recommendations for modification of technique to minimize them in the future are discussed.

  7. PRINCIPLES OF INTENSIVE CARE OF PATIENTS WITH SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGES AFTER CEREBRAL ANEURYSMS RUPTURE

    V. V. Krylov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. The paper presents the modern principles of intensive care of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage after cerebral aneurysms ruptures focusing on neuromonitoring, mechanical ventilation, intracranial pressure and hemodynamic correction, calcium antagonists prescription, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, nutritional support, thromboembolic complications prevention and infection complications management. 

  8. Association of Progressive Cerebellar Atrophy With Long-term Outcome in Patients With Anti-N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis.

    Iizuka, Takahiro; Kaneko, Juntaro; Tominaga, Naomi; Someko, Hidehiro; Nakamura, Masaaki; Ishima, Daisuke; Kitamura, Eiji; Masuda, Ray; Oguni, Eiichi; Yanagisawa, Toshiyuki; Kanazawa, Naomi; Dalmau, Josep; Nishiyama, Kazutoshi

    2016-06-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an immune-mediated disorder that occurs with IgG antibodies against the GluN1 subunit of NMDAR. Some patients develop reversible diffuse cerebral atrophy (DCA), but the long-term clinical significance of progressive brain and cerebellar atrophy is unknown. To report the long-term clinical implications of DCA and cerebellar atrophy in anti-NMDAR encephalitis. A retrospective observational study and long-term imaging investigation was conducted in the Department of Neurology at Kitasato University. Fifteen patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis admitted to Kitasato University Hospital between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2014, were included; data analysis was conducted between July 15, 2015, and January 18, 2016. Neurologic examination, immunotherapy, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies were performed. Long-term MRI changes in association with disease severity, serious complications (eg, pulmonary embolism, septic shock, and rhabdomyolysis), treatment, and outcome. The clinical outcome of 15 patients (median age, 21 years, [range, 14-46 years]; 10 [67%] female) was evaluated after a median follow-up of 68 months (range, 10-179 months). Thirteen patients (87%) received first-line immunotherapy (intravenous high-dose methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange alone or combined), and 4 individuals (27%) also received cyclophosphamide; 2 patients (13%) did not receive immunotherapy. In 5 patients (33%), ovarian teratoma was found and removed. Serious complications developed in 4 patients (27%). Follow-up MRI revealed DCA in 5 patients (33%) that, in 2 individuals (13%), was associated with progressive cerebellar atrophy. Long-term outcome was good in 13 patients (87%) and poor in the other 2 individuals (13%). Although cerebellar atrophy was associated with poor long-term outcome (2 of 2 vs 0 of 13 patients; P = .01), other features, such as DCA without cerebellar atrophy

  9. Nontraumatic temporal subcortical hemorrhage

    Weisberg, L.A.; Stazio, A.; Shamsnia, M.; Elliott, D.; Charity Hospital, New Orleans, LA

    1990-01-01

    Thirty patients with temporal hematomas were analyzed. Four with frontal extension survived. Of 6 with ganglionic extension, three had residual deficit. Of 8 with parietal extension, 4 had delayed deterioration and died, two patients recovered, and two with peritumoral hemorrhage due to glioblastoma multiforme died. Five patients with posterior temporal hematomas recovered. In 7 patients with basal-inferior temporal hematomas, angiography showed aneurysms in 3 cases, angiomas in 2 cases and no vascular lesion in 2 cases. Of 23 cases with negative angiography and no systemic cause for temporal hematoma, 12 patients were hypertensive and 11 were normotensive. Ten hypertensive patients without evidence of chronic vascular disease had the largest hematomas, extending into the parietal or ganglionic regions. Seven of these patients died; 3 had residual deficit. Eleven normotensive and two hypertensive patients with evidence of chronic vascular change had smaller hematomas. They survived with good functional recovery. (orig.)

  10. Intracerebral hemorrhage in brain tumors

    Fujita, Katsuzo; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    1980-01-01

    A series of 16 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumors are described. The literature is reviewed and the incidence of these cases is reported to be low, but we had clinically encountered these cases more commonly than reported, since CT was introduced to the neurosurgical field as a diagnostic aid. The presenting symptoms were those of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage or brain tumor. The intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumor may mask the cause of bleeding and confuse the diagnosis. The majority of the tumor causing the intracerebral hemorrhage are highly malignant as glioblastoma or metastatic brain tumor, but there are some benign tumors such as pituitary adenoma, hemangioblastoma, benign astrocytoma and meningioma, which would have good survival rates if discovered early. The mechanisms of massive hemorrhage with brain tumor are not clear. From pathological findings of our cases and other reports, the mechanism seems to be due to the vascular endothelial proliferation with subsequent obliteration of the lumen of the vessel. Thin walled, poorly formed vessels in tumor may also become distorted with growth of the tumor and these may easily rupture and bleed. Necrosis with subsequent loss of vessel support may be a factor in production of hemorrhage. Radiation therapy may be a predisposing factor. Children are rarely involved in these cases. The prognosis in the majority of cases would seen to be poor, since the majority of the tumor are highly malignant and most such patients are seen by the neurosurgeon some time after the hemorrhage has accomplished its fatal mischief. (author)

  11. Hydrocephalus secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Koga, Nobunori; Nakamura, Saburo; Kushi, Hidehiko; Yamamoto, Takamitsu; Tsubokawa, Takashi; Moriyasu, Nobuo

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between the extension and severity of subarachnoid hemorrhage, as demonstrated by computed tomography (CT), and hydrocephalus secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage was studied. In 94 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage, as analyzed by CT scan performed within 7 days after onset, high-density areas in the subarachnoid space were recognized in 61 cases (64%) and secondary hydrocephalus occurred in 22 cases (23%). 17 cases died within 2 weeks, before the occurrence of the hydrocephalus. The CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage was classified into 5 types, according to its severity and extension; especially the degree of high density in the basal cistern and/or cisterns around the brain stem was remarked. Secondary hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage was observed in 90% of the cases; they had a density higher than a CT number of 60 in the basal cistern and/or cisterns around the brain stem (Type V). The mean interval between the onset of subarachnoid hemorrhage and the appearance of hydrocephalus was 20.6 days. We conclude that a significantly high density of extravasated blood in the subarachnoid space, especially in the basal cistern and/or the cisterns around the brain stem, can be predictive of secondary hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage. (author)

  12. Intracerebral hemorrhage in brain tumors

    Fujita, K; Matsumoto, S [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1980-10-01

    A series of 16 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumors are described. The literature is reviewed and the incidence of these cases is reported to be low, but we had clinically encountered these cases more commonly than reported, since CT was introduced to the neurosurgical field as a diagnostic aid. The presenting symptoms were those of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage or brain tumor. The intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumor may mask the cause of bleeding and confuse the diagnosis. The majority of the tumor causing the intracerebral hemorrhage are highly malignant as glioblastoma or metastatic brain tumor, but there are some benign tumors such as pituitary adenoma, hemangioblastoma, benign astrocytoma and meningioma, which would have good survival rates if discovered early. The mechanisms of massive hemorrhage with brain tumor are not clear. From pathological findings of our cases and other reports, the mechanism seems to be due to the vascular endothelial proliferation with subsequent obliteration of the lumen of the vessel. Thin walled, poorly formed vessels in tumor may also become distorted with growth of the tumor and these may easily rupture and bleed. Necrosis with subsequent loss of vessel support may be a factor in production of hemorrhage. Radiation therapy may be a predisposing factor. Children are rarely involved in these cases. The prognosis in the majority of cases would seen to be poor, since the majority of the tumor are highly malignant and most such patients are seen by the neurosurgeon some time after the hemorrhage has accomplished its fatal mischief.

  13. Efficacy of transcatheter uterine artery embolization for treating emergency hemorrhage obstetrics and gynecology

    Li Hongwei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of selective iliac artery embolization (TAE) or uterine artery embolization (UAE) for treatment of emergency hemorrhage in obstetrics and gynecology. Methods: Selective bilateral TAE or UAE were performed on 59 patients with acute cervical hemorrhage from postpartum hemorrhage (30), cervical cancer (16), endometrial cancer (8), and choriocarcinoma (5). Gelfoam particles were used in postpartum hemorrhage; chemotherapeutics and Iodipin suspension were used in malignancy. Results: Bleeding was stopped completely in all 59 patients with TAE or UAE procedure time of 30-50 minutes (mean: 42.17±4.78 minutes). There were no serious complications. Conclusion: TAE or UAE are effective for treating emergency hemorrhage in obstetrics and gynecology. (authors)

  14. Endovascular Management of Intractable Postpartum Hemorrhage Caused by Vaginal Laceration

    Koganemaru, Masamichi; Nonoshita, Masaaki; Iwamoto, Ryoji; Kuhara, Asako; Nabeta, Masakazu; Kusumoto, Masashi; Kugiyama, Tomoko; Kozuma, Yutaka; Nagata, Shuji; Abe, Toshi

    2016-01-01

    PurposeWe evaluated the management of transcatheter arterial embolization for postpartum hemorrhage caused by vaginal laceration.Materials and MethodsWe reviewed seven cases of patients (mean age 30.9 years; range 27–35) with intractable hemorrhages and pelvic hematomas caused by vaginal lacerations, who underwent superselective transcatheter arterial embolization from January 2008 to July 2014. Postpartum hemorrhage was evaluated by angiographic vascular mapping to determine the vaginal artery’s architecture, technical and clinical success rates, and complications.ResultsThe vaginal artery was confirmed as the source of bleeding in all cases. The artery was found to originate from the uterine artery in three cases, the uterine and obturator arteries in two, or the internal pudendal artery in two. After vaginal artery embolization, persistent contrast extravasation from the inferior mesenteric artery as an anastomotic branch was noted in one patient. Nontarget vessels (the inferior vesical artery and nonbleeding vaginal arterial branches) were embolized in one patient. Effective control of hemostasis and no post-procedural complications were confirmed for all cases.ConclusionPostpartum hemorrhages caused by vaginal lacerations involve the vaginal artery arising from the anterior trunk of the internal iliac artery with various branching patterns. Superselective vaginal artery embolization is clinically acceptable for the successful treatment of vaginal laceration hemorrhages, with no complications. After vaginal artery embolization, it is suggested to check for the presence of other possible bleeding vessels by pelvic aortography with a catheter tip at the L3 vertebral level, and to perform a follow-up assessment.

  15. Endovascular Management of Intractable Postpartum Hemorrhage Caused by Vaginal Laceration

    Koganemaru, Masamichi, E-mail: mkoganemaru@med.kurume-u.ac.jp; Nonoshita, Masaaki, E-mail: z2rs-1973@yahoo.co.jp; Iwamoto, Ryoji, E-mail: iwamoto-ryouji@kurume-u.ac.jp; Kuhara, Asako, E-mail: kuhara-asako@med.kurume-u.ac.jp; Nabeta, Masakazu, E-mail: nabeta-masakazu@med.kurume-u.ac.jp; Kusumoto, Masashi, E-mail: kusumoto-masashi@med.kurume-u.ac.jp; Kugiyama, Tomoko, E-mail: kugiyama-tomoko@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Kurume University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Kozuma, Yutaka, E-mail: kouduma-yutaka@kurume-u.ac.jp [Kurume University School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Japan); Nagata, Shuji, E-mail: sn4735@med.kurume-u.ac.jp; Abe, Toshi, E-mail: toshiabe@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Kurume University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    PurposeWe evaluated the management of transcatheter arterial embolization for postpartum hemorrhage caused by vaginal laceration.Materials and MethodsWe reviewed seven cases of patients (mean age 30.9 years; range 27–35) with intractable hemorrhages and pelvic hematomas caused by vaginal lacerations, who underwent superselective transcatheter arterial embolization from January 2008 to July 2014. Postpartum hemorrhage was evaluated by angiographic vascular mapping to determine the vaginal artery’s architecture, technical and clinical success rates, and complications.ResultsThe vaginal artery was confirmed as the source of bleeding in all cases. The artery was found to originate from the uterine artery in three cases, the uterine and obturator arteries in two, or the internal pudendal artery in two. After vaginal artery embolization, persistent contrast extravasation from the inferior mesenteric artery as an anastomotic branch was noted in one patient. Nontarget vessels (the inferior vesical artery and nonbleeding vaginal arterial branches) were embolized in one patient. Effective control of hemostasis and no post-procedural complications were confirmed for all cases.ConclusionPostpartum hemorrhages caused by vaginal lacerations involve the vaginal artery arising from the anterior trunk of the internal iliac artery with various branching patterns. Superselective vaginal artery embolization is clinically acceptable for the successful treatment of vaginal laceration hemorrhages, with no complications. After vaginal artery embolization, it is suggested to check for the presence of other possible bleeding vessels by pelvic aortography with a catheter tip at the L3 vertebral level, and to perform a follow-up assessment.

  16. Non-operative management of arterial liver hemorrhages

    Goerich, J.; Rilinger, N.; Vogel, J.; Sokiranski, R.; Brambs, H.J. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Ulm (Germany); Brado, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Huppert, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Siech, M.; Ganzauge, F.; Beger, H.G. [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. of Ulm (Germany)

    1999-02-01

    A retrospective evaluation of embolotherapy in patients with arterial liver hemorrhages was carried out. Twenty-six patients, ranging in age from 10 days to 77 years with active arterial liver hemorrhages, underwent non-surgical embolotherapy. Bleeding was attributed to trauma (n = 21), tumor (n = 3), pancreatitis (n = 1), or unknown cause (n = 1). Twenty-nine embolizations were performed via a transfemoral (n = 26) or biliary (n = 2) approach. One bare Wallstent was placed into the common hepatic artery via to an axillary route to cover a false aneurysm due to pancreatitis. Treatment was controlled in 4 patients by cholangioscopy (n = 2) or by intravascular ultrasound (n = 2). Prior surgery had failed in 3 patients. Intervention controlled the hemorrhage in 24 of 26 (92 %) patients within 24 h. Embolotherapy failed in 1 patient with pancreatic carcinoma and occlusion of the portal vein. In 1 patient with an aneurysm of the hepatic artery treated by Wallstent insertion, total occlusion was not achieved in the following days, as demonstrated by CT and angiography. However, colour Doppler flow examination showed no flow in the aneurysm 6 months later. Complications were one liver abscess, treated successfully by percutaneous drainage for 10 days, and one gallbladder necrosis after superselective embolization of the cystic artery. Embolization is a effective tool with a low complication rate in the treatment of liver artery hemorrhage, even in patients in whom surgery has failed. (orig.) (orig.) With 2 figs., 26 refs.

  17. Imaging features of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage

    Schmit, M.; Vogel, W.; Horger, M.

    2006-01-01

    There are diverse etiologies of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage, so specific diagnosis may be difficult. Conventional radiography tends to be misleading as hemoptysis may lacking in patients with hemorrhagic anemia. Diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage should be differentiated from focal pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, active infection (tuberculosis) neoplasia, trauma, or embolism. (orig.)

  18. Hemorrhagic Lacrimation and Epistaxis in Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy

    Shireen Mreish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy is an uncommon benign cutaneous vasculitis. Despite its worrisome presentation, it carries good prognosis with rarely reported systemic involvement. Management of these cases has been an area of debate with majority of physicians adopting conservative modalities. We report a case that presented with classic triad of rash, low grade fever, and peripheral edema along with two rarely reported manifestations in literature: hemorrhagic lacrimation and epistaxis.

  19. Contribution of cerebellar sensorimotor adaptation to hippocampal spatial memory.

    Jean-Baptiste Passot

    Full Text Available Complementing its primary role in motor control, cerebellar learning has also a bottom-up influence on cognitive functions, where high-level representations build up from elementary sensorimotor memories. In this paper we examine the cerebellar contribution to both procedural and declarative components of spatial cognition. To do so, we model a functional interplay between the cerebellum and the hippocampal formation during goal-oriented navigation. We reinterpret and complete existing genetic behavioural observations by means of quantitative accounts that cross-link synaptic plasticity mechanisms, single cell and population coding properties, and behavioural responses. In contrast to earlier hypotheses positing only a purely procedural impact of cerebellar adaptation deficits, our results suggest a cerebellar involvement in high-level aspects of behaviour. In particular, we propose that cerebellar learning mechanisms may influence hippocampal place fields, by contributing to the path integration process. Our simulations predict differences in place-cell discharge properties between normal mice and L7-PKCI mutant mice lacking long-term depression at cerebellar parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. On the behavioural level, these results suggest that, by influencing the accuracy of hippocampal spatial codes, cerebellar deficits may impact the exploration-exploitation balance during spatial navigation.

  20. Laryngeal complications after type 1 thyroplasty.

    Cotter, C S; Avidano, M A; Crary, M A; Cassisi, N J; Gorham, M M

    1995-12-01

    Type I thyroplasty has become a primary surgical choice for voice restoration in patients with glottal incompetence. This study examines factors associated with laryngeal complications after type I thyroplasty. Ten laryngoscopic variables were analyzed from preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative videolaryngoscopies of 51 patients undergoing 58 medialization procedures. Ten patient and operative variables were examined by medical record review. Major complications were defined as wound hemorrhage, airway obstruction, or prosthesis extrusion. Minor complications were defined as vocal fold hematoma without airway obstruction or prosthesis movement. The major complication rate was 8.6%, and the minor complication rate was 29%. No delayed hemorrhage or airway obstruction occurred. Prosthesis extrusion occurred in five (8.6%) patients 1 week to 5 months after surgery. Extrusion was associated with suboptimal prosthesis placement in 80% of cases. Two patients retained excellent glottal closure despite extrusion. Vocal fold hematoma was identified in 14 (24%) cases and resolved within 1 week. Prosthesis movement occurred in three (5%) patients 1 week to 6 months after surgery and resulted in poor glottal closure. All patients with prosthesis extrusion or movement were female. Type I thyroplasty remains a safe outpatient procedure with few major complications. Prosthesis extrusion was associated with suboptimal prosthesis placement and may or may not result in poor glottal closure. Minor vocal fold hematomas were relatively frequent, resolved rapidly, and were not associated with airway obstruction. Female patients may be more prone to complications because of their small laryngeal size.

  1. An intractable case of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to radiation colitis. Usefulness of transcatheter arterial embolization

    Inoue, Koichi; Koyama, Tukasa [Yoka Hospital, Hyogo (Japan); Sugamura, Kenji; Ogawa, Toshihide [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    2003-05-01

    We tried transcatheter arterial embolization for lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to radiation colitis. In this case, colostomy and endoscopic therapy were not effective. We succeeded in arresting the hemorrhage without any complications. Transcatheter embolization is a low-invasive and safe method of treatment. For prevention of inflammation and iatrogenic abscess formation, we repeated this therapy and we tried arterial injection of antibiotics and steroid. And so, this therapy is one of the effective methods. (author)

  2. Heat stroke induced cerebellar dysfunction: A “forgotten syndrome”

    Kosgallana, Athula D; Mallik, Shreyashee; Patel, Vishal; Beran, Roy G

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of heat stroke induced acute cerebellar dysfunction, a rare neurological disease characterized by gross cerebellar dysfunction with no acute radiographic changes, in a 61 years old ship captain presenting with slurred speech and gait ataxia. A systematic review of the literature on heat stroke induced cerebellar dysfunction was performed, with a focus on investigations, treatment and outcomes. After review of the literature and detailed patient investigation it was concluded that this patient suffered heat stroke at a temperature less than that quoted in the literature. PMID:24340279

  3. Cerebellar abiotrophy in a family of Border Collie dogs.

    Sandy, J R; Slocombe, R E; Mitten, R W; Jedwab, D

    2002-11-01

    Cerebellar abiotrophies have a nonsex-linked, autosomal, recessively inherited basis in a number of species, and lesions typically reflect profound and progressive loss of Purkinje cells. In this report, an unusual form of abiotrophy is described for two sibling Border Collies. Extensive loss of the cerebellar granular cell layer was present with relative sparing of Purkinje cells of two female pups. The biochemical basis for this form of cerebellar abiotrophy is unknown, but the lack of disease in other siblings supports an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance.

  4. Adrenal hemorrhage presenting as a scrotal hematoma in the newborn: A case report.

    Yarci, Erbu; Arayici, Sema; Sari, Fatma Nur; Canpolat, Fuat Emre; Uras, Nurdan; Dilmen, Ugur

    2015-06-01

    Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage is uncommon. It is present in 0,2% of newborns. Ten percent of the cases occur bilaterally. It can be associated with birth trauma, large birth weight, or neonatal course complicated by hypoxia and asphyxia, hypotension, or coagulopathy. Scrotal hematoma is an extremely rare manifestation of NAH. Most patients present scrotal swelling with bluish discolouration. Scrotal swelling with/without bluish discoloration in newborns may result from different causes. We report an unusual case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage secondary to perinatal asphyxia, associated with SH. Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage and scrotal hematoma were diagnosed by ultrasonography and treated by conservative treatment, avoiding unnecessary surgical exploration.

  5. Massive postpartum right renal hemorrhage.

    Kiracofe, H L; Peterson, N

    1975-06-01

    All reported cases of massive postpartum right renal hemorrhage have involved healthy young primigravidas and blacks have predominated (4 of 7 women). Coagulopathies and underlying renal disease have been absent. Hematuria was painless in 5 of 8 cases. Hemorrhage began within 24 hours in 1 case, within 48 hours in 4 cases and 4 days post partum in 3 cases. Our first case is the only report in which hemorrhage has occurred in a primipara. Failure of closure or reopening of pyelovenous channels is suggested as the pathogenesis. The hemorrhage has been self-limiting, requiring no more than 1,500 cc whole blood replacement. Bleeding should stop spontaneously, and rapid renal pelvic clot lysis should follow with maintenance of adequate urine output and Foley catheter bladder decompression. To date surgical intervention has not been necessary.

  6. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria......, unipolar depression, epilepsy, migraine, and cognitive impairment was investigated. Genetic linkage analysis and sequencing of the SPG4 gene was performed and electrophysiologic investigations were carried out in six individuals and positron emission tomography (PET) in one patient. The disease was linked...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...

  7. The Cerebellar-Cerebral Microstructure Is Disrupted at Multiple Sites in Very Preterm Infants with Cerebellar Haemorrhage.

    Neubauer, Vera; Djurdjevic, Tanja; Griesmaier, Elke; Biermayr, Marlene; Gizewski, Elke Ruth; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula

    2018-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have prompted reconsideration of the anatomical correlates of adverse outcomes in preterm infants. The importance of the contribution made by the cerebellum is now increasingly appreciated. The effect of cerebellar haemorrhage (CBH) on the microstructure of the cerebellar-cerebral circuit is largely unexplored. To investigate the effect of CBH on the microstructure of cerebellar-cerebral connections in preterm infants aged microstructure (fractional anisotropy [FA] and apparent diffusion coefficient) were quantified in 5 vulnerable regions (the centrum semiovale, posterior limb of the internal capsule, corpus callosum, and superior and middle cerebellar peduncles). Group differences between infants with CBH and infants without CBH were assessed. There were 267 infants included in the study. Infants with CBH (isolated and combined) had significantly lower FA values in all regions investigated. Infants with isolated CBH showed lower FA in the middle and superior cerebellar peduncles and in the posterior limb of the internal capsule. This study provides evidence that CBH causes alterations in localised and remote WM pathways in the developing brain. The disruption of the cerebellar-cerebral microstructure at multiple sites adds further support for the concept of developmental diaschisis, which is propagated as an explanation for the consequences of early cerebellar injury on cognitive and affective domains. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Emergent embolization for control of massive hemorrhage from a splanchnic artery with a new coaxial catheter system

    Okazaki, M.; Higashihara, H.; Koganemaru, F.; Ono, H.; Fujimitsu, R.; Yamasaki, S.; Toyoshima, H.; Sato, S.; Hoashi, T.; Kimura, T.

    1992-01-01

    Emergent superselective embolization with a 3.0 F (1 mm) coaxial catheter and a steerable guidewire was performed in 27 patients with massive hemorrhage from a small-caliber splanchnic artery. Eight patients had intraperitoneal hemorrhage, 3 had hemobilia, 9 had gastric hemorrhage, and 7 had intestinal hemorrhage. Out of 27 patients, 7 had hemorrhage from a splanchnic artery pseudoaneurysm. Complete cessation of bleeding was obtained in all patients initially, but in 3 patients gastric hemorrhage recurred later. Otherwise, there was no rebleeding nor any major complication such as marked infarction of tissue or misplacement of embolic materials. This coaxial catheter system was highly reliable for achieving superselective catheterization in small-caliber arteries, minimizing the volume of infarcted tissue and allowing maximal preservation of splanchnic organic function. We conclude that this system represents a major advance in interventional radiology. (orig.)

  9. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    Mahajan, Divyesh; Kang, Mandeep; Sandhu, Manavjit Singh; Jain, Vanita; Kalra, Naveen; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD) are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS). As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG) and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions

  10. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    Divyesh Mahajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS. As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  11. Hemorrhage is the most common cause of neonatal mortality in patients with sacrococcygeal teratoma.

    Kremer, Marijke E B; Wellens, Lianne M; Derikx, Joep P M; van Baren, Robertine; Heij, Hugo A; Wijnen, Marc H W A; Wijnen, René M H; van der Zee, David C; van Heurn, L W Ernest

    2016-11-01

    A small percentage of neonates with sacrococcygeal teratoma die shortly after birth from hemorrhagic complications. The incidence of and risk factors associated with hemorrhagic mortality are unknown. In this multicenter study we determined the incidence of early death in neonates born with SCT and evaluated potential risk factors for hemorrhagic mortality. 235 children with SCT treated from 1970 to 2010 in the Netherlands were retrospectively included. The following candidate risk factors for hemorrhagic mortality were examined: sex, prematurity, Altman type, tumor volume, tumor histology, necessity of emergency operation and time of diagnosis. Eighteen patients (7.7%) died at a median age of 163.5days (range 1.7-973days). Nine patients died of a malignancy. Nine others (3.8%) died postnatally (age 1-27days), six even within two days after birth. In seven of these nine patients death was related to tumor-hemorrhage and/or circulatory failure. Risk factors for hemorrhagic mortality were prematurity, tumor volume>1000cm 3 and performance of an emergency operation. Hemorrhagic mortality of neonates with SCT is relatively high (3.8%) representing almost 70% of the overall mortality in the neonatal period. High-output cardiac failure, internal tumor hemorrhage and perioperative bleeding were the most common causes of early death and were all strongly associated with larger tumor sizes. II (Retrospective study). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage in the emergency department

    Diego Garbossa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is one of the major cause of mortality for stroke. The leading cause is the rupture of an intracrnial aneurym. Acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is a complex multifaceted disorder that plays out over days to weeks. The development of aneurysms is mainly due to a hemodynamic stress. Considerableadvances have been made in endovascular techniques, diagnostic methods, and surgical and perioperative management guidelines. Rebleeding remains the most imminent danger until the aneurysm is excluded from cerebral circulation. The only effective prevention of rebleeding is repair the aneurysm; choosing the right way with surgical or an endovascular approach. Outcome for patients with SAH remains poor, with population-based mortality rates as high as 45% and significant morbidity among survivors. In this work we analyzed the diagnostic-therapeutic course of patients presenting SAH. We analyzed the types and the occurrence of complications. We present two cases report to better demonstrate that treatments for specific patients need to be individualized.

  13. CLINICAL APPROACH TO HEREDITARY HEMORRHAGIC TELANGIECTASIA

    Mary Hachmeriyan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT or Rendu-Osler-Weber disease is a rare syndrome, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with incidence of 1/10000. The clinical manifestations are due to vascular malformations and predisposition to hemorrhages in different organs, the leading symptom being recurrent epistaxis. If diagnosed with HHT, the patient and his relatives and especially children have to be screened for occult vascular malformations.Case report: A 30 years old woman was treated for cerebral stroke, epistaxis, anemia, arterio-venous malformations for over 6 months. Only at this point she was diagnosed with HHT, after noticing the typical mucosal changes. Focused family history revealed symptoms of HHT in her only child, her father, aunt and two cousins The child was screened for occult vascular malformations – attainment of the nasal mucosa, lungs, gastrointestinal system, liver and brain. Pulmonary and gastrointestinal arterio-venous malformations were proven.Conclusion: Any case of recurrent epistaxis should be evaluated for HHT. After confirmation of the diagnosis every patient and close relatives have to be screened for attainment of other organs and followed up in order to prevent severe life threatening complications.

  14. The Effects of Vasospasm and Re-Bleeding on the Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage from Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm.

    Filipce, Venko; Caparoski, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm and re-bleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm are devastating complication that can severely affect the outcome of the patients. We are presenting a series of total number of 224 patients treated and operated at our Department due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, out of which certain number developed vasospasm and re-bleeding. We are evaluating the effect of these complications on the outcome of the patients according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at the day of discharge. In our experience both vasospasm and ReSAH can significantly influence the outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

  15. Hypertensive thalamic hemorrhage

    Munaka, Masahiro; Nishikawa, Michio; Hirai, Osamu; Kaneko, Takaaki; Watanabe, Syu; Fukuma, Jun; Handa, Hajime

    1988-01-01

    In the past six years, we have had experience with 40 patients with hypertensive thalamic hemorrhages, as verified by CT scan at our hospital within 24 hours. These patients were classified into the following three groups according to the location of the bleeding point and the size of the hematoma: (1) anteromedial (4 cases), (2) posterolateral (16 cases), and (3) massive (20 cases). The (1) and (2) hematomas were small (less than 3 cm in diameter), while those in (3) were large (more than 3 cm in diameter). Twenty cases (50% of all the thalamic hematomas) were small hematomas. The characteristic clinical symptoms of the anteromedial type were a mild disturbance of consciousness and thalamic dementia, while those of the posterolateral type were motor and sensory disturbance, and thalamic aphasia, respectively. Twenty cases (50%) were large hematomas. The clinical symptoms of these cases were mainly consciousness disturbance; 7 of them expired. Based on this experience, it may be considered that the patients whose hematoma size was larger than 3 cm had a poor prognosis and that the patients with the posterolateral type had a poor functional diagnosis. (author)

  16. MRI of intracranial hemorrhage

    Inoue, Yuichi; Takemoto, Kazumasa; Hashimoto, Hiromi

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 23 patients with putaminal or thalamic hematomas were reviewed. Inversion recovery (IR, TR; 2100 - 2500 msec, TI; 600 msec) and long spin echo (SE, TR; 1800 - 2500 msec, TE; 120 msec) images were obtained with a 0.5T MR scanner. Hematomas within 3 hours after hemorrhage were isointense to the gray matter on both IR and long SE images. Two day-old hematomas were hyperintense in part of it on IR images and hypointense on long SE images. In acute hematomas, there was a marked hyperintense crescent area around hematomas on long SE images which marked hypointense on IR images. Hematomas in the resolving stage had peripheral hyperintensity on IR images and then on long SE images. This hyperintensity filled into the center of hematomas with time. In the resolving stage linear hypointensity was recognized at immedeately adjacent to the hematoma on long SE images. In the chronic stage, hematomas were hypointense on both IR and long SE images. In a few cases, the central portion of hematomas demonstrated hyperintensity on long SE images which indicated the presence of fluid in the old hematoma cavity. (author)

  17. Cerebellar blood flow in methylmercury poisoning (Minamata disease)

    Itoh, K.; Korogi, Y.; Tomiguchi, S.; Takahashi, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine (Japan); Okajima, T. [Dept. of Neurology, Johnan Hospital, Maihara, Johnan-mochi (Japan); Sato, H. [Dept. of Neurology, Minamata City General Hospital and Medical Centre (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    We looked at regional cerebellar blood flow in patients with Minamata disease (MD) using technetium-99 m ethyl cysteinate dimer (99m-Tc-ECD). We carried out single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on 15 patients with MD (eight men, seven women, aged 51-78 years, mean 70.5 years) and 11 control subjects (eight men, three women, aged 62-80 years, mean 72.5 years). Regional blood flow was measured in the superior, middle, and inferior portions of the cerebellar hemispheres, and the frontal, temporal and occipital cerebral lobes. The degree of cerebellar atrophy was assessed on MRI. There were significant differences in regional blood flow in all parts of the cerebellum between patients and control, but no significant decrease was observed in the cerebrum. Blood flow was lower in the inferior cerebellum than in the other parts. Even in patients without cerebellar atrophy, flow was significantly decreased regional blood flow in the inferior part. (orig.)

  18. Bilateral cerebellar activation in unilaterally challenged essential tremor

    Marja Broersma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results expand on previous findings of bilateral cerebellar involvement in ET. We have identified specific areas in the bilateral somatomotor regions of the cerebellum: lobules V, VI and VIII.

  19. Anomalous cerebellar anatomy in Chinese children with dyslexia

    Ying-Hui eYang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia (DD claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children with dyslexia. In the present study, using voxel-based morphometry, we found decreased gray matter volume in the left cerebellum in Chinese children with dyslexia relative to age-matched controls. The positive correlation between reading performance and regional gray matter volume suggests that the abnormal structure in the left cerebellum is responsible for reading disability in Chinese children with dyslexia.

  20. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different.

  1. Cerebellar infarct patterns: The SMART-Medea study

    Laurens J.L. De Cocker, MD

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Small cerebellar infarcts proved to be much more common than larger infarcts, and preferentially involved the cortex. Small cortical infarcts predominantly involved the posterior lobes, showed sparing of subcortical white matter and occurred in characteristic topographic patterns.

  2. Late Onset of Cerebellar Abiotrophy in a Boxer Dog

    Sanjeev Gumber

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar abiotrophy is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system and has been reported in humans and animals. This case report documents clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical findings of cerebellar abiotrophy in an adult Boxer dog. A 3.5-year-old, female, tan Boxer dog presented with a six-week history of left-sided head tilt. Neurological examination and additional diagnostics during her three subsequent visits over 4.5 months revealed worsening of neurological signs including marked head pressing, severe proprioceptive deficits in all the four limbs, loss of menace response and palpebral reflex in the left eye, and a gradual seizure lasting one hour at her last visit. Based on the immunohistochemical staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein and histopathological examination of cerebellum, cerebellar cortical abiotrophy was diagnosed. This is the first reported case of cerebellar abiotrophy in a Boxer dog to our knowledge.

  3. Bilateral cerebellar activation in unilaterally challenged essential tremor

    Broersma, Marja; van der Stouwe, Anna M. M.; Buijink, Arthur W. G.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Groot, Paul F. C.; Speelman, Johannes D.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2016-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is one of the most common hyperkinetic movement disorders. Previous research into the pathophysiology of ET suggested underlying cerebellar abnormalities. In this study, we added electromyography as an index of tremor intensity to functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  4. Cerebellar blood flow in methylmercury poisoning (Minamata disease)

    Itoh, K.; Korogi, Y.; Tomiguchi, S.; Takahashi, M.; Okajima, T.; Sato, H.

    2001-01-01

    We looked at regional cerebellar blood flow in patients with Minamata disease (MD) using technetium-99 m ethyl cysteinate dimer (99m-Tc-ECD). We carried out single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on 15 patients with MD (eight men, seven women, aged 51-78 years, mean 70.5 years) and 11 control subjects (eight men, three women, aged 62-80 years, mean 72.5 years). Regional blood flow was measured in the superior, middle, and inferior portions of the cerebellar hemispheres, and the frontal, temporal and occipital cerebral lobes. The degree of cerebellar atrophy was assessed on MRI. There were significant differences in regional blood flow in all parts of the cerebellum between patients and control, but no significant decrease was observed in the cerebrum. Blood flow was lower in the inferior cerebellum than in the other parts. Even in patients without cerebellar atrophy, flow was significantly decreased regional blood flow in the inferior part. (orig.)

  5. Transconjunctival drainage of serous and hemorrhagic choroidal detachment.

    Rezende, Flávio A; Kickinger, Mônica C; Li, Gisèle; Prado, Renata F; Regis, Luiz Gustavo T

    2012-02-01

    To describe a novel surgical technique for drainage of bullous serous and hemorrhagic choroidal detachments. A prospective, consecutive case series of 6 eyes with serous and/or hemorrhagic choroidal detachments secondary to intraocular surgery was documented to evaluate the feasibility of using the 25-gauge and 20-gauge transconjunctival trocar/cannula systems to drain choroidal detachments. Two eyes had expulsive hemorrhagic choroidal detachments and 4 eyes had serous choroidal detachments after glaucoma surgeries. A 25-gauge infusion line was placed in the anterior chamber. A 20-gauge (in eyes with hemorrhagic choroidal detachments) or a 25-gauge (in eyes with serous detachments) trocar/cannula system was inserted into the suprachoroidal space 7.0 mm from limbus. After drainage, the cannulas were removed and no sutures were placed. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed only in eyes with concomitant pathology that demanded the additional procedure. The primary outcome measure was presence of choroidal detachment at 1 week, 2 weeks, and 1 month postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures were visual acuity at 6 months and intraocular pressure at 1 week and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Drainage of hemorrhagic choroidal detachments resulted in resolution of the detachments by 1 month postoperatively. In eyes with serous detachments, resolution was achieved by 1 week postdrainage. In both groups, intraocular pressure increased to at least 10 mmHg by postoperative Week 1. The visual acuity improved in all eyes. No complications related to the transconjunctival technique were noted. Transconjunctival drainage of serous and hemorrhagic choroidal detachments seems to be a feasible and simple surgical option with minimal scleral and conjunctival damage. Pars plana vitrectomy may not be necessary when draining choroidal detachments in this manner.

  6. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in polycythemia vera

    Shruti Bhandari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage (BAH is a rare complication typically seen in critically ill patients, which can lead to acute adrenal insufficiency and death unless it is recognized promptly and treated appropriately. We describe the case of a 64-year-old man with polycythemia vera found to be unresponsive with fever, hypotension, tachycardia, and hypoglycemia. Electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation with elevated troponin, hemoglobin, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. He required aggressive ventilator and vasopressor support. Despite primary coronary intervention, he remained hypotensive. Random cortisol level was low. He received stress dose hydrocortisone with immediate hemodynamic stability. BAH was highly suspected and was confirmed by non-contrast abdominal computed tomography. Prompt recognition and timely initiated treatment remain crucial to impact the mortality associated with acute adrenal insufficiency.

  7. Network-targeted cerebellar transcranial magnetic stimulation improves attentional control

    Esterman, Michael; Thai, Michelle; Okabe, Hidefusa; DeGutis, Joseph; Saad, Elyana; Laganiere, Simon E.; Halko, Mark A.

    2018-01-01

    Developing non-invasive brain stimulation interventions to improve attentional control is extremely relevant to a variety of neurologic and psychiatric populations, yet few studies have identified reliable biomarkers that can be readily modified to improve attentional control. One potential biomarker of attention is functional connectivity in the core cortical network supporting attention - the dorsal attention network (DAN). We used a network-targeted cerebellar transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) procedure, intended to enhance cortical functional connectivity in the DAN. Specifically, in healthy young adults we administered intermittent theta burst TMS (iTBS) to the midline cerebellar node of the DAN and, as a control, the right cerebellar node of the default mode network (DMN). These cerebellar targets were localized using individual resting-state fMRI scans. Participants completed assessments of both sustained (gradual onset continuous performance task, gradCPT) and transient attentional control (attentional blink) immediately before and after stimulation, in two sessions (cerebellar DAN and DMN). Following cerebellar DAN stimulation, participants had significantly fewer attentional lapses (lower commission error rates) on the gradCPT. In contrast, stimulation to the cerebellar DMN did not affect gradCPT performance. Further, in the DAN condition, individuals with worse baseline gradCPT performance showed the greatest enhancement in gradCPT performance. These results suggest that temporarily increasing functional connectivity in the DAN via network-targeted cerebellar stimulation can enhance sustained attention, particularly in those with poor baseline performance. With regard to transient attention, TMS stimulation improved attentional blink performance across both stimulation sites, suggesting increasing functional connectivity in both networks can enhance this aspect of attention. These findings have important implications for intervention applications

  8. Transient cerebellopontine demyelinisation revealed by MRI in acute cerebellar ataxia

    Aufricht, C.A.; Tenner, W.; Rosenmayr, F.; Stiglbauer, R.

    1990-01-01

    An eight year old boy was admitted to our ward with a history of abrupt onset of rapidly progressive gait disorder, nausea, vertigo and vomiting. The clinical as well as the laboratory findings suggested the diagnosis of acute cerebellar ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), however, showed marked demyelinisation in the cerebellar region and visual evoked potentials were pathologic. After immunosuppression the patient promptly improved clinically and the lesions depicted by MRI disappeared almost completely. (orig.)

  9. Complications of acucise endopyelotomy.

    Kim, F J; Herrell, S D; Jahoda, A E; Albala, D M

    1998-10-01

    Endoscopic management of ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction has a success rate of 80% to 86%. We have been performing a ureteral cutting balloon procedure under fluoroscopic control (Acucise endopyelotomy) for UPJ obstruction at Loyola University Medical Center since 1991. The overall success rate in 77 patients was 78%. All patients had a preoperative intravenous urogram or a retrograde pyelogram, but none had vascular imaging studies. Acucise endopyelotomy consisted of a posterolateral incision of the UPJ and placement of an endopyelotomy or double-J stent. Foley catheter placement at the end of the procedure demonstrated significant gross hematuria in three patients (4%). All three remained hemodynamically stable but with significant drops in postprocedure hemoglobin levels, which necessitated blood transfusion. Aggressive management included angiographic studies and embolization of lower-pole branching arteries in two patients (3%). One patient stopped bleeding after being given two units of blood. None of the patients required an open exploratory procedure. Although the risk of vascular injury is low with Acucise endopyelotomy, prolonged postoperative gross hematuria does mandate investigation and observation. Angiographic embolization appears to be the therapeutic modality of choice for patients with hemorrhagic complications after an Acucise endopyelotomy.

  10. Aberrant cerebellar connectivity in bipolar disorder with psychosis.

    Shinn, Ann K; Roh, Youkyung S; Ravichandran, Caitlin T; Baker, Justin T; Öngür, Dost; Cohen, Bruce M

    2017-07-01

    The cerebellum, which modulates affect and cognition in addition to motor functions, may contribute substantially to the pathophysiology of mood and psychotic disorders, such as bipolar disorder. A growing literature points to cerebellar abnormalities in bipolar disorder. However, no studies have investigated the topographic representations of resting state cerebellar networks in bipolar disorder, specifically their functional connectivity to cerebral cortical networks. Using a well-defined cerebral cortical parcellation scheme as functional connectivity seeds, we compared ten cerebellar resting state networks in 49 patients with bipolar disorder and a lifetime history of psychotic features and 55 healthy control participants matched for age, sex, and image signal-to-noise ratio. Patients with psychotic bipolar disorder showed reduced cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity in somatomotor A, ventral attention, salience, and frontoparietal control A and B networks relative to healthy control participants. These findings were not significantly correlated with current symptoms. Patients with psychotic bipolar disorder showed evidence of cerebro-cerebellar dysconnectivity in selective networks. These disease-related changes were substantial and not explained by medication exposure or substance use. Therefore, they may be mechanistically relevant to the underlying susceptibility to mood dysregulation and psychosis. Cerebellar mechanisms deserve further exploration in psychiatric conditions, and this study's findings may have value in guiding future studies on pathophysiology and treatment of mood and psychotic disorders, in particular.

  11. Reduced contralateral hemispheric flow measured by SPECT in cerebellar lesions

    Soenmezoglu, K.; Sperling, B.; Lassen, N.A.; Henriksen, T.; Tfelt-Hansen, P.

    1993-01-01

    Four patients with clinical signs of cerebellar stroke were studied twice by SPECT using 99m Tc-HMPAO as a tracer for cerebral blood flow (CBF). When first scanned 6 to 22 days after onset, all had a region of very low CBF in the symptomatic cerebellar hemisphere, and a mild to moderate CBF reduction (average 10%) in contralateral hemispheric cortex. In all four cases clinical signs of unilateral cerebellar dysfunction were still present when rescanned 1 to 4 months later and the relative CBF decrease in the contralateral cortex of the forebrain also remained. The basal ganglia contralateral to the cerebellar lesion CBF showed variable alterations. A relative CBF decrease was seen in upper part of basal ganglia in all four cases, but it was not a constant phenomenon. A relative CBF increase in both early and late SPECT scans was seen at low levels of neostriatum in two cases. The remote CBF changes in cerebellar stroke seen in the forebrain are probably caused by reduced or abolished cerebellar output. The term ''Crossed Cerebral Diaschisis'' may be used to describe these CBF changes that would appear to reflect both decreased and increased neuronal activity. (au)

  12. Verbal Memory Impairments in Children after Cerebellar Tumor Resection

    Matthew P. Kirschen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate cerebellar lobular contributions to specific cognitive deficits observed after cerebellar tumor resection. Verbal working memory (VWM tasks were administered to children following surgical resection of cerebellar pilocytic astrocytomas and age-matched controls. Anatomical MRI scans were used to quantify the extent of cerebellar lobular damage from each patient's resection. Patients exhibited significantly reduced digit span for auditory but not visual stimuli, relative to controls, and damage to left hemispheral lobule VIII was significantly correlated with this deficit. Patients also showed reduced effects of articulatory suppression and this was correlated with damage to the vermis and hemispheral lobule IV/V bilaterally. Phonological similarity and recency effects did not differ overall between patients and controls, but outlier patients with abnormal phonological similarity effects to either auditory or visual stimuli were found to have damage to hemispheral lobule VIII/VIIB on the left and right, respectively. We postulate that damage to left hemispheral lobule VIII may interfere with encoding of auditory stimuli into the phonological store. These data corroborate neuroimaging studies showing focal cerebellar activation during VWM paradigms, and thereby allow us to predict with greater accuracy which specific neurocognitive processes will be affected by a cerebellar tumor resection.

  13. Factors associated with the misdiagnosis of cerebellar infarction.

    Masuda, Yoko; Tei, Hideaki; Shimizu, Satoru; Uchiyama, Shinichiro

    2013-10-01

    Cerebellar infarction is easily misdiagnosed or underdiagnosed. In this study, we investigated factors leading to misdiagnosis of cerebellar infarction in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Data on neurological and radiological findings from 114 consecutive patients with acute cerebellar infarction were analyzed. We investigated factors associated with misdiagnosis from the data on clinical findings. Thirty-two (28%) patients were misdiagnosed on admission. Misdiagnosis was significantly more frequent in patients below 60 years of age and in patients with vertebral artery dissection, and significantly less frequent in patients with dysarthria. It tended to be more frequent in patients with the medial branch of posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory infarction, and infrequent in patients with the medial branch of the superior cerebellar artery territory infarction. Thirty out of 32 (94%) misdiagnosed patients were seen by physicians that were not neurologists at the first visit. Twenty-four of 32 (75%) misdiagnosed patients were screened only by brain CT. However, patients were not checked by brain MRI or follow-up CT until their conditions worsened. Patients below 60 years of age and patients with vertebral artery dissection are more likely to have a cerebellar infarction misdiagnosed by physicians other than neurologists. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of avastin on the incidence of post-operative vitreous hemorrhage after vitrectomy in diabetic vitreous hemorrhage

    Ahmed, N.; Shaheer, M.; Tahir, M.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common cause of legal blindness. Five to 10% of diabetic patients suffer from the proliferative diabetic retinopathy which includes the formation of new vessels on the retina and optic disc which can be complicated as vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment. Pars plana vitrectomy along with laser photocoagulation is being used for the management of vitreous hemorrhage. In our study we used injection avastin one week before surgery to see its role on the incidence of rebleed after vitrectomy in diabetic vitreous hemorrhage. Materials and Methods; Fifty patients were divided into 2 equal groups on the basis of simple random sampling. 25 patients in Group I were operated with routine pars plana vitrectomy with endolaser photo- coagulation while in Group II all the 25 patients were given injection avastin intra-vitreally one week before surgery. Evaluation was done on the first post operative day, first follow up visit (one week) and after one month to see the incidence of re-bleed. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Fifty patients divided into two groups. In Group I, 3 patients had recurrent vitreous hemorrhage on first post-operative day, 3 patients had re-bleed on first follow up visit, and only 2 patients had re-bleed after one month. In Group II, none of the patients had recurrent vitreous hemorrhage on first post-operative day and on first follow-up visit (one week) while 2 patients had re-bleed after one month. Conclusion: Injection intravitreal Avastin (Bevaci- zumab) one week before surgery significantly reduces the risk of vitreous hemorrhage after vitrectomy in diabetic patients. (author)

  15. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  16. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation

    Zizka, J.; Elias, P.; Michl, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Harrer, J. [Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Cesak, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Herman, A. [1. Dept. of Internal Medicine, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2001-07-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  17. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation

    Zizka, J.; Elias, P.; Michl, A.; Harrer, J.; Cesak, T.; Herman, A.

    2001-01-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  18. Thalamic hemorrhage following carotid angioplasty and stenting

    Friedman, Jonathan A.; Kallmes, David F.; Wijdicks, Eelco F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) has emerged as an alternative treatment of carotid stenosis for patients poorly suited for endarterectomy. Intracerebral hemorrhage following carotid revascularization is rare and thought to be related to hyperperfusion injury in most cases. Early experience suggests an increased incidence of hemorrhage following CAS as compared to endarterectomy. We describe a patient who suffered a thalamic hemorrhage following CAS. Because this hemorrhage occurred in a vascular territory unlikely to have been supplied by the treated artery, this case suggests that the mechanism of intracerebral hemorrhage following CAS may in some cases be different from the hyperperfusion hemorrhage classically described following endarterectomy. (orig.)

  19. Complications of bladder distension during retrograde urethrography.

    Barsanti, J A; Crowell, W; Losonsky, J; Talkington, F D

    1981-05-01

    A severe, ulcerative cystitis that resulted in macroscopic hematuria occurred in 8 of 20 healthy dogs undergoing a series of diagnostic tests. Four of the remaining 12 dogs had mild bladder lesions consisting of submucosal edema and hemorrhage. Nine of the 20 dogs developed urinary tract infection after the procedures. These complications seemed associated with the radiographic technique of retrograde urethrography performed when the urinary bladder was distended. To test this hypothesis, retrograde urethrography was performed on 5 additional dogs. With the bladder undistended, no complications occurred. However, distention of these same dogs' bladders for 1 minute or less with sterile lactated Ringer's solution administered through a Foley catheter in the penile urethra resulted in a macroscopic hematuria in all 5 dogs which persisted for 24 hours. A microscopic hematuria continued for 5 days. One dog developed a bacterial urinary tract infection. A severe fibrinopurulent cystitis was present at necropsy of 2 dogs 2 days after distention. The morphologic changes in the bladder gradually diminished over 7 days, but mild submucosal edema and hemorrhage were still present when 2 dogs were necropsied, 7 days after distention. These studies indicated that retrograde urethrography in dogs may be complicated by hemorrhagic cystitis and urinary tract infection if performed with urinary bladder distention.

  20. Obstetric hemorrhage: A global review.

    Goffman, Dena; Nathan, Lisa; Chazotte, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage remains the number one cause of maternal death globally despite the fact that it is largely a preventable and most often a treatable condition. While the global problem is appreciated, some may not realize that in the United States postpartum hemorrhage is a leading cause of mortality and unfortunately, the incidence is on the rise. In New York, obstetric hemorrhage is the second leading cause of maternal mortality in the state. National data suggests that hemorrhage is disproportionally overrepresented as a contributor to severe maternal morbidity and we suspect as we explore further this will be true in New York State as well. Given the persistent and significant contribution to maternal mortality, it may be useful to analyze the persistence of this largely preventable cause of death within the framework of the historic "Three Delays" model of maternal mortality. The ongoing national and statewide problem with postpartum hemorrhage will be reviewed in this context of delays in an effort to inform potential solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Complicated infective endocarditis: a case series.

    Kim, Joo Seop; Kang, Min-Kyung; Cho, A Jin; Seo, Yu Bin; Kim, Kun Il

    2017-05-08

    Infective endocarditis is associated with not only cardiac complications but also neurologic, renal, musculoskeletal, and systemic complications related to the infection, such as embolization, metastatic infection, and mycotic aneurysm. We report three cases (the first patient is Chinese and the other two are Koreans) of complicated infective endocarditis; two of the cases were associated with a mycotic aneurysm, and one case was associated with a splenic abscess. One case of a patient with prosthetic valve endocarditis was complicated by intracerebral hemorrhage caused by mycotic aneurysm rupture. A second case of a patient with right-sided valve endocarditis associated with a central catheter was complicated by an abdominal aortic mycotic aneurysm. The third patient had a splenic infarction and abscess associated with infected cardiac thrombi. Complicated infective endocarditis is rare and is associated with cardiac, neurologic, renal, musculoskeletal, and systemic complications related to infection, such as embolization, metastatic infection, and mycotic aneurysm. Infective endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus is more frequently associated with complications. Because the mortality rate increases when complications develop, aggressive antibiotic therapy and surgery, combined with specific treatments for the complications, are necessary.

  2. Clinical observation of two treatments for vitreous hemorrhage

    He-Yi Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the indications and therapeutic effect of the conservative treatment and surgical treatment for vitreous hemorrhage.METHODS: Hemorrhage reasons, degree of illness, and treatment and final results of vitreous hemorrhage were recorded from 2008 to 2013, and curative effect of different treatments was analyzed.RESULTS: Selected 22 cases(24 eyesof conservative treatment, vision degree of 6 eyes(25%had raised, 5 eyes(21%occurred secondary retinal detachment without treatment, 3 eyes(12.5%suffered neovascular glaucoma were underwent operation, but the vision had lost completely. In 26 cases(31 eyesof control(operationgroup, vision of 17 eyes(55%had improved, 2 eyes(6.5%suffered the second operation, 2 eyes(6.5%suffered the third surgery, 3 eyes(10%suffered eyeball atrophy. The number of ultimate vision improved with conservative treatment were significantly lower than the number of cases with surgical treatment(PCONCLUSION: The surgical treatment is still visible vitreous hemorrhage treatment means of positive, but there will be eyeball atrophy and other serious complications, so we should choose a different methods in according to the different treatment objects and treatment time.

  3. DSA diagnosis and embolization therapy of gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    Zhou Ruming; Qiu Shuibo; Liu Minhua; Yang Huijun; Zhuang Shaoyu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of digital subtraction angiography and transcatheter embolization for gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Methods: Twenty patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage received celiac arteries, superior mesenteric arteries and inferior mesenteric arteries angiography. Superselective angiography were performed when the arteries were suspicious by clinic or angiogrraphy. Ten patients with definite diagnosis and manifestation of hemorrhagic arteries by angiography were embolized after superselective catheterization with gelfoam particles, gelfoam particles and coils, polyvinyl alcohol particles. Results: The positive signs were observed in 13 cases. The DSA features including contrast medium accumulation in the gastrointestinal tract outside vascular, aneurysm, tumorous vascularization and staining, artery affect and local vasospasm. The bleedings were stopped immediately in 8 patients. No rebleeding and intestinal ischaemia or necrosis were observed in 30 days. One patient died in the second day after embolization from multiple organ failure. Rebleeding occurred 3 days after embolization in another patient, and was recovered after surgical operation. Conclusion: DSA is more effective for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal vascular malformation and tumors complicating acute bleeding. Transcatheter embolization is effective and safe to control the hemorrhage. (authors)

  4. Evaluation of emergency transcatheter arterial embolization in intractable postpartum hemorrhage

    Qi Weihong; Wang Song; Zhan Ying

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of emergency transcatheter arterial embolization in the management of intractable postpartum hemorrhage. Methods: Twenty-five patients with intractable postpartum hemorrhage were undertaken superselective catheterization into the bilateral internal iliac arteries or uterial arteries to find the causes and sites of bleeding through DSA and then followed by arterial embolization with gelfoam particles. Result: All of the 25 patients with obstetrical bleeding were successfully controlled by TAE, the procedure lasted for 25-60 min, (mean 42.5 ± 4.6 min); with both catheterization and bleeding halt successful rates of 100%. Comparison of hemoglobin and heartbeat before and after the procedure showed significance (t=29.49, P<0.01; t=16.51, P<0.01). The uterus showed reintegration on time and menstruation resumed in all patients. Conclusions: Emergency arterial embolization is a safe and effective means for control of intractable postpartum hemorrhage, providing less trauma and no severe complications, especially as an unique management for fetal postpartum hemorrhage. (authors)

  5. The association of abnormal cerebellar function in children with developmental coordination disorder and reading difficulties.

    O'Hare, Anne; Khalid, Shabana

    2002-01-01

    Children with developmental coordination disorder/dyspraxia (DCD) are at high risk of reading and writing delay. The difficulties with motor skills are heterogeneous and many children have features of poor cerebellar function, reflected in problems with posture, balance and fast accurate control of movement. This study confirmed a high level of parental reporting of reading and writing delay in a clinical group of 23 children with DCD, defined on the basis of both clinical examination and standardized testing of motor function. Direct measurement of reading delay, identified still further children in the group. Those children with reading delay had associated findings typical of phonological awareness difficulties. The children also underwent a standardized test of neurological function and although they all had difficulties with cerebellar function, no distinctive pattern emerged for those whose presentation was complicated by delayed reading and writing. Both the children with DCD and 136 typically developing children, completed the pilot parental questionnaire on gross motor skills. The three skills of catching a ball, jumping on a moving playground roundabout and handwriting, distinguished the children with DCD. This study therefore confirms that children with DCD should be assessed for difficulties in phonological awareness. Additionally, children aged between 7 and 12 years are on the whole, highly competent in a range of gross motor skills and further study might determine whether a simple parental questionnaire might detect children who would benefit from further assessment. The study also suggests that all the children with DCD have cerebellar dysfunction and further work with a larger group might determine particular patterns associated with reading delay.

  6. Multiple Gastrointestinal Complications of Crack Cocaine Abuse

    Neal Carlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine and its alkaloid free base “crack-cocaine” have long since been substances of abuse. Drug abuse of cocaine via oral, inhalation, intravenous, and intranasal intake has famously been associated with a number of medical complications. Intestinal ischemia and perforation remain the most common manifestations of cocaine associated gastrointestinal disease and have historically been associated with oral intake of cocaine. Here we find a rare case of two relatively uncommon gastrointestinal complications of hemorrhage and pancreatitis presenting within a single admission in a chronic crack cocaine abuser.

  7. Electrophysiological mapping of novel prefrontal - cerebellar pathways

    Thomas C Watson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Whilst the cerebellum is predominantly considered a sensorimotor control structure, accumulating evidence suggests that it may also subserve non motor functions during cognition. However, this possibility is not universally accepted, not least because the nature and pattern of links between higher cortical structures and the cerebellum are poorly characterized. We have therefore used in vivo electrophysiological methods in anaesthetized rats to directly investigate connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex (prelimbic subdivision, PrL and the cerebellum. Stimulation of deep layers of PrL evoked distinct field potentials in the cerebellar cortex with a mean latency to peak of approximately 35ms. These responses showed a well-defined topography, and were maximal in lobule VII of the contralateral vermis (a known oculomotor centre; they were not attenuated by local anesthesia of the overlying M2 motor cortex, though M2 stimulation did evoke field potentials in lobule VII with a shorter latency. Single-unit recordings showed that prelimbic cortical stimulation elicits complex spikes in lobule VII Purkinje cells, indicating transmission via a previously undescribed cerebro-olivocerebellar pathway. Our results therefore establish a physiological basis for communication between PrL and the cerebellum. The role(s of this pathway remain to be resolved, but presumably relate to control of eye movements and/or distributed networks associated with integrated prefrontal cortical functions.

  8. Intracranial Hemorrhage in Pregnancy

    Afshan B. Hameed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A pregnant woman with a mechanical prosthetic mitral valve was anticoagulated with low-molecular-weight heparin in the first trimester followed by warfarin until 36 weeks' gestation. She was then switched to intravenous unfractionated heparin infusion to allow for regional anesthesia in anticipation of vaginal delivery. She developed severe headache on hospital day 2 that was refractory to pain medications. Cranial imaging demonstrated a large subdural hematoma with midline shift. She delivered a healthy baby girl by cesarean section. Eventually, symptoms and intracranial abnormalities resolved over time. In conclusion, subdural hematoma is a relatively rare complication that requires multidisciplinary management plan.

  9. Spontaneous Atraumatic Mediastinal Hemorrhage

    Morkos Iskander BSc, BMBS, MRCS, PGCertMedEd

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous atraumatic mediastinal hematomas are rare. We present a case of a previously fit and well middle-aged lady who presented with acute breathlessness and an increasing neck swelling and spontaneous neck bruising. On plain chest radiograph, widening of the mediastinum was noted. The bruising was later confirmed to be secondary to mediastinal hematoma. This life-threatening diagnostic conundrum was managed conservatively with a multidisciplinary team approach involving upper gastrointestinal and thoracic surgeons, gastroenterologists, radiologists, intensivists, and hematologists along with a variety of diagnostic modalities. A review of literature is also presented to help surgeons manage such challenging and complicated cases.

  10. Spontaneous non aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Bian Jieyong; Wang Zhong; Zhou Dai

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the etiology and the treatment of spontaneous non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Methods: Twenty five cases of cerebral vessel angiography negative patients were analysed retrospectively, the majority of them had been undergone CT, DSA, MRI examination in order to define the etiological factor. Results: Among them, there was 1 case of spinal arteria-vena malformation, 1 case of hemorrhagic blood and 2 cases according to the revealing of MRI could be explained as bled vascular-occult malformation or cavernous angioma. Conclusion: The management and prognosis of patients in whom non-aneurysm is founded on the initial angiogram depends on the pattern of hemorrhage of the initial CT scanning, repeated angiography should be avoided for the case of premise encephalic non-aneurysmal SAH and MRI examination may be indicated to defining of etiological factors

  11. Endovascular Management of Patients with Head and Neck Cancers Presenting with Acute Hemorrhage: A Single-Center Retrospective Study

    Vilas Boas, P. P.; Castro-Afonso, L. H. de; Monsignore, L. M.; Nakiri, G. S. [University of São Paulo, Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Ribeirão Preto Medical School (Brazil); Mello-Filho, F. V. de [University of São Paulo, Department of Ophthalmology, Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Ribeirão Preto Medical School (Brazil); Abud, D. G., E-mail: dgabud@fmrp.usp.br [University of São Paulo, Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Ribeirão Preto Medical School (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    PurposeAcute hemorrhage associated with cancers of the head and neck is a life-threatening condition that requires immediate action. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of endovascular embolization for acute hemorrhage in patients with head and neck cancers.Materials and MethodsData were retrospectively collected from patients with head and neck cancers who underwent endovascular embolization to treat acute hemorrhage. The primary endpoint was the rate of immediate control of hemorrhage during the first 24 h after embolization. The secondary endpoints were technical or clinical complications, rate of re-hemorrhage 24 h after the procedure, time from embolization to re-hemorrhage, hospitalization time, mortality rate, and time from embolization to death.ResultsFifty-one patients underwent endovascular embolization. The primary endpoint was achieved in 94% of patients. The rate of technical complications was 5.8%, and no clinical complication was observed. Twelve patients (23.5%) had hemorrhage recurrence after an average time of 127.5 days. The average hospitalization time was 7.4 days, the mortality rate during the follow-up period was 66.6%, and the average time from embolization to death was 132.5 days.ConclusionEndovascular embolization to treat acute hemorrhage in patients with head and neck cancers is a safe and effective method for the immediate control of hemorrhage and results in a high rate of hemorrhage control. Larger studies are necessary to determine which treatment strategy is best for improving patient outcomes.

  12. Endovascular Management of Patients with Head and Neck Cancers Presenting with Acute Hemorrhage: A Single-Center Retrospective Study

    Vilas Boas, P. P.; Castro-Afonso, L. H. de; Monsignore, L. M.; Nakiri, G. S.; Mello-Filho, F. V. de; Abud, D. G.

    2017-01-01

    PurposeAcute hemorrhage associated with cancers of the head and neck is a life-threatening condition that requires immediate action. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of endovascular embolization for acute hemorrhage in patients with head and neck cancers.Materials and MethodsData were retrospectively collected from patients with head and neck cancers who underwent endovascular embolization to treat acute hemorrhage. The primary endpoint was the rate of immediate control of hemorrhage during the first 24 h after embolization. The secondary endpoints were technical or clinical complications, rate of re-hemorrhage 24 h after the procedure, time from embolization to re-hemorrhage, hospitalization time, mortality rate, and time from embolization to death.ResultsFifty-one patients underwent endovascular embolization. The primary endpoint was achieved in 94% of patients. The rate of technical complications was 5.8%, and no clinical complication was observed. Twelve patients (23.5%) had hemorrhage recurrence after an average time of 127.5 days. The average hospitalization time was 7.4 days, the mortality rate during the follow-up period was 66.6%, and the average time from embolization to death was 132.5 days.ConclusionEndovascular embolization to treat acute hemorrhage in patients with head and neck cancers is a safe and effective method for the immediate control of hemorrhage and results in a high rate of hemorrhage control. Larger studies are necessary to determine which treatment strategy is best for improving patient outcomes.

  13. FLAIR images of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Mikami, Takeshi; Saito, Koji; Okuyama, Tohru; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Akira; Shibata, Kazunori [Kushiro Neurosurgical Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    We studied MR fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) pulse sequences in 37 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by aneurysmal rupture. FLAIR sequence suppressed the CSF signal and produced very heavy T{sub 2} weighted images. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was able to be demonstrated as high signal intensity on FLAIR sequences in all patients clear visualization of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage was able to be obtained by MR FLAIR sequences in not only Fisher`s group 3 or 4, but also Fisher`s group 2. Moreover it was suited for the detection of intraaxial hematoma, Sylvian hematoma, subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the posterior fossa and interhemispheric fissure. Especially, it was useful for detecting intraventricular hemorrhage. Therefore, if patients suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage present slight headache or atypical symptoms, sometimes it may be more suitable to perform MRI FLAIR pulse sequences first. Aneurysms were found in 21 cases (56.8%). When the aneurysmal size is more than 7 mm, the rate of detection becomes 100%. Aneurysms present various MR appearances because of flow characteristics. Aneurysms were demonstrated as low signal intensity except in 3 cases. In one out of 3 cases, aneurysms were revealed as high signal intensity and in the other two cases, it was revealed as mixed signal intensity. According to the previous studies, rapid flow was demonstrated as low signal intensity by vascular flow void, and delayed flow was demonstrated as high or mixed signal intensity by flow related enhancement and even echo rephasing. MR clearly delineates the size, the lumen, the flow, and the extraaxial location of aneurysms. (K.H.)

  14. Rodent neonatal germinal matrix hemorrhage mimics the human brain injury, neurological consequences, and post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus.

    Lekic, Tim; Manaenko, Anatol; Rolland, William; Krafft, Paul R; Peters, Regina; Hartman, Richard E; Altay, Orhan; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2012-07-01

    Germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) is the most common neurological disease of premature newborns. GMH causes neurological sequelae such as cerebral palsy, post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus, and mental retardation. Despite this, there is no standardized animal model of spontaneous GMH using newborn rats to depict the condition. We asked whether stereotactic injection of collagenase type VII (0.3 U) into the ganglionic eminence of neonatal rats would reproduce the acute brain injury, gliosis, hydrocephalus, periventricular leukomalacia, and attendant neurological consequences found in humans. To test this hypothesis, we used our neonatal rat model of collagenase-induced GMH in P7 pups, and found that the levels of free-radical adducts (nitrotyrosine and 4-hyroxynonenal), proliferation (mammalian target of rapamycin), inflammation (COX-2), blood components (hemoglobin and thrombin), and gliosis (vitronectin and GFAP) were higher in the forebrain of GMH pups, than in controls. Neurobehavioral testing showed that pups with GMH had developmental delay, and the juvenile animals had significant cognitive and motor disability, suggesting clinical relevance of the model. There was also evidence of white-matter reduction, ventricular dilation, and brain atrophy in the GMH animals. This study highlights an instructive animal model of the neurological consequences after germinal matrix hemorrhage, with evidence of brain injuries that can be used to evaluate strategies in the prevention and treatment of post-hemorrhagic complications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A cerebellar neuroprosthetic system: computational architecture and in vivo experiments

    Ivan eHerreros Alonso

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Emulating the input-output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuro-prosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model's inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuro-prosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step towards replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuro-prosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuro-prosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step towards the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term

  16. Microvascular anatomy of the cerebellar parafloccular perforating space.

    Sosa, Pablo; Dujovny, Manuel; Onyekachi, Ibe; Sockwell, Noressia; Cremaschi, Fabián; Savastano, Luis E

    2016-02-01

    The cerebellopontine angle is a common site for tumor growth and vascular pathologies requiring surgical manipulations that jeopardize cranial nerve integrity and cerebellar and brainstem perfusion. To date, a detailed study of vessels perforating the cisternal surface of the middle cerebellar peduncle-namely, the paraflocculus or parafloccular perforating space-has yet to be published. In this report, the perforating vessels of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in the parafloccular space, or on the cisternal surface of the middle cerebellar peduncle, are described to elucidate their relevance pertaining to microsurgery and the different pathologies that occur at the cerebellopontine angle. Fourteen cadaveric cerebellopontine cisterns (CPCs) were studied. Anatomical dissections and analysis of the perforating arteries of the AICA and posterior inferior cerebellar artery at the parafloccular space were recorded using direct visualization by surgical microscope, optical histology, and scanning electron microscope. A comprehensive review of the English-language and Spanish-language literature was also performed, and findings related to anatomy, histology, physiology, neurology, neuroradiology, microsurgery, and endovascular surgery pertaining to the cerebellar flocculus or parafloccular spaces are summarized. A total of 298 perforating arteries were found in the dissected specimens, with a minimum of 15 to a maximum of 26 vessels per parafloccular perforating space. The average outer diameter of the cisternal portion of the perforating arteries was 0.11 ± 0.042 mm (mean ± SD) and the average length was 2.84 ± 1.2 mm. Detailed schematics and the surgical anatomy of the perforating vessels at the CPC and their clinical relevance are reported. The parafloccular space is a key entry point for many perforating vessels toward the middle cerebellar peduncle and lateral brainstem, and it must be respected and protected during surgical approaches to the

  17. A Cerebellar Neuroprosthetic System: Computational Architecture and in vivo Test

    Herreros, Ivan; Giovannucci, Andrea; Taub, Aryeh H.; Hogri, Roni; Magal, Ari; Bamford, Sim; Prueckl, Robert; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Emulating the input–output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuroprosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention, and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model’s inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuroprosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step toward replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuroprosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuroprosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step toward the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term, humans.

  18. A Cerebellar Neuroprosthetic System: Computational Architecture and in vivo Test

    Herreros, Ivan; Giovannucci, Andrea [Synthetic Perceptive, Emotive and Cognitive Systems group (SPECS), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Taub, Aryeh H.; Hogri, Roni; Magal, Ari [Psychobiology Research Unit, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Bamford, Sim [Physics Laboratory, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome (Italy); Prueckl, Robert [Guger Technologies OG, Graz (Austria); Verschure, Paul F. M. J., E-mail: paul.verschure@upf.edu [Synthetic Perceptive, Emotive and Cognitive Systems group (SPECS), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-05-21

    Emulating the input–output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuroprosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention, and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model’s inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuroprosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step toward replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuroprosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuroprosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step toward the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term, humans.

  19. Recurrent encephalic hemorrhage associated with cocaine abuse

    Pumar, J.; Otero, E.; Castineira, A.; Arrojo, L.; Linares, M.; Castineira, J.A.; Vidal, J.

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage secondary to cocaine abuse in a patient with no other predisposing factors. The hemorrhages were located both supra- and infratentorially. (orig.)

  20. PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    A. M. Gasanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article, we report the incidence and etiology of pulmonary hemorrhage, and modern classifications according to the literature data. Methods of endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hemorrhage are analyzed.

  1. Pleural liquid during hemorrhagic hypotension.

    Tresoldi, Claudio; Porta, Cristina; Zocchi, Luciano; Agostoni, Emilio

    2007-02-15

    The effect of approximately 25% or 35% blood loss (b.l.) on volume, pressure, and protein concentration of pleural liquid has been determined in anesthetized rabbits in lateral or supine posture. Volume and pressure of pleural liquid did not change with 25% b.l. 30 and 60 min after beginning of hemorrhage, and with 35% b.l. at 30 min (bleeding time approximately 10 and 12 min, respectively). With 35% b.l. protein concentration of pleural liquid was 85% greater (PPleural liquid seems protected against derangements from hemorrhage up to 25% b.l. for periods shorter than 1 h.

  2. [Carbetocin use to prevent obstetric hemorrhage].

    Posadas Robledo, Francisco Javier

    2011-07-01

    in Mexico, obstetric hemorrhage and its complications are the second leading cause of maternal death and is the origin of irreversible functional consequences. Carbetocin is a synthetic analogue of oxytocin with an average lifespan four times that of oxytocin and pharmacological effects of 120 minutes produces a tonic contraction which reduces postpartum blood loss. To evaluate the usefulness of carbetocin to prevent uterine bleeding complications and maternal deaths and assess the benefits, effectiveness and side effects. Prospective, observational clinical research in two phases, the first from May 2005 to January 2006 with a sample of 40 patients and the second from January to December of 2008 with a sample of 72 patients conducted at the Hospital Materno Infantil Dr. Alberto López Hermosa, San Luis Potosi. All were high-risk pregnancies and medical complications that warranted specialty hospital management. The intervention consisted of applying undiluted single dose of 100 micrograms of intravenous carbetocin at the time of delivery, as prophylaxis in patients with uterine overdistention in the first phase of the study and complicated pregnancies in the second phase. Were born by caesarean section over 60%. Initially, the hemoglobin showed a reduction of 17% after delivery. Seven patients required blood transfusion (17.5%). In the second phase, 65 patients (90%) did not require transfusion, only 6 patients (8%) required transfusion. No side effects were documented. Uterine overdistension was the main risk factor for bleeding and transfusion. Carbetocin combines the safety of oxytocin and the strength of the ergonovine preparations. To determine where carbetocin will be situated in the future as an useful oxytocic, it requires more than a simple demonstration of its effectiveness. This should be determined in each clinical situation, with factors such as overdistended uterus, indicating the convenience and economic constraints.

  3. Investigation on the clinical practice of transcatheter embolization for acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    Gao Bin; Xu Shengde; Cheng Bing; Peng Qiong; Hong Ci; Xu Guozhong; Wang Tao

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the tactics, methods and relevant factors of transcatheter embolization for acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Methods: Fifteen patients with acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage were embolized by one of the methods of Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA), gelfoam or metal coils. Four of the fifteen patients were upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, the other cases were lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage which were embolized using coaxial microcatheter. Results: Fourteen of the fifteen patients were treated successfully by these methods. There were total 17 times of embolization for 16 parts, the success rate reached 94. 1%. The other one revealed an infarction of intestine after the embolization and was cured by resection. One of the fifteen patients appeared a recurrent hemorrhage 3 months later, and confirmed to be a hemangiolymphangioma. Two patients with malignant tumor were operated upon selectively. The other patient of intestinal hemorrhage was embolized successfully by using a metal coil after shock. Leiomyoma complicated with large area of bleeding was finally proven by operation. Conclusions: Transcatheter embolization for acute massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage is safe and efficient under different choice of methods. The key of success is the right selection of embolized target artery and dosage of emboli

  4. Distributed Cerebellar Motor Learning; a Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity Model

    Niceto Rafael Luque

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Deep cerebellar nuclei neurons receive both inhibitory (GABAergic synaptic currents from Purkinje cells (within the cerebellar cortex and excitatory (glutamatergic synaptic currents from mossy fibres. Those two deep cerebellar nucleus inputs are thought to be also adaptive, embedding interesting properties in the framework of accurate movements. We show that distributed spike-timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms (STDP located at different cerebellar sites (parallel fibres to Purkinje cells, mossy fibres to deep cerebellar nucleus cells, and Purkinje cells to deep cerebellar nucleus cells in close-loop simulations provide an explanation for the complex learning properties of the cerebellum in motor learning. Concretely, we propose a new mechanistic cerebellar spiking model. In this new model, deep cerebellar nuclei embed a dual functionality: deep cerebellar nuclei acting as a gain adaptation mechanism and as a facilitator for the slow memory consolidation at mossy fibres to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. Equipping the cerebellum with excitatory (e-STDP and inhibitory (i-STDP mechanisms at deep cerebellar nuclei afferents allows the accommodation of synaptic memories that were formed at parallel fibres to Purkinje cells synapses and then transferred to mossy fibres to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. These adaptive mechanisms also contribute to modulate the deep-cerebellar-nucleus-output firing rate (output gain modulation towards optimising its working range.

  5. Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage

    Matsuda, Tadashi; Asao, Toyohiko; Shibata, Takeo

    1981-01-01

    Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage were diagnosed and followed up by CT scanning. By CT, hemorrhagic lesions were shown as high density areas in an acute stage and imaged as low density areas after the hemorrhage was absorbed. The time of absorption varies depending upon the site and the severity of hemorrhage. Intraventricular hemorrhage, petechial hemorrhage and subdural hematoma were absorbed rapidly in more than 70% of the exanimed cases, CT scanning 1 - 2 weeks after the onset revealed absorption of hemorrhage. However, the absorption delayed in intracerebral hematoma; CT scan taken after one month showed hemorrhagic lesions remaining in 75% of the cases. In nine cases who survived, following the absorption of the hemorrhagic lesions, cerebral atrophy was observed in 4 cases (44%), ventricular enlargement in 3 cases (33%), and complete recovery in 2 cases (22%). From these results, CT scanning for diagnosis of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage should be done before the hemorrhagic lesion is absorbed (within 7 days of the onset). Follow-up study by CT is important for observing changes and predicting prognosis of intracranial hemorrhage. (Ueda, J.)

  6. Supporting a Youth with Cerebellar Ataxia into Adolescence.

    Meneses, Veronica; Gonzalez-Castillo, Zurisadai; Edgar, Veronica B; Augustyn, Marilyn

    2017-04-01

    Zoe, a 13-year-old white girl, presents as a new patient to your pediatric clinic with complaints of frequent emesis, anxiety, and learning problems, and previous diagnosis of cerebellar ataxia. Parents accompany Zoe and state, "it is really hard for her to go out, she gets sick and falls easily." She was born full term by vaginal delivery without complications. Given globally delayed milestones, she received early intervention services. Feeding problems began at infancy, including gastroesophageal reflux and aspiration pneumonia.At age 2, Zoe saw a neurologist and brain MRI revealed cerebellar atrophy. She recently saw a geneticist and genetic studies are pending. Parents report receiving "little" information regarding prognosis; through their own research, they read about individuals having similar symptoms in adulthood, with a degenerative pattern. They worry that Zoe is "still very young and we do not know what her future will be like."Despite ongoing speech and feeding challenges, the parents report difficulty finding a speech and language therapist in their area. Zoe does see an otolaryngologist for frequent otitis media and hearing loss and an ophthalmologist for vision problems. Still, she continues to fall further behind in school. Furthermore, she is intensely afraid of falling at school and has few friends, resulting in the family being at a loss regarding "what to do about school."She lives with both parents and 2 healthy older sisters. Her mother has Crohn's disease and has been unable to work. Her maternal aunt is close to Zoe and has hypothyroidism. Her father works as an insurance agent and resources have been "tight." Zoe's mother describes "making" Zoe go out to the movies, "otherwise she just stays home." Zoe usually needs assistance to walk in public, to keep from stumbling. Parents share that simply being in a public place or meeting a new physician may trigger emesis. Zoe does enjoy interacting with neighborhood children and says she wants to

  7. Thalamic, brainstem, and cerebellar glucose metabolism in the hemiplegic monkey

    Shimoyama, I.; Dauth, G.W.; Gilman, S.; Frey, K.A.; Penney, J.B. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Unilateral ablation of cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 of Brodmann in the macaque monkey results in a contralateral hemiplegia that resolves partially with time. During the phase of dense hemiplegia, local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG1c) is decreased significantly in most of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation, and there are slight contralateral decreases. The lCMRGlc is reduced bilaterally in most of the brainstem nuclei and bilaterally in the deep cerebellar nuclei, but only in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. During the phase of partial motor recovery, lCMRGlc is incompletely restored in many of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation and completely restored in the contralateral nuclei. In the brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei, poor to moderate recovery occurs bilaterally. Moderate recovery occurs in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. The findings demonstrate that a unilateral cerebral cortical lesion strongly affects lCMRGlc in the thalamus ipsilaterally and in the cerebellar cortex contralaterally, but in the brainstem bilaterally. Partial recovery of lCMRGlc accompanies the progressive motor recovery. The structures affected include those with direct, and also those with indirect, connections to the areas ablated.

  8. Does cerebellar neuronal integrity relate to cognitive ability?

    Rae, C.; Lee, M.; Dixon, R.M.; Blamire, A.; Thompson, C.; Styles, P.; Radda, G.K.; University of Sydney, NSW; Karmiloff-Smith, A.; Grant, J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) allows the non-invasive measurement of metabolite levels in the brain. One of these is N-acetylaspartate (NA), a molecule found solely in neurones, synthesised there by mitochondria. This compound can be considered as a marker of 1) neuronal density and 2) neuronal mitochondria function. We recently completed a joint MRS and neuropsychological investigation of Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), a rare (1/20,000) autosomal dominant disorder caused by a deletion which includes the elastin locus and LIM-kinase. The syndrome has an associated behavioural and cognitive profile which includes hyperactivity, hyperacusis and excessive sociability. Spatial skills are severely affected, while verbal skills are left relatively intact Our investigation showed loss of NA from the cerebellum in WBS compared with normal controls, with the subject population as a whole displaying a continuum of cerebellar NA concentration. Ability at cognitive tests, including the Weschler IQ scale and various verbal and spatial tests, was shown to correlate significantly and positively with the concentration of NA in the cerebellum. This finding can be interpreted in one of two ways: 1. Our sampling of cerebellar metabolite levels represents a 'global' sampling of total brain neuronal density and, as such, is independent of cerebellar integrity. 2. Cerebellar neuronal integrity is associated with performance at cognitive tests. If the latter interpretation is shown to be the case, it will have important implications for our current understanding of cerebellar function. Copyright (1998) Australian Neuroscience Society

  9. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Wajnberg, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy corresponds to a syndrome characterized by a transient myocardial dysfunction affecting the left ventricular apex that classically occurs after major physical or emotional stress (also called 'broken heart syndrome' or 'stress-induced cardiomyopathy'). The author describes the case of a patient with takotsubo cardiomyopathy induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage. (author)

  10. Antifibrinolytic treatment in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Vermeulen, M.; Lindsay, K. W.; Murray, G. D.; Cheah, F.; Hijdra, A.; Muizelaar, J. P.; Schannong, M.; Teasdale, G. M.; van Crevel, H.; van Gijn, J.

    1984-01-01

    We enrolled 479 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine whether treatment with the antifibrinolytic agent tranexamic acid improves outcome by preventing rebleeding. At three months there was no statistical difference

  11. Reducing postpartum hemorrhage in Africa

    Lazarus, Jeff; Lalonde, A

    2005-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. This is being addressed by leading professional organizations, which point to the importance of a skilled attendant at birth. But they also emphasize that the active management of the third stage of labor...

  12. Rebleeding After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Larsen, Carl Christian; Astrup, Jens

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the current knowledge of the mechanisms leading to rebleeding and the prevention of rebleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). METHODS: A literature search was performed to investigate factors associated with rebleeding after SAH. RESULTS: The review of the literature...

  13. A case of immune thrombocytopenic purpura presenting with intracranial hemorrhage

    Sinan Akbayram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune thrombocytopenic purpura is an acute, generally considered a self-limiting benign disorder with a 60%-80% change of spontaneous recovery occurring usually within a few months after onset. Intracranial hemorrhage is a rare but life-threatening complication of childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura. We report a 4-year-old girl who admitted with headache, vomiting, bleeding from noise and bruises on the extremities. Her neurological examination was normal. Based on laboratory finding she was diagnosed immune thrombocytopenic purpura and intracranial hemorrhage. We suggest that cranial imaging should be perform in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura admitted with bleeding symptoms, vomiting and headache even if they had no abnormal neurological signs.

  14. CT differential diagnosis between hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage and hemorrhagic infarction localized in basal ganglia

    Tazawa, Toshiaki; Mizukami, Masahiro; Kawase, Takeshi.

    1984-01-01

    The symptoms of hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage and of middle cerebral artery occlusion are sometimes similar to each other. Hemorrhage sometimes occurs following cerebral infarction. We experienced 7 patients with hemorrhages localized in the basal ganglia following cerebral infarction. The CT findings of 55 patients with putaminal hemorrhage and 7 patients with hemorrhagic infarction localized at the basal ganglia were investigated retrospectively in order to discuss their characteristics. The high-density area (HD) of a putaminal hemorrhage was homogeneous on a plain CT within a week of the onset. There was a close correlation between the size of the HD and the timing of its disappearance. The HD with a maximum diameter of A cm generally disappeared A weeks after. On the other hand, the HD of a hemorrhagic infarction was lower in density than that of the putaminal hemorrhage. The HD of a hemorrhagic infarction generally disappeared earlier than that of a putaminal hemorrhage. Ring enhancement was visualized on contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) from 2 or 3 weeks after the onset in patients with putaminal hemorrhages except in the case of small hemorrhages (less than 1 cm diameter). Ring enhancement was also visualized in 6 out of 7 patients with hemorrhagic infarction; one of them was recognized within a week of the onset. Contrast enhancement of the cortex in the territory of the middle cerebral artery was visualized in 4 out of 7 patients with hemorrhagic infarction. This finding seems to indicate one characteristic of hemorrhagic infarction. (author)

  15. Computed tomography in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Lee, Seung Ro; Chang, Kee Hyun; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Man Chung; Sim, Bo Sung

    1981-01-01

    Computed Tomography has become increasingly important diagnostic method as the initial examination in the diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage with direct detection of extravasated blood in basal cistern and cortical sulci. Furthermore, CT provides better and exact visualization of the presence, localization, extent and degree of intracerebral, intraventricular and subdural hemorrhage, infarction, hydrocephalus and rebleeding which may be associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, and also could detect the causative lesions with contrast enhancement in many cases. The purpose of the paper is to describe the CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to various causes and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CT in subarachnoid hemorrhage. Authors analysed a total of 153 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage confirmed by lumbar puncture at Seoul National University Hospital from March 1979 to April 1981, with special emphasis on CT findings. All of the cases took CT scan and 125 cases of them angiography. The results are as follows: 1. Most prevalent age group was 4th to 6th decades (78%). The ratio of male to female was 1.1: 1. 2. Of 125 cases with angiography, aneurysm was a major cause (68%). Others were arterio-venous malformation (9.6%), Moya-moya disease (4%) and unknown (18.4%). 3. Of all 153 cases with CT scan, hemorrhage was demonstrated in 98 cases (64.1%); SAH in 72 cases (47.1%), ICH in 65 cases (42.5%), IVH in 34 cases (22.2%) and SDH in 1 case (0.7%). SAH combined with ICH was a major group (34.7%) in SAH. Detection rate of SAH was 68.3% within the first 7 days and 5.8% after 7 dyas. 4. In aneurysms, SAH was detected in 60 of 85 cases (70.6%); 88.1% within the first 7 dyas and 5.6% after 7 dyas. Anterior communicating artery was the most common site of the aneurysms (40%), in which detection rate of SAH was 100% within the first 7 days. SAH was combined with ICH in 38.3%. 5. On CT, SAH of unilateral Sylvian fissure was pathognomonic for ruptured MCA

  16. Computed tomography in intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia

    Hanyu, Haruo; Katsunuma, Hideyo; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Tomonaga, Masanori.

    1984-01-01

    In tracranial hemorrhage in leukemia was clinicopathologically studied in 62 cases of autopsy materials, with special attention paid to a morphological comparison of CT images with pathological findings. Intracranial hemorrhage was found in 32 of the 62 leukemic patients (51.6%), and in 13 of these patients (21.0%) it was responsible for death. Leukemic intracranial hemorrhage occurred more often in the acute leukemic type than in the chronic type, and even more often in younger leukemic patinents; it was pathologically characterized by multiple lesions in the white matter of the cerebral hemisphere, prone to combination with SAH or SDH. The hemorrhages could be divided into five types: (1) scattered small hemorrhagic type, (2) hematoma type, (3) fusion type (large hemorrhage composed of assembled small hemorrhages), (4) SAH type, and (5) SDH type. Among these types, the fusion type was considered to be characteristic of leukemia. CT was undertaken in 5 pathologically proven cases, with findings of the scattered small hemorrhagic type in 1, of the SDH type in 3, and of the fusion type in 1. Yet, one case with scattered small hemorrhages and two cases with SDH failed to be detected by CT. However, one case with a typical fusion hemorrhage was found to have multiple, irregular, high-density areas with surrounding edema and a mass effect as well as pathological findings. Therefore, a large-fusion hemorrhage, which is one of the most characteristic types of leukemic intracranial hemorrhage, could be demonstrated as distinctive CT images which reflected neuropathological findings. On the other hand, small parenchymal hemorrhages and relatively thin subdural hemorrhages could not be detected by CT. In conclusion, it seems that CT has value in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia. (J.P.N.)

  17. Hyponatremia in Patients with Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Jaime Robenolt Gray

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia is the most frequently encountered electrolyte abnormality in critically ill patients. Hyponatremia on admission has been identified as an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH. However, the incidence and etiology of hyponatremia (HN during hospitalization in a neurointensive care unit following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH remains unknown. This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients admitted to Detroit Receiving Hospital for sICH between January 2006 and July 2009. All serum Na levels were recorded for patients during the ICU stay. HN was defined as Na <135 mmol/L. A total of 99 patients were analyzed with HN developing in 24% of sICH patients. Patients with HN had an average sodium nadir of 130 ± 3 mmol/L and an average time from admission to sodium <135 mmol/L of 3.9 ± 5.7 days. The most common cause of hyponatremia was syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (90% of HN patients. Patients with HN were more likely to have fever (50% vs. 23%; p = 0.01, infection (58% vs. 28%; p = 0.007 as well as a longer hospital length of stay (14 (8–25 vs. 6 (3–9 days; p < 0.001. Of the patients who developed HN, fifteen (62.5% patients developed HN in the first week following sICH. This shows HN has a fairly high incidence following sICH. The presence of HN is associated with longer hospital length of stays and higher rates of patient complications, which may result in worse patient outcomes. Further study is necessary to characterize the clinical relevance and treatment of HN in this population.

  18. Glycemia in Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Clinical Implications

    Alvis-Miranda Hernando

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous cerebral hemorrhage or intracranial hemorrhage accounts for 10-15% of all strokes. Intracranial hemorrhage is much less common than ischemic stroke, but has higher mortality and morbidity, one of the leading causes of severe disability. Various alterations, among these the endocrine were identified when an intracerebral hemorrhage, these stress-mediated mechanisms exacerbate secondary injury. Deep knowledge of the injuries which are directly involved alterations of glucose, offers insight as cytotoxicity, neuronal death and metabolic dysregulations alter the prognosis of patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage.

  19. Migraine and risk of hemorrhagic stroke

    Gaist, David; González-Pérez, Antonio; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    to select 10,000 controls free from hemorrhagic stroke. Using unconditional logistic regression models, we calculated the risk of hemorrhagic stroke associated with migraine, adjusting for age, sex, calendar year, alcohol, body mass index, hypertension, previous cerebrovascular disease, oral contraceptive......BACKGROUND: We investigated the association between hemorrhagic stroke and migraine using data from The Health Improvement Network database. FINDINGS: We ascertained 1,797 incident cases of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and 1,340 of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Density-based sampling was used...

  20. Adverse effects of anticoagulation treatment: clinically significant upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    Pavel Skok

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last years, the use of oral anticoagulant treatment has increased dramatically, principally for the prevention of venous thrombosis and thrombembolic events. This treatment is demanding, especially among the elderly with concommitant diseases and different medication. Aim of the study to evaluate the rate of serious complications, clinically significant hemorrhage from upper gastointestinal tract in patients treated with oral antiocoagulants in a prospective cohort study.Patients and methods: Included were patients admitted to our institution between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2003 due to gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Emergency endoscopy and laboratory testing was performed in all patients.Results: 6416 patients were investigated: 2452 women (38.2 % and 3964 men (61.8 %, mean age 59.1 years, SD 17.2. Among our patients, 55 % were aged over 60 years. In 86.4 % of patients the source of bleeding was confirmed in the upper gastrointestinal tract. In the last week prior to bleeding, 20.4 % (1309/6416 of all patients were regularly taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulant therapy or antiplatelet agents in single daily doses at least. 6.3 % of patients (82/1309 with abundant hemorrhage from upper gastrointestinal tract were using oral anticoagulant therapy and had INR > 5 at admission, 25.6 % of them had INR > 10. The mortality of patients using oral anticoagulants and INR > 5 was 17.1 %.Conclusions: Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a serious complication of different medications, particularly in elderly patients. Safe use of anticoagulant therapy is based on careful selection of patients and correct intake of the prescribed drugs.

  1. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage: MRI

    Uchino, A. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan) Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Hasuo, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Uchida, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Matsumoto, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Tsukamoto, Y. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Ohno, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Masuda, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1993-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of seven patients with olivary degeneration caused by cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhages were reviewed. In four patients with cerebellar haemorrhage, old haematomas were identified as being located in the dentate nucleus; the contralateral inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense on proton-density- and T2-weighted images. In two patients with pontine haemorrhages, the old haematomas were in the tegmentum and the ipsilateral inferior olivary nuclei, which were hyperintense. In one case of midbrain haemorrhage, the inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense bilaterally. The briefest interval from the ictus to MRI was 2 months. Hypertrophic olivary nuclei were observed only at least 4 months after the ictus. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage should not be confused with ischaemic, neoplastic, or other primary pathological conditions of the medulla. (orig.)

  2. Early childhood obesity is associated with compromised cerebellar development.

    Miller, Jennifer L; Couch, Jessica; Schwenk, Krista; Long, Michelle; Towler, Stephen; Theriaque, Douglas W; He, Guojun; Liu, Yijun; Driscoll, Daniel J; Leonard, Christiana M

    2009-01-01

    As part of a study investigating commonalities between Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS-a genetic imprinting disorder) and early-onset obesity of unknown etiology (EMO) we measured total cerebral and cerebellar volume on volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images. Individuals with PWS (N = 16) and EMO (N = 12) had smaller cerebellar volumes than a control group of 15 siblings (p = .02 control vs. EMO; p = .0005 control vs. PWS), although there was no difference among the groups in cerebral volume. Individuals with PWS and EMO also had impaired cognitive function: general intellectual ability (GIA): PWS 65 +/- 25; EMO 81 +/- 19; and Controls 112 +/- 13 (p cognitive development, these results raise the possibility that early childhood obesity retards both cerebellar and cognitive development.

  3. Is Palliative Laparoscopic Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Effective in Patients with Malignant Hemorrhagic Ascites?

    de Mestier, Louis; Volet, Julien; Scaglia, Elodie; Msika, Simon; Kianmanesh, Reza; Bouché, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Malignant hemorrhagic ascites may complicate the terminal evolution of digestive cancers with peritoneal carcinomatosis. It has a bad influence on prognosis and may severely impair patients’ quality of life. Palliative laparoscopic hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) has been proposed to treat debilitating malignant ascites. Two cases of peritoneal carcinomatosis causing hemorrhagic ascites and severe anemia that needed iterative blood transfusions are reported. These patients were treated by laparoscopic HIPEC (mitomycin C and cisplatin with an inflow temperature of 43°C), resulting in cessation of peritoneal bleeding. No postoperative complication or relapse of ascites occurred during the following months. No more blood transfusion was needed. Laparoscopic HIPEC might be an effective and safe therapeutic option to consider in patients with malignant hemorrhagic ascites. PMID:22679405

  4. Fatal Complications after Pediatric Surgical Interventions: Lessons Learned

    Klein, W.M.; Putten, M.E. van der; Kusters, B.; Verhoeven, B.H.

    2017-01-01

    Placement of catheters, drains, shunts, and tubes in children can lead to serious or even fatal complications at the moment of placement, such as hemorrhage at insertion, or in the longterm, such as infections and migration into adjacent organs. The clinician should always be aware of these

  5. Distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome after acoustic neuroma surgery.

    Hegarty, Joseph L; Jackler, Robert K; Rigby, Peter L; Pitts, Lawrence H; Cheung, Steven W

    2002-07-01

    To define a clinicopathologic syndrome associated with persistent cerebellar dysfunction after acoustic neuroma (AN) excision. Case series derived from radiographic and clinical chart review. Tertiary referral center. In 12 patients with AN, persistent cerebellar dysfunction developed after AN removal. Each case demonstrated abnormality in the ipsilateral cerebellar peduncle on postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebellar function and ambulatory status over the first postoperative year. On magnetic resonance imaging scans, the extent of cerebellar peduncle infarcts was variable. It ranged from focal brain injury (2 cm) spanning the full thickness of the peduncle. Peduncular infarcts were associated with large tumor size (average 3.8 cm, range 2.0-5.5 cm diameter). The long-term functional outcomes (>1 yr) varied. Dysmetria was unchanged or improved in over half of the patients (6 of 11 patients). Gait recovered to normal or to preoperative levels in 5 patients. In the 6 patients with persistent impaired mobility, 2 had mild gait disturbance, 3 required regular use of a cane, and 1 has been dependent on a walker. One patient had sustained mild motor weakness. Three of 11 patients remained dependent on others for activities of daily living. Peduncle injury most likely stems from interruption of distal branches of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA). These small vessels are intimately related to the capsule of the tumor and may supply both the neoplasm and the brain parenchyma. It has long been recognized that interruption of the proximal segment of the AICA results in severe injury to the pons, with devastating neurologic sequelae. A limited AICA syndrome caused by loss of its distal ramifications seems a more plausible explanation for peduncular infarction than either venous insufficiency or direct surgical trauma.

  6. In-hospital cerebrovascular complications following orthotopic liver transplantation: A retrospective study

    Liang Zhijian

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebrovascular complications are severe events following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. This study aimed to observe the clinical and neuroimaging features and possible risk factors of in-hospital cerebrovascular complications in the patients who underwent OLT. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed 337 consecutive patients who underwent 358 OLTs. Cerebrovascular complications were determined by clinical and neuroimaging manifestations, and the possible risk factors were analyzed in the patients with intracranial hemorrhage. Results Ten of 337 (3.0% patients developed in-hospital cerebrovascular complications (8 cases experienced intracranial hemorrhage and 2 cases had cerebral infarction, and 6 of them died. The clinical presentations were similar to common stroke, but with rapid deterioration at early stage. The hematomas on brain CT scan were massive, irregular, multifocal and diffuse, and most of them were located at brain lobes and might enlarge or rebleed. Infarcts presented lacunar and multifocal lesions in basal gangliar but with possible hemorrhagic transformation. The patients with intracranial hemorrhage had older age and a more frequency of systemic infection than non-intracranial hemorrhage patients. (P = 0.011 and 0.029, respectively. Conclusion Posttransplant cerebrovascular complications have severe impact on outcome of the patients who received OLT. Older age and systemic infection may be the possible risk factors of in-hospital intracranial hemorrhage following OLT.

  7. Subdural hemorrhage: A unique case involving secondary vitamin K deficiency bleeding due to biliary atresia.

    Miyao, Masashi; Abiru, Hitoshi; Ozeki, Munetaka; Kotani, Hirokazu; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Kobayashi, Naho; Omae, Tadaki; Osamura, Toshio; Tamaki, Keiji

    2012-09-10

    Extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA) is a rare disease characterized by progressive and obliterative cholangiopathy in infants and is one of the major causes of secondary vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) due to cholestasis-induced fat malabsorption. Breast feeding increases the tendency of bleeding in EHBA patients because breast milk contains low amounts of vitamin K. A 2-month-old female infant unexpectedly died, with symptoms of vomiting and jaundice prior to death. She had been born by uncomplicated vaginal delivery and exhibited normal growth and development with breastfeeding. There was no history of trauma. She received vitamin K prophylaxis orally. In an emergency hospital, a CT scan showed a right intracranial hematoma and mass effect with midline shift to the left. In the postmortem examination, severe atresia was observed in the whole extrahepatic bile duct. Histologically, cholestasis, periductal fibrosis, and distorted bile ductules were noted. The gallbladder was not identified. A subdural hematoma and cerebellar tonsillar herniation were found; however, no traumatic injury in any part of the body was observed. Together, these findings suggest that the subdural hemorrhage was caused by secondary vitamin K deficiency resulting from a combination of cholestasis-induced fat malabsorption and breastfeeding. Subdural hemorrhage by secondary VKDB sometimes occurs even when vitamin K prophylaxis is continued. This case demonstrated that intrinsic factors, such as secondary VKDB (e.g., EHBA, neonatal hepatitis, chronic diarrhea), should also be considered in infant autopsy cases presenting with subdural hemorrhage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Common late-onset subcortical cerebral hemorrhage following excessive alcohol consumption: a case report

    Incedayi, M.; Sivrioglu, A.; Velioglu, M.; Aribal, S.; Sonmez, G.; Basekim, C.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: 50 year old male patient who was suffering from cooperation disorder and bilaterally blindness was admitted to our emergency service. He was addicted to alcohol and had excessive alcohol consumption the day before. Cranial nonenhanced CT was normal. T2 weighed MR imaging performed at 1,5 T unit showed high signal intensity in bilateral putaminal foci. In this localization diffusion-weighed images (DWI) were hyperintense due to restricted diffusion and low ADC values. After two weeks, drowsiness and confusion were appeared suddenly. Cranial nonenhanced CT was showed extensive subcortical white matter and basal ganglia abnormalities consistent with edema and hemorrhagic changes. The patient was transferred to intensive care unit and died after one day. In methanol intoxication, cerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage, cerebellar necrosis, diffuse cerebral edema, bilateral subcortical white matter necrosis and edema were defined It should also be known that 2 or 3 weeks after ingestion of methyl alcohol, the deterioration of the patient's general situation is responsible for cerebral subcortical hemorrhage. We have also thought that patients' mortality and morbidity can be reduced with radiological imaging due to early diagnosis

  9. Microdebrider complications in laryngologic and airway surgery.

    Howell, Rebecca J; Solowski, Nancy L; Belafsky, Peter C; Courey, Mark C; Merati, Albert L; Rosen, Clark A; Weinberger, Paul M; Postma, Gregory N

    2014-11-01

    There is a paucity of experience in the published literature documenting complications of powered surgical instruments in laryngologic surgery. Our objective was to ascertain the nature of these complications from expert opinion and review of the literature, and to recommend strategies to decrease major complications. Review of the literature and an e-mail survey. A literature review of microdebrider complications in laryngologic surgery was conducted using PubMed and Ovid (1985 to 2013), along with an analysis of a confidential e-mail survey of various surgeons in selected high-volume laryngologic centers. Powered instrumentation is frequently used in the operating room for larynx and airway surgery. The microdebrider can improve efficiency, lower costs, and shorten operative times. However, use of the microdebrider has the potential for serious complications in the larynx and airway. Great care must be taken when utilizing the microdebrider in laryngologic surgery. Significant complications including major vocal fold scar, airway compromise, severe hemorrhage, and unintentional tissue loss have occurred. The microdebrider is a popular and valuable tool for the otolaryngologist. A thorough knowledge of the instrument and its potential complications will improve surgical outcomes and may prevent complications. Awareness of the risks and surgeon experience with use of the microdebrider will allow the surgeon to successfully utilize this device in a safe and effective manner. 5. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Complications of endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms

    Orrù, Emanuele, E-mail: surgeon.ema@gmail.com [Neuroradiology Department, Padua University Hospital, Via Giustiniani 2, Padua 35128 (Italy); Roccatagliata, Luca, E-mail: lroccatagliata@neurologia.unige.it [Neuroradiology Department, IRCCS San Martino University Hospital and IST, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, Genoa 16132 (Italy); Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa (Italy); Cester, Giacomo, E-mail: giacomo.cester@sanita.padova.it [Neuroradiology Department, Padua University Hospital, Via Giustiniani 2, Padua 35128 (Italy); Causin, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.causin@sanita.padova.it [Neuroradiology Department, Padua University Hospital, Via Giustiniani 2, Padua 35128 (Italy); Castellan, Lucio, E-mail: lucio.castellan@hsanmartino.it [Neuroradiology Department, IRCCS San Martino University Hospital and IST, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, Genoa 16132 (Italy)

    2013-10-01

    The number of neuroendovascular treatments of both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms has increased substantially in the last two decades. Complications of endovascular treatments of cerebral aneurysms are rare but can potentially lead to acute worsening of the neurological status, to new neurological deficits or death. Some of the possible complications, such as vascular access site complications or systemic side effects associated with contrast medium (e.g. contrast medium allergy, contrast induced nephropathy) can also be encountered in diagnostic angiography. The most common complications of endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms are related to acute thromboembolic events and perforation of the aneurysm. Overall, the reported rate of thromboembolic complications ranges between 4.7% and 12.5% while the rate of intraprocedural rupture of cerebral aneurysms is about 0.7% in patients with unruptured aneurysms and about 4.1% in patients with previously ruptured aneurysms. Thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications may occur during different phases of endovascular procedures and are related to different technical, clinical and anatomic reasons. A thorough knowledge of the different aspects of these complications can reduce the risk of their occurrence and minimize their clinical sequelae. A deep understanding of complications and of their management is thus part of the best standard of care.

  11. Neurological Complications in Child with Chronic Renal Failure

    Faruk Incecik

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital uremic encephalopathy, progressive dialysis encephalopathy, Wernicke encefalopathy, headache, seizures because of dialysis, disequilibrium syndrome, cerebral hemorrhage and uremic neuropathy are the neurologic complications seen in child with chronic renal failure. Here it is aimed to discuss these complications with literature, and to emphasize the importance of evaluation of patients with these aspects. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(4.000: 406-412

  12. CT findings of acute cholecystitis and its complications.

    Shakespear, Jonathan S; Shaaban, Akram M; Rezvani, Maryam

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the CT findings of acute cholecystitis and its complications. CT findings suggesting acute cholecystitis should be interpreted with caution and should probably serve as justification for further investigation with abdominal ultrasound. CT has a relatively high negative predictive value, and acute cholecystitis is unlikely in the setting of a negative CT. Complications of acute cholecystitis have a characteristic CT appearance and include necrosis, perforation, abscess formation, intraluminal hemorrhage, and wall emphysema.

  13. Recent Advances in Cerebellar Ischemic Stroke Syndromes Causing Vertigo and Hearing Loss.

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Yi, Hyon-Ah; Lee, Hyung

    2016-12-01

    Cerebellar ischemic stroke is one of the common causes of vascular vertigo. It usually accompanies other neurological symptoms or signs, but a small infarct in the cerebellum can present with vertigo without other localizing symptoms. Approximately 11 % of the patients with isolated cerebellar infarction simulated acute peripheral vestibulopathy, and most patients had an infarct in the territory of the medial branch of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). A head impulse test can differentiate acute isolated vertigo associated with PICA territory cerebellar infarction from more benign disorders involving the inner ear. Acute hearing loss (AHL) of a vascular cause is mostly associated with cerebellar infarction in the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), but PICA territory cerebellar infarction rarely causes AHL. To date, at least eight subgroups of AICA territory infarction have been identified according to the pattern of neurotological presentations, among which the most common pattern of audiovestibular dysfunction is the combined loss of auditory and vestibular functions. Sometimes acute isolated audiovestibular loss can be the initial symptom of impending posterior circulation ischemic stroke (particularly within the territory of the AICA). Audiovestibular loss from cerebellar infarction has a good long-term outcome than previously thought. Approximately half of patients with superior cerebellar artery territory (SCA) cerebellar infarction experienced true vertigo, suggesting that the vertigo and nystagmus in the SCA territory cerebellar infarctions are more common than previously thought. In this article, recent findings on clinical features of vertigo and hearing loss from cerebellar ischemic stroke syndrome are summarized.

  14. A composite neurobehavioral test to evaluate acute functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage in rats.

    McBride, Devin W; Nowrangi, Derek; Kaur, Harpreet; Wu, Guangyong; Huang, Lei; Lekic, Tim; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2018-03-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhage accounts for 5-10% of all intracerebral haemorrhages and leads to severe, long-lasting functional deficits. Currently, there is limited research on this stroke subtype, which may be due to the lack of a suitable composite neuroscoring system specific for cerebellar injury in rodents. The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive composite neuroscore test for cerebellar injury using a rat model of cerebellar haemorrhage. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or cerebellar haemorrhage. Twenty-four hours post-injury, neurological behaviour was evaluated using 17 cost-effective and easy-to-perform tests, and a composite neuroscore was developed. The composite neuroscore was then used to assess functional recovery over seven days after cerebellar haemorrhage. Differences in the composite neuroscore deficits for the mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage models were observed for up to five days post-ictus. Until now, a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was not available for rodent studies. Herein, using mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage rat models a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was developed and used to assess functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage. This composite neuroscore may also be useful for other cerebellar injury models.

  15. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 DNase-seq Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... SRX685885,SRX685882,SRX685880 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  18. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Unclassified Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Histone Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Histone Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Histone Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... SRX685885,SRX685882,SRX685880 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Unclassified Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Unclassified Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  9. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... SRX685885,SRX685882,SRX685880 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Histone Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  11. File list: DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 DNase-seq Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... SRX685885,SRX685882,SRX685880 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... SRX685885,SRX685878,SRX685882,SRX685877,SRX685880,SRX685883 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... SRX685882,SRX685880,SRX685883,SRX685885,SRX685877,SRX685878 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  15. File list: DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 DNase-seq Neural Cerebellar granule neurons... SRX685882,SRX685880,SRX685883,SRX685885,SRX685877,SRX685878 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  16. Surgical approach to posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms.

    La Pira, Biagia; Sturiale, Carmelo Lucio; Della Pepa, Giuseppe Maria; Albanese, Alessio

    2018-02-01

    The far-lateral is a standardised approach to clip aneurysms of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). Different variants can be adopted to manage aneurysms that differ in morphology, topography, ruptured status, cerebellar swelling and surgeon preference. We distinguished five paradigmatic approaches aimed to manage aneurysms that are: proximal unruptured; proximal ruptured requiring posterior fossa decompression (PFD); proximal ruptured not requiring PFD; distal unruptured; distal ruptured. Preoperative planning in the setting of PICA aneurysm surgery is of paramount importance to perform an effective and safe procedure, to ensure an adequate PFD and optimal proximal control before aneurysm manipulation.

  17. Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome with crossed cerebellar atrophy

    Sanjay M. Khaladkar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome is a rare condition with classical, clinical and radiological changes – mental retardation, hemiparesis, facial asymmetry, seizures and cerebral hemiatrophy with calvarial changes. Contralateral cerebellar atrophy is rare and occurs if insult occurs after 1 month of age. We report a case of a 6-year-old female child presenting with right-sided hemiparesis, convulsions and left cerebral hemiatrophy with an old infarct in left middle cerebral artery (MCA territory, ipsilateral calvarial thickening and right (crossed cerebellar atrophy.

  18. Biliary atresia and cerebellar hypoplasia in polysplenia syndrome

    Vanderdood, Kurt; Op de Beeck, Bart; Desprechins, Brigitte; Osteaux, Michel [Department of Radiology, Free University Brussels, AZ-VUB, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)

    2003-09-01

    We report a 3.5-month-old boy with polysplenia syndrome who demonstrated hemiazygos continuation of the inferior vena cava, extrahepatic biliary atresia, multiple splenunculi, bowel malrotation, and the rare finding of brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia. A possible pathogenesis for cerebellar hypoplasia in this syndrome is suggested after review of the literature. The importance of seeking associated anomalies in biliary atresia, which may be possible indicators of polysplenia syndrome, is stressed since these patients need appropriate management when surgery is considered. (orig.)

  19. Cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism in thalamic hemorrhage

    Yasui, Nobuyuki; Asakura, Ken

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral oxygen consumption (CMRO 2 ), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) were studied in 20 cases of thalamic hemorrhage using positron CT and 15 O labeled gas steady-state inhalation method. CBF reduction was limited around the thalamus in the small sized hematoma. CBF were significantly diminished in the mean cortical, parietal, temporal, basal ganglia and thalamic area ipsilateral and cerebellar cortex contralateral to the medium sized hematoma. There was bilateral and diffuse CBF reduction in the large sized hematoma which was caused by increased intracranial pressure. CMRO 2 value were similary changed as CBF. OEF change showed within normal limit. Diffuse CBV reduction was observed in the large sized hematoma. This reduction was the result of decreased vascular bed caused by mass effect of the hematoma and hydrocephalus. Effect of surgical treatment such as ventricular drainage and hematoma evacuation were also discussed in correlation to CBF in some case using positron and single photon ECT. (author)

  20. Computed tomography of intraventricular hemorrhage

    Cho, Bum Shin; Shin, Kyoung Hee; Hahm, Chang Kok

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a new non-invasive diagnostic imaging method, which has ability to differentiate C.S.F., hematoma, and even edematous brain from normal brain tissue. Prior to the introduction of the CT, the diagnosis of the intraventricular hemorrhage in living patients was difficult and was confirmed by surgery of autopsy. Intracranial hemorrhages are visible on the CT with density higher than brain tissue in acute phase. CT is an accurate method for detecting of intraventricular hemorrhage including detection of nature, location, amount, and associated changes. CT is also useful as a guidance and in the evaluation of fate of the hematomas by easily performable follow up studies. The causes of the intraventricular hemorrhages are hypertension, rupture of aneurysm, arteriovenous malformation, head trauma, brain tumor, and others. This study included evaluation of CT of 69 patients who show the high density in cerebral ventricular system during the period of 31 months from Feb. 1979 to Aug. 1981 in the Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University. The results were as follows. 1. Age distribution of the total 69 patient was broad ranging from 1 month to 80 years. 28% of patients were in the 6th decade. The mate to female ratio was 2 : 1. 2. The consciousness of patients at CT study: Those were conscious in 11 cases, stuporous in 41 cases and unconscious in 17 cases. 3. The causes of intraventricular hemorrhages were hypertension in 28 cases, head trauma in 12 cases, aneurysm in 4 cases, tumor in 2 cases and others in 23 cases. 4. 9 cases showed intraventricular hematomas only, other 60 cases showed associated intracranial hematomas: Those were intracerebral hematomas in 53 cases including 30 cases of basal ganglial and thalamic hematomas, subarachnoid hemorrhage in 17 cases, epidural hematomas in 3 cases, and subdural hematomas in 2 cases. 5. All cases of the intraventricular hematomas except one sowed hematoma in the lateral

  1. CT findings of fundal hemorrhage in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Munemoto, Shigeru; Ishiguro, Shuzo; Kimura, Akira; Futami, Kazuya; Kogure, Yuzaburo; Wakamatsu, Koichi; Demachi, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    The patient was a 66-year-old man. He lost consciousness as a result of a third subarachnoid hemorrhage attack. On neurological examination, he was found to be comatose and to have no spontaneous respiration. A mydriasis was noticed on both eyes. Bilateral retinal bleeding was also observed, with the bleeding of the left side more severe than that of the right side. After his death, his brain and eyes were examined by means of a CT scan. The CT films showed a severe subarachnoid hemorrhage and ventricular hematoma. The thin-sliced CT films showed left retinal bleeding. Retinal bleeding may be caused by a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Usually we make a sketch of the retinal bleeding on the basis of a doctor's report. A photo of an optic fundus is a good record; however, taking a photo is troublesome for severely ill patients. The CT finding of retinal bleeding is gross, but a CT image is one good way to record retinal bleeding. (author)

  2. Dyslexic Children Show Atypical Cerebellar Activation and Cerebro-Cerebellar Functional Connectivity in Orthographic and Phonological Processing.

    Feng, Xiaoxia; Li, Le; Zhang, Manli; Yang, Xiujie; Tian, Mengyu; Xie, Weiyi; Lu, Yao; Liu, Li; Bélanger, Nathalie N; Meng, Xiangzhi; Ding, Guosheng

    2017-04-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have found atypical cerebellar activation in individuals with dyslexia in either motor-related tasks or language tasks. However, studies investigating atypical cerebellar activation in individuals with dyslexia have mostly used tasks tapping phonological processing. A question that is yet unanswered is whether the cerebellum in individuals with dyslexia functions properly during orthographic processing of words, as growing evidence shows that the cerebellum is also involved in visual and spatial processing. Here, we investigated cerebellar activation and cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity during word processing in dyslexic readers and typically developing readers using tasks that tap orthographic and phonological codes. In children with dyslexia, we observed an abnormally higher engagement of the bilateral cerebellum for the orthographic task, which was negatively correlated with literacy measures. The greater the reading impairment was for young dyslexic readers, the stronger the cerebellar activation was. This suggests a compensatory role of the cerebellum in reading for children with dyslexia. In addition, a tendency for higher cerebellar activation in dyslexic readers was found in the phonological task. Moreover, the functional connectivity was stronger for dyslexic readers relative to typically developing readers between the lobule VI of the right cerebellum and the left fusiform gyrus during the orthographic task and between the lobule VI of the left cerebellum and the left supramarginal gyrus during the phonological task. This pattern of results suggests that the cerebellum compensates for reading impairment through the connections with specific brain regions responsible for the ongoing reading task. These findings enhance our understanding of the cerebellum's involvement in reading and reading impairment.

  3. Aspirin in Alzheimer's Disease Increased Risk of Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Cause for Concern?

    Thoonsen, Hanneke; Richard, Edo; Bentham, Peter; Gray, Richard; van Geloven, Nan; de Haan, Rob J.; van Gool, Willem A.; Nederkoorn, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose-In a randomized controlled trial in Alzheimer's disease (AD), we found a higher number of intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs) in patients randomized to aspirin treatment. Here, we evaluate the literature on the risk of ICH as a complication in patients with AD treated with

  4. Compression of the posterior fossa venous sinuses by epidural hemorrhage simulating venous sinus thrombosis: CT and MR findings

    Singh, Sumit; Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H.; Hegde, Shilpa V.; Glasier, Charles M. [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Pediatric Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Posterior fossa dural venous sinus thrombus is a well-described complication of head trauma, especially when fracture crosses the dural sinus grooves or in association with epidural hemorrhage. We have found that post-traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma compressing a dural venous sinus can mimic dural venous thrombus. To discuss the CT and MRI findings of posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages simulating sinus thrombosis, to make radiologists aware of this important imaging pitfall. We describe radiologic findings in four children in whom a posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage mimicked dural venous sinus thrombus. Routine CT head and CT venography were obtained on Toshiba volume and helical CT scanners. MRI and MR venography were performed on a Philips scanner. In all cases there was medial displacement and compression of the posterior fossa dural venous sinuses without intraluminal thrombosis. The epidural hemorrhage was seen tracking along sinus grooves in the occipital bone, peeling the dura containing the sinuses from the calvarium and compressing the sinus, simulating thrombosis on axial CT views. Both venous sinus thrombosis and posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages in children are well-described complications of head trauma. Posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage can mimic a sinus thrombus by compressing and displacing the sinuses. It is important to recognize this pitfall because treatment of a suspected thrombus with anticoagulation can worsen epidural hemorrhage. (orig.)

  5. Compression of the posterior fossa venous sinuses by epidural hemorrhage simulating venous sinus thrombosis: CT and MR findings

    Singh, Sumit; Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H.; Hegde, Shilpa V.; Glasier, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Posterior fossa dural venous sinus thrombus is a well-described complication of head trauma, especially when fracture crosses the dural sinus grooves or in association with epidural hemorrhage. We have found that post-traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma compressing a dural venous sinus can mimic dural venous thrombus. To discuss the CT and MRI findings of posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages simulating sinus thrombosis, to make radiologists aware of this important imaging pitfall. We describe radiologic findings in four children in whom a posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage mimicked dural venous sinus thrombus. Routine CT head and CT venography were obtained on Toshiba volume and helical CT scanners. MRI and MR venography were performed on a Philips scanner. In all cases there was medial displacement and compression of the posterior fossa dural venous sinuses without intraluminal thrombosis. The epidural hemorrhage was seen tracking along sinus grooves in the occipital bone, peeling the dura containing the sinuses from the calvarium and compressing the sinus, simulating thrombosis on axial CT views. Both venous sinus thrombosis and posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages in children are well-described complications of head trauma. Posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage can mimic a sinus thrombus by compressing and displacing the sinuses. It is important to recognize this pitfall because treatment of a suspected thrombus with anticoagulation can worsen epidural hemorrhage. (orig.)

  6. Retinal complications after aqueous shunt surgical procedures for glaucoma.

    Law, S K; Kalenak, J W; Connor, T B; Pulido, J S; Han, D P; Mieler, W F

    1996-12-01

    To assess retinal complications and to identify risk factors for retinal complications following aqueous shunt procedures. Records of 38 consecutive aqueous shunt procedures that were performed on 36 patients at the Eye Institute of the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, from June 1993 to March 1995 (minimum follow-up, 6 months) were reviewed. The mean +/- SD follow-up was 11.4 +/- 5.2 months (median, 10.5 months). Twelve patients (32%) had the following retinal complications: 4 serous choroidal effusions (10%) that required drainage, 3 suprachoroidal hemorrhages (8%), 2 vitreous hemorrhages (5%), 1 rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (3%), 1 endophthalmitis (3%), and 1 scleral buckling extrusion (3%). Surgical procedures for retinal complications were required in 8 (67%) of these 12 patients. Visual acuity decreased 2 lines or more in 9 (75%) of these 12 patients. The median onset of a postoperative retinal complication was 12.5 days, with 10 patients (83%) experiencing complications within 35 days. Serous choroidal effusions developed in 10 other patients (26%), and these effusions resolved spontaneously. Visual acuity decreased 2 lines or more in 2 (20%) of these additional 10 patients. Patients who experienced serious retinal complications were significantly older, had a higher rate of hypertension, and postoperative ocular hypotony. Serious retinal complications were distributed evenly among patients with Krupin valves with discs and Molteno and Baerveldt devices. Experience with the Ahmed glaucoma valve implant was limited. Aqueous shunt procedures may be associated with significant retinal complications and subsequent visual loss.

  7. Hemorrhagic Stroke in a Young Healthy Male Following Use of Pre-Workout Supplement Animal Rage XL.

    Harris, Brandon F; Winn, Coty; Ableman, Thomas B

    2017-09-01

    So-called "pre-workout" supplements are substances marketed as natural dietary supplements with claims of helping athletes achieve more focused and intense workouts. The use of such products remains popular among American youth as a whole, but is especially high among active duty service members. Supplements are minimally regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and unlike pharmaceuticals, supplements are often brought to market without any testing to show neither efficacy nor safety. Several case reports have documented serious adverse events and raise the question of whether supplement use was a causative factor. Reported events occurring after use of pre-workout supplements include, among others, ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, myocardial infarction, hepatitis, and death. Here, we present the case of a healthy 25-year-old active duty male who experienced a bilateral cerebellar hemorrhagic stroke occurring shortly after taking a supplement named Animal Rage XL. Hemorrhagic stroke occurring in a healthy 25-year-old male with no risk factors is exceedingly rare. This is the first known case of stroke temporally associated with this particular supplement, which is currently available for purchase at military exchanges. Additionally, several of the active ingredients in this supplement have been shown to cause hypertension, tachycardia, and vasospasm. All of these effects could increase the likelihood and severity of a hemorrhagic stroke. The investigated ingredients in this abstract include β-phenethylamine, creatine-monophosphate, and caffeine. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  8. [Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever].

    Saijo, Masayuki; Moriikawa, Shigeru; Kurane, Ichiro

    2004-12-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute infectious disease caused by CCHF virus (CCHFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Nairovirus. The case fatality rate of CCHF ranges from 10-40%. Because CCHF is not present in Japan, many Japanese virologists and clinicians are not very familiar with this disease. However, there remains the possibility of an introduction of CCHFV or other hemorrhagic fever viruses into Japan from surrounding endemic areas. Development of diagnostic laboratory capacity for viral hemorrhagic fevers is necessary even in countries without these diseases. At the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan, laboratory-based systems such as recombinant protein-based antibody detection, antigen-capture and pathological examination have been developed. In this review article, epidemiologic and clinical data on CCHF in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, compiled through field investigations and diagnostic testing utilizing the aforementioned laboratory systems, are presented. CCHFV infections are closely associated with the environmental conditions, life styles, religion, occupation, and human economic activities. Based on these data, preventive measures for CCHFV infections are also discussed.

  9. MR imaging of intraocular hemorrhage

    Saint-Louis, L.A.; Weiss, R.; Ellsworth, R.; Chang, S.; Deck, M.D.F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors evaluated with MR imaging 11 globes (nine patients) with spontaneous or traumatic intraocular hemorrhage. Subretinal blood was present in eight. Intravitreal bleeding was associated in seven and three subchoroidal. The ages of the hemorrhages ranged from 1 day to 6 months. Six of the subretinal and two subchoroidal cases had clotted blood with different intensity on the short TE images but were markedly hypointense on long TR/long TE images. The intravitreal blood was hyperintense on all sequences except in one. All imaging was performed with .5 T, 256 matrix, and 4- and 7- mm section thickness. Because of the varied appearance of hemorrhages, the authors scanned and are scanning two rabbits with intravitreal blood in vivo. Parameters include: 3-mm sections, T1, PD, T2 scans in .3-T and 1.5-T imagers. Initial results for the first 2 days show no change in signal intensity (hyperintense on all sequences). The T1 images show a diminishing intensity up to 8 days, and T2 scans remained hyperintense. These results so far correlate with the patient findings. The authors present the clinical findings and experimental correlation

  10. Analysis of angiographic findings in cerebral arteriovenous malformation with hemorrhage: comparison between intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage

    Kim, Jae Kyun; Kim, Joon Hyung; Kwon, Jin Sook; Yoon, Soo Woong; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the angioarchitectures of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) and to determine whether there was correlation between angioarchitectures and patterns of intracranial hemorrhage (intracerebral, intraventricular, and both) in cerebral AVM. One hundred and twenty-eight patients who between November 1989 and December 1994 suffered supratentorial AVM with intracranial hemorrhage were studied retrospectively. Among 128 patients, intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage were seen in 68(53%) and 24 patients(19%), respectively, while both types were seen in the remaining 36 (28%). We analyzed the angioarchitectual characteristics of AVM, namely nidi, feeding arteries and draining veins, in three hemorrhagic groups of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage and both. The X 2 test or Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. A cortically located nidus was most common in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, while a periventricular location was most common in those with intraventricular hemorrhage (p<0.001). Location in the corpus callosum, choroid plexus, or intraventricular area was more frequent in the intraventricular than the intracerebral hemorrhagic group (p<0.05). Superficial venous drainage was most common in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (p<0.001), and deep venous drainage in those with intraventricular hemorrhage (p=3D0.001). The angioarchitectual characteristics of cerebral arteriovenous malformation correlate significantly with patterns of intracranial hemorrhage, and awareness of the type of hemorrhage could help to manage patients and determine prognosis.=20

  11. Prenatal MR imaging features of isolated cerebellar haemorrhagic lesions

    Martino, Francesca; Malova, Mariya; Ramenghi, Luca A.; Cesaretti, Claudia; Parazzini, Cecilia; Doneda, Chiara; Righini, Andrea; Rossi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal features of isolated cerebellar haemorrhagic lesions have not been sufficiently characterised. We aimed to better define their MR imaging characteristics, documenting the location, extension, evolution stage and anatomic sequelae, and to better understand cerebellar haemorrhage pathophysiology. We screened our foetal MR imaging database (3200 cases) for reports of haemorrhagic lesions affecting only the cerebellum (without any supratentorial bleeding or other clastic lesions), defined as one of the following: T2-weighted hypointense or mixed hypo-/hyperintense signal; rim of T2-weighted hypointense signal covering the surface of volume-reduced parenchyma; T1-weighted hyperintense signal; increased DWI signal. Seventeen cases corresponded to the selection criteria. All lesions occurred before the 26th week of gestation, with prevalent origin from the peripheral-caudal portion of the hemispheres and equal frequency of unilateral/bilateral involvement. The caudal vermis appeared affected in 2/3 of cases, not in all cases confirmed postnatally. Lesions evolved towards malformed cerebellar foliation. The aetiology and pathophysiology were unknown, although in a subset of cases intra- and extracranial venous engorgement seemed to play a key role. Onset from the peripheral and caudal portion of the hemispheres seems characteristic of prenatal cerebellar haemorrhagic lesions. Elective involvement of the peripheral germinal matrix is hypothesised. (orig.)

  12. Role of Calcium in Cerebellar Learning and Function

    Z. Gao (Zhenyu)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe cerebellum, which means little brain in Latin, occupies most of the posterior cranial fossa and connects with the dorsal brainstem (Kandel et al., 2000). The cerebellar cortex is one of the most foliated brain structures, which accounts for 10% of the total volume and over half of

  13. Cerebellar Codings for Control of Compensatory Eye Movements

    M. Schonewille (Martijn)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on the control of the cerebellum on motor behaviour, and more specifically on the role of the cerebellar Purkinje cells in exerting this control. As the cerebellum is an online control system, we look at both motor performance and learning, trying to identify

  14. Neurophysiological evidence for cerebellar dysfunction in primary focal dystonia.

    Teo, J.T.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Schneider, S.A.; Rothwell, J.C.; Bhatia, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that there may be functional and structural changes in the cerebellum of patients with adult onset primary focal dystonia. The aim of this study was to establish whether there is any neurophysiological indicator of abnormal cerebellar function, using the classic

  15. Cerebellar Damage Produces Selective Deficits in Verbal Working Memory

    Ravizza, Susan M.; Mccormick, Cristin A.; Schlerf, John E.; Justus, Timothy; Ivry, Richard B.; Fiez, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    The cerebellum is often active in imaging studies of verbal working memory, consistent with a putative role in articulatory rehearsal. While patients with cerebellar damage occasionally exhibit a mild impairment on standard neuropsychological tests of working memory, these tests are not diagnostic for exploring these processes in detail. The…

  16. Cerebro-cerebellar interactions underlying temporal information processing.

    Aso, Kenji; Hanakawa, Takashi; Aso, Toshihiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2010-12-01

    The neural basis of temporal information processing remains unclear, but it is proposed that the cerebellum plays an important role through its internal clock or feed-forward computation functions. In this study, fMRI was used to investigate the brain networks engaged in perceptual and motor aspects of subsecond temporal processing without accompanying coprocessing of spatial information. Direct comparison between perceptual and motor aspects of time processing was made with a categorical-design analysis. The right lateral cerebellum (lobule VI) was active during a time discrimination task, whereas the left cerebellar lobule VI was activated during a timed movement generation task. These findings were consistent with the idea that the cerebellum contributed to subsecond time processing in both perceptual and motor aspects. The feed-forward computational theory of the cerebellum predicted increased cerebro-cerebellar interactions during time information processing. In fact, a psychophysiological interaction analysis identified the supplementary motor and dorsal premotor areas, which had a significant functional connectivity with the right cerebellar region during a time discrimination task and with the left lateral cerebellum during a timed movement generation task. The involvement of cerebro-cerebellar interactions may provide supportive evidence that temporal information processing relies on the simulation of timing information through feed-forward computation in the cerebellum.

  17. [Cerebellar Infarction After Carbon Monoxide Poisoning and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy].

    Wick, Matthias; Schneiker, André; Bele, Sylvia; Pawlik, Michael; Meyringer, Helmut; Graf, Bernhard; Wendl, Christina; Kieninger, Martin

    2017-06-01

    We report on a patient who developed a space-occupying cerebellar infarction with occlusive hydrocephalus after a poisoning with carbon monoxide with the intention to commit suicide. A neurosurgical and intensive care therapy were needed. The patient's survival without severe neurological deficits could be secured due to the early detection of the intracerebral lesions. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Mutations in PTF1A cause pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis

    Sellick, GS; Barker, KT; Stolte-Dijkstra, [No Value; Fleischmann, C; Coleman, RJ; Garrett, C; Gloyn, AL; Edghill, EL; Hattersley, AT; Wellauer, PK; Goodwin, G; Houlston, RS

    2004-01-01

    Individuals with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus usually present within the first three months of life and require insulin treatment(1,2). We recently identified a locus on chromosome 10p13-p12.1 involved in permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus associated with pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis

  19. A convolutional neural network for intracranial hemorrhage detection in non-contrast CT

    Patel, Ajay; Manniesing, Rashindra

    2018-02-01

    The assessment of the presence of intracranial hemorrhage is a crucial step in the work-up of patients requiring emergency care. Fast and accurate detection of intracranial hemorrhage can aid treating physicians by not only expediting and guiding diagnosis, but also supporting choices for secondary imaging, treatment and intervention. However, the automatic detection of intracranial hemorrhage is complicated by the variation in appearance on non-contrast CT images as a result of differences in etiology and location. We propose a method using a convolutional neural network (CNN) for the automatic detection of intracranial hemorrhage. The method is trained on a dataset comprised of cerebral CT studies for which the presence of hemorrhage has been labeled for each axial slice. A separate test dataset of 20 images is used for quantitative evaluation and shows a sensitivity of 0.87, specificity of 0.97 and accuracy of 0.95. The average processing time for a single three-dimensional (3D) CT volume was 2.7 seconds. The proposed method is capable of fast and automated detection of intracranial hemorrhages in non-contrast CT without being limited to a specific subtype of pathology.

  20. Effects of Psychosocial Stress on Subsequent Hemorrhagic Shock and Resuscitation in Male Mice.

    Langgartner, Dominik; Wachter, Ulrich; Hartmann, Clair; Gröger, Michael; Vogt, Josef; Merz, Tamara; McCook, Oscar; Fink, Marina; Kress, Sandra; Georgieff, Michael; Kunze, Julia F; Radermacher, Peter L; Reber, Stefan O; Wepler, Martin

    2018-06-08

    Hypoxemia and tissue ischemia during hemorrhage as well as formation of oxygen and nitrogen radicals during resuscitation promote hyperinflammation and, consequently, trigger severe multiple-organ-failure (MOF). Individuals diagnosed with stress-related disorders or reporting a life history of psychosocial stress are characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation and a reduced glucocorticoid (GC) signaling. We hypothesized that exposure to chronic psychosocial stress during adulthood prior to hemorrhagic shock increases oxidative/nitrosative stress and therefore the risk of developing MOF in mice. To induce chronic psychosocial stress linked to mild immune activation and reduced GC signaling in male mice, the chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC) paradigm was employed. Single-housed (SHC) mice were used as controls. Subsequently, CSC and SHC mice were exposed to hemorrhagic shock following resuscitation to investigate the effects of prior psychosocial stress load on survival, organ function, metabolism, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and inflammatory readouts. An increased adrenal weight in CSC mice indicates that the stress paradigm reliably worked. However, no effect of prior psychosocial stress on outcome after subsequent hemorrhage and resuscitation could be detected. Chronic psychosocial stress during adulthood is not sufficient to promote hemodynamic complications, organ dysfunction, metabolic disturbances and did not increase the risk of MOF after subsequent hemorrhage and resuscitation. Intravenous norepinephrine to keep target hemodynamics might have led to a certain level of oxidative stress in both groups and, therefore, disguised potential effects of chronic psychosocial stress on organ function after hemorrhagic shock in the present murine trauma model.

  1. Interventional therapy of hepatic arterial hemorrhage occurred after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage

    Liang Songnian; Feng Bo; Su Hongying; Xu Ke

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the causes and clinical manifestations of hepatic arterial hemorrhage which occurred after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage and to summarize the practical experience in its diagnosis and treatment in order to decrease its incidence and mortality. Methods: During the period from June 2007 to June 2010, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was carried out in 622 cases, of which DSA-proved postoperative hepatic arterial hemorrhage occurred in 11, including bile duct hemorrhage (n=6), abdominal cavity bleeding (n=3) and combination of bile duct and abdominal cavity (n=2). Interventional embolization of the bleeding branches of hepatic artery with Gelfoam and coils was carried out in all 11 patients. The clinical data such as clinical manifestations and therapeutic results were retrospectively analyzed. Results: After interventional embolization therapy for postoperative hepatic arterial hemorrhage the bleeding stopped in ten patients, who were discharged from hospital when the clinical conditions were alleviated. The remaining one patient died of sustained deterioration in hepatic and renal functions although the bleeding was ceased. Conclusion: Though hepatic arterial hemorrhage occurred after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is a rare complication, it is dangerous and fatal. Hepatic arterial angiography together with interventional embolization is a sate and effective therapy for hepatic arterial hemorrhage. (authors)

  2. [in-hospital mortality in patient with acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke].

    Sadamasa, Nobutake; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Narumi, Osamu; Chin, Masaki; Yamagata, Sen

    2011-09-01

    There is a lack of evidence to compare in-hospital mortality with different types of stroke. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the in-hospital mortality after acute ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke and compare the factors associated with the mortality among stroke subtypes. All patients admitted to Kurashiki Central Hospital in Japan between January 2009 and December 2009, and diagnosed with acute ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke were included in this study. Demographics and clinical data pertaining to the patients were obtained from their medical records. Out of 738 patients who had an acute stroke, 53 (7.2%) died in the hospital. The in-hospital mortality was significantly lower in the cerebral infarction group than in the intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage group (3.5%, 15.1%, and 17.9%, respectively; Phemorrhage group than in the other 2 groups. With regard to past history, diabetes mellitus was significantly found to be a complication in mortality cases of intracranial hemorrhage. Further investigation is needed to clarify the effect of diabetes on mortality after intracranial hemorrhage.

  3. Effect of dexamethasone in primary intracerebral hemorrhage in the south west of iran

    Sharafadinzadeh, N.; Baghebanian, S.M.; Pipelzadeh, M.; Moravej, A. A.; Ghanavatiz, P.

    2008-01-01

    Previous study revealed the value of dexamethasone in the treatment of vasogenic edema associated with brain tumor and abscess. However there are poor documented studies about its usefulness in primary intracerebral hemorrhage. In this study we evaluated dexamethasone effects in primary intracerebral hemorrhage. In a double blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial we evaluated 200 intracerebral hemorrhage cases between 40 to 80 years old whom were admitted at Golestan Hospital (Ahwaz, IR) between March 2002 and March 2003. They were divided in two groups dexamethasone (N=100) and placebo (N=100). Then mortality, GI bleeding, fever, electrolytes disturbances, hypertension and hyperglycemic status were analyzed in two groups. Ethical considerations were employed and subjects were followed by appropriate statistical methods for 21 days to assess the major outcomes. Mortality was much higher in the dexamethasone group; Dexamethasone group (49.3%) and placebo (23.4%) and also fever was higher seen in the dexamethasone group; dexamethasone group (40.2%) and placebo group (24.7%) but there was not any significant statistical difference between two groups as regards other complications. Dexamethasone is widely used for cerebral edema associated conditions but in this study we saw that it's complications in intracerebral hemorrhage such as increasing fever and mortality are significantly higher. Hence it use for treatment of primary intracerebral hemorrhage should be reconsidered. (author)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of an intraventricular hemorrhage

    Kwak, Ryungchan; Higashi, Tooru; Ito, Shotaro; Kadoya, Satoru; Takarada, Akira; Sato, Shuji; Kurauchi, Manabu.

    1987-08-01

    The utility of MRI was investigated in 10 patients with intraventricular hemorrhage. MRI was found to be, in many respects, superior to CT: 1) MRI is able to detect to some extent the aging of an intraventricular hematoma. 2) It can determine the character of intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid, whether it is normal, bloody, or hyperprotein. 3) It can detect the cause of hemorrhage in the case of arterio-venous malformation. 4) MRI permits the detection of the penetration course and the location of a ventricular hematoma. 5) It can clearly detect periventricular lesions of early-stage hydrocephalus, accompanied by increased intracranial pressure and followed by intraventricular hemorrhage, by imaging the periventricular high-signal-intensity area. 6) MRI can clearly diagnose complications of intracranial lesions. For instance, it can distinguish subdural fluid collection from chronic subdural hematoma and can detect whether a cerebral infarction is new or old. On the other hand, MRI also has some disadvantages: 1) The imaging time is long, and clinical application is difficult, in serious and/or infant cases. 2) It is impossible to use MRI in some patients who have magnetic material in their bodies. 3) The spatial-image resolution is not good.

  5. Intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm infants and coagulation--ambivalent perspectives?

    Kuperman, Amir A; Brenner, Benjamin; Kenet, Gili

    2013-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a major complication of preterm birth, and large hemorrhages may yield significant future disability. During the last few decades, the survival of preterm infants has increased dramatically. Nevertheless, morbidity is still a major problem especially for very young and extremely low birth weight infants. As both, mortality and incidence of morbidities known to influence outcome, show a weekly decline with increasing gestational age, prematurity and low birth weight have been identified as major risk factors for IVH occurrence. This stems probably from the increased vulnerability of the premature germinal matrix as well as the physiologically impaired hemostasis, demonstrated in neonates. The hypothesis that a severe coagulation deficiency in the premature newborn could be a major contributing factor for IVH has been suggested, and small open label interventional studies targeting the premature coagulation system have been conducted with ethamsylate, vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma, recombinant activated factor VII and prothrombin complex concentrate. Nevertheless, potential venous origin of hemorrhages, which may be related to thrombophilic risk factors, has also been discussed. The following manuscript will focus upon IVH pathogenesis and address potential therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical analysis of the outcome of patients with brainstem hemorrhage

    Arimoto, Hirohiko; Takasato, Yoshio; Masaoka, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    To identify prognostic factors in patients with brainstem hemorrhage, we analyzed their clinical symptoms and laboratory data on admission to our hospital. In 70 patients with brainstem hemorrhage (51 men and 19 women aged 29-93, with a mean of 59 gears) who had been admitted to our hospital from 1995 to 2000, we statistically evaluated the association of the outcome with their age and clinical symptoms on admission, blood glucose levels and white blood counts within 6 hours of admission, and the volume and extent of hematoma, concomitant hydrocephalus, and intraventricular perforation on admission CT scans. The mortality tended to be higher, but not significantly (P=0.07), in patients aged 70 years or older (83%) than in those aged less than 70 years (55%). Quadriplegia or decerebrate rigidity (P 2 or higher (P<0.01) on admission were significantly correlated with the prognosis. Hematoma volumes of 6 ml or larger on CT scans were most strongly correlated with the prognosis (P<0.001). Central hematoma and hematoma with extension to the midbrain, thalamus, or medulla oblongata (P<0.05), as well as hemorrhage complicated by hydrocephalus or intraventricular perforation (P<0.01), were correlated with the prognosis. (author)

  7. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Ruptured due to Acute Intracystic Hemorrhage

    Kunishige Okamura

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of pancreatic pseudocyst is one of the rare complications and usually results in high mortality. The present case was a rupture of pancreatic pseudocyst that could be treated by surgical intervention. A 74-year-old man developed abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea, and he was diagnosed with cholecystitis and pneumonia. Three days later, acute pancreatitis occurred and computed tomography (CT showed slight hemorrhage in the cyst of the pancreatic tail. After another 10 days, CT showed pancreatic cyst ruptured due to intracystic hemorrhage. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed leakage of contrast agent from pancreatic tail cyst to enclosed abdominal cavity. His left hypochondrial pain was increasing, and CT showed rupture of the cyst of the pancreatic tail into the peritoneal cavity was increased in 10 days. CT showed also two left renal tumors. Therefore we performed distal pancreatectomy with concomitant resection of transverse colon and left kidney. We histopathologically diagnosed pancreatic pseudocyst ruptured due to intracystic hemorrhage and renal cell carcinoma. Despite postoperative paralytic ileus and fluid collection at pancreatic stump, they improved by conservative management and he could be discharged on postoperative day 29. He has achieved relapse-free survival for 6 months postoperatively. The mortality of pancreatic pseudocyst rupture is very high if some effective medical interventions cannot be performed. It should be necessary to plan appropriate treatment strategy depending on each patient.

  8. Pseudarthrosis due to galvanic corrosion presenting as subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Rosemary Noel Beavers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Two unlike metals near one another can break down as they move toward electrochemical equilibrium resulting in galvanic corrosion. We describe a case of electrochemical corrosion resulting in pseudarthrosis, followed by instrumentation failure leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage. A 53-year-old female with a history of cervical instability and two separate prior cervical fusion surgery with sublaminar cables presented with new onset severe neck pain. Restricted range of motion in her neck and bilateral Hoffman's was noted. X-ray of her cervical spine was negative. A noncontrast CT scan of her head and neck showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the prepontine and cervicomedullary cisterns. Neurosurgical intervention involved removal of prior stainless steel and titanium cables, repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak, and nonsegmental C1–C3 instrumented fusion. She tolerated the surgery well and followed up without complication. Galvanic corrosion of the Brook's fusion secondary to current flow between dissimilar metal alloys resulted in catastrophic instrumentation failure and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  9. Subdural Hemorrhage after Scoliosis and Detethering of Cord Surgery

    Rohan Bhimani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intracranial hypotension may occur when CSF leaks from the subarachnoid space. Formation of intracranial, subdural, and subarachnoid hemorrhage has been observed after significant CSF leak as seen in lumbar puncture or ventricular shunt placement. However, very few cases, referring to these remote complications following spine surgery, have been described in literature. We present a case of a 10-year-old male child operated for idiopathic scoliosis with low-lying conus medullaris who postoperatively developed subdural hemorrhage. Case Report. A case of a 10-year-old male operated for idiopathic scoliosis with low-lying conus medullaris is presented. To correct this, detethering was done at the L3 level, laminectomy was done from L2 to L3 with pedicular screw fixation from T3 to L2, and bone grafting with right costoplasty was done from the 3rd to the 6th ribs. On the 5th day postoperatively, the patient developed convulsions and drowsiness and recovered subsequently by postoperative day 7. Conclusion. We report a rare case of an acute intracranial subdural hemorrhage caused by intracranial hypotension following scoliosis and detethering of cord surgery. This report highlights the potential morbidity associated with CSF leak occurring after this surgery.

  10. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Description and incidence of oral complications

    Dreizen, S.

    1990-01-01

    No part of the body reflects the complications of cancer chemotherapy as visibly and as vividly as the mouth. The infectious, hemorrhagic, cytotoxic, nutritional, and neurologic signs of drug toxicity are reflected in the mouth by changes in the color, character, comfort, and continuity of the mucosa. The stomatologic complications of radiotherapy for oral cancer are physical and physiological in nature, transient or lasting in duration, and reversible or irreversible in type. Some linger as permanent mementos long after the cancer has been destroyed. They stem from radiation injury to the salivary glands, oral mucosa, oral musculature, alveolar bone, and developing teeth. They are expressed clinically by xerostomia, trismus, radiation dermatitis, nutritional stomatitis, and dentofacial malformation. In both cancer chemotherapy and cancer radiotherapy, the oral complications vary in pattern, duration, intensity, and number, with not every patient developing every complication. 21 references

  11. Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting as late onset neonatal jaundice

    Qureshi, Umar Amin; Ahmad, Nisar; Rasool, Akhter; Choh, Suhail

    2009-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of adrenal hemorrhage vary depending on the degree and rate of hemorrhage, as well as the amount of adrenal cortex compromised by hemorrhage. We report here a case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage that presented with late onset neonatal jaundice. The cause of adrenal hemorrhage was birth asphyxia.

  12. Cerebellar and pontine tegmental hypermetabolism in miller-fisher syndrome

    Kim, Yu Kyrong; Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) has been considered as a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a type of acute immune neuropathies involving peripheral nerve system. Unlike GBS, presence of cerebellar type ataxia and supranuclear ophthalmioplesia in MFS suggests additional involvement of the central nervous system. To determine involvement of the central nervous system in MFS, we investigated the cerebral metabolic abnormalities in patients with MFS using FDG PET. Nine patients who were diagnosed as MFS based on acute ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia without other identifiable causes participated in this study. In six patients, serum antibodies possibly related with symptom of MFS (anti- GQ1b or anti-GM1) were detected at the time of the study. With the interval of 25 26 days (range: 3-83 days) from the symptom on set, brain FDG PET were underwent in patients and compared with those from healthy controls. In group analysis comparing with healthy controls, FDG PET of patients revealed increased metabolism in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, and the thalamus. In contrast, the occipital cortex showed decreased metabolism. Individual analyses disclosed hypermetabolism in the cerebellar vermis or hemispheres in 5, and in the pontine tegmentum in 2 of the 9 patients. We also found that the cerebellar vermian hypermetabolism was inversely correlated with the interval between from the symptom on set to PET study. Moreover, follow-up PET of a patient demonstrated that cerebellar hypermetabolism decreased markedly with an improvement of the ophthalmoplegia and ataxia. These findings indicate an involvement of the central nervous system in MFS and suggest an antibody-associated acute inflammatory process as a mechanism of this disorder

  13. Adaptive robotic control driven by a versatile spiking cerebellar network.

    Claudia Casellato

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is involved in a large number of different neural processes, especially in associative learning and in fine motor control. To develop a comprehensive theory of sensorimotor learning and control, it is crucial to determine the neural basis of coding and plasticity embedded into the cerebellar neural circuit and how they are translated into behavioral outcomes in learning paradigms. Learning has to be inferred from the interaction of an embodied system with its real environment, and the same cerebellar principles derived from cell physiology have to be able to drive a variety of tasks of different nature, calling for complex timing and movement patterns. We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. Encoding and decoding strategies based on neuronal firing rates were applied. Adaptive motor control protocols with acquisition and extinction phases have been designed and tested, including an associative Pavlovian task (Eye blinking classical conditioning, a vestibulo-ocular task and a perturbed arm reaching task operating in closed-loop. The SNN processed in real-time mossy fiber inputs as arbitrary contextual signals, irrespective of whether they conveyed a tone, a vestibular stimulus or the position of a limb. A bidirectional long-term plasticity rule implemented at parallel fibers-Purkinje cell synapses modulated the output activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. In all tasks, the neurorobot learned to adjust timing and gain of the motor responses by tuning its output discharge. It succeeded in reproducing how human biological systems acquire, extinguish and express knowledge of a noisy and changing world. By varying stimuli and perturbations patterns, real-time control robustness and generalizability were validated. The implicit spiking dynamics of the cerebellar model fulfill timing, prediction and learning functions.

  14. Adaptive robotic control driven by a versatile spiking cerebellar network.

    Casellato, Claudia; Antonietti, Alberto; Garrido, Jesus A; Carrillo, Richard R; Luque, Niceto R; Ros, Eduardo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in a large number of different neural processes, especially in associative learning and in fine motor control. To develop a comprehensive theory of sensorimotor learning and control, it is crucial to determine the neural basis of coding and plasticity embedded into the cerebellar neural circuit and how they are translated into behavioral outcomes in learning paradigms. Learning has to be inferred from the interaction of an embodied system with its real environment, and the same cerebellar principles derived from cell physiology have to be able to drive a variety of tasks of different nature, calling for complex timing and movement patterns. We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN) with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. Encoding and decoding strategies based on neuronal firing rates were applied. Adaptive motor control protocols with acquisition and extinction phases have been designed and tested, including an associative Pavlovian task (Eye blinking classical conditioning), a vestibulo-ocular task and a perturbed arm reaching task operating in closed-loop. The SNN processed in real-time mossy fiber inputs as arbitrary contextual signals, irrespective of whether they conveyed a tone, a vestibular stimulus or the position of a limb. A bidirectional long-term plasticity rule implemented at parallel fibers-Purkinje cell synapses modulated the output activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. In all tasks, the neurorobot learned to adjust timing and gain of the motor responses by tuning its output discharge. It succeeded in reproducing how human biological systems acquire, extinguish and express knowledge of a noisy and changing world. By varying stimuli and perturbations patterns, real-time control robustness and generalizability were validated. The implicit spiking dynamics of the cerebellar model fulfill timing, prediction and learning functions.

  15. Adaptive filters and internal models: multilevel description of cerebellar function.

    Porrill, John; Dean, Paul; Anderson, Sean R

    2013-11-01

    Cerebellar function is increasingly discussed in terms of engineering schemes for motor control and signal processing that involve internal models. To address the relation between the cerebellum and internal models, we adopt the chip metaphor that has been used to represent the combination of a homogeneous cerebellar cortical microcircuit with individual microzones having unique external connections. This metaphor indicates that identifying the function of a particular cerebellar chip requires knowledge of both the general microcircuit algorithm and the chip's individual connections. Here we use a popular candidate algorithm as embodied in the adaptive filter, which learns to decorrelate its inputs from a reference ('teaching', 'error') signal. This algorithm is computationally powerful enough to be used in a very wide variety of engineering applications. However, the crucial issue is whether the external connectivity required by such applications can be implemented biologically. We argue that some applications appear to be in principle biologically implausible: these include the Smith predictor and Kalman filter (for state estimation), and the feedback-error-learning scheme for adaptive inverse control. However, even for plausible schemes, such as forward models for noise cancellation and novelty-detection, and the recurrent architecture for adaptive inverse control, there is unlikely to be a simple mapping between microzone function and internal model structure. This initial analysis suggests that cerebellar involvement in particular behaviours is therefore unlikely to have a neat classification into categories such as 'forward model'. It is more likely that cerebellar microzones learn a task-specific adaptive-filter operation which combines a number of signal-processing roles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cerebellar and pontine tegmental hypermetabolism in miller-fisher syndrome

    Kim, Yu Kyrong; Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) has been considered as a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a type of acute immune neuropathies involving peripheral nerve system. Unlike GBS, presence of cerebellar type ataxia and supranuclear ophthalmioplesia in MFS suggests additional involvement of the central nervous system. To determine involvement of the central nervous system in MFS, we investigated the cerebral metabolic abnormalities in patients with MFS using FDG PET. Nine patients who were diagnosed as MFS based on acute ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia without other identifiable causes participated in this study. In six patients, serum antibodies possibly related with symptom of MFS (anti- GQ1b or anti-GM1) were detected at the time of the study. With the interval of 25 26 days (range: 3-83 days) from the symptom on set, brain FDG PET were underwent in patients and compared with those from healthy controls. In group analysis comparing with healthy controls, FDG PET of patients revealed increased metabolism in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, and the thalamus. In contrast, the occipital cortex showed decreased metabolism. Individual analyses disclosed hypermetabolism in the cerebellar vermis or hemispheres in 5, and in the pontine tegmentum in 2 of the 9 patients. We also found that the cerebellar vermian hypermetabolism was inversely correlated with the interval between from the symptom on set to PET study. Moreover, follow-up PET of a patient demonstrated that cerebellar hypermetabolism decreased markedly with an improvement of the ophthalmoplegia and ataxia. These findings indicate an involvement of the central nervous system in MFS and suggest an antibody-associated acute inflammatory process as a mechanism of this disorder.

  17. Cerebellar motor learning: when is cortical plasticity not enough?

    John Porrill

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Classical Marr-Albus theories of cerebellar learning employ only cortical sites of plasticity. However, tests of these theories using adaptive calibration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR have indicated plasticity in both cerebellar cortex and the brainstem. To resolve this long-standing conflict, we attempted to identify the computational role of the brainstem site, by using an adaptive filter version of the cerebellar microcircuit to model VOR calibration for changes in the oculomotor plant. With only cortical plasticity, introducing a realistic delay in the retinal-slip error signal of 100 ms prevented learning at frequencies higher than 2.5 Hz, although the VOR itself is accurate up to at least 25 Hz. However, the introduction of an additional brainstem site of plasticity, driven by the correlation between cerebellar and vestibular inputs, overcame the 2.5 Hz limitation and allowed learning of accurate high-frequency gains. This "cortex-first" learning mechanism is consistent with a wide variety of evidence concerning the role of the flocculus in VOR calibration, and complements rather than replaces the previously proposed "brainstem-first" mechanism that operates when ocular tracking mechanisms are effective. These results (i describe a process whereby information originally learnt in one area of the brain (cerebellar cortex can be transferred and expressed in another (brainstem, and (ii indicate for the first time why a brainstem site of plasticity is actually required by Marr-Albus type models when high-frequency gains must be learned in the presence of error delay.

  18. Intraretinal hemorrhages in cystoid macular edema.

    Bovino, J A; Kelly, T J; Marcus, D F

    1984-08-01

    Retinal hemorrhages can be associated with typical cystoid macular edema. We examined the fundus photographs and fluorescein angiograms of 313 eyes of 264 patients with documented cystoid macular edema to establish the incidence and characteristics of associated intraretinal hemorrhages. As we wanted to study only those hemorrhages unique to cystoid macular edema, we excluded 86 eyes because the patients had diseases known to be associated with retinal hemorrhages. These diseases included diabetes mellitus, branch retinal vein occlusion, hypertensive retinopathy, venous stasis retinopathy, and perifoveal telangiectasia. Of the remaining 227 eyes with cystoid macular edema, 56 (24.7%) were identified with retinal hemorrhages not associated with systemic disease. The hemorrhages were characteristically oval, round, or linear and frequently filled or partially filled the intraretinal cystoid space. In many patients, a blood-fluid level was observed.

  19. MR imaging of acute hemorrhagic brain infarction

    Uchino, Akira; Ohnari, Norihiro; Ohno, Masato

    1989-01-01

    Six patients with acute hemorrhagic brain infarct were imaged using spin-echo (SE) pulse sequences on a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner. Including two patients with repeated MR imaging, a total of eight examinations, all performed within 15 days after stroke, were analyzed retrospectively. Four patients revealed massive hemorrhages in the basal ganglia or cerebellum and three cases demonstrated multiple linear hemorrhages in the cerebral cortex. On T1-weighted images, hemorrhages were either mildly or definitely hyperintense relative to gray matter, while varied from mildly hypointense to hyperintense on T2-weighted images. T1-weighted images were superior to T2-weighted images in detection of hemorrhgage. CT failed to detect hemorrhage in two of five cases: indicative of MR superiority to CT in the diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic infarcts. (author)

  20. MR imaging of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Spickler, E.; Lufkin, R.B.; Frazee, J.; Lylyk, P.; Vinuela, F.; Bentson, J.R.; Dion, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced in four Macaca nemestrina monkeys using the technique of Frazee. CT and MR imaging were performed immediately after the procedure and at frequent intervals up to 2 weeks after hemorrhage. The imaging studies were compared with clinical evaluations and pathologic specimens of all animals. Additional human clinical CT/MR studies of subarachnoid hemorrhage were also studied. Acute hemorrhage was recognized on MR as an increase in signal in the region of clot compared with surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. This most likely reflects T1 shortening due to proton binding rather than a pure paramagnetic effect. While CT is sensitive to the hemoglobin protein in acute hemorrhage, the superior resolution of the basal cisterns on MR images results in equal or better definition of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage on MR in many cases

  1. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Human Cerebellar Pathways and their Interplay with Cerebral Macrostructure

    Zafer eKeser

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar white matter connections to the central nervous system are classified functionally into the spinocerebellar, vestibulocerebellar, and cerebrocerebellar subdivisions. The Spinocerebellar (SC pathways project from spinal cord to cerebellum, whereas the vestibulocerebellar (VC pathways project from vestibular organs of the inner ear. Cerebrocerebellar connections are composed of feed forward and feedback connections between cerebrum and cerebellum including the cortico-ponto-cerebellar (CPC pathways being of cortical origin and the dentate-rubro-thalamo-cortical (DRTC pathway being of cerebellar origin. In this study we systematically quantified the whole cerebellar system connections using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI. Ten right-handed healthy subjects (7 males and 3 females, age range 20-51 years were studied. DT-MRI data were acquired with a voxel size = 2mm x 2mm x 2 mm at a 3.0 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. The DT-MRI data were prepared and analyzed using anatomically-guided deterministic tractography methods to reconstruct the SC, DRTC, fronto-ponto-cerebellar (FPC, parieto-ponto-cerebellar (PPC, temporo-ponto-cerebellar (TPC and occipito-ponto-cerebellar (OPC. The DTI-attributes or the cerebellar tracts along with their cortical representation (Brodmann areas were presented in standard Montréal Neurological Institute space. All cerebellar tract volumes were quantified and correlated with volumes of cerebral cortical, subcortical gray matter (GM, cerebral white matter (WM and cerebellar GM, and cerebellar WM. On our healthy cohort, the ratio of total cerebellar GM-to-WM was ~ 3.29 ± 0.24, whereas the ratio of cerebral GM-to-WM was approximately 1.10 ± 0.11. The sum of all cerebellar tract volumes is ~ 25.8 ± 7.3 mL, or a percentage of 1.52 ± 0.43 of the total intracranial volume.

  2. Rehabilitation Outcomes: Ischemic versus Hemorrhagic Strokes

    Perna, Robert; Temple, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background. Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes have different pathophysiologies and possibly different long-term cerebral and functional implications. Hemorrhagic strokes expose the brain to irritating effects of blood and ischemic strokes reflect localized or diffuse cerebral vascular pathology. Methods. Participants were individuals who suffered either an ischemic (n = 172) or hemorrhagic stroke (n = 112) within the past six months and were involved in a postacute neurorehabilitation program....

  3. Defects in the CAPN1 Gene Result in Alterations in Cerebellar Development and Cerebellar Ataxia in Mice and Humans

    Yubin Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous or heterozygous CAPN1-null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knockout (KO mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1-mediated cleavage of PH domain and leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1, which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans.

  4. [Clinical picture of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Croatia].

    Kuzman, Ilija

    2003-01-01

    quantity of urine of low specific gravity (up to 15 liters during 24 hours). The convalescence (convalescent stage) is slower, may last for several weeks or months, but usually resolves without complications. During the infection caused by PUU virus, the course of disease is usually milder with only two stages. The first one is febrile, followed by the second stage with renal symptoms, and rare and mild hemorrhagic manifestations. This type of disease is mostly encountered during epidemics. The mortality in severe cases of the disease (DOB virus) is 5% to 10%, whereas in PUU virus infection it is less than 1%.

  5. Hypertensive Cerebral Hemorrhage in a Patient with Turner Syndrome Caused by Deletion in the Short Arm of the X Chromosome.

    Hori, Yusuke S; Ohkura, Takahiro; Ebisudani, Yuki; Umakoshi, Michiari; Ishi, Masato; Oda, Kazunori; Aoi, Mizuho; Inoue, Takushi; Furujo, Mahoko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Fukuhara, Toru

    2018-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal disorder usually caused by complete deletion of an X chromosome, with deletion in the short arm of the X chromosome being a rare cause of the condition. Patients with Turner syndrome commonly develop hypertension, and associated vascular complications such as aortic dissection or cerebral hemorrhage have been reported. Cerebral hemorrhage in Turner syndrome is a rare complication, and only a few reports have been published. In these reports, all patients have XO karyotypes or a mosaic type as the cause of Turner syndrome, while no other Turner syndrome types have been documented. In this report, we present for the first time a patient with Turner syndrome caused by deletion in the short arm of the X chromosome who experienced hypertensive hemorrhage as a late complication. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Frequency of neonatal complications after premature delivery

    Gordana Grgić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preterm delivery is the delivery before 37 weeks of gestation are completed. The incidence of preterm birth ranges from 5 to 15%. Aims of the study were to determine the average body weight, Apgar score after one and five minutes, and the frequency of the most common complications in preterminfants.Methods: The study involved a total of 631 newborns, of whom 331 were born prematurely Aims of this study were to (24th-37th gestational weeks-experimental group, while 300 infants were born in time (37-42 weeks of gestation-control group.Results: Average body weight of prematurely born infants was 2382 grams, while the average Apgar score in this group after the fi rst minute was 7.32 and 7.79 after the fifth minute. The incidence of respiratory distress syndrome was 50%, intracranial hemorrhage, 28.1% and 4.8% of sepsis. Respiratory distresssyndrome was more common in infants born before 32 weeks of gestation. Mortality of premature infants is present in 9.1% and is higher than that of infants born at term.Conclusions: Birth body weight and Apgar scores was lower in preterm infants. Respiratory distress syndrome is the most common fetal complication of prematurity. Intracranial hemorrhage is the second most common complication of prematurity. Mortality of premature infants is higher than the mortality of infants born at term birth.

  7. Obstetric Emergencies: Shoulder Dystocia and Postpartum Hemorrhage.

    Dahlke, Joshua D; Bhalwal, Asha; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2017-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage represent two of the most common emergencies faced in obstetric clinical practice, both requiring prompt recognition and management to avoid significant morbidity or mortality. Shoulder dystocia is an uncommon, unpredictable, and unpreventable obstetric emergency and can be managed with appropriate intervention. Postpartum hemorrhage occurs more commonly and carries significant risk of maternal morbidity. Institutional protocols and algorithms for the prevention and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage have become mainstays for clinicians. The goal of this review is to summarize the diagnosis, incidence, risk factors, and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgical management of spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage

    Bal Krishna Shrestha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage is the spontaneous brainstem hemorrhage associated with long term hypertension but not having definite focal or objective lesion. It is a catastrophic event which has a poor prognosis and usually managed conservatively. It is not uncommon, especially in eastern Asian populations, accounting approximately for 10% of the intracerebral hemorrhage. Before the advent of computed tomography, the diagnosis of brainstem hemorrhage was usually based on the clinical picture or by autopsy and believed to be untreatable via surgery. The introduction of computed tomography permitted to categorize the subtypes of brainstem hemorrhage with more predicted outcome. Continuous ongoing developments in the stereotactic surgery and microsurgery have added more specific surgical management in these patients. However, whether to manage conservatively or promptly with surgical evacuation of hematoma is still a controversy. Studies have shown that an accurate prognostic assessment based on clinical and radiological features on admission is critical for establishing a reasonable therapeutic approach. Some authors have advocate conservative management, whereas others have suggested the efficacy of surgical treatment in brainstem hemorrhage. With the widening knowledge in microsurgical techniques as well as neuroimaging technology, there seems to have more optimistic hope of surgical management of spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage for better prognosis. Here we present five cases of severe spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage patients who had undergone surgery; and explore the possibilities of surgical management in patients with the spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage.

  9. CT findings of fulminant subarachnoid hemorrhages

    Ikeda, Yukio; Isayama, Kazuo; Yajima, Kouzo; Nakazawa, Shozo; Yano, Masami; Otsuka, Toshibumi

    1985-01-01

    We studied the clinical features and CT findings of 20 cases with fulminant subarachonid hemorrhages in the acute stage. They were admitted to our hospital within 3 hours after the attack as DOA (dead on arrival) or near DOA. CT-visualized subarachnoid hemorrhages were located in the basal cisterns surrounding the brain stem in all cases. In 90 % of the cases, the subarachnoid hemorrhage formed a clot or a thick layer. Massive intracerebral hematomas were observed in 10 % of the cases. Acute intraventricular hemorrhages were seen in 80 % of the cases. The mechanism of intraventricular hemorrhage in 70 % of the cases was of the reflux type, which was characterized by a reflux of the severe subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cistern. Acute and diffuse brain swelling on CT scan was observed in several cases, which also showed initial increased intracranial pressures. The major mechanisms leading to acute death or a very severe state soon after subarachnoid hemorrhage might be caused by acute brain-stem failure due to severe subarachnoid hemorrhages in the basal cisterns surrounding the brain-stem and an acute increase in intracranial pressure by cerebral edema following subarachnoid hemorrhage and secondary cerebral ischemia due to cardiac and respiratory arrest. (author)

  10. The Roles of Thrombospondins in Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Xuan Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic stroke is a devastating cerebrovascular disease with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Thrombospondins (TSPs, as matricellular proteins, belong to the TSP family which is comprised of five members. All TSPs modulate a variety of cellular functions by binding to various receptors. Recently, TSPs gained attention in the area of hemorrhagic stroke, especially TSP-1. TSP-1 participates in angiogenesis, the inflammatory response, apoptosis, and fibrosis after hemorrhagic stroke through binding to various molecules including but not limited to CD36, CD47, and TGF-β. In this review, we will discuss the roles of TSPs in hemorrhagic stroke and focus primarily on TSP-1.

  11. Timing tasks synchronize cerebellar and frontal ramping activity and theta oscillations: Implications for cerebellar stimulation in diseases of impaired cognition

    Krystal Lynn Parker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Timing is a fundamental and highly conserved mammalian capability yet the underlying neural mechanisms are widely debated. Ramping activity of single neurons that gradually increase or decrease activity to encode the passage of time, has been speculated to predict a behaviorally relevant temporal event. Cue-evoked low-frequency activity has also been implicated in temporal processing. Ramping activity and low-frequency oscillations occur throughout the brain and could indicate a network-based approach to timing. Temporal processing requires cognitive mechanisms of working memory, attention, and reasoning which are dysfunctional in neuropsychiatric disease. Therefore, timing tasks could be used to probe cognition in animals with disease phenotypes. The medial frontal cortex and cerebellum are involved in cognition. Cerebellar stimulation has been shown to influence medial frontal activity and improve cognition in schizophrenia. However, the mechanism underlying the efficacy of cerebellar stimulation is unknown. Here we discuss how timing tasks can be used to probe cerebellar interactions with the frontal cortex and the therapeutic potential of cerebellar stimulation. The goal of this theory and hypothesis manuscript is threefold. First, we will summarize evidence indicating that in addition to motor learning, timing tasks involve cognitive processes that are present within both the cerebellum and medial frontal cortex. Second, we propose methodologies to investigate the connections between these areas in patients with Parkinson’s disease, autism, and schizophrenia. We hypothesis that cerebellar transcranial stimulation may rescue medial frontal ramping activity, theta oscillations, and timing abnormalities, thereby restoring executive function in diseases of impaired cognition. These hypotheses could inspire the use of timing tasks as biomarkers for neuronal and cognitive abnormalities in neuropsychiatric disease and promote the therapeutic

  12. Numerous cerebral hemorrhages in a patient with influenza-associated encephalitis: A case report

    Lee, Ji Ye; Seong, Su Ok; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Chan Sup [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Influenza-associated encephalitis (IAE) is a complication of a common disease that is rare even during an epidemic. Awareness of magnetic resonance imaging features of IAE is important in treatment planning and prognosis estimation. Several reports have described necrotizing encephalopathy in children with influenza. However, few reports have described multifocal hemorrhages in both cerebral hemispheres in adults with concomitant infection with influenza A and B. Here, we describe a case of influenza A- and B-associated encephalitis accompanied by numerous cerebral hemorrhages.

  13. Spontaneous hemorrhage simulating rapid growth of a benign subperiosteal plexiform neurofibroma

    Blitman, Netta M.; Levsky, Jeffrey M.; Thornhill, Beverly A.; Villanueva-Siles, Esperanza

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous subperiosteal hemorrhage is a rare complication of von Recklinghausen's disease. There are few reports describing the MR imaging characteristics of this entity. Our case is unique among these as an underlying plexiform neurofibroma was visualized by MR imaging. We present a 12-year-old child with neurofibromatosis 1 who presented with a rapidly enlarging mass of the fibula. Surgery and pathology revealed subperiosteal hemorrhage into a benign, plexiform neurofibroma. The MR imaging features, pathogenesis and clinical implications of this entity are discussed. Recognition of this disease process and differentiating it from malignant transformation can prevent unnecessary surgery. (orig.)

  14. HEMORRHAGE EXPRESS-DIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPY IN CHILDREN 0-6 MONTHS OF AGE

    P. V. Svirin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic conditions are associated with severe health problems and an increase in mortality rate among children. Quick and adequate reaction of a doctor who was the first to appear beside such a patient is necessary to save the child’s life; mistakes may lead to severe complications, including fatal outcome. The article formulates methodological recommendations on diagnosing and rendering help to children of the first months of age with developing hemorrhagic manifestations in the environment of neonatal and newborn centers taking into account their laboratorial and therapeutic capabilities.

  15. Use of therapeutic surfactant lavage in a preterm infant with massive pulmonary hemorrhage

    Ino Kanavaki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a premature infant presenting with recurrent pulmonary hemorrhage in which we performed a therapeutic lavage with diluted surfactant after an acute episode of bleeding with severe intractable hypoxemia. Repeated small aliquots of diluted surfactant (10x2 mL allowed rapid improvement in oxygenation and reduction of required mean airway pressures during high frequency oscillatory ventilation. This observation may suggest that surfactant lavage could be beneficial in massive pulmonary hemorrhage in infants. A randomized controlled trial might be needed to clarify the potential benefit of this therapeutic intervention on outcome of infants suffering from this life-threatening complication.

  16. An uncommon initial presentation of snake bite-subarachnoid hemorrhage: A case report with literature review

    Manoj Kumar Roy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Snake bites are very common in India, particularly in West Bengal. Snake bite can cause various hematological, neuromyopathical complications. It can be very fatal if not detected and treated early. Timely intervention can save the patient. We are reporting a case of hematotoxic Russell viper snake bite presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patient was successfully treated with antivenom serum (AVS along with other conservative management. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as an initial presentation in viper bite is very rare and we discuss the case with proper literature review.

  17. Radiographic complications of biologic response modifiers

    Miketic, L.M.; Bahnson, R.R.; Ernstoff, M.S.; Kirkwood, J.M.; Nair, S.; Logan, T.; Downs, M.A.; Neuhart, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Biologic response modifiers, such as the interferons, are increasingly used in the treatment of cancer as an adjunct to conventional chemotherapy. In certain malignancies, particularly renal cell carcinoma, they are becoming agents of choice due to higher tumor response rate. The authors have reviewed 202 patients. Protocols include interferon, interleukin, tumor necrosis factor, and monoclonal antibodies. The radiology of significant clinical complications is discussed, especially the vascular leak syndrome often seen with interleukin administration and the cardiac toxicity of interferon. Less common abnormalities include progressive splenomegaly in one interferon study and a hemorrhagic episode caused by tumor necrosis factor

  18. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated by Grave's disease.

    Takahashi, Ayumi; Tamura, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2002-12-01

    The report describes a woman with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated with Grave's disease. Developing symptoms included a small cutaneous nodule on her finger and subsequently ecchymotic purpura on the cheeks, ears, buttocks and lower legs. Histological examinations showed thrombosed vessels in the dermis without or with hemorrhage, respectively. Laboratory investigation revealed positive lupus anticoagulant and immunogenic hyperthyroidism due to Grave's disease. There is a close relationship between the cutaneous manifestation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and the activities of Grave's disease and a possible link of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with Grave's disease was suggested both by the etiology of the disease as well as the disease activity.

  19. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage – some epidemiological characteristics of patients in the period 1994–2003

    Pavel Skok

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a frequent medical problem and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this prospective, cohort study, which was carried out at our institution, was to establish the causes of hemorrhage from the digestive tract and mortality during a 10-year period.Patients and methods: The study includes patients with emergency endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract and other diagnostic procedures of the digestive tract due to gastrointestinal hemorrhage between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2003.Results: 6416 patients were investigated: 2452 women (38.2 % and 3964 men (61.8 %. The average age of our patients was 59.3 years (a 1–106 year span, SD ± 17.2. In 2142 patients (33.4 %, endoscopic investigation of the upper digestive tube revealed signs of acute or traces of previous hemorrhage. Different methods of endoscopic hemostasis were carried out in 1486 cases (23.2 %. Sequelae of ulcer disease were the cause of hemorrhage in 36.4 % of investigated patients. Frequent causes of hemorrhage were also inflammatory, hemorrhagically-erosive changes of the gastric and duodenal mucosa (16.6 %, esophageal reflux disease (11.2 %, ruptured esophageal varices (10.7 %. Less frequent causes of hemorrhage from the upper digestive tract were different tumors (3.8 %, Mallory-Weiss tear (2.9 %, polyps (1.4 % and Dieulafoy lesion (1.3 %. In 13.7 % of patients the cause of hemorrhage was in the large bowel and in 0.4 % in the small intestine. More than half of our patients (53.4 % were aged over 60, 11.4 % older than 80 years. The total mortality of our patients was 9.9 %, the majority of them (8.5 %, were older than 60 years, with concommitant diseases and complications during treatment.Conclusions: In the observed period, sequelae of ulcer disease were the most significant cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Hemorrhages are frequent in elderly patients who usually have significant medical conditions

  20. Can femoral dialysis catheter insertion cause a life threatening complication?

    Nurkay Katrancıoğlu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous catheter (VC insertion may be necessary for the patients with renal failure facing vascular access problem. Femoral VCs are commonly used for their lower complication rates especially in emergency clinics. The incidence of bleeding associated with VC is reported 0.5-1.6%, however, life threatening hemorrhage and complications requiring surgical intervention are very rare. In this manuscript, we aimed to present a case with hemolytic uremic syndrome complicated with retroperitoneal hematoma after femoral VC insertion. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 472-474