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Sample records for cerebellar ataxia immunological

  1. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  2. A new Purkinje cell antibody (anti-Ca associated with subacute cerebellar ataxia: immunological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn Sigrun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a newly discovered serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF reactivity to Purkinje cells (PCs associated with subacute inflammatory cerebellar ataxia. The patient, a previously healthy 33-year-old lady, presented with severe limb and gait ataxia, dysarthria, and diplopia two weeks after she had recovered from a common cold. Immunohistochemical studies on mouse, rat, and monkey brain sections revealed binding of a high-titer (up to 1:10,000 IgG antibody to the cerebellar molecular layer, Purkinje cell (PC layer, and white matter. The antibody is highly specific for PCs and binds to the cytoplasm as well as to the inner side of the membrane of PC somata, dendrites and axons. It is produced by B cell clones within the CNS, belongs to the IgG1 subclass, and activates complement in vitro. Western blotting of primate cerebellum extract revealed binding of CSF and serum IgG to an 80-97 kDa protein. Extensive control studies were performed to rule out a broad panel of previously described paraneoplastic and non-paraneoplastic antibodies known to be associated with cerebellar ataxia. Screening of >9000 human full length proteins by means of a protein array and additional confirmatory experiments revealed Rho GTPase activating protein 26 (ARHGAP26, GRAF, oligophrenin-1-like protein as the target antigen. Preadsorption of the patient's serum with human ARHGAP26 but not preadsorption with other proteins resulted in complete loss of PC staining. Our findings suggest a role of autoimmunity against ARHGAP26 in the pathogenesis of subacute inflammatory cerebellar ataxia, and extend the panel of diagnostic markers for this devastating disease.

  3. Primary progressive cerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-two patients with primary progressive cerebellar ataxia were studied using MRI. This technique is better than CT in demonstrating atrophy of cerebellar structures as well as of brainstem and spinal cord. The differential diagnosis from other diseases particularly with multiple sclerosis is easier. The degree of ataxia correlated well with the degree of atrophy of cerebellum. However, we could not see any correlation between the degree of atrophy and the onset and duration of the disease and no certain specific aspects could be demonstrated in the different groups examined. (orig.)

  4. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya; Yoneda, Makoto; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto's encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Miller Fisher syndrome, ataxia associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Humoral mechanisms, cell-mediated immunity, inflammation, and vascular injuries contribute to the cerebellar deficits in immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias. PMID:25823827

  5. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias

    OpenAIRE

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S.; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Mi...

  6. Sleep disorders in cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Pedroso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias comprise a wide range of etiologies leading to central nervous system-related motor and non-motor symptoms. Recently, a large body of evidence has demonstrated a high frequency of non-motor manifestations in cerebellar ataxias, specially in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA. Among these non-motor dysfunctions, sleep disorders have been recognized, although still under or even misdiagnosed. In this review, we highlight the main sleep disorders related to cerebellar ataxias focusing on REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, restless legs syndrome (RLS, periodic limb movement in sleep (PLMS, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, insomnia and sleep apnea.

  7. Familial cerebellar ataxia and diabetes insipidus.

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, I C; O'Malley, B P; Young, I D

    1988-01-01

    Two sisters are reported who both developed partial cranial diabetes insipidus in their 4th decade, followed by progressive cerebellar ataxia. This appears to be the first report of cerebellar ataxia and diabetes insipidus occurring together as a genetic entity.

  8. Language Impairment in Cerebellar Ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, Judith; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Oostveen, Judith; Knuijt, Simone; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Kremer, Berry (H. ) P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several studies have suggested that language impairment can be observed in patients with cerebellar pathology. The aim of this study was to investigate language performance in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Methods: We assessed speech and language in 29 SCA6 patients

  9. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  10. Cerebellar ataxia of early onset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight cases of childhood cerebellar ataxia were reported. All these cases showed chronic cerebellar ataxia with early onset, and the other diseases of cerebellum such as infections, neoplasms and storage diseases were excluded by clinical symptoms and laboratory findings including blood counts, blood chemistry, lactate, pyruvate, ceruloplasmine, urinalysis, serum immunoglobulins, amino acid analysis in blood and urine, CSF analysis, leukocyte lysosomal enzymes, MCV, EMG, EEG and brain X-CT. Two pairs of siblings were included in this study. The clinical diagnosis were cerebellar type (5), spinocerebellar type (1), one Marinesco-Sjoegren syndrome and undetermined type (1). The age of onset was 1 to 5 years. The chief complaint was motor developmental delay in 6 cases; among them 5 patients could walk alone at the ages of 2 to 3 years'. Mental retardation was observed in 7 cases and epilepsy in 2. TRH was effective in 5 cases. The MRI study revealed that the area of medial sagittal slice of the cerebellum was reduced significantly in all cases and also that of pons was reduced in 5 cases. Different from typical adult onset spinocerebellar degenerations, most of the present cases have achieved slow developmental milestones and the clinical course was not progressive. Genetic factors are suspected in the pathogenesis of this disease in some cases. (author)

  11. Cerebellar ataxia and functional genomics : Identifying the routes to cerebellar neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C J L M; Verbeek, D S

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by atrophy of the cerebellum leading to motor dysfunction, balance problems, and limb and gait ataxia. These include among others, the dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias, recessive cerebellar ataxias such as Fried

  12. Cerebellar Involvement in Ataxia and Generalized Epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Kros (Lieke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The work described in this thesis was performed in order to elucidate the role of different cerebellar modules in ataxia and generalized epilepsy using various techniques including in vivo electrophysiology, optogenetics, pharmacological interventions, immunohistology a

  13. Adult-onset cerebellar Ataxia: a clinical and genetic Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Brusse (Esther)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCerebellar ataxias represent a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. Two main categories are distinguished: hereditary and sporadic ataxias. Sporadic ataxias may be symptomatic or idiopathic. The clinical classification of hereditary ataxias is nowadays being replaced by an

  14. Cerebellar ataxia as presenting feature of hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwal, Suman Kumar; Kotwal, Shalija; Gupta, Rohan; Singh, Jang Bhadur; Mahajan, Annil

    2016-04-01

    Symptoms and signs of the hypothyroidism vary in relation to the magnitude and acuteness of the thyroid hormone deficiency. The usual clinical features are constipation, fatigue, cold intolerance and weight gain. Rarely it can present with neurologic problems like reversible cerebellar ataxia, dementia, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis and coma. Hypothyroidism should be suspected in all cases of ataxia, as it is easily treatable. A 40 year-old male presented with the history facial puffiness, hoarseness of voice and gait-ataxia. Investigations revealed frank primary hypothyroidism. Anti-TPO antibody was positive. Thyroxine was started and patient improved completely within eight weeks. Hypothyroidism can present with ataxia as presenting feature. Hypothyroidism should be considered in all cases of cerebellar ataxia as it is a reversible cause of ataxia. PMID:26886095

  15. Acute cerebellar ataxia and infectious mononucleosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wadhwa, N. K.; Ghose, R R

    1983-01-01

    A 28-year-old man, who presented with acute cerebellar ataxia, was found to have haematological features of infectious mononucleosis. There was serological evidence of recent infection with Epstein-Barr virus. It is speculated that cerebellar dysfunction results from virus-induced inflammatory changes within the central nervous system.

  16. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

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    Ji Sun Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes.

  17. An update on Spino-cerebellar ataxias

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    Banashree Mondal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dominantly inherited ataxias, also known as Spino-cerebellar ataxias (SCAs, are rapidly expanding entities. New mutations are being identified at remarkable regularity. Recent awareness of molecular abnormalities in SCAs has addressed some of the long sought questions, but gaps in knowledge still exist. Three major categories of SCAs, according to molecular mechanisms, have evolved over recent few years: Polyglutamate expansion ataxia, non-coding zone repeat ataxia, and ataxia due to conventional mutation. Using the fulcrum of these mechanisms, the article provides an update of SCAs. Shared and specific clinical features, genetic abnormalities, and possible links between molecular abnormalities and cerebellar degeneration have been discussed. Emphasis has been placed on the mechanisms of polyglutamate toxicity.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARCA1 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 ( ARCA1 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  19. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P;

    2004-01-01

    identified in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the...... significantly relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations.......Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...

  20. CT and MR imaging of acute cerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adult female showed mild cerebellar ataxia and CSF pleocytosis following an acute infection of the upper respiratory tract, and was diagnosed as having acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA). CT and MR appearances in the acute stage revealed moderate swelling of the cerebellum and bilaterally increased signal intensity in the cerebellar cortex. (orig.)

  1. Acute cerebellar ataxia with human parvovirus B19 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Y; Ueno, T.; Komatsu, H.; Takada, H.; Nunoue, T.

    1999-01-01

    A 2 year old boy developed acute cerebellar ataxia in association with erythema infectiosum. During the disease, genomic DNA and antibodies against human parvovirus B19 were detected in serum but not in cerebrospinal fluid. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cerebellar ataxia might occur due to transient vascular reaction in the cerebellum during infection.



  2. Drug-induced cerebellar ataxia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Kerstens, F.G.; Maas, R.P.P.W.M.; Harmark, L.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cerebellar ataxia can be induced by a large number of drugs. We here conducted a systemic review of the drugs that can lead to cerebellar ataxia as an adverse drug reaction (ADR). METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search in Pubmed (1966 to January 2014) and EMB

  3. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  4. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  5. Deep Learning for Cerebellar Ataxia Classification and Functional Score Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhen; Zhong, Shenghua; Carass, Aaron; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia is a progressive neuro-degenerative disease that has multiple genetic versions, each with a characteristic pattern of anatomical degeneration that yields distinctive motor and cognitive problems. Studying this pattern of degeneration can help with the diagnosis of disease subtypes, evaluation of disease stage, and treatment planning. In this work, we propose a learning framework using MR image data for discriminating a set of cerebellar ataxia types and predicting a disease ...

  6. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia with bull's-eye macular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Eerola, K.U.; Vrijland, H.R.; Aandekerk, A.L.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Deutman, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: In 1980, we published in the American Journal of Ophthalmology two siblings with hereditary ataxia and atrophic maculopathy. The report is cited in the literature as autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia with retinal degeneration. The purpose of the present study is to document the progressi

  7. CT in autosomal dominant and idiopathic cerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signs of atrophy on cranial CT were investigated in 35 patients diagnosed as suffering from autosomal dominant (n=21) or idiopathic (n=14) cerebellar ataxia. Thirteen patients with a pure cerebellar syndrome were examined after at least 4 years of disease (mean duration 10.5 years) and were classified as cerebellar atrophy (CA). Twenty-two patients with additional non-cerebellar signs were classified as olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA). Four (30%) of the patients with CA had atrophy of the brain stem in addition. Of the 22 patients with OPCA, 9 (40%) had atrophy of the cerebellum only. In patients with CA or OPCA correlation of clinical signs with severity of atrophy on CT was poor. Atrophy on CT often fails to differentiate autosomal dominant or idiopathic cerebellar ataxias in CA or OPCA: Patients with CA can also have atrophy of the brain stem and patients with OPCA do not necessarily show brain stem atrophy. (orig.)

  8. An unusual cause of adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism

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    Menon Ramshekhar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of sporadic adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism. A 40-year-old unmarried man presented with progressive ataxia and dysarthria along with complaints of non-development of secondary sexual characteristics and erectile dysfunction. There were complaints of intermittent diarrhea. Clinical examination revealed a pan-cerebellar syndrome with features of hypoandrogenism. No eye movement abnormalities were evident. There were signs of malabsorption. Investigations confirmed the presence of auto-antibodies found in celiac disease, and a duodenal biopsy confirmed the same. Hypoandrogenism was postulated to be due to hypergonadotropic hypogonadism which has been mentioned in a few patients of celiac disease. However, the pattern seen in our patient was of a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. This is probably secondary to an autoimmune hypophysitis seen in some patients in the absence of other clinical manifestations. Autoantibody testing should be a diagnostic necessity in any adult with a sporadic cerebellar ataxia.

  9. Acute cerebellar ataxia: A neurological manifestation in malaria

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    Peddametla Shravan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the bite of an infected female anopheles mosquito presents with varied clinical manifestations. Neurological manifestations include headaches, confusion, convulsions, hemiplegia, ataxia, cerebral palsy, cortical blindness, and Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. We are presenting a case report of acute cerebellar ataxia in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with fever and positive for Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria antibodies.

  10. Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions that can cause acquired ataxia include stroke, multiple sclerosis, tumors, alcoholism, peripheral neuropathy, metabolic disorders, and vitamin deficiencies. Is there any treatment? There is no ...

  11. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  12. Acute Cerebellar Ataxia and Lyme Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Child neurologists at Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Turkey, report the case of a 5-year-old girl from the Mediterranean region of Anatolia with a 4-day history of progressive ataxia.

  13. Paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-Hu antibodies and benign ganglioneuroma

    OpenAIRE

    Fancellu, Roberto; Corsini, Elena; Bernardi, Gaetano; Buzzo, Paolo; Ferrari, Maria Luisa; Lamantea, Eleonora; Garaventa, Alberto; Truini, Mauro; Salvarani, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-Hu antibodies and benign ganglioneuroma. A 28-year-old woman developed progressive ataxia with hyporeflexia at the age of 19. Brain MRI showed progressive cerebellar atrophy. Neurophysiological studies, screening of immune-mediated ataxias, oncological markers, vitamin E and genetic tests for spinocerebellar ataxia types 1,2,3, Friedreich ataxia and POLG1 were negative. Anti-Hu antibodies were positive in Western blot and indirect i...

  14. Early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes : foot deformity in a first grade family member

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, HJ; Van der Hulst, M; Ippel, E; Prevo, RL; Hageman, G

    1999-01-01

    Early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (EOCA) is a clinical syndrome characterised by progressive cerebellar ataxia with an onset before the age of 25 years and a wide spectrum of associated features. It is distinguished from Friedreich's ataxia (FA) mainly by the preservation o

  15. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Types 1, 2, 3 and 6 : the Clinical Spectrum of Ataxia and Morphometric Brainstem and Cerebellar Findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, Heike; Hauser, Till-Karsten; Giunti, Paola; Globas, Christoph; Bauer, Peter; Schmitz-Huebsch, Tanja; Baliko, Laszlo; Filla, Alessandro; Mariotti, Caterina; Rakowicz, Maria; Charles, Perine; Ribai, Pascale; Szymanski, Sandra; Infante, Jon; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Duerr, Alexandra; Timmann, Dagmar; Boesch, Sylvia; Fancellu, Roberto; Rola, Rafal; Depondt, Chantal; Schoels, Ludger; Zdzienicka, Elzbieta; Kang, Jun-Suk; Ratzka, Susanne; Kremer, Berry; Stephenson, Dennis A.; Melegh, Bela; Pandolfo, Massimo; du Montcel, Sophie Tezenas; Borkert, Johannes; Schulz, Joerg B.; Klockgether, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    To assess the clinical spectrum of ataxia and cerebellar oculomotor deficits in the most common spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), we analysed the baseline data of the EUROSCA natural history study, a multicentric cohort study of 526 patients with either spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, 2, 3 or 6. To qua

  16. A Study Of Sporadic Adult Onset Degenerative Cerebellar Ataxias

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    Sinha K K

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four cases of sporadic olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA of adult onset were studied over a period of two years. Results suggest that this disorder has its usual onset in the 5th and 6th decade of life with a male: female ratio of 2:1. It manifests clinically with gait ataxia in all, dysarthria, other cerebellar signs and autonomic involvement in vast majority. There were features of basal ganglia involvement in some. No known identifiable environmental cause was found and genetically they are quite distinct from the known autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias though sporadic occurrence in recessive inheritance or a de novo mutation could not be ruled out completely, but it is unlikely.

  17. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Fujioka Shinsuke; Sundal Christina; Wszolek Zbigniew K

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA) Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and...

  18. Ataxia cerebelar aguda na criança Acute cerebellar ataxia in children

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    Valeriana Moura Ribeiro

    1968-03-01

    Full Text Available São relatados os casos de 6 crianças com ataxia cerebelar aguda. Admitem os autores a presença de um fator etiológico de caráter viral comum a todos êles, discutindo os mecanismos patogênicos com base nos casos da literatura. A evolução foi favorável em todos os pacientes, com regressão completa da sintomatologia, dentro do período de 6 a 60 dias.Clinical observations of 6 children with acute cerebellar ataxia and respective laboratorial data are reported. Considerations are made in order to support the hypothesis of involving virus. The evolution of the disorder was a nonfatal one and the patients regained normal cerebellar function within a period of 6 to 60 days.

  19. Ataxia-telangiectasia: the pattern of cerebellar atrophy on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe MRI of the brain in 19 patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) and correlate the appearances with the degree of neurologic deficit. We examined 10 male and nine female patients; 17 were aged between 2 and 12 years (mean 8 years) but a woman and her brother were 35 and 38 years old, and had a variant of AT. Ataxia was the first recognized sign of the disease in every patient. We detected the following patterns of cerebellar atrophy: in the youngest patient, aged 2 years, the study was normal; in the five next youngest patients 3-7 years of age, the lateral cerebellum and superior vermis showed the earliest changes of atrophy; and all but one of the other patients had moderate to marked diffuse atrophy of vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. There were 12 patients aged 9 years and above; one, who was normal, was 9 years old. The five patients who at the time of examination were unable to walk all had diffuse atrophy involving both vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. (orig.)

  20. Ataxia-telangiectasia: the pattern of cerebellar atrophy on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavani, F. [Department of Radiology, University of Modena (Italy); Zimmerman, R.A.; Gatti, R.; Bingham, P. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Berry, G.T. [Department of Endocrinology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Sullivan, K. [Department of Immunology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States)

    2003-05-01

    We describe MRI of the brain in 19 patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) and correlate the appearances with the degree of neurologic deficit. We examined 10 male and nine female patients; 17 were aged between 2 and 12 years (mean 8 years) but a woman and her brother were 35 and 38 years old, and had a variant of AT. Ataxia was the first recognized sign of the disease in every patient. We detected the following patterns of cerebellar atrophy: in the youngest patient, aged 2 years, the study was normal; in the five next youngest patients 3-7 years of age, the lateral cerebellum and superior vermis showed the earliest changes of atrophy; and all but one of the other patients had moderate to marked diffuse atrophy of vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. There were 12 patients aged 9 years and above; one, who was normal, was 9 years old. The five patients who at the time of examination were unable to walk all had diffuse atrophy involving both vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. (orig.)

  1. Population-based study of acquired cerebellar ataxia in Al-Kharga district, New Valley, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farghaly WMA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Wafaa MA Farghaly1, Hamdy N El-Tallawy1, Ghaydaa A Shehata1, Tarek A Rageh1, Nabil Abdel Hakeem2, Noha M Abo-Elfetoh11Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt; 2Al Azhar University, Assiut Branch, EgyptBackground: The aim of this research was to determine the prevalence and etiology of acquired ataxia in Al-Kharga district, New Valley, Egypt.Methods: A population-based study of acquired ataxia was conducted in a defined geographical region with a total population of 62,583. A door-to-door survey was used to identify cases of acquired cerebellar ataxia. Patients with acquired cerebellar ataxia at any age and of both genders were included. Cases of known inherited cerebellar ataxia, acquired neurological disorders with ataxia as a minor feature, or pure acquired sensory ataxia, were excluded.Results: We identified 17 cases of acquired ataxia, of which eight were vascular, six were an ataxic cerebral palsy subtype, and three involved postencephalitic ataxia. The crude prevalence rate for acquired ataxia was 27.16/100,000 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 14.3–40.1. The mean age of the patients at interview was 31.8 (range 4–72 years, with a male to female ratio of 2.1:1. The most frequent presenting complaint was disturbance of gait (90.7%. The majority (92% were ambulatory, but only 9.3% were independently self-caring.Conclusion: This population-based study provides an insight into acquired cerebellar ataxia within a defined region, and may inform decisions about the rational use of health care resources for patients with acquired cerebellar ataxia. The most common causes of acquired cerebellar ataxia in this region were cerebrovascular injury and cerebral palsy.Keywords: acquired cerebellar ataxia, prevalence, subtypes, Egypt

  2. Identification and characterization of novel PDYN mutations in dominant cerebellar ataxia cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jezierska, Justyna; Stevanin, Giovanni; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Fokkens, Michiel R.; Zagnoli, Fabien; Kok, Jerome; Goas, Jean-Yves; Bertrand, Pierre; Robin, Christophe; Brice, Alexis; Bakalkin, Georgy; Durr, Alexandra; Verbeek, Dineke S.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently identified missense mutations in prodynorphin (PDYN), the precursor to dynorphin opioid peptides, as the cause for spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA23) in Dutch ataxia cases. We report a screen of PDYN for mutations in 371 cerebellar ataxia cases, which had a positive family history; most

  3. Post-Plasmodium vivax malaria cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis: A new form of delayed cerebellar ataxia or cerebellar variant of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav M Kasundra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM is commonly seen after viral and bacterial infections, immunization, and Plasmodium falciparum (PF malaria. Plasmodium vivax (PV rarely causes ADEM. We report a 14-year-old female patient who presented with acute onset bilateral cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis, 2 weeks after recovery from PV. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral cerebellar hyperintensities suggestive of ADEM. No specific viral etiology was found on cerebrospinal fluid examination. Patient responded well to treatment without any sequelae. Thus, PV too is an important cause of ADEM along with PF. Two of the previously reported cases had co-infection with falciparum malaria. The only other two reported cases, as also this patient, are from Asia. A geographical or racial predisposition needs to be evaluated. Also, a possibility of post-PV delayed cerebellar ataxia, which is classically described post-PF infection, may be considered as it may be clinically, radiologically, and prognostically indistinguishable from a milder presentation of ADEM.

  4. Preliminary Study of Intravenous Amantadine Treatment for Ataxia Management in Patients with Probable Multiple System Atrophy with Predominant Cerebellar Ataxia

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    Jinyoung Youn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia is a disabling neurologic disease. However, effective management has not yet been established. We conducted a short-term, open-label preliminary study to assess the benefits of intravenous amantadine treatment in patients with probable multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia. Methods: Twenty patients (10 male, 10 female with probable multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia received 400 mg of amantadine by intravenous per day for 5 days. Ataxia severity was evaluated by the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale before and after intravenous amantadine therapy and all subjects reported subjective improvement after intravenous amantadine treatment using a patient global impression scale. We analyzed the total and subscale scores by the ataxia scale and patient global impression scale. Results: The mean age was 57.4 years (range: 47–72 and the mean disease duration was 30.8 months (range: 11–79. The ataxia severity significantly decreased after intravenous amantadine therapy from 42.5 to 37.3 (p < 0.001. The mean patient global impression scale for improvement was 2.9 and there were no side effects of intravenous amantadine treatment observed. When we assessed responders, the duration of intravenous amantadine effect was more than 1 month in 4 subjects of 7 responders. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that intravenous amantadine treatment can be a safe management option in cerebellar ataxia, although the mechanism is unclear. Thus, further double-blind, long-term studies with a larger sample size are needed.

  5. A practical approach to late-onset cerebellar ataxia: putting the disorder with lack of order into order.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2012-01-01

    The clinical management of cerebellar ataxia is challenging, mainly because ataxia is a symptom of many neurological diseases. Many types of ataxia disorders are genetic and some are extremely rare. Here, the authors suggest a diagnostic approach to ataxia developed around a case of sporadic, late-o

  6. Republished: A practical approach to late-onset cerebellar ataxia: putting the disorder with lack of order into order.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2012-01-01

    The clinical management of cerebellar ataxia is challenging, mainly because ataxia is a symptom of many neurological diseases. Many types of ataxia disorders are genetic and some are extremely rare. Here, the authors suggest a diagnostic approach to ataxia developed around a case of sporadic, late-o

  7. Mutations in DNMT1 cause autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkelmann, Juliane; Lin, Ling; Schormair, Barbara;

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) is characterized by late onset (30-40 years old) cerebellar ataxia, sensory neuronal deafness, narcolepsy-cataplexy and dementia. We performed exome sequencing in five individuals from three ADCA-DN kindreds and identified DNMT.......GLY605Ala mutation was subsequently identified. Narcolepsy and deafness were the first symptoms to appear in all pedigrees, followed by ataxia. DNMT1 is a widely expressed DNA methyltransferase maintaining methylation patterns in development, and mediating transcriptional repression by direct binding to...

  8. A case of human immunodeficiency virus infection with cerebellar ataxia that suggested by an association with autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Shigeto; Kondo, Takayuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakagawa, Tomokazu; Matsumoto, Sadayuki

    2016-04-28

    We report a case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that showed subacute progressive cerebellar ataxia without HIV encephalopathy or other encephalopathies, including progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy or encephalitis of other human herpes virus (HHV) infections. A 43-year-old man exhibited unsteady gait. Neurological examination disclosed ataxia of the trunk and lower extremities. Personality change and dementia were absent. Magnetic resonance imaging did not reveal any abnormal finding, including of the cerebellum. The serum HIV-1-RNA was 1.2 × 10(5) copies/ml, and the absolute CD4 lymphocyte count was 141 cells/ml. Remarkably, the serum anti-Yo antibody, as an anti-cerebellar antibody of paraneoplastic syndrome, and anti-gliadin antibody, associated with celiac disease or gluten ataxia, were positive. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunoglobulin G index was 1.2 (ataxia, cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy might manifest as autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. As regards the association of HIV infection and autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, a previous report suggested that anti-gliadin antibody was detected in about 30% of HIV-infected children, though there is no reference to an association with cerebellar ataxia. Moreover, to our knowledge, detection of anti-Yo antibody in an HIV-infected patient with cerebellar ataxia has not been reported. These findings suggest that, although it is extremely rare, clinicians need to consider HIV infection in a patient exhibiting autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. PMID:27010096

  9. Clinical and genetic analysis of a four-generation family with a distinct autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, H J; Ippel, P F; Hageman, G; Sinke, R J; van der Laan, E N; Beemer, F A

    2001-01-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterised by progressive cerebellar dysfunction in combination with a variety of other associative features. Since 1993 ADCAs have been increasingly characterised in terms of their genetic

  10. False-positive head-impulse test in cerebellar ataxia

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    Olympia eKremmyda

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The objective of this study was to compare the findings of the bedside head impulse test (HIT, passive head rotation gain, and caloric irrigation in patients with cerebellar ataxia (CA. In 16 patients with CA and bilaterally pathological bedside HIT, VOR gains were measured during HIT and passive head rotation by scleral search coil technique. Eight of the patients had pathologically reduced caloric responsiveness, while the other eight had normal caloric responses. Those with normal calorics showed a slightly reduced HIT gain (mean±SD: 0.73±0.15. In those with pathological calorics, gains 80ms and 100 ms after the HIT as well as the passive rotation VOR gains were significantly lower. The corrective saccade after head turn occurred earlier in patients with pathological calorics (111±62 ms after onset of the HIT than in those with normal calorics. (191±17 ms, p=0.0064 We indentified two groups of patients with CA: those with an isolated moderate HIT deficit only, probably due to floccular dysfunction, and those with combined HIT, passive rotation and caloric deficit, probably due to a peripheral vestibular deficit. From a clinical point of view, these results show that the bedside HIT alone can be false positive for establishing a diagnosis of a bilateral peripheral vestibular deficit in patients with CA.

  11. Defects in the CAPN1 gene result in alterations in cerebellar development and in cerebellar ataxia in mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yubin; Hersheson, Joshua; Lopez, Dulce; Hamad, Monia Ben; Liu, Yan; Lee, Ka-Hung; Pinto, Vanessa; Seinfeld, Jeff; Wiethoff, Sarah; Sun, Jiandong; Amouri, Rim; Hentati, Faycal; Baudry, Neema; Tran, Jennifer; Singleton, Andrew B; Coutelier, Marie; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Durr, Alexandra; Bi, Xiaoning; Houlden, Henry; Baudry, Michel

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous CAPN1 null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knock-out (KO) mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1 mediated cleavage of PH domain and Leucine rich repeat Protein Phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1), which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis, and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans. PMID:27320912

  12. PMPCA mutations cause abnormal mitochondrial protein processing in patients with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobling, Rebekah K; Assoum, Mirna; Gakh, Oleksandr; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian A; Mignot, Cyril; Roze, Emmanuel; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Lévy, Nicolas; Prasad, Chitra; Paton, Tara; Paterson, Andrew D; Roslin, Nicole M; Marshall, Christian R; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Roëckel-Trevisiol, Nathalie; Scherer, Stephen W; Rouleau, Guy A; Mégarbané, André; Isaya, Grazia; Delague, Valérie; Yoon, Grace

    2015-06-01

    Non-progressive cerebellar ataxias are a rare group of disorders that comprise approximately 10% of static infantile encephalopathies. We report the identification of mutations in PMPCA in 17 patients from four families affected with cerebellar ataxia, including the large Lebanese family previously described with autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia and short stature of Norman type and localized to chromosome 9q34 (OMIM #213200). All patients present with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, and the majority have intellectual disability of variable severity. PMPCA encodes α-MPP, the alpha subunit of mitochondrial processing peptidase, the primary enzyme responsible for the maturation of the vast majority of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins, which is necessary for life at the cellular level. Analysis of lymphoblastoid cells and fibroblasts from patients homozygous for the PMPCA p.Ala377Thr mutation and carriers demonstrate that the mutation impacts both the level of the alpha subunit encoded by PMPCA and the function of mitochondrial processing peptidase. In particular, this mutation impacts the maturation process of frataxin, the protein which is depleted in Friedreich ataxia. This study represents the first time that defects in PMPCA and mitochondrial processing peptidase have been described in association with a disease phenotype in humans. PMID:25808372

  13. A case of midbrain infarction with acute bilateral cerebellar ataxia visualized by diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Yuka; Kawabori, Masahito; Oura, Daisuke; Niiya, Yoshimasa; Iwasaki, Motoyuki; Mabuchi, Shoji

    2016-08-31

    An 85-year-old woman with hypertension was admitted with a sudden onset of gait disturbance and dysarthria. On admission, the patient showed severe bilateral cerebellar ataxia with moderate right medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) syndrome. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed an acute infarction in the lower and medial part of midbrain. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) started from both cerebellar peduncles revealed that the lesion of the acute infarction matched the decussation of superior cerebellar peduncle where crossing of tract was seen and a part of its tract was interrupted at the site. Interruption of the cerebellum red nuclear path at the medial part of midbrain was considered to be the reason for bilateral cerebellar ataxia and visualization of cerebellum red nuclear path by DTI can give better understanding of the neurological symptom. PMID:27477572

  14. Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, and vestibular areflexia syndrome: a slowly progressive disorder with stereotypical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzato, Daniele; Bella, Eleonora Dalla; Dacci, Patrizia; Mariotti, Caterina; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy and vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) is a newly described condition with onset in adulthood, characterized by progressive balance impairment and sensory disturbances in the lower limbs, which can severely affect patients' quality of life. Its pathogenesis remains obscure and the diagnosis challenging. We described four patients complaining of slowly progressive gait unbalance and sensory disturbances at the feet followed, after a period ranging 2-6 years, by cerebellar dysfunction. All patients showed gait and limb ataxia, positive Romberg sign, cerebellar dysarthria, gaze-evoked nystagmus, absent deep tendon reflexes, and impaired vibratory sensation. Nerve conduction studies revealed axonal sensory neuropathy, brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebellar atrophy, and otoneurological investigation demonstrated bilateral vestibular areflexia with impaired vestibulo-ocular reflexes. The diagnosis of CANVAS should be suspected on clinical ground based on homogeneous course of symptoms and signs, and addressed by video-oculography eye movement recording. PMID:26566912

  15. Familial cerebellar ataxia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: evidence for hypothalamic LHRH deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berciano, J; Amado, J A; Freijanes, J; Rebollo, M; Vaquero, A

    1982-01-01

    A family with familial cerebellar ataxia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is described. The condition was inherited as an autosomal recessive defect. CT scan in one case revealed cerebellar and brain stem atrophy. Endocrinological tests showed abnormalities only in two patients who were clinically affected. In both cases raised gonadotropic levels were found after repetitive stimulation with luteining hormone-releasing hormone which suggests that the hypogonadism was due to a primary hypothalamic disturbance. Images PMID:6813427

  16. Gluten ataxia of sporadic and hereditary cerebellar ataxia in patients from mainland China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Juan Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gluten sensitivity (GS is a spectrum of disorders with diverse manifestations. Recent evidence suggests that ataxia may be the only manifestation of GS and that it may be one of the causes of sporadic ataxia. Aim: To investigate the prevalence of gluten ataxia among patients with ataxia in China. Materials and Methods: Serum levels of anti-gliadin, anti-transglutaminase 2 (TG2, and anti-transglutaminase 6 (TG6 antibodies measured in 125 patients with ataxia (100 patients with sporadic ataxia and 25 patients with hereditary ataxia and 51 healthy controls by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results: The serum concentrations of anti-gliadin, anti-TG2 IgG, IgA, and TG6-IgG antibodies were elevated in ataxia patients, but the increase was not statistically significant. However, TG6-IgA serum levels were significantly higher in sporadic ataxia as compared to those in healthy controls (P < 0.05. Conclusions: These results provide evidence that sporadic ataxia in a subgroup of patients may be due to gluten ataxia in mainland China. Measurement of serum anti-TG6 antibodies along with anti-TG2 and anti-gliadin antibodies may be useful for diagnosing gluten ataxia.

  17. Physiotherapy in degenerative cerebellar ataxias: utilisation, patient satisfaction, and professional expertise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonteyn, E.M.R.; Keus, S.H.J.; Verstappen, C.C.P.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2013-01-01

    Physiotherapy plays an important role in the management of patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxias. However, our insight in the quantity and quality of physiotherapy prescription in this group of patients is incomplete. The purposes of this study were to investigate the utilization of physioth

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients presenting with (sub)acute cerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute or subacute cerebellar inflammation is mainly caused by postinfectious, toxic, neoplastic, vascular, or idiopathic processes and can result in cerebellar ataxia. Previous magnetic resonance (MR) studies in single patients who developed acute or subacute ataxia showed varying imaging features. Eighteen patients presenting with acute and subacute onset of ataxia were included in this study. Cases of chronic-progressive/hereditary and noncerebellar causes (ischemia, multiple sclerosis lesions, metastasis, bleedings) were excluded. MR imaging findings were then matched with the clinical history of the patient. An underlying etiology for ataxic symptoms were found in 14/18 patients (postinfectious/infectious, paraneoplastic, autoimmune, drug-induced). In two of five patients without MR imaging findings and three of eight patients with minimal imaging features (cerebellar atrophy, slight signal alterations, and small areas of restricted diffusion), adverse clinical outcomes were documented. Of the five patients with prominent MR findings (cerebellar swelling, contrast enhancement, or broad signal abnormalities), two were lost to follow-up and two showed long-term sequelae. No correlation was found between the presence of initial MRI findings in subacute or acute ataxia patients and their long-term clinical outcome. MR imaging was more flagrantly positive in cases due to encephalitis. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients presenting with (sub)acute cerebellar ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Tanja [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Thomalla, Goetz [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neurology, Hamburg (Germany); Goebell, Einar [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Piotrowski, Anna [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yousem, David Mark [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Acute or subacute cerebellar inflammation is mainly caused by postinfectious, toxic, neoplastic, vascular, or idiopathic processes and can result in cerebellar ataxia. Previous magnetic resonance (MR) studies in single patients who developed acute or subacute ataxia showed varying imaging features. Eighteen patients presenting with acute and subacute onset of ataxia were included in this study. Cases of chronic-progressive/hereditary and noncerebellar causes (ischemia, multiple sclerosis lesions, metastasis, bleedings) were excluded. MR imaging findings were then matched with the clinical history of the patient. An underlying etiology for ataxic symptoms were found in 14/18 patients (postinfectious/infectious, paraneoplastic, autoimmune, drug-induced). In two of five patients without MR imaging findings and three of eight patients with minimal imaging features (cerebellar atrophy, slight signal alterations, and small areas of restricted diffusion), adverse clinical outcomes were documented. Of the five patients with prominent MR findings (cerebellar swelling, contrast enhancement, or broad signal abnormalities), two were lost to follow-up and two showed long-term sequelae. No correlation was found between the presence of initial MRI findings in subacute or acute ataxia patients and their long-term clinical outcome. MR imaging was more flagrantly positive in cases due to encephalitis. (orig.)

  20. Cerebellar Ataxia with Bilateral Vestibulopathy: Description of a Syndrome and Its Characteristic Clinical Sign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Americo A.; Halmagyi, G. Michael; McGarvie, Leigh A.; Cremer, Phillip D.

    2004-01-01

    We report four patients with the syndrome of cerebellar ataxia with bilateral vestibulopathy (CABV) and, using search coil oculography, we validate its characteristic clinical sign, namely impairment of the visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex (VVOR) or doll's head reflex. In our four patients, CABV began in the sixth decade of life; they are…

  1. Acute cerebellar ataxia in a child with transient pontine lesions demonstrated by MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R.J.M.; Begeer, J H; Wilmink, J T; le Coultre, R

    1991-01-01

    A case of acute cerebellar ataxia with discrete signs of pyramidal and tegmental involvement is reported, several days after recovery from an upper respiratory infection of unknown etiology. Magnetic resonance imaging showed transient pontine lesions, disappearing in the convalescence phase. Laborat

  2. Cerebellar Dysfunction and Ataxia in Patients with Epilepsy: Coincidence, Consequence, or Cause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Pavel; Bareš, Martin; Brázdil, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Basic epilepsy teachings assert that seizures arise from the cerebral cortex, glossing over infratentorial structures such as the cerebellum that are believed to modulate rather than generate seizures. Nonetheless, ataxia and other clinical findings in epileptic patients are slowly but inevitably drawing attention to this neural node. Tracing the evolution of this line of inquiry from the observed coincidence of cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar dysfunction (most apparently manifested as ataxia) in epilepsy to their close association, this review considers converging clinical, physiological, histological, and neuroimaging evidence that support incorporating the cerebellum into epilepsy pathology. We examine reports of still controversial cerebellar epilepsy, studies of cerebellar stimulation alleviating paroxysmal epileptic activity, studies and case reports of cerebellar lesions directly associated with seizures, and conditions in which ataxia is accompanied by epileptic seizures. Finally, the review substantiates the role of this complex brain structure in epilepsy whether by coincidence, as a consequence of deleterious cortical epileptic activity or antiepileptic drugs, or the very cause of the disease. PMID:27375960

  3. Late onset autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia a family description and linkage analysis with the hla system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter O. Arruda

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available A family suffering an autosomal dominant form of late onset hereditary cerebellar ataxia is described. Eight affected family members were personally studied, and data from another four were obtained through anamnesis. The mean age of onset was 37.1±5.4 years (27-47 years. The clinical picture consisted basically of a pure ataxic cerebellar syndrome. CT-scan disclosed diffuse cerebellar atrophy with relative sparing of the brainstem (and no involvement of supratentorial structures. Neurophysiological studies (nerve conduction, VEP and BAEP were normal. Twenty-six individuals were typed for HLA histocompatibility antigens. Lod scores were calculated with the computer program LINKMAP. Close linkage of the ataxia gene with the HLA system in this family could be excluded - 0==0,02, z=(-2,17 - and the overall analysis of the lod scores suggest another chromossomal location than chromosome 6.

  4. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujioka Shinsuke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and SCA31. The subtype SCA6 is the most common. These subtypes are associated with four causative genes and two loci. The severity of symptoms and age of onset can vary between each SCA subtype and even between families with the same subtype. SCA5 and SCA11 are caused by specific gene mutations such as missense, inframe deletions, and frameshift insertions or deletions. SCA6 is caused by trinucleotide CAG repeat expansions encoding large uninterrupted glutamine tracts. SCA31 is caused by repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding region of the disease gene. Currently, there are no specific gene mutations associated with SCA26 or SCA30, though there is a confirmed locus for each subtype. This disease is mainly diagnosed via genetic testing; however, differential diagnoses include pure cerebellar ataxia and non-cerebellar features in addition to ataxia. Although not fatal, ADCA Type III may cause dysphagia and falls, which reduce the quality of life of the patients and may in turn shorten the lifespan. The therapy for ADCA Type III is supportive and includes occupational and speech modalities. There is no cure for ADCA Type III, but a number of recent studies have highlighted novel therapies, which bring hope for future curative treatments.

  5. Paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-Hu antibodies and benign ganglioneuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancellu, Roberto; Corsini, Elena; Bernardi, Giorgio; Buzzo, Paolo; Ferrari, Maria Luisa; Lamantea, Eleonora; Garaventa, Alberto; Truini, Mauro; Salvarani, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-Hu antibodies and benign ganglioneuroma. A 28-year-old woman developed progressive ataxia with hyporeflexia at the age of 19. Brain MRI showed progressive cerebellar atrophy. Neurophysiological studies, screening of immune-mediated ataxias, oncological markers, vitamin E and genetic tests for spinocerebellar ataxia types 1,2,3, Friedreich ataxia and POLG1 were negative. Anti-Hu antibodies were positive in Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (1:640). Total-body computed tomography revealed a mediastinum mass; the histological diagnosis was maturing ganglioneuroma. Immunohistochemistry showed a mild reaction between the tumor and the patient's serum, and no reaction between the tumor and control serum. After surgery, serum anti-Hu titer decreased, while ataxic symptoms initially worsened and then stabilized. Ganglioneuroma is a benign tumor, usually derived from the maturation of a neuroblastoma. The benign histology and the presence of anti-Hu antibodies could be related to the positive oncological prognosis and to the slow clinical course mimicking a degenerative ataxia. PMID:25764259

  6. A Precocious Cerebellar Ataxia and Frequent Fever Episodes in a 16-Month-Old Infant Revealing Ataxia-Telangiectasia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Nespoli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT is the most frequent progressive cerebellar ataxia in infancy and childhood. Immunodeficiency which includes both cellular and humoral arms has variable severity. Since the clinical presentation is extremely variable, a high clinical suspicion will allow an early diagnosis. Serum alpha-fetoprotein is elevated in 80–85% of patients and therefore could be used as a screening tool. Here, we present a case of a 5-year-old female infant who was admitted to our department at the age of 16 months because of gait disorders and febrile episodes that had begun at 5 months after the cessation of breastfeeding. Serum alfa-fetoprotein level was elevated. Other investigations showed leukocytopenia with lymphopenia, reduced IgG2 and IgA levels, and low titers of specific postimmunization antibodies against tetanus toxoid and Haemophilus B polysaccharide. Peripheral lymphocytes subsets showed reduction of T cells with a marked predominance of T cells with a memory phenotype and a corresponding reduction of naïve T cells; NK cells were very increased (41% with normal activity. The characterization of the ATM gene mutations revealed 2 specific mutations (c.5692C > T/c.7630-2A > C compatible with AT diagnosis. It was concluded that AT syndrome should be considered in children with precocious signs of cerebellar ataxia and recurrent fever episodes.

  7. Spectrum of centrosome autoantibodies in childhood varicella and post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stinton Laura M

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sera from children with post-varicella infections have autoantibodies that react with centrosomes in brain and tissue culture cells. We investigated the sera of children with infections and post-varicella ataxia and related conditions for reactivity to five recombinant centrosome proteins: γγ-enolase, pericentrin, ninein, PCM-1, and Mob1. Methods Sera from 12 patients with acute post-varicella ataxia, 1 with post-Epstein Barr virus (EBV ataxia, 5 with uncomplicated varicella infections, and other conditions were tested for reactivity to cryopreserved cerebellum tissue and recombinant centrosome proteins. The distribution of pericentrin in the cerebellum was studied by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF using rabbit antibodies to the recombinant protein. Antibodies to phospholipids (APL were detected by ELISA. Results Eleven of 12 children with post-varicella ataxia, 4/5 children with uncomplicated varicella infections, 1/1 with post-EBV ataxia, 2/2 with ADEM, 1/2 with neuroblastoma and ataxia, and 2/2 with cerebellitis had antibodies directed against 1 or more recombinant centrosome antigens. Antibodies to pericentrin were seen in 5/12 children with post-varicella ataxia but not in any of the other sera tested. IIF demonstrated that pericentrin is located in axons and centrosomes of cerebellar cells. APL were detected in 75% of the sera from children with post-varicella ataxia and 50% of children with varicella without ataxia and in none of the controls. Conclusion This is the first study to show the antigen specificity of anti-centrosome antibodies in children with varicella. Our data suggest that children with post-varicella ataxia have unique autoantibody reactivity to pericentrin.

  8. Preserved Glucose Metabolism of Deep Cerebellar Nuclei in a Case of Multiple System Atrophy with Predominant Cerebellar Ataxia: F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Dae Kwon

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar glucose metabolism of multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C is known to be decreased but is not defined among areas of cerebellum. We encountered a 54-year-old man who developed dizziness and progressive ataxia followed by urinary incontinence and orthostatic hypotension, all of those symptoms progressed relentlessly and the symptoms responded poorly to levodopa therapy. Visual analysis and statistical parametric mapping analysis of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed hypometabolism of both cerebellar hemisphere, severe at cortical area, and pons. There was clear sparing of deep cerebellar nuclei. Our report, as we know, shows the first case of preserved glucose metabolism of deep cerebellar nuclei relative to cerebellar cortex in an MSA-C patient.

  9. 4-aminopyridine reverses ataxia and cerebellar firing deficiency in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabal, Sriram; Chang, Hui Ho Vanessa; Cullen, Kathleen E; Watt, Alanna J

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is a devastating midlife-onset autosomal dominant motor control disease with no known treatment. Using a hyper-expanded polyglutamine (84Q) knock-in mouse, we found that cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision was degraded in heterozygous (SCA6(84Q/+)) mice at 19 months when motor deficits are observed. Similar alterations in firing precision and motor control were observed at disease onset at 7 months in homozygous (SCA6(84Q/84Q)) mice, as well as a reduction in firing rate. We further found that chronic administration of the FDA-approved drug 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), which targets potassium channels, alleviated motor coordination deficits and restored cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision to wildtype (WT) levels in SCA6(84Q/84Q) mice both in acute slices and in vivo. These results provide a novel therapeutic approach for treating ataxic symptoms associated with SCA6. PMID:27381005

  10. The interrelationship between disease severity, dynamic stability, and falls in cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schniepp, Roman; Schlick, Cornelia; Pradhan, Cauchy; Dieterich, Marianne; Brandt, Thomas; Jahn, Klaus; Wuehr, Max

    2016-07-01

    Cerebellar ataxia (CA) results in discoordination of body movements (ataxia), a gait disorder, and falls. All three aspects appear to be obviously interrelated; however, experimental evidence is sparse. This study systematically correlated the clinical rating of the severity of ataxia with dynamic stability measures and the fall frequency in patients with CA. Clinical severity of CA in patients with sporadic (n = 34) and hereditary (n = 24) forms was assessed with the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Gait performance was examined during slow, preferred, and maximally fast walking speeds. Spatiotemporal variability parameters in the fore-aft and medio-lateral directions were analyzed. The fall frequency was assessed using a standardized interview about fall events within the last 6 months. Fore-aft gait variability showed significant speed-dependent characteristics with highest magnitudes during slow and fast walking. The SARA score correlated positively with fore-aft gait variability, most prominently during fast walking. The fall frequency was significantly associated to fore-aft gait variability during slow walking. Severity of ataxia, dynamic stability, and the occurrence of falls were interrelated in a speed-dependent manner: (a) Severity of ataxia symptoms was closely related to instability during fast walking. (b) Fall frequency was associated with instability during slow walking. These findings suggest the presence of a speed-dependent, twofold cerebellar locomotor control. Assessment of gait performance during non-preferred, slow and fast walking speeds provides novel insights into the pathophysiology of cerebellar locomotor control and may become a useful approach in the clinical evaluation of patients with CA. PMID:27159995

  11. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I: A review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujioka Shinsuke

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA characterized by ataxia with other neurological signs, including oculomotor disturbances, cognitive deficits, pyramidal and extrapyramidal dysfunction, bulbar, spinal and peripheral nervous system involvement. The global prevalence of this disease is not known. The most common type I ADCA is SCA3 followed by SCA2, SCA1, and SCA8, in descending order. Founder effects no doubt contribute to the variable prevalence between populations. Onset is usually in adulthood but cases of presentation in childhood have been reported. Clinical features vary depending on the SCA subtype but by definition include ataxia associated with other neurological manifestations. The clinical spectrum ranges from pure cerebellar signs to constellations including spinal cord and peripheral nerve disease, cognitive impairment, cerebellar or supranuclear ophthalmologic signs, psychiatric problems, and seizures. Cerebellar ataxia can affect virtually any body part causing movement abnormalities. Gait, truncal, and limb ataxia are often the most obvious cerebellar findings though nystagmus, saccadic abnormalities, and dysarthria are usually associated. To date, 21 subtypes have been identified: SCA1-SCA4, SCA8, SCA10, SCA12-SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA17-SCA23, SCA25, SCA27, SCA28 and dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA. Type I ADCA can be further divided based on the proposed pathogenetic mechanism into 3 subclasses: subclass 1 includes type I ADCA caused by CAG repeat expansions such as SCA1-SCA3, SCA17, and DRPLA, subclass 2 includes trinucleotide repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding regions of the disease gene including SCA8, SCA10 and SCA12. Subclass 3 contains disorders caused by specific gene deletions, missense mutation, and nonsense mutation and includes SCA13, SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA27 and SCA28. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, physical

  12. Differences between spinocerebellar ataxias and multiple system atrophy-cerebellar type on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiing-Feng Lirng

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: A broad spectrum of diseases can manifest cerebellar ataxia. In this study, we investigated whether proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS may help differentiate spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA from multiple systemic atrophy- cerebellar type (MSA-C. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This prospective study recruited 156 patients with ataxia, including spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA types 1, 2, 3, 6 and 17 (N = 94 and MSA-C (N = 62, and 44 healthy controls. Single voxel proton MRS in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis were measured. The differences were evaluated using nonparametric statistic tests. RESULTS: When compared with healthy controls, the cerebellar and vermis NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho were lower in all patients(p<0.002. The Cho/Cr was lower in SCA2 and MSA-C (p<0.0005. The NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr were lower in MSA-C or SCA2 comparing with SCA3 or SCA6. The MRS features of SCA1 were in between (p<0.018. The cerebellar NAA/Cho was lower in SCA2 than SCA1, SCA3 or SCA6 (p<0.04. The cerebellar NAA/Cho in MSA-C was lower than SCA3 (p<0.0005. In the early stages of diseases (SARA score<10, significant lower NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho in SCA2, SCA3, SCA6 or MSA-C were observed comparing with healthy controls (p<0.017. The Cho/Cr was lower in MSA-C or SCA2 (p<0.0005. Patients with MSA-C and SCA2 had lower NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr than SCA3 or SCA6 (p<0.016. CONCLUSION: By using MRS, significantly lower NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and NAA/Cho in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis were found in patients with ataxia (SCAs and MSA-C. Rapid neuronal degeneration and impairment of membrane activities were observed more often in patients with MSA-C than those with SCA, even in early stages. MRS could also help distinguish between SCA2 and other subtypes of SCAs. MRS ratios may be of use as biomarkers in early stages of disease and should be further assessed in a longitudinal study.

  13. Evaluation of acetazolamine response in patients with cerebellar ataxia using dynamic quantitative F-18-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebellar Ataxia (CA) usually shows dramatic response to acetazolamide treatment. But few cases of acetazolamide unresponse CA were reported recently. Using dynamic FDG PET, we tried to evaluate the metabolic abnormality and its drug response in CA. Quantitative F-18-FDG PET was performed prior and after treatment of acetazolamide (250 mg qid for 10 days) in two patient suspected episodic cerebellar ataxia. Using Model-based clustering method, the regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate (rCMRglu) was calculated. Two patients showed different treatment response to acetazolamide. In one patient who showed markedly reduced frequency of the ataxic attack after treatment. FDG PET showed that mean cerebellar glucose metabolism was increased after treatment (ΔrCMRglu:9%). However, in the other who showed poor response to acetazolamide, FDG PET showed the more decrease metabolism in cerebellar metabolism after treatment (ΔrCMRglu:-17%). The change of the cerebellar glucose metabolism on FDG PET reflected the symptomatic improvement after acetazolamide in these two CA patients. We could expected that FDG PET might be a very useful tool to quantitatively predict the treatment response in CA and other neurologic disorder

  14. Evaluation of acetazolamine response in patients with cerebellar ataxia using dynamic quantitative F-18-FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. K.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, M. H.; Lee, K. M.; Yeo, J. S.; Chung, J. K.; Lee, M. C. [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Cerebellar Ataxia (CA) usually shows dramatic response to acetazolamide treatment. But few cases of acetazolamide unresponse CA were reported recently. Using dynamic FDG PET, we tried to evaluate the metabolic abnormality and its drug response in CA. Quantitative F-18-FDG PET was performed prior and after treatment of acetazolamide (250 mg qid for 10 days) in two patient suspected episodic cerebellar ataxia. Using Model-based clustering method, the regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate (rCMRglu) was calculated. Two patients showed different treatment response to acetazolamide. In one patient who showed markedly reduced frequency of the ataxic attack after treatment. FDG PET showed that mean cerebellar glucose metabolism was increased after treatment ({delta}rCMRglu:9%). However, in the other who showed poor response to acetazolamide, FDG PET showed the more decrease metabolism in cerebellar metabolism after treatment ({delta}rCMRglu:-17%). The change of the cerebellar glucose metabolism on FDG PET reflected the symptomatic improvement after acetazolamide in these two CA patients. We could expected that FDG PET might be a very useful tool to quantitatively predict the treatment response in CA and other neurologic disorder.

  15. Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome and Autosomal Recessive Spastic Ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay : A Report of Two Male Sibs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Willem M. A.; Egger, Jos I. M.; Ahmed, Amir I. M.; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Vermeer, Sascha; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the SACS gene (13q12) encoding the protein sacsin. It is characterized by early-onset cerebellar ataxia, lower limb spasticity, sensorimotor axonal polyneuropath

  16. Familial cosegregation of manic-depressive illness and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piqueras, J.F.; Santos, J.; Puertollano, R. [Universidad Autonoma, Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    1995-06-19

    We report on a Spanish family with co-occurrence of manic-depression and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia. All affected individuals in the second generation showed cerebellar ataxia and manic-depression simultaneously. Since anticipation has been described in both disorders and the pattern of segregation may be autosomal as well as X-linked, we have searched for a possible involvement of two candidate genes which are located either on an autosome (SCA1) or on the X-chromosome (GABRA3). We concluded that expansion of trinucleotide repeats at SCA1 gene cannot be considered as a disease-causing mutation, and this gene should be initially discarded. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Improvement of balance in progressive degenerative cerebellar ataxias after Ayurvedic therapy: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriranjini S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The treatment options for improving the balance in degenerative cerebellar ataxias are very few. Ayurvedic texts have described diverse treatment regimens for this disease. Aims: To determine the change in balance indices, if any, by dynamic posturography (Biodex Balance System, USA in progressive cerebellar ataxia following Ayurvedic treatment. Materials and Methods: We performed a preliminary open labelled study on ten patients diagnosed with progressive cerebellar ataxia. The patients were treated over a period of one month. Treatment consisted of Shirobasti (therapeutic retention of medicament over the scalp in male patients and Shirodhara (pouring of a steady stream of medicament on the forehead in female patients with Dhanvantaram tailam (medicated oil for 45 minutes daily, followed by Abhyanga (methodical massage with Dhanvantaram tailam and Bhashpa sweda (steam bath, for 14 days. In addition, the treatment also consisted Abhyantara aushadha (oral medicines of Maharasnadi kashayam 15ml thrice daily, Dhanvantaram capsules 101 two capsules thrice daily, and Ashwagandha tablet 500 mg one tablet thrice daily, for one month. The patients were assessed on the Biodex balance system before and after the treatment. Results were analyzed using paired samples ′t′ test. Results: All patients tolerated the treatment well without any adverse events and reported subjective improvement in walking. There was a statistically significant improvement in the overall and anteroposterior balance indices of dynamic stability. Conclusions: Over the short period of the present study, Ayurvedic therapy was found to be safe and, showed improvement in the balance in patients with progressive degenerative cerebellar ataxia. Further randomized placebo-control double-blind studies are needed to validate the results.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of cerebellar ataxias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Takase, Sadao; Mochizuki, Hiroshi; Kogure, Kyuya; Yamada, Kenji; Hishinuma, Takashi; Matsuzawa, Taiju.

    1987-11-01

    Radiological evaluation in order to quantitatively analyse the size of structures in the posterior fossa using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in the patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD). The subjects consisted of 17 patients including 11 OPCA (olivopontocerebellar atrophy)-type and 6 LCCA (late cortical cerebellar atrophy)-type SCD patients, and their disease was in the initial phase. Using a mid-line sagittal view, quantitative measurements of the cerebellum, pons and the medulla oblongata were performed. In the OPCA-type SCD patients, the area, and the longitudinal and anteroposterior diameters of the cerebellar vermis, the area and the anteroposterior diameter of the pons, the height of the fourth ventricle, and the anteroposterior diameter of the medulla oblongata were significantly smaller than those of normal subjects. In the LCCA-type SCD patients, only the area and the anteroposterior diameter of the cerebellar vermis were smaller than those of the normal. As a result, MRI is useful in the diagnosis of SCD, and in the differential diagnosis between the OPCA-type and the LCCA-type SCDs.

  19. Hereditary cerebellar ataxia progressively impairs force adaptation during goal-directed arm movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschke, Matthias; Gomez, Christopher M; Ebner, Timothy J; Konczak, Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    We investigated how humans with hereditary cerebellar degeneration [spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) type 6 and 8, n = 9] and age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 9) adapted goal-directed arm movements to an unknown external force field. We tested whether learning could be generalized to untrained regions in the workspace, an aspect central to the idea of an internal model, and if any learning could be retained. After removal of the force field, SCA patients showed little or no learning-related aftereffects indicating that repeated force-field exposure never led to successful force compensation. In contrast, healthy control subjects quickly adapted their movements to the new force field. The difference in force adaptation was significant for movements to targets that required both the shoulder and elbow joint (P < 0.001). Moreover, the generalization of learned movements to targets outside the learned workspace was prevented by the cerebellar degeneration (P < 0.01). Retention of force adaptation was significantly lower in SCA patients (P = 0.003). The severity of ataxia in SCA patients correlated negatively with the extent of learning (r = -0.84, P = 0.004). Our findings imply that progressive loss of cerebellar function gradually impairs force adaptation. The failure to generalize learning suggests that cerebellar degeneration prevents the formation of an internal representation of the limb dynamics. PMID:13679403

  20. Speech changes after coordinative training in patients with cerebellar ataxia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tykalova, Tereza; Pospisilova, Mariana; Cmejla, Roman; Jerabek, Jaroslav; Mares, Pavel; Rusz, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Although rehabilitative training is a necessary adjunct in the management of gait ataxia, it remains unknown whether the possible beneficial effect of intensive coordinative training may translate to activities of daily living, which are closely connected with postural alignment. The aim of the present study was to examine the effectiveness of a 2-week intensive coordinative motor training on speech production. Speech and motor performances in a cohort of ten individuals with cerebellar degeneration were examined three times; before the introduction of training, directly and 4 weeks after the last training session. Each patient was instructed to perform a speaking task of fast syllable repetition and monologue. Objective acoustic analyses were used to investigate six key aspects of speech production disturbed in ataxic dysarthria including accuracy of consonant articulation, accuracy of vowel articulation, irregular alternating motion rates, prolonged phonemes, slow alternating motion rates and inappropriate segmentation. We found that coordinative training had a mild beneficial effect on speech in cerebellar patients. Immediately after the last training session, slight speech improvements were evident in all ten patients. Furthermore, follow-up assessment performed 4 weeks later revealed that 90 % of the patients showed better speech performance than before initiation of the therapy. The present study supports evidence that the intensive rehabilitative training may positively affect fine-motor movements such as speech in patients with cerebellar ataxia. PMID:26377098

  1. First de novo KCND3 mutation causes severe Kv4.3 channel dysfunction leading to early onset cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability, oral apraxia and epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smets, Katrien; Duarri, Anna; Deconinck, Tine; Ceulemans, Berten; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Zuechner, Stephan; Gonzalez, Michael Anthony; Schuele, Rebecca; Synofzik, Matthis; Van der Aa, Nathalie; De Jonghe, Peter; Verbeek, Dineke S.; Baets, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Identification of the first de novo mutation in potassium voltage-gated channel, shal-related subfamily, member 3 (KCND3) in a patient with complex early onset cerebellar ataxia in order to expand the genetic and phenotypic spectrum. Methods: Whole exome sequencing in a cerebellar ataxia

  2. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 Protein Aggregates Cause Deficits in Motor Learning and Cerebellar Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Mark, Melanie D.; Krause, Martin; Boele, Henk-Jan; Kruse, Wolfgang; Pollok, Stefan; Kuner, Thomas; Dalkara, Deniz; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Herlitze, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is linked to poly-glutamine (polyQ) within the C terminus (CT) of the pore-forming subunits of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels (Cav2.1) and is characterized by CT protein aggregates found in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). One hypothesis regarding SCA6 disease is that a CT fragment of the Cav2.1 channel, which is detected specifically in cytosolic and nuclear fractions in SCA6 patients, is associated with the SCA6 pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we expres...

  3. Barr humbug: acute cerebellar ataxia due to Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Benjamin; Machin, Nicholas; Lavin, Timothy; Ul Haq, Mian Ayaz

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with neurological sequellae, but rarely there is acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA) in an adult. We present a novel case of a 26-year-old man, who presented with ACA. He had normal MRI and CSF analysis. Serum testing confirmed active EBV. A course of oral prednisolone 1 mg/kg for 4 weeks, with a subsequent taper was started. He made a full recovery within 3 weeks of presentation. PMID:27558189

  4. Cerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and olivopontocerebellar degeneration, progressive degenerative disorders in which cerebellar degeneration is a key feature Friedreich’s ataxia, and other spinocerebellar ataxias, which are caused by ...

  5. Ataxia and tremor due to lesions involving cerebellar projection pathways: a DTI tractographic study in six patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, M; Paus, S; Allert, N; Mädler, B; Klockgether, T; Urbach, H; Coenen, V A

    2015-01-01

    Focal lesions of brainstem, thalamus, and subcortical white matter may cause movement disorders that are clinically indistinguishable from cerebellar symptoms. It is suspected that ataxia in these cases is due to damage of efferent or afferent pathways of the cerebellum. However, the precise anatomical correlate often remains undefined. We used deterministic diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) tractography to study the anatomical relationship between lesions causing ataxia and efferent cerebellar pathways. Study subjects were six male patients with focal lesions of different etiology (demyelination, hemorrhage, ischemia, neoplasm) outside the cerebellum. Five patients had cerebellar-like ataxia with prominent contralateral upper limb involvement. One patient with an almost midline mesencephalic lesion had a symmetrical ataxic syndrome. We used 3T MRI (Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, Netherlands) and DTI tractography (32 directions, StealthViz DTI, Medtronic Navigation, Louisville, USA) to delineate the dentato-rubro-thalamo-cortical tract (DRT). In all patients, tractography demonstrated focal lesions affecting the DRT in different locations. We conclude that in vivo mapping of cerebral pathways using DTI tractography in patients with focal extracerebellar brain lesions may provide direct evidence of circumscribed damage to the DRT, causing unilateral cerebellar-like ataxia. Also, a unilateral mesencephalic lesion at the level of the crossing of the DRT may cause bilateral ataxia. PMID:25287016

  6. Transplantation of human induced cerebellar granular-like cells improves motor functions in a novel mouse model of cerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tongming; Tang, Hailiang; Shen, Yiwen; Tang, Qisheng; Chen, Luping; Wang, Zhifu; Zhou, Ping; Xu, Feng; Zhu, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-based reparative approaches have been applied to cerebellum-related disorders during the last two decades. Direct lineage reprogramming of human fibroblasts into functional granular neurons holds great promise for biomedical applications such as cerebellum regeneration and cellbased disease modeling. In the present study, we showed that a combination of Ascl1, Sox2 and OCT4, in a culture subsequently treated with secreted factors (BMP4, Wnt3a and FGF8b), was capable of converting human fibroblasts from the scalp tissue of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) into functional human induced cerebellar granular-like cells (hiCGCs). Morphological analysis, immunocytochemistry, gene expression and electrophysiological analysis were performed to identify the similarity of induced neuronal cells to human cerebellum granular cells. Our strategy improved the efficiency for hiCGCs induction, which gave the highest conversion efficiency 12.30±0.88%, and Ath1+/Tuj1+ double positive cells to 5.56±0.80%. We transplanted hiCGCs into the cerebellum of NmycTRE/TRE: tTS mice, a novel mouse model of cerebellar ataxia, and demonstrated that the hiCGCs were able to survive, migrate, proliferate and promote mild functional recovery after been grafted into cerebellum.

  7. SETX mutations are a frequent genetic cause of juvenile and adult onset cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein

    OpenAIRE

    Nanetti, Lorenzo; Cavalieri, Simona; Pensato, Viviana; Erbetta, Alessandra; Pareyson, Davide; Panzeri, Marta; Zorzi, Giovanna; Antozzi, Carlo; Moroni, Isabella; Gellera, Cinzia; Brusco, Alfredo; Mariotti, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/background Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia defines a group of genetically distinct recessive ataxias including ataxia-telangectasia (A-T, ATM gene), ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1, APTX gene) and type 2 (AOA2, SETX gene). Although, a few unique clinical features differentiate each of these forms, the patients also share common clinical signs, such as the presence of cerebellar atrophy, sensorimotor axonal neuropathy, and elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) serum level. Mat...

  8. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia: a complex phenotype associated with a new SPG4 gene mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Johnson, B; Koefoed, Pernille;

    2004-01-01

    identified in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the...... significantly relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations......Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...

  9. Epigenetic remodelling and dysregulation of DLGAP4 is linked with early-onset cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Hansen, Claus; Kim, Hyung-Goo;

    2014-01-01

    Genome instability, epigenetic remodelling and structural chromosomal rearrangements are hallmarks of cancer. However, the coordinated epigenetic effects of constitutional chromosomal rearrangements that disrupt genes associated with congenital neurodevelopmental diseases are poorly understood....... To understand the genetic-epigenetic interplay at breakpoints of chromosomal translocations disrupting CG-rich loci, we quantified epigenetic modifications at DLGAP4 (SAPAP4), a key post-synaptic density 95 (PSD95) associated gene, truncated by the chromosome translocation t(8;20)(p12;q11.23), co......-segregating with cerebellar ataxia in a five-generation family. We report significant epigenetic remodelling of the DLGAP4 locus triggered by the t(8;20)(p12;q11.23) translocation and leading to dysregulation of DLGAP4 expression in affected carriers. Disruption of DLGAP4 results in monoallelic hypermethylation...

  10. Cerebellar Ataxia and Coenzyme Q Deficiency through Loss of Unorthodox Kinase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefely, Jonathan A; Licitra, Floriana; Laredj, Leila; Reidenbach, Andrew G; Kemmerer, Zachary A; Grangeray, Anais; Jaeg-Ehret, Tiphaine; Minogue, Catherine E; Ulbrich, Arne; Hutchins, Paul D; Wilkerson, Emily M; Ruan, Zheng; Aydin, Deniz; Hebert, Alexander S; Guo, Xiao; Freiberger, Elyse C; Reutenauer, Laurence; Jochem, Adam; Chergova, Maya; Johnson, Isabel E; Lohman, Danielle C; Rush, Matthew J P; Kwiecien, Nicholas W; Singh, Pankaj K; Schlagowski, Anna I; Floyd, Brendan J; Forsman, Ulrika; Sindelar, Pavel J; Westphall, Michael S; Pierrel, Fabien; Zoll, Joffrey; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Kannan, Natarajan; Bingman, Craig A; Coon, Joshua J; Isope, Philippe; Puccio, Hélène; Pagliarini, David J

    2016-08-18

    The UbiB protein kinase-like (PKL) family is widespread, comprising one-quarter of microbial PKLs and five human homologs, yet its biochemical activities remain obscure. COQ8A (ADCK3) is a mammalian UbiB protein associated with ubiquinone (CoQ) biosynthesis and an ataxia (ARCA2) through unclear means. We show that mice lacking COQ8A develop a slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia linked to Purkinje cell dysfunction and mild exercise intolerance, recapitulating ARCA2. Interspecies biochemical analyses show that COQ8A and yeast Coq8p specifically stabilize a CoQ biosynthesis complex through unorthodox PKL functions. Although COQ8 was predicted to be a protein kinase, we demonstrate that it lacks canonical protein kinase activity in trans. Instead, COQ8 has ATPase activity and interacts with lipid CoQ intermediates, functions that are likely conserved across all domains of life. Collectively, our results lend insight into the molecular activities of the ancient UbiB family and elucidate the biochemical underpinnings of a human disease. PMID:27499294

  11. Cerebellar Expression of the Neurotrophin Receptor p75 in Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rahimi Balaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutation in the lysosomal acid phosphatase 2 (Acp2 mouse (nax—naked-ataxia mutant mouse correlates with severe cerebellar defects including ataxia, reduced size and abnormal lobulation as well as Purkinje cell (Pc degeneration. Loss of Pcs in the nax cerebellum is compartmentalized and harmonized to the classic pattern of gene expression of the cerebellum in the wild type mouse. Usually, degeneration starts in the anterior and posterior zones and continues to the central and nodular zones of cerebellum. Studies have suggested that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (NTR plays a role in Pc degeneration; thus, in this study, we investigated the p75NTR pattern and protein expression in the cerebellum of the nax mutant mouse. Despite massive Pc degeneration that was observed in the nax mouse cerebellum, p75NTR pattern expression was similar to the HSP25 pattern in nax mice and comparable with wild type sibling cerebellum. In addition, immunoblot analysis of p75NTR protein expression did not show any significant difference between nax and wild type sibling (p > 0.5. In comparison with wild type counterparts, p75NTR pattern expression is aligned with the fundamental cytoarchitecture organization of the cerebellum and is unchanged in the nax mouse cerebellum despite the severe neurodevelopmental disorder accompanied with Pc degeneration.

  12. Selective loss of Purkinje cells in a patient with anti-gliadin-antibody-positive autoimmune cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasegawa Akira

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The patient was an 84-year-old woman who had the onset of truncal ataxia at age 77 and a history of Basedow's disease. Her ataxic gait gradually deteriorated. She could not walk without support at age 81 and she was admitted to our hospital at age 83. Gaze-evoked nystagmus and dysarthria were observed. Mild ataxia was observed in all limbs. Her deep tendon reflex and sense of position were normal. IgA anti-gliadin antibody, IgG anti-gliadin antibody, anti-SS-A/Ro antibody, anti-SS-B/La antibody and anti-TPO antibody were positive. A conventional brain MRI did not show obvious cerebellar atrophy. However, MRI voxel based morphometry (VBM and SPECT-eZIS revealed cortical cerebellar atrophy and reduced cerebellar blood flow. IVIg treatment was performed and was moderately effective. After her death at age 85, the patient was autopsied. Neuropathological findings were as follows: selective loss of Purkinje cells; no apparent degenerative change in the efferent pathways, such as the dentate nuclei or vestibular nuclei; no prominent inflammatory reaction. From these findings, we diagnosed this case as autoimmune cerebellar atrophy associated with gluten ataxia. All 3 autopsies previously reported on gluten ataxia have noted infiltration of inflammatory cells in the cerebellum. In this case, we postulated that the infiltration of inflammatory cells was not found because the patient's condition was based on humoral immunity. The clinical conditions of gluten ataxia have not yet been properly elucidated, but are expected to be revealed as the number of autopsied cases increases.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation ameliorates motor function deterioration of spinocerebellar ataxia by rescuing cerebellar Purkinje cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Wei-Hsien

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA refers to a disease entity in which polyglutamine aggregates are over-produced in Purkinje cells (PCs of the cerebellum as well as other neurons in the central nervous system, and the formation of intracellular polyglutamine aggregates result in the loss of neurons as well as deterioration of motor functions. So far there is no effective neuroprotective treatment for this debilitating disease although numerous efforts have been made. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs possess multi-lineage differentiation potentials as well as immuno-modulatory properties, and are theoretically good candidates for SCA treatment. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether transplantation of human MSCs (hMSCs can rescue cerebellar PCs and ameliorate motor function deterioration in SCA in a pre-clinical animal model. Method Transgenic mice bearing poly-glutamine mutation in ataxin-2 gene (C57BL/6J SCA2 transgenic mice were serially transplanted with hMSCs intravenously or intracranially before and after the onset of motor function loss. Motor function of mice was evaluated by an accelerating protocol of rotarod test every 8 weeks. Immunohistochemical stain of whole brain sections was adopted to demonstrate the neuroprotective effect of hMSC transplantation on cerebellar PCs and engraftment of hMSCs into mice brain. Results Intravenous transplantation of hMSCs effectively improved rotarod performance of SCA2 transgenic mice and delayed the onset of motor function deterioration; while intracranial transplantation failed to achieve such neuroprotective effect. Immunohistochemistry revealed that intravenous transplantation was more effective in the preservation of the survival of cerebellar PCs and engraftment of hMSCs than intracranial injection, which was compatible to rotarod performance of transplanted mice. Conclusion Intravenous transplantation of hMSCs can indeed delay the onset as well as improve the motor

  14. Mapping of the SCA23 locus involved in autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia to chromosome region 20p13-12.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, D S; van de Warrenburg, B P; Wesseling, P; Pearson, P L; Kremer, H P; Sinke, R J

    2004-01-01

    We report upon a Dutch autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) family, clinically characterized by a late-onset (>40 years), slowly progressive, isolated spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). Neuropathological examination in one affected subject showed neuronal loss in the Purkinje cell layer, dentate n

  15. Familial periodic cerebellar ataxia without myokymia maps to a 19-cM region on 19p13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teh, B.T.; Lindblad, K.; Betz, R. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Switzerland)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Familial periodic cerebellar ataxia (FPCA) is a heterogenous group of rare autosomal dominant disorders characterized by episodic cerebellar disturbance. A potassium-channel gene (KCNA1) has been found to be responsible for one of its subgroups, familial periodic cerebellar ataxia with myokymia (FPCA/+M; MIM 160120). A different subgroup that is not associated with myokymia (FPCA/-M; MIM 108500) was recently mapped to chromosome 19p. Here we have performed linkage analysis in two large families with FPCA/-M that also demonstrated neurodegenerative pathology of the cerebellum. Three markers in 19p13 gave significant lod scores (>3.0), while linkage to KCNA1 and three known loci for spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA1, SCA2, and SCA3) was excluded. The highest lod score was obtained with the marker D19S413 (4.4 at recombination fraction 0), and identification of meiotic recombinants in affected individuals placed the locus between the flanking markers D19S406 and D19S226, narrowing the interval to 19 cM. A CAG trinucleotide-repeat expansion was detected in one family but did not consegregate with the disease. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The 3-second rule in hereditary pure cerebellar ataxia: a synchronized tapping study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunichi Matsuda

    Full Text Available The '3-second rule' has been proposed based on miscellaneous observations that a time period of around 3 seconds constitutes the fundamental unit of time related to the neuro-cognitive machinery in normal humans. The aim of paper was to investigate the temporal processing in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6 and SCA31, pure cerebellar types of spinocerebellar degeneration, using a synchronized tapping task. Seventeen SCA patients (11 SCA6, 6 SCA31 and 17 normal age-matched volunteers participated. The task required subjects to tap a keyboard in synchrony with sequences of auditory stimuli presented at fixed interstimulus intervals (ISIs between 200 and 4800 ms. In this task, the subjects required non-motor components to estimate the time of forthcoming tone in addition to motor components to tap. Normal subjects synchronized their taps to the presented tones at shorter ISIs, whereas as the ISI became longer, the normal subjects displayed greater latency between the tone and the tapping (transition zone. After the transition zone, normal subjects pressed the button delayed relative to the tone. On the other hand, SCA patients could not synchronize their tapping with the tone even at shorter ISIs, although they pressed the button delayed relative to the tone earlier than normal subjects did. The earliest time of delayed tapping appearance after the transition zone was 4800 ms in normal subjects but 1800 ms in SCA patients. The span of temporal integration in SCA patients is shortened compared to that in normal subjects. This could represent non-motor cerebellar dysfunction in SCA patients.

  17. Pelagra endógena e ataxia cerebelar sem aminoacidúria: doença de Hartnup? Endogenous pellagra and cerebellar ataxia without aminoaciduria: Hartnup disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Possati Resende

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Menino, 7 anos, com história de convulsão, hiperpigmentação cutânea em áreas de exposição solar e episódios recorrentes de ataxia cerebelar. Estabelecido diagnóstico clínico de doença de Hartnup, foi tratado com nicotinamida, com melhora. Análises não confirmaram aminoacidúria ou outras alterações metabólicas. Na doença de Hartnup ocorre defeito no transporte renal e intestinal de aminoácidos neutros, reduzindo triptofano disponível para produção de niacina. Cursa com ataxia cerebelar intermitente, erupções cutâneas pelagróides e distúrbios mentais. Aminoacidúria em cromatografia urinária confirma diagnóstico, porém são descritos casos compatíveis com doença de Hartnup sem aminoacidúria.A seven-year-old boy with history of convulsion, cutaneous hyperpigmentation in sun-exposed areas and recurrent episodes of cerebellar ataxia is presented. Once established the clinical diagnosis of Hartnup disease, treatment with nicotinamide was started, with improvement. Laboratorial results did not confirm aminoaciduria nor other identified metabolic changes. In Hartnup disease, defective renal and intestinal transport of neutral amino acids occurrs, resulting in reduction of tryptophan to produce to nicotinamide. Symptomatic cases present with intermittent episodes of cerebellar ataxia, pellagra-like skin rash and mental disturbances. Urinary chromatographic amino acid pattern confirms diagnosis; however, cases compatible with Hartnup disease, but without aminoaciduria, have been reported.

  18. Clinical spectrum of early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes: an autosomal recessive ataxia not to be missed Espectro clínico da ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos: uma ataxia autossômica recessiva para não ser esquecida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Pedroso

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders. In 1981, a neurological entity comprised by early onset progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, pyramidal weakness of the limbs and retained or increased upper limb reflexes and knee jerks was described. This disorder is known as early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes. In this article, we aimed to call attention for the diagnosis of early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes as the second most common cause of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias, after Friedreich ataxia, and also to perform a clinical spectrum study of this syndrome. In this data, 12 patients from different families met all clinical features for early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes. Dysarthria and cerebellar atrophy were the most common features in our sample. It is uncertain, however, whether early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes is a homogeneous disease or a group of phenotypically similar syndromes represented by different genetic entities. Further molecular studies are required to provide definitive answers to the questions that remain regarding early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes.As ataxias cerebelares autossômicas recessivas são um grupo heterogêneo de doenças neurológicas. Em 1981, foi descrita uma entidade neurológica incluindo ataxia cerebelar progressiva de início precoce, disartria, liberação piramidal e manutenção ou aumento dos reflexos tendíneos nos membros superiores e inferiores. Essa síndrome é conhecida como ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos. Neste artigo, o objetivo foi chamar a atenção para o diagnóstico de ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos como a segunda causa mais comum de ataxia cerebelar autossômica recessiva, após a ataxia de Friedreich, e também realizar um estudo do espectro cl

  19. Ataxias cerebelares hereditárias: do martelo ao gen Hereditary cerebellar ataxias from neurological hammer to genetics

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    Walter Oleschko Arruda

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available As heredoataxias constituem grupo complexo de doenças neurodegenerativas hereditárias, para o qual várias formas de classificação clínica e patológica foram propostas com sucesso variável. O desenvolvimento das técnicas de biologia molecular trouxe informações importantes que têm permitido caracterizar geneticamente as ataxias cerebelares hereditárias. O reconhecimento das doenças causadas por expansões de trinucleotídeos abre novo capítulo para a pesquisa sobre outros mecanismos de doenças, como na ataxia de Friedreich e nas várias formas de ataxia cerebelar autossômica dominante(SCAl a SCA7, das quais a doença de Machado-Joseph / SCA3 parece ser a mais comum no nosso meio. A deficiência familial de vitamina E (cromossomo 8q leva a quadro semelhante ao da ataxia de Friedreich (cromossomo 9p, mas responde à reposição oral de tocoferol. Formas familiais de ataxia periódica com (cromossomo 12p ou sem (cromossomo 19p mioquimia foram caracterizadas, a primeira resultado de mutações dos gens de canais de potássio. Os portadores do gen da ataxia-teleangiectasia (cromossomo 1 lq representam 1-3% da população e são suscetíveis aos efeitos oncogênicos da radiação iônica. Sem olvidar da importância da avaliação clínica neurológica, a avaliação genética laboratorial passa a ser valiosa ferramenta para o diagnóstico e aconselhamento genético, além do melhor entendimento da patogênese dessas doenças.The hereditary ataxias comprise a complex group of neurological disorders involving the cerebellum and its connections. Several classifications based on clinical and/or pathological data have been only partially successful. Recent progress in molecular genetics has identified the genic loci of hereditary ataxias and has allowed a more precise diagnosis of distinct genetic diseases. Trinucleotide repeat expansions has been recognized as a mechanism of disease in some autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (ADCA

  20. Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, Sara; Singh, Piyush K; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2013-01-01

    The approach to the child with ataxia requires a detailed history and careful general and neurological examination as well as selected blood work and brain imaging and increasingly available genetic testing for inherited ataxias that usually have an episodic or progressive presentation. The differential of acute and recurring ataxia covered in this chapter includes intoxication (e.g., antiepileptics, lead, alcohol), postinfectious cerebellitis, hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, tumor (posterior fossa or cerebellum), brainstem encephalitis, occult neuroblastoma, Miller Fisher syndrome, conversion reaction, multiple sclerosis, epileptic pseudoataxia, vasculitis (e.g., Kawasaki), metabolic etiologies (e.g., maple syrup urine disease, pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, biotinidase deficiency, Hartnup disease, and argininosuccinic aciduria), migraine, migraine equivalents (benign paroxysmal positional vertigo), autosomal dominant episodic ataxias (with seven types currently identified), and hypothyroidism. Cooperation with therapists and providers from other specialties including ophthalmology and genetics and metabolism is essential to caring for these children and their families. PMID:23622331

  1. Rapid Onset of Motor Deficits in a Mouse Model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 Precedes Late Cerebellar Degeneration 1,2,3

    OpenAIRE

    Jayabal, Sriram; Ljungberg, Lovisa; Erwes, Thomas; Cormier, Alexander; Quilez, Sabrina; El Jaouhari, Sara; Watt, Alanna J

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal-dominant cerebellar ataxia that has been associated with loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Disease onset is typically at midlife, although it can vary widely from late teens to old age in SCA6 patients. Our study focused on an SCA6 knock-in mouse model with a hyper-expanded (84X) CAG repeat expansion that displays midlife-onset motor deficits at ∼7 months old, reminiscent of midlife-onset symptoms in SCA6 patients, although a deta...

  2. Clinical Analysis of 13 Cases with Cerebellar Ataxia%小脑性共济失调13例病例报道

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施韵; 干静; 陈伟; 刘振国

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨以进行性小脑性共济失调为主要临床症状的疾病诊断.方法:回顾性分析13例以慢性进行性小脑共济失调为主要临床表现患者的临床资料、实验室、影像学和基因检查结果.结果:13例患者中,脊髓小脑性共济失调3例,多系统萎缩-小脑型6例,小脑肿瘤1例,桥小脑结合臂脓肿1例,小脑梗死后遗症2例.结论:对于以进行性小脑共济失调为主要体征的患者,临床上首先要排除占位性病变,其次多系统萎缩和脊髓小脑性共济失调为主要的遗传变性病因.%Aim: To investigate the diagnosis for the diseases that present with progressive cerebellar ataxia Methods : The data of 13 cases manifesting with cerebellar ataxia as a main clinical feature, including clinical data laboratory data and images, were analyzed. Results: Among 13 cases, 3 cases were spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) , 6 cases MSA with predominant cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C) , 1 case cerebellar tumor, 1 case pontocerebellar brachium abscess and 2 cases with sequela of cerebellar infarction. Conclusion : For the patients with cerebellar ataxia as the main signs, space-occupying lesions should be first excluded. And then MSA and SCA may be the main degenerative and genetic causes.

  3. Brain pathology of spinocerebellar ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, Kay; Siswanto, Sonny; Brunt, Ewout R. P.; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Korf, Horst-Werner; Rueb, Udo

    2012-01-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCAs) represent a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases with progressive ataxia and cerebellar degeneration. The current classification of this disease group is based on the underlying genetic defects and their typical disease courses. Accordin

  4. A novel c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation in Senataxin in a Cypriot family with an autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia

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    Zamba-Papanicolaou Eleni

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senataxin (chromosome 9q34 was recently identified as the causative gene for an autosomal recessive form of Ataxia (ARCA, termed as Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia, type 2 (AOA2 and characterized by generalized incoordination, cerebellar atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, "oculomotor apraxia" and increased alpha-fetoprotein (AFP. Here, we report a novel Senataxin mutation in a Cypriot ARCA family. Methods We studied several Cypriot autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA families for linkage to known ARCA gene loci. We linked one family (909 to the SETX locus on chromosome 9q34 and screened the proband for mutations by direct sequencing. Results Sequence analysis revealed a novel c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation in exon 11 of the SETX gene. The mutation has not been detected in 204 control chromosomes from the Cypriot population, the remaining Cypriot ARCA families and 37 Cypriot sporadic cerebellar ataxia patients. Conclusion We identified a novel SETX homozygous c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation that co-segregates with ARCA with cerebellar atrophy and raised AFP.

  5. An early-onset recessive cerebellar disorder with distal amyotrophy and, in two patients, gross myoclonia: A probable ataxia telangiectasia variant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. de Graaf (A.); G. de Jong (G.); W.J. Kleijer (Wim)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe report a family of 4 siblings from a non-consanguineous marriage, presenting with an early onset recessive cerebellar ataxia and progressive distal limb wasting. Ocular or other telangiectasias were absent. There were neither frequent infections nor immunodeficiencies. The two younges

  6. A SEL1L mutation links a canine progressive early-onset cerebellar ataxia to the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD machinery.

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    Kaisa Kyöstilä

    Full Text Available Inherited ataxias are characterized by degeneration of the cerebellar structures, which results in progressive motor incoordination. Hereditary ataxias occur in many species, including humans and dogs. Several mutations have been found in humans, but the genetic background has remained elusive in dogs. The Finnish Hound suffers from an early-onset progressive cerebellar ataxia. We have performed clinical, pathological, and genetic studies to describe the disease phenotype and to identify its genetic cause. Neurological examinations on ten affected dogs revealed rapidly progressing generalized cerebellar ataxia, tremors, and failure to thrive. Clinical signs were present by the age of 3 months, and cerebellar shrinkage was detectable through MRI. Pathological and histological examinations indicated cerebellum-restricted neurodegeneration. Marked loss of Purkinje cells was detected in the cerebellar cortex with secondary changes in other cortical layers. A genome-wide association study in a cohort of 31 dogs mapped the ataxia gene to a 1.5 Mb locus on canine chromosome 8 (p(raw = 1.1x10(-7, p(genome = 7.5x10(-4. Sequencing of a functional candidate gene, sel-1 suppressor of lin-12-like (SEL1L, revealed a homozygous missense mutation, c.1972T>C; p.Ser658Pro, in a highly conserved protein domain. The mutation segregated fully in the recessive pedigree, and a 10% carrier frequency was indicated in a population cohort. SEL1L is a component of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD machinery and has not been previously associated to inherited ataxias. Dysfunctional protein degradation is known to cause ER stress, and we found a significant increase in expression of nine ER stress responsive genes in the cerebellar cortex of affected dogs, supporting the pathogenicity of the mutation. Our study describes the first early-onset neurodegenerative ataxia mutation in dogs, establishes an ERAD-mediated neurodegenerative

  7. Population-based study of acquired cerebellar ataxia in Al-Kharga district, New Valley, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Farghaly WMA; El-Tallawy HN; Shehata GA; Rageh TA; Abdel Hakeem N; Abo-Elfetoh NM

    2011-01-01

    Wafaa MA Farghaly1, Hamdy N El-Tallawy1, Ghaydaa A Shehata1, Tarek A Rageh1, Nabil Abdel Hakeem2, Noha M Abo-Elfetoh11Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt; 2Al Azhar University, Assiut Branch, EgyptBackground: The aim of this research was to determine the prevalence and etiology of acquired ataxia in Al-Kharga district, New Valley, Egypt.Methods: A population-based study of acquired ataxia was conducted in a defined geographical region with a total populati...

  8. An early-onset recessive cerebellar disorder with distal amyotrophy and, in two patients, gross myoclonia: A probable ataxia telangiectasia variant

    OpenAIRE

    Graaf, A. de; De Jong, G; Kleijer, Wim

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe report a family of 4 siblings from a non-consanguineous marriage, presenting with an early onset recessive cerebellar ataxia and progressive distal limb wasting. Ocular or other telangiectasias were absent. There were neither frequent infections nor immunodeficiencies. The two youngest patients exhibited an incapacitating myoclonus which abated markedly after 20 years. Late onset diabetes was demonstrated in 3 patients. Hypogonadism was not a feature and there was a prolonged s...

  9. 遗传性小脑共济失调的MRI表现附2个家系报告%MRI Findings of Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董江宁; 刘啸峰; 马力

    2004-01-01

    遗传性小脑共济失调(hereditary cerebellar ataxia,HCA),又称遗传性痉挛性共济失调(hereditary spastic ataxia,HSA),属介于脊髓型至脑干小脑型及小脑型之间的遗传性共济失调(hereditary ataxia,HA),包括Sanger-Brown型、橄榄桥脑小脑萎缩(olivopontocerebellar atrophy,

  10. Cerebellar Hypoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorders that begin in early childhood, such as ataxia telangiectasia. In an infant or young child, symptoms of a disorder that features cerebellar hypoplasia might include floppy muscle tone, developmental or ...

  11. More falls in cerebellar ataxia when standing on a slow up-moving tilt of the support surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    PAQUETTE, Caroline; FRANZÉN, Erika; HORAK, Fay B

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how subjects with cerebellar ataxia (CA) adapt their postural stability and alignment to a slow and small tilt of the support surface allowing for online postural corrections. Eight subjects with CA and eight age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects participated in the study. Subjects stood eyes closed for 1 minute after which the support surface was tilted 5° toes-up at a ramp velocity of 1°/s. The toes-up position was held for 2.5 minutes after which the surface rotated back down to level with identical tilt characteristics. As reflected by the large number of falls, subjects with CA had marked difficulty adapting their posture to the up-moving incline in contrast to control subjects. Subjects with CA who lost their balance had faster trunk velocity and excessive backward trunk reorientation beginning within the first second after onset of the tilting surface. In contrast, the down-moving tilt to level did not result in instability in CA subjects. These results suggest that instability and falls associated with CA derives from an inability to maintain trunk orientation to vertical while standing on a slow-moving or unstable surface. This study underscores the importance of the cerebellum in the online sensory control of the upper body orientation during small amplitude and slow velocity movements of the support surface. PMID:26202671

  12. More Falls in Cerebellar Ataxia When Standing on a Slow Up-Moving Tilt of the Support Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Caroline; Franzén, Erika; Horak, Fay B

    2016-06-01

    We investigated how subjects with cerebellar ataxia (CA) adapt their postural stability and alignment to a slow and small tilt of the support surface allowing for online postural corrections. Eight subjects with CA and eight age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects participated in the study. Subjects stood eyes closed for 1 min after which the support surface was tilted 5° toes-up at a ramp velocity of 1°/s. The toes-up position was held for 2.5 min after which the surface rotated back down to level with identical tilt characteristics. As reflected by the large number of falls, subjects with CA had marked difficulty adapting their posture to the up-moving incline in contrast to control subjects. Subjects with CA who lost their balance had faster trunk velocity and excessive backward trunk reorientation beginning within the first second after onset of the tilting surface. In contrast, the down-moving tilt to level did not result in instability in CA subjects. These results suggest that instability and falls associated with CA derive from an inability to maintain trunk orientation to vertical while standing on a slow-moving or unstable surface. This study underscores the importance of the cerebellum in the online sensory control of the upper body orientation during small amplitude and slow velocity movements of the support surface. PMID:26202671

  13. Two new cases of anti-Ca (anti-ARHGAP26/GRAF autoantibody-associated cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarius Sven

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently, we discovered a novel serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF autoantibody (anti-Ca to Purkinje cells in a patient with autoimmune cerebellar ataxia (ACA and identified the RhoGTPase-activating protein 26 (ARHGAP26; alternative designations include GTPase regulator associated with focal adhesion kinase pp125, GRAF, and oligophrenin-1-like protein, OPHN1L as the target antigen. Here, we report on two new cases of ARHGAP26 autoantibody-positive ACA that were first diagnosed after publication of the index case study. While the index patient developed ACA following an episode of respiratory infection with still no evidence for malignancy 52 months after onset, neurological symptoms heralded ovarian cancer in one of the patients described here. Our finding of anti-Ca/anti-ARHGAP26 antibodies in two additional patients supports a role of autoimmunity against ARHGAP26 in the pathogenesis of ACA. Moreover, the finding of ovarian cancer in one of our patients suggests that anti-Ca/anti-ARHGAP26-positive ACA might be of paraneoplastic aetiology in some cases. In conclusion, testing for anti-Ca/anti-ARHGAP26 should be included in the diagnostic work-up of patients with ACA, and an underlying tumour should be considered in patients presenting with anti-Ca/ARHGAP26 antibody-positive ACA.

  14. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 14 (SCA14)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SCA14) is one of those types of hereditary cerebellar ataxias. The involved gene, discovered in 2003, is located ... evaluation by a physician makes the diagnosis of cerebellar ataxia. A CT or MRI scan of the brain ...

  15. 丁螺环酮治疗小脑性共济失调%The Treatment of Cerebellar Ataxia with Buspirone Hydrochloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邬剑军; 蒋雨平

    2001-01-01

    目的:探讨5-HT1A受体激动剂丁螺环酮改善共济失调症状的作用。方法:应用评分计分法观察丁螺环酮治疗24例共济失调患者3个月。结果:治疗前后共济失调评分,包括稳定性、协调性、构音、眼球运动各方面的差异均有显著意义(P0.05)。结论:丁螺环酮短期内可以有效地改善患者小脑性共济失调的症状。%Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of buspirone hydrochloride, a serotonin (5-hydroxytrypamine1A) agonist, in treating patients with cerebellar ataxia. Methods:Open-table study in which 24 patients received buspimne hydrochloride for three months. Results:All who completed the study showed significant improvement in ataxia rating scale, including stability, coordination, articulation, ocular movement, but not in the Hamilton anxiety scale. Conclusion:Short-term treatment with buspirone hydrochloride can improve the symptoms of patients with cerebellar ataxia.

  16. Early-onset Purkinje cell dysfunction underlies cerebellar ataxia in peroxisomal multifunctional protein-2 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munter, Stephanie; Verheijden, Simon; Vanderstuyft, Esther; Malheiro, Ana Rita; Brites, Pedro; Gall, David; Schiffmann, Serge N; Baes, Myriam

    2016-10-01

    The cerebellar pathologies in peroxisomal diseases underscore that these organelles are required for the normal development and maintenance of the cerebellum, but the mechanisms have not been resolved. Here we investigated the origins of the early-onset coordination impairment in a mouse model with neural selective deficiency of multifunctional protein-2, the central enzyme of peroxisomal β-oxidation. At the age of 4weeks, Nestin-Mfp2(-/-) mice showed impaired motor learning on the accelerating rotarod and underperformed on the balance beam test. The gross morphology of the cerebellum and Purkinje cell arborization were normal. However, electrophysiology revealed a reduced Purkinje cell firing rate, a decreased excitability and an increased membrane capacitance. The distribution of climbing and parallel fiber synapses on Purkinje cells was immature and was accompanied by an increased spine length. Despite normal myelination, Purkinje cell axon degeneration was evident from the occurrence of axonal swellings containing accumulated organelles. In conclusion, the electrical activity, axonal integrity and wiring of Purkinje cells are exquisitely dependent on intact peroxisomal β-oxidation in neural cells. PMID:27353294

  17. Ocular-motor profile and effects of memantine in a familial form of adult cerebellar ataxia with slow saccades and square wave saccadic intrusions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Rosini

    Full Text Available Fixation instability due to saccadic intrusions is a feature of autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxias, and includes square wave intrusions (SWI and macrosaccadic oscillations (MSO. A recent report suggested that the non-competitive antagonist of NMDA receptors, memantine, could decrease MSO and improve fixation in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia with saccadic intrusions (SCASI. We similarly tested two sisters, respectively of 58 and 60 years, with an unrecognized form of recessive, adult-onset cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy and slow saccades, who showed prominent SWI and also complained with difficulty in reading. We tested horizontal visually guided saccades (10°-18° and three minutes of steady fixation in each patient and in thirty healthy controls. Both patients showed a significant reduction of peak and mean velocity compared with control subjects. Large SWI interrupting steady fixation were prominent during steady fixation and especially following visually guided saccades. Eye movements were recorded before and during the treatment with memantine, 20 mg/daily for 6 months. The treatment with memantine reduced both the magnitude and frequency of SWI (the former significantly, but did not modified neurological conditions or saccade parameters. Thus, our report suggests that memantine may have some general suppressive effect on saccadic intrusions, including both SWI and MSO, thereby restoring the capacity of reading and visual attention in these and in other recessive forms of ataxia, including Friedreich's, in which saccadic intrusions are prominent.

  18. “Hot cross bun” sign in multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia: A comparison between proton density-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate whether proton density-weighted imaging can detect the “hot cross bun” sign in the pons in multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia significantly better than T2-weighted imaging at 3 T. Methods: Sixteen consecutive patients with multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia according to the Consensus Criteria were reviewed. Axial unenhanced proton density-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging were obtained using a dual-echo fast spin-echo sequence at 3 T. Two neuroradiologists independently evaluated visualisation of the abnormal pontine signal using a 4-point visual grade from Grade 0 (no “hot cross bun” sign) to Grade 3 (prominent “hot cross bun” sign on two or more sequential slices). Differences in grade between proton density-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging were statistically analysed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: In 11 patients (69%), a higher grade was given for proton density-weighted imaging than T2-weighted imaging. In 1 patient (6%), grades were the same (Grade 3) on both images. In the remaining 4 patients (25%), signal abnormalities were not detected on either image (Grade 0). The “hot cross bun” sign was thus observed significantly better on proton density-weighted imaging than on T2-weighted imaging (P = 0.001). Conclusions: The “hot cross bun” sign considered diagnostic for multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia is significantly better visualised on proton density-weighted imaging than on T2-weighted imaging at 3 T

  19. “Hot cross bun” sign in multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia: A comparison between proton density-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasahara, Seiko, E-mail: nuun077@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Miki, Yukio, E-mail: yukio.miki@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Department of Radiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545–8585 (Japan); Kanagaki, Mitsunori, E-mail: mitsuk@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kondo, Takayuki, E-mail: kondotak@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Yamamoto, Akira, E-mail: yakira@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Morimoto, Emiko, E-mail: foresta@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Okada, Tomohisa, E-mail: tomokada@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ito, Hidefumi, E-mail: itohid@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Takahashi, Ryosuke, E-mail: ryosuket@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); and others

    2012-10-15

    Objective: To investigate whether proton density-weighted imaging can detect the “hot cross bun” sign in the pons in multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia significantly better than T2-weighted imaging at 3 T. Methods: Sixteen consecutive patients with multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia according to the Consensus Criteria were reviewed. Axial unenhanced proton density-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging were obtained using a dual-echo fast spin-echo sequence at 3 T. Two neuroradiologists independently evaluated visualisation of the abnormal pontine signal using a 4-point visual grade from Grade 0 (no “hot cross bun” sign) to Grade 3 (prominent “hot cross bun” sign on two or more sequential slices). Differences in grade between proton density-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging were statistically analysed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: In 11 patients (69%), a higher grade was given for proton density-weighted imaging than T2-weighted imaging. In 1 patient (6%), grades were the same (Grade 3) on both images. In the remaining 4 patients (25%), signal abnormalities were not detected on either image (Grade 0). The “hot cross bun” sign was thus observed significantly better on proton density-weighted imaging than on T2-weighted imaging (P = 0.001). Conclusions: The “hot cross bun” sign considered diagnostic for multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia is significantly better visualised on proton density-weighted imaging than on T2-weighted imaging at 3 T.

  20. Whole-genome sequencing identifies a novel ABCB7 gene mutation for X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia in a large family of Mongolian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protasova, Maria S; Grigorenko, Anastasia P; Tyazhelova, Tatiana V; Andreeva, Tatiana V; Reshetov, Denis A; Gusev, Fedor E; Laptenko, Alexander E; Kuznetsova, Irina L; Goltsov, Andrey Y; Klyushnikov, Sergey A; Illarioshkin, Sergey N; Rogaev, Evgeny I

    2016-04-01

    X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia is a heterogeneous nonprogressive neurodevelopmental disorder with onset in early childhood. We searched for a genetic cause of this condition, previously reported in a Buryat pedigree of Mongolian ancestry from southeastern Russia. Using whole-genome sequencing on Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, we found a missense mutation in the ABCB7 (ABC-binding cassette transporter B7) gene, encoding a mitochondrial transporter, involved in heme synthesis and previously associated with sideroblastic anemia and ataxia. The mutation resulting in a substitution of a highly conserved glycine to serine in position 682 is apparently a major causative factor of the cerebellar hypoplasia/atrophy found in affected individuals of a Buryat family who had no evidence of sideroblastic anemia. Moreover, in these affected men we also found the genetic defects in two other genes closely linked to ABCB7 on chromosome X: a deletion of a genomic region harboring the second exon of copper-transporter gene (ATP7A) and a complete deletion of PGAM4 (phosphoglycerate mutase family member 4) retrogene located in the intronic region of the ATP7A gene. Despite the deletion, eliminating the first of six metal-binding domains in ATP7A, no signs for Menkes disease or occipital horn syndrome associated with ATP7A mutations were found in male carriers. The role of the PGAM4 gene has been previously implicated in human reproduction, but our data indicate that its complete loss does not disrupt male fertility. Our finding links cerebellar pathology to the genetic defect in ABCB7 and ATP7A structural variant inherited as X-linked trait, and further reveals the genetic heterogeneity of X-linked cerebellar disorders. PMID:26242992

  1. 儿童慢性小脑共济失调15例%Clinical analysis of 15 cases with childhood chronic cerebellar ataxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李素云; 钱旭光; 赵勇; 赵伊黎; 辛晶; 刘振寰

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the diagnosis of the diseases that presented with childhood chronic cerebellar ataxia.Method The clinical data of 15 children with chronic cerebellar ataxia were studied,including the clinical features,laboratory results and neuroimaging aspect.Results Of the 15 children with chronic cerebellar ataxia,3 cases had chronic progressive cerebellar ataxia diagnosed as ataxia telangiectasia,and neuroimaging finding that indicated mild to marked cerebellar atrophy.The others 12 cases had non-progressive cerebellar ataxia,2 cases of them had Joubert syndrome,characterized by delayed motor function and speech,lower limbs ataxia and cerebellar vermis hypoplasia; 10 cases had ataxic cerebral palsy with delayed motor skills,9 of them had mental retardation and verbal problem.Of the 10 children with ataxic cerebral palsy,7 cases had cerebellar hemispheric atrophy by computer tomography (CT) or MRI,while the other 3 cases had no positive finding in cerebellum by MRI,but 2 of whom were found reduced metabolism in cerebellar neuron during the test of positron emission tomography and CT.Comparson with the scores in the gross motor function measure (GMFM) and developmental quotient (DQ) of 5 domains (adaption,gross motor,fine motor,language and social development) in Gesell developmental Schedules before and after the rehabilitation approach:the totaI scores in GMFM after the treatment (56.42 ± 15.65) was significantly higher than that of before traatment (44.15 ±20.41) (t =-3.121,P <0.05),while the DQ of gross motor after the treatment (28.27 ± 14.65) was sigrificantly lower than that before treatment (35.23 ± 17.23) (t =2.75,P < 0.05).The other 4 domains before the treatment were 37.47 ± 14.47,37.06 ± 11.51,40.69 ± 12.10 and 40.41 ± 15.79,and had no remarkable change after the treatment (39.44 ±16.29,35.96 ±10.76,40.26 ±14.20 and 38.61± 11.95) (allP>0.05).Conclusions Children with chronic cerebellar ataxia presented as hypotonia with

  2. 3-羟基丁酸尿症伴小脑性共济失调病例报告%A Case Report of 3-Hydroxybutyric Aciduria with Cerebellar Ataxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓鹏; 曹韦; 周小平; 蒋雨平

    2015-01-01

    Aim To report a case of 3-hydroxybutyric aciduria with cerebellar ataxia. Methods A case of 3-hydroxybutyric aciduria with cerebellar ataxia as initial manifestations was collectedand and reviewed. Results The case was a adult femalepatient,who was examined and found signs of cerebellar ataxia and high levels of 3-hydroxybutyric acid, acetylacetate, 2-keto-3-methypentanoate, 2-keto-isocaproate in acid. Conclusion The patient was diagnosed 3-hydroxybutyric aciduria with cerebellar ataxia.%目的:报告3-羟基丁酸尿症伴小脑性共济失调的病例。方法收集以共济失调为首发症状的3-羟基丁酸尿症患者的临床资料,结合文献复习进行分析。结果3-羟基丁酸尿症患者经临床体检发现有小脑共济失调的体征和尿中3-羟基丁酸、乙酰乙酸、2-酮-3-甲基戊酸、2-酮-异己酸显著升高。结论发现1例3-羟基丁酸尿症伴小脑性共济失调病例。

  3. Pelagra endógena e ataxia cerebelar sem aminoacidúria: doença de Hartnup? Endogenous pellagra and cerebellar ataxia without aminoaciduria: Hartnup disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Júlio César Possati Resende; Leonardo Rodrigues de Oliveira; Luciano Carvalho Dias; Lívia das Graças Vieito L. Teodoro; Luciano Borges Santiago

    2006-01-01

    Menino, 7 anos, com história de convulsão, hiperpigmentação cutânea em áreas de exposição solar e episódios recorrentes de ataxia cerebelar. Estabelecido diagnóstico clínico de doença de Hartnup, foi tratado com nicotinamida, com melhora. Análises não confirmaram aminoacidúria ou outras alterações metabólicas. Na doença de Hartnup ocorre defeito no transporte renal e intestinal de aminoácidos neutros, reduzindo triptofano disponível para produção de niacina. Cursa com ataxia cerebelar intermi...

  4. Effects of different treatments on cerebellar ataxia induced by acute cerebellar infarction.Chen%不同方法治疗急性小脑梗塞后小脑共济失调的疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国梁; 陈晓明

    2014-01-01

    目的:比较不同方法治疗急性小脑梗塞后小脑共济失调的疗效。方法:将我院确诊的急性小脑梗塞后小脑共济失调患者80例随机分为以下四组,每组20例。 A组:常规药物治疗组(补充B族维生素、胞二磷胆碱、抗血小板药物和对症支持治疗);B组:常规药物治疗组+功能性电刺激;C组:常规药物治疗组+作业疗法;D组:常规药物治疗组+功能性电刺激+作业疗法。结果:B组、C组和D组的疗效明显高于A组(P<0.05);D组的疗效最为明显,高于其他三组(P<0.05)。结论:单独或联合使用功能性电刺激和/或作业疗法治疗急性小脑梗塞后小脑共济失调的疗效明显高于常规药物组,而联合使用功能性电刺激和作业疗法的治疗效果最为明显。%Objective:To compare the efficacy of different treatments, such as routine drug therapy, functional electrical stimulation and occupational therapy ,on cerebellar ataxia induced by acute cerebellar infarction. Methods:Eighty patients with cerebellar ataxia induced by acute cerebellar infarction were divided into 4 different groups with 20 each: group A: routine drug therapy including Vitamin B, cytoplasmic two choline, antiplatelet drugs and supportive treatment;group B:routine drug therapy and functional electrical stimulation;group C: routine drug therapy and occupational therapy; group D: routine drug therapy, functional electrical stimulation and occupational therapy. Results:Effects of group B, C and D were significantly higher than that in group A(P<0.05);group C and D were not statistically significant difference;effect of group D was the most obvious, higher than the other three groups (P<0.05). Conclusion:Efficacy of single or combined use of functional electrical stimulation and/or occupational therapy in the treatment of acute cerebellar infarction cerebellar ataxia was obviously higher than that of routine drug therapy. And the

  5. 不同方法治疗急性小脑梗塞后小脑共济失调的疗效分析%Effects of different treatments on cerebellar ataxia induced by acute cerebellar infarction.Chen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国梁; 陈晓明

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To compare the efficacy of different treatments, such as routine drug therapy, functional electrical stimulation and occupational therapy ,on cerebellar ataxia induced by acute cerebellar infarction. Methods:Eighty patients with cerebellar ataxia induced by acute cerebellar infarction were divided into 4 different groups with 20 each: group A: routine drug therapy including Vitamin B, cytoplasmic two choline, antiplatelet drugs and supportive treatment;group B:routine drug therapy and functional electrical stimulation;group C: routine drug therapy and occupational therapy; group D: routine drug therapy, functional electrical stimulation and occupational therapy. Results:Effects of group B, C and D were significantly higher than that in group A(P<0.05);group C and D were not statistically significant difference;effect of group D was the most obvious, higher than the other three groups (P<0.05). Conclusion:Efficacy of single or combined use of functional electrical stimulation and/or occupational therapy in the treatment of acute cerebellar infarction cerebellar ataxia was obviously higher than that of routine drug therapy. And the combined use of functional electrical stimulation and occupational therapy treatment effect is the best.%目的:比较不同方法治疗急性小脑梗塞后小脑共济失调的疗效。方法:将我院确诊的急性小脑梗塞后小脑共济失调患者80例随机分为以下四组,每组20例。 A组:常规药物治疗组(补充B族维生素、胞二磷胆碱、抗血小板药物和对症支持治疗);B组:常规药物治疗组+功能性电刺激;C组:常规药物治疗组+作业疗法;D组:常规药物治疗组+功能性电刺激+作业疗法。结果:B组、C组和D组的疗效明显高于A组(P<0.05);D组的疗效最为明显,高于其他三组(P<0.05)。结论:单独或联合使用功能性电刺激和/或作业疗法治疗急性小脑梗塞后小脑共济失调的疗效

  6. Validation of a clinical practice-based algorithm for the diagnosis of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias based on NGS identified cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallaret, Martial; Renaud, Mathilde; Redin, Claire; Drouot, Nathalie; Muller, Jean; Severac, Francois; Mandel, Jean Louis; Hamza, Wahiba; Benhassine, Traki; Ali-Pacha, Lamia; Tazir, Meriem; Durr, Alexandra; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Mignot, Cyril; Charles, Perrine; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Chamard, Ludivine; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Laugel, Vincent; Burglen, Lydie; Calvas, Patrick; Fleury, Marie-Céline; Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu; Koenig, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Establishing a molecular diagnosis of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) is challenging due to phenotype and genotype heterogeneity. We report the validation of a previously published clinical practice-based algorithm to diagnose ARCA. Two assessors performed a blind analysis to determine the most probable mutated gene based on comprehensive clinical and paraclinical data, without knowing the molecular diagnosis of 23 patients diagnosed by targeted capture of 57 ataxia genes and high-throughput sequencing coming from a 145 patients series. The correct gene was predicted in 61 and 78 % of the cases by the two assessors, respectively. There was a high inter-rater agreement [K = 0.85 (0.55-0.98) p < 0.001] confirming the algorithm's reproducibility. Phenotyping patients with proper clinical examination, imaging, biochemical investigations and nerve conduction studies remain crucial for the guidance of molecular analysis and to interpret next generation sequencing results. The proposed algorithm should be helpful for diagnosing ARCA in clinical practice. PMID:27142713

  7. Exclusion of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene and the human achaete-scute homologue 1 gene as candidate loci for spinal cerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twells, R.; Xu, W. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)]|[Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics Research, Babraham, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ball, D. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The autosomal dominant ataxias are a heterogeneous group of disorders, characterized by progressive degeneration of the cerebellum, pons and inferior olives, as well as the spinal cord. We previously mapped the spinal cerebellar ataxia 2 locus (SCA2) to chromosome 12q23-24.1 in a large Cuban founder population, flanked by the markers D12S58 and PLA2. Anticipation is a common feature of this disorder and therefore we have examined genes in this region which contain trinucleotide repeat motifs as candidate loci for SCA2. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS) has recently been assigned to chromosome 12q24.2-24.3 by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Neuronal NOS is responsible for the production of nitric oxide, a neurotransmitter expressed in high levels in the cerebellum as well as other regions of the nervous system. We report here the identification and analysis of an (AAT){sub n} repeat motif in an intronic region of the neuronal NOS gene, genetic mapping data and its exclusion from being involved in SCA2. We also report the exclusion of the human achaete-scute homologue 1 gene (HASH1), instrumental in neurosensory development in mouse, from being involved in SCA2 by the analysis of a proximal (CAG){sub n} repeat motif in the Cuban pedigrees, and its genetic location on chromosome 12q.

  8. Cerebellar abiotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBowes, R M; Leipold, H W; Turner-Beatty, M

    1987-08-01

    Cerebellar abiotrophy is a degenerative condition of Arabian horses that produces signs of head tremors and ataxia. Affected foals demonstrate clinical signs between the time of birth and 6 months of age. The condition is untreatable, although some animals have reportedly improved to varying degrees. The disease is believed to be inherited; however, definitive evidence is lacking at this time. PMID:3497695

  9. Spinocerebellar ataxias Ataxias espinocerebelares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs constitute a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia in association with some or all of the following conditions: ophthalmoplegia, pyramidal signs, movement disorders, pigmentary retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, cognitive dysfunction and dementia. OBJECTIVE: To carry out a clinical and genetic review of the main types of SCA. METHOD: The review was based on a search of the PUBMED and OMIM databases. RESULTS: Thirty types of SCAs are currently known, and 16 genes associated with the disease have been identified. The most common types are SCA type 3, or Machado-Joseph disease, SCA type 10 and SCA types 7, 2, 1 and 6. SCAs are genotypically and phenotypically very heterogeneous. A clinical algorithm can be used to distinguish between the different types of SCAs. CONCLUSIONS: Detailed clinical neurological examination of SCA patients can be of great help when assessing them, and the information thus gained can be used in an algorithm to screen patients before molecular tests to investigate the correct etiology of the disease are requested.As ataxias espinocerebelares (AECs compreendem um grupo heterogeneo de enfermidades neurodegenerativas, que se caracterizam pela presença de ataxia cerebelar progressiva, associada de forma variada com oftalmoplegia, sinais piramidais, distúrbios do movimento, retinopatia pigmentar, neuropatia periférica, disfunção cognitiva e demência. OBJETIVO: Realizar uma revisão clínico-genética dos principais tipos de AECs. MÉTODO: A revisão foi realizada através da pesquisa pelo sistema do PUBMED e do OMIM. RESULTADOS: Na atualidade existem cerca de 30 tipos de AECs, com a descoberta de 16 genes. Os tipos mais comuns são a AEC tipo 3, ou doença de Machado-Joseph, a AEC tipo 10, e as AECs tipo 7, 2 1, e 6. As AECs apresentam grande heterogeneidade genotípica e fenotípica. Pode-se utilizar um algoritmo clínico para a

  10. A hitherto undescribed case of cerebellar ataxia as the sole presentation of thyrotoxicosis in a young man: a plausible association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhadd, Tarik Abdelkareim; Linton, Kathryn; McCoy, Caoihme; Saha, Subrata; Holden, Roger

    2014-01-01

    A 16-year-old male presented to hospital following an episode of unusual behavior on the football pitch, where he was witnessed as grossly ataxic by his teammates. The assessment demonstrated marked cerebellar signs on examination but no other neurological deficit. The investigation showed the evidence of biochemical thyrotoxicosis with free T4 at 37 pmol/L (normal reference range: 11-27) and thyrotropin (TSH) relationship is plausible because alternative etiologies were excluded, and the normalization of thyroid function with treatment was coupled with complete resolution of the neurological syndrome. Cerebellar syndromes may well be one of the presenting features of thyrotoxicosis, and this should be in the list of its differential diagnosis. PMID:25827703

  11. Top-down but not bottom-up visual scanning is affected in hereditary pure cerebellar ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunichi Matsuda

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to clarify the nature of visual processing deficits caused by cerebellar disorders. We studied the performance of two types of visual search (top-down visual scanning and bottom-up visual scanning in 18 patients with pure cerebellar types of spinocerebellar degeneration (SCA6: 11; SCA31: 7. The gaze fixation position was recorded with an eye-tracking device while the subjects performed two visual search tasks in which they looked for a target Landolt figure among distractors. In the serial search task, the target was similar to the distractors and the subject had to search for the target by processing each item with top-down visual scanning. In the pop-out search task, the target and distractor were clearly discernible and the visual salience of the target allowed the subjects to detect it by bottom-up visual scanning. The saliency maps clearly showed that the serial search task required top-down visual attention and the pop-out search task required bottom-up visual attention. In the serial search task, the search time to detect the target was significantly longer in SCA patients than in normal subjects, whereas the search time in the pop-out search task was comparable between the two groups. These findings suggested that SCA patients cannot efficiently scan a target using a top-down attentional process, whereas scanning with a bottom-up attentional process is not affected. In the serial search task, the amplitude of saccades was significantly smaller in SCA patients than in normal subjects. The variability of saccade amplitude (saccadic dysmetria, number of re-fixations, and unstable fixation (nystagmus were larger in SCA patients than in normal subjects, accounting for a substantial proportion of scattered fixations around the items. Saccadic dysmetria, re-fixation, and nystagmus may play important roles in the impaired top-down visual scanning in SCA, hampering precise visual processing of individual items.

  12. Maculopathy and spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebranchu, Pierre; Le Meur, Guylène; Magot, Armelle;

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia is a rare heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by cerebellar symptoms, often associated with other multisystemic signs. Mild optic neuropathy has been associated with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), but macular dysfunction has been reported in...

  13. Cognition and Emotion in Cerebellar Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT... Cognition and Emotion in Cerebellar Disorders Are problems in the areas of cognition and ... active investigation. Why is this important for the ataxia patient? Cerebellar patients and families generally find it helpful to ...

  14. Genetics of the dominant ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Dineke S.; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.

    2011-01-01

    The relevant clinical, genetic, and cell biologic aspects of the dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are reviewed in this article. SCAs are diseases of the entire nervous system; in addition to cerebellar ataxia, the central (but not obligate) disease feature, many noncerebellar comp

  15. Dystonia as presenting manifestation of ataxia telangiectasia : a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Goyal V; Behari M

    2002-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a genetically inherited multisystem disorder with predominant feature being telangiectasia and cerebellar ataxia. In this report, a family of three siblings suffering from ataxia telangiectasia is described. The proband presented with dystonia and dystonic myoclonus, both of which are rare presenting features of ataxia telangiectasia.

  16. Linkage disequilibrium at the Machado-Joseph disease spinal cerebellar ataxia 3 locus: Evidence for a common founder effect in French and Portuguese-Brazilian families as well as a second ancestral Portuguese-Azorean mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanin, G.; Cancel, G.; Didierjean, O. [and others

    1995-11-01

    Spinal cerebellar ataxia 3 (SCA3) is a genetic subtype of the type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA type I), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurological disorders. SCA3 was mapped in French families to chromosome 14q24.3-qter in the same region as the gene for Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), which was classified as a form of ADCA type I on the basis of similarities in the clinical presentation of individual patients. The MJD gene was recently identified in Japanese kindreds, and the mutation was characterized as an unstable CAG repeat that is expanded in affected individuals. The same mutation is observed in families of Portuguese-Azorean ancestry, as well as in French SCA3 kindreds. In other disorders caused by unstable and expanded triplet repeats, such as fragile X syndrome (FRA-X), myotonic dystrophy (MD), Huntington disease (HD), and SCA1, linkage disequilibrium (LD) between the mutation and closely linked polymorphic markers was detected, suggesting that there were only one or a few founders or predisposing haplotypes. In the present study, 29 families of different geographical origins were tested for LD between the MJD/SCA3 mutation and four flanking microsatellite markers. 27 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. 针康法治疗中风后小脑性共济失调临床观察%Clinical Observation on Acupuncture and Rehabilitation Therapy on Cerebellar Ataxia after Stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马力

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect in coordination function and activities of daily living of acupuncture combined with rehabilitation on cerebellar ataxia after stroke. Methods:58 patients with cerebellar ataxia after stroke were randomly divided into treatment group and control group with each of 29 cases, control group with rehabilitation therapy, treatment group adopted acupuncture and rehabilitation therapy, rehabilitation evalua-tion of two groups were taken according to ICARS and FIM. Results:Ataxia scale score and activities of daily living of treatment group were both significantly better than those of control group (P<0.05), the total effective rate of treatment group was significantly higher than that of control group (P<0.05). Conclusion:Acupuncture combined with rehabilitation can improve the coordination function and activities of daily living of patients with cerebellar ataxia after stroke.%目的:探讨针康法对中风后小脑性共济失调患者的协调功能及日常生活活动能力的影响。方法:58例中风后小脑性共济失调患者随机分为治疗组和对照组各29例,对照组采取康复治疗,治疗组采取针康法,两组患者参照ICARS及FIM进行康复评定。结果:治疗组共济失调量表评分及日常生活活动能力均显著优于对照组(P<0.05),治疗组总有效率显著高于对照组(P<0.05)。结论:针康法能改善中风后小脑性共济失调患者的协调功能及日常生活活动能力。

  18. Germ-line CAG repeat instability causes extreme CAG repeat expansion with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Ek, Jakob; Duno, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by dominant inheritance, progressive cerebellar ataxia and diverse extracerebellar symptoms. A subgroup of the ataxias is caused by unstable CAG-repeat expansions in their respective...

  19. Sporadic Ataxia and Multiple System Atrophy (MSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is unclear why some people with sporadic ataxia progress to develop MSA whereas others do not. Many people with adult onset cerebellar degeneration may have the dominantly inherited form, which ...

  20. A case of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 mimicking olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal dominant, slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia without multisystem involvement. We report a 57-year-old woman with genetically confirmed SCA6 who showed clinical features of olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Conventional T2-weighted and FLAIR MRI demonstrated high signal in the middle cerebellar peduncles, in addition to mild atrophy of the pons and cerebellum. (orig.)

  1. A case of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 mimicking olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, N.; Katayama, T.; Makita, Y.; Kuroda, K.; Aizawa, H.; Kikuchi, K. [First Dept. of Internal Medicine, Asahikawa Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal dominant, slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia without multisystem involvement. We report a 57-year-old woman with genetically confirmed SCA6 who showed clinical features of olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Conventional T2-weighted and FLAIR MRI demonstrated high signal in the middle cerebellar peduncles, in addition to mild atrophy of the pons and cerebellum. (orig.)

  2. Signal transduction of ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is characterized by immunodeficiency, progressive cerebellar ataxia, gonadal abnormalities, radiosensitivity, and cancer predisposition. The signal transduction of AT are reviewed, including ATM (AT mutated) gene and clinical symptoms, some transcription factors in the signaling pathway induced by ionizing radiation, cell cycle checkpoint defects, durative oxidative stress and cell apoptosis

  3. [From gene to disease; ataxia telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeks, A.; Veer, L.J. van 't; Ottenheim, C.; Hiel, J.A.P.; Kleijer, W.J.; Weemaes, C.M.R.

    2003-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectasia, immune defects, and a predisposition to malignancy. Chromosomal breakage is a feature. AT cells are abnormally sensitive to cell kill by ionising radiation and abnormally resistant to in

  4. Cerebral Abnormalities in Adults with Ataxia-Telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, D.D.M.; Barker, P. B.; Lederman, H M; Crawford, T O

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia, an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defect of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene, is characterized by progressive neurologic impairment with cerebellar atrophy, ocular and cutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency, heightened sensitivity to ionizing radiation and susceptibility to developing lymphoreticular malignancy. Supratentorial brain abnormalities have been reported only rarely. In this study, brain MRI was performed in 10 adults with ataxia-telangiecta...

  5. Unusual and severe disease course in a child with ataxia-telangiectasia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyts, I.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Wolf-Peeters, C. de; Proesmans, M.; Renard, M.; Uyttebroeck, A.; Boeck, K. de

    2003-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive syndrome of combined immunodeficiency. Hallmarks of the disease comprise progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, cancer susceptibility and variable humoral and cellular immunodeficiency. We describe a patient with AT presenti

  6. Location of the spinal cerebellar ataxia 2 locus to a 1 cM interval on chromsome 12q23-24.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allotey, R.; Twells, R.; Orozco, G. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterised by progressive ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria and dysdiadochokinesia. We have previously assigned the disease locus to chromosome 12q23-24.1 in a population from the Holguin province, Cuba, within a 31 cM interval flanked by the anonymous marker D12S53 and the phospholipase A2 gene (PLA2). Clinical as much as genealogical and geographical evidence indicate that the Cuban pedigrees are homogeneous and descend from a common ancestor. We now report fine genetic mapping of the disease locus with fourteen microsatellite loci known to span this region, which positions SCA2 in a 1 cM interval defined by the loci D12S84-AFM291xe9. Observation of a common haplotype segregating with the disease supports the existence of a founder effect in the Holguin pedigrees.

  7. Friedreich's Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedreich's ataxia is an inherited disease that damages your nervous system. The damage affects your spinal cord and the ... of 5 and 15. The main symptom is ataxia, which means trouble coordinating movements. Specific symptoms include ...

  8. Ataxia - telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001394.htm Ataxia - telangiectasia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ataxia-telangiectasia is a rare childhood disease. It affects ...

  9. Ataxia Telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare, inherited disease. It affects the nervous system, immune system, and ... young children, usually before age 5. They include Ataxia - trouble coordinating movements Poor balance Slurred speech Tiny, ...

  10. Diagnosis of Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate to the National Ataxia Foundation Diagnosis of Ataxia Being diagnosed with Ataxia can be overwhelming. Below ... help you to understand ataxia better. What is Ataxia? The word "ataxia", comes from the Greek word, " ...

  11. Cell biological study on ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosis of ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) has largely been dependent on the clinical findings such as cerebellar ataxia, telangiectasia, and immunological deficiency. However, diagnosis of AT by these ordinary criteria is sometimes not sufficient because of the lack of immunological abnormalities. We examined three cases of AT by ordinary clinical criteria and also by X-ray sensitivity of cultured skin fibroblasts. Case 1, a 9-year-old boy, revealed typical clinical features of AT. However, he had no abnormality in serum IgA or IgE. Case 2, a 10-year-old boy, showed decreased serum IgA level. Case 3, a 19-year-old female, had typical clinical features of AT with normal serum IgA, and developed papillary adenocarcinoma of thyroid which was surgically removed. Fibroblast strains derived from these three cases of AT and from the parents of Case 3 were examined with regard to X-ray sensitivity. Three fibroblast strains derived from AT patients (AT homozygotes) showed remarkable hypersensitivity to X-ray. Fibroblast strains derived from the parents (AT heterozygotes) of Case 3, however, showed normal X-ray sensitivity. Recently, AT fibroblasts have been known to show hypersensitivity also to some mutagen like neocarzinostazin as reported by Shiloh et al. Fibroblasts from Case 3 revealed hypersensitivity to neocarzinostazin. However, the sensitivity of the strains from AT heterozygotes (the parents of Case 3) showed no apparent difference from that of control cells. The assay system for mutagen is quite unstable and proper conditioning of the seeding cell number is important for the carrier detection. However, the diagnosis of AT homozygotes was definitely established by X-ray irradiation to cultured fibroblasts from patients. (author)

  12. National Ataxia Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Page - Twitter - YouTube Giving a talk on Ataxia? - Ataxia Presentation Thank You To Our Partners Donate Now! Welcome to the National Ataxia Foundation International Ataxia Awareness Day (IAAD) The "International Ataxia Awareness Day" ...

  13. Causes of Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate to the National Ataxia Foundation Causes of Ataxia The hereditary ataxias are genetic, which means they ... the disease is inherited as a recessive gene. Ataxia Gene Identified in 1993 The first ataxia gene ...

  14. The gene for spinal cerebellar ataxia 3 (SCA3) is located in a region of {approximately} 3 cM on chromosome 14q24.3-q32.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanin, G.; Cancel, G.; Duerr, A.; Dubourg, O.; Agid, Y.; Brice, A. [Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France); Chneiweiss, H.; Weissenbach, J.; Cann, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    SCA3, the gene for spinal cerebellar ataxia 3, was recently mapped to a 15-cM interval between D14S67 and D14S81 on chromosome 14q, by linkage analysis in two families of French ancestry. The SCA3 candidate region has now been refined by linkage analysis with four new microsatellite markers (D14S256, D14S291, D14S280, and AFM343vf1) in the same two families, in which 19 additional individuals were genotyped, and in a third French family. Combined two-point linkage analyses show that the new markers, D14S280 and AFM343vf1, are tightly linked to the SCA3 locus, with maximal lod scores, at recombination fraction, ({theta}) = .00, of 7.05 and 13.70, respectively. Combined multipoint and recombinant haplotype analyses localize the SCA3 locus to a 3-cM interval flanked by D14S291 and D14S81. The same allele for D14S280 segregates with the disease locus in the three kindreds. This allele is frequent in the French population, however, and linkage disequilibrium is not clearly established. The SCA3 locus remains within the 29-cM region on 14q24.3-q32.2 containing the gene for the Machado-Joseph disease, which is clinically related to the phenotype determined by SCA3, but it cannot yet be concluded that both diseases result from alterations of the same gene. 30 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Spinocerebellar ataxia 17: Inconsistency between phenotype and neuroimage findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA17 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized by the presence of cerebellar ataxia in combination with variable neurological symptoms. Here we report a Chinese SCA17 family which proband′s clinical manifestation was inconsistent with the neuroimage findings.

  16. A Case of Ataxia with Isolated Vitamin E Deficiency Initially Diagnosed as Friedreich’s Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bonello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency (AVED is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is caused by a mutation in the alpha tocopherol transfer protein gene. It is almost indistinguishable clinically from Friedreich’s ataxia but with appropriate treatment its devastating neurological features can be prevented. Patients can present with a progressive cerebellar ataxia, pyramidal spasticity, and evidence of a neuropathy with absent deep tendon reflexes. It is important to screen for this condition on initial evaluation of a young patient presenting with progressive ataxia and it should be considered in patients with a long standing ataxia without any diagnosis in view of the potential therapeutics and genetic counselling. In this case report we present a patient who was initially diagnosed with Friedreich’s ataxia but was later found to have AVED.

  17. A Case of Ataxia with Isolated Vitamin E Deficiency Initially Diagnosed as Friedreich's Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonello, Michael; Ray, Partha

    2016-01-01

    Ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is caused by a mutation in the alpha tocopherol transfer protein gene. It is almost indistinguishable clinically from Friedreich's ataxia but with appropriate treatment its devastating neurological features can be prevented. Patients can present with a progressive cerebellar ataxia, pyramidal spasticity, and evidence of a neuropathy with absent deep tendon reflexes. It is important to screen for this condition on initial evaluation of a young patient presenting with progressive ataxia and it should be considered in patients with a long standing ataxia without any diagnosis in view of the potential therapeutics and genetic counselling. In this case report we present a patient who was initially diagnosed with Friedreich's ataxia but was later found to have AVED. PMID:26989534

  18. Gly118Asp is a SCA14 founder mutation in the Dutch ataxia population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, DS; van de Warrenburg, BPC; Hennekam, FAM; Dooijes, D; Ippel, PF; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, CC; Kremer, HPH; Sinke, RJ

    2005-01-01

    Missense mutations in the PRKCG gene have recently been identified in spinocerebellar ataxia 14 (SCA14) patients; these include the Gly118Asp mutation that we found in a large Dutch autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) family. We subsequently screened the current Dutch ataxia cohort (approxim

  19. Friedreich's Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order Brochures News From NINDS Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Friedreich's Ataxia Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS Disorders Get Web page suited for printing Email this to a friend ...

  20. Visuomotor ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three patients with visuomotor ataxia, a disorder of hand movement to grasp objects located in the periphery of the visual field, were studied clinically and neuroradiologically with conventional and reformatted CT scans. Visuomotor ataxia was noted in the hemifield contralateral to the parieto-occipital lesion with both hands regardless the side of the lesion in this study. No dominant hemisphere for visuomotor ataxia was noted. The responsible lesions for this disorder were overlapped at Broadmann's area 7, 18, 19 and their surrounded white matter including the connecting fibers to the contralateral hemisphere via the splenium of corpus callosum. No direct lesion was found in the angular gyrus (Broadmann area 39). Visuomotor ataxia was seen with both hands in our series and it can be explained by the disconnection of either or both of the direct and crossed long association fibers between visual association areas and motor association areas at the parieto-occipital junction. (author)

  1. Case of subacute cerebellar degeneration associated with pleocytosis and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Hiide; Anezaki, Toshiharu; Takashima, Noriko; Inuzuka, Takashi; Miyatake, Tadashi

    1988-02-01

    A 44 year old woman was healthy until January 3, 1986, when she had headache. On January 9, she developed gait ataxia and dysarthria. Cerebellar ataxia worsened rapidly. Aftar a week she could not sit without support and her consciousness was disturbed. Corticosteroid was administrated and consciousness proved alert, but cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria remained unchanged. The patient was found carcinoma of the lung in August 1986. Characteristic features of clinical and laboratory findings of this patient are acute progression, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis of 1,064/3 cells (860 mononuclear cell, 204 polymorphonuclear cell), and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning. Though the mechanism of acute cerebellar degeneration is still uncertained, inflammatory process was supported to exist in cerebellum of this case.

  2. Spinocerebellar ataxia-10 with paranoid schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavesh Trikamji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spino-cerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10 is an autosomal dominant disorder that is characterized by cerebellar ataxia, seizures and nystagmus with a fragmented pursuit. Schizophrenia has been reported with SCAs 1 and 2 yet in SCA 10, psychiatric manifestations are uncommon. We report a Hispanic family involving a father and his four children with SCA10 genetic mutation. Two of his children, a 20-year-old female and a 23-year-old male, presented with gradually progressive spino-cerebellar ataxia and paranoid schizophrenia. Neurological examination revealed ocular dysmetria, dysdiadokinesia, impaired finger-to-nose exam, gait ataxia and hyperreflexia in both the cases. Additionally, they had a history of psychosis with destructive behavior, depression and paranoid delusions with auditory hallucinations. Serology and CSF studies were unremarkable and MRI brain revealed cerebellar volume loss. Ultimately, a test for ATAXIN-10 mutation was positive thus confirming the diagnosis of SCA10 in father and his four children. We now endeavor to investigate the association between schizophrenia and SCA10.

  3. Friedreich's Ataxia Research Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools Raising Awareness Advocacy Memorials What is Friedreich's Ataxia? About FARA Mission & Organization Financials Leadership & Staff Scientific ... Tools Raising Awareness Advocacy Memorials What is Friedreich's Ataxia? FARA News / Blogs Ride Ataxia rideATAXIA Chicago 2016 ...

  4. Antigliadin antibody in sporadic adult ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Aloosh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common neurologic manifestationof gluten sensitivity is ataxia, which accounts for up to 40%of idiopathic sporadic ataxia. Timing of diagnosis of glutenataxia is vital as it is one of the very few treatable causes ofsporadic ataxia and causes irreversible loss of Purkinje cells.Antigliadin antibody (AGA of the IgG type is the bestmarker for neurological manifestations of gluten sensitivity.This study was conducted to measure the prevalence ofgluten ataxia in a group of Iranian patients with idiopathicataxia.Methods: For 30 patients with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia, aquestionnaire about clinical and demographic data wascompleted. Serum AGA (IgA and IgG and antiendomysialantibody (AEA were assessed. Gluten ataxic patientsunderwent duodenal biopsy. Magnetic resonanceimaging was done for all patients to see if cerebellaratrophy is present.Results: Only 2 patients had a positive IgG AGA (6.7%who both had a positive AEA while none of themshowed changes of celiac disease in their duodenalbiopsies. Only presence of gastrointestinal symptomsand pursuit eye movement disorders were higher inpatients with gluten ataxia.Conclusion: Prevalence of gluten ataxia in Iranianpatients with idiopathic ataxia seems to be lower thanmost of other regions. This could be explained by smallsample size, differences in genetics and nutritionalhabits and also effect of serologic tests in clinical versusresearch setting. Further researches with larger samplesize are recommended.

  5. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P;

    2004-01-01

    to the SPG4 locus on chromosome 2p as previously reported for pure HSP. Sequence analysis of the SPG4 (spastin) gene identified a novel 1593 C > T (GLN490Stop) mutation leading to premature termination of exon 12 with ensuing truncation of the encoded protein. However, the mutation was only...

  6. Lacunar thalamic stroke with pure cerebellar and proprioceptive deficits.

    OpenAIRE

    Gutrecht, J A; Zamani, A A; D N Pandya

    1992-01-01

    Case reports of two patients with cerebellar ataxia and proprioceptive sensory loss are presented. MRI of the brain revealed lesions of the ventroposterior part of the thalamus. These patients illustrate clinically the anatomical independence of cerebellar and sensory pathways in the thalamus. We suggest that the ataxic deficit is caused by interruption of cerebellar outflow pathways in the thalamus and not secondary to sensory deafferentation.

  7. Nuclear Ataxias

    OpenAIRE

    Orr, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Historically basic neuroscience research has made several important contributions to the cell biology of the nucleus, in particular the elucidation of nuclear structures and compartments. As research progressed towards elucidating the mechanism of neurological disease at the cellular and molecular levels, it is now providing insight into the importance and basis of coordination of nuclear pathways within the nucleus and with other cellular compartments. Ataxias, lethal neurodegenerative disea...

  8. The Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome and Its Relation to Cerebellar Cognitive Function and the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Karin S.; Khademian, Zarir P.; Keating, Robert F.; Packer, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS), consisting of diminished speech output, hypotonia, ataxia, and emotional lability, occurs after surgery in up to 25% of patients with medulloblastoma and occasionally after removal of other posterior fossa tumors. Although the mutism is transient, speech rarely normalizes and the syndrome is…

  9. A case of subacute cerebellar degeneration associated with pleocytosis and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 44 year old woman was healthy until January 3, 1986, when she had headache. On January 9, she developed gait ataxia and dysarthria. Cerebellar ataxia worsened rapidly. Aftar a week she could not sit without support and her consciousness was disturbed. Corticosteroid was administrated and consciousness proved alert, but cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria remained unchanged. The patient was found carcinoma of the lung in August 1986. Characteristic features of clinical and laboratory findings of this patient are acute progression, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis of 1,064/3 cells (860 mononuclear cell, 204 polymorphonuclear cell), and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning. Though the mechanism of acute cerebellar degeneration is still uncertained, inflammatory process was supported to exist in cerebellum of this case. (author)

  10. Cerebellar stroke-manifesting as mania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Jagadesan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed.

  11. Asymptomatic cerebellar atrophy after acute enteroviral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaszil, Edina; Kamondi, Anita; Csillik, Anita; Velkey, Imre; Szirmai, Imre

    2005-07-01

    We report on a 13-year-old male who had acute enteroviral encephalitis causing cerebellar symptoms at the age of 10 years. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no abnormalities. Clinically he appeared to be recovered completely after 6 months. Twenty-three months after the recovery, MRI was performed because he presented with slight lower-limb and truncal ataxia experienced as lack of foot coordination while playing football or riding a bicycle. MRI demonstrated severe cerebellar atrophy. Clinically he recovered completely in 10 days. Only sophisticated electrophysiological methods revealed cerebellar dysfunction. The case provides evidence for the plasticity of cerebellar regulatory structures involved in the coordination of fine movements. It seems that in childhood the slow, isolated disintegration of cerebellar systems can be compensated for by upper thalamic or telencephalic connections, in a similar way to a congenital deficit of the cerebellum. PMID:15991870

  12. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6: MRI of three Japanese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the MRI findings in three Japanese patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) in which a polymorphic CAG repeat was identified in the gene encoding the α1A voltage-dependent P/Q-type Ca2+ channel subunit (CACNL1A4). All showed slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and mild pyramidal signs. Neuroradiologically, they had moderate cerebellar atrophy, most prominently in the superior vermis, whereas the brain stem appeared to be spared. No abnormal signal intensity was identified. (orig.)

  13. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6: MRI of three Japanese patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, J.I.; Tokumoto, H.; Yukitake, M.; Matsui, M.; Kuroda, Y. [Division of Neurology, Department of Internal Medicine, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849 (Japan); Matsuyama, Z.; Kawakami, H.; Nakamura, S. [Third Department of Internal Medicine, Hiroshima University School of Medicine Hiroshima (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    We describe the MRI findings in three Japanese patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) in which a polymorphic CAG repeat was identified in the gene encoding the {alpha}{sub 1A} voltage-dependent P/Q-type Ca{sup 2+} channel subunit (CACNL1A4). All showed slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and mild pyramidal signs. Neuroradiologically, they had moderate cerebellar atrophy, most prominently in the superior vermis, whereas the brain stem appeared to be spared. No abnormal signal intensity was identified. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 23 refs.

  14. Phenotype variability and early onset ataxia symptoms in spinocerebellar ataxia type 7: comparison and correlation with other spinocerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Cristino de Albuquerque

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA are a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by heterogeneous clinical presentation. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 is caused by an abnormal CAG repeat expansion and includes cerebellar signs associated with visual loss and ophthalmoplegia. Marked anticipation and dynamic mutation is observed in SCA7. Moreover, phenotype variability and very early onset of symptoms may occur. In this article, a large series of Brazilian patients with different SCA subtypes was evaluated, and we compared the age of onset of SCA7 with other SCA. From the 26 patients with SCA7, 4 manifested their symptoms before 10-year-old. Also, occasionally the parents may have the onset of symptoms after their children. In conclusion, our study highlights the genetic anticipation phenomenon that occurs in SCA7 families. Patients with very early onset ataxia in the context of a remarkable family history, must be considered and tested for SCA7.

  15. Speech Characteristics Associated with Three Genotypes of Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Ahn, Ji Sook; Gomez, Christopher; Sidtis, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Advances in neurobiology are providing new opportunities to investigate the neurological systems underlying motor speech control. This study explores the perceptual characteristics of the speech of three genotypes of spino-cerebellar ataxia (SCA) as manifest in four different speech tasks. Methods: Speech samples from 26 speakers with SCA…

  16. The ataxia (axJ mutation causes abnormal GABAA receptor turnover in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Lappe-Siefke

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia represents a pathological coordination failure that often involves functional disturbances in cerebellar circuits. Purkinje cells (PCs characterize the only output neurons of the cerebellar cortex and critically participate in regulating motor coordination. Although different genetic mutations are known that cause ataxia, little is known about the underlying cellular mechanisms. Here we show that a mutated ax(J gene locus, encoding the ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (Usp14, negatively influences synaptic receptor turnover. Ax(J mouse mutants, characterized by cerebellar ataxia, display both increased GABA(A receptor (GABA(AR levels at PC surface membranes accompanied by enlarged IPSCs. Accordingly, we identify physical interaction of Usp14 and the GABA(AR alpha1 subunit. Although other currently unknown changes might be involved, our data show that ubiquitin-dependent GABA(AR turnover at cerebellar synapses contributes to ax(J-mediated behavioural impairment.

  17. Hereditary ataxias and paraplegias in Cantabria, Spain. An epidemiological and clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, J M; Calleja, J; Combarros, O; Berciano, J

    1991-04-01

    A clinical, genetic and epidemiological study of hereditary ataxias and paraplegias was conducted within a defined area (Cantabria) in Northern Spain from 1974 to 1986. The series comprised 48 index cases and 65 affected relatives. On prevalence day, 103 patients were alive, giving a prevalence of 20.2 cases per 100,000. There were 24 patients (18 families) with Friedreich's ataxia (FA), 12 (6 families) with early onset cerebellar ataxia (EOCA) differing from FA, 6 (3 families) with dominantly transmitted late onset cerebellar ataxia (LOCA), 11 with 'idiopathic' LOCA, 49 (9 families) with 'pure' hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), and 1 patient with congenital cerebellar ataxia. The prevalence found here is comparable with the highest figures described in previous surveys. This may in part be due to the great number of secondary cases in our series. A high frequency of parental consanguinity occurred in FA patients, 'pseudodominant' inheritance being observed in 1 family. The clinical features were those of classical FA except for later onset and slower course in 1 family, and retained tendon reflexes in the lower limbs in 2 cases. Such data indicate the need for modification of the essential criteria for the disease. EOCA included 4 patients with normoreflexic ataxia and 1 patient with ataxia and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone deficiency. In addition, there were 7 patients from 2 unrelated families with a homogeneous syndrome characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance, cerebellar ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa and sensory neuropathy. This syndrome is therefore a well defined nosological entity to be added to the list of autosomal recessive mendelian phenotypes. The clinical picture of patients with LOCA was either a 'pure' cerebellar or a 'cerebellar-plus' syndrome. Genetic subgroups of 'pure' HSP were autosomal dominant type I in 5 families and type II in 2, and autosomal recessive in 2 families. PMID:2043954

  18. SCA3/MJD presenting as "pure" cerebellar ataxia in a family: one case report%表现为"纯小脑性"共济失调的SCA3/MJD一家系报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖李玲; 陈健华; 曾妍; 李俏侠; 周琦; 缪志锦; 宋兴旺

    2008-01-01

    @@ 遗传性脊髓小脑型共济失调(spinocerebellar ataxias, SCA)是一类包括多种亚型共济失调在内的进行性神经系统变性疾病,多为常染色体显性遗传.SCA具有明显的遗传和临床异质性.我们对1个临床诊断为SCA的家系进行了部分基因的CAG三核苷酸重复突变检测分析,报道如下.

  19. [Cerebellar stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowski, Michał; Zimny, Anna; Paradowski, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar stroke belongs to a group of rare diseases of vascular origin. Cerebellum, supplied by three pairs of arteries (AICA, PICA, SCA) with many anastomoses between them is less susceptible for a stroke, especially ischemic one. Diagnosis of the stroke in this region is harder due to lower sensibility of commonly used CT of the head in case of stroke suspicion. The authors highlight clinical symptoms distinguishing between vascular territories or topographical locations of the stroke, diagnostic procedures, classical and surgical treatment, the most common misdiagnoses are also mentioned. The authors suggest a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm development, including rtPA treatment criteria for ischemic cerebellar stroke. PMID:26181157

  20. Dual Transgene Expression in Murine Cerebellar Purkinje Neurons by Viral Transduction In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch, Marie K.; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.; Ornitz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Viral-vector mediated gene transfer to cerebellar Purkinje neurons in vivo is a promising avenue for gene therapy of cerebellar ataxias and for genetic manipulation in functional studies of animal models of cerebellar disease. Here, we report the results of experiments designed to identify efficient methods for viral transduction of adult murine Purkinje neurons in vivo. For these analyses, several lentiviral and an adeno-associated virus (AAV), serotype 1, vector with various promoter combin...

  1. Cell Signaling and Neurotoxicity: 3H-Arachidonic acid release (Phospholipase A2) in cerebellar granule neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cell signaling is a complex process which controls basic cellular activities and coordinates actions to maintain normal cellular homeostasis. Alterations in signaling processes have been associated with neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and cerebellar ataxia, as well as, ...

  2. Cutaneous granulomas in ataxia telangiectasia and other primary immunodeficiencies: Reflection of inappropriate immune regulation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.Y.T. Chiam (L. Y T); M.M.M. Verhagen (Mijke); A. Haraldsson (Ásgeir); N.M. Wulffraat (Nico); G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M.G. Netea (Mihai); C.M.R. Weemaes (Corry); M.M.B. Seyger (Marieke); M. van Deuren (Marcel)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Non-infective cutaneous granulomas with unknown pathogenesis occur in various primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) including ataxia telangiectasia (A-T). Objective: To find a common immunological denominator in these cutaneous granulomas. Methods: The dermatological and immunolo

  3. Speech and Language Findings Associated with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paslawski, Teresa; Duffy, Joseph R.; Vernino, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is an autoimmune disease that can be associated with cancer of the breast, lung, and ovary. The clinical presentation of PCD commonly includes ataxia, visual disturbances, and dysarthria. The speech disturbances associated with PCD have not been well characterized, despite general acceptance that…

  4. Episodic ataxia : a case report and review of literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhvi J

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the clinical features of a 29 year female presenting with a 3 years history of episodes of cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria and nystagmus lasting 3-5 days, recurring almost every month. Sleep disturbance and buzzing in ears were noted 3-4 days before each episode. No other precipitant factor was present. Family history was negative. She was diagnosed as a case of episodic ataxia type-2 and was successfully treated with acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. She was asymptomatic at 2 year followup.

  5. Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAQ NATIONAL ATAXIA FOUNDATION FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT... Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia This fact sheet provides an overview of gene testing for ataxia. It also addresses commonly asked ...

  6. Immunological memory is associative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.J.; Forrest, S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Perelson, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to show that immunological memory is an associative and robust memory that belongs to the class of sparse distributed memories. This class of memories derives its associative and robust nature by sparsely sampling the input space and distributing the data among many independent agents. Other members of this class include a model of the cerebellar cortex and Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM). First we present a simplified account of the immune response and immunological memory. Next we present SDM, and then we show the correlations between immunological memory and SDM. Finally, we show how associative recall in the immune response can be both beneficial and detrimental to the fitness of an individual.

  7. Friedreich's Ataxia (FA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facts About Friedreich’s Ataxia Updated December 2009 Michelle Moffitt Smith Michelle and James Smith at their wedding Dear Friends: W hen I was ... some tests, I found out I had Friedreich’s ataxia. My parents and I immediately learned all we ...

  8. Reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Song; NIU Hui-xia; ZHAO Lu; GAO Yuan; LU Jia-meng; SHI Chang-he; Chandra Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Background The Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) was shown to be a reliable and valid measurement for patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA).The Brazilian version and the Japanese version of SARAwere favorable for good reliability and validity.This study aimed to translate SARA into Chinese and test its reliability and validity in measurement of cerebellar ataxia.Methods SARA was translated into Chinese.A total 39 patients with degeneration cerebellar ataxia were evaluated independently by two neurologists with the Chinese version of SARA.Then the patients were evaluated by one of above neurologists with International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS).The statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0 for Windows.Results The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the Chinese version of SARA was 0.78,which represents a good internal consistence.The correlation coefficient of the Chinese version of SARA scores between the two evaluators was 0.86,illustrating that the inter-rater reliability of Chinese version of SARA was good.The correlation coefficient between the Chinese version of SARA and ICARS was 0.91,illustrating that the criterion validity of Chinese version of SARA was not bad.Conclusions The Chinese version of SARA is reliable and effective for the assessment of degeneration cerebellar ataxia.Compared with ICARS,the evaluation of Chinese version of SARA is more objective,the assessment time is shortened,and the maneuverability is better.

  9. A case of Spinocerebellar Ataxia from ethnic tribe of Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayal Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the case of a 17-year-old girl belonging to an ethnic tribe (Bodo tribe of Assam, presenting with bilateral cerebellar signs and with history suggestive of an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, who was found to have spinocerebellar ataxia 7 on genetic testing. This case throws light on the probability of more such cases in the multi-ethnic society of the North-Eastern Indian states, which are not studied or reported till date.

  10. Huntington’s disease masquerading as spinocerebellar ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Quiroga, Sergio Alejandro; Gonzalez-Morón, Dolores; Garretto, Nelida; Kauffman, Marcelo Andres

    2013-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterised by the presence of choreic abnormal movements, behavioural or psychiatric disturbances and dementia. Noteworthy, despite atypical motor symptoms other than chorea have been reported as initial presentation in some patients, a very few number of HD patients, presenting at onset mostly cerebellar dysfunction masquerading dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), were occasionally reported. We rep...

  11. The contribution of the cerebellum to cognition in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Freya E.; Manon Grube; Elsegood, Kelly J.; Welch, John L.; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2010-01-01

    This study sought evidence for a specific cerebellar contribution to cognition by characterising the cognitive phenotype of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 (SCA-6); an autosomal dominant genetic disease which causes a highly specific late-onset cerebellar degeneration. A comprehensive neuropsychological assessment was administered to 27 patients with genetically confirmed SCA-6. General intellectual ability, memory and executive function were examined using internationally standardised tests (W...

  12. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration [PCD]) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis

  13. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-06-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD)) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis.

  14. Diet for Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discuss these guidelines with a physical therapist and nutritionist familiar with movement disorders. Ataxia is a complex ... fiber to your diet with your physician or nutritionist, ask them if you might also benefit by ...

  15. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Truncal Ataxia and HINTS as Cardinal Signs for Acute Vestibular Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Sergio; Martínez, Carlos; Zalazar, Guillermo; Moro, Marcela; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Luis, Leonel; Gordon, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The head impulse, nystagmus type, test of skew (HINTS) protocol set a new paradigm to differentiate peripheral vestibular disease from stroke in patients with acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). The relationship between degree of truncal ataxia and stroke has not been systematically studied in patients with AVS. We studied a group of 114 patients who were admitted to a General Hospital due to AVS, 72 of them with vestibular neuritis (based on positive head impulse, abnormal caloric tests, and negative MRI) and the rest with stroke: 32 in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory (positive HINTS findings, positive MRI) and 10 in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory (variable findings and grade 3 ataxia, positive MRI). Truncal ataxia was measured by independent observers as grade 1, mild to moderate imbalance with walking independently; grade 2, severe imbalance with standing, but cannot walk without support; and grade 3, falling at upright posture. When we applied the HINTS protocol to our sample, we obtained 100% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity, similar to previously published findings. Only those patients with stroke presented with grade 3 ataxia. Of those with grade 2 ataxia (n = 38), 11 had cerebellar stroke and 28 had vestibular neuritis, not related to the patient’s age. Grade 2–3 ataxia was 92.9% sensitive and 61.1% specific to detect AICA/PICA stroke in patients with AVS, with 100% sensitivity to detect AICA stroke. In turn, two signs (nystagmus of central origin and grade 2–3 Ataxia) had 100% sensitivity and 61.1% specificity. Ataxia is less sensitive than HINTS but much easier to evaluate. PMID:27551274

  16. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Truncal Ataxia and HINTS as Cardinal Signs for Acute Vestibular Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Sergio; Martínez, Carlos; Zalazar, Guillermo; Moro, Marcela; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Luis, Leonel; Gordon, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The head impulse, nystagmus type, test of skew (HINTS) protocol set a new paradigm to differentiate peripheral vestibular disease from stroke in patients with acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). The relationship between degree of truncal ataxia and stroke has not been systematically studied in patients with AVS. We studied a group of 114 patients who were admitted to a General Hospital due to AVS, 72 of them with vestibular neuritis (based on positive head impulse, abnormal caloric tests, and negative MRI) and the rest with stroke: 32 in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory (positive HINTS findings, positive MRI) and 10 in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory (variable findings and grade 3 ataxia, positive MRI). Truncal ataxia was measured by independent observers as grade 1, mild to moderate imbalance with walking independently; grade 2, severe imbalance with standing, but cannot walk without support; and grade 3, falling at upright posture. When we applied the HINTS protocol to our sample, we obtained 100% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity, similar to previously published findings. Only those patients with stroke presented with grade 3 ataxia. Of those with grade 2 ataxia (n = 38), 11 had cerebellar stroke and 28 had vestibular neuritis, not related to the patient's age. Grade 2-3 ataxia was 92.9% sensitive and 61.1% specific to detect AICA/PICA stroke in patients with AVS, with 100% sensitivity to detect AICA stroke. In turn, two signs (nystagmus of central origin and grade 2-3 Ataxia) had 100% sensitivity and 61.1% specificity. Ataxia is less sensitive than HINTS but much easier to evaluate. PMID:27551274

  17. Clinical, psychological, and genetic characteristics of spinocerebellar ataxia type 19 (SCA19).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, H.J.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2005-01-01

    The SCA19 locus on chromosome 1p21-q21 was identified in a Dutch family in 2002. Affected individuals displayed a lateonset slowly progressive mild cerebellar ataxia, hyporeflexia, and signs of frontal lobe dysfunction. A postural head tremor and myoclonic movements were observed occasionally. Befor

  18. The effectiveness of allied health care in patients with ataxia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonteyn, E.M.R.; Keus, S.H.J.; Verstappen, C.C.P.; Schols, L.; Groot, I.J.M. de; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with cerebellar ataxia have serious disabilities in daily life, while pharmacological treatment options are absent. Therefore, allied health care is considered to be important in the management of these patients. The goal of this review is to evaluate scientific evidence for allied hea

  19. The spinocerebellar ataxia 2 locus is located within a 3-cm interval on chromosome 12q23-24.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allotey, R.; Twells, R.; Cemal, C. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA) are a clinically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by a predominantly cerebellar syndrome of onset with gait ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria, and dysdiadochokinesia. Pathologically, the disorders are characterized by premature neuronal loss in the cerebellar cortex and the inferior olivary and pontine nuclei, with degeneration of the spinal cord. We have previously assigned the spinocerebellar ataxia 2 locus to chromosome 12q23-24.1, within a 31-cM interval flanked by the loci D12S58 and PLA2. Linkage to SCA2 has been demonstrated in pedigrees from Europe, Japan, and North America, the latter serving to refine the candidate region to a 16-cM interval. We report here genetic analysis undertaken between SCA2 and nine microsatellite loci known to span 8 cM within this interval. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. An elderly man with progressive ataxia and palatal tremor presenting with dizziness and oculopalatal tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukahara, Yuka; Suzuki, Keisuke; Kokubun, Norito; Nakamura, Toshiki; Takekawa, Hidehiro; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-08-31

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our department for dizziness and progressive unsteady gait over 6 years. His family history was unremarkable. Neurological examination showed dysarthria, saccadic eye movement, palatal tremor (1.7 Hz)-synchronous with rotational ocular movement, and truncal ataxia. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed hyperintense and hypertrophic bilateral inferior olivary nuclei at the medulla and mild cerebellar atrophy. On the basis of neurological findings of oculopalatal tremor and cerebellar ataxia with brain MRI findings, the diagnosis of progressive ataxia and palatal tremor (PAPT) was made. PAPT should be included in differential diagnosis of dizziness observed in elderly individuals. PMID:27477579

  1. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3: subphenotypes in a cohort of brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Moro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 involves cerebellar, pyramidal, extrapyramidal, motor neuron and oculomotor systems with strong phenotypic heterogeneity, that lead us to classify the disorder into different clinical subtypes according to the predominantly affected motor systems. Method The series comprises 167 SCA3 patients belonging to 68 pedigrees, studied from 1989-2013. These patients were categorized into seven different subphenotypes. Results SCA3 cases were clustered according to the predominant clinical features. Three most common forms were subphenotype 2, characterized by ataxia and pyramidal symptom was observed in 67.5%, subphenotype 3 with ataxia and peripheral signs in 13.3%, and subphenotype 6 with pure cerebellar syndrome in 7.2%. Conclusion Our study was the first to systematically classify SCA3 into seven subphenotypes. This classification may be particularly useful for determination of a more specific and direct phenotype/genotype correlation in future studies.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Friedreich ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Friedreich ataxia Friedreich ataxia Enable ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: episodic ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mapping for a large pedigree with episodic ataxia. Neurology. 2005 Jul 12;65(1):156-8. Citation ... RW. Clinical spectrum of episodic ataxia type 2. Neurology. 2004 Jan 13;62(1):17-22. Citation ...

  4. Cerebellar involvement that occurred during treatment of Legionella pneumonia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Alici

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Legionnaires’ disease can appear with different levels of severity. A case of a previously healthy lady with communityacquiredpneumonia who progressed to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and developed cerebellar dysfunctionis reported. In patients presenting with neurological symptoms after an episode of pneumonia, Legionella infectionshould be considered. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2013; 3(2: 83-85Key words: Legionella, cerebellar dysfunction, dysarthria, ataxia

  5. Missense mutations in ITPR1 cause autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Lijia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia is characterized by early gross motor delay, hypotonia, gait ataxia, mild dysarthria and dysmetria. The clinical presentation remains fairly stable and may be associated with cerebellar atrophy. To date, only a few families with autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia have been reported. Linkage to 3pter was demonstrated in one large Australian family and this locus was designated spinocerebellar ataxia type 29. The objective of this study is to describe an unreported Canadian family with autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia and to identify the underlying genetic causes in this family and the original Australian family. Methods and Results Exome sequencing was performed for the Australian family, resulting in the identification of a heterozygous mutation in the ITPR1 gene. For the Canadian family, genotyping with microsatellite markers and Sanger sequencing of ITPR1 gene were performed; a heterozygous missense mutation in ITPR1 was identified. Conclusions ITPR1 encodes inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 1, a ligand-gated ion channel that mediates calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Deletions of ITPR1 are known to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, a distinct and very slowly progressive form of cerebellar ataxia with onset in adulthood. Our study demonstrates for the first time that, in addition to spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, alteration of ITPR1 function can cause a distinct congenital nonprogressive ataxia; highlighting important clinical heterogeneity associated with the ITPR1 gene and a significant role of the ITPR1-related pathway in the development and maintenance of the normal functions of the cerebellum.

  6. Disorders of Upper Limb Movements in Ataxia-Telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aasef G Shaikh

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia is known for cerebellar degeneration, but clinical descriptions of abnormal tone, posture, and movements suggest involvement of the network between cerebellum and basal ganglia. We quantitatively assessed the nature of upper-limb movement disorders in ataxia-telangiectasia. We used a three-axis accelerometer to assess the natural history and severity of abnormal upper-limb movements in 80 ataxia-telangiectasia and 19 healthy subjects. Recordings were made during goal-directed movements of upper limb (kinetic task, while arms were outstretched (postural task, and at rest. Almost all ataxia-telangiectasia subjects (79/80 had abnormal involuntary movements, such as rhythmic oscillations (tremor, slow drifts (dystonia or athetosis, and isolated rapid movements (dystonic jerks or myoclonus. All patients with involuntary movements had both kinetic and postural tremor, while 48 (61% also had resting tremor. The tremor was present in transient episodes lasting several seconds during two-minute recording sessions of all three conditions. Percent time during which episodic tremor was present was greater for postural and kinetic tasks compared to rest. Resting tremor had higher frequency but smaller amplitude than postural and kinetic tremor. Rapid non-rhythmic movements were minimal during rest, but were triggered during sustained arm postures and goal directed arm movements suggesting they are best considered a form of dystonic jerks or action myoclonus. Advancing age did not correlate with the severity of involuntary limb movements. Abnormal upper-limb movements in ataxia-telangiectasia feature classic cerebellar impairment, but also suggest involvement of the network between the cerebellum and basal ganglia.

  7. Preliminary assessment of CT-scanning results in children with ataxia-teleangiectasia (Louis-Bar's syndrome)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of computer tomography scanning of 5 children with ataxia-teleangiectasia are discussed. In all children CT-scanning has shown atrophy of cerebellum, in 4 children widening of 4 ventricles of the brain, cisterns of cerebellar angles and supratentorial cisterns. CT-scanning in children with ataxia-teleangiectasia may replace current invasive diagnostic techniques e.g. pneumocephaly, cerebral arteriography, etc. (author)

  8. The Use of a Trained Dog as a Gait Aid for Clients with Ataxia: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Abbud, Gabriela; Janelle, Caroline; Vocos, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To illustrate the use of a trained dog as a therapeutic tool to optimize physical and psychosocial adaptation of clients with ataxia. Method: The gait pattern and gait speed of two people with cerebellar ataxia using different gait aids, including a trained intervention dog and an assistance dog, were compared. Participants' experience of working with the dogs was documented via semi-structured interviews. Results: The use of an intervention dog as part of rehabilit...

  9. Dietary treatment of gluten ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Hadjivassiliou, M; DAVIES-JONES, G; Sanders, D.; Grunewald, R

    2003-01-01

    Background: Gluten ataxia is an immune mediated disease, part of the spectrum of gluten sensitivity, and accounts for up to 40% of cases of idiopathic sporadic ataxia. No systematic study of the effect of gluten-free diet on gluten ataxia has ever been undertaken.

  10. IMMUNOLOGICAL METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental microbiology does not deal with all aspects of immunology or the immune responses per se, but instead adapts immunology-based research technologies or immunoassays for the study of microorganisms and chemical contaminants in association with the environment. The primary immunologic-bas...

  11. Lissencephaly-pachygyria and cerebellar hypoplasia in a calf

    OpenAIRE

    Bianca Lemos dos Santos; Maria Cecília Florisbal Damé; Ana Carolina Barreto Coelho; Plínio Aguiar de Oliveira; Clairton Marcolongo-Pereira; Ana Lucia Schild

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: A case of lissencephaly-pachygyria and cerebellar hypoplasia diagnosed in a Charolais x Tabapuã calf is described. The calf presented since birth, clinical signs characterized by apathy, prolonged recumbency, tremors of the head and neck, ataxia, hypermetria, difficulty walking, blindness and swelling of the joints of the four limbs. Due to the unfavorable prognosis, the animal was euthanized and necropsied at 34 days of age. At necropsy, a rudimentary development of the brain folds...

  12. Cranial MRI in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined five males with laboratory-confirmed ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), aged 9-28 years, several times by MRI (9 examinations: 5 at 0.15 T, 3 at 0.5 T, 1 at 1.5 T). Intermediate, T1-, T2- and T2*-weighted spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences were performed. All patients showed vermian atrophy, enlarged fourth ventricle and cisterna magna; four showed cerebellar hemisphere atrophy; two enlarged infracerebellar subarachnoid spaces and four patients had sinusitis. No focal areas of abnormal signal were seen in the brain, diffuse high signal was found in the central cerebral white matter of the oldest patient. AT is an important human model of inherited cancer susceptibility and multisystem ageing; as in xeroderma pigmentosum and other ''breakage syndromes'', ionising radiation should be avoided. When imaging is necessary, MRI should be preferred to CT in patients known or suspected to have AT and those with undefined paediatric ataxias of nontraumatic origin. If atrophy of only the cerebellum, especially the vermis, is noted, laboratory research should be performed to confirm the diagnosis of AT. (orig.)

  13. Cranial MRI in ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardanelli, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Parodi, R.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Ottonello, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Renzetti, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Saitta, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Lignana, E. [G. Gaslini Inst., Genoa (Italy); Mancardi, G.L. [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy)

    1995-01-01

    We examined five males with laboratory-confirmed ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), aged 9-28 years, several times by MRI (9 examinations: 5 at 0.15 T, 3 at 0.5 T, 1 at 1.5 T). Intermediate, T1-, T2- and T2{sup *}-weighted spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences were performed. All patients showed vermian atrophy, enlarged fourth ventricle and cisterna magna; four showed cerebellar hemisphere atrophy; two enlarged infracerebellar subarachnoid spaces and four patients had sinusitis. No focal areas of abnormal signal were seen in the brain, diffuse high signal was found in the central cerebral white matter of the oldest patient. AT is an important human model of inherited cancer susceptibility and multisystem ageing; as in xeroderma pigmentosum and other ``breakage syndromes``, ionising radiation should be avoided. When imaging is necessary, MRI should be preferred to CT in patients known or suspected to have AT and those with undefined paediatric ataxias of nontraumatic origin. If atrophy of only the cerebellum, especially the vermis, is noted, laboratory research should be performed to confirm the diagnosis of AT. (orig.)

  14. Cerebellar and pontine tegmental hypermetabolism in miller-fisher syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) has been considered as a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a type of acute immune neuropathies involving peripheral nerve system. Unlike GBS, presence of cerebellar type ataxia and supranuclear ophthalmioplesia in MFS suggests additional involvement of the central nervous system. To determine involvement of the central nervous system in MFS, we investigated the cerebral metabolic abnormalities in patients with MFS using FDG PET. Nine patients who were diagnosed as MFS based on acute ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia without other identifiable causes participated in this study. In six patients, serum antibodies possibly related with symptom of MFS (anti- GQ1b or anti-GM1) were detected at the time of the study. With the interval of 25 26 days (range: 3-83 days) from the symptom on set, brain FDG PET were underwent in patients and compared with those from healthy controls. In group analysis comparing with healthy controls, FDG PET of patients revealed increased metabolism in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, and the thalamus. In contrast, the occipital cortex showed decreased metabolism. Individual analyses disclosed hypermetabolism in the cerebellar vermis or hemispheres in 5, and in the pontine tegmentum in 2 of the 9 patients. We also found that the cerebellar vermian hypermetabolism was inversely correlated with the interval between from the symptom on set to PET study. Moreover, follow-up PET of a patient demonstrated that cerebellar hypermetabolism decreased markedly with an improvement of the ophthalmoplegia and ataxia. These findings indicate an involvement of the central nervous system in MFS and suggest an antibody-associated acute inflammatory process as a mechanism of this disorder

  15. Cerebellar and pontine tegmental hypermetabolism in miller-fisher syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Kyrong; Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) has been considered as a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a type of acute immune neuropathies involving peripheral nerve system. Unlike GBS, presence of cerebellar type ataxia and supranuclear ophthalmioplesia in MFS suggests additional involvement of the central nervous system. To determine involvement of the central nervous system in MFS, we investigated the cerebral metabolic abnormalities in patients with MFS using FDG PET. Nine patients who were diagnosed as MFS based on acute ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia without other identifiable causes participated in this study. In six patients, serum antibodies possibly related with symptom of MFS (anti- GQ1b or anti-GM1) were detected at the time of the study. With the interval of 25 26 days (range: 3-83 days) from the symptom on set, brain FDG PET were underwent in patients and compared with those from healthy controls. In group analysis comparing with healthy controls, FDG PET of patients revealed increased metabolism in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, and the thalamus. In contrast, the occipital cortex showed decreased metabolism. Individual analyses disclosed hypermetabolism in the cerebellar vermis or hemispheres in 5, and in the pontine tegmentum in 2 of the 9 patients. We also found that the cerebellar vermian hypermetabolism was inversely correlated with the interval between from the symptom on set to PET study. Moreover, follow-up PET of a patient demonstrated that cerebellar hypermetabolism decreased markedly with an improvement of the ophthalmoplegia and ataxia. These findings indicate an involvement of the central nervous system in MFS and suggest an antibody-associated acute inflammatory process as a mechanism of this disorder.

  16. The history of spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 in Brazil: travels of a gene A história da ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 10 no Brasil: as viagens de um gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the history of spinocerebellar ataxia 10 (SCA10, since its first report in a large Portuguese-ancestry Family with autosomal dominant pure cerebellar ataxia, till the final identification of further families without Mexican ancestry. These families present a quite different phenotype from those SCA10 families described in Mexico.Os autores apresentam a história da descoberta da ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 10 (AEC10 no Brasil, desde o primeiro relato em uma família com ancestrais portugueses com ataxia cerebelar pura, autossômica dominante, até a identificação de famílias sem ancestrais mexicanos. Essas famílias apresentam um fenótipo de AEC10, com ataxia cerebelar "pura", distinta daquele descrito nas famílias no México.

  17. Principal component analysis of cerebellar shape on MRI separates SCA types 2 and 6 into two archetypal modes of degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Brian C; Choi, Soo I; Du, Annie X; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L; Geng, Zhuo Z; Ying, Howard S; Perlman, Susan L; Toga, Arthur W; Prince, Jerry L; Ying, Sarah H

    2012-12-01

    Although "cerebellar ataxia" is often used in reference to a disease process, presumably there are different underlying pathogenetic mechanisms for different subtypes. Indeed, spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) types 2 and 6 demonstrate complementary phenotypes, thus predicting a different anatomic pattern of degeneration. Here, we show that an unsupervised classification method, based on principal component analysis (PCA) of cerebellar shape characteristics, can be used to separate SCA2 and SCA6 into two classes, which may represent disease-specific archetypes. Patients with SCA2 (n=11) and SCA6 (n=7) were compared against controls (n=15) using PCA to classify cerebellar anatomic shape characteristics. Within the first three principal components, SCA2 and SCA6 differed from controls and from each other. In a secondary analysis, we studied five additional subjects and found that these patients were consistent with the previously defined archetypal clusters of clinical and anatomical characteristics. Secondary analysis of five subjects with related diagnoses showed that disease groups that were clinically and pathophysiologically similar also shared similar anatomic characteristics. Specifically, Archetype #1 consisted of SCA3 (n=1) and SCA2, suggesting that cerebellar syndromes accompanied by atrophy of the pons may be associated with a characteristic pattern of cerebellar neurodegeneration. In comparison, Archetype #2 was comprised of disease groups with pure cerebellar atrophy (episodic ataxia type 2 (n=1), idiopathic late-onset cerebellar ataxias (n=3), and SCA6). This suggests that cerebellar shape analysis could aid in discriminating between different pathologies. Our findings further suggest that magnetic resonance imaging is a promising imaging biomarker that could aid in the diagnosis and therapeutic management in patients with cerebellar syndromes. PMID:22258915

  18. Transplantation and Stem Cell Therapy for Cerebellar Degenerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendelin, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-based and regenerative therapy may become a hopeful treatment for neurodegenerative diseases including hereditary cerebellar degenerations. Neurotransplantation therapy mainly aims to substitute lost cells, but potential effects might include various mechanisms including nonspecific trophic effects and stimulation of endogenous regenerative processes and neural plasticity. Nevertheless, currently, there remain serious limitations. There is a wide spectrum of human hereditary cerebellar degenerations as well as numerous cerebellar mutant mouse strains that serve as models for the development of effective therapy. By now, transplantation has been shown to ameliorate cerebellar function, e.g. in Purkinje cell degeneration mice, Lurcher mutant mice and mouse models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and type 2 and Niemann-Pick disease type C. Despite the lack of direct comparative studies, it appears that there might be differences in graft development and functioning between various types of cerebellar degeneration. Investigation of the relation of graft development to specific morphological, microvascular or biochemical features of the diseased host tissue in various cerebellar degenerations may help to identify factors determining the fate of grafted cells and potential of their functional integration. PMID:26155762

  19. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7: Report of an Indian family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurusidheshwar M Wali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 is a form of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia which is associated with pigmentary retinal degeneration. It is known for its world-wide rarity except in the Scandinavian countries. It is very rarely reported from India and the neighbouring Asian countries . The present report describes the neurogenetic findings of a family of SCA7, from the northern part of Karnataka in South India. It documents the wide intrafamilial phenotypic variability, which could be correlated with the CAG repeat counts and phenomenon of anticipation. Genotype phenotype correlation highlighted certain disparities in comparison with the previous studies. The report highlights the need for multiethnic population studies and the role of genetic counseling and prenatal testing in SCA7 patients.

  20. Familial Alzheimer's disease-associated presenilin-1 alters cerebellar activity and calcium homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Hagel, Christian; Korwitz, Anne; Vinueza-Veloz, Maria Fernanda; Zhou, Kuikui; Schonewille, Martijn; Zhou, Haibo; Velazquez-Perez, Luis; Rodriguez-Labrada, Roberto; Villegas, Andres; Ferrer, Isidro; Lopera, Francisco; Langer, Thomas; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Glatzel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) is characterized by autosomal dominant heritability and early disease onset. Mutations in the gene encoding presenilin-1 (PS1) are found in approximately 80% of cases of FAD, with some of these patients presenting cerebellar damage with amyloid plaques and ataxia w

  1. Cerebellar infarction in vascular territory of arteria cerebelli superior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Dejan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cerebellar vascular diseases are focal cerebrovascular diseases in posterior circulation - vertebrobasilar system. The cerebellum is supplied by three main arteries arising from the vertebrobasilar system: arteria cerebelli inferior posterior, arteria cerebelli inferior anterior and arteria cerebelli superior. Cerebelar infarctions are rare but unpredictable disorders. The aim of this study was determination of main risk factors, clinical presentation and prognosis of the cerebellar infarctions in distal vascular territory of the arteria cerebelli superior. Material and methods. We evaluated 60 patients hospitalized after acute cerebellar infarction among other hospitalized patients in five year period. In 18 patients computerized tomography demonstrated infarction in distal vascular territory of the arteria cerebelli superior. All patients underwent clinical and other diagnostic investigations (computerized tomography, electrocardyography and standard blood tests and were questioned by phone after finishing hospital treatment. Results. Cerebellar infarcts in distal vascular territory of arteria cerebeli superior was 30% of all cerebellar infarcts. The most frequent risk factor was hypertension (66. 7%. Symptomatology and clinical signs were heterogenous but the most frequent were instability (77.8%, vertigo (72.2% and vomiting (55.6% followed by ataxia of the limbs (77.8% and the body (61.1%, nystagmus (55.6% and disarthria (33.3% in clinical presentation. All patients had good recovery in hospital and one year afterwards. Discussion. Infarctions in distribution of arteria cerebelli superior are rare and have multiple risk factors and various clinical features in majority of other studies as in this one. Mass effects are present in several studies but none in this one which reflects contraversions present in other published investigations. Conclusion. Cerebellar infarctions in vascular territory of arteria cerebelli superior have

  2. Ataxia-telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson Pires Ferreira

    1983-01-01

    São apresentados os casos de dois irmãos com ataxia-telangiectasia, estudados sob os pontos de vista clínico, eletrencefalográfico, liquórico e encefalográfico. O autor resume os achados de diversos autores e chama a atenção para a regressão parcial da síndrome cerebelar em ambos os pacientes, fato ainda não referido na literatura.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia-telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions ataxia-telangiectasia ataxia-telangiectasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia-telangiectasia is a rare inherited disorder that affects ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with oculomotor apraxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ataxia with oculomotor apraxia ataxia with oculomotor apraxia Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia is a condition characterized by ...

  5. Broad distribution of ataxin 1 silencing in rhesus cerebella for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Megan S; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro; Davidson, Beverly L

    2015-12-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 is one of nine polyglutamine expansion diseases and is characterized by cerebellar ataxia and neuronal degeneration in the cerebellum and brainstem. Currently, there are no effective therapies for this disease. Previously, we have shown that RNA interference mediated silencing of ATXN1 mRNA provides therapeutic benefit in mouse models of the disease. Adeno-associated viral delivery of an engineered microRNA targeting ATXN1 to the cerebella of well-established mouse models improved motor phenotypes, neuropathy, and transcriptional changes. Here, we test the translatability of this approach in adult rhesus cerebella. Nine adult male and three adult female rhesus macaque were unilaterally injected with our therapeutic vector, a recombinant adeno-associated virus type 1 (rAAV1) expressing our RNAi trigger (miS1) and co-expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (rAAV1.miS1eGFP) into the deep cerebellar nuclei using magnetic resonance imaging guided techniques combined with a Stealth Navigation system (Medtronics Inc.). Transduction was evident in the deep cerebellar nuclei, cerebellar Purkinje cells, the brainstem and the ventral lateral thalamus. Reduction of endogenous ATXN1 messenger RNA levels were ≥30% in the deep cerebellar nuclei, the cerebellar cortex, inferior olive, and thalamus relative to the uninjected hemisphere. There were no clinical complications, and quantitative and qualitative analyses suggest that this therapeutic intervention strategy and subsequent reduction of ATXN1 is well tolerated. Collectively the data illustrate the biodistribution and tolerability of rAAV1.miS1eGFP administration to the adult rhesus cerebellum and are supportive of clinical application for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1. PMID:26490326

  6. Consensus Paper: Revisiting the Symptoms and Signs of Cerebellar Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodranghien, Florian; Bastian, Amy; Casali, Carlo; Hallett, Mark; Louis, Elan D; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter; Nowak, Dennis A; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Serrao, Mariano; Steiner, Katharina Marie; Strupp, Michael; Tilikete, Caroline; Timmann, Dagmar; van Dun, Kim

    2016-06-01

    The cerebellum is involved in sensorimotor operations, cognitive tasks and affective processes. Here, we revisit the concept of the cerebellar syndrome in the light of recent advances in our understanding of cerebellar operations. The key symptoms and signs of cerebellar dysfunction, often grouped under the generic term of ataxia, are discussed. Vertigo, dizziness, and imbalance are associated with lesions of the vestibulo-cerebellar, vestibulo-spinal, or cerebellar ocular motor systems. The cerebellum plays a major role in the online to long-term control of eye movements (control of calibration, reduction of eye instability, maintenance of ocular alignment). Ocular instability, nystagmus, saccadic intrusions, impaired smooth pursuit, impaired vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and ocular misalignment are at the core of oculomotor cerebellar deficits. As a motor speech disorder, ataxic dysarthria is highly suggestive of cerebellar pathology. Regarding motor control of limbs, hypotonia, a- or dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetria, grasping deficits and various tremor phenomenologies are observed in cerebellar disorders to varying degrees. There is clear evidence that the cerebellum participates in force perception and proprioceptive sense during active movements. Gait is staggering with a wide base, and tandem gait is very often impaired in cerebellar disorders. In terms of cognitive and affective operations, impairments are found in executive functions, visual-spatial processing, linguistic function, and affective regulation (Schmahmann's syndrome). Nonmotor linguistic deficits including disruption of articulatory and graphomotor planning, language dynamics, verbal fluency, phonological, and semantic word retrieval, expressive and receptive syntax, and various aspects of reading and writing may be impaired after cerebellar damage. The cerebellum is organized into (a) a primary sensorimotor region in the anterior lobe and adjacent part of lobule VI, (b) a second sensorimotor

  7. Cerebellar Lingula Size and Experiential Risk Factors Associated with High Levels of Alcohol and Drug Use in Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Carl M.; Rabi, Keren; Lukas, Scott E.; Teicher, Martin H.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have reported cerebellar abnormalities or static ataxia associated with risk for chronic use of alcohol and drugs. Adverse childhood experience (ACE) is another strong risk factor for later substance abuse. We therefore, sought to ascertain the relationship between morphological phenotypes of the lingula (Lobule I) of the anterior cerebellar vermis (ACV), and exposure to emotional (EM) versus physical (PM) maltreatment,on the degree of ongoing alcohol or drug use. The study d...

  8. A gene for nystagmus-associated episodic ataxia maps to chromosome 19p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, P.L.; Root, D.; Gancher, S. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by attacks of generalized ataxia and relatively normal neurological function between attacks. Onset occurs in childhood or adolescence and persists through adulthood. Penetrance is nearly complete. EA is clinically heterogeneous, including at least two distinct entities: (1) episodes of ataxia and dysarthria lasting hours to days, generally with interictal nystagmus (MIM 108500); (2) episodes of ataxia and dysarthria lasting only minutes, with interictal myokymia (MMM 160120). The EA/nystagmus patients sometimes develop persistent ataxia and cerebellar atrophy. Previously we reported linkage in four EA/myokymia families to a K{sup +} channel gene on chromosome 12p. We excluded this region in a large family with EA/nystagmus. We now report evidence for linkage to chromosome 19p in this and in one other EA/nystagmus family, based on eight microsatellite markers which span approximately 30 cM. The region is flanked distally by D19S209 and proximally by D19S226. All six markers within this region gave positive evidence for linkage; the highest total two-point lod scores occurred wtih D19S221 (3.98 at theta = 0.10) and D19S413 (3.37 at theta = 0.05). Interestingly, Joutel et al. (1993) mapped a gene for familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) to the region around D19S221. Some individuals in these families have ataxia, cerebellar atrophy and interictal nystagmus, but no episodic ataxia. These results demonstrate that the clinical heterogeneity in EA reflects underlying genetic hetreogeneity. In addition, they suggest that EA/nystagmus and some FHM may represent different mutations in the same gene locus on chromosome 19p.

  9. A Family with Mental Retardation, Epilepsy and Cerebellar Hypoplasia Showing Linkage to Chromosome 20p11.21-q11.23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Bayrakli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebellar hypoplasia (CH is a rare malformation caused by various etiologies, usually manifesting clinically as nonprogressive cerebellar ataxia with or without mental retardation. The molecular pathogenesis of the autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias has a wide range of mechanisms. Differential diagnosis and categorization of the recessive cerebellar ataxias, however, need more specific, biochemical and genetic investigation. Methods: This study applied whole-genome linkage analysis to study a family with nonprogressive cerebellar ataxia and additional mental retardation, epilepsy, and facial dysmorphic features. Genotyping and linkage analysis was done using the GeneChip Mapping 250K NspI Array (Affymetrix Inc., Santa Clara, Calif., USA for genome-wide linkage analysis of the genotyping data from the affected children and their parents. Results: Allegro software version 1.2 was used for multipoint linkage analysis. We assumed an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern and assigned a penetrance of 0.999. Single-nucleotide polymorphism allele frequencies were estimated from the Affymetrix data of the Caucasian family studied. Using these parameters, a theoretical maximum logarithm of the odds score of 2.69 was identified at chromosome 20p11.21-q11.23. Conclusions: This chromosomal locus is unprecedented in autosomal recessive and nonprogressive ataxia disorder. Further investigation might reveal a new causative gene generating the CH phenotype.

  10. Friedreich's ataxia: clinical and molecular study of 25 Brazilian cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albano Lilian M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Friedreich's ataxia is a neurodegenerative disorder whose clinical diagnostic criteria for typical cases basically include: a early age of onset (< 20 or 25 years, b autosomal recessive inheritance, c progressive ataxia of limbs and gait, and d absence of lower limb tendon reflexes. METHODS: We studied the frequency and the size of expanded GAA and their influence on neurologic findings, age at onset, and disease progression in 25 Brazilian patients with clinical diagnosis of Friedreich's ataxia - 19 typical and 6 atypical - using a long-range PCR test. RESULTS: Abnormalities in cerebellar signs, in electrocardiography, and pes cavus occurred more frequently in typical cases; however, plantar response and speech were more frequently normal in this group when the both typical and atypical cases were compared. Homozygous GAA expansion repeats were detected in 17 cases (68% - all typical cases. In 8 patients (32% (6 atypical and 2 typical, no expansion was observed, ruling out the diagnosis of Friedreich's ataxia. In cases with GAA expansions, foot deformity, cardiac abnormalities, and some neurologic findings occurred more frequently; however, abnormalities in cranial nerves and in tomographic findings were detected less frequently than in patients without GAA expansions. DISCUSSION: Molecular analysis was imperative for the diagnosis of Friedreich's ataxia, not only for typical cases but also for atypical ones. There was no genotype-phenotype correlation. Diagnosis based only on clinical findings is limited; however, it aids in better screening for suspected cases that should be tested. Evaluation for vitamin E deficiency is recommended, especially in cases without GAA expansion.

  11. Cutaneous granulomas in ataxia telangiectasia and other primary immunodeficiencies: Reflection of inappropriate immune regulation?

    OpenAIRE

    Chiam, L. Y T; Verhagen, Mijke; Haraldsson, Ásgeir; Wulffraat, Nico; Driessen, Gertjan; Netea, Mihai,; Weemaes, Corry; Seyger, Marieke; van Deuren, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Non-infective cutaneous granulomas with unknown pathogenesis occur in various primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) including ataxia telangiectasia (A-T). Objective: To find a common immunological denominator in these cutaneous granulomas. Methods: The dermatological and immunological features of 4 patients with A-T and cutaneous granulomas were described. The literature on skin granulomas in A-T and in other PIDs is reviewed. Results: All 4 A-T patients had progressive gr...

  12. Childhood Ataxia with Cerebral Hypomyelination Syndrome: a Variant of Patient with Early Childhood Onset Related to EIF2B3 Mutation. A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetto, F; Stoppino, L P; Calì, A; Milillo, P; Grilli, G; Vinci, R; Macarini, L

    2012-03-01

    Childhood ataxia with central nervous system hypomyelination (CACH) syndrome is an autosomal recessive transmitted leukodystrophy characterised by early childhood onset and acute deterioration following febrile illnesses or head trauma. We describe the case of a child with early onset of CACH syndrome. He presented with cerebellar ataxia beginning around two years of age with mild mental retardation. MRI showed diffuse white matter signal changes with thinning of the corpus callosum. PMID:24028880

  13. Ataxia-telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Pires Ferreira

    1966-09-01

    Full Text Available São apresentados os casos de dois irmãos com ataxia-telangiectasia, estudados sob os pontos de vista clínico, eletrencefalográfico, liquórico e encefalográfico. O autor resume os achados de diversos autores e chama a atenção para a regressão parcial da síndrome cerebelar em ambos os pacientes, fato ainda não referido na literatura.

  14. Restoring cognitive functions using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques in patients with cerebellar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RChrisMiall

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have highlighted the possibility of modulating the excitability of cerebro-cerebellar circuits bi-directionally using transcranial electrical brain stimulation, in a manner akin to that observed using magnetic stimulation protocols. It has been proposed that cerebellar stimulation activates Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, leading to inhibition of the dentate nucleus, which exerts a tonic facilitatory drive onto motor and cognitive regions of cortex through a synaptic relay in the ventral-lateral thalamus. Some cerebellar deficits present with cognitive impairments if damage to non-motor regions of the cerebellum disrupts the coupling with cerebral cortical areas for thinking and reasoning. Indeed, white matter changes in the dentato-rubral tract correlate with cognitive assessments in patients with Friedreich ataxia, suggesting that this pathway is one component of the anatomical substrate supporting a cerebellar contribution to cognition. An understanding of the physiology of the cerebro-cerebellar pathway previously helped us to constrain our interpretation of results from two recent studies in which we showed cognitive enhancements in healthy participants during tests of arithmetic after electrical stimulation of the cerebellum, but only when task demands were high. Others studies have also shown how excitation of the prefrontal cortex can enhance performance in a variety of working memory tasks. Thus, future efforts might be guided towards neuro-enhancement in certain patient populations, using what is commonly termed 'non-invasive brain stimulation' as a cognitive rehabilitation tool to modulate cerebro-cerebellar circuits, or for stimulation over the cerebral cortex to compensate for decreased cerebellar drive to this region. This article will address these possibilities with a review of the relevant literature covering ataxias and cerebellar cognitive affective disorders, which are characterized by thalamo

  15. Speech prosody in Friedreich's and olivo-ponto cerebellar atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Maureen

    2001-05-01

    A critical issue in the study of speech motor control is the identification of the mechanisms that generate the temporal flow of serially ordered articulatory events. Two staged models of serial ordered events (Lashley, 1951; Lindblom, 1963) claim that time controls events whereas dynamic models predict a relative relation between time and space. Each of these models predicts a different relation between the acoustic measures of formant frequency and segmental duration. The most recent method described herein provides a sensitive index of speech deterioration which is both acoustically robust and phonetically systematic. Both acoustic and magnetic resonance imaging measures were used to describe the speech disturbance in two neurologically distinct groups of cerebellar ataxia: Friedreich's ataxia and olivo-ponto cerebellar ataxia. The speaking task was designed to elicit six different prosodic conditions and four prosodic contrasts. All subjects read the same syllable embedded in a sentence, under six different prosodic conditions. Pair-wise comparisons derived from the six conditions were used to describe (1) final lengthening, (2) phrasal accent, (3) nuclear accent and (4) syllable reduction. An estimate of speech deterioration as determined by individual and normal subects' acoustic values of syllable duration, formant and fundamental frequencies was used in correlation analyses with magnetic resonance imaging ratings.

  16. 100 CHILDREN WITH ACUTE ATAXIA; A SURVEY IN MOFID CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Karimzadeh

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The term "Ataxia" refers to disturbances of body posture and movementthat are normally controlled by the cerebellum, frontal lobes and theposterior columns of the spinal cord. The primary symptom and themost prominent feature of ataxia is abnormal gait which is characterizedby lurching and wide base walking.Ataxia was considered acute, if it had occurred within the two precedingweeks. Knowing how frightening acute-onset Ataxia is for the familyis not surprising that the condition prompts an immediate visit to thephysician.Material & Methods:In view of the lack of information in our country, on the etiology ofsudden-onset Ataxia, the authors enrolled 100 children with the chiefcomplaint of acute loss of equilibrium, who came to the attention ofthe Pediatric Neurology Department over a two year duration(Sept.2001-Sept 2003; they were admitted to the Mofid Childrens'Hospital and all necessary investigations were carried out.Results & Conclusion:The results revealed that Acute Cerebellar Ataxia was the most commoncause of the problem, the second most frequent being drug intoxication,which most commonly occurred in patients, 2-4years old. The remainingcausative factors in order of descending frequency consisted ofinfectious polyneuropathy, migraine, opsoclonus-myoclonus, braintumor, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, multiple sclerosis, andepilepsy.

  17. Autosomal dominant ataxia: Genetic evidence for locus heterogeneity from a cuban founder-effect population

    OpenAIRE

    Auburger, Georg; Diaz, Guillermo Orozco; Capote, Raul Ferreira; Sanchez, Suzana Gispert; Perez, Marta Paradoa; del Cueto, Marianela Estrada; Meneses, Mirna Garcia; Farrall, Martin; Williamson, Robert; Chamberlain, Susan; Baute, Luis Heredero

    1990-01-01

    The locus for autosomal dominant ataxia with a diagnosis of olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy at autopsy has been previously assigned to chromosome 6p. However, evidence for two alternative locations has been reported. We have recently described a large potential founder-effect population of such patients in the Holguin province of Cuba. With an estimated 1,000 patients available for analysis, this extensive cluster of families provides a unique opportunity for the definitive localization of the...

  18. Rehabilitation for Ataxia Following Chemotherapy for Burkitt Lymphoma Involving the Rectum

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyoung Seop; Jung, Chul Oh; Jeon, Ha Ra; Sung, Lee Ho

    2012-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a type of B-cell lymphoma that occurs mostly in children, and rarely in adults. The sporadic type is known to occur mostly at the ileum and cecum. Cytarabine, which is used for central nervous system prophylaxis during chemotherapy for Burkitt lymphoma, has known neurotoxicity, and its side effects include motor ataxia due to cerebellar injury, ataxic dysarthria, dysfunction of ocular movement, confusion, somnolence and lethargy. This case report is about a patient diagnos...

  19. Pharmacometabolomic Signature of Ataxia SCA1 Mouse Model and Lithium Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Bertrand Perroud; Paymaan Jafar-Nejad; Wikoff, William R.; Gatchel, Jennifer R.; Lu Wang; Barupal, Dinesh K.; Juan Crespo-Barreto; Oliver Fiehn; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Rima Kaddurah-Daouk

    2013-01-01

    We have shown that lithium treatment improves motor coordination in a spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) disease mouse model (Sca1(154Q/+)). To learn more about disease pathogenesis and molecular contributions to the neuroprotective effects of lithium, we investigated metabolomic profiles of cerebellar tissue and plasma from SCA1-model treated and untreated mice. Metabolomic analyses of wild-type and Sca1(154Q/+) mice, with and without lithium treatment, were performed using gas chromatogra...

  20. High prevalence of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 in an ethnic Tamil community in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rengaraj R

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the prevalence, clinical and molecular genetic characteristics of cerebellar ataxia in an ethnic Tamil community in India. Methods: An epidemiological study of cerebellar ataxia was done in two villages in the Indian state of Tamilnadu where its prevalence was observed to be high. All the people were screened and the clinical characteristics of those with ataxia were recorded. Genetic analysis was done in those with ataxia and in two asymptomatic control groups - group I belonging to the affected community and group II belonging to the unaffected community. The clinical and genetic results are correlated. Measures to help the community are suggested. Results: The total population of the two villages was 378. Among them 345 belonged to Vanniyakula Kshatriyar community and 33 to another. Cerebellar ataxia was found in 25 individuals belonging only to the former community (7.2%. The mean age of onset was 39.8 years and the salient features were ataxic gait (100%, dysarthria (100%, pyramidal signs (72%, slow saccades (48% and bleeding diathesis (12%. Genetic studies were done in 17 of the study group. All showed pathological expansion of CAG repeats above 40, in chromosome 6p, diagnostic of SCA1. 7 of the 18 in the control group (I and none in control group (II had CAG repeats above 40. Conclusion: The prevalence of SCA1 is high (7.2% in this ethnic Tamil community with a large asymptomatic group waiting to manifest. The symptomatic individuals need social support and rehabilitation. Appropriate counseling, prenatal evaluation and therapy will prevent the spread of disease to the next generation.

  1. Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome CCAS – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starowicz-Filip, Anna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the study was to describe a case of the patient with cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome CCAS, characterize the role of cerebellum in the regulation of cognitive functions and present theprocedure of neuropsychological diagnosis useful in indicating the specific cognitive and emotional problems in patients with cerebellar damage.Case report. A 41- year old man with an ischemic cerebellar stroke of its right hemisphere manifested the neuropsychological symptoms typical for the frontal damage: euphoric mood, disorganized behavior,lack of criticism and mental plasticity, tendency to shorten the personal distance, problems with mistake correction. In neuropsychological diagnosis we used following methods: Raven Progressive Matrices Test, Mini Mental Stage Examination (MMSE, Trail Making Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Stroop Interference Test, Word Fluency Test, Auditory Verbal Learning Test by Łuria, Benton Visual Retention Test, Digit Span.Results. Analyzing the obtained results we observed the significant decrease of all executive functions: planning, abstract thinking, cognitive flexibility, adaptation to new situations as well as memory impairments and changes in emotional and behavioral state similar to frontal syndrome. The whole of impairments including the typical cerebellar symptoms (ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria,hypotonia create the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome CCAS with leading role of dysexecutive syndrome.Conclusions. The cerebellum takes part in the regulation of cognitive functions. The cerebellar damages can imitate the emotional- cognitive problems of patients after frontal damages what additionally stress the functional link between these two brain structures. Patient’s with cerebellar damages should have neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric diagnosis and care.

  2. Progression of brain atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a longitudinal tensor-based morphometry study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Mascalchi

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 is the second most frequent autosomal dominant inherited ataxia worldwide. We investigated the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to track in vivo progression of brain atrophy in SCA2 by examining twice 10 SCA2 patients (mean interval 3.6 years and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean interval 3.3 years on the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. We used T1-weighted images and tensor-based morphometry (TBM to investigate volume changes and the Inherited Ataxia Clinical Rating Scale to assess the clinical deficit. With respect to controls, SCA2 patients showed significant higher atrophy rates in the midbrain, including substantia nigra, basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles and posterior medulla corresponding to the gracilis and cuneatus tracts and nuclei, cerebellar white matter (WM and cortical gray matter (GM in the inferior portions of the cerebellar hemisphers. No differences in WM or GM volume loss were observed in the supratentorial compartment. TBM findings did not correlate with modifications of the neurological deficit. In conclusion, MRI volumetry using TBM is capable of demonstrating the progression of pontocerebellar atrophy in SCA2, supporting a possible role of MRI as biomarker in future trials.

  3. Deep brain stimulation or thalamotomy in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome? Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamás, Gertrúd; Kovács, Norbert; Varga, Noémi Ágnes; Barsi, Péter; Erőss, Loránd; Molnár, Mária Judit; Balás, István

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 66-year-old man who has been treated for essential tremor since the age of 58. He developed mild cerebellar gait ataxia seven years after tremor onset. Moderate, global brain atrophy was identified on MRI scans. At the age of 68, only temporary tremor relief could be achieved by bilateral deep brain stimulation of the ventral intermedius nucleus of the thalamus. Bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus also resulted only in transient improvement. In the meantime, progressive gait ataxia and tetraataxia developed accompanied by other cerebellar symptoms, such as nystagmus and scanning speech. These correlated with progressive development of bilateral symmetric hyperintensity of the middle cerebellar peduncles on T2 weighted MRI scans. Genetic testing revealed premutation of the FMR1 gene, establishing the diagnosis of fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome. Although this is a rare disorder, it should be taken into consideration during preoperative evaluation of essential tremor. Postural tremor ceased two years later after thalamotomy on the left side, while kinetic tremor of the right hand also improved. PMID:27375149

  4. Exome sequencing reveals a novel CWF19L1 mutation associated with intellectual disability and cerebellar atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Christina; Kaufmann, Lilian; Seitz, Angelika; Paramasivam, Nagarajan; Granzow, Martin; Karch, Stephanie; Fischer, Christine; Hinderhofer, Katrin; Gdynia, Georg; Elsässer, Michael; Pinkert, Stefan; Schlesner, Matthias; Bartram, Claus R; Moog, Ute

    2016-06-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) with cerebellar ataxia comprises a genetically heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders. We identified a homozygous frameshift mutation in CWF19L1 (c.467delC; p.(P156Hfs*33)) by a combination of linkage analysis and Whole Exome Sequencing in a consanguineous Turkish family with a 9-year-old boy affected by early onset cerebellar ataxia and mild ID. Serial MRI showed mildly progressive cerebellar atrophy. Absent C19L1 protein expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines strongly suggested that c.467delC is a disease-causing alteration. One further pregnancy of the mother had been terminated at 22 weeks of gestation because of a small cerebellum and agenesis of corpus callosum. The homozygous CWF19L1 variant was also present in the fetus. Postmortem examination of the fetus in addition showed unilateral hexadactyly and vertebral malformations. These features have not been reported and may represent an expansion of the CWF19L1-related phenotypic spectrum, but could also be due to another, possibly autosomal recessive disorder. The exact function of the evolutionarily highly conserved C19L1 protein is unknown. So far, homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in CWF19L1 have been identified in two Turkish siblings and a Dutch girl, respectively, affected by cerebellar ataxia and ID. A zebrafish model showed that CWF19L1 loss-of-function mutations result in abnormal cerebellar morphology and movement disorders. Our report corroborates that loss-of-function mutations in CWF19Ll lead to early onset cerebellar ataxia and (progressive) cerebellar atrophy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27016154

  5. Gastric outlet obstruction due to adenocarcinoma in a patient with Ataxia-Telangiectasia syndrome: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammond Sue

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ataxia-Telangiectasia syndrome is characterized by progressive cerebellar dysfunction, conjuctival and cutaneous telangiectasias, severe immune deficiencies, premature aging and predisposition to cancer. Clinical and radiographic evaluation for malignancy in ataxia-telangiectasia patients is usually atypical, leading to delays in diagnosis. Case presentation We report the case of a 20 year old ataxia-telangiectasia patient with gastric adenocarcinoma that presented as complete gastric outlet obstruction. Conclusion A literature search of adenocarcinoma associated with ataxia-telangiectasia revealed 6 cases. All patients presented with non-specific gastrointestinal complaints suggestive of ulcer disease. Although there was no correlation between immunoglobulin levels and development of gastric adenocarcinoma, the presence of chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia seem to lead to the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. One should consider adenocarcinoma in any patient with ataxia-telangiectasia who presents with non-specific gastrointestinal complaints, since this can lead to earlier diagnosis.

  6. [Heart involvement in Friedreich's ataxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidemann, F; Scholz, F; Florescu, C; Liu, D; Hu, K; Herrmann, S; Ertl, G; Störk, S

    2015-03-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is a rare hereditary disease and although the gene defect has already been identified as a deficiency of the mitochondrial protein frataxin, the pathophysiology is still unknown. Although a multisystem disorder organ involvement is predominantly neurological. Besides the characteristic features of spinocerebellar ataxia the heart is frequently also affected. Cardiac involvement typically manifests as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which can progress to heart failure and death. So far most research has focused on the neurological aspects and cardiac involvement in Friedreich's ataxia has not been systematically investigated. Thus, a better understanding of the progression of the cardiomyopathy, cardiac complications and long-term cardiac outcome is warranted. Although no specific treatment is available general cardiac therapeutic options for cardiomyopathy should be considered. The current review focuses on clinical and diagnostic features of cardiomyopathy and discusses potential therapeutic developments for Friedreich's ataxia. PMID:24848865

  7. Therapeutic Developments in Friedreich Ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Robert B Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia is an inherited, severe, progressive neuro- and cardiodegenerative disorder for which there currently is no approved therapy. Friedreich ataxia is caused by the decreased expression and/or function of frataxin, a mitochondrial matrix protein that binds iron and is involved in the formation of iron-sulfur clusters. Decreased frataxin function leads to decreased iron-sulfur cluster formation, mitochondrial iron accumulation, cytosolic iron depletion, oxidative stress, and mito...

  8. Ataxia-telangiectasia: future prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary MW; Al-Baradie RS

    2014-01-01

    Mohammed Wajid Chaudhary, Raidah Saleem Al-Baradie Pediatric Neurology, Neurosciences Centre, King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract: Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive multi-system disorder caused by mutation in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM). ATM is a large serine/threonine protein kinase, a member of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family whose best-studied function is as master controller of si...

  9. Purkinje cell apoptosis in arabian horses with cerebellar abiotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, A; Moyano, R; Vivo, J; Flores-Acuña, R; Molina, A; Blanco, C; Monterde, J G

    2006-08-01

    Purkinje cerebellar cells were studied in three Arabian horses aged between 6 and 8 months with clinical disorders in their movements, tremors and ataxia; the occurrence of apoptosis in this cell population was investigated by the (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) method. Both optical and electron microscopical images showed a scant number of Purkinje cells, most of them with morphological features of apoptosis such as condensation of the nucleus and cytoplasm as well as segregation and fragmentation of the nucleus into apoptotic bodies. The TUNEL technique revealed a substantial number (65%) of positive immunoreactive Purkinje cells. PMID:16901270

  10. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in Hodgkin′s lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinit Suri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD is a rare disorder presenting typically with acute or subacute severe cerebellar ataxia. PCD is most commonly associated with small cell lung cancer followed by adenocarcinoma of breast and ovary, and Hogdkin′s lymphoma. We report a case of a 54-year-old male with acute-onset pancerebellar syndrome with underlying Hodgkin′s lymphoma. A high index of suspicion of PCD resulted in arriving at an early diagnosis of underlying Hodgkin′s disease. The patient was managed with six cycles of chemotherapy, which resulted in clinical stabilization and reversal of magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities. Antitumor therapy appears to have a significant impact on reversing PCD and hence early diagnosis and intervention for the primary remains the corner stone in stabilizing the neurological condition.

  11. Adult onset sporadic ataxias: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Graziani Povoas Barsottini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with adult onset non-familial progressive ataxia are classified in sporadic ataxia group. There are several disease categories that may manifest with sporadic ataxia: toxic causes, immune-mediated ataxias, vitamin deficiency, infectious diseases, degenerative disorders and even genetic conditions. Considering heterogeneity in the clinical spectrum of sporadic ataxias, the correct diagnosis remains a clinical challenge. In this review, the different disease categories that lead to sporadic ataxia with adult onset are discussed with special emphasis on their clinical and neuroimaging features, and diagnostic criteria.

  12. Localization of the candidate gene d-amino acid oxidase outside the refined 1-cM region of spinocerebellar ataxia 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auburger, G.; Gispert, S.; Lunkes, A. [Univ. Hospital, Duesseldorf (Germany)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) is one form of the neurodegenerative autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias and has been linked to chromosome 12q in 25 previously described and 13 new families from a founder collective of {ge}500 patients in Holguin, Cuba. Although SCA2 in most patients cannot be distinguished from other spinocerebellar ataxias by clinical criteria, in some patients it exhibits a particular phenotype with early neuropathy/late slow saccades and late myoclonus. Autopsy in 11 patients demonstrated olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy with a selective sparing of the dentate nucleus. Complete allelic association within the Holguin population was established with the microsatellite D12S105, and the candidate region was determined to be within a 6-cM region distal to the marker D12S84, contrasting previous reports by Pulst and Lopes-Cendes and according to preliminary data between D12S84 and D12S1329. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Cerebellar anatomy as applied to cerebellar microsurgical resections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Ramos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To define the anatomy of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles, demonstrating the surgical application of anatomic landmarks in cerebellar resections. METHODS: Twenty cerebellar hemispheres were studied. RESULTS: The majority of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles had demonstrated constant relationship to other cerebellar structures, which provided landmarks for surgical approaching. The lateral border is separated from the midline by 19.5 mm in both hemispheres. The posterior border of the cortex is separated 23.3 mm from the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus; the lateral one is separated 26 mm from the lateral border of the nucleus; and the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus is separated 25.4 mm from the posterolateral angle formed by the junction of lateral and posterior borders of cerebellar hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS: Microsurgical anatomy has provided important landmarks that could be applied to cerebellar surgical resections.

  14. Motor dysfunction in cerebellar Purkinje cell-specific vesicular GABA transporter knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikiko eKayakabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian central nervous system and plays modulatory roles in neural development. The vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT is an essential molecule for GABAergic neurotransmission due to its role in vesicular GABA release. Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs are GABAergic projection neurons that are indispensable for cerebellar function. To elucidate the significance of VGAT in cerebellar PCs, we generated and characterized PC-specific VGAT knockout (L7-VGAT mice. VGAT mRNAs and proteins were specifically absent in the 40-week-old L7-VGAT PCs. The morphological charactereistics, such as lamination and foliation of the cerebellar cortex, of the L7-VGAT mice were similar to those of the control littermate mice. Moreover, the protein expression levels and patterns of pre- (calbindin and parvalbumin and postsynaptic (GABA-A receptor α1 subunit (GABAARα1 and gephyrin molecules between the L7-VGAT and control mice were similar in the deep cerebellar nuclei that receive PC projections. However, the L7-VGAT mice performed poorly in the accelerating rotarod test and displayed ataxic gait in the footprint test. The L7-VGAT mice also exhibited severer ataxia as VGAT deficits progressed. These results suggest that VGAT in cerebellar Purkinje cells is not essential for the rough maintenance of cerebellar structure, but does play an important role in motor coordination. The L7-VGAT mice are a novel model of ataxia without PC degeneration, and would also be useful for studying the role of Purkinje cells in cognition and emotion.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions SCA2 spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 ( SCA2 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions SCA3 spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 ( SCA3 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions SCA6 spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 ( SCA6 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions SCA1 spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 ( SCA1 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  19. Multiple-System Atrophy with Cerebellar Predominance Presenting as Respiratory Insufficiency and Vocal Cords Paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    João Manuel Quinaz; Ramon Andrade Bezerra de Mello; José Manuel Dias da Costa; Maria José Rosas; Diana Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Background. MSA (Multiple System Atrophy) may be associated either with Parkinsonism or with cerebellar ataxia (MSA-c subtype). It is considered a rare disease, but many patients are misdiagnosed as suffering from idiopathic Parkinson's disease. In this paper, we report a case of a patient admitted with respiratory failure and vocal cords paralysis due to MSA-c. Case Report. A 79-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted in March 2010 with dyspnea, asthenia, stridor, and respiratory failure needi...

  20. Ataxia telangiectasia: learning from previous mistakes

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Naveen; Aggarwal, Puneet; Dev, Nishanth; Kumar, Gunjan

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is an early onset neurodegenerative disorder. We report a case of childhood onset ataxia and ocular telangiectasia, presenting with pulmonary infection. The patient was diagnosed as ataxia telangiectasia. The patient succumbed to death owing to late diagnosis and sepsis.

  1. Ataxia, Dementia, and Hypogonadotropism Caused by Disordered Ubiquitination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margolin, David H.; Kousi, Maria; Chan, Yee-Ming;

    2013-01-01

    affected patients. Neurologic and reproductive endocrine phenotypes were characterized in detail. The effects of sequence variants and the presence of an epistatic interaction were tested in a zebrafish model. RESULTS Digenic homozygous mutations in RNF216 and OTUD4, which encode a ubiquitin E3 ligase...... in cerebellar pathways and the hippocampus; surviving hippocampal neurons contained ubiquitin-immunoreactive intranuclear inclusions. Defects were detected at the hypothalamic and pituitary levels of the reproductive endocrine axis. CONCLUSIONS The syndrome of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, ataxia, and dementia...... can be caused by inactivating mutations in RNF216 or by the combination of mutations in RNF216 and OTUD4. These findings link disordered ubiquitination to neurodegeneration and reproductive dysfunction and highlight the power of whole-exome sequencing in combination with functional studies to unveil...

  2. Clinical Features of Friedreich Ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Delatycki, Martin B.; Corben, Louise A

    2012-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia, the most common hereditary ataxia, affects about 1:29 000 Caucasians. In about 98% of these individuals it is due to homozygosity for a GAA trinucleotide repeat expansion in intron 1 of FXN; in the other 2% it is due to compound heterozygosity for a GAA expansion and point mutation or deletion. The condition affects multiple sites in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as a number of other organ systems, resulting in multiple signs and symptoms. Onset of this ...

  3. Clinical challenges in the ataxias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.H. Subramony

    2011-01-01

    Ataxias are rare diseases and the etiologic heterogeneity make individual entities even rarer. There are still substantial numbers of patients who are still poorly understood. Available assessment techniques still point to large numbers of patients needed for clinical trials and the need for cooperative efforts, better assessment tools and novel trial designs. Better understanding of neural circuitry abnormalities may lead to more effective symptomatic therapy. Opportunities exist for targeting at risk individuals for effective therapies but how this can be done is not clear. Preventive strategies may become feasible in many ataxias.

  4. HSF1-deficiency affects gait coordination and cerebellar calbindin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenwerth, Marc; Estrada, Veronica; Stahr, Anna; Müller, Hans Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in cell homeostasis and protect against cell damage. They were previously identified as key players in different ataxia models. HSF1 is the main transcription factor for HSP activation. HSF1-deficient mice (HSF1-/-) are known to have deficiencies in motor control test. However, little is known about effects of HSF1-deficiency on locomotor, especially gait, coordination. Therefore, we compared HSF-deficient (HSF1-/-) mice and wildtype littermates using an automated gait analysis system for objective assessment of gait coordination. We found significant changes in gait parameters of HSF1-/- mice reminiscent of cerebellar ataxia. Immunohistochemical analyses of a cerebellum revealed co-localization of HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis of a potential interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Calbindin levels were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, respectively. While quantitative PCR revealed no differences in calbindin mRNA levels between HSF1+/+ and HSF1-/- mice, calbindin protein levels, however, were significantly decreased in a cerebellum of HSF1-/- mice. A pathway analysis supports the hypothesis of an interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin. In summary, the targeted deletion of HSF1 results in changes of locomotor function associated with changes in cerebellar calbindin protein levels. These findings suggest a role of HSF1 in regular Purkinje cell calcium homeostasis. PMID:27173427

  5. Impaired Spatio-Temporal Predictive Motor Timing Associated with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broersen, Robin; Onuki, Yoshiyuki; Abdelgabar, Abdel R; Owens, Cullen B; Picard, Samuel; Willems, Jessica; Boele, Henk-Jan; Gazzola, Valeria; Van der Werf, Ysbrand D; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2016-01-01

    Many daily life activities demand precise integration of spatial and temporal information of sensory inputs followed by appropriate motor actions. This type of integration is carried out in part by the cerebellum, which has been postulated to play a central role in learning and timing of movements. Cerebellar damage due to atrophy or lesions may compromise forward-model processing, in which both spatial and temporal cues are used to achieve prediction for future motor states. In the present study we sought to further investigate the cerebellar contribution to predictive and reactive motor timing, as well as to learning of sequential order and temporal intervals in these tasks. We tested patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) and healthy controls for two related motor tasks; one requiring spatio-temporal prediction of dynamic visual stimuli and another one requiring reactive timing only. We found that healthy controls established spatio-temporal prediction in their responses with high temporal precision, which was absent in the cerebellar patients. SCA6 patients showed lower predictive motor timing, coinciding with a reduced number of correct responses during the 'anticipatory' period on the task. Moreover, on the task utilizing reactive motor timing functions, control participants showed both sequence order and temporal interval learning, whereas patients only showed sequence order learning. These results suggest that SCA6 affects predictive motor timing and temporal interval learning. Our results support and highlight cerebellar contribution to timing and argue for cerebellar engagement during spatio-temporal prediction of upcoming events. PMID:27571363

  6. 5-hydroxytryptamine and Lyme disease. Opportunity for a novel therapy to reduce the cerebellar tremor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximov, G K; Maximov, K G; Chokoeva, A A; Lotti, T; Wollina, U; Patterson, J W; Guarneri, C; Tana, C; Fioranelli, M; Roccia, M G; Kanazawa, N; Tchernev, G

    2016-01-01

    Lyme boreliosis is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burdorferi, which is transmitted by ticks. A 59 year-old woman developed pyrexia, strong headaches, ataxia, dysarthria and tremor of the limbs after a tick bite. She was unable to work and eat on her own. She was hospitalized three times and diagnosed with cerebellar intention tremor, cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, bilateral horizontal gaze paralysis and a central lesion of the left facial nerve. There were no pyramidal, sensory or psychiatric disturbances. The brain MRI showed multifocal leucoencephalopathy with many hyperintense areas in both hemispheres, as well as in the left superior pedunculus cerebellaris. Diagnosis was confirmed by serologic examination. Treatment with cephtriaxone, doxycycline, methylprednisolone, cephixime and ciprofloxacine was administered without effect on the tremor, ataxia and horizontal gaze paralysis. Treatment was then administered with 5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT) in increased doses. The result of the three-month treatment with 5-HT was a gradual diminution of the tremor and the ataxia and an increase in the ability to eat, walk and work independently. PMID:27373127

  7. Imaging study of lymphoreticular tumor development in ataxia-telangiectasia and Nijmegen breakage syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), or Louis-Bar syndrome, is an autosomal recessive illness characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculo-cutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency combined with susceptibility to sinopulmonary infections and high incidence of neoplastic development. Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a variant of AT, is also an autosomal recessive illness that presents cerebellar ataxia, as well as combined immunodeficiency and a tendency toward tumor development. Contrary to Louis-Bar syndrome, it doesn't present telangiectasia and exhibits a characteristics phenotype (short stature, bird-like face and microcephaly). Both entities are classified as syndrome of chromosomal instability or chromosomal fragility, a group which also includes Bloom syndrome and Fanconi anemia. All of these show an increase in the frequency of neoplastic pathologies, mainly lymphoid tumors. We present three patients,two with AT and one with NBS, who developed different lymphoma types in the course of the illness. We highlight the most outstanding aspects from a clinical-radiological point of view. (Author) 17 refs

  8. Quantitative evaluation of brain involvement in ataxia telangiectasia by diffusion weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firat, Ahmet Kemal [Inonu University Medical Faculty, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Malatya 44280 (Turkey); Karakas, Hakki Muammer [Inonu University Medical Faculty, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Malatya 44280 (Turkey)]. E-mail: hkarakas@inonu.edu.tr; Firat, Yezdan [Inonu University Medical Faculty, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Malatya (Turkey); Yakinci, Cengiz [Inonu University Medical Faculty, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Malatya (Turkey)

    2005-11-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in diagnosing ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and to investigate the spatial distribution of cerebral microstructural changes caused by the disease. Methods: Six AT patients (9-13 years) and nine healthy control subjects were examined on 1.5 T scanner. In addition to conventional MR images, DWI were performed with a fat suppressed, multishot spin echo EPI sequence using B values of 0, 500 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2}. Mean ADC values were measured from 16 different supra and infratentorial location. The difference between controls and AT patients regarding ADC values, and the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of them in discrimination were analyzed with t-tests, logistic regression analysis, ANOVA and ROC curves. Results: Conventional images of the controls were normal. In AT patients, the only conventional MR abnormality was cerebellar atrophy. The difference between both groups regarding mean ADC values was not significant for any of the cerebral structures. In contrary to cerebrum, cerebellar mean ADC values of patients and controls were statistically different (p < 0.011-0.0001). Patients and controls were classified with 100% accuracy using ADC values of cerebellar white matter and cortex together (p < 0.016). The cut-off ADC value (0.699 mm{sup 2}/s) for middle cerebellar cortex had produced highest (100%) sensitivity and specificity. There was a difference between superior, middle and inferior cerebellar cortex regarding ADC values (p < 0.026). Superior cerebellar cortex (0.987 {+-} 0.1956 mm{sup 2}/s) had higher ADC values than the middle and inferior cerebellar cortex. Conclusion: DWI provides a supplementary and objective imaging finding in AT. This finding is highly accurate in the radiological discrimination of healthy subjects and AT. Our findings also implicate that AT causes a diffuse atrophy and mostly affects superior part of the cortex.

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, Ashley M; Öz, Gülin; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), would benefit from the identification of reliable biomarkers that could serve as disease subtype-specific and stage-specific indicators for the development and monitoring of treatments. We analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of tau, α-synuclein, DJ-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), proteins previously associated with neurodegenerative processes, in patients with the autosomal dominant SCA1, SCA2, and SCA6, and the sporadic disease multiple system atrophy, cerebellar type (MSA-C), compared with age-matched controls. We estimated disease severity using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Most proteins measured trended higher in disease versus control group yet did not reach statistical significance. We found the levels of tau in both SCA2 and MSA-C patients were significantly higher than control. We found that α-synuclein levels were lower with higher SARA scores in SCA1 and tau levels were higher with greater SARA in MSA-C, although this final correlation did not reach statistical significance after post hoc correction. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed to improve the power of these studies and validate the use of CSF biomarkers in SCA and MSA-C. PMID:26265793

  10. Huntington’s disease masquerading as spinocerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Quiroga, Sergio Alejandro; Gonzalez-Morón, Dolores; Garretto, Nelida; Kauffman, Marcelo Andres

    2013-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterised by the presence of choreic abnormal movements, behavioural or psychiatric disturbances and dementia. Noteworthy, despite atypical motor symptoms other than chorea have been reported as initial presentation in some patients, a very few number of HD patients, presenting at onset mostly cerebellar dysfunction masquerading dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), were occasionally reported. We report the case of a 42-year-old man with a 5-year history of gait disturbance, dysarthria and cognitive impairment and familial antecedents of dementia and movement disorders. Initially the clinical picture suggested the diagnosis of a dominant SCA, but finally a diagnosis of HD was made based on the molecular evidence of abnormal 39 Cytosine-Adenine-Guanine (CAG) repeats in exon 1 of Huntingtin gene. The authors highlight the importance of suspecting HD in the aetiology of spinocerebellar ataxias when dementia is a prominent feature in the proband or their family. PMID:23853009

  11. Kv3.3 potassium channels and spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yalan; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-08-15

    The voltage-dependent potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed at high levels in cerebellar Purkinje cells, in auditory brainstem nuclei and in many other neurons capable of firing at high rates. In the cerebellum, it helps to shape the very characteristic complex spike of Purkinje cells. Kv3.3 differs from other closely related channels in that human mutations in the gene encoding Kv3.3 (KCNC3) result in a unique neurodegenerative disease termed spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13). This primarily affects the cerebellum, but also results in extracerebellar symptoms. Different mutations produce either early onset SCA13, associated with delayed motor and impaired cognitive skill acquisition, or late onset SCA13, which typically produces cerebellar degeneration in middle age. This review covers the localization and physiological function of Kv3.3 in the central nervous system and how the normal function of the channel is altered by the disease-causing mutations. It also describes experimental approaches that are being used to understand how Kv3.3 mutations are linked to neuronal survival, and to develop strategies for treatment. PMID:26442672

  12. Ataxia and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism with Intrafamilial Variability Caused by RNF216 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqwaifly, Mohammed; Bohlega, Saeed

    2016-06-15

    Gordon Holmes syndrome (GHS) is a distinct phenotype of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia, characterized by ataxia, dementia, reproductive defects and hypogonadism; it has been recently found to be associated with RNF216 mutation. We performed whole-exome sequencing and filtered the resulting novel variants by the coordinates of the shared autozygome. We identified a novel splicing variant in RNF216 that is likely to abolish the canonical splice site at the junction of exon/intron 13 (NM_207111.3:c.2061G>A). We herein report two patients with GHS caused by a novel RNF216 mutation as the first follow up report on RNF216-related GHS, and show interfamilial variability of phenotype supporting the previously reported RNF216-related cases. PMID:27441066

  13. Gait and Functional Mobility Deficits in Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Joan A; Robertson-Dick, Erin E; Hall, Deborah A; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) results from a "premutation" (PM) size CGG repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Cerebellar gait ataxia is the primary feature in some FXTAS patients causing progressive disability. However, no studies have quantitatively characterized gait and mobility deficits in FXTAS. We performed quantitative gait and mobility analysis in seven FMR1 PM carriers with FXTAS and ataxia, six PM carriers without FXTAS, and 18 age-matched controls. We studied four independent gait domains, trunk range of motion (ROM), and movement transitions using an instrumented Timed Up and Go (i-TUG). We correlated these outcome measures with FMR1 molecular variables and clinical severity scales. PM carriers with FXTAS were globally impaired in every gait performance domain except trunk ROM compared to controls. These included total i-TUG duration, stride velocity, gait cycle time, cadence, double-limb support and swing phase times, turn duration, step time before turn, and turn-to-sit duration, and increased gait variability on several measures. Carriers without FXTAS did not differ from controls on any parameters, but double-limb support time was close to significance. Balance and disability scales correlated with multiple gait and movement transition parameters, while the FXTAS Rating Scale did not. This is the first study to quantitatively examine gait and movement transitions in FXTAS patients. Gait characteristics were consistent with those from previous cohorts with cerebellar ataxia. Sensitive measures like the i-TUG may help determine efficacy of interventions, characterize disease progression, and provide early markers of disease in FXTAS. PMID:26298472

  14. Unanswered Questions in Friedreich Ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, David R; Deutsch, Eric C.; Wilson, Robert B.; Tennekoon, Gihan

    2012-01-01

    During the past 15 years, the pace of research advancement in Friedreich ataxia has been rapid. The abnormal gene has been discovered and its gene product characterized, leading to the development of new evidence-based therapies. Still, various unsettled issues remain that affect clinical trials. These include the level of frataxin deficiency needed to cause disease, the mechanism by which frataxin-deficient mitochondrial dysfunction leads to symptomatology, and the reason selected cells are ...

  15. The preterm pig as a model of premature infant gait ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, A.; Ryom, K.; Vanden Hole, C.;

    Aims/background Compromised gait, balance and motor coordination (ataxia) as observed in cases of cerebral palsy is a serious complication to premature birth. The cerebellum is a central region with regards to these brain functions and its development shows high sensitivity to premature birth. Our...... aim of this study was to compare gait patterns and cerebellar neurodevelopmental gene expression of preterm and term piglets. Methods We compared gait patterns and T-maze performance of caesarean born preterm (3 litters, 90% gestation) and term born pigs (1 litter, 100% gestation) recorded at five...... distinct postnatal days. MatLab was used to determine a list of spatiotemporal gait characteristics e.g. stride length/ frequency, ”duty factor” and asymmetry indices. These data were paralleled by qPCR of >60 selected neurodevelopmental genes of isolated cerebellar tissue. Results While most genes did not...

  16. [Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome secondary to a cerebellar tumour].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Carreras-Sáez, I; García-Peñas, J J; Fournier-Del Castillo, C; Villalobos-Reales, J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is characterized by disturbances of executive function, impaired spatial cognition, linguistic difficulties, and personality change. The case of an 11 year old boy is presented, with behavior problems, learning difficulties and social interaction problems. In the physical examination he had poor visual contact, immature behavior, reduced expressive language and global motor disability with gait dyspraxia, with no defined cerebellar motor signs. In the neuropsychological evaluation he has a full scale overall intellectual quotient of 84, with signs of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. A tumour affecting inferior cerebellar vermis was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging, which had not significantly grown during 5 years of follow up. The cerebellum participates in controlling cognitive and affective functions. Cerebellar pathology must be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cognitive or learning disorder with associated behavioral and emotional components. PMID:24954915

  17. Friedreich Ataxia and Diabetes Mellitus: family study

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, M; Fagulha, A; Barros, L.; Guimarães, J; Carrilho, F; Carvalheiro, M

    2005-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FA) is one of the genetic syndromes sometimes associated with diabetes and the most common hereditary ataxia. It is a autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease, caused by a mutation in the FRDA gene, which originates decreased expression of frataxin, a mitochondrial protein involved in iron metabolism. The disorder is usually manifest in childhood and is characterised by ataxia, dysarthria, scoliosis and feet deformity. About two thirds of patients have hypertrophic c...

  18. Extensive White Matter Alterations and Its Correlations with Ataxia Severity in SCA 2 Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R Hernandez-Castillo

    Full Text Available Previous studies of SCA2 have revealed significant degeneration of white matter tracts in cerebellar and cerebral regions. The motor deficit in these patients may be attributable to the degradation of projection fibers associated with the underlying neurodegenerative process. However, this relationship remains unclear. Statistical analysis of diffusion tensor imaging enables an unbiased whole-brain quantitative comparison of the diffusion proprieties of white matter tracts in vivo.Fourteen genetically confirmed SCA2 patients and aged-matched healthy controls participated in the study. Tract-based spatial statistics were performed to analyze structural white matter damage using two different measurements: fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD. Significant diffusion differences were correlated with the patient's ataxia impairment.Our analysis revealed decreased FA mainly in the inferior/middle/superior cerebellar peduncles, the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule and the bilateral superior corona radiata. Increases in MD were found mainly in cerebellar white matter, medial lemniscus, and middle cerebellar peduncle, among other regions. Clinical impairment measured with the SARA score correlated with FA in superior parietal white matter and bilateral anterior corona radiata. Correlations with MD were found in cerebellar white matter and the middle cerebellar peduncle.Our findings show significant correlations between diffusion measurements in key areas affected in SCA2 and measures of motor impairment, suggesting a disruption of information flow between motor and sensory-integration areas. These findings result in a more comprehensive view of the clinical impact of the white matter degeneration in SCA2.

  19. [{sup 123}I]-IMP SPECT findings in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Yasuhiko; Nakabayashi, Haruo; Iguchi, Yasuyuki; Suzuki, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Masayuki [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital; Nakajima, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    To study the dynamics of metabolic function in the cerebellar hemispheres, vermis and brain stem of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6), we used single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-[{sup 123}I] iodoamphetamine (IMP) to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in six Japanese patients with SCA6 and nine normal control subjects. All patients with SCA6 were found to have expanded CAG repeats (from 22 to 24 repeats). The SPECT data were also analyzed semiquantitatively. The rCBF in the cerebellar hemisphere, vermis and brain stem was not significantly lower in patients with SCA6 than in normal controls. However, the ratio of the cerebellar hemisphere to occipital lobe (C/O ratio) was significantly lower in patients. The ratio of the vermis and brain stem to occipital lobe (V/O, P/O ratio) were not significantly lower in patients. The C/O, V/O and P/O ratio were especially sensitive indexes for regional cerebral function in patients with SCA6. Results of this study suggest that the functional decrease in SCA6 may begin in the cerebellar hemispheres. IMP SPECT was useful for evaluating rCBF in patients with SCA6. (author)

  20. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with vitamin E deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions ataxia with vitamin E deficiency ataxia with vitamin E deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency is a disorder that ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by a blood ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Open All Close All Description Dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia (DCMA) syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  3. Direct transcranial puncture for Onyx embolization of a cerebellar hemangioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Evans, Avery J; Liu, Kenneth C

    2014-06-01

    Intracranial hemangioblastomas are benign but hypervascular tumors, most commonly located in the cerebellum, which are difficult to resect without significant operative blood loss. While preoperative embolization may decrease the amount of operative bleeding, the vascular supply of cerebellar hemangioblastomas frequently precludes safe embolization by an endovascular route due to the risk of thromboembolic vertebrobasilar infarction. Direct puncture embolization overcomes many of the limitations of endovascular embolization but its safety and feasibility for intracranial tumors is unknown. We report a 48-year-old man who was diagnosed with a large cerebellar mass after presenting with headaches and gait ataxia. Based on diagnostic angiography, which demonstrated a highly vascular tumor supplied by the posterior inferior cerebellar and posterior meningeal arteries, we decided to embolize the tumor by a direct transcranial puncture approach. After trephinating the skull in a standard fashion, a catheter-needle construct, composed of an Echelon 10 microcatheter (ev3 Endovascular, Plymouth, MN, USA) placed into a 21-gauge spinal needle, was inserted into the tumor under biplanar angiographic guidance. Using continuous angiographic monitoring, 9cc of Onyx 34 (ev3 Endovascular) was injected through the catheter, resulting in 75% tumor devascularization without evidence of complications. The patient was taken directly to surgery where a gross total resection of the hemangioblastoma was achieved with an acceptable operative blood loss. At his 2 year follow-up, the patient was neurologically intact without neuroimaging evidence of residual tumor. We describe, to our knowledge, the first case of direct transcranial puncture for preoperative embolization of a cerebellar hemangioblastoma. PMID:24370504

  4. Clinical and molecular studies in five Brazilian cases of Friedreich ataxia Avaliação clínica e molecular de cinco pacientes brasileiros com ataxia de Friedreich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IDA V.D. SCHWARTZ

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia (FRDA, the most common autosomal recessive ataxia, is caused in 94% of cases by homozygous expansions of an unstable GAA repeat localised in intron 1 of the X25 gene. We have investigated this mutation in five Brazilian patients: four with typical FRDA findings and one patient with atypical manifestations, who was considered to have some other form of cerebellar ataxia with retained reflexes. The GAA expansion was detected in all these patients. The confirmation of FRDA diagnosis in the atypical case may be pointing out, as in other reports, that clinical spectrum of Friedreich's ataxia is broader than previously recognised and includes cases with intact tendon reflexes.A ataxia de Friedreich (FRDA é a mais frequente das ataxias com herança autossômica recessiva. Em 94 % dos casos, é causada por uma expansão homozigota instável da repetição de trinucleotídeos GAA, localizada no primeiro íntron do gene X25. Esta mutação foi investigada em cinco pacientes brasileiros: quatro com quadro clínico típico de FRDA e um paciente com manifestações atípicas, cujo diagnóstico prévio era o de alguma outra forma de ataxia cerebelar com preservação de reflexos. A investigação foi positiva nos cinco casos. A confirmação do diagnóstico de FRDA no paciente com quadro atípico, assim como em outros casos semelhantes já relatados na literatura, sugere que o espectro de manifestações clínicas da FRDA seja mais amplo do que o classicamente reconhecido, incluindo casos com preservação de reflexos.

  5. Episodic ataxia type 2 manifests as epileptiform electroencephalographic activity with no epileptic attacks in two family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaido, Misako; Furuta, Mitsuru; Nakamori, Masayuki; Yuasa, Yoshihito; Takahashi, Masanori P

    2016-04-28

    Here, we report two cases of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) in a 63-year-old woman and her 36-year-old daughter. The mother experienced recurrent attacks of cerebellar dysfunction lasting 4 to 5 hours since the age of 41 years. On several occasions, she was admitted to the emergency room, where she was diagnosed with epilepsy or stroke. Based on these diagnoses, she was treated with antiepileptic or anticoagulant drugs, but both treatments were eventually discontinued. The frequency of the attacks increased after the patient reached the age of 62. Interictal neurological examination demonstrated signs of slight cerebellar ataxia, i.e. saccadic eye movements, gaze-directed nystagmus, and mild truncal ataxia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebellar vermis atrophy. Electroencephalography (EEG) revealed various spike and wave patterns: solitary spikes, spike-and-slow wave complexes, and slow wave bursts. Photoparoxysmal response (PPR) type 3 was also observed. Treatment with acetazolamide abolished the patient's attacks almost completely. The daughter started experiencing 5- to 10-minute ataxic episodes at the age of 16 years. Based on her epileptiform EEG activities with PPR (type 2), antiepileptic drugs (valproate and zonisamide) were prescribed. Despite pharmacological treatment, the attacks recurred; however, their frequency gradually decreased with time, until they almost entirely disappeared when the patient was 33. Unfortunately, migraine-like headaches arose instead. Subtle truncal ataxia was observed during interictal periods. Sanger sequencing of the exons of the CACNA1A gene revealed a novel single base deletion (c.3575delA) in both patients. Despite the difference in age of onset and clinical course, both patients showed clearly epileptiform EEG activities without experiencing the concurrent epileptic episodes. Thus, EA2 is a disease that may be misdiagnosed as epilepsy or stroke in the field of emergency medicine. PMID:27025991

  6. [An acute severe heat stroke patient showing abnormal diffuse high intensity of the cerebellar cortex in diffusion weighted image: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Yusuke; Yasui, Keizo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Akira; Sobue, Gen

    2009-10-01

    A 47-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of general convulsion, loss of consciousness and hyperthermia. A diagnosis of acute heat stroke was made clinically and neuroradiologically. As the consciousness level ameliorated, he developed severe abulia and mutism, then cerebellar ataxic syndrome (viz. truncal ataxia, hypermetria, ataxic speech and nystagmus). An MRI (diffusion weighted image; DWI) disclosed abnormal diffuse high signal intensity of the cerebellar cortex with reduced apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Two months later after the onset, truncal ataxia and dysarthria significantly improved, while dysmetria of the extremities rather worsened. At that time, the abnormal signal intensity of the cerebellar cortex disappeared, and the cerebellum became atrophic. The cerebellar blood flow was significantly decreased on brain SPECT (99mTc-ECD). The abnormal DWI signal intensity of the cerebellar cortex in the present patient may represent the cytotoxic edema of Purkinje cells resulting from heat stroke-related hyperthermia It is essential to repeat MRI examination for cerebellar pathology and to obtain better insight into sequelae in patients with acute heat stroke. Protirelin tartrate seemed to be valid for improvement of abulia in the present patient. Further study is indicated. PMID:19999144

  7. Superior cerebellar artery infarction in endovascular treatment for tentorial dural arteriovenous fistulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jingbo; Lv Xianli; Jiang Chuhan; Li Youxiang [Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, 6, Tiantan, Xili, Chongwen, 100050, Beijing (China); Wu Zhongxue, E-mail: ttyyzjb@sina.co [Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, 6, Tiantan, Xili, Chongwen, 100050, Beijing (China)

    2010-06-15

    Background: Superior cerebellar artery (SCA) syndrome shows ipsilateral cerebellar ataxia and Horner's syndrome, contralateral superficial sensory disturbance, as well as nystagmus toward the impaired side, vertigo, and nausea. Occasionally, unilateral lesions may produce bilateral hypogeusia and contralateral hypoacusia. Objective: To report 2 patients with unilateral lower midbrain ischemic lesions of the inferior colliculus level caused by transarterial embolization for tentorial dural arteriovenous fistulas (TDAVFs). Methods: Hospital records for 21 patients with TDAVFs mainly treated by endovascular techniques between 2005 and 2008 were reviewed. Two patients with MRI evidence of unilateral SCA territory infarction were investigated. Results: Of 21 patients, 2 treated transarterially with Onyx-18 (a nonahesive liquid embolic agent) developed infarctions in the territory of SCA. One patient had lateral SCA infarction characterized by ipsilateral gait ataxia, contralateral hemihypoesthesia, with additional ipsilateral ocular motor palsy and bilateral gustatory loss. And the other patient had medial SCA infarction characterized by ipsilateral ataxia contralateral hemihypoesthesia with additional contralateral hypoacusia. Conclusion: SCA infarction can be caused by transarterial injection of Onyx-18 via SCA or the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) for TDAVFs and additionally presented with gustatory loss and deafness, which is generally not a feature of the SCA syndrome.

  8. Radiosensitivity in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiosensitivity is a major hallmark of the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. This hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation has been demonstrated in vitro after exposure of patients to therapeutic thought to be the major factor contculture. Clearly an understanding of the nature of the molecular defect in ataxia-telangiectasia will be of considerable assistance in delineating additional pathways that determine cellular radiosensitivity/radioresistance. Furthermore, since patients with this syndrome are also predisposed to developing a number of leukaemias and lymphomas the possible connection between radiosensitivity and cancer predisposition is of interest. Now that the gene (ATM) responsible for this genetic disease has been cloned and identified, progress is being made in determining the role of the ATM protein in mediating the effects of cellular exposure to ionizing radiation and other forms of redox stress. Proteins such as the product of the tumour suppressor gene p53 and the proto-oncogene c-Abl (a protein tyrosine kinase) have been shown to interact with ATM. Since several intermediate steps in both the p53 and c-Abl pathways, activated by ionizing radiation, are known it will be possible to map the position of ATM in these pathways and describe its mechanism of action. What are the clinical implications of understanding the molecular basis of the defect in ataxia-telangiectasia? As outlined above since radiosensitivity is a universal characteristic of A-T understanding the mechanism of action of ATM will provide additional information or radiation signalling in human cells. With this information it may be possible to sensitize tumour cells to radiation and thus increase the therapeutic benefit of radiotherapy. This might involve the use of small molecules that would interfere with the normal ATM controlled pathways and thus sensitize cells to radiation or alternatively it might involve the efficient introduction of ATM anti-sense c

  9. Radiosensitivity in ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavin, M.F. [Royal Brisbane Hospital, QLD (Australia). Queensland Institute of Medical Research and The Department of Surgery; Khanna, K.K.; Watters, D. [Royal Brisbane Hospital, QLD (Australia). Queensland Institute of Medical Research

    1998-12-31

    Full text: Radiosensitivity is a major hallmark of the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. This hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation has been demonstrated in vitro after exposure of patients to therapeutic thought to be the major factor contculture. Clearly an understanding of the nature of the molecular defect in ataxia-telangiectasia will be of considerable assistance in delineating additional pathways that determine cellular radiosensitivity/radioresistance. Furthermore, since patients with this syndrome are also predisposed to developing a number of leukaemias and lymphomas the possible connection between radiosensitivity and cancer predisposition is of interest. Now that the gene (ATM) responsible for this genetic disease has been cloned and identified, progress is being made in determining the role of the ATM protein in mediating the effects of cellular exposure to ionizing radiation and other forms of redox stress. Proteins such as the product of the tumour suppressor gene p53 and the proto-oncogene c-Abl (a protein tyrosine kinase) have been shown to interact with ATM. Since several intermediate steps in both the p53 and c-Abl pathways, activated by ionizing radiation, are known it will be possible to map the position of ATM in these pathways and describe its mechanism of action. What are the clinical implications of understanding the molecular basis of the defect in ataxia-telangiectasia? As outlined above since radiosensitivity is a universal characteristic of A-T understanding the mechanism of action of ATM will provide additional information or radiation signalling in human cells. With this information it may be possible to sensitize tumour cells to radiation and thus increase the therapeutic benefit of radiotherapy. This might involve the use of small molecules that would interfere with the normal ATM controlled pathways and thus sensitize cells to radiation or alternatively it might involve the efficient introduction of ATM anti-sense c

  10. Ataxias agudas en la infancia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaline Betancourt Fursow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available La ataxia cerebelosa aguda infantil (ACAI es la forma más frecuente de complicación neurológica por el virus de la varicela.Descritas dentro del grupo de las cerebelitis agudas. Los objetivos de este estudio fueron: evaluar la presentación clínica, manejo y seguimiento de niños hospitalizados con ACAI en un hospital pediátrico terciario donde la inmunización para varicela no está disponible (parte I y describir los diagnósticos diferenciales de la cerebelitis aguda (parte II. Estudiamos 95 pacientes. Los criterios diagnósticos de ataxia aguda se basaron en: pérdida aguda de la coordinación o dificultad para la marcha con o sin nistagmo asociado y duración menor de 48 horas, en un niño previamente sano. Estos criterios se cumplían en todos los casos valorados, excepto en las ataxias secundarias a ingesta de tóxicos, en los que la duración debía ser menor de 24 horas para su inclusión en el estudio. Se registraron los datos en una historia clínica pediátrica y neurológica. Entre los pacientes inmunosuprimidos la incidencia mayor fue la complicación por varicela. La mayoría de los pacientes fueron varones. El rango de edad fue la preescolar, 5 años . El intervalo entre la presentación del rash y el ingreso fue de 1 a 3 días. El estudio de LCR se practicó en 59.5% de los casos. La TAC y la resonancia magnética cerebral (RM presentaron edema en el 33.3%. El aciclovir endovenoso fue utilizado en 23 pacientes; pero no hubo diferencias significativas en las manifestaciones clínicas y seguimiento entre tratados y no tratados. La ataxia fue la primera manifestación clínica. La estadía hospitalaria fue de 4 días (rango: 2-11 días.

  11. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 : a genetic update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Dineke S.

    2009-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 locus was identified in 2004 based on linkage analysis in a large, two-generation Dutch family. The age of onset ranged 43-56 years and the phenotype was characterized by a slowly progressive, isolated ataxia. Neuropathological examination revealed neuronal loss in

  12. Friedreich's ataxia presenting after cardiac transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard, H; Forsyth, R.

    2001-01-01

    A 4 year old boy underwent cardiac transplantation because of cardiomyopathy with ischaemia. Following transplantation he developed neurological signs of Friedreich's ataxia and the diagnosis was confirmed with genetic testing. Cardiomyopathy is a rare presentation of Friedreich's ataxia and to our knowledge this is the first reported transplant operation for the cardiomyopathy associated with this condition.



  13. Multiple-System Atrophy with Cerebellar Predominance Presenting as Respiratory Insufficiency and Vocal Cords Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Andrade Bezerra de Mello

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. MSA (Multiple System Atrophy may be associated either with Parkinsonism or with cerebellar ataxia (MSA-c subtype. It is considered a rare disease, but many patients are misdiagnosed as suffering from idiopathic Parkinson's disease. In this paper, we report a case of a patient admitted with respiratory failure and vocal cords paralysis due to MSA-c. Case Report. A 79-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted in March 2010 with dyspnea, asthenia, stridor, and respiratory failure needing noninvasive ventilation. She had orthostatic blood pressure decline, constipation, insomnia, daytime sleepiness, and snoring. The neurologic examination revealed cerebellar ataxia. A laryngoscopy revealed vocal cord paralysis in midline position and tracheostomy was performed. The Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging revealed atrophy of middle cerebellar peduncles and pons with the “hot cross bun sign.” Conclusion. Although Multiple-system atrophy is a rare disease, unexplained respiratory failure, bilateral vocal cord paralysis, or stridor should lead to consider MSA as diagnosis.

  14. Metastatic cerebellar tumor of papillary thyroid carcinoma mimicking cerebellar hemangioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ideguchi, Makoto; Nishizaki, Takafumi; Ikeda, Norio; Nakano, Shigeki; Okamura, Tomomi; Fujii, Natsumi; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Ikeda, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma generally (PTC) have a favorable prognosis. This metastasis is rare in the central nervous system. Brain metastasis has a relatively poor prognosis. We present a rare case of cerebellar metastasis, one that mimics a solid type cerebellar hemangioblastoma and because of which it was very hard to reach accurate preoperative diagnosis. Accurate diagnosis was challenging because of the similar imaging and histopathological findings for ...

  15. Imaging study of lymphoreticular tumor development in ataxia-telangiectasia and Nijmegen breakage syndrome; Estudio por imagen del desarrollo de tumores linforreticulares en la ataxia telangiectasia y el sindrome de Nijmegen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Leon, M. I.; Ceres-Ruiz, L.; Cuesta, M. A.; Garcia-Martin, F. J. [Hospital Materno-Infantil C.H.U. Carlos Haya. Malaga (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), or Louis-Bar syndrome, is an autosomal recessive illness characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculo-cutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency combined with susceptibility to sinopulmonary infections and high incidence of neoplastic development. Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a variant of AT, is also an autosomal recessive illness that presents cerebellar ataxia, as well as combined immunodeficiency and a tendency toward tumor development. Contrary to Louis-Bar syndrome, it doesn't present telangiectasia and exhibits a characteristics phenotype (short stature, bird-like face and microcephaly). Both entities are classified as syndrome of chromosomal instability or chromosomal fragility, a group which also includes Bloom syndrome and Fanconi anemia. All of these show an increase in the frequency of neoplastic pathologies, mainly lymphoid tumors. We present three patients,two with AT and one with NBS, who developed different lymphoma types in the course of the illness. We highlight the most outstanding aspects from a clinical-radiological point of view. (Author) 17 refs.

  16. Change in the cortical complexity of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 appears earlier than clinical symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Yun Wang

    Full Text Available Patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 have exhibited cerebral cortical involvement and various mental deficits in previous studies. Clinically, conventional measurements, such as the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and electroencephalography (EEG, are insensitive to cerebral cortical involvement and mental deficits associated with SCA3, particularly at the early stage of the disease. We applied a three-dimensional fractal dimension (3D-FD method, which can be used to quantify the shape complexity of cortical folding, in assessing cortical degeneration. We evaluated 48 genetically confirmed SCA3 patients by employing clinical scales and magnetic resonance imaging and using 50 healthy participants as a control group. According to the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA, the SCA3 patients were diagnosed with cortical dysfunction in the cerebellar cortex; however, no significant difference in the cerebral cortex was observed according to the patients' MMSE ratings. Using the 3D-FD method, we determined that cortical involvement was more extensive than involvement of traditional olivopontocerebellar regions and the corticocerebellar system. Moreover, the significant correlation between decreased 3D-FD values and disease duration may indicate atrophy of the cerebellar cortex and cerebral cortex in SCA3 patients. The change of the cerebral complexity in the SCA3 patients can be detected throughout the disease duration, especially it becomes substantial at the late stage of the disease. Furthermore, we determined that atrophy of the cerebral cortex may occur earlier than changes in MMSE scores and EEG signals.

  17. Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome - features, mechanisms and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerman, Randi J; Hagerman, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Many physicians are unaware of the many phenotypes associated with the fragile X premutation, an expansion in the 5' untranslated region of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene that consists of 55-200 CGG repeats. The most severe of these phenotypes is fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), which occurs in the majority of ageing male premutation carriers but in fewer than 20% of ageing women with the premutation. The prevalence of the premutation is 1 in 150-300 females, and 1 in 400-850 males, so physicians are likely to see people affected by FXTAS. Fragile X DNA testing is broadly available in the Western world. The clinical phenotype of FXTAS at presentation can vary and includes intention tremor, cerebellar ataxia, neuropathic pain, memory and/or executive function deficits, parkinsonian features, and psychological disorders, such as depression, anxiety and/or apathy. FXTAS causes brain atrophy and white matter disease, usually in the middle cerebellar peduncles, the periventricular area, and the splenium and/or genu of the corpus callosum. Here, we review the complexities involved in the clinical management of FXTAS and consider how targeted treatment for these clinical features of FXTAS will result from advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie this neurodegenerative disorder. Such targeted approaches should also be more broadly applicable to earlier forms of clinical involvement among premutation carriers. PMID:27340021

  18. Virtual Immunology: Software for Teaching Basic Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berçot, Filipe Faria; Fidalgo-Neto, Antônio Augusto; Lopes, Renato Matos; Faggioni, Thais; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2013-01-01

    As immunology continues to evolve, many educational methods have found difficulty in conveying the degree of complexity inherent in its basic principles. Today, the teaching-learning process in such areas has been improved with tools such as educational software. This article introduces "Virtual Immunology," a software program available…

  19. Cerebellar Malformations and Cognitive Disdorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The behavioral developmental profile of 27 children and adults (17 males and 10 females with congenital cerebellar malformations was determined in a clinical, neuroradiological and neuropsychological study at the Scientific Institute 'E Medea', University of Milano, Italy.

  20. An altered GABA-A receptor function in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 associated with the CACNA1A gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kono

    2014-12-01

    General significance: An altered GABA-A receptor function has previously been reported in models of inherited murine cerebellar ataxia caused by a mutation in the CACNA1A gene. This study showed novel clinical characteristics of alteration in the GABA-A receptor in vivo, which may provide clinical evidence indicating a pathological mechanism common to neurological disorders associated with CACNA1A gene mutation.

  1. Ataxia espinocerebelosa 7: Investigación clínica y genética en una familia argentina Spinocerebellar ataxia 7: Clinical and genetic investigation in an Argentine family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan I. Rojas

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Las ataxias espino cerebelosas (AEC, constituyen un grupo de trastornos hereditarios neurodegenerativos de herencia autosómica dominante. Se caracterizan principalmente por la presencia clínica de ataxia cerebelosa asociada a oftalmoplejía, disartria, signos piramidales o extrapiramidales y pérdida de la sensibilidad profunda. La AEC 7 pertenece al grupo de las ataxias espinocerebelosas en la cual el trastorno es consecuencia de la expansión del triplete CAG localizado en el cromosoma 3 p12-p21. La característica clínica de dicha ataxia es la pérdida de la agudeza visual y posterior ceguera. Presentamos tres individuos de una familia con ataxia cerebelosa, pérdida de la agudeza visual y otros signos neurológicos. El diagnóstico fue confirmado por medio del análisis genético en el cual se observó la anormalidad característica de la AEC 7. Este es el primer caso de AEC 7 en Argentina confirmado por estudio genético. En la revisión de la literatura (hasta enero 2006 se hallaron sólo dos familias notificadas en América Latina. El objetivo del trabajo es el de enfocar la atención en el diagnóstico de esta enfermedad degenerativa en pacientes que se presentan con ataxia cerebelosa progresiva asociada con disminución de la agudeza visual e historia familiar positiva.Spino cerebellar ataxia (SCA are a complex group of hereditary neurodegenerative disturbances of autosomal dominant pattern. They are largely characterized by the clinical presence of cerebellar ataxia related to ophtalmoplegia, dysarthria, pyramidal and extra-pyramidal signs and loss of deep sensitivity. SCA 7 belongs to the SCA group in which the disturbance is a result of the expansion of CAG triplet repetition located in the 3p12-p21 chromosome. The characteristic clinical feature of SCA7 is the loss of visual acuity and blindness. We present here three cases of ataxia, from the same family, with loss of visual acuity and other neurological disorders. The diagnosis

  2. CACNA1A haploinsufficiency causes cognitive impairment, autism and epileptic encephalopathy with mild cerebellar symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaj, Lena; Lupien-Meilleur, Alexis; Lortie, Anne; Riou, Émilie; Ospina, Luis H; Gagnon, Louise; Vanasse, Catherine; Rossignol, Elsa

    2015-11-01

    CACNA1A loss-of-function mutations classically present as episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2), with brief episodes of ataxia and nystagmus, or with progressive spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA6). A minority of patients carrying CACNA1A mutations develops epilepsy. Non-motor symptoms associated with these mutations are often overlooked. In this study, we report 16 affected individuals from four unrelated families presenting with a spectrum of cognitive impairment including intellectual deficiency, executive dysfunction, ADHD and/or autism, as well as childhood-onset epileptic encephalopathy with refractory absence epilepsy, febrile seizures, downbeat nystagmus and episodic ataxia. Sequencing revealed one CACNA1A gene deletion, two deleterious CACNA1A point mutations including one known stop-gain and one new frameshift variant and a new splice-site variant. This report illustrates the phenotypic heterogeneity of CACNA1A loss-of-function mutations and stresses the cognitive and epileptic manifestations caused by the loss of CaV2.1 channels function, presumably affecting cerebellar, cortical and limbic networks. PMID:25735478

  3. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong-Jun [Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Hosup, E-mail: shim@dku.edu [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physiology, Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  4. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies

  5. Cerebellar allocentric and action-intentional spatial neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Nicholas J; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2014-09-01

    Contralesional hemispatial neglect most often results from lesions in the right posterior temporoparietal cortex. Less commonly, contralesional and ipsilesional neglect are caused by lesions in the frontal lobe. Although unilateral left cerebellar lesions have been reported to cause body-centered (egocentric) ipsilesional neglect, they have not been reported to cause left-side object-centered (allocentric) neglect together with a leftward action-intentional bias. We describe a patient who had these signs of neglect 7 months after a left cerebellar hemorrhage. This 61-year-old right-handed woman reported emotional lability and difficulty walking, frequently bumping into things on her left side. Neurologic examination revealed ocular dysmetria and left-side limb ataxia. Neuropsychological tests showed evidence of neglect. On a clock-drawing test, the patient accurately drew a circle but her number placement deviated to the left side. She showed the same leftward deviation when she tried to draw a circle composed of small triangles. Although her line bisection was normal, on an allocentric task of open-triangle cancellation she was most likely to neglect triangles with a left-side opening. Her performance on this task indicated left allocentric neglect. Her leftward deviation on the clock and figure drawing tasks seems to be a form of an action-intentional grasp, which may have been induced by right frontal dysfunction superimposed on a deficit of global attention. PMID:25237748

  6. A case of Salla disease with involvement of the cerebellar white matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salla disease (SD) is a lysosomal disorder manifesting in infancy with hypotonia, nystagmus, ataxia and retarded motor development. MRI typically shows hypomyelination confined to the cerebral white matter. We describe a patient with two MRI studies in addition to repeated urine examinations. This case was problematic because the first urine examination did not show the elevation of free sialic acid typical of SD and MRI was also atypical, with abnormal signal intensity in cerebellar white matter. We recommend repeated urinary examinations and a search for SLC17A5 mutations in patients with cerebral signal intensity abnormalities typical of SD and emphasise that cerebellar white-matter involvement on MRI does not exclude the diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Congenital porencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia in a Holstein calf: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the case of a nine-day-old female Holstein calf which had cheiloschisis, a moderate dome-shaped head, ataxia and opisthotonus since birth. No significant findings except the dome-shaped head were observed on survey radiography of the skull. Computed tomography (CT) images showed bilateral lateral ventriculomegaly, cerebellar hypoplasia and a cyst-like lesion communicating with the right lateral ventricle. Post-mortem examination revealed a cerebral defect in the frontoparietal lobe, which communicated with the right lateral ventricle, and cerebellar hypoplasia. CT provided a characteristic finding of porencephaly and was helpful for diagnosing the accompanying anomalies. We suggest that porencephaly should be included as a specific anomaly in the differential diagnosis of congenital brain malformation

  8. A case of Salla disease with involvement of the cerebellar white matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linnankivi, T.; Loennqvist, T. [Department of Paediatric Neurology, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Helsinki (Finland); Autti, T. [Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 340, FIN-00029 HUCH (Finland)

    2003-02-01

    Salla disease (SD) is a lysosomal disorder manifesting in infancy with hypotonia, nystagmus, ataxia and retarded motor development. MRI typically shows hypomyelination confined to the cerebral white matter. We describe a patient with two MRI studies in addition to repeated urine examinations. This case was problematic because the first urine examination did not show the elevation of free sialic acid typical of SD and MRI was also atypical, with abnormal signal intensity in cerebellar white matter. We recommend repeated urinary examinations and a search for SLC17A5 mutations in patients with cerebral signal intensity abnormalities typical of SD and emphasise that cerebellar white-matter involvement on MRI does not exclude the diagnosis. (orig.)

  9. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with anti-Yo antibodies - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Anand; Opal, Puneet

    2016-08-01

    The ataxic syndrome associated with Anti-Yo antibody, or Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody type 1 (PCA1), is the most common variant of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). The typical presentation involves the subacute development of pancerebellar deficits with a clinical plateau within 6 months. The vast majority of cases have been reported in women with pelvic or breast tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain is often normal in the early stages, with cerebellar atrophy seen later. The underlying mechanism is believed to be an immunological reaction to cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2 (CDR2), a protein usually found in the cerebellum that is ectopically produced by tumor cells. Although both B- and T-cell abnormalities are seen, there is debate about the relative importance of the autoantibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the neuronal loss. Cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities, primarily elevated protein, lymphocytic pleocytosis, and oligoclonal bands, are common in the early stages. The low prevalence of this condition has not allowed for large-scale randomized controlled trials. Immunotherapies, such as steroids, intravenous immune globulins, and plasma exchange, have been extensively used in managing this condition, with limited success. Although some reports indicate benefit from antitumor therapies like surgery and chemotherapy, this has not been consistently observed. The prognosis for anti-Yo PCD is almost uniformly poor, with most patients left bedridden. Further studies are required to clarify the pathophysiology and provide evidence-based treatment options. PMID:27606347

  10. Force dysmetria in spinocerebellar ataxia 6 correlates with functional capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostina Casamento Moran

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6 is a genetic disease that causes pure cerebellar degeneration affecting walking, balance, and coordination. One of the main symptoms of SCA6 is dysmetria. The magnitude of dysmetria and its relation to functional capacity in SCA6 has not been studied. Our purpose was to quantify dysmetria and determine the relation between dysmetria and functional capacity in SCA6. Ten individuals diagnosed and genetically confirmed with SCA6 (63.7 ± 7.02yrs and nine age-matched healthy controls (65.9 ± 8.5yrs performed goal-directed isometric contractions with the ankle joint. Dysmetria was quantified as the force and time error during goal-directed contractions. SCA6 functional capacity was determined by ICARS and SARA clinical assessments. We found that SCA6 participants exhibited greater force dysmetria than healthy controls (P < 0.05, and reduced time dysmetria than healthy controls (P < 0.05. Only force dysmetria was significantly related to SCA6 functional capacity, as measured with ICARS kinetic score (R2 = 0.63, ICARS total score (R2 = 0.43, and SARA total score (R2 = 0.46. Our findings demonstrate that SCA6 exhibit force dysmetria and that force dysmetria is associated to SCA6 functional capacity. Quantifying force and time dysmetria in individuals with SCA6 could provide a more objective evaluation of the functional capacity and disease state in SCA6.

  11. Reduced cardiac 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a comparative study with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia, supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, and peripheral neuropathy. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is often present. This study evaluated the cardiac sympathetic function in patients with SCA2 using 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) in comparison with patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and control subjects. Nine patients with SCA2, nine patients with PD, and nine control subjects underwent 123I-MIBG imaging studies from which early and late heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratios and myocardial washout rates were calculated. Early (F = 12.3, p 123I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy demonstrated an impairment of cardiac sympathetic function in patients with SCA2, which was less marked than in PD patients. These results suggest that 123I-MIBG cardiac imaging could become a useful tool for analysing the pathophysiology of SCA2. (orig.)

  12. Ethanol modulates facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in cerebellar Purkinje cells in vivo in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mao-Cheng; Bing, Yan-Hua; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Acute ethanol overdose can induce dysfunction of cerebellar motor regulation and cerebellar ataxia. In this study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on facial stimulation-evoked inhibitory synaptic responses in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) in urethane-anesthetized mice, using in vivo patch-clamp recordings. Under voltage-clamp conditions, ethanol (300 mM) decreased the amplitude, half-width, rise time and decay time of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in PCs. The ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was dose-dependent, with an IC50 of 148.5 mM. Notably, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents were significantly abrogated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonists, AM251 and O-2050, as well as by the CB1 agonist WIN55212-2. Moreover, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was prevented by cerebellar surface perfusion of the PKA inhibitors H-89 and Rp-cAMP, but not by intracellular administration of the PKA inhibitor PKI. Our present results indicate that ethanol inhibits the facial stimulation-evoked outward currents by activating presynaptic CB1 receptors via the PKA signaling pathway. These findings suggest that ethanol overdose impairs sensory information processing, at least in part, by inhibiting GABA release from molecular layer interneurons onto PCs. PMID:27489024

  13. Ethanol modulates facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in cerebellar Purkinje cells in vivo in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mao-Cheng; Bing, Yan-Hua; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Acute ethanol overdose can induce dysfunction of cerebellar motor regulation and cerebellar ataxia. In this study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on facial stimulation-evoked inhibitory synaptic responses in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) in urethane-anesthetized mice, using in vivo patch-clamp recordings. Under voltage-clamp conditions, ethanol (300 mM) decreased the amplitude, half-width, rise time and decay time of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in PCs. The ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was dose-dependent, with an IC50 of 148.5 mM. Notably, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents were significantly abrogated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonists, AM251 and O-2050, as well as by the CB1 agonist WIN55212-2. Moreover, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was prevented by cerebellar surface perfusion of the PKA inhibitors H-89 and Rp-cAMP, but not by intracellular administration of the PKA inhibitor PKI. Our present results indicate that ethanol inhibits the facial stimulation-evoked outward currents by activating presynaptic CB1 receptors via the PKA signaling pathway. These findings suggest that ethanol overdose impairs sensory information processing, at least in part, by inhibiting GABA release from molecular layer interneurons onto PCs. PMID:27489024

  14. [Ataxia telangiectasia: review of 13 new cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, O; Póo, P; Campistol, J; Vernet, A; Fernández-Alvarez, E; Sierra, I; Gean, E

    1996-01-01

    We report the review of 13 patients who were diagnosed of ataxia telangiectasia before 6 years of age. All of them manifested cerebelous ataxia, oculocutaneus telangiectasias (11), sinopulmonary infections (9), dystonia (9), oculomotor apraxia (9) and Burkitt linfoma (1). We analyse the most common presentation of the disease in early stages and the complementary studies performed. The prompt diagnosis allow us a better control of infections, malignant process and finally the possibility of genetic counseling. PMID:8852005

  15. Biallelic CACNA1A mutations cause early onset epileptic encephalopathy with progressive cerebral, cerebellar, and optic nerve atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinson, Karit; Õiglane-Shlik, Eve; Talvik, Inga; Vaher, Ulvi; Õunapuu, Anne; Ennok, Margus; Teek, Rita; Pajusalu, Sander; Murumets, Ülle; Tomberg, Tiiu; Puusepp, Sanna; Piirsoo, Andres; Reimand, Tiia; Õunap, Katrin

    2016-08-01

    The CACNA1A gene encodes the transmembrane pore-forming alpha-1A subunit of the Cav 2.1 P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel. Several heterozygous mutations within this gene, including nonsense mutations, missense mutations, and expansion of cytosine-adenine-guanine repeats, are known to cause three allelic autosomal dominant conditions-episodic ataxia type 2, familial hemiplegic migraine type 1, and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6. An association with epilepsy and CACNA1A mutations has also been described. However, the link with epileptic encephalopathies has emerged only recently. Here we describe two patients, sister and brother, with compound heterozygous mutations in CACNA1A. Exome sequencing detected biallelic mutations in CACNA1A: A missense mutation c.4315T>A (p.Trp1439Arg) in exon 27, and a seven base pair deletion c.472_478delGCCTTCC (p.Ala158Thrfs*6) in exon 3. Both patients were normal at birth, but developed daily recurrent seizures in early infancy with concomitant extreme muscular hypotonia, hypokinesia, and global developmental delay. The brain MRI images showed progressive cerebral, cerebellar, and optic nerve atrophy. At the age of 5, both patients were blind and bedridden with a profound developmental delay. The elder sister died at that age. Their parents and two siblings were heterozygotes for one of those pathogenic mutations and expressed a milder phenotype. Both of them have intellectual disability and in addition the mother has adult onset cerebellar ataxia with a slowly progressive cerebellar atrophy. Compound heterozygous mutations in the CACNA1A gene presumably cause early onset epileptic encephalopathy, and progressive cerebral, cerebellar and optic nerve atrophy with reduced lifespan. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27250579

  16. Modelling Immunological Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Garret, Simon; Walker, Joanne; Wilson, William; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Accurate immunological models offer the possibility of performing highthroughput experiments in silico that can predict, or at least suggest, in vivo phenomena. In this chapter, we compare various models of immunological memory. We first validate an experimental immunological simulator, developed by the authors, by simulating several theories of immunological memory with known results. We then use the same system to evaluate the predicted effects of a theory of immunological memory. The resulting model has not been explored before in artificial immune systems research, and we compare the simulated in silico output with in vivo measurements. Although the theory appears valid, we suggest that there are a common set of reasons why immunological memory models are a useful support tool; not conclusive in themselves.

  17. Ataxia-telangiectasia: future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary MW

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed Wajid Chaudhary, Raidah Saleem Al-Baradie Pediatric Neurology, Neurosciences Centre, King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract: Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T is an autosomal recessive multi-system disorder caused by mutation in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM. ATM is a large serine/threonine protein kinase, a member of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK family whose best-studied function is as master controller of signal transduction for the DNA damage response (DDR in the event of double strand breaks (DSBs. The DDR rapidly recognizes DNA lesions and initiates the appropriate cellular programs to maintain genome integrity. This includes the coordination of cell-cycle checkpoints, transcription, translation, DNA repair, metabolism, and cell fate decisions, such as apoptosis or senescence. DSBs can be generated by exposure to ionizing radiation (IR or various chemical compounds, such as topoisomerase inhibitors, or can be part of programmed generation and repair of DSBs via cellular enzymes needed for the generation of the antibody repertoire as well as the maturation of germ cells. AT patients have immunodeficiency, and are sterile with gonadal dysgenesis as a result of defect in meiotic recombination. In the cells of nervous system ATM has additional role in vesicle dynamics as well as in the maintenance of the epigenetic code of histone modifications. Moderate levels of ATM are associated with prolonged lifespan through resistance to oxidative stress. ATM inhibitors are being viewed as potential radiosensitizers as part of cancer radiotherapy. Though there is no cure for the disease at present, glucocorticoids have been shown to induce alternate splicing site in the gene for ATM partly restoring its activity, but their most effective timing in the disease natural history is not yet known. Gene therapy is promising but large size of the gene makes it technically difficult

  18. Alcohol Withdrawal and Cerebellar Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Marianna E

    2015-08-01

    Cerebellar disorders trigger the symptoms of movement problems, imbalance, incoordination, and frequent fall. Cerebellar disorders are shown in various CNS illnesses including a drinking disorder called alcoholism. Alcoholism is manifested as an inability to control drinking in spite of adverse consequences. Human and animal studies have shown that cerebellar symptoms persist even after complete abstinence from drinking. In particular, the abrupt termination (ethanol withdrawal) of long-term excessive ethanol consumption has shown to provoke a variety of neuronal and mitochondrial damage to the cerebellum. Upon ethanol withdrawal, excitatory neurotransmitter molecules such as glutamate are overly released in brain areas including cerebellum. This is particularly relevant to the cerebellar neuronal network as glutamate signals are projected to Purkinje neurons through granular cells that are the most populated neuronal type in CNS. This excitatory neuronal signal may be elevated by ethanol withdrawal stress, which promotes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and a decrease in a Ca(2+)-binding protein, both of which result in the excessive entry of Ca(2+) to the mitochondria. Subsequently, mitochondria undergo a prolonged opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the overproduction of harmful free radicals, impeding adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-generating function. This in turn provokes the leakage of mitochondrial molecule cytochrome c to the cytosol, which triggers a cascade of adverse cytosol reactions. Upstream to this pathway, cerebellum under the condition of ethanol withdrawal has shown aberrant gene modifications through altered DNA methylation, histone acetylation, or microRNA expression. Interplay between these events and molecules may result in functional damage to cerebellar mitochondria and consequent neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Mitochondria-targeting research may help develop a powerful new

  19. Hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage and cerebellar hemorrhage caused by cryptic angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of 44 patients with hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage and nine patients with cerebellar hemorrhage caused by small angiomas is described. Hypertensive hemorrhage occurred most frequently in the patients in their seventies, whereas the onset of angioma-caused hemorrhage was often seen below the age of 40. Clinical syndromes of cerebellar hemorrhages can be categorized into three basic types: the vertigo syndrome, cerebellar dysfunction syndrome and brain stem compression syndrome. Patients with small (>= 2 cm in diameter in CT scans) and medium-sized (2 cm = 3 cm) hematomas deteriorated into unresponsive conditions and developed signs of brain stem compression. Surgical mortality was 32% in the hypertensive group, while it was 0% in the angioma group. Mortality as well as morbidity in both groups was strongly influenced by the preoperative status of consciousness. Our results suggest that substantial improvement could be obtained in the overall outcome of this disease by emergency craniectomy and removal of hematomas in all patients with large hematomas regardless of the levels of consciousness and regardless of the causes of bleeding. Furthermore, when clinical information and CT findings are suggestive of a ''cryptic'' angioma as the causative lesion, posterior fossa surgery may be indicated to extirpate the lesion, even if the hematoma is small. (author)

  20. Oral Administration of PF-01247324, a Subtype-Selective Nav1.8 Blocker, Reverses Cerebellar Deficits in a Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shields, Shannon D.; Butt, Richard P.; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; WAXMAN, STEPHEN G.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar symptoms significantly diminish quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We previously showed that sodium channel Nav1.8, although normally restricted to peripheral somatosensory neurons, is upregulated in the cerebellum in MS, and that Nav1.8 expression is linked to ataxia and MS-like symptoms in mice. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular administration of the Nav1.8 blocker A-803467 temporarily reversed electrophysiological and behavioral manifestations of diseas...

  1. Correlation of atrophic change of brain stem by MRI and the degree of symptoms from the ataxia rating scale between Machado-Joseph disease and olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated atrophic changes of brain stem and the degree of symptoms from the ataxia rating scale in 13 cases of Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) and 10 cases of olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA). Patients with MJD and OPCA and normal controls were examined using 1.5-T MRI. Furthermore, we evaluated 3 cases of each two groups with a long-term follow-up study. We used International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) for the evaluation of ataxia. The MRI of patients with MJD disclosed remarkably reduced width of the middle cerebellar peduncles and the dilatation of 4th ventricle, which correlated with the limb ataxia in ICARS. On the other hand, the MRI of patients with OPCA revealed diminished anteroposterior and transverse diameters of the pons. The latter of which correlated inversely with the total ICARS. In long-term follow up, MJD showed slow progression of atrophic change and clinical course contrasted to OPCA. In conclusion, we suggested that atrophic changes of brain stem of MJD and OPCA were well correlated with ataxia rating scale, ICARS. (author)

  2. Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2: clinical, biological and genotype/phenotype correlation study of a cohort of 90 patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Anheim, M

    2009-10-01

    Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) is an autosomal recessive disease due to mutations in the senataxin gene, causing progressive cerebellar ataxia with peripheral neuropathy, cerebellar atrophy, occasional oculomotor apraxia and elevated alpha-feto-protein (AFP) serum level. We compiled a series of 67 previously reported and 58 novel ataxic patients who underwent senataxin gene sequencing because of suspected AOA2. An AOA2 diagnosis was established for 90 patients, originating from 15 countries worldwide, and 25 new senataxin gene mutations were found. In patients with AOA2, median AFP serum level was 31.0 microg\\/l at diagnosis, which was higher than the median AFP level of AOA2 negative patients: 13.8 microg\\/l, P = 0.0004; itself higher than the normal level (3.4 microg\\/l, range from 0.5 to 17.2 microg\\/l) because elevated AFP was one of the possible selection criteria. Polyneuropathy was found in 97.5% of AOA2 patients, cerebellar atrophy in 96%, occasional oculomotor apraxia in 51%, pyramidal signs in 20.5%, head tremor in 14%, dystonia in 13.5%, strabismus in 12.3% and chorea in 9.5%. No patient was lacking both peripheral neuropathy and cerebellar atrophy. The age at onset and presence of occasional oculomotor apraxia were negatively correlated to the progression rate of the disease (P = 0.03 and P = 0.009, respectively), whereas strabismus was positively correlated to the progression rate (P = 0.03). An increased AFP level as well as cerebellar atrophy seem to be stable in the course of the disease and to occur mostly at or before the onset of the disease. One of the two patients with a normal AFP level at diagnosis had high AFP levels 4 years later, while the other had borderline levels. The probability of missing AOA2 diagnosis, in case of sequencing senataxin gene only in non-Friedreich ataxia non-ataxia-telangiectasia ataxic patients with AFP level > or =7 microg\\/l, is 0.23% and the probability for a non-Friedreich ataxia non-ataxia

  3. Cultures of Cerebellar Granule Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Parizad M. Bilimoria and Azad Bonni1 Corresponding author ([]()) ### INTRODUCTION Primary cultures of granule neurons from the post-natal rat cerebellum provide an excellent model system for molecular and cell biological studies of neuronal development and function. The cerebellar cortex, with its highly organized structure and few neuronal subtypes, offers a well-characterized neural circuitry. Many fundamental insight...

  4. Cerebellar arteriovenous malformations in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, P.D. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Acad. Dept. of Radiol.; Blaser, S.; Armstrong, D.; Chuang, S.; Harwood-Nash, D. [Division of Neuroradiology, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Humphreys, R.P. [Division of Neurosurgery, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    1998-05-01

    We review the presentation, imaging findings and outcome in 18 children with cerebellar arteriovenous malformations (AVM). This group is of particular interest because of the reported poor outcome despite modern imaging and neurosurgical techniques. All children had CT and 15 underwent catheter angiography at presentation. Several of the children in the latter part of the study had MRI. Of the 18 children, 17 presented with a ruptured AVM producing intracranial haemorrhage. The remaining child presented with temporal lobe epilepsy and was shown to have temporal, vermian and cerebellar hemisphere AVM. This child had other stigmata of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. Three other children had pre-existing abnormalities of possible relevance. One had a vascular malformation of the cheek and mandible, one a documented chromosomal abnormality and another a midline cleft upper lip and palate. Six of the 17 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM died within 7 days of the ictus. Vascular pathology other than an AVM was found in 10 of the 14 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM who had angiography: 4 intranidal aneurysms, 5 venous aneurysms and 2 cases of venous outflow obstruction (one child having both an aneurysm and obstruction). The severity of clinical presentation was directly related to the size of the acute haematoma, which was a reasonable predictor of outcome. (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 tabs., 23 refs.

  5. Cerebellar arteriovenous malformations in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the presentation, imaging findings and outcome in 18 children with cerebellar arteriovenous malformations (AVM). This group is of particular interest because of the reported poor outcome despite modern imaging and neurosurgical techniques. All children had CT and 15 underwent catheter angiography at presentation. Several of the children in the latter part of the study had MRI. Of the 18 children, 17 presented with a ruptured AVM producing intracranial haemorrhage. The remaining child presented with temporal lobe epilepsy and was shown to have temporal, vermian and cerebellar hemisphere AVM. This child had other stigmata of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. Three other children had pre-existing abnormalities of possible relevance. One had a vascular malformation of the cheek and mandible, one a documented chromosomal abnormality and another a midline cleft upper lip and palate. Six of the 17 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM died within 7 days of the ictus. Vascular pathology other than an AVM was found in 10 of the 14 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM who had angiography: 4 intranidal aneurysms, 5 venous aneurysms and 2 cases of venous outflow obstruction (one child having both an aneurysm and obstruction). The severity of clinical presentation was directly related to the size of the acute haematoma, which was a reasonable predictor of outcome. (orig.)

  6. The immunology of filariasis*

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes the available information on the immunology of filariasis, and discusses immunodiagnosis and the immunological factors influencing the host—parasite relationship in lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis. Several areas that require further research are identified, particularly concerning the development of new serological techniques, and the fractionation of specific antigens. The problems associated with vaccine development are considered and the importance of finding...

  7. The New Cellular Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  8. Genetics Home Reference: neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions NARP neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa ( NARP ) is a condition that ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions IOSCA infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia ( IOSCA ) is a progressive disorder that affects the ...

  10. Fragile X-Associated Tremor and Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources and Publications Fragile X-Associated Tremor and Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS): Overview Skip sharing on social media ... this: Page Content Fragile X-associated tremor and ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset condition (occurs ...

  11. Friedreich's ataxia cardiomyopathy: case based discussion and management issues.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanley, A

    2010-04-01

    Cardiac involvement is common in Friedreich\\'s Ataxia and is a common cause of premature death. Evidence regarding treatment of congestive heart failure in patients with Friedreich\\'s Ataxia is lacking. The case of a 31-year-old male with advanced Friedreich\\'s Ataxia who presented with an acute diarrhoeal illness and features of acute heart failure is discussed. We then review the reported cardiac manifestations of Friedreich\\'s Ataxia and discuss management options.

  12. Cytokines in Machado Joseph Disease/Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Carvalho, Gerson; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Haas, Clarissa Branco; Torrez, Vitor Rocco; Brochier, Andressa Wigner; Souza, Gabriele Nunes; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Gheno, Tailise; Russo, Aline; Monte, Thais Lampert; Schumacher-Schuh, Artur; D'Avila, Rui; Donis, Karina Carvalho; Castilhos, Raphael Machado; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Torman, Vanessa Leotti; Camey, Suzi; Portela, Luis Valmor; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to describe the serum concentrations of a broad spectrum of cytokines in symptomatic and asymptomatic carriers of Machado Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) CAG expansions. Molecularly confirmed carriers and controls were studied. Age at onset, disease duration, and clinical scales Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), Neurological Examination Score for Spinocerebellar Ataxias (NESSCA), SCA Functional Index (SCAFI), and Composite Cerebellar Functional Score (CCFS) were obtained from the symptomatic carriers. Serum was obtained from all individuals and a cytokine panel "consisted of" eotaxin, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2, IL-2R, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, interferon gamma-induced protein (IP)-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-a, MIP-b, regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was analyzed. In a subgroup of symptomatic carriers, the cytokine panel was repeated after 360 days. Cytokine distribution among groups was studied by discriminant analysis; changes in serum levels after 360 days were studied by generalized estimation equation. Sixty-six symptomatic carriers, 13 asymptomatic carriers, and 43 controls were studied. No differences in cytokine patterns were found between controls and carriers of the CAG expansions or between controls and symptomatic carriers only. In contrast, eotaxin concentrations were significantly higher in asymptomatic than in symptomatic carriers or in controls (p = 0.001, ANCOVA). Eotaxin did not correlate with age, disease duration, CAG expansion, NESSCA score, and SARA score. Among symptomatic carriers, eotaxin dropped after 360 days (p = 0.039, GEE). SCA3/MJD patients presented a benign pattern of

  13. Ataxia with Vitamin E Deficiency in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areej Elkamil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED is a rare autosomal recessive neurological disorder which usually starts in childhood. The clinical presentation is very similar to Friedreich ataxia, most patients have progressive truncal and extremity ataxia, areflexia, positive Babinski sign, dysarthria and sensory neuropathy. Methods We made an inquiry to our colleagues in Norway, we included information from a prevalence study published southern Norway and added data from our own known case. Results A newly published prevalence study of hereditary ataxias (total of 171 subjects found only one subject with AVED in Southeast Norway. We describe two more patients, one from the Central part and one from the Northern part of Norway. All 3 cases had age of onset in early childhood (age of 4–5 years and all experienced gait ataxia and dysarthria. The genetic testing confirmed that they had pathogenic mutations in the α-tocopherol transfer protein gene (TTPA. All were carriers of the non-sense c.400C > T mutation, one was homozygous for that mutation and the others were compound heterozygous, either with c.358G > A or c.513_514insTT. The homozygous carrier was by far the most severely affected case. Conclusions We estimate the occurrence of AVED in Norway to be at least 0.6 per million inhabitants. We emphasize that all patients who develop ataxia in childhood should be routinely tested for AVED to make an early diagnosis for initiating treatment with high dose vitamin E to avoid severe neurological deficits.

  14. Ataxia with Parkinsonism and dystonia after intentional inhalation of liquefied petroleum gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godani, Massimiliano; Canavese, Francesca; Migliorini, Sonia; Sette, Massimo Del

    2015-01-01

    The practice of inhaling liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) to commit suicide is uncommon and almost exclusively a prerogative of the prison population. Numerous cases of sudden deaths caused by intentional propane and/or butane inhalation have been described, but these cases survived and a description of the consequences is very rare. We describe a prisoner who survived after voluntary inhalation of LPG, and who developed ataxia, Parkinsonism, and dystonia. Brain MRI showed bilateral hyperintensity in the basal ganglia and in the cerebellar hemispheres. The clinical evolution and the MRI abnormalities are similar to those described in cases of poisoning by CO where the mechanism of brain injury is related to histotoxic hypoxia. We believe that LPG, considered until now a mixture of gas with low neurotoxic power, may have caused direct toxic damage to the brain, mediated by a mechanism of hypoxia, such as in CO intoxication. PMID:26005350

  15. RNA interference-based therapy for spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 retinal degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavitra S Ramachandran

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of motor coordination and retinal degeneration with no current therapies in the clinic. The causative mutation is an expanded CAG repeat in the ataxin-7 gene whose mutant protein product causes cerebellar and brainstem degeneration and retinal cone-rod dystrophy. Here, we reduced the expression of both mutant and wildtype ataxin-7 in the SCA7 mouse retina by RNA interference and evaluated retinal function 23 weeks post injection. We observed a preservation of normal retinal function and no adverse toxicity with ≥50% reduction of mutant and wildtype ataxin-7 alleles. These studies address an important safety concern regarding non-allele specific silencing of ataxin-7 for SCA7 retinal therapy.

  16. A haplotype common to intermediate radiosensitivity variants of ataxia-telangiectasia in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a study of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) in the UK, patients in10 out of 60 families were shown to have a much lower level of chromosomal radiosensitivity compared with the majority of patients. In some patients the level of radiosensitivity was hardly distinguishable from normal. Patients in this group, however, could be distinguished clinically from the majority either by the later onset of severe cerebellar features or the slower rate of progress of the disorder. By using highly polymorphic microsatellite repeat markers a chromosome 11q22-23 haplotype common to the majority of these patients, and not occurring in any non-A-T chromosome in 60 families, was identified on one chromosome. The haplotype probably defines the region of the A-T gene in these families and the mutation associated with this haplotype may be much less severe than the second mutation thereby producing the slightly milder phenotype. (author)

  17. A haplotype common to intermediate radiosensitivity variants of ataxia-telangiectasia in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, A.M.R.; McConville, C.M.; Byrd, P.J. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Medical School; Rotman, G.; Shiloh, Y. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Sackler School of Medicine

    1994-12-01

    In a study of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) in the UK, patients in10 out of 60 families were shown to have a much lower level of chromosomal radiosensitivity compared with the majority of patients. In some patients the level of radiosensitivity was hardly distinguishable from normal. Patients in this group, however, could be distinguished clinically from the majority either by the later onset of severe cerebellar features or the slower rate of progress of the disorder. By using highly polymorphic microsatellite repeat markers a chromosome 11q22-23 haplotype common to the majority of these patients, and not occurring in any non-A-T chromosome in 60 families, was identified on one chromosome. The haplotype probably defines the region of the A-T gene in these families and the mutation associated with this haplotype may be much less severe than the second mutation thereby producing the slightly milder phenotype. (author).

  18. The new immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminovitch, K A

    1992-03-01

    Among the biomedical sciences, immunology stands out as a discipline in which knowledge emanating from fundamental research has rapidly been transferred to the clinical paradigm, with consequent improvement in human health. Virtually all medical subspecialties have benefitted from diagnostic reagents and technologies provided by basic immunology. In terms of numbers of lives saved, immunologic-based therapeutic strategies, most notably vaccination, rank among the most effective measures ever achieved by medical intervention. Yet, despite immunology's profound impact on medicine and the longstanding recognition of many of the general principles and cellular components involved in immunity, until relatively recently, the operational workings of the immune system eluded precise definition. The abstract nature of the immune system rendered the field intangible or, at the very least, confusing, to the nonimmunologic medical community. However, in recent years, this situation has changed radically, as cell cloning, hybridoma, and recombinant DNA technologies have provided the means to delineate the precise immunologic cellular structures and interactions. The purpose of this review is to highlight a few of the most significant advances in immunology during the past decade, and to show how they have made possible the translation of abstract concepts of classical immunology into tangible, structural information. Striking gains in the understanding of antigen recognition, one of the most fundamental aspects of immunity, are described as an illustrative case. PMID:1640405

  19. Anti-Yo and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies presenting in carcinoma of the uterus with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panegyres Peter K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is a rare non-metastatic manifestation of malignancy. In this report, to the best of our knowledge we describe for the first time a diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration several months prior to the diagnosis of clear carcinoma of the uterus. Case presentation A 75-year-old Caucasian woman manifested a rapidly progressive cerebellar syndrome with nystagmus, past-pointing, dysdiadochokinesis, dysarthria, truncal ataxia and titubation. The paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration was associated with anti-Yo and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. 14-3-3 protein was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid. She was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin prior to laparotomy, hysterectomy and bilateral salpingoophorectomy. Our patient has survived for three years following diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of an association of clear cell carcinoma of the uterus and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with both anti-Yo and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. The findings imply that both antibodies contributed to the fulminating paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration observed in our patient, and this was of such severity it resulted in the release of 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, a marker of neuronal death.

  20. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with bilateral middle cerebellar peduncle lesions confirmed by repeated CSF-JC virus tests and coexistence of JC virus granule cell neuronopathy. Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daisuke; Yasui, Keizo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Katsuno, Masahisa; Takahashi, Akira

    2016-07-28

    A 65 year-old woman with small lymphocytic leukemia presented with subacute cerebellar ataxia. Six months after rituximab chemotherapy, a cranial MRI revealed lesions in the bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles. Both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) JC virus (JCV)-DNA PCR test on three occasions and brain biopsy were negative. CSF tests were repeated. The fourth test performed 6 months after the onset showed positive JCV-DNA, and a definite diagnosis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) was made. Neuroimaging of cerebellar atrophy was considered to be coexistence of granule cell neuronopathy. Medication with mirtazapine and mefloquine was temporarily effective for several months. Little are known solitary bilateral MRI lesions of the middle cerebellar peduncle in PML. JCV-PCR test of CSF may be negative at an earlier stage of PML. Repeated CSF tests should be essential to confirming the diagnosis in such cases. PMID:27356732

  1. Widespread neuronal damage and cognitive dysfunction in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Tátila Martins; D'Abreu, Anelyssa; França, Marcondes Cavalcante; Yasuda, Clarissa Lin; Betting, Luiz Eduardo; Samara, Adriana Bastos; Castellano, Gabriela; Somazz, Júlio César; Balthazar, Marcio Luiz Figueredo; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Cendes, Fernando

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated cognitive impairments in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3/MJD); however, there is no consensus about the cognitive domains affected and the correlation with structural brain abnormalities. We investigated the neuropsychological profile and 3T-MRI findings, including high-resolution T1-images, diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 32 patients with SCA3/MJD and 32 age-, gender- and educational level-matched healthy controls. We reviewed patients' clinical history and CAG repeat length, and performed assessment and rating of ataxia (SARA)-Brazilian version and the neuropsychiatric inventory. Patients presented worse performance in episodic and working memory and Beck inventories (depression and anxiety). SCA3/MJD patients had a reduction of gray matter volume (GM) in the cerebellum, putamen, cingulum, precentral and parietal lobe. A positive correlation was identified between the cognitive findings and GM of temporal, frontal, parietal, culmen and insula. We observed positive correlation between the brainstem's fractional anisotropy and digit span-forward. The following cerebellar metabolite groups (measured relative to creatine) were reduced in patients: N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), NAA + N-acetyl-aspartate-glutamate and glutamate + glutamine (Glx). We found a positive correlation between Corsi's block-tapping task forward with Glx; semantic verbal fluency with phosphorylcholine and glycerophosphorylcholine; digits span-forward with NAA. The cognitive impairments in SCA3/MJD are associated not only with cerebellar and brainstem abnormalities, but also with neuroimaging evidence of diffuse neuronal and axonal dysfunction, particularly in temporal, frontal, parietal and insular areas. PMID:23775343

  2. ATP1A3 Mutation in Adult Rapid-Onset Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweadner, Kathleen J.; Toro, Camilo; Whitlow, Christopher T.; Snively, Beverly M.; Cook, Jared F.; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Markello, Thomas C.; Brashear, Allison

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year old male presented with ataxia and dysarthria that had appeared over a period of months. Exome sequencing identified a de novo missense variant in ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na,K-ATPase. Several lines of evidence suggest that the variant is causative. ATP1A3 mutations can cause rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP) with a similar age and speed of onset, as well as severe diseases of infancy. The patient’s ATP1A3 p.Gly316Ser mutation was validated in the laboratory by the impaired ability of the expressed protein to support the growth of cultured cells. In a crystal structure of Na,K-ATPase, the mutated amino acid was directly apposed to a different amino acid mutated in RDP. Clinical evaluation showed that the patient had many characteristics of RDP, however he had minimal fixed dystonia, a defining symptom of RDP. Successive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed progressive cerebellar atrophy, explaining the ataxia. The absence of dystonia in the presence of other RDP symptoms corroborates other evidence that the cerebellum contributes importantly to dystonia pathophysiology. We discuss the possibility that a second de novo variant, in ubiquilin 4 (UBQLN4), a ubiquitin pathway component, contributed to the cerebellar neurodegenerative phenotype and differentiated the disease from other manifestations of ATP1A3 mutations. We also show that a homozygous variant in GPRIN1 (G protein-regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1) deletes a motif with multiple copies and is unlikely to be causative. PMID:26990090

  3. Gait adaptability training improves obstacle avoidance and dynamic stability in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonteyn, Ella M R; Heeren, Anita; Engels, Jasper-Jan C; Boer, Jasper J Den; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Balance and gait problems in patients with cerebellar degeneration lead to reduced mobility, loss of independence, and frequent falls. It is currently unclear, however, whether balance and gait capacities can be improved by training in this group of patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of gait adaptability training on obstacle avoidance and dynamic stability during adaptive gait. Ten patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxia received 10 protocolized gait adaptability training sessions of 1 h each during 5 weeks. Training was performed on a treadmill with visual stepping targets and obstacles projected on the belt's surface. As the primary outcome, we used an obstacle avoidance task while walking on a treadmill. We determined avoidance success rates, as well as dynamic stability during the avoidance manoeuvre. Clinical ratings included the scale for the assessment of ataxia (SARA), 10 m walking test, timed up-and-go test, berg balance scale, and the obstacle subtask of the emory functional ambulation profile (EFAP). Following the intervention, success rates on the obstacle avoidance task had significantly improved compared to pre-intervention. For successful avoidance, participants allowed themselves smaller stability margins in the sagittal plane in the (shortened) pre-crossing step. However, in the subsequent steps they returned to baseline stability values more effectively than before training. SARA scores and the EFAP obstacle subtask improved significantly as well. This pilot study provides preliminary evidence of a beneficial effect of gait adaptability training on obstacle avoidance capacity and dynamic stability in patients with cerebellar degeneration. PMID:24786476

  4. In the Rat Cerebellar Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Ordek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The changes of excitability in affected neural networks can be used as a marker to study the temporal course of traumatic brain injury (TBI. The cerebellum is an ideal platform to study brain injury mechanisms at the network level using the electrophysiological methods. Within its crystalline morphology, the cerebellar cortex contains highly organized topographical subunits that are defined by two main inputs, the climbing and mossy fibers. Here we demonstrate the use of cerebellar evoked potentials (EPs mediated through these afferent systems for monitoring the injury progression in a rat model of fluid percussion injury (FPI. A mechanical tap on the dorsal hand was used as a stimulus, and EPs were recorded from the paramedian lobule (PML of the posterior cerebellum via multi-electrode arrays (MEA. Post-injury evoked response amplitudes (EPAs were analyzed on a daily basis for one week and compared with pre-injury values. We found a trend of consistently decreasing EPAs in all nine animals, losing as much as 72±4% of baseline amplitudes measured before the injury. Notably, our results highlighted two particular time windows; the first 24 hours of injury in the acute period and day-3 to day-7 in the delayed period where the largest drops (~50% and 24% were observed in the EPAs. In addition, cross-correlations of spontaneous signals between electrode pairs declined (from 0.47±0.1 to 0.35±0.04, p<0.001 along with the EPAs throughout the week of injury. In support of the electrophysiological findings, immunohistochemical analysis at day-7 post-injury showed detectable Purkinje cell loss at low FPI pressures and more with the largest pressures used. Our results suggest that sensory evoked potentials recorded from the cerebellar surface can be a useful technique to monitor the course of cerebellar injury and identify the phases of injury progression even at mild levels.

  5. Cerebellar hemangioblastoma: magnetic resonance findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To characterize the results of magnetic resonance imaging in cerebellar hemangioblastoma. This retrospective study deals with seven cases of histologically-confirmed cerebellar hemangioblastoma after surgery. Another patient, diagnosed as having Von Hippel-Lindau disease, also developed this lesions, but the finding was not histologically confirmed. In all, there were 2 women and 6 men. Three of these patients presented Von Hippel-Lindaus disease. All were studied on a 0.5 T imager with T1, T2 and PD-weighted spin-echo axial planes; T1-weighted sequences were repeated after intravenous gadolinium administration. According to their aspects, the lesions were divided into three groups as follows: cyst containing a mural nodule (n=3)solid tumor (n=3) and cavitated tumor (n=1). In one patient, the lesion was initially solid and was found to present cavitation two years later. Abnormal vascularization was observed in all the tumors except for two small solid tumors, and the findings were not clear in one of the cysts containing a mural nodule. In the differential diagnosis it may be difficult to rule out other tumors, such as cystic astrocytoma. However, magnetic resonance imaging, together with the clinical data, is of diagnostic value in the three morphological types of cerebellar hemangioblastoma. (Author) 15 refs

  6. Crossed cerebral - cerebellar diaschisis : MRI evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty A

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available MRI, done later in life, in two patients with infantile hemiplegia syndrome showed significant volume loss in the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the side of the affected cerebrum. The cerebellar volume loss seemed to correlate with the degree of volume loss in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. These observations provide morphological evidence of the phenomenon of crossed cerebral-cerebellar diaschisis (CCD. Functional neuroimaging studies in support of the concept of CCD has been critically reviewed.

  7. Climbing Fiber Signaling and Cerebellar Gain Control

    OpenAIRE

    Ohtsuki, Gen; Piochon, Claire; Hansel, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The physiology of climbing fiber signals in cerebellar Purkinje cells has been studied since the early days of electrophysiology. Both the climbing fiber-evoked complex spike and the role of climbing fiber activity in the induction of long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses have become hallmark features of cerebellar physiology. However, the key role of climbing fiber signaling in cerebellar motor learning has been challenged by recent reports of forms of synaptic ...

  8. Cerebellar medulloblastoma presenting with skeletal metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Barai Sukanta; Bandopadhayaya G; Julka P; Dhanapathi H; Haloi A; Seith A

    2004-01-01

    Medulloblastomas are highly malignant brain tumours, but only rarely produce skeletal metastases. No case of medulloblastoma has been documented to have produced skeletal metastases prior to craniotomy or shunt surgery. A 21-year-old male presented with pain in the hip and lower back with difficulty in walking of 3 months′ duration. Signs of cerebellar dysfunction were present hence a diagnosis of cerebellar neoplasm or skeletal tuberculosis with cerebellar abscess formation was consid...

  9. Motor Training in Degenerative Spinocerebellar Disease: Ataxia-Specific Improvements by Intensive Physiotherapy and Exergames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is essentially involved in movement control and plays a critical role in motor learning. It has remained controversial whether patients with degenerative cerebellar disease benefit from high-intensity coordinative training. Moreover, it remains unclear by which training methods and mechanisms these patients might improve their motor performance. Here, we review evidence from different high-intensity training studies in patients with degenerative spinocerebellar disease. These studies demonstrate that high-intensity coordinative training might lead to a significant benefit in patients with degenerative ataxia. This training might be based either on physiotherapy or on whole-body controlled videogames (“exergames”). The benefit shown in these studies is equal to regaining one or more years of natural disease progression. In addition, first case studies indicate that even subjects with advanced neurodegeneration might benefit from such training programs. For both types of training, the observed clinical improvements are paralleled by recoveries in ataxia-specific dysfunctions (e.g., multijoint coordination and dynamic stability). Importantly, for both types of training, the retention of the effects seems to depend on the frequency and continuity of training. Based on these studies, we here present preliminary recommendations for clinical practice, and articulate open questions that might guide future studies on neurorehabilitation in degenerative spinocerebellar disease. PMID:24877117

  10. Clinical and genetic study of a Chinese family with spinocerebellar ataxia type 7

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    Han Yan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia 7 (SCA7 is a rare disease, and only few SCA7 families have been reported, especially from East Asia. Clinical features of a genetically confirmed SCA7 Chinese family were evaluated. The onset of the disease varied from 4 years to 48 years, and the initial presenting feature was cerebellar ataxia or visual impairment, or both. There were abnormal findings on fundus photography, electroretinogram, flash visual evoked potential and oscillatory potentials. Abnormal mitochondria were also found in skeletal muscle or liver biopsies. The number of cytosine adenine guanine (CAG repeats ranged from 50 to 97, and the length of CAG repeat was inversely correlated with the age of onset (r=-0.867, P=0.025. Conclusion: The clinical manifestations and SCA7 gene of SCA7 patients were homogeneous in this study. Larger CAG repeats had not only resulted in earlier onset, but also related to the rapid progression and severity of the disease. Abnormal mitochondria may be a common finding in biopsy studies of various organs in SCA7 patients.

  11. Motor Training in Degenerative Spinocerebellar Disease: Ataxia-Specific Improvements by Intensive Physiotherapy and Exergames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthis Synofzik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is essentially involved in movement control and plays a critical role in motor learning. It has remained controversial whether patients with degenerative cerebellar disease benefit from high-intensity coordinative training. Moreover, it remains unclear by which training methods and mechanisms these patients might improve their motor performance. Here, we review evidence from different high-intensity training studies in patients with degenerative spinocerebellar disease. These studies demonstrate that high-intensity coordinative training might lead to a significant benefit in patients with degenerative ataxia. This training might be based either on physiotherapy or on whole-body controlled videogames (“exergames”. The benefit shown in these studies is equal to regaining one or more years of natural disease progression. In addition, first case studies indicate that even subjects with advanced neurodegeneration might benefit from such training programs. For both types of training, the observed clinical improvements are paralleled by recoveries in ataxia-specific dysfunctions (e.g., multijoint coordination and dynamic stability. Importantly, for both types of training, the retention of the effects seems to depend on the frequency and continuity of training. Based on these studies, we here present preliminary recommendations for clinical practice, and articulate open questions that might guide future studies on neurorehabilitation in degenerative spinocerebellar disease.

  12. Motor training in degenerative spinocerebellar disease: ataxia-specific improvements by intensive physiotherapy and exergames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synofzik, Matthis; Ilg, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is essentially involved in movement control and plays a critical role in motor learning. It has remained controversial whether patients with degenerative cerebellar disease benefit from high-intensity coordinative training. Moreover, it remains unclear by which training methods and mechanisms these patients might improve their motor performance. Here, we review evidence from different high-intensity training studies in patients with degenerative spinocerebellar disease. These studies demonstrate that high-intensity coordinative training might lead to a significant benefit in patients with degenerative ataxia. This training might be based either on physiotherapy or on whole-body controlled videogames ("exergames"). The benefit shown in these studies is equal to regaining one or more years of natural disease progression. In addition, first case studies indicate that even subjects with advanced neurodegeneration might benefit from such training programs. For both types of training, the observed clinical improvements are paralleled by recoveries in ataxia-specific dysfunctions (e.g., multijoint coordination and dynamic stability). Importantly, for both types of training, the retention of the effects seems to depend on the frequency and continuity of training. Based on these studies, we here present preliminary recommendations for clinical practice, and articulate open questions that might guide future studies on neurorehabilitation in degenerative spinocerebellar disease. PMID:24877117

  13. A high frequency of distinct ATM gene mutations in ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, J.; Teraoka, S.; Concannon, P. [Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The clinical features of the autosomal recessive disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) include a progressive cerebellar ataxia, hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation, and an increased susceptibility to malignancies. Epidemiological studies have suggested that AT heterozygotes may also be at increased risk for malignancy, possibly as a consequence of radiation exposure. A gene mutated in AT patients (ATM) has recently been isolated, making mutation screening in both patients and the general population possible. Because of the relatively large size of the ATM gene, the design of screening programs will depend on the types and distribution of mutations in the general population. In this report, we describe 30 mutations identified in a panel of unrelated AT patients and controls. Twenty-five of the 30 were distinct, and most patients were compound heterozygotes. The most frequently detected mutation was found in three different families and had previously been reported in five others. This corresponds to a frequency of 8% of all reported ATM mutations. Twenty-two of the alterations observed would be predicted to lead to protein truncation at sites scattered throughout the molecule. Two fibroblast cell lines, which displayed normal responses to ionizing radiation, also proved to be heterozygous for truncation mutations of ATM. These observations suggest that the carrier frequency of ATM mutations may be sufficiently high to make population screening practical. However, such screening may need to be done prospectively, that is, by searching for new mutations rather than by screening for just those already identified in AT families. 33 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Ancestral origin of the ATTCT repeat expansion in spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Almeida

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by cerebellar ataxia and seizures. The disease is caused by a large ATTCT repeat expansion in the ATXN10 gene. The first families reported with SCA10 were of Mexican origin, but the disease was soon after described in Brazilian families of mixed Portuguese and Amerindian ancestry. The origin of the SCA10 expansion and a possible founder effect that would account for its geographical distribution have been the source of speculation over the last years. To unravel the mutational origin and spread of the SCA10 expansion, we performed an extensive haplotype study, using closely linked STR markers and intragenic SNPs, in families from Brazil and Mexico. Our results showed (1 a shared disease haplotype for all Brazilian and one of the Mexican families, and (2 closely-related haplotypes for the additional SCA10 Mexican families; (3 little or null genetic distance in small normal alleles of different repeat sizes, from the same SNP lineage, indicating that they are being originated by a single step mechanism; and (4 a shared haplotype for pure and interrupted expanded alleles, pointing to a gene conversion model for its generation. In conclusion, we show evidence for an ancestral common origin for SCA10 in Latin America, which might have arisen in an ancestral Amerindian population and later have been spread into the mixed populations of Mexico and Brazil.

  15. Ataxia with Parkinsonism and dystonia after intentional inhalation of liquefied petroleum gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godani M

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Massimiliano Godani,1 Francesca Canavese,1 Sonia Migliorini,2 Massimo Del Sette1 1Neurology Unit, 2Department of Neuroradiology, Sant’Andrea Hospital, La Spezia, Italy Abstract: The practice of inhaling liquefied petroleum gas (LPG to commit suicide is uncommon and almost exclusively a prerogative of the prison population. Numerous cases of sudden deaths caused by intentional propane and/or butane inhalation have been described, but these cases survived and a description of the consequences is very rare. We describe a prisoner who survived after voluntary inhalation of LPG, and who developed ataxia, Parkinsonism, and dystonia. Brain MRI showed bilateral hyperintensity in the basal ganglia and in the cerebellar hemispheres. The clinical evolution and the MRI abnormalities are similar to those described in cases of poisoning by CO where the mechanism of brain injury is related to histotoxic hypoxia. We believe that LPG, considered until now a mixture of gas with low neurotoxic power, may have caused direct toxic damage to the brain, mediated by a mechanism of hypoxia, such as in CO intoxication. Keywords: ataxia, Parkinsonism, dystonia, liquefied petroleum gas

  16. Crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion in brain perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinnouchi, Seishi; Nagamachi, Shigeki; Nishii, Ryuuichi; Futami, Shigemi; Tamura, Shozo [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan); Kawai, Keiichi

    2000-10-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis is a well-known brain SPECT finding in stroke patients. Few reports, however, have described supratentorial and contralateral cerebellar hyperperfusion (crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion, CCH). We assessed the incidence of CCH in 33 patients with cerebral hyperperfusion. Brain SPECT showed CCH in five patients out of 20 epilepsy and three of 13 patients with acute encephalitis. These eight patients with CCH had recent epileptic attack. CCH was found in ECD SPECT as well as HM-PAO. The contralateral cerebellar activity correlated with the cerebral activity in patients with CCH. CCH would have a relation with supratentrial hyperfunction in epilepsy and acute encephalitis. (author)

  17. Clinical Characteristics, Radiological Features and Gene Mutation in 10 Chinese Families with Spinocerebellar Ataxias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wen Chen; Li Zhao; Feng Zhang; Lan Li; Yu-Hang Gu; Jing-Yuan Zhou; Hui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a group ofneurodegenerative disorders that primarily cause the degeneration in the cerebellum,spinal cord,and brainstem.We study the clinical characteristics,radiological features and gene mutation in Chinese families with SCAs.Methods:In this study,we investigated 10 SCAs Chinese families with SCA1,SCA3/Machado-Joseph disease (MJD),SCA7,SCAB.There were 27 people who were genetically diagnosed as SCA,of which 21 people showed clinical symptoms,and 6 people had no clinical phenotype that we called them presymptomatic patients.In addition,3 people with cerebellar ataxia and cataracts were diagnosed according to the Harding diagnostic criteria but failed to be recognized as SCAs on genetic testing.Clinical characteristic analyses of each type of SCAs and radiological examinations were performed.Results:We found that SCA3/MJD was the most common subtype in Han population in China,and the ratio of the pontine tegmentum and the posterior fossa area was negatively correlated with the number of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) repeats;the disease duration was positively correlated with the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale score;and the CAG repeats number of abnormal alleles was negatively correlated with the age of onset.Conclusions:Collectively our study is a systematic research on SCAs in China,which may help for the clinical diagnosis and prenatal screening of this disease,and it may also aid toward better understanding of this disease.

  18. Mutation analysis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) in a large Iakut kinship of Eastern Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldfarb, L.G.; Lunkes, A.; Vaconcelos, O. [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have studied 131 patients with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia clinically and pathologically expressed as olivopontocerebellar atrophy. The disease in this Siberian kinship has been genetically linked to the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p, and the pedigree was screened for the recently described CAG repeat expansion in this gene using the GeneScan program (ABI). The normal allele in the affected individuals had 26 to 32 repeats, and among 424 analyzed normal alleles of the unaffected members of the kinship, unrelated controls and patients with other neurological disorders, the range of repeat numbers was 26 to 37, with 92% within 28 to 30 repeats. All 65 normal alleles in which the repeat area has been sequenced show a CAT or CATCAGCAT interruption between the first and the second stretches of 10 to 17 CAG repeats. The SCA1 allele was extended to 39 to 60 uninterrupted repeats in all fifty-nine analyzed ataxia patients. Repeat numbers of 40 to 55 were also found in thirty-nine of 105 tested unaffected first and second degree relatives. Two patients and an unaffected child were homozygous for the elongated allele. In seven of 10 paternal transmissions an increase of 2 to 11 repeats have occurred; in nine maternal transmissions the repeat numbers remained the same or grew for just one repeat. Mutation analysis provides new opportunities in diagnosis and risk assessment of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

  19. Characteristics of gait ataxia in δ2 glutamate receptor mutant mice, ho15J.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Takeuchi

    Full Text Available The cerebellum plays a fundamental, but as yet poorly understood, role in the control of locomotion. Recently, mice with gene mutations or knockouts have been used to investigate various aspects of cerebellar function with regard to locomotion. Although many of the mutant mice exhibit severe gait ataxia, kinematic analyses of limb movements have been performed in only a few cases. Here, we investigated locomotion in ho15J mice that have a mutation of the δ2 glutamate receptor. The cerebellum of ho15J mice shows a severe reduction in the number of parallel fiber-Purkinje synapses compared with wild-type mice. Analysis of hindlimb kinematics during treadmill locomotion showed abnormal hindlimb movements characterized by excessive toe elevation during the swing phase, and by severe hyperflexion of the ankles in ho15J mice. The great trochanter heights in ho15J mice were lower than in wild-type mice throughout the step cycle. However, there were no significant differences in various temporal parameters between ho15J and wild-type mice. We suggest that dysfunction of the cerebellar neuronal circuits underlies the observed characteristic kinematic abnormality of hindlimb movements during locomotion of ho15J mice.

  20. The Contribution of the Cerebellum to Cognition in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freya E. Cooper

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study sought evidence for a specific cerebellar contribution to cognition by characterising the cognitive phenotype of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 (SCA-6; an autosomal dominant genetic disease which causes a highly specific late-onset cerebellar degeneration. A comprehensive neuropsychological assessment was administered to 27 patients with genetically confirmed SCA-6. General intellectual ability, memory and executive function were examined using internationally standardised tests (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III, Wechsler Memory Scale-III, Delis and Kaplan Executive Function System, Brixton Spatial Anticipation test. The patient group showed no evidence of intellectual or memory decline. However, tests of executive function involving skills of cognitive flexibility, inhibition of response and verbal reasoning and abstraction demonstrated significant impairment at the group level with large effect sizes. The results demonstrate an executive deficit due to SCA-6 that can be conceptualised as parallel to the motor difficulties suffered by these patients: the data support a role for the cerebellum in the regulation and coordination of cognitive, as well as motor processes that is relevant to individual performance.

  1. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 mutation that is associated with disease onset in infancy disrupts axonal pathfinding during neuronal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi A. Issa

    2012-11-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13 is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the Kv3.3 voltage-gated potassium (K+ channel. SCA13 exists in two forms: infant onset is characterized by severe cerebellar atrophy, persistent motor deficits and intellectual disability, whereas adult onset is characterized by progressive ataxia and progressive cerebellar degeneration. To test the hypothesis that infant- and adult-onset mutations have differential effects on neuronal development that contribute to the age at which SCA13 emerges, we expressed wild-type Kv3.3 or infant- or adult-onset mutant proteins in motor neurons in the zebrafish spinal cord. We characterized the development of CaP (caudal primary motor neurons at ∼36 and ∼48 hours post-fertilization using confocal microscopy and 3D digital reconstruction. Exogenous expression of wild-type Kv3.3 had no significant effect on CaP development. In contrast, CaP neurons expressing the infant-onset mutation made frequent pathfinding errors, sending long, abnormal axon collaterals into muscle territories that are normally innervated exclusively by RoP (rostral primary or MiP (middle primary motor neurons. This phenotype might be directly relevant to infant-onset SCA13 because interaction with inappropriate synaptic partners might trigger cell death during brain development. Importantly, pathfinding errors were not detected in CaP neurons expressing the adult-onset mutation. However, the adult-onset mutation tended to increase the complexity of the distal axonal arbor. From these results, we speculate that infant-onset SCA13 is associated with marked changes in the development of Kv3.3-expressing cerebellar neurons, reducing their health and viability early in life and resulting in the withered cerebellum seen in affected children.

  2. A case of slowly progressive anti-Yo-associated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration successfully treated with antitumor and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboguchi, Shintaro; Yajima, Ryuji; Higuchi, You; Ishikawa, Masanori; Kawachi, Izumi; Koyama, Yu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo

    2016-07-28

    We report a case of slowly progressive anti-Yo-associated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) with breast cancer in a 54-year-old woman. The symptoms of limb and truncal ataxia, and dysarthria gradually progressed during the course of 1 year, and the modified Rankin scale (mRS) score was 2. A mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection was performed for the breast cancer. No malignant cells were found on histopathological examination of the lymph node. Combination chemotherapy with adriamycin and cyclophosphamide (AC) prevented neurologic deterioration. However, subsequent treatment with trastuzumab and paclitaxel did not prevent progression of the symptoms (mRS score 3). Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed atrophy of the cerebellar hemispheres without brain stem atrophy. Anti-Yo antibody was detected in the serum, which led to a diagnosis of anti-Yo-associated PCD. We resected an enlarged axillary lymph node, which was found on computed tomography. The histopathological analysis of the lymph node revealed foreign body granuloma, which suggested an association with necrotic malignant tissue. Following additional tegafur-uracil therapy and two courses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), the cerebellar signs and symptoms gradually improved (mRS score 2). The clinical course shows that PCD can present as a slowly progressive cerebellar symptom. We propose an active treatment for anti-Yo-associated PCD consisting of tumor resection, combined chemotherapy, and IVIg. PMID:27356731

  3. Congenital ataxia and hemiplegic migraine with cerebral edema associated with a novel gain of function mutation in the calcium channel CACNA1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Segarra, Nuria; Gautschi, Ivan; Mittaz-Crettol, Laureane; Kallay Zetchi, Christine; Al-Qusairi, Lama; Van Bemmelen, Miguel Xavier; Maeder, Philippe; Bonafé, Luisa; Schild, Laurent; Roulet-Perez, Eliane

    2014-07-15

    Mutations in the CACNA1A gene, encoding the α1 subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type), have been associated with three neurological phenotypes: familial and sporadic hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1, SHM1), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2), and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). We report a child with congenital ataxia, abnormal eye movements and developmental delay who presented severe attacks of hemiplegic migraine triggered by minor head traumas and associated with hemispheric swelling and seizures. Progressive cerebellar atrophy was also observed. Remission of the attacks was obtained with acetazolamide. A de novo 3 bp deletion was found in heterozygosity causing loss of a phenylalanine residue at position 1502, in one of the critical transmembrane domains of the protein contributing to the inner part of the pore. We characterized the electrophysiology of this mutant in a Xenopus oocyte in vitro system and showed that it causes gain of function of the channel. The mutant Ca(V)2.1 activates at lower voltage threshold than the wild type. These findings provide further evidence of this molecular mechanism as causative of FHM1 and expand the phenotypic spectrum of CACNA1A mutations with a child exhibiting severe SHM1 and non-episodic ataxia of congenital onset. PMID:24836863

  4. Metronidazole-Induced Cerebellar Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Sabat, Shyam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy.

  5. Metronidazole-induced cerebellar toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agarwal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy.

  6. Investigation of epididymal immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Zong-Liang

    2005-01-01

    Immunology is the study of the structure and function of the immune system. The immune system consists of an earlier-stage innate immunity and a later-stage adaptive immunity. The task of the immune system is to efficiently respond to non-self antigens and the invasion of pathogens, thereby protecting the host's homeostasis. This review article discusses the structure and function of the epididymis, including the composition of the epithelial cells of the epididymis and their relationship to the immune system, through the assessment of alterations in the immune cells of the epididymis. The review also shows the anti-inflammatory properties of rat epididymal defensin and the description of the blood-epididymis barrier, immune barrier, epididymitis and pathological mechanisms of infertility in males. Taken together, we see that the epididymis possesses a close link with immunology. Finally, this review discusses the future of studies involving epididymal immunology.

  7. Systems Theory in Immunology

    CERN Document Server

    Doria, Gino; Koch, Giorgio; Strom, Roberto

    1979-01-01

    This volume collects the contributions presented at the "Working Conference on System Theory in Immunology", held in Rome, May 1978. The aim of the Conference was to bring together immunologists on one side and experts in system theory and applied mathematics on the other, in order to identify problems of common interest and to establish a network of joint effort toward their solution. The methodologies of system theory for processing experimental data and for describing dynamical phenomena could indeed contribute significantly to the under­ standing of basic immunological facts. Conversely, the complexity of experimental results and of interpretative models should stimulate mathematicians to formulate new problems and to design appropriate procedures of analysis. The multitude of scientific publications in theoretical biology, appeared in recent years, confirms this trend and calls for extensive interaction between mat- matics and immunology. The material of this volume is divided into five sections, along ...

  8. Cellular and molecular basis of cerebellar development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Salvador; Andreu, Abraham; Mecklenburg, Nora; Echevarria, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering, and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification, and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function. PMID:23805080

  9. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cerebellar Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador eMartinez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function.

  10. Immunologic mechanism at infertility

    OpenAIRE

    İlknur Aydın; Behice Erci

    2006-01-01

    Infertility has been serious problem for couples that want to have a child. It is estimated that %10-15 of marriages are involuntary childless; that is, there is the serious problem of infertility. In more than 40% of infertility couples that is the reason of their infertility was unknown. In those couples, probably immunological factors were found to be responsible for the infertility. In the article, it was aimed to review the immunologic causes of male and female infertility in the light o...

  11. Immunologic mechanism at infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behice Erci

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Infertility has been serious problem for couples that want to have a child. It is estimated that %10-15 of marriages are involuntary childless; that is, there is the serious problem of infertility. In more than 40% of infertility couples that is the reason of their infertility was unknown. In those couples, probably immunological factors were found to be responsible for the infertility. In the article, it was aimed to review the immunologic causes of male and female infertility in the light of the current scientific data.

  12. Immunologic mechanism at infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlknur Aydın

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Infertility has been serious problem for couples that want to have a child. It is estimated that %10-15 of marriages are involuntary childless; that is, there is the serious problem of infertility. In more than 40% of infertility couples that is the reason of their infertility was unknown. In those couples, probably immunological factors were found to be responsible for the infertility. In the article, it was aimed to review the immunologic causes of male and female infertility in the light of the current scientific data.

  13. Identification of telomere dysfunction in Friedreich ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Anjomani Virmouni, Sara; Al-Mahdawi, Sahar; Sandi, Chiranjeevi; Yasaei, Hemad; Giunti, Paola; Slijepcevic, Predrag; Mark A. Pook

    2015-01-01

    Background Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutation of the FXN gene, resulting in decreased frataxin expression, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. A recent study has identified shorter telomeres in FRDA patient leukocytes as a possible disease biomarker. Results Here we aimed to investigate both telomere structure and function in FRDA cells. Our results confirmed telomere shortening in FRDA patient leukocytes and identifie...

  14. Axonal inclusions in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel, Kay; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.; Schultz, Christian; Paulson, Henry; Frank, Stefanie; de Vos, Rob A.; Brunt, Ewout R.; Deller, Thomas; Harm H Kampinga; Rüb, Udo

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a major pathological hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders including polyglutamine diseases. Aggregation of the mutated form of the disease protein ataxin-3 into neuronal nuclear inclusions is well described in the polyglutamine disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 or Machado–Joseph disease), although these inclusions are not thought to be directly pathogenic. Neuropil aggregates have not yet been described in SCA3. We performed a systematic immunohistoch...

  15. Marked variation in the cardiomyopathy associated with Friedreich's ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Dutka, D.; Donnelly, J; Nihoyannopoulos, P; Oakley, C; Nunez, D

    1999-01-01

    Objective—To document the cardiac phenotype associated with Friedreich's ataxia, a recessively inherited disorder characterised by spinocerebellar degeneration.
Setting—Individuals with Friedreich's ataxia who accepted the invitation to participate in the study.
Hypothesis—The cardiomyopathy associated with Friedreich's ataxia may offer a human model for the study of factors modulating cardiac hypertrophy.
Methods—55 patients (mean (SD) age 30 (9) years) with a clinical diagnosis of Friedreic...

  16. Friedreich Ataxia: Molecular Mechanisms, Redox Considerations, and Therapeutic Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Renata; Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Seguin, Alexandra; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Lesuisse, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage are at the origin of numerous neurodegenerative diseases like Friedreich ataxia and Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common hereditary ataxia, with one individual affected in 50,000. This disease is characterized by progressive degeneration of the central and peripheral nervous systems, cardiomyopathy, and increased incidence of diabetes mellitus. FRDA is caused by a dynamic mutation, a GAA trinucleotide repe...

  17. Oral Microbiology and Immunology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Olsen, Ingar

    , dental assistants and trainees may find it a useful source of reference. The contents are based on general microbiology and immunology. Oral microbiology is given particular attention, with examples relevant to oral infectious diseases. Each chapter opens with a relatively short pre-reading section...

  18. The immunological synapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemmensen, Thomas; Pedersen, Lars Ostergaard; Geisler, Carsten

    2003-01-01

    distinct 3-dimensional supramolecular structure at the T cell/APC interface has been suggested to be involved in the information transfer. Due to its functional analogy to the neuronal synapse, the structure has been termed the "immunological synapse" (IS). Here, we review molecular aspects concerning IS...

  19. Immunology & Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jeffrey R.; And Others

    This monograph was designed for the high school biology curriculum. The first section reviews the major areas of importance in immunology. Section three contains six instructional activities for the high school classroom and the second section contains teacher's materials for those activities. The activities address for students some of the major…

  20. Basic and clinical immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

  1. HIV Molecular Immunology 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusim, Karina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Korber, Bette Tina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Brander, Christian [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Barouch, Dan [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States). Division of Vaccine Research; de Boer, Rob [Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands). Faculty of Biology; Haynes, Barton F. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Duke Human Vaccine Institute and Departments of Medicine, Surgery and Immunology; Koup, Richard [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). Vaccine Research Center; Moore, John P. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Weill Medical College; Walker, Bruce D. [Ragon Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Watkins, David [Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-04-05

    The scope and purpose of the HIV molecular immunology database: HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2015 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as cross-reactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins

  2. Ataxia with Vitamin E Deficiency May Present with Cervical Dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Andrew E.; Vargas, Wendy; Pearson, Toni S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is an autosomal recessive disorder that usually presents with ataxia, areflexia, and proprioceptive and vibratory sensory loss. Dystonia has been reported rarely. Case Report An 11-year-old female presented with dystonic head tremor and cervical and bilateral arm dystonia. Her 14-year-old older brother had dystonic head tremor and generalized dystonia. One year later, the brother developed dysarthria, limb dysmetria, and gait ataxia. Compound heterozygous mutations in TTPA were detected, confirming the diagnosis of AVED. Discussion AVED may present with dystonia rather than ataxia, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of progressive dystonia.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: PRICKLE1-related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with ataxia PRICKLE1-related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Description PRICKLE1 -related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia is a rare inherited condition characterized by recurrent ...

  4. Cerebellar contributions to verbal working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Simon P; Davis, Nick J; Morgan, Helen M; Bracewell, R Martyn

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing evidence for a cerebellar role in working memory. Clinical research has shown that working memory impairments after cerebellar damage and neuroimaging studies have revealed task-specific activation in the cerebellum during working memory processing. A lateralisation of cerebellar function within working memory has been proposed with the right hemisphere making the greater contribution to verbal processing and the left hemisphere for visuospatial tasks. We used continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) to examine whether differences in post-stimulation performance could be observed based on the cerebellar hemisphere stimulated and the type of data presented. We observed that participants were significantly less accurate on a verbal version of a Sternberg task after stimulation to the right cerebellar hemisphere when compared to left hemisphere stimulation. Performance on a visual Sternberg task was unaffected by stimulation of either hemisphere. We discuss our results in the context of prior studies that have used cerebellar stimulation to investigate working memory and highlight the cerebellar role in phonological encoding. PMID:24338673

  5. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusim, Karina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Korber, Bette Tina Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Barouch, Dan [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Koup, Richard [Vaccine Research Center National Institutes of Health (United States); de Boer, Rob [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Biology; Moore, John P. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Weill Medical College; Brander, Christian [Institucioi Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Haynes, Barton F. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Duke Human Vaccine Institute and Departments of Medicine, Surgery and Immunology; Walker, Bruce D. [Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Cambridge, MA (United States); Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  6. Oral administration of PF-01247324, a subtype-selective Nav1.8 blocker, reverses cerebellar deficits in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon D Shields

    Full Text Available Cerebellar symptoms significantly diminish quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. We previously showed that sodium channel Nav1.8, although normally restricted to peripheral somatosensory neurons, is upregulated in the cerebellum in MS, and that Nav1.8 expression is linked to ataxia and MS-like symptoms in mice. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular administration of the Nav1.8 blocker A-803467 temporarily reversed electrophysiological and behavioral manifestations of disease in a mouse MS model; unfortunately A-803467 is not orally bioavailable, diminishing the potential for translation to human patients. In the present study, we assessed the effect of per os (p.o. dosing of a new orally bioavailable Nav1.8-selective blocker, PF-01247324, in transgenic mice expressing Nav1.8 in Purkinje neurons, and in wildtype mice in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model. PF-01247324 was administered by oral gavage at 1000 mg/kg; control groups received an equal volume of vehicle. Behavioral assays of motor coordination, grip strength, and ataxia were performed. We observed significant improvements in motor coordination and cerebellar-like symptoms in mice that received PF-01247324 compared to control littermates that received vehicle. These preclinical proof-of-concept data suggest that PF-01247324, its derivatives, or other Nav1.8-selective blockers merit further study for providing symptomatic therapy for cerebellar dysfunction in MS and related disorders.

  7. Urgent decisions and a tight spot: embolic infarction of a herniated cerebellar tonsil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Donagh, Ruth; Bradley, David; Harbison, Joseph Augustine

    2016-01-01

    A previously well 30-year-old woman presented at 17:30 with a sudden onset of dizziness, ataxia and headache. She was initially investigated with a CT scan of the brain and lumbar puncture, which yielded no diagnosis. Subsequent MR scan revealed multiple posterior circulation infarcts, along with a previously undiagnosed Arnold-Chiari 2 malformation with an associated syrinx of her cervical and thoracic spine. The infarct involved one of the herniated cerebellar tonsils. Oedema of an infarct in the herniated tonsils caused compression of the medulla at the foramen magnum, with associated neurological symptoms including Lhermitte's phenomenon and headache on valsalva manoeuvre. Owing to these symptoms a surgical decompression was performed. The most likely aetiology of her stroke was determined to be a paradoxical embolus via patent foramen ovale. PMID:27489065

  8. Sonic hedgehog patterning during cerebellar development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Annarita; Cerrato, Valentina; Fucà, Elisa; Parmigiani, Elena; Buffo, Annalisa; Leto, Ketty

    2016-01-01

    The morphogenic factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) actively orchestrates many aspects of cerebellar development and maturation. During embryogenesis, Shh signaling is active in the ventricular germinal zone (VZ) and represents an essential signal for proliferation of VZ-derived progenitors. Later, Shh secreted by Purkinje cells sustains the amplification of postnatal neurogenic niches: the external granular layer and the prospective white matter, where excitatory granule cells and inhibitory interneurons are produced, respectively. Moreover, Shh signaling affects Bergmann glial differentiation and promotes cerebellar foliation during development. Here we review the most relevant functions of Shh during cerebellar ontogenesis, underlying its role in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26499980

  9. Pediatric Neurocutaneous Syndromes with Cerebellar Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Neurocutaneous syndromes encompasses a broad group of genetic disorders with different clinical, genetic, and pathologic features that share developmental lesions of the skin as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Cerebellar involvement has been shown in numerous types of neurocutaneous syndrome. It may help or be needed for the diagnosis and to explain the cognitive and behavioral phenotype of affected children. This article describes various types of neurocutaneous syndrome with cerebellar involvement. For each neurocutaneous disease or syndrome, clinical features, genetic, neuroimaging findings, and the potential role of the cerebellar involvement is discussed. PMID:27423801

  10. CT findings in cerebellar hemangioblastomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, E.; Albert, F.

    1982-02-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in 16 personal cases of cerebellar hemangioblastomas are presented. Accordings to other reports in the literature, three-quarters of the tumours were cystic, containing a small mural nodule, whereas the others were predominantly solid. By CT scan the cystic tumours were always identified as roundish or oval space-occupying lesions, sharply demarcated from the surrounding tissue. The solid portion of these tumours, projecting into the cystic part, was delineated more precisely by contrast enhancement, but sometimes escaped identification. On the contrary, even after contrast enhancement the predominantly solid tumours could not be clearly identified as hemangioblastomas. Calcification could not be demonstrated. Additional angiographic investigations were imperative in order to establish the diagnosis, besides visualizing further hypervascular nodules of hemangioblastoma, which CT scanning failed to reveal.

  11. Cerebellar mutism syndrome and its relation to cerebellar cognitive and affective function: Review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yildiz Ozlem

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors of the cerebellum and brainstem account for half of all brain tumors in children. The realization that cerebellar lesions produce clinically relevant intellectual disability makes it important to determine whether neuropsychological abnormalities occur in long-term survivors of pediatric cerebellar tumors. Little is known about the neurobehavioral sequale resulting specifically from the resection of these tumors in this population. We therefore reviewed neuropsychological findings associated with postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome and discuss the further implications for cerebellar cognitive function.

  12. Canine hereditary ataxia in old english sheepdogs and gordon setters is associated with a defect in the autophagy gene encoding RAB24.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryline Agler

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters suffer from a juvenile onset, autosomal recessive form of canine hereditary ataxia primarily affecting the Purkinje neuron of the cerebellar cortex. The clinical and histological characteristics are analogous to hereditary ataxias in humans. Linkage and genome-wide association studies on a cohort of related Old English Sheepdogs identified a region on CFA4 strongly associated with the disease phenotype. Targeted sequence capture and next generation sequencing of the region identified an A to C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP located at position 113 in exon 1 of an autophagy gene, RAB24, that segregated with the phenotype. Genotyping of six additional breeds of dogs affected with hereditary ataxia identified the same polymorphism in affected Gordon Setters that segregated perfectly with phenotype. The other breeds tested did not have the polymorphism. Genome-wide SNP genotyping of Gordon Setters identified a 1.9 MB region with an identical haplotype to affected Old English Sheepdogs. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural evaluation of the brains of affected dogs from both breeds identified dramatic Purkinje neuron loss with axonal spheroids, accumulation of autophagosomes, ubiquitin positive inclusions and a diffuse increase in cytoplasmic neuronal ubiquitin staining. These findings recapitulate the changes reported in mice with induced neuron-specific autophagy defects. Taken together, our results suggest that a defect in RAB24, a gene associated with autophagy, is highly associated with and may contribute to canine hereditary ataxia in Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters. This finding suggests that detailed investigation of autophagy pathways should be undertaken in human hereditary ataxia.

  13. Mechanisms of immunological tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Herman

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing interest in establishing diagnostic markers of immunological tolerance applicable to efforts to minimize drug immunosuppression in transplantation and chronic immunological diseases. It is hoped that an understanding of the diverse mechanisms that can contribute to tolerance will guide efforts to establish diagnostic tolerance biomarkers. Not only would these be valuable for management of autoimmune diseases, transplants and allergies, but they might also guide efforts to override tolerance processes in cancer and vaccine development. Where tolerance is generated by deletion or inactivation of antigen reactive lymphocytes, it is unlikely that any long-term-valid blood biomarkers might be found. Where tolerance is mediated by active regulatory mechanisms, indicators that can be usefully measured may emerge, but these would likely show significant heterogeneity reflecting the diversity of active tolerance processes operating in different individuals. Given this, the most useful "kits" might be those "smart" enough to detect this diversity of tolerance players. PMID:26036868

  14. Cerebellar mutism: review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudrunardottir, Thora; Sehested, Astrid; Juhler, Marianne;

    2011-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a common complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. This article reviews current status with respect to incidence, anatomical substrate, pathophysiology, risk factors, surgical considerations, treatment options, prognosis and prevention....

  15. Recent Advancements in Targeted Delivery of Therapeutic Molecules in Neurodegenerative Disease - Spinocerebellar Ataxia - Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Prakash

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery and its methodologies have been very effective in terms of treating cancers and immunological disorders but have not been able to stop genetic diseases as most of the drugs target at the protein level. They merely mitigate the symptoms of the disease. Spinocerebellar ataxia is a neurological genetic disorder that is caused by the formation of an abnormal protein. There have been several reports on ataxic drug development but actual clinical treatment is yet to be achieved. Oligonucleotide therapy called sequence specific siRNA mediated gene silencing has evolved with promising results. This approach emphasizes on suppressing the expression of the diseased gene at mRNA level. However, there is a limitation in delivery of siRNA to the target site. Several methods have been developed over the last decade to enhance the target specific delivery of DNA, siRNA, protein and small drug molecules for therapeutic purpose with less or no side effects. This review discusses the latest upcoming technologies in the field that focus on a number of nonviral nanocarriers for targeted delivery. In this review, we explore the promise and potential of novel therapeutics with interest on ataxia therapy.

  16. Fundamentals of Vaccine Immunology

    OpenAIRE

    Angela S Clem

    2011-01-01

    From a literature review of the current literature, this article provides an introduction to vaccine immunology including a primer on the components of the immune system, passive vs. active immunization, the mechanism(s) by which immunizations stimulate(s) immunity, and the types of vaccines available. Both the innate and adaptive immune subsystems are necessary to provide an effective immune response to an immunization. Further, effective immunizations must induce long-term stimulation of bo...

  17. Immunologically mediated abortion (IMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomucci, E; Bulletti, C; Polli, V; Prefetto, R A; Flamigni, C

    1994-06-01

    Roughly 20% of all clinical pregnancies evolve into "spontaneous abortions". The causes of spontaneous abortion have been determined in under 60% of the total and comprise genetic, infectious, hormonal and immunological factors. In some cases the immune tolerance mechanism may be impaired and the foetus immunologically rejected (IMA, immunologically mediated abortion). The immunological mechanism implicated depends on the time in which pregnancy loss takes place. During preimplantation and up to the end of implantation (13th day) the cell-mediated immune mechanism (potential alloimmune etiologies) is responsible for early abortion. This mechanism involves immunocompetent decidual cells (eGL, endometrial granulated lymphocytes) already present during pre-decidualization (late luteal phase) and their production of soluble factors or cytokines. Once the implantation process is over, after blastocyst penetration of the stroma and the decidual reaction of uterine tissue, IMA could be caused by cell-mediated and humoral mechanism (anti-paternal cytotoxic antibodies or autoantibody etiology), by the production of paternal anti major histocompatibility complex antibodies, or even by an autoimmune disorder leading to the production of autoantibodies (antiphospholipid antibodies, antinuclear antibodies or polyclonal B cell activation). The diagnostic work-up adopted to select IMA patients is crucial and includes primary (karyotype of both partners, toxo-test, hysterosalpingography, endometrial biopsy, thyroid function tests, serum hprolactin, luteal phase dating) and secondary (full hemochromocytometric test, search for LE cells, lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin, antinuclear antibodies, Rheumatoid factor, blood complement VDRL) investigations. Therapeutical approaches vary. If autoimmune disorders are demonstrated therapies with different combinations of corticosteroids, aspirin and heparin or intravenous immunoglobulin are administered. Otherwise, therapy with paternal

  18. Immunology of lymphatic filariasis

    OpenAIRE

    Babu, Subash; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    The immune responses to filarial parasites encompass a complex network of innate and adaptive cells whose interaction with the parasite underlies a spectrum of clinical manifestations. The predominant immunological feature of lymphatic filariasis is an antigen - specific Th2 response and an expansion of IL-10 producing CD4+ T cells that is accompanied by a muted Th1 response. This antigen specific T cell hypo-responsiveness appears to be crucial for the maintenance of the sustained, long-stan...

  19. Immunology and Epidemiology

    CERN Document Server

    Hraba, Tomáš

    1986-01-01

    In February 1985 a small international meeting of scientists took place at the recreation resort of the Polish Academy of Sci­ ences in Mogilany, near Cracow, Poland. The initiative for holding the workshop came from a working meeting on mathematical immunology and related topics at the International Institute for Applied Sys­ tems Analysis in Laxenburg, Austria, in November 1983. In addition to representatives of IIASA, delegates of the IIASA National Member Organizations (NMO) of Czechoslovakia, Italy, and the soviet Union took part in that working meeting. The participants came to the conclusion that IIASA could play an important role in facilitating the development of research in this field. The first step that they recommended to I IASA was to organize a workshop on mathematical immunology. The purpose of the workshop was to review the progress that has been made in applying mathematics to problems in immunology and to explore ways in which further progress might be achieved, especially by more efficie...

  20. Cosmos-1989 immunology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1991-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. The number of flight experiments has been small, and the full breadth of immunological alterations occurring after space flight remains to be established. Among the major effects on immune responses after space flight that have been reported are: alterations in lymphocyte blastogenesis and natural killer cell activity, alterations in production of cytokines, changes in leukocyte sub-population distribution, and decreases in the ability in the ability of bone marrow cells to respond to colony stimulating factors. Changes have been reported in immunological parameters of both humans and rodents. The significance of these alterations in relation to resistance to infection remains to be established. The current study involved a determination of the effects of flight on Cosmos mission 2044 on leukocyte subset distribution and the sensitivity of bone marrow cells to colony stimulating factor-GM. A parallel study with antiorthostatic suspension was also carried out. The study involved repetition and expansion of studies carried out on Cosmos 1887.

  1. Ataxia rating scales are age-dependent in healthy children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, Rick; Spits, Anne H.; Kuiper, Marieke J.; Lunsing, Roelinka J.; Burger, Huibert; Kremer, Hubertus P.; Sival, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate ataxia rating scales in children for reliability and the effect of age and sex. METHOD: Three independent neuropaediatric observers cross-sectionally scored a set of paediatric ataxia rating scales in a group of 52 healthy children (26 males, 26 females) aged 4 to 16 years (mean

  2. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  3. Dysarthria and Friedreich's Ataxia: What Can Intelligibility Assessment Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, Bronagh; Hewlett, Nigel

    2007-01-01

    Background: Friedreich's ataxia is one of the most common hereditary disorders of the nervous system. Dysarthria is a pervasive symptom of Friedreich's ataxia, yet the clinical presentation of speech symptoms remains poorly understood, leaving clinicians without the evidence required to develop therapy interventions. Aims: The research reported…

  4. Leukoencephalopathy after prophylactic radiation for leukaemia in ataxia telangiectasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Eyre, J A; Gardner-Medwin, D; Summerfield, G P

    1988-01-01

    Children with ataxia telangiectasia have a high probability of developing acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, and have increased sensitivity to chemotherapy and irradiation. We report a 51/2 year old boy who had undiagnosed ataxia telangiectasia when he presented with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. He subsequently developed a chemoradiation induced leukoencephalopathy after conventional central nervous system prophylaxis.

  5. Meningococcal meningitis presenting with bilateral deafness and ataxia.

    OpenAIRE

    Sandyk, R.; Brennan, M J

    1984-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with bilateral deafness and ataxia of sudden onset and without constitutional symptoms or signs of meningeal irritation. He was subsequently proved to have meningococcal meningitis, and the deafness and ataxia resolved following appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  6. Synchrony and neural coding in cerebellar circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L Person

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum regulates complex movements and is also implicated in cognitive tasks, and cerebellar dysfunction is consequently associated not only with movement disorders, but also with conditions like autism and dyslexia. How information is encoded by specific cerebellar firing patterns remains debated, however. A central question is how the cerebellar cortex transmits its integrated output to the cerebellar nuclei via GABAergic synapses from Purkinje neurons. Possible answers come from accumulating evidence that subsets of Purkinje cells synchronize their firing during behaviors that require the cerebellum. Consistent with models predicting that coherent activity of inhibitory networks has the capacity to dictate firing patterns of target neurons, recent experimental work supports the idea that inhibitory synchrony may regulate the response of cerebellar nuclear cells to Purkinje inputs, owing to the interplay between unusually fast inhibitory synaptic responses and high rates of intrinsic activity. Data from multiple laboratories lead to a working hypothesis that synchronous inhibitory input from Purkinje cells can set the timing and rate of action potentials produced by cerebellar nuclear cells, thereby relaying information out of the cerebellum. If so, then changing spatiotemporal patterns of Purkinje activity would allow different subsets of inhibitory neurons to control cerebellar output at different times. Here we explore the evidence for and against the idea that a synchrony code defines, at least in part, the input-output function between the cerebellar cortex and nuclei. We consider the literature on the existence of simple spike synchrony, convergence of Purkinje neurons onto nuclear neurons, and intrinsic properties of nuclear neurons that contribute to responses to inhibition. Finally, we discuss factors that may disrupt or modulate a synchrony code and describe the potential contributions of inhibitory synchrony to other motor

  7. Huntington's disease-like and ataxia syndromes: identification of a family with a de novo SCA17/TBP mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Sara; Petersen, Thor; Nørremølle, Anne;

    2010-01-01

    tract in the respective proteins. SCA17 is caused by a CAG/CAA repeat expansion in the TATA box-binding protein-gene (TBP). In some cases the clinical phenotype of SCA17 overlaps that of Huntington's disease (HD), hence the use of the term Huntington's disease-like. We screened 89 patients with a...... Huntington's disease-like phenotype without the HD-gene mutation and 178 patients with genetically unclassified cerebellar ataxia for the mutation in TBP. A 33-year old woman presenting with an HD like phenotype with a de novo 54 CAG/CAA repeat expansion was identified. Her normal allele included 38 repeats....... The patient's mother and father both carried normal range repeats, 38/38 and 33/39 respectively. Analysis of the repeat structures revealed that the expansion had occurred upon expansion of the longer paternal allele. We conclude that, however rare, SCA17 must be considered as a cause of Huntington...

  8. A YAC contig spanning the ataxia-telangiectasia locus (groups A and C) at 11q22-q23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotman, G.; Savitsky, K.; Ziv, Y. [Tel Aviv Univ. Ramat Aviv (Israel)] [and others

    1994-11-15

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disease involving cerebellar degeneration, immunodeficiency, cancer predisposition, chromosomal instability and radiosensitivity. A-T is heterogeneous, and the majority of A-T cases are associated with two complementation groups, A and C. The ATA and ATC loci are closely linked at chromosome 11q22-q23. Recombination mapping and linkage disequilibrium analysis have confined both loci between the markers D11S1817 and D11S927. Construction of this contig was expedited by prior generation of a region-specific ICRF sublibrary using Alu-PCR products derived from a radiation hybrid. The contig was expanded further by screening the libraries with Alu-PCR products derived from YAC clones and with STSs from YAC ends. YAC clones were aligned by fingerprinting with moderately repetitive probes. 56 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Expression of Caytaxin protein in Cayman Ataxia mouse models correlates with phenotype severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine M Sikora

    Full Text Available Caytaxin is a highly-conserved protein, which is encoded by the Atcay/ATCAY gene. Mutations in Atcay/ATCAY have been identified as causative of cerebellar disorders such as the rare hereditary disease Cayman ataxia in humans, generalized dystonia in the dystonic (dt rat, and marked motor defects in three ataxic mouse lines. While several lines of evidence suggest that Caytaxin plays a critical role in maintaining nervous system processes, the physiological function of Caytaxin has not been fully characterized. In the study presented here, we generated novel specific monoclonal antibodies against full-length Caytaxin to examine endogenous Caytaxin expression in wild type and Atcay mutant mouse lines. Caytaxin protein is absent from brain tissues in the two severely ataxic Atcay(jit (jittery and Atcay(swd (sidewinder mutant lines, and markedly decreased in the mildly ataxic/dystonic Atcay(ji-hes (hesitant line, indicating a correlation between Caytaxin expression and disease severity. As the expression of wild type human Caytaxin in mutant sidewinder and jittery mice rescues the ataxic phenotype, Caytaxin's physiological function appears to be conserved between the human and mouse orthologs. Across multiple species and in several neuronal cell lines Caytaxin is expressed as several protein isoforms, the two largest of which are caused by the usage of conserved methionine translation start sites. The work described in this manuscript presents an initial characterization of the Caytaxin protein and its expression in wild type and several mutant mouse models. Utilizing these animal models of human Cayman Ataxia will now allow an in-depth analysis to elucidate Caytaxin's role in maintaining normal neuronal function.

  10. Computational Insights into The Neuroprotective Action of Riluzole on 3-Acetylpyridine-Induced Ataxia in Rats

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    Mahyar Janahmadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Intra-peritoneal administration of riluzole has been shown to preserve the membrane properties and firing characteristics of Purkinje neurons in a rat model of cerebellar ataxia induced by 3-acetylpyridine (3-AP. However, the exact mechanism(s by which riluzole restores the normal electrophysiological properties of Purkinje neurons is not completely understood. Changes in the conductance of several ion channels, including the BK channels, have been proposed as a neuro protective target of riluzole. In this study, the possible cellular effects of riluzole on Purkinje cells from 3-AP-induced ataxic rats that could be responsible for its neuro protective action have been investigated by computer simulations.Materials and Methods: This is a computational stimulation study. The simulation environment enabled a change in the properties of the specific ion channels as the possible mechanism of action of riluzole. This allowed us to study the resulted changes in the firing activity of Purkinje cells without concerns about its other effects and interfering parameters in the experiments. Simulations were performed in the NEURON environment (Version 7.1 in a time step of 25 μs; analyses were conducted using MATLAB r2010a (The Mathworks. Data were given as mean ± SEM. Statistical analyses were performed by the student’s t test, and differences were considered significant if p<0.05.Results: The computational findings demonstrated that modulation of an individual ion channel current, as suggested by previous experimental studies, should not be considered as the only possible target for the neuro protective effects of riluzole to restore the normal firing activity of Purkinje cells from ataxic rats.Conclusion: Changes in the conductance of several potassium channels, including voltage-gated potassium (Kv1, Kv4 and big Ca2+-activated K+ (BK channels may be responsible for the neuro protective effect of riluzole against 3-AP induced alterations in

  11. Friedreich`s ataxia in American families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Costa, A.; Maguire, B.A.; Sylvester, J.E. [Hahnemann Univ., Philadephia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Freidreich`s ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder presenting with dysarthia, loss of tendon reflexes, and ataxic gait. Both diabetes mellitus and cardiomyopathy are frequently found associated with the disease. The gene, FRDA, has been localized to 9q13-21. Recent reports of recombination events in individuals homozygous by descent have positioned the gene to a 450 KB region in the FRDA locus centromeric to the original markers. Candidate cDNA`s have been isolated from part of this region, and characterized, but not shown to be responsible for the disease. We have performed linkage analysis on 46 American families with markers in the FRDA region. A recombination has been detected in a family which has the phenotypic criteria for Friedreich`s; none of the three affected exhibit signs of cardiomyopathy which is a required diagnostic criteria. Since this recombination lies within the now excluded D9S5/D9S15 region, it is being tested for linkage to the {open_quotes}ataxia with selective vitamin E deficiency{close_quotes} (AVED) locus on chromosome 8q. Our lab has work in progress to subclone appropriate regions from YACs in order to identify expressed sequences and nucleotide variations (by SSCP) in the FRDA locus.

  12. Síndrome de Ataxia-Telangiectasia

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    Amauri Batista da Silva

    1971-06-01

    Full Text Available A ataxia-telangiectasia, doença de Mme. Louis-Bar, é caracterizada pela associação de ataxia cerebelar progressiva, em geral com início na primeira infância, telangiectasas óculo-cutâneas, movimentos coreoatetósicos, tendência a infecções repetidas do sistema respiratório, retardo estaturo-ponderal, demenciação. São mais ou menos freqüentes os tumores do sistema reticuloendotelial. A doença é geralmente familiar, transmitida por genes recessivos, autossômicos, não ligados ao sexo. A alteração bioquímica mais encontrada consiste na diminuição ou ausência completa da fração A das gamaglobulinas, bem como na perturbação das reações de hipersensibilidade retardada. Os AA. relatam o estudo clínico, biológico e pneumencefalográfico de uma criança de 3 anos de idade, apresentando essa enfermidade desde os 18 meses de vida, sem antecedentes familiares.

  13. Bilateral Cerebellar Cortical Dysplasia without Other Malformations: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jung Seok; Ahn Kook Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Lee, Sun Jin; Park, Jeong Mi [Catholic University Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Recent advances in MRI have revealed congenital brain malformations and subtle developmental abnormalities of the cerebral and cerebellar cortical architecture. Typical cerebellar cortical dysplasia as a newly categorized cerebellar malformation, has been seen in patients with Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy. Cerebellar cortical dysplasia occurs at the embryonic stage and is often observed in healthy newborns. It is also incidentally and initially detected in adults without symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, cerebellar dysplasia without any related disorders is very rare. We describe the MRI findings in one patient with disorganized foliation of both cerebellar hemispheres without a related disorder or syndrome

  14. Social and Cultural Elements Associated with Neurocognitive Dysfunctions in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadillo, Roberto Emmanuele; Galvez, Víctor; Díaz, Rosalinda; Paredes, Lorena; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R.; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2) is a rare genetic disorder producing cerebellar degeneration and affecting motor abilities. Neuroimaging studies also show neurodegeneration in subcortical and cortical regions related to emotional and social processes. From social neuroscience, it is suggested that motor and social abilities can be influenced by particular cultural dynamics so, culture is fundamental to understand the effect of brain-related alterations. Here, we present the first analysis about the cultural elements related to the SCA2 disorder in 15 patients previously evaluated with neuroimaging and psychometric instruments, and their nuclear relationships distributed in six geographical and cultural regions in Mexico. Ethnographic records and photographic and video archives about the quotidian participant’s routine were obtained from the patients, their relatives and their caregivers. The information was categorized and interpreted taking into consideration cultural issues and patients’ medical files. Our analyses suggest that most of the participants do not understand the nature of the disease and this misunderstanding favors magic and non-medical explanations. Patients’ testimonies suggest a decrease in pain perception as well as motor alterations that may be related to interoceptive dysfunctions. Relatives’ testimonies indicate patients’ lack of social and emotional interests that may be related to frontal, temporal, and cerebellar degeneration. In general, participants use their religious beliefs to deal with the disease and only a few of them trust the health system. Patients and their families are either openly rejected and ignored, tolerated or even helped by their community accordingly to different regional traits. We propose that ethnography can provide social representations to understand the patients’ alterations, to formulate neurobiological hypotheses, to develop neurocognitive interventions, and to improve the medical approach to

  15. Parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synaptic impairment in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 27

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    Filippo Tempia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetically inherited mutations in the fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14 gene lead to spinocerebellar ataxia type 27 (SCA27, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by severe heterogeneous motor and cognitive impairments. Consistently, genetic deletion of Fgf14 in Fgf14-/- mice recapitulates salient features of the SCA27 human disease. In vitro molecular studies in cultured neurons indicate that the FGF14F145S SCA27 allele acts as a dominant negative mutant suppressing the FGF14 wild type function and resulting in inhibition of voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels. To gain insights in the cerebellar deficits in the animal model of the human disease, we applied whole-cell voltage-clamp in the acute cerebellar slice preparation to examine the properties of parallel fibers (PF to Purkinje neuron synapses in Fgf14-/- mice and wild type littermates. We found that the AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents evoked by PF stimulation (PF-EPSCs were significantly reduced in Fgf14-/- animals, while short-term plasticity, measured as paired-pulse facilitation (PPF, was enhanced. Measuring Sr2+-induced release of quanta from stimulated synapses, we found that the size of the PF-EPSCs was unchanged, ruling out a postsynaptic deficit. This phenotype was corroborated by decreased expression of VGLUT1, a specific presynaptic marker at PF-Purkinje neuron synapses. We next examined the mGluR1 receptor-induced response (mGluR1-EPSC that under normal conditions requires a gradual build-up of glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft, and found no changes in these responses in Fgf14-/- mice. These results provide evidence of a critical role of FGF14 in maintaining presynaptic function at PF-Purkinje neuron synapses highlighting critical target mechanisms to recapitulate the complexity of the SCA27 disease.

  16. Social and Cultural Elements Associated with Neurocognitive Dysfunctions in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadillo, Roberto Emmanuele; Galvez, Víctor; Díaz, Rosalinda; Paredes, Lorena; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2) is a rare genetic disorder producing cerebellar degeneration and affecting motor abilities. Neuroimaging studies also show neurodegeneration in subcortical and cortical regions related to emotional and social processes. From social neuroscience, it is suggested that motor and social abilities can be influenced by particular cultural dynamics so, culture is fundamental to understand the effect of brain-related alterations. Here, we present the first analysis about the cultural elements related to the SCA2 disorder in 15 patients previously evaluated with neuroimaging and psychometric instruments, and their nuclear relationships distributed in six geographical and cultural regions in Mexico. Ethnographic records and photographic and video archives about the quotidian participant's routine were obtained from the patients, their relatives and their caregivers. The information was categorized and interpreted taking into consideration cultural issues and patients' medical files. Our analyses suggest that most of the participants do not understand the nature of the disease and this misunderstanding favors magic and non-medical explanations. Patients' testimonies suggest a decrease in pain perception as well as motor alterations that may be related to interoceptive dysfunctions. Relatives' testimonies indicate patients' lack of social and emotional interests that may be related to frontal, temporal, and cerebellar degeneration. In general, participants use their religious beliefs to deal with the disease and only a few of them trust the health system. Patients and their families are either openly rejected and ignored, tolerated or even helped by their community accordingly to different regional traits. We propose that ethnography can provide social representations to understand the patients' alterations, to formulate neurobiological hypotheses, to develop neurocognitive interventions, and to improve the medical approach to the disease

  17. Social and cultural elements associated with neurocognitive dysfunctions in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Emmanuele Mercadillo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2 is a rare genetic disorder producing cerebellar degeneration and affecting motor abilities. Neuroimaging studies also show neurodegeneration in subcortical and cortical regions related to emotional and social processes. From social neuroscience it is suggested that motor and social abilities can be influenced by particular cultural dynamics so, culture is fundamental to understand the effect of brain related alterations. Here we present the first analysis about the cultural elements related to the SCA2 disorder in 15 patients previously evaluated with neuroimaging and psychometric instruments, and their nuclear relationships distributed in six geographical and cultural regions in Mexico. Ethnographic records and photographic and video archives about the quotidian participant’s routine were obtained from the patients, their relatives and their caregivers. The information was categorized and interpreted taking into consideration cultural issues and patients’ medical files. Our analyses suggest that most of the participants do not understand the nature of the disease and this misunderstanding favors magic and non-medical explanations. Patients’ testimonies suggest a decrease in pain perception as well as motor alterations that may be related to interoceptive dysfunctions. Relatives’ testimonies indicate patients’ lack of social and emotional interests that may be related to frontal, temporal and cerebellar degeneration. In general, participants use their religious beliefs to deal with the disease and only a few of them trust the health system. Patients and their families are either openly rejected and ignored, tolerated or even helped by their community accordingly to different regional traits. We propose that ethnography can provide social representations to understand the patients’ alterations, to formulate neurobiological hypotheses, to develop neurocognitive interventions, and to improve the

  18. Pharmacometabolomic signature of ataxia SCA1 mouse model and lithium effects.

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    Bertrand Perroud

    Full Text Available We have shown that lithium treatment improves motor coordination in a spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 disease mouse model (Sca1(154Q/+. To learn more about disease pathogenesis and molecular contributions to the neuroprotective effects of lithium, we investigated metabolomic profiles of cerebellar tissue and plasma from SCA1-model treated and untreated mice. Metabolomic analyses of wild-type and Sca1(154Q/+ mice, with and without lithium treatment, were performed using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and BinBase mass spectral annotations. We detected 416 metabolites, of which 130 were identified. We observed specific metabolic perturbations in Sca1(154Q/+ mice and major effects of lithium on metabolism, centrally and peripherally. Compared to wild-type, Sca1(154Q/+ cerebella metabolic profile revealed changes in glucose, lipids, and metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and purines. Fewer metabolic differences were noted in Sca1(154Q/+ mouse plasma versus wild-type. In both genotypes, the major lithium responses in cerebellum involved energy metabolism, purines, unsaturated free fatty acids, and aromatic and sulphur-containing amino acids. The largest metabolic difference with lithium was a 10-fold increase in ascorbate levels in wild-type cerebella (p<0.002, with lower threonate levels, a major ascorbate catabolite. In contrast, Sca1(154Q/+ mice that received lithium showed no elevated cerebellar ascorbate levels. Our data emphasize that lithium regulates a variety of metabolic pathways, including purine, oxidative stress and energy production pathways. The purine metabolite level, reduced in the Sca1(154Q/+ mice and restored upon lithium treatment, might relate to lithium neuroprotective properties.

  19. Requirement for zebrafish ataxin-7 in differentiation of photoreceptors and cerebellar neurons.

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    Constantin Yanicostas

    Full Text Available The expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ tract in the N-terminal region of ataxin-7 (atxn7 is the causative event in spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7, an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder mainly characterized by progressive, selective loss of rod-cone photoreceptors and cerebellar Purkinje and granule cells. The molecular and cellular processes underlying this restricted neuronal vulnerability, which contrasts with the broad expression pattern of atxn7, remains one of the most enigmatic features of SCA7, and more generally of all polyQ disorders. To gain insight into this specific neuronal vulnerability and achieve a better understanding of atxn7 function, we carried out a functional analysis of this protein in the teleost fish Danio rerio. We characterized the zebrafish atxn7 gene and its transcription pattern, and by making use of morpholino-oligonucleotide-mediated gene inactivation, we analysed the phenotypes induced following mild or severe zebrafish atxn7 depletion. Severe or nearly complete zebrafish atxn7 loss-of-function markedly impaired embryonic development, leading to both early embryonic lethality and severely deformed embryos. More importantly, in relation to SCA7, moderate depletion of the protein specifically, albeit partially, prevented the differentiation of both retina photoreceptors and cerebellar Purkinje and granule cells. In addition, [1-232] human atxn7 fragment rescued these phenotypes showing strong function conservation of this protein through evolution. The specific requirement for zebrafish atxn7 in the proper differentiation of cerebellar neurons provides, to our knowledge, the first in vivo evidence of a direct functional relationship between atxn7 and the differentiation of Purkinje and granule cells, the most crucial neurons affected in SCA7 and most other polyQ-mediated SCAs. These findings further suggest that altered protein function may play a role in the pathophysiology of the disease, an

  20. Seeking a unified framework for cerebellar function and dysfunction: from circuit operations to cognition

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    Egidio eD‘Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the fundamental recognition of its involvement in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum is now also believed to take part in the processing of cognition and emotion. This hypothesis is recurrent in numerous papers reporting anatomical and functional observations, and it requires an explanation. We argue that a similar circuit structure in all cerebellar areas may carry out various operations using a common computational scheme. On the basis of a broad review of anatomical data, it is conceivable that the different roles of the cerebellum lie in the specific connectivity of the cerebellar modules, with motor, cognitive and emotional functions (at least partially segregated into different cerebro-cerebellar loops. We here develop a conceptual and operational framework based on multiple interconnected levels (a meta-levels hypothesis: from cellular/molecular to network mechanisms leading to generation of computational primitives, thence to high-level cognitive/emotional processing, and finally to the sphere of mental function and dysfunction. The main concept explored is that of intimate interplay between timing and learning (reminiscent of the timing and learning machine capabilities long attributed to the cerebellum, which reverberates from cellular to circuit mechanisms. Subsequently, integration within large-scale brain loops could generate the disparate cognitive/emotional and mental functions in which the cerebellum has been implicated. We propose, therefore, that the cerebellum operates as a general-purpose co-processor, whose effects depend on the specific brain centers to which individual modules are connected. Abnormal functioning in these loops could eventually contribute to the pathogenesis of major brain pathologies including not just ataxia but also dyslexia, autism, schizophrenia and depression.

  1. Hematology and immunology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimzey, S. L.

    1977-01-01

    A coordinated series of experiments were conducted to evaluate immunologic and hemotologic system responses of Skylab crewmen to prolonged space flights. A reduced PHA responsiveness was observed on recovery, together with a reduced number of T-cells, with both values returning to normal 3 to 5 days postflight. Subnormal red cell count, hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit values also returned gradually to preflight limits. Most pronounced changes were found in the shape of red blood cells during extended space missions with a rapid reversal of these changes upon reentry into a normal gravitational environment.

  2. Assessment of speech in early-onset ataxia : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Marieke J.; Brandsma, Rick; Lawerman, T.F.; Lunsing, Roelineke J.; Keegstra, Anne L.; Burger, Huibert; De Koning, Tom J.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Sival, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to determine whether paediatric ataxia speech subscores are reliably applicable for international early-onset ataxia (EOA) databases. If so, we reasoned that ataxia speech subscores should be associated with ataxia scores and involve high interobserver agreement, includ

  3. Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia caused by compound heterozygosity for Twinkle mutations and modeling of Twinkle mutations causing recessive disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulsuner, Suleyman; Stapleton, Gail A.; Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K.; Mandell, Jessica B.; Morales, Augusto; Klevit, Rachel E.; King, Mary-Claire; Rogers, R. Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes required for the replication and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA cause progressive multisystemic neuromuscular disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Biallelic mutations in C10orf2, encoding the Twinkle mitochondrial DNA helicase, lead to infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia (IOSCA), as well as milder and more severe phenotypes. We present a 13-year-old girl with ataxia, severe hearing loss, optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that the patient is compound heterozygous for previously unreported variants in the C10orf2 gene: a paternally inherited frameshift variant (c.333delT; p.L112Sfs*3) and a maternally inherited missense variant (c.904C>T; p.R302W). The identification of novel C10orf2 mutations extends the spectrum of mutations in the Twinkle helicase causing recessive disease, in particular the intermediate IOSCA phenotype. Structural modeling suggests that the p.R302W mutation and many other recessively inherited Twinkle mutations impact the position or interactions of the linker region, which is critical for the oligomeric ring structure and activity of the helicase. This study emphasizes the utility of whole-exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of a complex multisystemic disorder. PMID:27551684

  4. Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia caused by compound heterozygosity for Twinkle mutations and modeling of Twinkle mutations causing recessive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Sarah B; Gulsuner, Suleyman; Stapleton, Gail A; Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K; Mandell, Jessica B; Morales, Augusto; Klevit, Rachel E; King, Mary-Claire; Rogers, R Curtis

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes required for the replication and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA cause progressive multisystemic neuromuscular disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Biallelic mutations in C10orf2, encoding the Twinkle mitochondrial DNA helicase, lead to infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia (IOSCA), as well as milder and more severe phenotypes. We present a 13-year-old girl with ataxia, severe hearing loss, optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that the patient is compound heterozygous for previously unreported variants in the C10orf2 gene: a paternally inherited frameshift variant (c.333delT; p.L112Sfs*3) and a maternally inherited missense variant (c.904C>T; p.R302W). The identification of novel C10orf2 mutations extends the spectrum of mutations in the Twinkle helicase causing recessive disease, in particular the intermediate IOSCA phenotype. Structural modeling suggests that the p.R302W mutation and many other recessively inherited Twinkle mutations impact the position or interactions of the linker region, which is critical for the oligomeric ring structure and activity of the helicase. This study emphasizes the utility of whole-exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of a complex multisystemic disorder. PMID:27551684

  5. Clinical and genetic study of spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 in East Asian population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yan; YU Long; ZHENG Hui-min; GUAN Yang-tai

    2010-01-01

    Background Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is known as an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia; patients with genetically confirmed diagnoses of SCA7 have increased rapidly in recent years.However, SCA7 is a rare subtype of SCA, and most data available about SCA7 are those of white people.The aim of the present study was to systematically review the prevalence and clinical and genetic aspects of SCA7 patients in East Asian population.Methods A search for publications on SCA7 was performed by using the "PubMed" database with the published language limited in English.Publications mainly focusing on the prevalence of SCA7 in patients with SCA and the clinical and genetic features of SCA7 patients were fully reviewed and analyzed.Results The prevalence of SCA7 in SCA patients ranged from 0 to 7.7%, which was similar to those reported previously.The clinical manifestations were typically present at the 30's of its victims (median, 29 years; interquartile range (IQR),19.5-36.5 years), and the symptoms appeared 15 years ((15.17±4.22) years) earlier on average in the offspring than in the parents.Gait ataxia and visual impairment were both found in all patients of whom the clinical features were described.Mutant SCA7 alleles contained 40-100 CAG repeats, with a median of 47 repeats (IQR, 44.5-50.0); and the offspring had 13 more repeats on average compared with their parents (12.62±19.03).A strong negative correlation was found between CAG repeat size and the onset age of patients (r=-0.739, P=0.000).In addition, no significant difference was found in CAG repeat sizes between patients with visual impairment as the initial symptom and those with gait disturbance as their initial symptom (P=0.476).Conclusions The prevalence of SCA7 in SCA patients, the age at onset and CAG repeats of SCA7 patients in East Asia are consistent with those of white people.However, larger population study is needed to assess the correlation between the CAG repeat size and initial symptoms

  6. Ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 6: relato de caso

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    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar as alterações vestibulococleares observadas em um caso de ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 6. O caso foi encaminhado do Hospital de Clínicas para o Laboratório de Otoneurologia de uma Instituição de Ensino e foi submetido aos seguintes procedimentos: anamnese, inspeção otológica, avaliações audiológica e vestibular. O caso retrata uma paciente com diagnóstico genético de ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 6, do sexo feminino, com 57 anos de idade, que referiu desequilíbrio à marcha com tendência a queda para a esquerda, disartria e disfonia. Na avaliação audiológica apresentou configuração audiométrica descendente a partir da frequência de 4kHz e curva timpanométrica do tipo "A" com presença dos reflexos estapedianos bilateralmente. No exame vestibular observou-se na pesquisa da vertigem posicional presença de nistagmo vertical inferior e oblíquo, espontâneo e semiespontâneo múltiplo com características centrais (ausência de latência, paroxismo, fatigabilidade e vertigem, nistagmooptocinético abolido e hiporreflexia à prova calórica. Constataram-se alterações labirínticas que indicaram afecção do sistema vestibular central evidenciando-se a importância dessa avaliação. A existência da possível relação entre os achados com os sintomas vestibulares apresentados pela paciente apontou a relevância do exame labiríntico neste tipo de ataxia uma vez que a presença do nistagmo vertical inferior demonstrou ser frequente neste tipo de patologia.

  7. Oculomotor studies of cerebellar function in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, Caralynn V; Minshew, Nancy J; Luna, Beatriz; Takarae, Yukari; Sweeney, John A

    2005-11-15

    Histopathological, neuroimaging and genetic findings indicate cerebellar abnormalities in autism, but the extent of neurophysiological dysfunction associated with those findings has not been systematically examined. Suppression of intrusive saccades (square wave jerks) and the ability to sustain eccentric gaze, two phenomena requiring intact cerebellar function, were examined in 52 high-functioning individuals with autism and 52 age- and IQ-matched healthy subjects during visual fixation of static central and peripheral targets. Rates of intrusive saccades were not increased in autism during visual fixation, and foveopetal ocular drift was also not increased when subjects held an eccentric gaze. The absence of gross disturbances of visual fixation associated with cerebellar disease in individuals with autism, such as increased square wave jerk rates and foveopetal drift when holding eccentric gaze, indicates that the functional integrity of cerebellar--brainstem networks devoted to oculomotor control is preserved in autism despite reported anatomic variations. However, increased amplitude of intrusive saccades and reduced latency of target refixation after intrusive saccades were observed in individuals with autism, especially when subjects maintained fixation of remembered target locations without sensory guidance. The atypical metrics of intrusive saccades that were observed may be attributable to faulty functional connectivity in cortico-cerebellar networks. PMID:16214219

  8. An Introduction to Chinese Society of Immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Chinese Society of Immunology (CSI) was founded in 1984. It has had over 5000 members, among whom 1000 are members of IUIS. There are six Chinese periodicals associated with the Society: Chinese Journal of Immunology, Immunological Journal, Current Immunology, Chinese Journal of Cellular and Molecular Immunology; Chinese Journal of

  9. An Introduction to Chinese Society of Immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Chinese Socicty of Immunology (CSI) was founded in 1984. It has had over 5000 members, among whom 1000 are members of IUIS. There are six Chinese periodicals associated with the Society: Chinese Journal of Immunology,Immunological Journal,Current Immunology,Chinese Journal of Cellular and Molecular Immunology,Chinese Journal of

  10. Sensorimotor processing for balance in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6.

    OpenAIRE

    Bunn, L. M.; Marsden, J. F.; Voyce, D. C.; Giunti, P.; Day, B. L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether balance impairments caused by cerebellar disease are associated with specific sensorimotor processing deficits that generalize across all sensory modalities. Experiments focused on the putative cerebellar functions of scaling and coordinate transformation of balance responses evoked by stimulation of single sensory channels. Vestibular, visual, and proprioceptive sensory channels were stimulated in isolation using galvanic vestibular stimulation, moving visual scenery,...

  11. Malignancies in pediatric patients with ataxia telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT), known to have an inherent increased susceptibility to the development of cancer, may present with malignancies that are unusual for the patient's age, are often difficult to diagnose clinically and radiographically and respond poorly to conventional therapy. Materials and methods. We reviewed the clinical presentation and imaging studies of 12 AT patients who developed malignancies. Results. Eight of the twelve patients developed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (CNS, thorax, bone), two developed Hodgkin's disease, and two were diagnosed with gastrointestinal mucinous adenocarcinoma. Conclusion. The lymphomas were commonly extra nodal, and infiltrative rather than mass-like. The recognition of the tumors was often delayed due to confusion with the known infectious complications in AT patients. (orig.)

  12. Research progress of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-wei ZHANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 is a kind of autosomal dominant genetic neurodegenerative disorder. To date, the pathogenesis of SCA1 remains unclear. Studies in numerous SCA1 experimental models, including transgenic mice, transgenic drosophila and induced pluripotent stem cells, have shown that phosphorylation of S776 in mutant ataxin-1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin-proteasome system and down-regulation of several components of RAS-MAPK-MSK1 pathway may involve in the pathogenesis of SCA1. In this review, the clinical and pathological features of SCA1, and the latest advances of pathogenesis, model systems and therapeutic exploration will be briefly summarized. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.017

  13. Malignancies in pediatric patients with ataxia telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, R.C.; Berdon, W.E.; Ruzal-Shapiro, C. [Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, Department of Radiology, NY (United States); Hall, E.J. [Center for Radiological Research, Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Kornecki, A.; Daneman, A. [Hospital for Sick Children, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Brunelle, F. [Groupe-Hospitalier, Necker-Enfants-Malades, Paris (France); Campbell, J.B. [Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children and Women, Dept. of Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Background. Patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT), known to have an inherent increased susceptibility to the development of cancer, may present with malignancies that are unusual for the patient`s age, are often difficult to diagnose clinically and radiographically and respond poorly to conventional therapy. Materials and methods. We reviewed the clinical presentation and imaging studies of 12 AT patients who developed malignancies. Results. Eight of the twelve patients developed non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma (CNS, thorax, bone), two developed Hodgkin`s disease, and two were diagnosed with gastrointestinal mucinous adenocarcinoma. Conclusion. The lymphomas were commonly extra nodal, and infiltrative rather than mass-like. The recognition of the tumors was often delayed due to confusion with the known infectious complications in AT patients. (orig.) With 8 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs.

  14. Anomalous Cerebellar Anatomy in Chinese Children with Dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ying-Hui; Yang, Yang; Chen, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Bi, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children ...

  15. Cerebellar contribution to feedforward control of locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanda Pisotta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is an important contributor to feedforward control mechanisms of the central nervous system, and sequencing—the process that allows spatial and temporal relationships between events to be recognized—has been implicated as the fundamental cerebellar mode of operation. By adopting such a mode and because of cerebellar activity patterns are sensitive to a variety of sensorimotor-related tasks, the cerebellum is believed to support motor and cognitive functions that are encoded in the frontal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. In this model, the cerebellum is hypothesized to make predictions about the consequences of a motor or cognitive command that originates from the cortex to prepare the entire system to cope with ongoing changes. In this framework, cerebellar predictive mechanisms for locomotion are addressed, focusing on sensorial and motoric sequencing. The hypothesis that sequence recognition is the mechanism by which the cerebellum functions in gait control is presented and discussed.

  16. Cerebellar contribution to feedforward control of locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisotta, Iolanda; Molinari, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is an important contributor to feedforward control mechanisms of the central nervous system, and sequencing-the process that allows spatial and temporal relationships between events to be recognized-has been implicated as the fundamental cerebellar mode of operation. By adopting such a mode and because cerebellar activity patterns are sensitive to a variety of sensorimotor-related tasks, the cerebellum is believed to support motor and cognitive functions that are encoded in the frontal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. In this model, the cerebellum is hypothesized to make predictions about the consequences of a motor or cognitive command that originates from the cortex to prepare the entire system to cope with ongoing changes. In this framework, cerebellar predictive mechanisms for locomotion are addressed, focusing on sensorial and motoric sequencing. The hypothesis that sequence recognition is the mechanism by which the cerebellum functions in gait control is presented and discussed. PMID:25009490

  17. IMMUNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF NEUROSYPHILIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Chuhlovina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reduced incidence of syphilis was reported in Russia over last years, along with increased prevalence of neurosyphilis. The issues of the mechanisms of the damage of nervous system and the immune response to syphilis are actual. Origin of syphilis antibodies from cerebrospinal fluid of patients with neurosyphilis is considered. The role of intrathecal immunoglobulin production and dysfunction of blood-brain barrier in patients infected with syphilis is of special importance. The aim of the research was to analyze the immunological aspects of neurosyphilis. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes have been shown to play an important role in infection with Treponema pallidium during clearance of the pathogenes. Potential virulence factors of Treponema pallidium have been discovered. It has been found that cell-mediated immune response is very important for defense against Treponema pallidium, while the key importance in bacterial clearance is put on Th1. Evidence has shown that the level of cytokines which are secreted by Th1 (IL-2, interferon gamma and tumor necrosis factor and Th2 (IL-6 and IL-10 — lymphocytes, correlates with syphilis progression. The role of IL-10 in immune response regulation in patients infected with syphilis has been examined: this cytokine can inhibit the activity of immunocompetent cells. Some data has been produced concerning intrathecal production of immunoglobulins in neurosyphilis patients’ cerebrospinal fluid. The research of immunological parameters and composition of liquor in the patients with syphilis has revealed, that lymphocytes of peripheral blood are sensitized to antigens of the brain. It indicates the violation of permeability of patients’ blood-brain barrier. Nervous system becomes involved into the pathological process during the first weeks or months after syphilis infection. Cerebrospinal fluid changes can be detected at seronegative stage of the primary infection. The most expressed changes were found in

  18. Fundamentals of vaccine immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela S Clem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available From a literature review of the current literature, this article provides an introduction to vaccine immunology including a primer on the components of the immune system, passive vs. active immunization, the mechanism(s by which immunizations stimulate(s immunity, and the types of vaccines available. Both the innate and adaptive immune subsystems are necessary to provide an effective immune response to an immunization. Further, effective immunizations must induce long-term stimulation of both the humoral and cell-mediated arms of the adaptive system by the production of effector cells and memory cells. At least seven different types of vaccines are currently in use or in development that produce this effective immunity and have contributed greatly to the prevention of infectious disease around the world.

  19. Immunological Detection of Arbutin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The relative molecular mass of Arbutin is small.Both fluorolabeling and radiolabeling may affect its properties and functions.Therefore, the immunoassay of Arbutin was studied.Arbutin was coupled to bovine serum albumin to get the Arbutin-BSA conjugate with high molar ratio of Arbutin to BSA.Two rabbits were injected with the conjugate to develop the anti-Arbutin serum.Ammonium sulfate precipitation and affinity chromatography were used to purify the antibody.Double agar diffusion test and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were adopted to identify the antibody titer.The results demonstrated that the purity and activity of the antibody are high.The method proposed is satisfactory for the immunological detection of Arbutin.

  20. Hepatocytes as Immunological Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispe, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocytes are targeted for infection by a number of major human pathogens, including hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and malaria. However, hepatocytes are also immunological agents in their own right. In systemic immunity, they are central in the acute-phase response, which floods the circulation with defensive proteins during diverse stresses, including ischemia, physical trauma, and sepsis. Hepatocytes express a variety of innate immune receptors and, when challenged with pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns, can deliver cell-autonomous innate immune responses that may result in host defense or in immunopathology. Important human pathogens have evolved mechanisms to subvert these responses. Finally, hepatocytes talk directly to T cells, resulting in a bias toward immune tolerance. PMID:26685314

  1. CAG repeats determine brain atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia 17: a VBM study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Reetz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abnormal repeat length has been associated with an earlier age of onset and more severe disease progression in the rare neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA17. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine whether specific structural brain degeneration and rate of disease progression in SCA17 might be associated with the CAG repeat size, observer-independent voxel-based morphometry was applied to high-resolution magnetic resonance images of 16 patients with SCA17 and 16 age-matched healthy controls. The main finding contrasting SCA17 patients with healthy controls demonstrated atrophy in the cerebellum bilaterally. Multiple regression analyses with available genetic data and also post-hoc correlations revealed an inverse relationship again with cerebellar atrophy. Moreover, we found an inverse relationship between the CAG repeat length and rate of disease progression. CONCLUSIONS: Our results highlight the fundamental role of the cerebellum in this neurodegenerative disease and support the genotype-phenotype relationship in SCA17 patients. Genetic factors may determine individual susceptibility to neurodegeneration and rate of disease progression.

  2. A single ataxia telangiectasia gene with a product similar to PI-3 kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savitsky, K.; Bar-Shira, A.; Gilad, S.; Rotman, G.; Ziv, Y.; Vanagaite, L.; Smith, S.; Uziel, T.; Sfez, S.; Ashkenazi, M. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)] [and others

    1995-06-23

    A gene, ATM, that is mutated in the autosomal recessive disorder ataxia telangiectasia (AT) was identified by positional cloning on chromosome 11q22-23. AT is characterized by cerebellar degeneration, immunodeficiency, chromosomal instability, cancer predisposition, radiation sensitivity, and cell cycle abnormalities. The disease is genetically heterogeneous, with four complementation groups that have been suspected to represent different genes. ATM, which has a transcript of 12 kilobases, was found to be mutated in AT patients from all complementation groups, indicating that it is probably the sole gene responsible for this disorder. A partial ATM complementary DNA clone of 5.9 kilobases encoded a putative protein that is similar to several yeast and mammalian phosphatidylinositol-3{prime} kinases that are involved in mitogenic signal transduction, meiotic recombination, and cell cycle control. The discovery of ATM should enhance understanding of AT and related syndromes and may allow the identification of AT heterozygotes, who are at increased risk of cancer. 54 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. A rare case of tubercular cerebellar abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanjari K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tubercular brain abscess are uncommon and tubercular cerebellar abscess are rarely reported. Most of these cases occur in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of multiple cerebellar abscesses in a 55-year-old HIV seronegative non-diabetic female, who complained of headache, neck pain and unsteadiness of gait since two months. She had been on treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis, diagnosed earlier. Diagnosis was made by CT scan of brain and confirmed by bacteriological examination of drained pus obtained by suboccipital craniotomy. The patient showed signs of recovery.

  4. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis in ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meneghetti, G; Vorstrup, S; Mickey, B; Lindewald, H; Lassen, N A

    1984-01-01

    Seventy measurements of CBF were performed in 12 stroke patients by 133Xe inhalation and a rapidly rotating single photon emission computerized tomograph. CBF was measured every other day during the acute phase and at 2- and 6-month follow-up visits. A persistent contralateral cerebellar blood flow...... is concluded from this serial study that crossed cerebellar diaschisis is a common finding in completed stroke. It is probably caused by disconnection of the corticopontine pathways, a disconnection that tends to persist. The phenomenon is in fact less variable than the stroke-related CBF changes in...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions MEMSA myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia Enable Javascript to view the ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  6. The radiotoxicity of iodine-125 in ataxia telangiectasia fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal and ataxia telangiectasia fibroblast strains were labeled with 3H- or 125I-labelled iododeoxyuridine, were stored at -750C to accumulate damage, and were thawed for survival assays. X-ray survival of frozen, unlabeled cells was also determined. The ataxia telangiectasia strains were about twice as sensitive as normal (based upon survival curve slopes) when irradiated with X-rays or 3H decays under frozen conditions. Accumulated 125I decays, while about 13 time more toxic than 3H decays, also killed ataxia telangiectasia cells about twice as efficiently as normal cells. These results indicate that a large proportion of 125I-induced damage - at least 50% - is subject to repair in normal cells. In addition, they suggest that ataxia telangiectasia cells less capably repair a lesion that is induced in common by X-rays and 125I, but in larger proportion by the latter - probably a DNA double-strand break. (Auth.)

  7. DNA repair enzymes in Ataxia telangiectasia and Bloom's syndrome fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataxia telangiectasia, Bloom's syndrome and normal fibroblasts were compared as to the capacity of their cellular extracts to enhance the priming activity of γ-irradiated colicin E1 DNA for purified DNA polymerase. It was found that an ataxia strain had substantially lower, and a Bloom's syndrome strain had slightly lower capacity than a normal strain; while the activities of apurinic site specific endonuclease in these extracts were comparable

  8. Friedreich's Ataxia as a Cause of Premature Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Giugliano, Gregory R.; Sethi, Prabhdeep S.

    2007-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is the most common hereditary neurodegenerative disorder, and more than half of all patients show echocardiographic evidence of cardiomyopathy. Although angina has been reported in these patients, the role of coronary artery disease has previously been dismissed and is therefore underestimated. Premature obstructive coronary disease has rarely been angiographically demonstrated in patients with Friedreich's ataxia. We present an unusual case of a 35-year-old woman with Fri...

  9. Ionizing radiation and cell cycle progression in ataxia telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation causes delay in normal progress through the cell cycle at a number of different checkpoints. Abnormalities in these checkpoints have been described for ataxia telangiectasia cells after irradiation. In this report we show that these abnormalities occur at different phases in the cell cycle in several ataxia telangiectasia lymphoblastoid cells. Ataxia telangiectasia cells, synchronized in late G1 phase with either mimosine or aphidicolin and exposed to radiation, showed a reduced delay in entering S phase compared to irradiated control cells. Failure to exhibit G1-phase delay in ataxia telangiectasia cells is accompanied by a reduced ability of radiation to activate the product of the tumor suppressor gene p53, a protein involved in G1/S-phase delay. When the progress of irradiated G1-phase cells was followed into the subsequent G2 and G1 phases ataxia telangiectasia cells showed a more pronounced accumulation in G2 phase than control cells. When cells were irradiated in S phase and extent of delay was more evident in G2 phase and ataxia telangiectasia cells were delayed to a greater extent. These results suggest that the lack of initial delay in both G1 and S phases to the radiosensitivity observed in this syndrome. 26 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Cerebellar motor dysfunction in schizophrenia and psychosis risk: the importance of regional cerebellar analysis approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Bernard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Motor abnormalities in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis are well documented. An accumulating body of work has also highlighted motor abnormalities related to cerebellar dysfunction in schizophrenia including eye-blink conditioning, timing, postural control, and motor learning. We have also recently found evidence for motor dysfunction in individuals at ultra high-risk for psychosis (1–3. This is particularly relevant as the cerebellum is thought to be central to the cognitive dysmetria model of schizophrenia, and these overt motor signs may point to more general cerebellar dysfunction in the etiology of psychotic disorders. While studies have provided evidence indicative of motor cerebellar dysfunction in at-risk populations and in schizophrenia, findings with respect to the cerebellum have been mixed. One factor potentially contributing to these mixed results is the whole-structure approach taken when investigating the cerebellum. In non-human primates there are distinct closed-loop circuits between the cerebellum, thalamus, and brain with motor and non-motor cortical regions. Recent human neuroimaging has supported this finding and indicates that there is a cerebellar functional topography (4, and this information is being missed with whole-structure approaches. Here, we review cerebellar motor dysfunction in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis. We also discuss cerebellar abnormalities in psychosis, and the cerebellar functional topography. Because of the segregated functional regions of the cerebellum, we propose that it is important to look at the structure regionally in order to better understand its role in motor dysfunction in these populations. This is analogous to approaches taken with the basal ganglia, where each region is considered separately. Such an approach is necessary to better understand cerebellar pathophysiology on a macro-structural level with respect to the

  11. Mitigation of cerebellar neuropathy in globoid cell leukodystrophy mice by AAV-mediated gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dar-Shong; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Lee, Allan Yueh-Luen; Ho, Che-Sheng; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Wang, Tuen-Jen; Jian, Yuan-Ren; Hsu, Jui-Cheng; Huang, Zon-Darr; Lee, Tsung-Han; Chiang, Ming-Fu

    2015-10-15

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the enzyme galactocerebrosidase (GALC). The absence of GALC activity leads to the accumulation of the toxic substance psychosine and the preferential loss of myelinating cells in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Profound demyelination, astrogliosis and axonopathy are the hallmarks of the pathogenesis of GLD, and cerebellar ataxia is one of the dominant manifestations in adolescents and adults affected with GLD. To date, studies regarding cerebellar degeneration in GLD are limited. In this study, the efficacy of cerebellum-targeted gene therapy on the cerebellar neuropathology in twitcher mice (a murine model of GLD) has been validated. We observed degeneration of Purkinje cells, Bergmann glia, and granule cells in addition to astrocytosis and demyelination in the cerebellum of the twitcher mice. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dark cell degeneration and disintegration of the cellular composition of Purkinje cells in untreated twitcher mice. In addition, the expressions of neurotrophic factors CNTF, GDNF and IGF-I were up-regulated and the expression of BDNF was down-regulated. Intracerebellar-mediated gene therapy efficiently corrected enzymatic deficiency by direct transduction to Purkinje cells and cross-correction in other cell types in the cerebellum, leading to the amelioration of both neuroinflammation and demyelination. The population, dendritic territory, and axonal processes of Purkinje cells remained normal in the cerebellum of treated twitcher mice, where radial fibers of Bergmann glia spanned the molecular layer and collateral branches ensheathed the dendritic processes of Purkinje cells. Moreover, the aberrant expressions of neurotrophic factors were mitigated in the cerebellum of treated twitcher mice, indicating the preservation of cellular function in addition to maintaining the neuronal architecture. The life span of the

  12. Ultrasonically detectable cerebellar haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Lisa Kenyon

    2011-07-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of cerebellar haemorrhage (CBH) on routine cranial ultrasound (cUS) imaging in infants of ≤32 weeks gestation, and to investigate how extremely preterm infants with CBH differ from those with severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH).

  13. Cerebellar dysregulation and heterogeneity of mood disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Tobe EH

    2014-01-01

    Edward H Tobe Department of Psychiatry, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Camden, NJ, USA Abstract: This paper discusses diverse studies to consider the hypothesis that cerebellar pathology supports the heterogeneous metabolic pathologies of mood disorders. The evidence presented includes studies selected from the following areas of scientific research: magnetic resonance imaging, histology, clinical syndromes, comparative anatomy, neuronal connections, and mitochondrial dysfunctio...

  14. Cerebellar liponeurocytoma: a case-report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Sreedhar Babu

    Full Text Available Cerebellar liponeurocytoma is a rare cerebellar neoplasm of adults with advanced neuronal / neurocytic and focal lipomatous differentiation, a low proliferative potential and a favorable clinical prognosis corresponding to World Health Organization grade I or II. Only a few cases have been described in the literature (approximately 20 cases by different names. A 48-years old female, presented with history of headache and dizziness associated with neck pain; restricted neck movements, drop attacks and occasional regurgitation of food since one year. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a right cerebellar mass lesion. Gross total resec- tion of the tumour was accomplished through a suboccipital craniotomy. The excised tissue was diagnosed as cerebellar liponeurocytoma, a rare entity, based on histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry. The morphological appearance of this neoplasm can be confused with that of oligodendroglioma, neurocytoma, ependymoma, medulloblastoma, solid hemangioblastoma and metastatic carcinomas etc., with unpredictable prognosis, which require postoperative radiotherapy, hence the importance of accurately diagnosing this rare neoplasm. This tumour should be added to the differential diagnosis of mass lesions of the posterior fossa.

  15. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusser, Michael; Gutkin, Boris S.; Roth, Arnd

    2016-01-01

    Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR). While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing. PMID:27541958

  16. Improving cerebellar segmentation with statistical fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multiatlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non- Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  17. Ataxia, acute mountain sickness, and high altitude cerebral edema

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Tianyi; Ma Siqing; Bian Huiping; Zhang Minming

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations suggest that ataxia is common and often one of the most reliable warning signs of high altitude cerebral edema(HACE).The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic role of ataxia in acute mountain sickness (AMS) and HACE among mountain rescuers on the quake areas,and in approaching the relation between AMS and HACE.After the earthquake on April 14,2010,approximately 24080 lowland rescuers were rapidly transported from sea level or lowlands to the mountainous rescue sites at 3750 ~ 4568 m,and extremely hardly worked for an emergency treatment after arrival.Assessments of acute altitude illness on the quake areas were using the Lake Louise Scoring System.73 % of the rescuers were found to be developed AMS.The incidence of high altitude pulmonary edema(HAPE) and HACE was 0.73 % and 0.26 %,respectively,on the second to third day at altitude.Ataxia sign was measured by simple tests of coordination including a modified Romberg test.The clinical features of 62 patients with HACE were analyzed.It was found that the most frequent,serious neurological symptoms and signs were altered mental status(50/62,80.6 %)and truncal ataxia (47/62,75.8 %).Mental status change was rated slightly higher than ataxia,but ataxia occurred earlier than mental status change and other symptoms.The earliest sign of ataxia was a vague unsteadiness of gait,which may be present alone in association with or without AMS.Advanced ataxia was correlated with the AMS scores,but mild ataxia did not correlate with AMS scores at altitudes of 3750~4568 m.Of them,14 patients were further examined by computerized tomographic scanning of the brain and cerebral magnetic resonance imagines were examined in another 15 cases.These imaging studies indicated that the presence of the cerebral edema was in 97 % of cases who were clinically diagnosed as HACE (28/29).Ataxia seems to be a reliable sign of advanced AMS or HACE,so does altered mental status.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebellar Schistosomiasis mansoni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 15-year-old boy was admitted to hospital with a history of headache, dizziness, vomiting and double vision that started two weeks before. His parents denied any previous disease. During clinical examination he presented diplopia on lateral gaze to the left and horizontal nystagmus. No major neurological dysfunction was detected. He was well built, mentally responsive and perceptive. Laboratory findings revealed a leukocyte count of 10,000/mL, a normal red blood cell count and no eosinophilia. The magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the brain showed a left cerebellar lesion with mass effect compressing the surrounding tissues. Contrast-enhanced images showed a mass like structure and punctate nodules (Figures A and B: axial and coronal contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images showed the nodular - yellow arrows - enhancement pattern of a left cerebellar intraxial lesion). The lesion extended to the vermis and brachium pons and compressed the medulla. There was no hydrocephalus. He was taken to the operating room with the presumptive diagnosis of a neuroglial tumor, and submitted to a lateral suboccipital craniectomy. A brown, brittle tumoral mass without a clearly defined margin with the cerebellar tissue was removed. Microscopic examination revealed schistosomal granulomas in the productive phase in the cerebellum (Figure C). After surgery, treatment with praziquantel (50 mg/kg/dia, single dose) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) was offered and the patient improved quickly. Thirty days later he was seen again at the outpatient clinic: he was asymptomatic and with no neurological impairment. This is the eighth case of cerebellar involvement in schistosomiasis mansoni and the second report of a tumoral form of cerebellar schistosomiasis documented by magnetic resonance images. (author)

  19. Immunology of lymphatic filariasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Subash; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    The immune responses to filarial parasites encompass a complex network of innate and adaptive cells whose interaction with the parasite underlies a spectrum of clinical manifestations. The predominant immunological feature of lymphatic filariasis is an antigen - specific Th2 response and an expansion of IL-10 producing CD4+ T cells that is accompanied by a muted Th1 response. This antigen specific T cell hypo-responsiveness appears to be crucial for the maintenance of the sustained, long-standing infection often with high parasite densities. While the correlates of protective immunity to lymphatic filariasis are still incompletely understood, primarily due to the lack of suitable animal models to study susceptibility, it is clear that T cells and to a certain extent B cells are required for protective immunity. Host immune responses, especially CD4+ T cell responses clearly play a role in mediating pathological manifestations of LF, including lymphedema, hydrocele and elephantiasis. The main underlying defect in the development of clinical pathology appears to be a failure to induce T cell hypo-responsiveness in the face of antigenic stimulation. Finally, another intriguing feature of filarial infections is their propensity to induce bystander effects on a variety of immune responses, including responses to vaccinations, allergens and to other infectious agents. The complexity of the immune response to filarial infection therefore provides an important gateway to understanding the regulation of immune responses to chronic infections, in general. PMID:24134686

  20. Cellular radiosensitivity in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypersensitivity to both the cell-killing and chromosome-damaging effects of ionizing radiations, and other agents causing DNA breakage, is a consistent feature of cells from individuals with the cancer-prone disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T). Evidence for a defect in DNA strand break rejoining is slight, but a higher-than-normal level of chromosomal breaks persists in irradiated A-T cells. There is also evidence for elevated frequencies of DNA recombination and deletion mutation in A-T cells; these responses may be linked through a loss of fidelity in rejoining DNA breaks through recombination mechanisms. Additionally the regulation of cell-cycle responses is altered in A-T cells: in all phases of the cycle there is some loss of 'checkpoint' function shortly after irradiation, allowing cells to continue cycling despite extensive DNA damage. However, on present evidence, radiation hypersensitivity cannot be explained by this loss of regulatory function. It is suggested that the A-T gene product acts in the early stages of a DNA damage-recognition pathway, normally interacting with regulatory proteins such as p53, but also with proteins involved in the processing of DNA breaks. Reduced efficiency in this type of signalling function could well explain the link between radiosensitivity and cancer proneness. (author)

  1. Immunology of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W R

    1981-12-01

    Recent research on immunological infertility in men and women is reviewed and the possibilities for therapeutic success in this area are assessed. Surface antigens of the acrosome and main tail piece appear to provoke antibodies of special relevance to male and female infertility and are recognized by circulating sperm-immobilizing antibodies in women and by immobilizing and agglutinizing antibodies in men. Assessment methods have focused on the development of tests of local immunity to sperm. Antisperm antibodies have been tested via sperm microagglutination, the gelatin agglutination test, the sperm immobilization test, and immunofluorescence techniques. In addition, measurement has focused on antibodies in cervical mucus, antibodies in seminal plasma, and cell-mediated immunity. Methods involving both partners include postcoital test, the sperm-cervical mucus penetration test, and the sperm-cervical mucus contact test. There remains a need for the development of specific radioimmunoassys for the precise detection and quantitation of antibodies to sperm antigens, especially those of cell membrane origin. In males, autoimmunity to sperm antigens can be related to infertility by 2 main pathogenic mechanisms: 1) the adverse effects of antibodies directly on spermatozoa, and 2) the association with disordered spermatogenesis resulting in oligospermia and azoospermia. In women, the effector pathways of local immunization mediate both systemic and cell-mediated immune responses. Local antibodies can interfere with the reproductive process by arming macrophages and enhancing phagocytic clearance of spermatozoa from the genital tract, mediating cytotoxic effects on sperm, preventing sperm from adequately penetrating cervical mucus, intefering with sperm capacitation, and influencing sperm selection within the female genital tract. Between 5-10% of infertile men and women show evidence of anitbodies to sperm. Treatment has included occlusion therapy, intrauterine

  2. Ataxia crónica en pediatría

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Erazo Torricelli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Las ataxias crónicas constituyen un grupo heterogéneo de enfermedades, que afectan al niño a diferentes edades. Así las formas congénitas, generalmente no progresivas, se observan desde los primeros meses de vida y se expresan por hipotonía y retraso motor, mucho antes de que la ataxia se haga evidente. La resonancia magnética cerebral puede ser diagnóstica en algunos cuadros, como ocurre con el síndrome de Joubert. El grupo de ataxias hereditarias progresivas, en constante expansión, suelen comenzar después del período del lactante. Los signos clínicos destacables son la apraxia ocular y la inestabilidad de la marcha que pueden asociarse a telangiectasias oculocutáneas (ataxia-telangiectasia o a neuropatía sensitiva (ataxia de Friedreich. En esta revisión se describen en forma sucinta las ataxias congénitas y en forma más detallada las causas principales de ataxias hereditarias progresivas autosómicas recesivas, autosómicas dominantes y mitocondriales. Se destaca la importancia del estudio genético, que es la clave para lograr el diagnóstico en la mayoría de estas enfermedades. Aunque aún no hay tratamiento para la mayoría de las ataxias hereditarias progresivas, algunas sí lo tienen, como la enfermedad de Refsum, déficit de vitamina E, déficit de Coenzima Q10, por lo cual el diagnóstico en estos casos es aún más relevante. En la actualidad, el diagnóstico de los cuadros de ataxia hereditaria del niño aún no tratable es fundamental para lograr un manejo adecuado, determinar un pronóstico preciso y dar a la familia un consejo genético oportuno.

  3. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia: a complex phenotype associated with a new SPG4 gene mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J. E.; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P;

    2004-01-01

    to the SPG4 locus on chromosome 2p as previously reported for pure HSP. Sequence analysis of the SPG4 (spastin) gene identified a novel 1593 C > T (GLN490Stop) mutation leading to premature termination of exon 12 with ensuing truncation of the encoded protein. However, the mutation was only...

  4. Is Friedreich ataxia an epigenetic disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Daman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is a debilitating and frequently fatal neurological disorder that is recessively inherited. It belongs to the group of genetic disorders known as the Repeat Expansion Diseases, in which pathology arises from the deleterious consequences of the inheritance of a tandem repeat array whose repeat number exceeds a critical threshold. In the case of FRDA, the repeat unit is the triplet GAA•TTC and the tandem array is located in the first intron of the frataxin (FXN gene. Pathology arises because expanded alleles make lower than normal levels of mature FXN mRNA and thus reduced levels of frataxin, the FXN gene product. The repeats form a variety of unusual DNA structures that have the potential to affect gene expression in a number of ways. For example, triplex formation in vitro and in bacteria leads to the formation of persistent RNA:DNA hybrids that block transcription. In addition, these repeats have been shown to affect splicing in model systems. More recently, it has been shown that the region flanking the repeats in the FXN gene is enriched for epigenetic marks characteristic of transcriptionally repressed regions of the genome. However, exactly how repeats in an intron cause the FXN mRNA deficit in FRDA has been the subject of much debate. Identifying the mechanism or mechanisms responsible for the FXN mRNA deficit in FRDA is important for the development of treatments for this currently incurable disorder. This review discusses evidence for and against different models for the repeat-mediated mRNA deficit.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARSACS autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay Enable Javascript to view the ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay , more commonly known as ARSACS , ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions FXTAS fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... All Close All Description Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome ( FXTAS ) is characterized by problems with movement ...

  7. New insights into the pathoanatomy of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (Machado-Joseph disease)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, Udo; Brunt, Ewout R.; Deller, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes recent neuropathological findings in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 and discusses their relevance for clinical neurology. Recent findings The extent of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 related central nervous neurodegenerative changes has been recently system

  8. Isolated rhomboencephalosynapsis – a rare cerebellar anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhomboencephalosynapsis (RES, RS) is a unique entity usually recognized in infancy based on neuroimaging. Cerebellar fusion and absence of cerebellar vermis is often associated with supratentorial findings. Since now there are about 50 cases described worldwide, with approximately 36 patients diagnosed by MRI. The authors present the first in Poland case of this uncommon malformation and review the literature. The authors describe a 28-month-old-girl with microcephaly and proper psychomotor development. The family history was unrelevant. Based on MRI the congenital malformation of posterior fossa-rhombencephalosynapsis was confirmed Presented patient is a typical example of MRI usefulness especially in patients with RES. RES symptoms are mild and that is why the diagnosis is usually made only in adulthood

  9. Moving, sensing and learning with cerebellar damage

    OpenAIRE

    Bastian, Amy J.

    2011-01-01

    The cerebellum is a subcortical brain structure that is essential for learning and controlling movement. Recent work shows that the cerebellum also plays a role in certain perceptual abilities, beyond what would be expected secondary to poor movement control. This review covers these and other recent advances, focusing on how cerebellar damage affects human abilities ranging from sensory perception to movement control and motor learning.

  10. Cerebellar and cerebral atrophy in trichothiodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Sargent, Michael A.; Poskitt, Kenneth J. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Prendiville, Julie S. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Division of Paediatric Dermatology, Department of Paediatrics, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    Trichothiodystrophy is a rare neuroectodermal disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance that is characterized by brittle hair, nail dysplasia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and gonadal failure. We describe a female patient whose cranial MRI revealed almost total lack of myelination in the supratentorial white matter, which is similar to the previously described cases. In addition, there was progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, which has not been well documented in association with trichothiodystrophy. (orig.)

  11. Genome-wide mRNA sequencing of a single canine cerebellar cortical degeneration case leads to the identification of a disease associated SPTBN2 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forman Oliver P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neonatal cerebellar cortical degeneration is a neurodegenerative disease described in several canine breeds including the Beagle. Affected Beagles are unable to ambulate normally from the onset of walking and the main pathological findings include Purkinje cell loss with swollen dendritic processes. Previous reports suggest an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The development of massively parallel sequencing techniques has presented the opportunity to investigate individual clinical cases using genome-wide sequencing approaches. We used genome-wide mRNA sequencing (mRNA-seq of cerebellum tissue from a single Beagle with neonatal cerebellar cortical degeneration as a method of candidate gene sequencing, with the aim of identifying the causal mutation. Results A four-week old Beagle dog presented with progressive signs of cerebellar ataxia and the owner elected euthanasia. Histopathology revealed findings consistent with cerebellar cortical degeneration. Genome-wide mRNA sequencing (mRNA-seq of RNA from cerebellum tissue was used as a method of candidate gene sequencing. After analysis of the canine orthologues of human spinocerebellar ataxia associated genes, we identified a homozygous 8 bp deletion in the β-III spectrin gene, SPTBN2, associated with spinocerebellar type 5 in humans. Genotype analysis of the sire, dam, ten clinically unaffected siblings, and an affected sibling from a previous litter, showed the mutation to fully segregate with the disorder. Previous studies have shown that β-III spectrin is critical for Purkinje cell development, and the absence of this protein can lead to cell damage through excitotoxicity, consistent with the observed Purkinje cell loss, degeneration of dendritic processes and associated neurological dysfunction in this Beagle. Conclusions An 8 bp deletion in the SPTBN2 gene encoding β-III spectrin is associated with neonatal cerebellar cortical degeneration in Beagle dogs

  12. Missense mutation in the ATPase, aminophospholipid transporter protein ATP8A2 is associated with cerebellar atrophy and quadrupedal locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emre Onat, Onur; Gulsuner, Suleyman; Bilguvar, Kaya; Nazli Basak, Ayse; Topaloglu, Haluk; Tan, Meliha; Tan, Uner; Gunel, Murat; Ozcelik, Tayfun

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation and dysequilibrium syndrome is a rare and heterogeneous condition. We investigated a consanguineous family from Turkey with four affected individuals exhibiting the condition. Homozygosity mapping revealed that several shared homozygous regions, including chromosome 13q12. Targeted next-generation sequencing of an affected individual followed by segregation analysis, population screening and prediction approaches revealed a novel missense variant, p.I376M, in ATP8A2. The mutation lies in a highly conserved C-terminal transmembrane region of E1 E2 ATPase domain. The ATP8A2 gene is mainly expressed in brain and development, in particular cerebellum. Interestingly, an unrelated individual has been identified, in whom mental retardation and severe hypotonia is associated with a de novo t(10;13) balanced translocation resulting with the disruption of ATP8A2. These findings suggest that ATP8A2 is involved in the development of the cerebro-cerebellar structures required for posture and gait in humans. PMID:22892528

  13. [Diagnostic and treatment of hypertensive cerebellar hematomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, V V; Dash'ian, V G; Murashko, A A; Burov, S A

    2009-01-01

    Authors analyzed the results of treatment of 56 patients with hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhages (volume 0,5-41 cm3). Brain stem symptoms were found in 45 (80%) of patients. The dislocation of brain stem was observed in 38 (68%) cases, occlusive hydrocephaly - in 22 (39%), intraventricular hemorrhage - in 26 (46%). Severity of state depended on character of disease course, presence of stem symptoms, awakening level, volume and localization of cerebellar hematoma, development of intraventricular hemorrhage, occlusive hydrocephaly and dislocation of brain stem. Thirty-six patients were operated. After the neurosurgical intervention, 22 (61%) patients were discharged without or with the minimal neurological deficit, 1 (3%) with marked disability and 13 (36%) patients died. In conclusion, the removal of hematoma is recommended in dislocation of brain stem and disturbance of consiousnes: the ventricular drainage - in occlusive hydrocephaly developed as a consequence of hemotamponade of IV ventricular. The surgical treatment is not recommended to patients with cerebellar hematomas with the volume less than 7 cm3. PMID:19491806

  14. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    D'Mello, Anila M.; Stoodley, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and...

  15. Sensory mechanisms of balance control in cerebellar disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bunn, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    A wealth of evidence exists to suggest that the cerebellum has an important role in the integration of vestibular, proprioceptive and visual sensory signals. Human bipedal balance depends on sensory integration and balance impairment is a common feature of cerebellar disease. I test the hypothesis that disrupted sensori-motor processing is responsible for balance impairment in cerebellar disease. Balance control in subjects with pure cerebellar disease (SCA6) was compared with matched healthy...

  16. GlyT2+ Neurons in the Lateral Cerebellar Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Uusisaari, Marylka; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) are a major hub in the cerebellar circuitry but the functional classification of their neurons is incomplete. We have previously characterized three cell groups in the lateral cerebellar nucleus: large non-GABAergic neurons and two groups of smaller neurons, one of which express green fluorescence protein (GFP) in a GAD67/GFP mouse line and is therefore GABAergic. However, as a substantial number of glycinergic and glycine/GABA co-expressing neurons have been ...

  17. Ondansetron, a 5-HT3 antagonist, improves cerebellar tremor.

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, G P; Lesaux, J; Vandervoort, P.; Macewan, L; Ebers, G C

    1997-01-01

    It has been previously shown that ondansetron, a 5-HT3 antagonist, can ameliorate vertigo in patients with acute brainstem disorders. A coincidental benefit was the improvement of cerebellar tremor in some patients with both vertigo and tremor. To further evaluate this effect, a placebo controlled, double blind, crossover study was conducted of a single dose of intravenous ondansetron in 20 patients with cerebellar tremor caused by multiple sclerosis, cerebellar degeneration, or drug toxicity...

  18. Enfermedad cardiovascular en pacientes cubanos afectados por Ataxia de Friedreich.

    OpenAIRE

    Tania Cruz Mariño; Ana Luz Portelles Caminero; William Áreas Zalazar; Luís Velázquez Pérez

    2010-01-01

    Al describir la ataxia de Friedreich, Nicholaus hizo referencia a la patología cardiaca. Esta enfermedad autosómica recesiva se debe a una mutación dinámica en el gen FRDA, codificándose deficientemente la proteína Frataxina, conduciendo a estrés oxidativo y muerte celular cardiaca. La presente investigación se desarrolló con el objetivo de describir las anomalías cardiovasculares presentes en los pacientes cubanos afectados por ataxia de Friedreich. A los individuos con diagnóstico molecular...

  19. Bilateral maculopathy in a patient with ataxia telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Lauren V; Bonsall, Dean; Moffett, Kathryn; Leys, Monique

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of toxoplasmosis with bilateral maculopathy in a 7-year-old boy diagnosed with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) at age 6. AT manifests as ataxia, apraxia, telangiectasia, and dysarthria. Common ophthalmologic findings in AT include fine conjunctival telangiectasia. Patients also suffer from recurrent sinopulmonary infections; however, serious opportunistic infection is rarely diagnosed. At 8 years of age he developed disseminated Toxoplasma gondii (toxoplasmosis) infection and meningoencephalitis. This ophthalmologic finding and the subsequent toxoplasmosis meningoencephalitis have not been previously reported in AT. PMID:26917084

  20. Unilateral absence of cerebellar hemisphere: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a 38-year-old woman with absence of right cerebellar hemisphere incidentally discovered by MR imaging. No cerebellar abnormality was detected on neurological examination. Tissue probably representing dysgenetic cerebellar tissue with no corticomedullary differentiation was present, connected to the right superior cerebellar peduncle. Ipsilateral enlargement of the pons and cerebral peduncle were additional findings. Although the terms ''aplasia'' or ''agenesis'' have been used to describe this entity, intrauterine destruction is the presumed pathogenetic mechanism in our case, and therefore these terms have been avoided. Asymmetry of pons and mesencephalon may be related to compensatory reorganisation or to the impairment of sequential development of nuclei and neural tracts. (orig.)

  1. Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Liu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunology is the study of interaction between cancer cells and immune system by the application of immunology principle and theory. With the recent approval of several new drugs targeting immune checkpoints in cancer, cancer immunology has become a very attractive field of research and is thought to be the new hope to conquer cancer. This chapter introduces the aberrant expression and function of noncoding RNAs, mainly microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, in tumor-infiltrating immune cells, and their significance in tumor immunity. It also illustrates how noncoding RNAs are shuttled between tumor cells and immune cells in tumor microenvironments via exosomes or other microvesicles to modulate tumor immunity. PMID:27376738

  2. The insulin-like growth factor pathway is altered in Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and type 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatchel, Jennifer R.; Watase, Kei; Thaller, Christina; Carson, James P.; Jafar-Nejad, Paymaan; Shaw, Chad A.; Zu, Tao; Orr, Harry T.; Zoghbi, Huda Yahya

    2008-01-29

    Polyglutamine diseases are inherited neurodegenerative disorders caused by expansion of CAG trinucleotide repeats encoding a polyglutamine tract in the disease-causing proteins. There are nine of these disorders each having distinct features but also clinical and pathological similarities. In particular, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and 7 (SCA1 and SCA7) patients manifest cerebellar ataxia with corresponding degeneration of Purkinje cells. Given this common phenotype, we asked whether the two disorders share common molecular pathogenic events. To address this question we studied two genetically accurate mouse models of SCA1 and SCA7—Sca1154Q/2Q and Sca7266Q/5Q knock-in mice—that express the glutamine-expanded proteins from the respective endogenous loci. We found common transcriptional changes in early symptomatic mice, with downregulation of Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 (Igfbp5) representing one of the most robust transcriptional changes that closely correlates with disease state. Interestingly, down-regulation of Igfbp5 occurred in granule neurons through a non-cell autonomous mechanism and was concomitant with activation of the Insulin-like growth factor I (Igf-I) pathway, and, in particular, the Igf-I receptor, expressed in part on Purkinje cells (PC). These data define a possible common pathogenic response in SCA1 and SCA7 and reveal the importance of neuron-neuron interactions in SCA1 and SCA7 pathogenesis. The sensitivity of Igfbp5 levels to disease state could render it and other components of its effector pathway useful as biomarkers in this class of diseases.

  3. Motor dysfunction in the tottering mouse is linked to cerebellar spontaneous low frequency oscillations revealed by flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Popa, Laurentiu S.; Wang, Xinming; Gao, Wangcai; Barnes, Justin; Hendrix, Claudia M.; Hess, Ellen J.; Ebner, Timothy J.

    2009-02-01

    Flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging is developing into a powerful research tool to study neural activity, particularly in vivo. In this study we used this imaging technique to investigate the neuronal mechanism underlying the episodic movement disorder that is characteristic of the tottering (tg) mouse, a model of episodic ataxia type 2. Both EA2 and the tg mouse are caused by mutations in the gene encoding Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. These mutations result in a reduction in P/Q Ca2+ channel function. Both EA2 patients and tg mice have a characteristic phenotype consisting of transient motor attacks triggered by stress, caffeine or ethanol. The neural events underlying these episodes of dystonia are unknown. Flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging revealed spontaneous, transient, low frequency oscillations in the cerebellar cortex of the tg mouse. Lasting from 30 - 120 minutes, the oscillations originate in one area then spread to surrounding regions over 30 - 60 minutes. The oscillations are reduced by removing extracellular Ca2+ and blocking Cav 1.2/1.3 (L-type) Ca2+ channels. The oscillations are not affected by blocking AMPA receptors or by electrical stimulation of the parallel fiber - Purkinje cell circuit, suggesting the oscillations are generated intrinsically in the cerebellar cortex. Conversely, L-type Ca2+ agonists generate oscillations with similar properties. In the awake tg mouse, transcranial flavoprotein imaging revealed low frequency oscillations that are accentuated during caffeine induced attacks of dystonia. The oscillations increase during the attacks of dystonia and are coupled to oscillations in face and hindlimb EMG activity. These transient oscillations and the associated cerebellar dysfunction provide a novel mechanism by which an ion channel disorder results in episodic motor dysfunction.

  4. Study on diagnosis and treatment of hereditary ataxia%遗传性共济失调诊断与治疗专家策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐北沙; 江泓

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia (HA) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders with high mortality and morbidity. It is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia of gait and limbs variably associated with ophthalmoplegia, pigmentary retinopathy, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, dementia and peripheral neuropathy. The molecular diagnosis process is proposed based on molecular classification. So far, symptomatic treatment is the mainly approach, with the lack of effective therapeutic method.%遗传性共济失调是一大类具有高度临床和遗传异质性、病死率和病残率较高的遗传性神经系统退行性疾病.临床上以小脑共济失调为主要特征,表现为平衡障碍、进行性肢体协调运动障碍、步态不稳、构音障碍、眼球运动障碍等,并可伴有复杂的神经系统损害.本文结合疾病分子分型提出了遗传性共济失调的分子诊断流程.目前此类疾病尚缺乏有效的治疗方法,主要以对症治疗为主.

  5. A Patient with Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome Presenting with Executive Cognitive Deficits and Cerebral White Matter Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensaku Kasuga

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects males who are carriers of a premutation of a CGG expansion in the FMR1 gene. In Asian populations, FXTAS has rarely been reported. Here, we report the case of a Japanese FXTAS patient who showed predominant executive cognitive deficits as the main feature of his disease. In contrast, the patient exhibited only very mild symptoms of intention tremor and ataxia, which did not interfere with daily activities. A gene analysis revealed that the patient carried a premutation of a CGG expansion (111 CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene. The mRNA expression level of FMR1 in the patient was 1.5-fold higher than in controls. On brain MRI scans, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images showed high-intensity lesions in the middle cerebellar peduncles and the cerebral white matter, with a frontal predominance. The present case extends previous notions regarding the cognitive impairment in FXTAS patients. Recognizing FXTAS patients with predominant cognitive impairment from various ethnic backgrounds would contribute to our understanding of the phenotypic variation of this disease.

  6. Marked phenotypic heterogeneity associated with expansion of a CAG repeat sequence at the spinocerebellar ataxia 3/Machado-Joseph disease locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancel, G.; Abbas, N.; Stevanin, G. [Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxia 3 locus (SCA3) for type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA type I), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders, has been mapped to chromosome 14q32.1. ADCA type I patients from families segregating SCA3 share clinical features in common with those with Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), the gene of which maps to the same region. We show here that the disease gene segregating in each of three French ADCA type I kindreds and in a French family with neuropathological findings suggesting the ataxochoreic form of dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy carries an expanded CAG repeat sequence located at the same locus as that for MJD. Analysis of the mutation in these families shows a strong negative correlation between size of the expanded CAG repeat and age at onset of clinical disease. Instability of the expanded triplet repeat was not found to be affected by sex of the parent transmitting the mutation. Evidence was found for somatic and gonadal mosaicism for alleles carrying expanded trinucleotide repeats. 36 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Friedreich's Ataxia: a review from a cardiology perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bourke, T

    2011-12-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are not among the common causes of cardiomyopathy in the general population; however, cardiomyopathy is known to occur in several neuromuscular disorders including Friedreich\\'s Ataxia (FA). In patients with neuromuscular disorders, concomitant cardiac involvement contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality and often leads to premature death.

  8. Visual System Involvement in Patients with Friedreich's Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Filippo; Barboni, Piero; Liguori, Rocco; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Savini, Giacomo; Gellera, Cinzia; Mariotti, Caterina; Rizzo, Giovanni; Tonon, Caterina; Manners, David; Lodi, Raffaele; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio

    2009-01-01

    Optic neuropathy is common in mitochondrial disorders, but poorly characterized in Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), a recessive condition caused by lack of the mitochondrial protein frataxin. We investigated 26 molecularly confirmed FRDA patients by studying both anterior and posterior sections of the visual pathway using a new, integrated approach.…

  9. Voicing Status of Word Final Plosives in Friedreich's Ataxia Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, B. E.; Hewlett, N.

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study, the authors identified final plosive voicing contrast as the highest single error source in dysarthria associated with Friedreich's Ataxia in a group of Irish English-speaking participants. This study aimed to determine the acoustic features underlying misperceptions of voicing status and implications for clinical management.…

  10. Speech Perception Ability in Individuals with Friedreich Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, Gary; Fava, Rosanne; Baldock, Heath; Chong, April; Barker, Elizabeth; Corben, Louise; Delatycki

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate auditory pathway function and speech perception ability in individuals with Friedreich ataxia (FRDA). Ten subjects confirmed by genetic testing as being homozygous for a GAA expansion in intron 1 of the FXN gene were included. While each of the subjects demonstrated normal, or near normal sound detection, 3…

  11. Clinical spectrum of ataxia-telangiectasia in adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, M. M. M.; Abdo, W. F.; Willemsen, M. A. A. P.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Smeets, D. F. C. M.; Hiel, J. A. P.; Brunt, E. R.; van Rijn, M. A.; Krakauer, D. Majoor; Oldenburg, R. A.; Broeks, A.; Last, J. I.; van't Veer, L. J.; Tijssen, M. A. J.; Dubois, A. M. I.; Kremer, H. P. H.; Weemaes, C. M. R.; Taylor, A. M. R.; van Deuren, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe the phenotype of adult patients with variant and classic ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), to raise the degree of clinical suspicion for the diagnosis variant A-T, and to assess a genotype-phenotype relationship for mutations in the ATM gene. Methods: Retrospective analysis of the

  12. Clinical spectrum of ataxia-telangiectasia in adulthood.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, M.M.; Abdo, W.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Hiel, J.A.P.; Brunt, E.R.; Rijn, M.A. van; Majoor Krakauer, D.; Oldenburg, R.A.; Broeks, A.; Last, J.I.; Veer, L.J. van 't; Tijssen, M.A.; Dubois, A.M.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Taylor, A.M.; Deuren, M. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the phenotype of adult patients with variant and classic ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), to raise the degree of clinical suspicion for the diagnosis variant A-T, and to assess a genotype-phenotype relationship for mutations in the ATM gene. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of the

  13. ERS statement on the multidisciplinary respiratory management of ataxia telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhatt, J.M.; Bush, A.; Gerven, M.; Nissenkorn, A.; Renke, M.; Yarlett, L.; Taylor, M.; Tonia, T.; Warris, A.; Zielen, S.; Zinna, S.; Merkus, P.J.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare, progressive, multisystem disease that has a large number of complex and diverse manifestations which vary with age. Patients with A-T die prematurely with the leading causes of death being respiratory diseases and cancer. Respiratory manifestations include immu

  14. Neuropathology in classical and variant ataxia-telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Mijke M. M.; Martin, Jean-Jacques; van Deuren, Marcel; Groote, Chantal Ceuterick-de; Weemaes, Corry M. R.; Kremer, Berry H. P. H.; Taylor, Malcolm A. R.; Willemsen, Michel A. A. P.; Lammens, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is classically characterized by progressive neurodegeneration, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency and elevated a-fetoprotein levels. Some patients, classified as variant A-T, exhibit a milder clinical course. In the latter patients extrapyramidal symptoms, in

  15. Genetic and pharmacological evidence implicates cathepsins in Niemann-Pick C cerebellar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chan; Puthanveetil, Prasanth; Ory, Daniel S; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2016-04-01

    Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC) disease, an autosomal recessive lipid trafficking disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the NPC1 gene, is characterized by progressive neurodegeneration resulting in cognitive impairment, ataxia and early death. Little is known about the cellular pathways leading to neuron loss. Here, we studied the effects of diminishing expression of cystatin B, an endogenous inhibitor of cathepsins B, H and L, on the development of NPC neuropathology. We show that decreased expression of cystatin B in patient fibroblasts enhances cathepsin activity. Deletion of the encoding Cstb gene in Npc1-deficient mice resulted in striking deleterious effects, particularly within the cerebellum where diffuse loss of Purkinje cells was observed in young mice. This severe pathology occurred through cell autonomous mechanisms that triggered Purkinje cell death. Moreover, our analyses demonstrated the mislocalization of lysosomal cathepsins within the cytosol of Npc1-deficient Purkinje cells. We provide evidence that this may be a consequence of damage to lysosomal membranes by reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the leakage of lysosomal contents that culminates in apoptotic cell death. Consistent with this notion, toxicity from ROS was attenuated in an NPC cell model by cystatin B over-expression or pharmacological inhibition of cathepsin B. The observation that Npc1 and Cstb deletion genetically interact to potently enhance the degenerative phenotype of the NPC cerebellum provides strong support for the notion that lysosomal membrane permeabilization contributes to cerebellar degeneration in NPC disease. PMID:26908626

  16. A deficiency of ceramide biosynthesis causes cerebellar purkinje cell neurodegeneration and lipofuscin accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Zhao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids, lipids with a common sphingoid base (also termed long chain base backbone, play essential cellular structural and signaling functions. Alterations of sphingolipid levels have been implicated in many diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, it remains largely unclear whether sphingolipid changes in these diseases are pathological events or homeostatic responses. Furthermore, how changes in sphingolipid homeostasis shape the progression of aging and neurodegeneration remains to be clarified. We identified two mouse strains, flincher (fln and toppler (to, with spontaneous recessive mutations that cause cerebellar ataxia and Purkinje cell degeneration. Positional cloning demonstrated that these mutations reside in the Lass1 gene. Lass1 encodes (dihydroceramide synthase 1 (CerS1, which is highly expressed in neurons. Both fln and to mutations caused complete loss of CerS1 catalytic activity, which resulted in a reduction in sphingolipid biosynthesis in the brain and dramatic changes in steady-state levels of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases. In addition to Purkinje cell death, deficiency of CerS1 function also induced accumulation of lipofuscin with ubiquitylated proteins in many brain regions. Our results demonstrate clearly that ceramide biosynthesis deficiency can cause neurodegeneration and suggest a novel mechanism of lipofuscin formation, a common phenomenon that occurs during normal aging and in some neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. [Cerebellar Control of Ocular Movements: Application to the Topographical Diagnosis of Cerebellar Lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Genjiro

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade, substantial information on cerebellar oculomotor control has been provided by the use of sophisticated neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, and imaging techniques. We now know that an intact cerebellum is a prerequisite for normal oculomotor performance. This review clarifies the current knowledge on structure-function correlations of the cerebellum in relation to ocular movements and allows them to be applied to topographical diagnosis of cerebellar lesions. The cerebellar regions most closely related to oculomotor function are: (1) the flocculus/paraflocculus for VOR suppression, cancellation, smooth pursuit eye movement and gaze-holding, (2) the nodulus/ventral uvula for velocity storage and low frequency prolonged vestibular response, and (3) the dorsal oculomotor vermis (declive VI, folium VII) and the posterior portion of the fastigial nucleus (fastigial oculomotor region) for saccades and smooth pursuit initiation. Symptomatically, defects in the flocculus/parflocculus cause saccadic pursuit, downbeat nystagmus, and impairments to visual suppression of the VOR. Lesions of the nodulus/uvula reveal as periodic alternating nystagmus. Lesions of the oculomotor vermis and the fastigial nucleus can induce saccadic dysmetria, while fastigial nucleus lesions may also cause ocular flutter/opsoclonus. A detailed knowledge of cerebellar anatomy and the physiology of eye movements enables localization of lesions to specific areas of the cerebellum. PMID:27001776

  18. CCL8 BASED IMMUNOLOGICAL MONITORING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The present invention relates to an immunological method and, more particularly, a method for measuring cell-mediated immune reactivity (CMI) in mammals based on the production of CCL8.The invention further discloses an assay and a kit for measuring CMI to an antigen using whole blood or other...

  19. The double helix and immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, Gustav J. V.

    2003-01-01

    The immune system can recognize and produce antibodies to virtually any molecule in the Universe. This enormous diversity arises from the ingenious reshuffling of DNA sequences encoding components of the immune system. Immunology is an example of a field completely transformed during the past 50 years by the discovery of the structure of DNA and the emergence of DNA technologies that followed.

  20. Rehabilitation for Ataxia after Operation for Hemangioblastoma:A Case Report%脑血管母细胞瘤术后共济失调康复1例报道

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜晓霞; 邢乃飞; 宋鲁平; 何静杰; 朱镛连

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨脑血管母细胞瘤的临床特点及共济失调康复方法。方法报道1例脑血管母细胞瘤多次复发患者,手术后出现共济失调,给予康复训练。结果经过3个月康复后,患者Fugl-Meyer平衡功能评分由4分增加到13分;改良Barthel指数由50分提高到90分。结论康复训练能改善脑血管母细胞瘤多次复发患者日常生活能力和平衡功能。%Objective To explore the feature and rehabilitation of ataxia post 5 times recurrence of hemangioblastoma. Methods A case was reviewed combined with literatures. Results The patient presented cerebellar ataxia after 5 times recurrence of hemangioblastoma. The score of Fugl-Meyer Assessment of balance increased from 4 to 13, while the modified Barthel Index from 50 to 90 after 3 months of reha-bilitation. Conclusion Rehabilitation may improve the activeties of daily living and balance for patient with ataxia after multiple recurrences of hemangioblastoma.