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Sample records for cerebellar artery junction

  1. Successful Removal of a Metastatic Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in the Craniovertebral Junction using an Occipital Artery to Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Bypass

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    Yukitomo Ishi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are rare mesenchymal neoplasms arising from the gastrointestinal tract. The authors present a case of the successful removal of a metastatic GIST in the craniovertebral junction, using an occipital artery to posterior inferior cerebellar artery (OA-PICA bypass. The patient is a 54-year-old male who underwent his first surgery for a small-bowel tumor at the age of 45 and was diagnosed with GIST. Nine years after his primary diagnosis, the patient suffered from severe neck pain. MRI demonstrated a large demarcated mass adjacent to the right atlas. The right vertebral artery (VA, completely engulfed by the tumor, showed a narrowing and ended in the PICA. Poor collateral blood supply in the right PICA territory was presumed. To prevent ischemic complications, an OA-PICA bypass was performed prior to the tumor resection. After the OA-PICA bypass, the tumor associated with the right VA was successfully removed, and the patient was discharged without any neurological deficits.

  2. The bihemispheric posterior inferior cerebellar artery

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    Cullen, Sean P. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Neurosurgery, Boston, MA (United States); Ozanne, Augustin; Alvarez, Hortensia; Lasjaunias, Pierre [Service de Neuroradiologie Diagnostic et Therapeutique, Hopital de Bicetre-Universite Paris-sud Orsay (France)

    2005-11-01

    Rarely, a solitary posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) will supply both cerebellar hemispheres. We report four cases of this variant. We present a retrospective review of clinical information and imaging of patients undergoing angiography at our institution to identify patients with a bihemispheric PICA. There were four patients: three males and one female. One patient presented with a ruptured arteriovenous malformation, and one with a ruptured aneurysm. Two patients had normal angiograms. The bihemispheric PICA was an incidental finding in all cases. The bihemispheric vessel arose from the dominant left vertebral artery, and the contralateral posterior inferior cerebellar artery was absent or hypoplastic. In all cases, contralateral cerebellar supply arose from a continuation of the ipsilateral PICA distal to the choroidal point and which crossed the midline dorsal to the vermis. We conclude that the PICA may supply both cerebellar hemispheres. This rare anatomic variant should be considered when evaluating patients with posterior fossa neurovascular disease. (orig.)

  3. Cerebellar arteries originating from the internal carotid artery: angiographic evaluation and embryologic explanations

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    Lee, Jae Young; Han, Moon Hee; Yu, In Gyu; Chang, Ki Hyun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eui Jong [Kyunghee Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Ho [Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Asan(Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    To find and describe the cerebellar arteries arising from the internal carotid artery, explain them embryologically, and evaluate their clinical implication. To determine the point in the internal carotid artery from which the cereballar artery arose anomalously, consecutive angiographic studies performed in the last three years were reviewed. The distribution of such anomalous cerebellar arteries, the point in the internal carotid artery from which the anomalous vessels originated, and associated findings were analyzed. Five anomalous origins of cerebellar arteries arising arising directly from the internal carotid artery were found in five patients. Three anterior inferior cerebellar arteries (AICA) and one common trunk of an AICA and a posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) were found to originate from the internal carotid artery at a point close to the origin of the primitive trigeminal artery. A PICA arose from an artery presenting a course similar to the proatlantal intersegmental artery. Intracranial aneurysms in two patients, Moyamoya disease in one, and facial arteriovenous malformation in one. In our series, AICAs supplied from the arteries considered to be persistent trigeminal artery variants were the most common type. A correlation between type of anomalous cerebellar artery and type of carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis may exist. Cerebellar arteries originating anomalously from the internal carotid artery seem to occur as a result of the persistence of carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses associated with incomplete fusion of the longitudinal neural arteries. An understanding of these anomalous cerebellar arteries may help prevent accidents during therapeutic embolization and surgical treatment, as well as misinterpretation.

  4. Retrograde Stent Placement for Coil Embolization of a Wide-Necked Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysm

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    Roh, Hong Gee; Chun, Young IL; Choi, Jin Woo; Cho, Joon; Moon, Won Jin [University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Solander, Sten [University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Wide-necked aneurysms of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) are infrequently encountered in cerebrovascular practice, and endovascular treatment is difficult or impossible even with the use of several neck remodeling techniques. We present the case of a patient with a wide-necked aneurysm of the PICA, which was treated by the retrograde stenting through the contralateral vertebral artery and vertebrobasilar junction with antegrade coil embolization.

  5. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vertebral artery disease

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    Cocker, Laurens J.L. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kliniek Sint-Jan Radiologie, Brussels (Belgium); Compter, A.; Kappelle, L.J.; Worp, H.B. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Luijten, P.R.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-09-15

    Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are a newly recognised entity associated with atherothromboembolic cerebrovascular disease and worse physical functioning. We aimed to investigate the relationship of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia and with vascular risk factors. We evaluated the MR images of 46 patients with a recent vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke and a symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis ≥50 % from the Vertebral Artery Stenting Trial (VAST) for the presence of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities ≤1.5 cm. At inclusion in VAST, data were obtained on age, sex, history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, and vascular risk factors. Adjusted risk ratios were calculated with Poisson regression analyses for the relation between cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vascular risk factors. Sixteen out of 46 (35 %) patients showed cerebellar cortical infarct cavities on the initial MRI, and only one of these 16 patients was known with a previous vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke. In patients with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia, risk factor profiles of patients with cerebellar cortical infarct cavities were not different from patients without these cavities. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are seen on MRI in as much as one third of patients with recently symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis. Since patients usually have no prior history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, cerebellar cortical infarct cavities should be added to the spectrum of common incidental brain infarcts visible on routine MRI. (orig.)

  6. Acute bilateral cerebellar infarction in the territory of the medial branches of posterior inferior cerebellar arteries.

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    Gurer, G; Sahin, G; Cekirge, S; Tan, E; Saribas, O

    2001-10-01

    The most frequent type of cerebellar infarcts involved the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and superior cerebellar artery territories but bilateral involvement of lateral or medial branches of PICA is extremely rare. In this report, we present a 55-year-old male who admitted to hospital with vomiting, nausea and dizziness. On examination left-sided hemiparesia and ataxic gait were detected. Infarct on bilateral medial branch of PICA artery territories was found out with cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique and 99% stenosis of the left vertebral artery was found out with digital subtraction arteriography. The patient was put on heparin treatment. After 3 weeks, his complaints and symptoms had disappeared except for mild gait ataxia.

  7. Moyamoya disease associated with an anterior inferior cerebellar artery arising from a persistent trigeminal artery

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    Uchino, A.; Sawada, A.; Takase, Y.; Kudo, S. [Department of Radiology, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga, 849-8501 (Japan); Koizumi, T. [Department of Neurosurgery, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga, 849-8501 (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    The authors present a case of moyamoya disease associated with a persistent trigeminal artery from which the anterior inferior cerebellar artery arose. We reviewed previously reported cases of moyamoya disease associated with persistent carotid-basilar arterial anastomosis and investigated the embryology of this rare arterial variation. (orig.)

  8. Morphology and biomechanical properties of cerebellar arteries in adults

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    Olga A. Fomkina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal was to analyze the variability of a number of morphometric and biomechanical parameters of cerebellar arteries in adults aged 20-74 years. Material and Methods ― 179 samples of cerebellar arteries, obtained by autopsy of adults without acute cerebrovascular pathology have been studied; 24 preparations of arterial complexes «arterial circle – cerebral arteries» from scientific collection of Human Anatomy Department of Saratov State Medical University (Saratov, Russia have been also investigated. Research methods were: preparation, microscopy, experiments on uniaxial longitudinal stretching at a tensile testing machine Tira Test 28005 (TIRA GmbH, Germany. We studied outer diameter, angle of divergence, overall strength and maximal relative deformation of superior (SCA, anterior inferior (AICA and posterior inferior cerebellar arteries (PICA. Results and Conclusion ― It was revealed that SCA was characterized by the largest diameter and angle of divergence, the most strength and extensibility. AICA and PICA had no significant differences of the studied parameters. It was noted that AICA originated in the lower third part of basilar artery 1.5 times more likely than in the middle third part of this artery.

  9. Cerebellar hemorrhage after embolization of ruptured vertebral dissecting aneurysm proximal to PICA including parent artery

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    Akira Tamase

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some complications related to vertebral artery occlusion by endovascular technique have been reported. However, cerebellar hemorrhage after vertebral artery occlusion in subacute phase is rare. In this report, we describe a patient who showed cerebellar hemorrhage during hypertensive therapy for vasospasm after embolization of a vertebral dissecting aneurysm. Case Description: A 56-year-old female with a ruptured vertebral dissecting aneurysm proximal to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery developed cerebellar hemorrhage 15 days after embolization of the vertebral artery, including the dissected site. In this patient, the preserved posterior inferior cerebellar artery fed by retrograde blood flow might have been hemodynamically stressed during hypertensive and antiplatelet therapies for subarachnoid hemorrhage, resulting in cerebellar hemorrhage. Conclusion: Although cerebellar hemorrhage is not prone to occur in the nonacute stage of embolization of the vertebral artery, it should be taken into consideration that cerebellar hemorrhage may occur during hypertensive treatment.

  10. Surgical treatment for ruptured anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms

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    TONG Xiao-guang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA aneurysm is an extremely raretumor, which can cause severe results after ruptured. This article retrospectively analyzed the clinical symptoms, imaging manifestations, surgical approaches, endovascular therapy and postoperative outcomes of 12 cases with AICA aneurysms, so as to provide reference for clinical practice. Methods Clinical data of patients with AICA aneurysms, who were treated in our hospital between June 2004 and June 2012, were carefully collected and studied. Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS scores were used to evaluate the patients' living status. Results There were 12 patients (the average age was 54 years old with 13 ruptured aneurysms, accounting for 0.19% of all aneurysms (6467 cases treated in the same period. CT showed simple subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in 6 patients, simple ventricular hemorrhage in 1 patient and SAH complicated with ventricular hemorrhage in 5 patients. According to Hunt-Hess Grade, 2 patients were classified as Grade Ⅰ; 7 were Grade Ⅱ; 3 were Grade Ⅲ. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA showed there were 10 saccular aneurysms and 3 fusiform aneurysms. Three aneurysms were located in the proximal segment of AICA (the junction of AICA and basilar artery, 3 premeatal segment (first bifurcation of AICA, 3 meatal and 4 postmeatal. The mean diameter was 3.90 mm. Three patients with 4 aneurysms were treated with microsurgery, of which clipping was carried out in 2 patients with 3 aneurysms and trapping in 1 case. Other 9 patients were treated with endovascular therapy, of which 2 cases underwent coil embolization, 3 stent-assisted coil, and 4 parent artery occlusion (PAO. Postoperative complications included facial paralysis (1 case, dysphagia and coughing when drinking (1 case and contralateral hemianopia in both eyes (1 case. Follow-up was available in all of these cases for a mean of 36.41 months, with GOS scores 3 in 1 case, 4 in 2 cases and 5 in 9

  11. Anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction with sudden deafness and vertigo.

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    Murakami, Takenobu; Nakayasu, Hiroyuki; Doi, Mitsuru; Fukada, Yasuyo; Hayashi, Miwa; Suzuki, Takeo; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Nakashima, Kenji

    2006-12-01

    We report a patient with anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction, which manifested as profound deafness, transient vertigo, and minimal cerebellar signs. We suspect that ischaemia of the left internal auditory artery, which originates from the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, caused the deafness and transient vertigo. A small lesion in the middle cerebellar peduncle in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory and no lesion in the dentate nucleus in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory are thought to explain the minimal cerebellar signs despite the relatively large size of the infarction. Thus a relatively large infarction of the vertebral-basilar territory can manifest as sudden deafness with vertigo. Neuroimaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, is strongly recommended for patients with sudden deafness and vertigo to exclude infarction of the vertebral-basilar artery territory.

  12. Distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm in a child

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    J. Francisco Salomão

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available The case of a 7-year-old boy presenting with recurrent episodes of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm (PICA, successfully operated, is reported.' The low incidence of intracranial aneurysms in the first decade of life and the rare occurrence of distal PICA aneurysms are unusual features of this case. The theories regarding the origin of intracranial berry aneurysms are discussed.

  13. [Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report].

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    Adorno, Juan Oscar Alarcón; de Andrade, Guilherme Cabral

    2002-12-01

    The intracranial aneurysms of the posterior circulation have been reported between 5 and 10% of all cerebral aneurysms and the aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are considered rare, can cause cerebello pontine angle (CPA) syndrome with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Since 1948 few cases were described in the literature. We report on a 33 year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to sacular aneurysm of the left AICA. She was submitted to clipage of the aneurysm without complications.

  14. Sudden deafness as an initial presenting symptom of posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction: two case reports.

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    Lee, E J; Yoon, Y J

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports on two patients with posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction whose only presenting complaint was acute unilateral hearing loss. In the two cases reported, sudden hearing loss was an initial symptom, with no other neurological signs. Infarction in the territory of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery was diagnosed using brain magnetic resolution imaging. The patients had some degree of hearing improvement 3 or 4 days after initial treatment. In this article, new cases of posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction presenting as sudden deafness, without prominent neurological signs, are described. Otologists should be aware that hearing loss can sometimes appear as a warning sign of impending posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction.

  15. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

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    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-02-29

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Spontaneous healing and complete disappearance of a ruptured posterior inferior cerebellar artery dissecting aneurysm.

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    Su, Tsung-Ming; Cheng, Ching-Hsiao; Chen, Wu-Fu; Hsu, Shih-Wei

    2014-05-01

    A 7-month-old baby presented with a 4-day history of drowsiness and vomiting after a falling accident. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage, and variable stages of subdural hematoma in bilateral occipital and left temporal subdural spaces. A partially thrombosed aneurysm was noted in the right craniocervical junction. Ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral retinal petechial hemorrhages. Conventional cerebral angiography revealed a dissecting aneurysm in the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). Endovascular embolization was suggested, but the family refused. After conservative treatment, follow-up MRI revealed that the PICA aneurysm had remodeled and ultimately disappeared completely at the 10th month. This case illustrates the relatively plastic nature of intracranial aneurysms in pediatric patients. More studies are necessary to clarify the natural history of spontaneously thrombosed aneurysms to assist in their overall management.

  17. Anterior spinal and bulbar artery supply to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery revealed by a ruptured aneurysm: case report.

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    Gabrieli, Joseph; Sourour, Nader-Antoine; Chauvet, Dorian; Di Maria, Federico; Chiras, Jacques; Clarençon, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    The posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) is a vessel located between the intra- and extracranial circulation. The artery is characterized by a complex embryological development and numerous anatomical variants. The authors present a case of the PICA supplied by both a hypertrophic anterior spinal artery and a hypoplastic bulbar artery. This unusual arrangement somehow completes the list of previously published variants, and the spontaneous rupture of a related aneurysm confirmed the fragility of this network. The authors discuss anatomical and treatment considerations.

  18. Post-traumatic cerebellar infarction due to vertebral artery foramina fracture: case report

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    Moscote-Salazar Luis Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic cerebral infarction is an uncommon cause of morbidity and mortality and many studies have highlighted that trauma needs to considered as causative factor for cerebellar infarction. We present a case of cerebellar infarction in a 35 year old young patient secondary to vertebral fracture involving the vertebral foramen and vertebral artery injury. CT scan cervical spine showed C2-3 fracture on left side with fracture extending into the left vertebral foramen. A CT scan angiogram could not be performed because of poor neurological status. Possibly the infarction was due to left vertebral artery injury. Without surgical intervention prognosis of these patients remain poor. Prognosis of patients with traumatic cerebellar infarction depends on the neurological status of the patient, intrinsic parenchymal damage and more importantly extrinsic compression of the brainstem by the edematous cerebellar hemispheres.

  19. Post-traumatic cerebellar infarction due to vertebral artery foramina fracture: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Moscote-Salazar Luis Rafael; Rubiano Andres M.; Calderon-Miranda Willem Guillermo; Agrawal Amit

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic cerebral infarction is an uncommon cause of morbidity and mortality and many studies have highlighted that trauma needs to considered as causative factor for cerebellar infarction. We present a case of cerebellar infarction in a 35 year old young patient secondary to vertebral fracture involving the vertebral foramen and vertebral artery injury. CT scan cervical spine showed C2-3 fracture on left side with fracture extending into the left vertebral foramen. A CT scan angiogram c...

  20. Bilateral Superior Cerebellar Artery Embolic Occlusion with a Fetal-Type Posterior Cerebral Artery Providing Collateral Circulation

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    Taylor J. Bergman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral infarction of the superior cerebellar arteries with sparing of the rest of the posterior circulation, particularly the posterior cerebral arteries, is an uncommon finding in neurological practice. Most commonly, the deficits of the superior cerebellar arteries and posterior cerebral arteries occur together due to the close proximity of their origins at the top of the basilar artery. A patient was transferred to the neurological intensive care unit with a history of recent-onset falls from standing, profound hypertension, dizziness, and headaches. The neurological exam revealed cerebellar signs, including dysmetria of the right upper extremity and a decreased level of consciousness. Computed tomography of the head and neck revealed decreased attenuation throughout most of the cerebellar hemispheres suggestive of ischemic injury with sparing of the rest of the brain. Further investigation with a computed tomography angiogram revealed a fetal-type posterior cerebral artery on the right side that was providing collateral circulation to the posterior brain. Due to this embryological anomaly, the patient was spared significant morbidity and mortality that would have likely occurred had the circulation been more typical of an adult male.

  1. Gravity-dependent nystagmus and inner-ear dysfunction suggest anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarct.

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    Shaikh, Aasef G; Miller, Benjamin R; Sundararajan, Sophia; Katirji, Bashar

    2014-04-01

    Cerebellar lesions may present with gravity-dependent nystagmus, where the direction and velocity of the drifts change with alterations in head position. Two patients had acute onset of hearing loss, vertigo, oscillopsia, nausea, and vomiting. Examination revealed gravity-dependent nystagmus, unilateral hypoactive vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and hearing loss ipsilateral to the VOR hypofunction. Traditionally, the hypoactive VOR and hearing loss suggest inner-ear dysfunction. Vertigo, nausea, vomiting, and nystagmus may suggest peripheral or central vestibulopathy. The gravity-dependent modulation of nystagmus, however, localizes to the posterior cerebellar vermis. Magnetic resonance imaging in our patients revealed acute cerebellar infarct affecting posterior cerebellar vermis, in the vascular distribution of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). This lesion explains the gravity-dependent nystagmus, nausea, and vomiting. Acute onset of unilateral hearing loss and VOR hypofunction could be the manifestation of inner-ear ischemic injury secondary to the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) compromise. In cases of combined AICA and PICA infarction, the symptoms of peripheral vestibulopathy might masquerade the central vestibular syndrome and harbor a cerebellar stroke. However, the gravity-dependent nystagmus allows prompt identification of acute cerebellar infarct. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss as prodromal symptom of anterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction.

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    Martines, Francesco; Dispenza, Francesco; Gagliardo, Cesare; Martines, Enrico; Bentivegna, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a clinical condition characterized by a sudden onset of unilateral or bilateral hearing loss. In recent years sudden deafness has been frequently described in association with anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarction generally presenting along with other brainstem and cerebellar signs such as ataxia, dysmetria and peripheral facial palsy. The authors report a rare clinical case of a 53-year-old man who suddenly developed hearing loss and tinnitus without any brainstem or cerebellar signs. Computed tomography of his brain was normal, and the audiological results localized the lesion causing deafness to the inner ear. Surprisingly, magnetic resonance imaging showed an ischemic infarct in the right AICA territory. This case represents the fifth in the literature to date but it confirms that AICA occlusion can cause sudden deafness even without brainstem or cerebellar signs. Therefore, we recommend submitting the patient for neuroimaging, as an emergency, in order to exclude infarction of the AICA territory. By doing this, it may be possible to limit the extent of the lesion by commencing early therapy.

  3. Ultrastructure of synaptic junctions in the cerebellar cortex in experimental valproate encephalopathy and after terminating chronic application of the antiepileptic.

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    Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria E

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse in TEM the evolution of changes in structural elements of synaptic junctions of the cerebellar cortex in rats in valproate encephalopathy induced by chronic 12-month administration of sodium valproate - VPA (once daily intragastrically, in a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w.) and after withdrawal of this antiepileptic for 1 and 3 months. After 9 and 12 months of the experiment, synaptic endings of both the symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses in the neuropil of the cerebellar cortex, especially in the molecular layer, showed signs of severe damage (mainly swelling) and even disintegration. They were mostly observed in axodendritic endings and axospinal endings on the dendritic spines of Purkinje cells, being manifested in the presence of large vacuolar structures, electron lucent areas and swollen mitochondria within the cytoplasm. A reduced number of axonal synaptic vesicles (with more type F vesicles preserved) could be seen. One and 3 months after the end of chronic application of VPA, the synaptic junctions did not show morphological exponents of the repair processes. The alterations observed in the synapticjunctions of the cerebellar cortex may suggest disorders in neurotransmission processes, such as exhaustion and damage caused by ischaemia due to damage to the blood-brain barrier induced by VPA and/or its toxic metabolites.

  4. Anatomical study on the "perforator-free zone": reconsidering the proximal superior cerebellar artery and basilar artery perforators.

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    Garcia-Gonzalez, Ulises; Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Agrawal, Abhishek; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2012-03-01

    The proximal superior cerebellar artery (pSCA) is often considered a perforator-free area. Precise anatomical knowledge of this region clarifies the pathophysiology underlying posterior fossa ischemic syndromes and helps avoid treatment-related complications. To anatomically evaluate perforating branches arising from the pSCA and the upper basilar artery (BA). Forty-four SCAs from 20 cadaveric heads were examined to determine patterns of the pSCA; its morphometry for medial and lateral branches; and frequency, number, diameter, distribution, and vascular territory of perforators arising from the pSCA and rostral BA. SCA arose as a single trunk in 36 sides (90%): mean diameter at origin was 1.38 mm; mean length was 14.4 ± 7.9 mm. Ninety-nine pSCA perforator branches were present in 82% of specimens (mean, 2.3 ± 1.6; range, 0-7 perforators/side). Of these, 59% were direct, belonging to the interpeduncular group in 85% of cases; 28% were short circumflex, belonging to lateral and medial pontine group; and 13% were long circumflex, reaching the medullary perforation zone (basal cerebellar group). Median distance to the first perforator was 2.0 mm (range, 0.1-15 mm). There were 132 perforator branches in the last centimeter of the BA. The pSCA should not be regarded as a perforator-free area. Although the pSCA territories likely overlap with the posterior cerebral artery, BA, and anterior inferior cerebellar artery, the pSCA segment cannot be surgically manipulated with impunity.

  5. Immersed boundary simulation of flow through arterial junctions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DWAIPAYAN SARKAR; NISHANT UPADHYAY; SOMNATH ROY; SUBHAS CHANDRA RANA

    2017-04-01

    The present work demonstrates implementation of a mass-conserving sharp-interface immersed boundary for simulation of flows in branched arterial geometries. A simplistic two-dimensional arterial junction is considered to capture the preliminary flow physics in the aortic regions. Numerical solutions are benchmarked against established available experimental PIV results in Ensley et al (Annu. Thorac. Surg. 68(4):1384–1390,1999) and numerical predictions in Gilmanov and Sotiropoulos (J. Comput. Phys. 207(2):457–492, 2005) and deZelicourt et al (Comput. Fluids 38(9):1749–1762, 2009). Simulations are further carried out for pulsated flows and effects of blockages near the junctions (due to stenosis or atherosclerosis). Instabilities in the flow structures near the junction and the resulting changes in the downstream pulsation frequency were observed. These changes account for the physiological heart defects that arise from the poorly working valve (due to blockage),giving rise to chest pain and breathing instability, and can potentially be used as a detection tool for arterial diseases.

  6. Cerebellar infarction resulting from vertebral artery occlusion associated with a Jefferson fracture.

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    Muratsu, Hirotsugu; Doita, Minoru; Yanagi, Toshihide; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Nishida, Kotaro; Tomioka, Masao; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2005-06-01

    Neurologic deficit secondary to a Jefferson fracture is rare, as the fracture fragments tend to spread outward. To the authors' knowledge, only five cases of vertebral artery injury associated with C1 fracture have been reported. A 75-year-old man with diffuse spinal hyperostosis hit the top of his head and sustained a Jefferson fracture. The patient presented with vertigo and slurred speech. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated cerebellar infarction, and MR angiography (MRA) showed bilateral vertebral artery occlusion associated with a Jefferson fracture. The patient was placed in a halo vest for a total of 11 weeks and treated with anticoagulant therapy. Vertigo gradually improved, and the patient was able to walk with a cane. Previously slurred speech was completely resolved. This case demonstrates that a Jefferson fracture can cause vertebral artery occlusion, resulting in cerebellar infarction. The clinician should be aware of the possibility and implications of vertebral artery injuries, especially if a fracture involving the foramen transversarium with displacement is documented or if there is a neurologic deficit above the level of injury. Advances in noninvasive imaging such as MRA will facilitate accurate evaluation of these potentially life-threatening vascular injuries.

  7. Fusiform superior cerebellar artery aneurysm treated with STA-SCA bypass and trapping

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    Fabricio C Lamis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fusiform aneurysms of cerebellar arteries are rare. Different surgical techniques to address these challenging lesions have been described, and their application depends on whether the goal is to maintain the flow in the parent vessel or to occlude it. Case Description: The authors reported a case of a fusiform aneurysm located in the lateral pontomesencephalic segment of the superior cerebellar artery (SCA in a 32-year-old man who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. The patient was subjected to aneurysm trapping followed by a bypass between the superficial temporal artery (STA and SCA and had an uneventful recovery. Conclusions: Although only a few cases of fusiform aneurysms in the supracerebellar artery have been reported in the literature, the treatment strategies adopted were diverse. In selected cases of patients in good neurological condition with ruptured fusiform aneurysms at the proximal segments of SCA and who have poor evidence of collateral supply, the possibility of a STA-SCA bypass with aneurysm trapping must be considered. A review of the current treatment modalities of this pathology is also presented.

  8. Giant partially thrombosed 4 th ventricular posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm; microsurgical management

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    Forhad Hossain Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old woman presented with a 3-month history of progressive occipital headache, vomiting, walking difficulty, and repeated fall. She had no history of sudden and severe headache. She had positive cerebellar signs, predominantly on the right side. Computerized tomography (CT scan, CT angiogram, and magnetic resonance image (MRI of the brain showed suspected partially thrombosed giant 4 th ventricular posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm. Patient developed severe hypersensitivity reaction during both CT scan and MRI after contrast injection. Though needed, digital subtraction angiogram (DSA of cerebral vessels was not done. The aneurysm was managed by microsurgical clipping of the aneurysm neck and partial excision of thrombosed aneurysm. Here, we report the details of management of these difficult giant aneurysm without DSA.

  9. Vascular loops in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, as identified by magnetic resonance imaging, and their relationship with otologic symptoms

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    Luiz de Abreu Junior

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To use magnetic resonance imaging to identify vascular loops in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery and to evaluate their relationship with otologic symptoms. Materials and Methods: We selected 33 adults with otologic complaints who underwent magnetic resonance imaging at our institution between June and November 2013. Three experienced independent observers evaluated the trajectory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery in relation to the internal auditory meatus and graded the anterior inferior cerebellar artery vascular loops according to the Chavda classification. Kappa and chi-square tests were used. Values of p < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: The interobserver agreement was moderate. Comparing ears that presented vascular loops with those that did not, we found no association with tinnitus, hearing loss, or vertigo. Similarly, we found no association between the Chavda grade and any otological symptom. Conclusion: Vascular loops do not appear to be associated with otoneurological manifestations.

  10. Vascular loops in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, as identified by magnetic resonance imaging, and their relationship with otologic symptoms*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu Junior, Luiz; Kuniyoshi, Cristina Hiromi; Wolosker, Angela Borri; Borri, Maria Lúcia; Antunes, Augusto; Ota, Vanessa Kiyomi Arashiro; Uchida, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Objective To use magnetic resonance imaging to identify vascular loops in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery and to evaluate their relationship with otologic symptoms. Materials and Methods We selected 33 adults with otologic complaints who underwent magnetic resonance imaging at our institution between June and November 2013. Three experienced independent observers evaluated the trajectory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery in relation to the internal auditory meatus and graded the anterior inferior cerebellar artery vascular loops according to the Chavda classification. Kappa and chi-square tests were used. Values of p < 0.05 were considered significant. Results The interobserver agreement was moderate. Comparing ears that presented vascular loops with those that did not, we found no association with tinnitus, hearing loss, or vertigo. Similarly, we found no association between the Chavda grade and any otological symptom. Conclusion Vascular loops do not appear to be associated with otoneurological manifestations. PMID:27818543

  11. Junctional chiasmatic syndrome due to large anterior communicating artery aneurysm

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    Maruthi Kesani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though aneurysm involving the anterior communicating artery (A Com A was common in clinical practice, producing compressive symptoms such as visual loss was rare. We report a case, in which patient had gradually progressive visual loss with features of the junctional chiasmatic syndrome, imaging revealed partially thrombosed large A Com A aneurysm. Intraoperatively, aneurysm was found compressing the optic chiasm and right optic nerve, following clipping and decompression of the optic nerve and chiasm there was gradually improvement in the vision over 2 weeks postoperatively.

  12. Superior cerebellar artery infarction in endovascular treatment for tentorial dural arteriovenous fistulas

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    Zhang Jingbo; Lv Xianli; Jiang Chuhan; Li Youxiang [Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, 6, Tiantan, Xili, Chongwen, 100050, Beijing (China); Wu Zhongxue, E-mail: ttyyzjb@sina.co [Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, 6, Tiantan, Xili, Chongwen, 100050, Beijing (China)

    2010-06-15

    Background: Superior cerebellar artery (SCA) syndrome shows ipsilateral cerebellar ataxia and Horner's syndrome, contralateral superficial sensory disturbance, as well as nystagmus toward the impaired side, vertigo, and nausea. Occasionally, unilateral lesions may produce bilateral hypogeusia and contralateral hypoacusia. Objective: To report 2 patients with unilateral lower midbrain ischemic lesions of the inferior colliculus level caused by transarterial embolization for tentorial dural arteriovenous fistulas (TDAVFs). Methods: Hospital records for 21 patients with TDAVFs mainly treated by endovascular techniques between 2005 and 2008 were reviewed. Two patients with MRI evidence of unilateral SCA territory infarction were investigated. Results: Of 21 patients, 2 treated transarterially with Onyx-18 (a nonahesive liquid embolic agent) developed infarctions in the territory of SCA. One patient had lateral SCA infarction characterized by ipsilateral gait ataxia, contralateral hemihypoesthesia, with additional ipsilateral ocular motor palsy and bilateral gustatory loss. And the other patient had medial SCA infarction characterized by ipsilateral ataxia contralateral hemihypoesthesia with additional contralateral hypoacusia. Conclusion: SCA infarction can be caused by transarterial injection of Onyx-18 via SCA or the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) for TDAVFs and additionally presented with gustatory loss and deafness, which is generally not a feature of the SCA syndrome.

  13. Treatment of Ruptured Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysms Distal to the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery: Stenting or Trapping?

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    Fang, Yi-Bin, E-mail: fangyibin@163.com; Zhao, Kai-Jun, E-mail: zkjwcfzwh@163.com; Wu, Yi-Na, E-mail: wuyina0923@163.com; Zhou, Yu, E-mail: yzhou-2011@126.com; Li, Qiang, E-mail: lqeimm@126.com; Yang, Peng-Fei, E-mail: 15921196312@163.com; Huang, Qing-Hai, E-mail: ocinhqh@163.com; Zhao, Wen-Yuan, E-mail: doczhaowy@163.com; Xu, Yi, E-mail: xuyichyy@163.com; Liu, Jian-Min, E-mail: chstroke@163.com [Second Military Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Changhai Hospital (China)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe treatment of ruptured vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VADAs) continues to be controversial. Our goal was to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and long-term outcomes of internal trapping and stent-assisted coiling (SAC) for ruptured VADAs distal to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (supra-PICA VADAs), which is the most common subset.MethodsA retrospective review was conducted of 39 consecutive ruptured supra-PICA VADAs treated with internal trapping (n = 20) or with SAC (n = 19) at our institution. The clinical and angiographic data were retrospectively compared.ResultsThe immediate total occlusion rate of the VADAs was 80 % in the trapping group, which improved to 88.9 % at the follow-ups (45 months on average). Unwanted occlusions of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) were detected in three trapped cases. Incomplete obliteration of the VADA or unwanted occlusions of the PICA were detected primarily in the VADAs closest to the PICA. In the stenting group, the immediate total occlusion rate was 47.4 %, which improved to 100 % at the follow-ups (39 months on average). The immediate total occlusion rate of the VADAs was higher in the trapping group (p < 0.05), but the later total occlusion was slightly higher in the stenting group (p > 0.05).ConclusionsOur preliminary results showed that internal trapping and stent-assisted coiling are both technically feasible for treating ruptured supra-PICA VADAs. Although not statistically significant, procedural related complications occurred more frequently in the trapping group. When the VADAs are close to the PICA, we suggest that the lesions should be treated using SAC.

  14. Right cerebellar infarction due to ipsilateral neck-rotation-induced right vertebral artery compression and occlusion, demonstrated by CT angiography

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    Rongli Wu, MD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotation-induced vertebral artery compression and occlusion with the outcome of cerebellar infarction (as opposed to the outcome of transient ischemia from hemodynamic insufficiency, known as bow hunter's stroke is extremely rare. We report a 40-year-old male who suffered from ipsilateral neck-rotation-induced right vertebral artery compression and occlusion that resulted in right cerebellar infarction. In most reported cases, the rotation-compressed vertebral artery is located at the C1–2 level; however, our patient's compressed artery was located at the C6–7 level as demonstrated clearly by 3-dimensional CT angiography. This case report is based on a literature review and an investigation of the likely factors of this specific incident via the patient's personal details, clinical course, and diagnostic images.

  15. Layer specific changes of astroglial gap junctions in the rat cerebellar cortex by persistent Borna Disease Virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster-Patzlaff, Christiane; Hosseini, Seyed Mehdi; Reuss, Bernhard

    2008-07-11

    Neonatal Borna Disease Virus (BDV) infection of the Lewis rat brain, leads to Purkinje cell degeneration, in association with astroglial activation. Since astroglial gap junctions (GJ) are known to influence neuronal degeneration, we investigated BDV dependent changes in astroglial GJ connexins (Cx) Cx43, and Cx30 in the Lewis rat cerebellum, 4, and 8 weeks after neonatal infection. On the mRNA level, RT-PCR demonstrated a BDV dependent increase in cerebellar Cx43, and a decrease in Cx30, 8, but not 4 weeks p.i. On the protein level, Western blot analysis revealed no overall upregulation of Cx43, but an increase of its phosphorylated forms, 8 weeks p.i. Cx30 protein was downregulated. Immunohistochemistry revealed a BDV dependent reduction of Cx43 in the granular layer (GL), 4 weeks p.i. 8 weeks p.i., Cx43 immunoreactivity recovered in the GL, and was induced in the molecular layer (ML). Cx30 revealed a BDV dependent decrease in the GL, both 4, and 8 weeks p.i. Changes in astroglial Cxs correlated not with expression of the astrogliotic marker GFAP, which was upregulated in radial glia. With regard to functional coupling, primary cerebellar astroglial cultures, revealed a BDV dependent increase of Cx43, and Cx30 immunoreactivity and in spreading of the GJ permeant dye Lucifer Yellow. These results demonstrate a massive, BDV dependent reorganization of astroglial Cx expression, and of functional GJ coupling in the cerebellar cortex, which might be of importance for the BDV dependent neurodegeneration in this brain region.

  16. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis after stroke identified noninvasively with cerebral blood flow-weighted arterial spin labeling MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strother, Megan K.; Buckingham, Cari; Faraco, Carlos C.; Arteaga, Daniel; Lu, Pengcheng; Xu, Yaomin; Donahue, Manus J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) is most commonly investigated using hemodynamic PET and SPECT imaging. However, noninvasive MRI offers advantages of improved spatial resolution, allowing hemodynamic changes to be compared directly with structural findings and without concerns related to ionizing radiation exposure. The aim of this study was to evaluate relationships between CCD identified from cerebral blood flow (CBF)-weighted arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI with cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR)-weighted blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) MRI, Wallerian degeneration, clinical motor impairment, and corticospinal tract involvement. Methods Subjects (n=74) enrolled in an ongoing observational stroke trial underwent CBF-weighted ASL and hypercapnic CVR-weighted BOLD MRI. Hemispheric asymmetry indices for basal cerebellar CBF, cerebellar CVR, and cerebral peduncular area were compared between subjects with unilateral supratentorial infarcts (n=18) and control subjects without infarcts (n=16). CCD required (1) supratentorial infarct and (2) asymmetric cerebellar CBF (>95% confidence interval relative to controls). Results In CCD subjects (n=9), CVR (p=0.04) and cerebral peduncular area (p < 0.01) were significantly asymmetric compared to controls. Compared to infarct subjects not meeting CCD criteria (n=9), CCD subjects had no difference in corticospinal tract location for infarct (p=1.0) or motor impairment (p=0.08). Conclusions CCD correlated with cerebellar CVR asymmetry and Wallerian degeneration. These findings suggest that noninvasive MRI may be a useful alternative to PET or SPECT to study structural correlates and clinical consequences of CCD following supratentorial stroke. PMID:26724658

  17. Ectopic overexpression of engrailed-2 in cerebellar Purkinje cells causes restricted cell loss and retarded external germinal layer development at lobule junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baader, S L; Sanlioglu, S; Berrebi, A S; Parker-Thornburg, J; Oberdick, J

    1998-03-01

    Members of the En and Wnt gene families seem to play a key role in the early specification of the brain territory that gives rise to the cerebellum, the midhindbrain junction. To analyze the possible continuous role of the En and Wnt signaling pathway in later cerebellar patterning and function, we expressed En-2 ectopically in Purkinje cells during late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar development. As a result of this expression, the cerebellum is greatly reduced in size, and Purkinje cell numbers throughout the cerebellum are reduced by more than one-third relative to normal animals. Detailed analysis of both adult and developing cerebella reveals a pattern of selectivity to the loss of Purkinje cells and other cerebellar neurons. This is observed as a general loss of prominence of cerebellar fissures that is highlighted by a total loss of sublobular fissures. In contrast, mediolateral patterning is generally only subtly affected. That En-2 overexpression selectively affects Purkinje cells in the transition zone between lobules is evidenced by direct observation of selective Purkinje cell loss in certain fissures and by the observation that growth and migration of the external germinal layer (EGL) is selectively retarded in the deep fissures during early postnatal development. Thus, in addition to demonstrating the critical role of Purkinje cells in the generation and migration of granule cells, the heterogeneous distribution of cellular effects induced by ectopic En expression suggests a relatively late morphogenetic role for this and other segment polarity proteins, mainly oriented at lobule junctions.

  18. Ruptured aneurysm at the cortical segment of the distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery associated with hemodynamic stress after basilar artery occlusion

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    Akiko Marutani

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This report describes a case of de novo development of a saccular distal PICA aneurysm after atherosclerotic basilar artery occlusion. We believe that increased hemodynamic stress at the PICA might have contributed to the occurrence and rupture of the aneurysm. STA-SCA bypass, introduced in the territory of the cerebellar hemisphere, reduces hemodynamic stress, which would prevent the occurrence of de novo aneurysm and recurrent bleeding.

  19. Superior cerebellar artery aneurysms: incidence, clinical presentation and midterm outcome of endovascular treatment

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    Peluso, Jo P.P.; Rooij, Willem Jan van; Sluzewski, Menno [St. Elisabeth Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Tilburg (Netherlands); Beute, Guus N. [St. Elisabeth Ziekenhuis, Department of Neurosurgery, Tilburg (Netherlands)

    2007-09-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence, clinical presentation and midterm clinical and imaging outcome of endovascular treatment of 34 superior cerebellar artery (SCA) aneurysms in 33 patients. Between January 1995 and January 2007, 2,112 aneurysms were treated in our institution, and 36 aneurysms in 35 patients were located on the SCA (incidence 1.7%). Two of three distal SCA aneurysms were excluded. All the remaining 34 SCA aneurysms, of which 22 (65%) were ruptured and 12 (35%) were unruptured, in 33 patients were treated by endovascular techniques. There were 6 men and 27 women ranging from 29-72 years. In 14 patients (42%) multiple aneurysms were present. Initial angiographic occlusion was (near) complete in 32 aneurysms (94%) and incomplete in 2 aneurysms (6%). Complications leading to permanent morbidity or death occurred in two patients (6.1%, 95% CI 0.6 to 20.60%). Outcome at 6 months follow-up in 31 surviving patients was GOS5 in 26 (84%), GOS4 in 4 (13%) and GOS3 in 1 patient (3%). There were no episodes of (re)bleeding during 118 patient-years of follow-up. The 6-month angiographic follow up in 28 SCA aneurysms and extended angiographic follow-up in 19 showed stable occlusion in 27 aneurysms. No additional treatments were performed. SCA aneurysms are rare with an incidence of 1.7% of treated aneurysms at our institution. They are frequently associated with other aneurysms. Endovascular treatment is effective and safe in excluding the aneurysms from the circulation. (orig.)

  20. Positional occlusion of the vertebral artery in a case of rheumatoid atlantoaxial subluxation presenting with multiple cerebral and cerebellar infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Kaito, Takashi; Makino, Takahiro; Yonenobu, Kazuo

    2012-08-01

    We report an uncommon case of positional occlusion of the vertebral artery associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Plain radiography showed reducible atlantoaxial subluxation, and dynamic vertebral arteriography demonstrated positional occlusion of the left vertebral artery. The patient was treated with C1-2 posterior fusion and has since experienced no recurrent symptoms. Insufficiency of the vertebrobasilar artery is a relatively uncommon complication with cervical lesions in RA patients. However, when RA patients manifest recurrent cerebral and cerebellar symptoms, this condition should be kept in mind and actions taken to avoid further irreversible cerebral damage. Recommended imaging methods include vertebral dynamic lateral plain radiography of the cervical spine and vertebral arteriography at multiple cervical positions.

  1. A ruptured aneurysm arising at the leptomeningeal collateral circulation from the extracranial vertebral artery to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery associated with bilateral vertebral artery occlusion.

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    Chonan, Masashi; Nishimura, Shinjitu; Kimura, Naoto; Ezura, Masayuki; Uenohara, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2014-02-01

    We report an extremely rare case of a small ruptured aneurysm of the leptomeningeal collateral circulation from the vertebral artery (VA) to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA); this aneurysm was associated with bilateral VA occlusion. A 72-year-old woman with sudden headache, nausea, and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was admitted to our hospital. On admission, no evidence of cerebral signs or cranial nerve palsy was found. Computed tomography imaging showed SAH predominantly in the posterior fossa, and digital subtraction angiography revealed bilateral VA occlusion and the left VA aneurysm located proximal to the VA union. In addition, a small aneurysm was observed at the leptomeningeal collateral circulation located between the extracranial left VA and the left PICA. The patient underwent radical surgery on the day of the onset of the symptoms associated with SAH. However, the VA aneurysm was unruptured and surgically trapped. The small aneurysm arising at the leptomeningeal collateral circulation was ruptured during the surgery and was electrocoagulated; the collateral circulation was preserved, and no neurologic deficits were observed. The postoperative course was uneventful. SAH with the occlusion of major vessels should be diagnosed with utmost caution to allow preoperative neurologic and radiological assessments.

  2. [Case of cerebellar and spinal cord infarction presenting with acute brachial diplegia due to right vertebral artery occlusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takayuki; Santa, Yo; Akutagawa, Noriko; Nagano, Sukehisa; Yoshimura, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted for evaluation of sudden onset of dizziness, bilateral shoulder pain, and brachial diplegia. Neurological examination revealed severe bilateral weakness of the triceps brachii, wrist flexor, and wrist extensor muscles. There was no paresis of the lower limbs. His gait was ataxic. Pinprick and temperature sensations were diminished at the bilateral C6-C8 dermatomes. Vibration and position senses were intact. An MRI of the head revealed a right cerebellar infarction and occlusion of the right vertebral artery. An MRI of the cervical spine on T₂ weighted imaging (T₂WI) showed cord compression at the C3/4-C5/6 level secondary to spondylotic degeneration without any intramedullary signal changes of the cord. On the following day, however, high-signal lesions on T₂WI appeared in the C5-C6 spinal cord, suggesting cord infarction. Unilateral vertebral artery occlusion does not usually result in cervical cord infarction because of anastomosis of arteries. Because of the long-term mechanical compression in our case, it was likely that cervical cord ischemia was present before the onset of symptoms. On the basis of chronic cord compression, our case suggests that occlusion of a unilateral vertebral artery could cause cervical cord infarction.

  3. Angioplasty and stenting for severe vertebral artery oriifce stenosis:effects on cerebellar function remodeling veriifed by blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Liu; Zhiwei Li; Peng Xie

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral artery oriifce stenting may improve blood supply of the posterior circulation of the brain to regions such as the cerebellum and brainstem. However, previous studies have mainly focused on recovery of cerebral blood lfow and perfusion in the posterior circulation after inter-ventional therapy. This study examined the effects of functional recovery of local brain tissue on cerebellar function remodeling using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic reso-nance imaging before and after interventional therapy. A total of 40 Chinese patients with severe unilateral vertebral artery oriifce stenosis were enrolled in this study. Patients were equally and randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. The control group received drug treat-ment only. The intervention group received vertebral artery oriifce angioplasty and stenting+identical drug treatment to the control group. At 13 days after treatment, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory score was compared between the intervention and control groups. Cerebellar function remodeling was observed between the two groups using blood oxygen level-dependent function-al magnetic resonance imaging. The improvement in dizziness handicap and cerebellar function was more obvious in the intervention group than in the control group. Interventional therapy for severe vertebral artery oriifce stenosis may effectively promote cerebellar function remodeling and exert neuroprotective effects.

  4. Parent artery occlusion with Onyx for distal aneurysms of posterior inferior cerebellar artery: A single-centre experience in a series of 15 patients

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    Qi Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aneurysms located at distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA are rare. These aneurysms are difficult for surgical or endovascular treatment, especially for ruptured aneurysms. Aims: To investigate the clinical and radiologic efficacy of parent artery occlusion (PAO with embolic agent Onyx in the treatment of distal PICA aneurysm. Materials and Methods: Case records of 15 consecutive patients with 15 ruptured distal PICA aneurysms treated with Onyx embolization were reviewed retrospectively. The follow-up ranged between 6 and 52 months. Cerebral angiography or cerebra computed tomography-angiogram (CTA was performed for follow-up radiological study. Two aneurysms had origin from tonsillomedullary segment, nine from telovelotonsillar segments, and four from cortical segments. All patients were treated with Onyx to occlude aneurysm and proximal portion of vessel in front of aneurysm via endovascular approach. Results: Aneurysm was occluded completely in every patient. One patient died because of intra-procedure haemorrhage. Fourteen patients had good recovery and the last follow-up Glasgow outcome scale was 5. Head CT scan was performed in every survived patient before discharge. CT in 3 patients revealed cerebellar infarctions but without any neurological deficits. None of the 14 patients had rebleeding or fresh neurologic deficits during the follow-up period. Aneurysmal recanalization had not been observed in any of the survived patients. Conclusions: Onyx occlusion of proximal parent artery and aneurysm in the treatment of distal PICA aneurysm is safe and effective according to this study. Morphology and location of aneurysm are important to decide the therapeutic strategy.

  5. Endovascular treatment of vertebral artery dissecting aneurysm involving posterior inferior cerebellar artery%累及小脑后下动脉椎动脉夹层动脉瘤的血管内介入治疗效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何川; 张鹏; 张鸿祺

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze stenting and dual catheter technique in protection of posterior inferior cerebellar artery and its imaging and clinical follow-up results in the endovascular treatment of vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms. Methods From January 2012 to December 2014,the clinical data of 4 patients with vertebral artery dissecting aneurysm involving posterior inferior cerebellar artery treated with endovascular method and admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery,Xuanwu Hospital,Capital Medical University were enrolled retrospectively. The whole brain DSA examinations were performed at 6 months after procedure. The clinical follow-up period ranged from 12 to 24 months. Results Three of the 4 patients were treated with posterior inferior cerebellar artery-vertebral artery stenting,one patient was treated by using bidirectional dual catheter technique to protect posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The interventional therapy of 4 patients were all successful. Immediately after procedure,angiography revealed that the posterior inferior cerebellar arteries were patent,no ischemic symptoms were observed. The angiography at 6 months after procedure revealed no recurrence of aneurysms;the posterior inferior cerebellar arteries were patent without in-stent stenosis. No new symptoms of neurological deficit were observed during 12 to 24-month follow-up. Conclusion In the interventional treatment of vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms of posterior inferior cerebellar artery,using the posterior inferior cerebellar artery-vertebral artery stenting technique and bidirectional dual catheter technique may safely and effectively protect the posterior inferior cerebellar artery.%目的:分析椎动脉夹层动脉瘤的血管内介入治疗中支架置入和双导管技术保护小脑后下动脉(PICA)的方法及其影像和临床随访结果。方法回顾性纳入首都医科大学宣武医院神经外科2012年1月至2014年12月收治的4例累及PICA的椎动

  6. Distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm: case report Aneurisma da artéria cerebelar posterior e inferior distal: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ramina

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The majority of posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA aneurysms are usually found on the bifurcation of the vertebral artery (VA - PICA junction. Aneurysms arising from more peripheral PICA segments named distal PICA aneurysm are uncommon. The major clinical manifestation is that of an intracranial bleeding and the site of hemorrhage is related to the PICA segment originating the aneurysm. Lesions originating from distal PICA segments, particularly those arising from the telovelotonsillar segment, are associated with hemorrhage extending into the ventricular system, mainly the IV ventricle. A case of a 50-year-old woman with sudden headaches and vomiting, and intraventricular hemorrhage (four ventricles caused by an aneurysm of the telovelotonsillar segment of the PICA, is presented. No signs of subarachnoidal hemorrhage were found in the computerized tomography. The aneurysm was clipped and the patient presented a favorable outcome. Anatomical aspects and clinical series are reviewed.A maioria dos aneurismas da artéria cerebelar posterior inferior (PICA é geralmente encontrada na junção artéria vertebral (VA - PICA. Aneurismas originando-se nos segmentos mais distais da PICA são considerados raros. A manifestação clínica em geral por hemorragia intracraniana, e o local desta está relacionado ao segmento que origina o aneurisma. Lesões localizadas em segmentos mais distais da PICA, em especial os originados do segmento telovelotonsilar, estão associados a hemorragias no sistema ventricular, particularmente no quarto ventrículo. Relatamos o caso de mulher de 50 anos de idade que desenvolveu quadro de cefaléia súbita e vômitos, com hemorragia nos quatro ventrículos, causada por ruptura de aneurisma localizado no segmento telovelotonsilar da PICA. Não havia sinais de hemorragia subaracnóidea na tomografia computadorizada de crânio. O aneurisma foi clipado e a paciente apresentou evolução favorável. Aspectos anatômicos e

  7. Intracranial-to-intracranial bypass for posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms: options, technical challenges, and results in 35 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abla, Adib A; McDougall, Cameron M; Breshears, Jonathan D; Lawton, Michael T

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Intracranial-to-intracranial (IC-IC) bypasses are alternatives to traditional extracranial-to-intracranial (EC-IC) bypasses to reanastomose parent arteries, reimplant efferent branches, revascularize branches with in situ donor arteries, and reconstruct bifurcations with interposition grafts that are entirely intracranial. These bypasses represent an evolution in bypass surgery from using scalp arteries and remote donor sites toward a more local and reconstructive approach. IC-IC bypass can be utilized preferentially when revascularization is needed in the management of complex aneurysms. Experiences using IC-IC bypass, as applied to posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms in 35 patients, were reviewed. METHODS Patients with PICA aneurysms and vertebral artery (VA) aneurysms involving the PICA's origin were identified from a prospectively maintained database of the Vascular Neurosurgery Service, and patients who underwent bypass procedures for PICA revascularization were included. RESULTS During a 17-year period in which 129 PICA aneurysms in 125 patients were treated microsurgically, 35 IC-IC bypasses were performed as part of PICA aneurysm management, including in situ p3-p3 PICA-PICA bypass in 11 patients (31%), PICA reimplantation in 9 patients (26%), reanastomosis in 14 patients (40%), and 1 V3 VA-to-PICA bypass with an interposition graft (3%). All aneurysms were completely or nearly completely obliterated, 94% of bypasses were patent, 77% of patients were improved or unchanged after treatment, and good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale ≤ 2) were observed in 76% of patients. Two patients died expectantly. Ischemic complications were limited to 2 patients in whom the bypasses occluded, and permanent lower cranial nerve morbidity was limited to 3 patients and did not compromise independent function in any of the patients. CONCLUSIONS PICA aneurysms receive the application of IC-IC bypass better than any other aneurysm, with nearly one

  8. Cerebellar anatomy as applied to cerebellar microsurgical resections

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    Alejandro Ramos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To define the anatomy of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles, demonstrating the surgical application of anatomic landmarks in cerebellar resections. METHODS: Twenty cerebellar hemispheres were studied. RESULTS: The majority of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles had demonstrated constant relationship to other cerebellar structures, which provided landmarks for surgical approaching. The lateral border is separated from the midline by 19.5 mm in both hemispheres. The posterior border of the cortex is separated 23.3 mm from the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus; the lateral one is separated 26 mm from the lateral border of the nucleus; and the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus is separated 25.4 mm from the posterolateral angle formed by the junction of lateral and posterior borders of cerebellar hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS: Microsurgical anatomy has provided important landmarks that could be applied to cerebellar surgical resections.

  9. Extracranial aneurysms of the distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery: Resection and primary reanastomosis as the preferred management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwajol, Markus; Hage, Ziad A; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Charbel, Fady T

    2013-01-01

    Extracranial aneurysms of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) are rare, with only 22 reported cases in the English literature. For saccular extracranial distal PICA aneurysms not amenable to coiling, a surgically placed clip is not protected by the cranium postoperatively, and can be subject to movement in the mobile cervical region. Furthermore, fusiform or complex aneurysms cannot be clipped primarily. Resection and primary reanastomosis is a useful surgical approach not previously described for these extracranial lesions. We report three cases of extracranially located distal PICA aneurysms successfully treated with this surgical strategy at our center. One patient harboring a broad necked saccular aneurysm originally underwent successful primary clipping of the aneurysm but sustained a second subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on postoperative day 25 due to clip dislodgement from vigorous neck movement. The other two patients were found to have fusiform and complex aneurysms, respectively. All three patients were ultimately treated with resection and end-to-end PICA anastomosis, which successfully obliterated their aneurysms. Resection and primary reanastomosis of extracranial distal PICA aneurysms averts the risk of clip dislodgement due to neck movement and/or compression by soft tissues in the upper cervical region. It is a safe and efficacious technique, which we propose as the preferred management strategy for these rare vascular lesions.

  10. Role of gap junctions in acetylcholine-induced vasodilation of proximal and distal arteries of the rat mesentery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C E; Hickey, H; Sandow, S L

    2000-07-01

    We have previously shown that myoendothelial gap junctions are more prevalent in distal than in proximal arteries of the rat mesentery. In the present study we have investigated the role of gap junctions in the mechanism of action of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in these same vessels following relaxation with acetylcholine. Arteries were pre-constricted with phenylephrine and concentration response curves to acetylcholine were constructed in the presence of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10(-5) M) and indomethacin (10(-5) M) to prevent effects due to the release of nitric oxide and prostacyclins. Nitric oxide was found to have only a small role in the relaxation of the proximal vessels and was not involved in the relaxations of the distal vessels. 18 alpha-Glycyrrhetinic acid (10(-5) M), a putative gap junction uncoupler, significantly reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxations by 50% in both proximal and distal vessels. Potassium channel antagonists, tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA; 10(-3) M) and barium chloride (10(-4) M), together abolished the dilatory response in the proximal mesenteric arteries, but did not completely block responses in the distal arteries. The data suggest that gap junctions contribute significantly to the acetylcholine-induced relaxation in both proximal and distal arteries of the rat mesentery. We hypothesize that the absence of a correlation between the role of gap junctions and the incidence of myoendothelial gap junctions in these same vessels is due to significant effects of the inhibitors on gap junctions located in the smooth muscle layers of the larger vessels.

  11. Bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction resulting from vertebral artery injury following cervical trauma without radiographic damage of the spinal column: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimata, Yoshikuni; Sato, Kotaro; Suzuki, Yoshiaki [Iwate Prefectural Chubu Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kitakami (Japan); Murakami, Hideki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    Vertebral artery injury can be a complication of cervical spine injury. Although most cases are asymptomatic, the rare case progresses to severe neurological impairment and fatal outcomes. We experienced a case of bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction with fatal outcome resulting from vertebral artery injury associated with cervical spine trauma. A 69-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of tetraplegia after falling down the stairs and hitting his head on the floor. Marked bony damage of the cervical spine was not apparent on radiographs and CT scans, so the injury was initially considered to be a cervical cord injury without bony damage. However, an intensity change in the intervertebral disc at C5/C6, and a ventral epidural hematoma were observed on MRI. A CT angiogram of the neck showed the right vertebral artery was completely occluded at the C4 level of the spine. Forty-eight hours after injury, the patient lapsed into drowsy consciousness. The cranial CT scan showed a massive low-density area in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and brain stem. Anticoagulation was initiated after a diagnosis of the right vertebral artery injury, but the patient developed bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction. The patient's brain herniation progressed and the patient died 52 h after injury. We considered that not only anticoagulation but also treatment for thrombosis would have been needed to prevent cranial embolism. We fully realize that early and appropriate treatment are essential to improve the treatment results, and constructing a medical system with a team of orthopedists, radiologists, and neurosurgeons is also very important. (orig.)

  12. Bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction resulting from vertebral artery injury following cervical trauma without radiographic damage of the spinal column: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimata, Yoshikuni; Murakami, Hideki; Sato, Kotaro; Suzuki, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral artery injury can be a complication of cervical spine injury. Although most cases are asymptomatic, the rare case progresses to severe neurological impairment and fatal outcomes. We experienced a case of bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction with fatal outcome resulting from vertebral artery injury associated with cervical spine trauma. A 69-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of tetraplegia after falling down the stairs and hitting his head on the floor. Marked bony damage of the cervical spine was not apparent on radiographs and CT scans, so the injury was initially considered to be a cervical cord injury without bony damage. However, an intensity change in the intervertebral disc at C5/C6, and a ventral epidural hematoma were observed on MRI. A CT angiogram of the neck showed the right vertebral artery was completely occluded at the C4 level of the spine. Forty-eight hours after injury, the patient lapsed into drowsy consciousness. The cranial CT scan showed a massive low-density area in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and brain stem. Anticoagulation was initiated after a diagnosis of the right vertebral artery injury, but the patient developed bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction. The patient's brain herniation progressed and the patient died 52 h after injury. We considered that not only anticoagulation but also treatment for thrombosis would have been needed to prevent cranial embolism. We fully realize that early and appropriate treatment are essential to improve the treatment results, and constructing a medical system with a team of orthopedists, radiologists, and neurosurgeons is also very important.

  13. Development of anterior inferior cerebellar artery pseudoaneurysm after gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma. A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Geraint; Hassan, Faizul; Bhatnagar, Priya; Mitchell, Patrick; Jayakrishnan, Vijayam; Forster, David; Mendelow, Alexander David

    2014-08-01

    Gamma knife surgery (GKS) is a well-established modality for controlling the progression of vestibular schwannomas. Adverse effects of this treatment are extremely rare but include cyst formation and malignant transformation. We report a case of anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) pseudoaneurysm development rupture presenting as a poor WFNS grade subarachnoid haemorrhage. This is only the fourth case of aneurysm development (AICA aneurysm) following GKS reported but due to its serious nature we believe this potential complication warrants awareness in those offering this treatment.

  14. Cerebellar Mutism

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Of a series of 15 children operated for cerebellar tumor at University Hospital Rotterdam-Dijkzigt, The Netherlands, 5 developed “cerebellar mutism” and subsequent dysarthria after surgery, and 2 had mild speech problems.

  15. Evaluation of crossed cerebellar diaschisis in 30 patients with major cerebral artery occlusion by means of quantitative I-123 IMP SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa, Nobuhiko; Toyama, Keiji; Arbab, A.S.; Arai, Takao; Nukui, Hideaki [Yamanashi Medical Univ., Tamaho (Japan); Koizumi, Kiyoshi

    2001-12-01

    Quantitative crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) and the correlation with a reduction in supratentorial regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVR) were investigated in clinically stable patients with major cerebral artery occlusion by the iodine-123-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine (I-123 IMP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) method. Thirty patients with major cerebral artery occlusion underwent SPECT by the I-123 IMP autoradiographic method. Regional CBF was measured in the cerebral hemisphere, frontal and parietal lobes, temporo-parietal lobe, and cerebellum both at rest and after administration of acetazolamide. Eighteen of 30 patients (60%) had CCD. CCD was significantly related to magnetic resonance imaging evidence of infarction. Quantitative CCD was 17% and the CVR in the cerebellum was preserved in patients with CCD. There was a significant difference in CBF and CVR between the affected and normal sides in all regions of interest in the patients without CCD [CBF (ml/100 g/min): hemisphere (H), normal side (N): 31.4{+-}6.8, affected side (A): 27.5{+-}7.4; p<0.05. CVR: H, N: 0.56{+-}0.38, A: 0.42{+-}0.18; p<0.01]. CCD is common in patients with major cerebral artery occlusion, and quantitative I-123 IMP SPECT is helpful in detecting CCD in clinically stable patients with occlusion of major cerebral arteries. (author)

  16. Microsurgical anatomy and clinic significance of posterior inferior cerebellar artery%小脑后下动脉的显微解剖研究及其临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴江; 张世明; 徐峰

    2010-01-01

    目的 研究小脑后下动脉的显微解剖,为神经外科手术提供临床解剖资料.方法 手术显微镜下观察测量20具(共40侧)人脑标本的小脑后下动脉(PICA)的起始行径、直径、主要分支、穿动脉及分布,检查PICA与脑神经根的关系.结果 40侧标本共发出PICA 35支,平均管径(1.6±0.6)mm,距离椎基底动脉汇合点平均(16±5)mm.在35支PICA中28支PICA走行在第Ⅻ脑神经根之间,7支走行在第Ⅻ脑神经根下方,32支走行在第Ⅺ脑神经根之间.结论 PICA是椎基动脉系统重要的分支,变异多,走行与脑神经关系密切,熟悉解剖结构,在后颅窝手术中予以保护具有重要意义.%Objective To study the microsurgical anatomy of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) for neurosurgery. Methods Twenty Chinese adult brain samples (40 sides) were measured with microscope for the diameters, lengths, origins, courses, and the branches of the PICA. The relationship between the PICA and cranial nerves was also checked. Results There were 35 PICAs in 20 brain samples.The mean diameter of the PICAs was (1.6±0.6) mm, the mean length from PICAs' origin of vertebral artery to the vertebrobasilar junction was (16±5) mm. In 35 PICAs,28 PICAs go through the rootlets of Ⅻ cranial nerves,7 PICAs go inferior Ⅻ cranial nerves, and 32 PICAs go through the rootlets of Ⅺ cranial nerves. Conclusions PICA is an important branch artery with more variation and complex relationship to the cranial nerves trend in the vertebral artery system. It is necessary to master the microsurgical anatomy of PICA and to be careful protection during the neurosurgical operations.

  17. Clinical analysis of cerebellar infarction with vertebral artery hypoplasia%伴椎动脉发育不良的小脑梗死临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐澍; 马志刚; 廖琴; 孙玉衡; 胡洪涛

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize the clinical features and vascular lesions in patients who suffered from cerebellar infarction with vertebral artery hypoplasia(VAH). Methods Retrospective analysis was used in the research. The selected patients suffered from cerebellar infarction with VAH or stenosis (stenosis rate≥50%). Seventy-one patients with cerebellar infarction were enrolled. There were 34 patients in VAH group and 37 patients in vertebral artery stenosis group. The age, sex, risk factors, clinical manifestations and characteristics of vascular examination were compared. Results The age, sex, risk factors between two groups had no significant differences (P>0.05). The scores of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) between two groups had no significant difference (P>0.05). The proportion of early neurological deterioration in VAH group (41.2%, 14/34) was higher than that in vertebral artery stenosis group (18.9%, 7/37), χ2=4.21, P<0.05. There were more patients with anterior circulation artery stenosis in the VAH group (35.3%, 12/34), compared with that in artery stenosis group (13.5%, 5/37),χ2=4.62, P<0.05. Except the ipsilateral vertebral artery, other arteries stenosis in VAH group (44.1%, 15/34) was significantly higher than that in vertebral artery stenosis group (13.5%, 5/37),χ2=8.20, P<0.05. Conclusions Cerebellar infarction with vertebral artery hypoplasia is more likely to have multiple cerebral arterial stenosis (stenosis rate ≥50%). The patients who suffered from cerebellar infarction with vertebral artery hypoplasia might be prone to early neurological deterioration.%目的:总结伴有椎动脉发育不良(VAH)的小脑梗死患者的临床特征和血管病变情况。方法采用回顾性分析方法,选择伴VAH和椎动脉粥样硬化狭窄率≥50%的初发小脑梗死患者,按照椎动脉病变分为VAH组(34例)和椎动脉狭窄组(椎动脉狭窄≥50%,37例),比较两组年龄、性别构成、危险

  18. Cerebellar ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Marmolino, Daniele

    2009-08-01

    The term 'cerebellar ataxias' encompasses the various cerebellar disorders encountered during daily practice. Patients exhibit a cerebellar syndrome and can also present with pigmentary retinopathy, extrapyramidal movement disorders, pyramidal signs, cortical symptoms (seizures, cognitive impairment/behavioural symptoms), and peripheral neuropathy. The clinical diagnosis of subtypes of ataxias is complicated by the salient overlap of the phenotypes between genetic subtypes. The identification of the causative mutations of many hereditary ataxias and the development of relevant animal models bring hope for effective therapies in neurodegenerative ataxias. We describe the current classification of cerebellar ataxias and underline the recent discoveries in molecular pathogenesis. Cerebellar disorders can be divided into sporadic forms and inherited diseases. Inherited ataxias include autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias, autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias/spinocerebellar ataxia) and episodic ataxias, and X-linked ataxias. From a motor control point of view, the leading theories of ataxia are based on neural representations or 'internal models' to emulate fundamental natural processes such as body motion. Recent molecular advances have direct implications for research and daily practice. We provide a framework for the diagnosis of ataxias. For the first time, the therapeutic agents under investigation are targeted to deleterious pathways.

  19. Cerebellar Hypoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as ataxia telangiectasia. In an infant or young child, symptoms of a disorder that features cerebellar hypoplasia might include floppy muscle tone, developmental or speech delay, problems with walking ...

  20. Cerebellar and cerebral autoregulation in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Matthias; Schork, Joscha; Allignol, Arthur; Weiller, Cornelius; Kaube, Holger

    2012-04-01

    Silent ischemic brain lesions frequently occur in migraine with aura and are most often located in cerebellar border zones. This may imply an impairment of cerebellar blood flow autoregulation. This study investigated the characteristics of interictal cerebellar autoregulation in migraine with and without aura. Thirty-four patients (n=17, migraine without aura; n=17, migraine with aura) and 35 age- and sex-matched controls were studied. Triple simultaneous transcranial Doppler monitoring of one posterior inferior cerebellar artery, right posterior cerebral artery, and left middle cerebral artery was performed. Autoregulation dynamics were assessed from spontaneous blood pressure fluctuations (correlation coefficient index Dx) and from respiratory-induced 0.1-Hz blood pressure oscillations (phase and gain). Compared with controls, the autoregulatory index Dx was higher (indicating less autoregulation) in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (P=0.0062) and middle cerebral artery (P=0.0078) in migraine with aura, but not in migraine without aura. Phase and gain did not significantly differ between migraine patients and controls. No significant associations of autoregulation with clinical factors were found, including frequency of migraine attacks and orthostatic intolerance. This first-time analysis of cerebellar autoregulation in migraine did not show a specific cerebellar dysautoregulation in the interictal period. More static autoregulatory properties (index Dx) are, however, impaired in persons with migraine with aura both in the cerebellar and anterior circulation. The cerebellar predilection of ischemic lesions in migraine with aura might be a combination of altered autoregulation and additional factors, such as the end artery cerebellar angioarchitecture.

  1. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, particularly younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  2. Aneurisma da artéria cerebelar ântero-inferior: relato de caso Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Oscar Alarcón Adorno

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Os aneurismas intracranianos do sistema vértebro-basilar representam cerca de 5 a 10% de todos os aneurismas cerebrais. Os aneurismas da artéria cerebelar ântero-inferior (AICA são considerados raros, podendo causar síndrome do ângulo ponto cerebelar, com ou sem hemorragia subaracnóidea. Desde 1948, foram descritos poucos casos na literatura. Apresentamos o caso de uma paciente, de 33 anos, na qual, após investigação de quadro de hemorragia subaracnóidea, diagnosticou-se aneurisma sacular da AICA esquerda. Foi submetida a clipagem do aneurisma, com ótimo resultado pós operatório.The intracranial aneurysms of the posterior circulation have been reported between 5 and 10% of all cerebral aneurysms and the aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA are considered rare, can cause cerebello pontine angle (CPA syndrome with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Since 1948 few cases were described in the literature. We report on a 33 year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to sacular aneurysm of the left AICA. She was submitted to clipage of the aneurysm without complications.

  3. Role of Myoendothelial Gap Junctions in the Regulation of Human Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Differentiation by Laminar Shear Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongqi Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Smooth muscle cells may dedifferentiate into the synthetic phenotype and promote atherosclerosis. Here, we explored the role of myoendothelial gap junctions in phenotypic switching of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs co-cultured with human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs exposed to shear stress. Methods: HCASMCs and HCAECs were seeded on opposite sides of Transwell inserts, and HCAECs were exposed to laminar shear stress of 12 dyn/cm2 or 5 dyn/cm2. The myoendothelial gap junctions were evaluated by using a multi-photon microscope. Results: In co-culture with HCAECs, HCASMCs exhibited a contractile phenotype, and maintained the expression of differentiation markers MHC and H1-calponin. HCASMCs and HCAECs formed functional intercellular junctions, as evidenced by colocalization of connexin(Cx40 and Cx43 on cellular projections inside the Transwell membrane and biocytin transfer from HCAECs to HCASMCs. Cx40 siRNA and 18-α-GA attenuated protein expression of MHC and H1-calponin in HCASMCs. Shear stress of 5 dyn/cm2 increased Cx43 and decreased Cx40 expression in HCAECs, and partly inhibited biocytin transfer from HCAECs to HCASMCs, which could be completely blocked by Cx43 siRNA or restored by Cx40 DNA transfected into HCAECs. The exposure of HCAECs to shear stress of 5 dyn/cm2 promoted HCASMC phenotypic switching, manifested by morphological changes, decrease in MHC and H1-calponin expression, and increase in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB release, which was partly rescued by Cx43 siRNA or Cx40 DNA or PDGF receptor signaling inhibitor. Conclusions: The exposure of HCAECs to shear stress of 5 dyn/cm2 caused the dysfunction of Cx40/Cx43 heterotypic myoendothelial gap junctions, which may be replaced by homotypic Cx43/Cx43 channels, and induced HCASMC transition to the synthetic phenotype associated with the activation of PDGF receptor signaling, which may contribute to shear stress

  4. Junctional Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysms: The Schrödinger's Cat of Vascular Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Andrew P; Loveren, Harry R van; Youssef, A Samy; Agazzi, Siviero

    2015-03-01

    Objectives Despite advances in neuroimaging, it is not always definitive whether a paraclinoid aneurysm is intradural or entirely extradural. We illustrate the potential use of surgical exploration in these aneurysms that we refer to as "junctional" aneurysms. Methods Retrospective review of eight patients with unruptured aneurysms who underwent a planned surgical exploration of a junctional aneurysm. Results Of the eight patients, three underwent exploration of the aneurysm during surgery for a different aneurysm. All three of these were found to be extradural. Five patients underwent a craniotomy for the exclusive purpose of clarifying the location of the aneurysm. Two of these cases were found to be intradural and were clipped. Two cases were found to be extradural. In one patient, the initially extradural aneurysm was converted into an intradural aneurysm during removal of the anterior clinoid process, necessitating surgical clipping. One transient third nerve palsy was observed. Discussion Until further progress in neuroimaging allows clinicians to determine unequivocally the exact anatomical location of a paraclinoid aneurysm, we advocate the use of the term junctional aneurysm to reflect the clinical uncertainty inherent in management decisions made regarding these aneurysms. We have illustrated a strategy of surgical exploration in select patients.

  5. 枕动脉-小脑下后动脉吻合术治疗颅内段椎动脉梭形动脉瘤四例%Fusiform aneurysm of the vertebral artery: treatment by the trapping and occipital artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery bypass in 4 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永力; 石祥恩; 周忠清; 刘方军; 孙玉明

    2009-01-01

    @@ 对部分椎动脉瘤,尤其是累及小脑下后动脉(posteriorInferior cerebellar artery,PICA)的梭彤夹层动脉瘤,因无法火闭动脉瘤的同时,保证小脑下后动脉通畅,需要行枕动脉-PICA吻合术.因发病率低,手术困难,治疗风险大,文献报道较少[1].

  6. Detection of misery perfusion in the cerebral hemisphere with chronic unilateral major cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease using crossed cerebellar hypoperfusion: comparison of brain SPECT and PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Yoshiyasu; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Saito, Hideo; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Ogasawara, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Ogawa, Akira [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan); Iwate Medical University, Cyclotron Research Center, Morioka (Japan); Terasaki, Kazunori [Iwate Medical University, Cyclotron Research Center, Morioka (Japan); Yoshida, Kenji; Beppu, Takaaki; Kubo, Yoshitaka; Fujiwara, Shunrou [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan); Tsushima, Eiki [Hirosaki University, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hirosaki (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    In patients with unilateral internal carotid or middle cerebral artery (ICA or MCA) occlusive disease, the degree of crossed cerebellar hypoperfusion that is evident within a few months after the onset of stroke may reflect cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen in the affected cerebral hemisphere relative to that in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the ratio of blood flow asymmetry in the cerebellar hemisphere to blood flow asymmetry in the cerebral hemisphere on positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) correlates with oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) asymmetry in the cerebral hemisphere on PET in patients with chronic unilateral ICA or MCA occlusive disease and whether this blood flow ratio on SPECT detects misery perfusion in the affected cerebral hemisphere in such patients. Brain blood flow and OEF were assessed using {sup 15}O-PET and N-isopropyl-p-[{sup 123}I]iodoamphetamine ({sup 123}I-IMP) SPECT, respectively. All images were anatomically standardized using SPM2. A region of interest (ROI) was automatically placed in the bilateral MCA territories and in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres using a three-dimensional stereotaxic ROI template, and affected-to-contralateral asymmetry in the MCA territory or contralateral-to-affected asymmetry in the cerebellar hemisphere was calculated. Sixty-three patients with reduced blood flow in the affected cerebral hemisphere on {sup 123}I-IMP SPECT were enrolled in this study. A significant correlation was observed between MCA ROI asymmetry of PET OEF and the ratio of cerebellar hemisphere asymmetry of blood flow to MCA ROI asymmetry of blood flow on PET (r = 0.381, p = 0.0019) or SPECT (r = 0.459, p = 0.0001). The correlation coefficient was higher when reanalyzed in a subgroup of 43 patients undergoing a PET study within 3 months after the last ischemic event (r = 0.541, p = 0.0001 for PET; r = 0.609, p < 0

  7. Optimal measurement for "posterolateral protrusion" of the vertebral artery at the craniovertebral junction using computed tomography angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Ohya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Among extraosseous abnormalities of the vertebral artery (VA at the craniovertebral junction (CVJ, available evidence regarding "posterolateral protrusion," the VA running distant from the groove over the superior surface of the posterior arch of the atlas, is limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal measurement to indicate posterolateral protrusion of the VA. Materials and Methods: Computed tomography angiography (CTA images of 40 consecutive patients with cervical disease were reviewed. Ultimately, 66 arteries were included in this study. Five parameters predicted to indicate posterolateral protrusion of the VA were defined (A-E and measured by two surgeons twice over a 2-week interval. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC were used to examine intra-observer reproducibility and inter-observer reliability. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis was performed to determine the most optimal parameter to predict posterolateral protrusion of the VA. Results: Excellent inter-observer reliability and intra-observer reproducibility were obtained for all parameters (ICC = 0.87-0.99. Among them, parameter A, defined as the maximal length from the outer surface of the VA to the outer surface of the posterior arch of the atlas, was most accurately described posterolateral protrusion of the VA. The optimal cut-off value of parameter A obtained with ROC curves was 8.3 mm (sensitivity 97.5%, specificity 100%. Conclusions: The measurement in this study can quantitatively evaluate the posterolateral protrusion of the VA. Before posterior surgery at the CVJ, pre-operative CTA can help surgeons detect anomalous VA and reduce the risk of intra-operative VA injury.

  8. Effect of vertebral artery hypoplasia on the territory-related perfusion of posterior inferior cerebellar artery%椎动脉发育不全对小脑后下动脉供血区脑灌注的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马乾坤; 张道培; 张杰文; 张淑玲; 鹿桂凤; 尹所

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨椎动脉发育不全(vertebral artery hypoplasia,VAH )对小脑后下动脉供血区脑灌注的影响。方法选择2014-12—2015-07年龄≥30岁并行头颅磁共振灌注成像和头颈部三维对比增强磁共振血管造影检查的头晕或眩晕患者244例。获脑血流量(CBF)、脑血容量(CBV)、平均通过时间(MTT)和达峰时间(TTP)灌注图,测量一侧小脑后下动脉供血区及对侧镜像区的灌注参数值(CBF、CBV、MTT、TTP),计算椎动脉直径较小侧/对侧镜像区的灌注参数相对比值(rCBF、rCBV、rMTT、rTTP)。定义 VAH 为椎动脉直径≤2 mm,或双侧椎动脉不对称比≥1.7:1,分为 VAH 组和 non-VAH(Non-hypoplasitic vertebral artey)组,对临床资料和小脑、延髓灌参数相对比值进行比较。结果共纳入114例患者,男女各57例;VAH 组31例(27.2%),左侧5例(16%),右侧26例(84%);Non-VAH 组83例。2组间 VA 直径较小侧与对侧的 rTTP和 rCBF≤0.85的例数存在显著统计学差异(P 值分别为0.005,0.031);rCBF 倾向于有统计学差异(P =0.098);rCBV、rMTT 及 rCBV≤0.85例数无显著统计学差异。结论VAH 可以造成小脑后下动脉供血区域低灌注改变,且以 TTP 延长或 CBF 降低为主。%Objective To investigate the effect of vertebral artery hypoplasia on the territory perfusion of posterior inferi-or cerebellar artery (PICA).Methods 244 patients with vertigo or dizziness (age≥30 years old)from December 2014 to July 201 5 were selected as subjects who underwent brain perfusion-weighted imaging (pWI)and three-dimensional dynamic con-trast-enhanced MRA (3D DCE-MRA).The perfusion figures of cerebral blood flow(CBF),cerebral blood volume(CBV),mean transit time(MTT)and time to peak(TTP)were obtained.The perfusion parameters including CBF,CBV,MTT and TTP val-ues were measured at PICA areas and at the opposite mirror-imaging areas.Relative perfusion parameter values (rCBF,rCBV, rMTT and rTTP)defined as the ratio of the

  9. Morfologia da artéria cerebelar superior do macaco prego (Cebus apella L., 1766: divisões e anastomoses Morphology of the superior cerebellar artery of the “macaco prego” (Cebus paella L., 1766: divisions and anastomoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosimeire Alves da Silva

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Dando continuidade a estudos já existentes na área de mapeamento da vascularização cerebral do Cebus apella e considerando a semelhança desse animal com outros primatas descritos, inclusive os humanos, estudou-se a morfologia das artérias cerebelares superiores, que destinam a irrigar a superfície superior do cerebelo. 57 hemisférios cerebelares foram injetados com látex corado e fixados em solução de formol a 10%, dissecados sob mesoscopia de luz com microdissecações. As artérias cerebelares superiores são simétricas em 84,21% e assimétricas em 7,01%, ramificam-se em 4 ramos: sendo 1 para o mesencéfalo e 3 troncos principais para a superfície superior do cerebelo e regiões anterior dessa superfície. Estas artérias terminam na fissura póstero-superior ou pós-semilunar após emitir vários ramos colaterais de hierarquia decrescente de calibreIn order to continue studies already done in the area of mapping the cerebral vascularization of Cebus paella and taking into consideration the resemblance of this animal with other primates described, humans included, we studied the morphology of the superior cerebellar arteries determined to perfuse the superior surface of the cerebellum. Fifty-seven cerebellar hemispheres were injected with stained latex, fixed in 10% formol solution and dissected under light mesoscopy. The superior cerebellar arteries are symmetrical in 84,21% and asymmetrical in 7,01%, and give off four branches, one to the mesencephalon and three mains branches to the upper surface of the cerebellum and its anterior portion. These arteries end in the posterior superior or post-semilunar fissure, after giving off many collaterals of decreasing diameter

  10. Vertebral Artery Transposition Via an Extreme-Lateral Approach for Anterior Foramen Magnum Meningioma or Craniocervical Junction Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hun Ho; Lee, Kyu-Sung; Hong, Chang-Ki

    2016-04-01

    Vertebral artery (VA) transposition in the extreme-lateral transcondylar approach can minimize the manipulation of the low cranial nerves and the brain stem. The authors describe the surgical technique of VA transposition. From March 2000 to December 2014, 28 of 48 patients underwent VA transposition for anterior foramen magnum meningioma (16 patients) and craniocervical junction (CCJ) tumors (12 patients). Tumor was resected via an extreme-lateral approach with partial condylectomy to expose the anterior portion of the brain stem. For intradural tumors, the VA was mobilized caudomedially after circumferential dural incision around the VA at the level of the foramen magnum. For extradural tumors involving the CCJ, VA was transposed medially from the transverse foramen of C1 without any dural incision. Gross total resection was achieved in 26 of 28 patients (92.9%) with VA transposition. Histologically, meningioma and schwannoma were most common. The origin of the tumors was foramen magnum (57.1%), C1 nerve root (17.9%), clivus (10.7%), jugular foramen (7.1%), posterior skull base (3.6%), and hypoglossal canal (3.6%). VA transposition was performed intradurally in 19 patients (67.9%) and extradurally in 9 patients (32.1%). Surgical morbidity was 17.9% including 4 patients with hypoglossal nerve palsy and 1 patient with quadriparesis. The mean follow-up duration after surgery was 4.2 years (range, 0.1-14.8 years). VA transposition can provide a wide surgical window for anterior foramen magnum meningioma or tumors involving the CCJ with the least manipulation of the neuraxis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of the gap junctions in the contractile response to agonists in pulmonary artery from two rat models of pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahan Diana

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Pulmonary hypertension (PH is characterized by arterial vascular remodelling and alteration in vascular reactivity. Since gap junctions are formed with proteins named connexins (Cx and contribute to vasoreactivity, we investigated both expression and role of Cx in the pulmonary arterial vasoreactivity in two rat models of PH. Methods Intrapulmonary arteries (IPA were isolated from normoxic rats (N, rats exposed to chronic hypoxia (CH or treated with monocrotaline (MCT. RT-PCR, Western Blot and immunofluorescent labelling were used to study the Cx expression. The role of Cx in arterial reactivity was assessed by using isometric contraction and specific gap junction blockers. Contractile responses were induced by agonists already known to be involved in PH, namely serotonin, endothelin-1 and phenylephrine. Results Cx 37, 40 and 43 were expressed in all rat models and Cx43 was increased in CH rats. In IPA from N rats only, the contraction to serotonin was decreased after treatment with 37-43Gap27, a specific Cx-mimetic peptide blocker of Cx 37 and 43. The contraction to endothelin-1 was unchanged after incubation with 40Gap27 (a specific blocker of Cx 40 or 37-43Gap27 in N, CH and MCT rats. In contrast, the contraction to phenylephrine was decreased by 40Gap27 or 37-43Gap27 in CH and MCT rats. Moreover, the contractile sensitivity to high potassium solutions was increased in CH rats and this hypersensitivity was reversed following 37-43Gap27 incubation. Conclusion Altogether, Cx 37, 40 and 43 are differently expressed and involved in the vasoreactivity to various stimuli in IPA from different rat models. These data may help to understand alterations of pulmonary arterial reactivity observed in PH and to improve the development of innovative therapies according to PH aetiology.

  12. Recent Advances in Cerebellar Ischemic Stroke Syndromes Causing Vertigo and Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Yi, Hyon-Ah; Lee, Hyung

    2016-12-01

    Cerebellar ischemic stroke is one of the common causes of vascular vertigo. It usually accompanies other neurological symptoms or signs, but a small infarct in the cerebellum can present with vertigo without other localizing symptoms. Approximately 11 % of the patients with isolated cerebellar infarction simulated acute peripheral vestibulopathy, and most patients had an infarct in the territory of the medial branch of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). A head impulse test can differentiate acute isolated vertigo associated with PICA territory cerebellar infarction from more benign disorders involving the inner ear. Acute hearing loss (AHL) of a vascular cause is mostly associated with cerebellar infarction in the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), but PICA territory cerebellar infarction rarely causes AHL. To date, at least eight subgroups of AICA territory infarction have been identified according to the pattern of neurotological presentations, among which the most common pattern of audiovestibular dysfunction is the combined loss of auditory and vestibular functions. Sometimes acute isolated audiovestibular loss can be the initial symptom of impending posterior circulation ischemic stroke (particularly within the territory of the AICA). Audiovestibular loss from cerebellar infarction has a good long-term outcome than previously thought. Approximately half of patients with superior cerebellar artery territory (SCA) cerebellar infarction experienced true vertigo, suggesting that the vertigo and nystagmus in the SCA territory cerebellar infarctions are more common than previously thought. In this article, recent findings on clinical features of vertigo and hearing loss from cerebellar ischemic stroke syndrome are summarized.

  13. 小脑后下动脉远端动脉瘤破裂的血管内治疗%Endovascular treatment of ruptured distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈状; 李林; 公方和; 王伟民

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical characteristics and endovascular treatment of ruptured distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms. Methods Clinical data of 11 patients with ruptured distal PICA aneurysms were analyzed retrospectively, including grade Ⅰ in 1 patient, grade Ⅱ in 5 patients, grade Ⅲ in 4 and grade Ⅳ in 1. All the patients were treated by endovascular treatment with coiling alone. Results Embolization alone of aneurysm was achieved in 7 patients, and embolization of aneurysm and parent artery occlusion at the same time in 4. All the patients were followed up for 1 to 4 years. Recurrence occurred in 1 patient 2 years after surgery, who was retreated by endovascular treatment. The occluded parent artery of 1 patient was recanalized 1 year after surgery without recurrence of aneurysm. The other 9 aneurysms were completely embolized. The modified rankin scale score 1 year after surgery was 0 in 2 patients, 1 in 8 and 2 in 1. Conclusions The embolization of ruptured distal PICA aneurysms by coiling with or without parent arteries occlusion is feasible, relatively safe, and can effectively prevent short- and medium-term rebleeding. Regular DSA follow-up is necessary to find and treat recurrence.%目的 总结小脑后下动脉(posterior inferior cerebellar artery,PICA)远端动脉瘤破裂的临床特征及血管内治疗方法.方法 回顾性分析11例破裂PICA远端动脉瘤病人的临床资料.术前Hunt-Hess分级:Ⅰ级1例,Ⅱ级5例,Ⅲ级4例,Ⅳ级1例.全部以单纯弹簧圈行血管内治疗.结果 单纯闭塞动脉瘤7例,同时闭塞动脉瘤及载瘤动脉4例.所有病人随访1~4年,术后2年复发1例,再次行血管内治疗;术后1年载瘤动脉再通1例,但仍未见动脉瘤复发;余9例动脉瘤均栓塞完全.术后1年改良rankin评分(modified rankin scale,MRS):0分2例,1分8例,2分1例.结论 对于PICA远端动脉瘤,以单纯弹簧圈闭塞动脉瘤或者同时闭塞动脉瘤和载瘤

  14. Controlateral cavernous syndrome, brainstem congestion and posterior fossa venous thrombosis with cerebellar hematoma related to a ruptured intracavernous carotid artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Sorin; Guedin, Pierre; Roccatagliata, Luca; Boulin, Anne; Auliac, Stéphanie; Dupuy, Michel; Cerf, Charles; Gaillard, Stéphan; Rodesch, Georges

    2011-06-01

    Intracavernous carotid artery aneurysms (ICCAs) are rarely associated with life-threatening complications. We describe a 55-year-old woman who, after the rupture of an intracavernous carotid artery aneurysm, presented with a contralateral cavernous sinus syndrome and severe posterior fossa and spinal cord symptoms. Following parent artery occlusion, thrombosis of the posterior fossa and spinal cord veins caused a progressive worsening of the neurological status to a "locked-in" state. The patient fully recovered with anticoagulation therapy. Comprehension of the pathophysiological mechanism associated with the rupture of ICCA and early diagnosis of the related symptoms are essential in order to plan a correct treatment that includes the management of the aneurysm rupture and of possible complications related to venous thrombosis.

  15. Bilateral otogenic cerebellar abscesses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadkarni T

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available An unusual presentation of bilateral otogenic cerebellar abscesses observed in two of our patients is reported. Both gave a history of otorrhoea, fever, headache, vomiting and had bilateral cerebellar signs and conductive hearing loss. The abscesses were detected on computerised tomography. X-rays revealed bilateral mastoiditis. The therapy followed was excision of abscesses, mastoidectomy and antibiotic therapy.

  16. Fenestrated vertebrobasilar junction aneurysm: diagnostic and therapeutic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Erminia; Russo, Antonino; Ulm, Arthur J

    2009-03-01

    Vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) aneurysms are uncommon and are often found in association with basilar artery (BA) fenestration. The complex anatomical environment of the VBJ, and the complicated geometry of the fenestration make clipping of these aneurysms difficult. Therefore, endovascular treatment of these aneurysms is now widely accepted. The authors describe the case of a 43-year-old woman with sickle cell anemia. She presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Digital subtraction angiography was performed and depicted multiple intracranial aneurysms. The patient had a left superior hypophysial artery aneurysm, a right superior cerebellar artery-posterior cerebral artery aneurysm, and a VBJ aneurysm associated with a fenestration of the BA. The VBJ aneurysm was not identified on the initial angiogram and was only revealed after 3D rotational angiography was performed. The 3D reconstruction was critical to the understanding of the complex geometry associated with the fenestrated BA. The VBJ was reconstructed using a combination endovascular technique. The dominant limb of the fenestration was stented and balloon-assisted coiling was performed, followed by sacrifice of the nondominant vertebral artery using coils and the embolic agent Onyx. Postoperative angiography demonstrated successful occlusion of the aneurysm with reconstruction of the VBJ. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a fenestrated VBJ aneurysm treated with the combination of stenting, balloon remodeling, coiling, and vessel sacrifice. Three-dimensional angiography was critical in making the correct diagnosis of the source of the subarachnoid hemorrhage and with operative planning.

  17. A cadaveric study of the endoscopic endonasal transclival approach to the basilar artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Leon T; Morgan, Michael K; Chin, David C W; Snidvongs, Kornkiat; Huang, June X Z; Malek, Joanne; Lam, Matthew; McLachlan, Rohan; Harvey, Richard J

    2013-04-01

    The anterior transclival route to basilar artery aneurysms is not widely performed. The objective of this study was to carry out a feasibility assessment of the transclival approach to basilar aneurysms with advanced endonasal techniques on 11 cadaver heads. Clival dura was exposed from the sella to the foramen magnum between the paraclival segments of the internal carotid arteries (ICA) laterally. An inverted dural "U" flap was reflected inferiorly to expose the basilar artery. The maximal dimensions from operative measurements were recorded. Surgical manoeuvrability of multiple instruments and the proficiency to place proximal and distal vascular clips were evaluated. The mean operative depth (± standard deviation), measured from the anterior choanae to the basilar artery, was 110±6mm. The lateral corridors were limited distally by the medial pterygoids (mean width 21±2mm) and paraclival ICA (mean width 20±2mm). The mean transclival craniectomy dimensions were 19±2mm (width) and 23±4mm (height). Exposure of the basilar-anterior inferior cerebellar artery junction, superior cerebellar artery, and the basilar caput were possible in 100%, 91%, and 64% of instances, respectively. Placements of proximal and distal aneurysm clips were achieved in all instances. Based on our findings, the transclival endoscopic endonasal surgery approach provides excellent visualisation of the basilar artery. Clip application and manoeuvrability of instruments was considered adequate for basilar aneurysm surgery. Surgical skills and instrumentation to control significant haemorrhage can potentially limit the clinical applicability of this technique.

  18. Significance of MR angiography in the diagnosis of aberrant renal arteries as the cause of ureteropelvic junction obstruction in children; Stellenwert der MR-Angiografie in der Diagnostik aberrierender Nierenarterien als Ursache einer Ureterabgangsstenose bei Kindern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, L.; Sorge, I.; Hirsch, F.W.; Vieweger, A. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Radiology; Goetz, G.; Lehnert, T.; Buehligen, U.; Geyer, C. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Surgery

    2015-01-15

    To determine the importance of MRI with contrast-enhanced MRA for the detection or exclusion of aberrant or obstructing renal arteries in ureteropelvic junction obstruction in children. Key word-based search in RIS database (ureteropelvic junction obstruction/MRI) and retrospective comparison of arterial findings from preoperative contrast-enhanced MRA and intra-operative inspection. From 2007 to 2013, 19 children with ureteropelvic junction obstruction underwent contrast-enhanced MRA. Based on the results of the MRI scan and MAG3 scintigraphy, the children were referred to surgery (Anderson-Hynes-pyeloplasty). An aberrant renal artery was diagnosed with MRI in 14 of 19 children, and intra-operative inspection confirmed 13 of those 14. In the remaining 5 children, no aberrant vessel could be observed in MRI and this was confirmed intra-operatively in 3 of the 5 cases, while in the remaining 2, an aberrant vessel was found. Of the 14 children with aberrant vessels, 12 underwent surgery due to assumed ureteral obstruction, which was confirmed by surgery in 11 cases. In one case, an aberrant artery was found intra-operatively, but obstruction could not be confirmed. In one of the 14 children, the vessel was found in MRI, but its obstructing character was negated via MRA, which was confirmed intra-operatively. In the diagnosis of aberrant and obstructing renal arteries, contrast-enhanced MRA presents 85 % sensitivity and 80 % specificity, with a positive predictive value of 0.8. MRI with contrast-enhanced MRA is suitable to detect aberrant and obstructing renal arteries. An obstructive effect of the aberrant vessel is to be assumed if the vessel has a close relationship to the ureteropelvic junction and if it is linearly stretched.

  19. Iatrogenic postoperative cerebellar cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Robin; Moscovici, Samuel; Wygoda, Marc; Eliahou, Ruth; Spektor, Sergey

    2016-12-01

    Cerebellar cyst is a known but uncommon entity. It is congenital in most cases, or may develop after brain parenchyma injuries or interventions. To our knowledge, de novo cerebellar cyst after extra-axial tumor excision, has not been described in the literature. We present the first reported case of a de novo cerebellar cyst developing in a 70-year-old woman following retrosigmoid craniotomy for vestibular schwannoma excision, and discuss the possible causes. Following cyst fenestration, there was no clinical or radiological evidence of a residual cyst. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The microvasculature of the human cerebellar meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Hiroko; Akima, Michiko; Hatori, Tsutomu; Nagayama, Tadashi; Zhang, Zean; Ihara, Fumie

    2002-12-01

    The vascular architecture of the human cerebellar meninges was investigated. The surface meninges were poor in vasculature. In the sulci, the meninges were highly vascular but had few capillaries. The venous blood vessels gave long side branches at right angles to the parent vessels in a cruciform pattern, running horizontally along the cerebellar sulci. They were situated at the origin of the secondary or tertiary sulci. Anastomoses between these horizontal branches gave a crosshatched appearance. Short branches often extended to the bases of the sulci, terminating in T-shaped bifurcations with numerous tiny branches, like the roots of a tree. The arteries ran perpendicular to venous branches which were parallel to each other exclusively along the sagittal plane. These arteries bifurcated to straddle the horizontally running veins at the origin of the secondary or tertiary sulci. They gave off many small branches like teeth of a fork from each artery in the secondary or tertiary sulci after they bifurcated to straddle the venous branches and penetrated the cerebellar cortex at the bases of sulci. These fork-like ramifications in the bases of the sulci were most likely responsible for the ready development of pronounced ischemic state. They might also play an important role in the occurrence of ischemic damage at the bases of sulci in cases of severe generalized ischemia.

  1. Os odontoideum with cerebellar infarction: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, H; Itoh, T; Takei, H; Hayashi, M

    2000-05-01

    A case report. To report the case of a child with os odontoideum associated with cerebellar infarction and to discuss the correlation between atlantoaxial instability with os odontoideum and vertebrobasilar artery insufficiency. Knowledge of the influence of atlantoaxial instability on vertebrobasilar artery insufficiency remains limited despite the publication of several reports. A 5-year-old boy with ataxic gait disturbance was hospitalized in the pediatric ward. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple cerebellar infarctions, and cerebral angiogram showed occlusions of several branches of the basilar artery and a winding of the left vertebral artery. Stress lateral radiographs of the cervical spine showed atlantoaxial instability with os odontoideum. Posterior C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation with iliac bone graft was applied to obtain firm stability and fusion. There was no damage to the vertebral arteries or spinal nerves in the perioperative period. Solid union of the grafted bone and rigid stability of the atlantoaxial joint were seen on lateral flexion-extension radiographs 1 year after the operation. There has been no sign of recurrent arterial insufficiency, and the patient has been free from cerebellar dysfunction to date. Atlantoaxial instability may cause insufficiency of the vertebral artery as well as spinal cord injury. More attention should be paid to the possible relation between atlantoaxial instability and vertebrobasilar artery insufficiency.

  2. 小脑后下动脉远端动脉瘤的临床治疗%Clinical treatment of aneurysm of distal part of posterior inferior cerebellar artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王云彦; 李学恩; 李刚; 李新钢

    2011-01-01

    目的 总结小脑后下动脉( PICA)远端动脉瘤的临床特点,探讨其临床治疗方式的选择.方法 回顾性研究16例PICA远端动脉瘤的临床特点及治疗.6例行后正中入路开颅动脉瘤夹闭术;4例行枕下远外侧入路动脉瘤夹闭术;6例行血管内栓塞术.结果 术后15例恢复良好,1例死亡,1例合并交通性脑积水,行脑室-腹腔分流术.15例出院时均无神经系统阳性体征,随访患者恢复良好.结论 对于PICA远端动脉瘤的治疗,应根据患者的临床情况及动脉瘤和PICA的形态,可以选择开颅夹闭或血管内栓塞.%Objective To study the clinical features and surgical treatment of aneurysms of distal part of posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA).Methods The clinical features and treatment of sixteen cases with aneurysms of distal part of PICA within last 3 years were studied retrospectively.Six patients underwent clipping of aneurysm through the middle posterior approach,four underwent clipping through suboccipital lateral approach,and the other underwent endovascular embolization.Results The postoperative course of fifteen patients was uneventful and one patient dead from the respiratory and circulatory complications.Fifteen patients were discharged without neurological deficits and remained well in follow - up.Conclusions As for a given patient with aneurysms of distal part of PICA,whether surgical or endovascular treatment should be selected depending on the attitude of the neurosurgeon and the patient,especially the clinical condition of the patient and morphology of the artery and aneurysm.

  3. Diagnosis value of CTA on posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm(report of 2 cases)%CTA对小脑后下动脉动脉瘤的诊断价值(附2例报告)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李平

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨CTA对小脑后下动脉( PICA)动脉瘤的诊断价值。方法对2例PICA动脉瘤患者的临床资料进行回顾性分析。结果2例患者为老年,急性发病,经CT确诊蛛网膜下腔出血,发病后3 h内初次CTA检查均为阴性结果。经防止脑血管痉挛、增高血容量、保护脑细胞等治疗3~7 d后,病情好转1例,无效1例。再次行CTA检查发现PICA动脉瘤3个,其中1例患者为左侧PICA 2个动脉瘤合并脑积水,另1例患者左侧PICA有1个动脉瘤。2例患者的PICA动脉瘤均获得良好的影像信息。结论 CTA可作为PI-CA动脉瘤首选的检查方法,能提供其全面的影像资料。对首次CTA检查阴性者,经短期治疗后进行CTA复查仍为理想的选择。%Objective To explore the diagnosis value of CTA on posterior inferior cerebellar artery ( PICA ) aneurysm.Methods The clinical data of 2 patients with PICA aneurysms were analyzed retrospectively .Results Two patients were elderly,acute onset,CT confirmed subarachnoid hemorrhage ,CTA of the first time were negative within 3 h after the onset .After the treatments of preventing cerebral vasospasm , increasing blood volume , protecting brain cells and etc for 3-7 d, one case improved ,one case were invalid .Given CTA examination again then found 3 aneurysms, one case with 2 aneurysms located on the left side of the PICA , accompanying with hydrocephalus ,and the other case with 1 aneurysm located on the left side of the PICA .Two patients obtained a good image evaluation and rich information .Conclusions In view of the particularity of the PICA aneurysms , CTA can be used as the preferred method of examination , which can provide comprehensive imaging data .When CTA examination of the first time is negative , giving CTA again remains an ideal choice after short-term treatment .

  4. Cerebellar Hypoplasia and Autism

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    The size of the cerebellar hemisphere and vermal lobules was measured in ten autistic and eight normal control subjects at the Neuropsychology Research Laboratory, Children’s Hospital Research Center, and the Departments of Neurosciences and Radiology, School of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, LaJolla.

  5. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya; Yoneda, Makoto; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto's encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Miller Fisher syndrome, ataxia associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Humoral mechanisms, cell-mediated immunity, inflammation, and vascular injuries contribute to the cerebellar deficits in immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias.

  6. Cerebellar network plasticity: from genes to fast oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheron, G; Servais, L; Dan, B

    2008-04-22

    The role of the cerebellum has been increasingly recognized not only in motor control but in sensory, cognitive and emotional learning and regulation. Purkinje cells, being the sole output from the cerebellar cortex, occupy an integrative position in this network. Plasticity at this level is known to critically involve calcium signaling. In the last few years, electrophysiological study of genetically engineered mice has demonstrated the topical role of several genes encoding calcium-binding proteins (calretinin, calbindin, parvalbumin). Specific inactivation of these genes results in the emergence of a fast network oscillation (ca. 160 Hz) throughout the cerebellar cortex in alert animals, associated with ataxia. This oscillation is produced by synchronization of Purkinje cells along the parallel fiber beam. It behaves as an electrophysiological arrest rhythm, being blocked by sensorimotor stimulation. Pharmacological manipulations showed that the oscillation is blocked by GABA(A) and NMDA antagonists as well as gap junction blockers. This cerebellar network oscillation has also been documented in mouse models of human conditions with complex developmental cerebellar dysfunction, such as Angelman syndrome and fetal alcohol syndrome. Recent evidence suggests a relationship between fast oscillation and cerebellar long term depression (LTD). This may have major implications for future therapeutic targeting.

  7. Cerebellar and afferent ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfo, Massimo; Manto, Mario

    2013-10-01

    Ataxia is the predominant manifestation of many acquired and inherited neurologic disorders affecting the cerebellum, its connections, and the afferent proprioceptive pathways. This article reviews the phenomenology and etiologies of cerebellar and afferent ataxias and provides indications for a rational approach to diagnosis and management. The pathophysiology of ataxia is being progressively understood and linked to the functional organization of the cerebellum. The impact of cerebellar diseases on different neurologic functions has been better defined and shown not to be limited to loss of motor coordination. The role of autoimmunity is increasingly recognized as a cause of sporadic cases of ataxia. Large collaborative studies of long duration are providing crucial information on the clinical spectrum and natural history of both sporadic ataxias (such as the cerebellar form of multiple system atrophy) and inherited ataxias. New dominant and recessive ataxia genes have been identified. On the therapeutic front, progress mostly concerns the development of treatments for Friedreich ataxia. Ataxia is the clinical manifestation of a wide range of disorders. In addition to accurate clinical assessment, MRI plays a major role in the diagnostic workup, allowing us to distinguish degenerative conditions from those due to other types of structural damage to the cerebellar or proprioceptive systems. Diagnostic algorithms based on clinical features, imaging, and neurophysiologic and biochemical parameters can be used to guide genetic testing for hereditary ataxias, the diagnosis of which is likely to be greatly improved by the introduction of new-generation DNA-sequencing approaches. Some rare forms of ataxia can be treated, so their diagnosis should not be missed. Proven symptomatic treatments for ataxia are still lacking, but intensive physical therapy appears to be helpful.

  8. Fatal remote cerebellar hemorrhage after supratentorial unruptured aneurysm surgery in patient with previous cerebellar infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eun-Jeong; Park, Jung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) is a rare complication of supratentorial and spinal surgeries, seldom requiring intervention but occasionally causing significant morbidity or even mortality. Although a number of theories have been proposed, the exact pathophysiology of RCH remains incompletely understood. Patient concerns: We present a 62-year-old patient with RCH encountered following surgical clipping of an unruptured middle cerebral artery bifurcation aneurysm in a patient with previous cerebellar infarction. Lessons: It is extremely rare, but sometimes, RCH can be life-threatening. It is necessary to check the patient's general condition, underlying diseases and medical history. And controlled drainage of the CSF seems to be most important. Arachnoidplasty may be a consideration and the position of the drain string might have to be carefully determined. PMID:28121936

  9. Genetics Home Reference: lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH) affects brain development, resulting in the brain ...

  10. Preliminary clinical study on endovascular treatment of posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms%小脑后下动脉瘤血管内栓塞治疗的初步临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵兵; 钟鸣; 谭显西; 郑匡; 张明升; 尹剑; 何文根

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the methods and results of endovascular treatment of posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms. Methods Twenty-one patients with PICA aneurysms were treated with endovascular treatment. The locations of aneurysm on PICA were evaluated through the DSA. Eight patients received single coil embolization, 5 received liquid Glue embolization, 2 received coil embolization combined with liquid Glue, 2 received coil embolization assisted with stents, and 4 underwent ocelasion of the parent PICA. Outcome was evaluated with the Glasgow outcome scale (COS). Results There were complete (100%) occlusion in 5 patients, near complete (>90% ) occlusion in 2, and incomplete (85%) occlusion in 1 in single coil embolization. Seven patients with Glue embolization (n = 5 ) or combination with coils ( n = 2 ) exhibited complete ( 100% ) occlusion. There were near complete ( >90% ) occlusion in 2 cases with coil assisted with stents. Complete occlusion of the parent PICA was achieved in 3 patients, and near complete occlusion of PICA in one case. One patient suffered from new neurological deficits, and one patient treated with coils and stents died. None of the patients suffered from re-bleeding. These patients received follow-up during a mean period of (22±8) months. Overall long-term outcome was good ( GOS score 4 or 5 ) in 17 patients, poor ( COS score 2 or 3) in 3, and fatal ( GOS score 1 ) in one case. Conclusions According to the location of aneurysms on PICA, aneurysms can be effectively and safely treated with endovaecular embolization.%目的 探讨小脑后下动脉(PICA)瘤栓塞治疗的方法及效果.方法 回顾性分析21例PICA瘤经血管内栓塞治疗的临床资料,根据DSA资料估计动脉瘤的解削分段.采取单纯弹簧圈栓塞8例、单纯液体胶栓塞5例、弹簧圈联合液体胶栓塞2例、支架辅助弹簧圈栓塞2例、球囊辅助弹簧圈PICA闭塞4例,用格拉斯哥预后(GOS)评分评估疗效.结果

  11. 枕下远外侧入路治疗小脑后下动脉近端动脉瘤%Management of the proximal posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms via far lateral approach with linear scalp incision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施铭岗; 佟小光

    2014-01-01

    目的 通过直线切口远外侧入路来治疗小脑后下动脉(PICA)近端动脉瘤.方法 回顾性分析应用枕下直线切口行远外侧入路外科处理PICA近端动脉瘤11例临床资料,并判断其疗效.11例破裂PICA近端动脉瘤,Hunt-Hess分级为Ⅰ~Ⅱ级6例,Ⅲ级3例,Ⅳ级2例.结果 11例破裂PICA近端动脉瘤均因血管内栓塞困难改为开颅夹闭或孤立术.无一例死亡,3例术后出现吞咽困难,出院时症状好转,2例手术直接夹闭困难,行枕动脉(OA)和PICA吻合,动脉瘤孤立术,其余8例无手术并发症.结论 未能行血管内栓塞治疗的PICA近端动脉瘤,可通过直线远外侧入路动脉瘤直接夹闭或行动脉搭桥动脉瘤孤立术,特别是夹层动脉瘤,直线切口远外侧入路治疗PICA动脉瘤,能充分暴露病变并取得较好的临床效果.%Objective To study the efficacyof surgical management of the proximal posterior inferior cerebellar artery(PICA) aneurysms by far lateral approach with linear scalp incision.Methods To manage the proximal PICA aneurysms by the far lateral approach and analyze its clinical outcome.According to Hunt-Hess Grade Score,of all 11 cases with the proximal PICA ruptured aneurysms,6 cases were of Ⅰ-Ⅱ grade,3 cases of Ⅲ and 2 cases of Ⅳ.Results All of 11 cases with the proximal PICA ruptured aneurysms were excluded for endovascular management because of their size,location and morphology,and then underwent craniotomy to clip or trap through OA-PICA bypass via far lateral approach with linear scalp incision.Postoperatively,therewasno mortality,3 cases had swallowing difficulty and improved by the time of discharge,2 cases underwent OA-PICA bypass after failure of direct clipping,the rest (8 cases) had no surgical complications.Condusions The proximal PICA aneurysms can be managed by directly clipping or bypass to trap the aneurysm via the far lateral approach with linear scalp incision,the bypass operation is the more suitable to the

  12. 三维动脉自旋标记脑血流灌注加权成像在交叉性小脑神经机能联系不能的应用价值%Application of three-dimensional arterial spin labeling cerebral blood flow perfusion imaging in crossed cerebellar diaschisis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄泽春; 汪文胜; 成丽娜; 谢甜甜; 李松涛; 欧阳兵; 颜刘清; 陈楷哲

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of three-dimensional arterial spin labeling perfusion weighted imaging (3D ASL) in the diagnosis of crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) role by observing the whole brain perfusion of cerebral blood flow,. and to investigate the relationship between the primary brain lesions with CCD. Methods Tha data of 58 cases with supratentorial lesions associated with unilateral middle cerebral artery blood supply combined with contralateral cerebellar hemisphere hypoperfusion were collected..The cerebral blood flow of bilateral cerebellar hemisphere cerebellar was measured using 3D ASL and the asymmetry index (AI) was calculated. CCD was diagnosed if the AI was greater than 10%..The correlations between supratentorial lesion and CCD was analyzed..Results In 58 cases with unilateral supratentorial lesions supplied by middle cerebral artery resulted in contralateral hypoperfusion in infratentorial cerebellar hemisphere, especially in the lower part of cerebellar hemisphere. 55 of the unilateral supratentorial lesions were cerebral infarction, 3 were brain injury. All the supratentorial lesions involved the white matter along the cortex-pons-cerebellar tract..The lower CBF valued in the supratentorial brain tissue and the lower CBF valued in the contralateral cerebellar hemisphere,.which showed a positive correlation..There was no correlation between the occurrence of CCD and the size of low perfusion in supratentorial brain tissue..ASL was done twice in 4 patients and 3 times in 2 patients,.and there was no obvious changes of the CBF in the cerebellum CCD lesion hemisphere..CCD occurred during 1 day and 1 years 2 months after the disease..The occurrence of CCD was related to the location of supratentorial cerebral lesions and not related to the time of onset and duration..Conclusion As a new perfusion method,.3D ASL,.is capable of noninvasive evaluating the occurrence of CCD,.which has a good diagnostic value and can quantitatively assess the degree

  13. Microsurgical anatomy related to craniocervical junction segment of the vertebral artery in far lateral approach%寰枢段椎动脉在远外侧入路中的应用显微解剖研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾旺; 毕智勇; 鲁润春; 于春江

    2013-01-01

    Objective Microsurgical anatomy of craniocervical junction (CCJ) segment of the vertebral artery (VA) were studied to provide an applied anatomic basis for the far lateral approach.Methods Simulated operation of far lateral approach was performed on 10 cadaveric heads specimens and 10 dry skulls for measurment of the osseous relationships in the region.Results Craniocervical junction segment of the vertebral artery has five curvatures in most of the specimens,and compensatory vascular expansion in the curvatures was found.The average diameter is (4.3 ± 0.5) mm with changeful direction.The average half length of posterior arch of atlas is (19.3 ±4.7) mm,also the safe extent for exposing vertebral artery.Conclusions The key points to successfully preserve vertebral artery in far lateral approach are familiarity with the microanatomical relationship of craniocervical junction segment of the vertebral artery,especially the five curvatures.%目的 为颅颈交界区手术入路提供解剖学参数,帮助神经外科医生安全、准确地暴露手术靶区.方法 应用10%甲醛固定的汉族成人尸头标本10例20侧;漂白干颅骨及寰枢椎10例20侧.模拟手术入路逐层解剖,并对解剖结构进行精确测量和拍照.结果 寰枢段椎动脉在颅颈交界区形成比较恒定的五个生理弯曲,平均直径(4.3±0.5) mm,角度多变.寰椎后弓外侧半距(19.3±4.7)mm.结论 熟悉寰枢段椎动脉五个生理弯曲的定位方法,有助于提高颅颈交界区手术入路的安全性.

  14. 载瘤动脉闭塞治疗小脑后下动脉以远椎动脉瘤二例报告并文献复习%Treatment of vertebral aueurysms distal to the origin of posterior inferior cerebellar artery by occluding the parent artery: a report of 2 cases and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘智良; 秦家振; 魏群; 徐如祥; 戴宜武; 邓其峻; 王国福; 罗永春; 卢洪流; 杨志军; 李运军

    2011-01-01

    目的探讨载瘤动脉闭塞治疗小脑后下动脉(PICA)以远椎动脉瘤的方法和效果。方法中山大学附属佛山第一人民医院神经外科自2006年1月至2007年1月对2例PICA以远椎动脉瘤破裂患者行介入载瘤动脉电解可脱弹簧圈(GDC)闭塞治疗,分析患者的临床特征、影像学特点和栓塞疗效。 结果2例患者术后PICA以远载瘤动脉合并动脉瘤均成功获得完全闭塞,无术后并发症发生。术后3个月造影复查证实动脉瘤体无充盈,同时PICA通畅,4年内无再出血发生。 结论对于开颅手术夹必困难的PICA以远椎动脉瘤,在PICA远端处闭塞一侧载瘤椎动脉是一种安全、有效的治疗方法。%Objective To summarize the clinical characteristics, therapeutic strategy and outcome of the vertebral aneurysms distal to the origin of posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA).Methods Two patients with vertebral posterior aneurysms distal to the origin of PICA, admitted to our hospital from January 2006 to January 2007 and received endovascular treatment of Gugliemi detachable coils (GDC), were submitted to a retrospective analysis of clinical features, radiological characteristics and therapeutic effects. Results Total occlusion was achieved in these 2 patients and no immediate complication occurred after the treatment. They were followed up for 3 months to 4 years; the postoperative digital subtraction angiography (DSA) revealed that the PICA was unobstructed and no rehaemorrhagia was noted. Conclusion Endovascular therapy with microcoil placement may be a safe and available alternative for the treatment of some complicated aneurysms of vertebral artery aneurysms distal to the origin of PICA, which is difficult to be clipped.

  15. Neurotransplantation therapy and cerebellar reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendelin, Jan; Mitoma, Hiroshi; Manto, Mario

    2017-08-10

    Neurotransplantation has been recently the focus of interest as a promising therapy to substitute lost cerebellar neurons and improve cerebellar ataxias. However, since cell differentiation and synaptic formation are required to obtain a functional circuitry, highly integrated reproduction of cerebellar anatomy is not a simple process. Rather than a genuine replacement, recent studies have shown that grafted cells rescue surviving cells from neurodegeneration by exerting trophic effects, supporting mitochondrial function, modulating neuroinflammation, stimulating endogenous regenerative processes, and facilitating cerebellar compensatory properties thanks to neural plasticity. On the other hand, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that the self-recovery capacity is still preserved even if the cerebellum is affected by a diffuse and progressive pathology. We put forward the period with intact recovery capacity as "restorable stage" and the notion of reversal capacity as "cerebellar reserve". The concept of cerebellar reserve is particularly relevant, both theoretically and practically, to target recovery of cerebellar deficits by neurotransplantation. Reinforcing the cerebellar reserve and prolonging the restorable stage can be envisioned as future endpoints of neurotransplantation. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Falls in degenerative cerebellar ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Steijns, Janneke A G; Munneke, Marten; Kremer, Berry P H; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2005-01-01

    We retrospectively and prospectively assessed the frequency and characteristics of falls in patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxias. The results show that falls occur very frequently in patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxias and that these falls are serious and often lead to injuries or

  17. Childhood Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Brent L.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood presentations of ataxia, an impairment of balance and coordination caused by damage to or dysfunction of the cerebellum, can often be challenging to diagnose. Presentations tend to be clinically heterogeneous but key considerations may vary based on the child's age at onset, the course of illness, and subtle differences in phenotype. Systematic investigation is recommended for efficient diagnosis. In this review, we outline common etiologies and describe a comprehensive approach to the evaluation of both acquired and genetic cerebellar ataxia in children. PMID:22764177

  18. A case of cerebellar psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Amy; Goldman, Mona; Cameron, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Pathology of the cerebellum has traditionally been associated with motor symptoms, vertigo, and nystagmus. Patients with cerebellar disorders do not usually receive psychiatric evaluations. The authors seek to alert clinicians to the association between cerebellar disease and psychiatric symptoms. The authors describe a patient with uncommon psychiatric morbidity associated with cerebellar dysfunction, and provide a brief review of previous research on this phenomenon. Neurology consultants suggested that physical exam findings and behavioral changes could be accounted for by cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. This syndrome involves dysfunction of the cerebellum, including classic cerebellar findings, in addition to cognitive difficulties and affective/personality changes. The suspected etiology was post-infectious cerebellitis from Epstein-Barr virus infection.

  19. Toxic agents causing cerebellar ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum is particularly vulnerable to intoxication and poisoning, especially so the cerebellar cortex and Purkinje neurons. In humans, the most common cause of a toxic lesion to the cerebellar circuitry is alcohol related, but the cerebellum is also a main target of drug exposure (such as anticonvulsants, antineoplastics, lithium salts, calcineurin inhibitors), drug abuse and addiction (such as cocaine, heroin, phencyclidine), and environmental toxins (such as mercury, lead, manganese, toluene/benzene derivatives). Although data for the prevalence and incidence of cerebellar lesions related to intoxication and poisoning are still unknown in many cases, clinicians should keep in mind the list of agents that may cause cerebellar deficits, since toxin-induced cerebellar ataxias are not rare in daily practice. Moreover, the patient's status may require immediate therapies when the intoxication is life-threatening. 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Sleep disorders in cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Pedroso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias comprise a wide range of etiologies leading to central nervous system-related motor and non-motor symptoms. Recently, a large body of evidence has demonstrated a high frequency of non-motor manifestations in cerebellar ataxias, specially in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA. Among these non-motor dysfunctions, sleep disorders have been recognized, although still under or even misdiagnosed. In this review, we highlight the main sleep disorders related to cerebellar ataxias focusing on REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, restless legs syndrome (RLS, periodic limb movement in sleep (PLMS, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, insomnia and sleep apnea.

  1. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevik, Belma [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)], E-mail: belmac@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  2. Cerebellar Malformations and Cognitive Disdorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The behavioral developmental profile of 27 children and adults (17 males and 10 females with congenital cerebellar malformations was determined in a clinical, neuroradiological and neuropsychological study at the Scientific Institute 'E Medea', University of Milano, Italy.

  3. Endoscopic Transoral Approach to Vertebral Artery at Anterior Craniocervical Junction: An Anatomic Study%内镜下经口入路颅颈交界区前方椎动脉的解剖学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈革; 张秋航; 李茗初; 魏宇魁; 凌锋

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the anatomic relationship of vertebral artery at anterior craniocervical junction with its surrounding structures in order to provide anatomic support about how to prevent damage to vertebral artery when endoscope was employed to treat those lesions at craniocervical junction. Methods : Four adult cadaveric heads were selected for study. The anatomic structures at craniocervical junction from posterior wall of pharynx were carefully dissected layer by layer under microscope and endoscope. The distribution route of the vertebrate artery was observed and studied. The anatomy of bone structure at craniocervical junction and vertehral artery were reconstructed at CT platform based on the images acquired via CTA examination at craniocervical junction of 31 adults. The distance of vertebral artery to the midline at each segment was measured at CT axial - image. The measurement was further analyzed. Results : The bony landmarks involved during endoscopic transoral approach were closely related to the verification of vertebral artery. Vertehral artery ( VA ) mutation occurred most frequently at axis segment and part of VA could hide in the lateral mass of axis. A new concept called Lateral Triangle of Axis ( LTA ) was put forward in this study. The three points forming the Lateral Triangle of Axis were the constant bony landmarks. Based on the observation of the relationship between vertebral artery and Axis Triangle via the CTA reconstruction of 31 cases, 41 of 62 sides ( 66% ) of VA was located within this LTA, 21 ( 34% ) outside. Those VA into the LTA were all concentrated in the outer corner of the LTA. Among those not into the LTA, 14 went into the lateral mass of axis. The total amount of VA that went into the lateral mass of axis was 55 ( 89% ). Conclusions : During endoscopic transoral approach to the lesion involved axis, avoiding injury of the vertebral artery inside the lateral mass of axis should be focused on.The actual anatomy of VA

  4. Complex partial seizures: cerebellar metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodore, W.H.; Fishbein, D.; Deitz, M.; Baldwin, P.

    1987-07-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) with (/sup 18/F)2-deoxyglucose to study cerebellar glucose metabolism (LCMRglu) and the effect of phenytoin (PHT) in 42 patients with complex partial seizures (CPS), and 12 normal controls. Mean +/- SD patient LCMRglu was 6.9 +/- 1.8 mg glucose/100 g/min (left = right), significantly lower than control values of 8.5 +/- 1.8 (left, p less than 0.006), and 8.3 +/- 1.6 (right, p less than 0.02). Only four patients had cerebellar atrophy on CT/MRI; cerebellar LCMRglu in these was 5.5 +/- 1.5 (p = 0.054 vs. total patient sample). Patients with unilateral temporal hypometabolism or EEG foci did not have lateralized cerebellar hypometabolism. Patients receiving phenytoin (PHT) at the time of scan and patients with less than 5 years total PHT exposure had lower LCMRglu, but the differences were not significant. There were weak inverse correlations between PHT level and cerebellar LCMRglu in patients receiving PHT (r = -0.36; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1), as well as between length of illness and LCMRglu (r = -0.22; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1). Patients with complex partial seizures have cerebellar hypometabolism that is bilateral and due only in part to the effect of PHT.

  5. Gap Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  6. Gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1853-1872, 2012.

  7. Atypical cerebral and cerebellar language organisation: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dun, Kim; De Witte, Elke; Van Daele, Wendy; Van Hecke, Wim; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In the majority of right-handed subjects, language processing is subserved by a close interplay between the left cerebral hemisphere and right cerebellum. Within this network, the dominant fronto-insular region and the contralateral posterior cerebellum are crucially implicated in oral language production. We report atypical anatomoclinical findings in a right-handed patient with an extensive right cerebellar infarction and an older left fronto-insular stroke. Standardised neurolinguistic and neurocognitive test batteries were performed. In addition, fMRI, DTI, and SPECT results are reported. In this patient, disruption of the cerebellocerebral language network due to vascular damage in the left fronto-insular region and right posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory did not induce any speech or language deficits. By contrast, executive and behavioural disturbances were found after the right cerebellar stroke. Evidence from fMRI and DTI suggests atypical bilateral language representation (Laterality Index = +0,11). At the cerebellar level, fMRI showed more activated voxels in the left than in the right hemisphere (Laterality Index = +0,66). We hypothesise congenital bilateral language representation in this patient which might be more advantageous than a typically lateralised distribution of linguistic functions to compensate acute damage to critical language regions. The more activated left cerebellum possibly compensated the functional loss in the right cerebellum after acute damage due to bilateral organisation of language function. However, more research is needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  8. [Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome secondary to a cerebellar tumour].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Carreras-Sáez, I; García-Peñas, J J; Fournier-Del Castillo, C; Villalobos-Reales, J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is characterized by disturbances of executive function, impaired spatial cognition, linguistic difficulties, and personality change. The case of an 11 year old boy is presented, with behavior problems, learning difficulties and social interaction problems. In the physical examination he had poor visual contact, immature behavior, reduced expressive language and global motor disability with gait dyspraxia, with no defined cerebellar motor signs. In the neuropsychological evaluation he has a full scale overall intellectual quotient of 84, with signs of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. A tumour affecting inferior cerebellar vermis was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging, which had not significantly grown during 5 years of follow up. The cerebellum participates in controlling cognitive and affective functions. Cerebellar pathology must be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cognitive or learning disorder with associated behavioral and emotional components. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Cognition and Emotion in Cerebellar Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cerebral cortical “association” areas important for thought, reasoning, motivation, memory and feelings. Damage to the non-motor ... tolerance. Psychosocial interaction may be impaired, particularly in children with cerebellar damage. Dementia is uncommon in cerebellar ...

  10. The Usefulness of the TOAST Classification and Prognostic Significance of Pyramidal Symptoms During the Acute Phase of Cerebellar Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziadkowiak, Edyta; Chojdak-Łukasiewicz, Justyna; Guziński, Maciej; Noga, Leszek; Paradowski, Bogusław

    2016-04-01

    Cerebellar stroke is a rare condition with very nonspecific clinical features. The symptoms in the acute phase could imitate acute peripheral vestibular disorders or a brainstem lesion. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification in cerebellar stroke and the impact of clinical features on the prognosis. We retrospectively analyzed 107 patients with diagnosed ischemic cerebellar infarction. We studied the clinical features and compared them based on the location of the ischemic lesion and its distribution in the posterior interior cerebellar artery (PICA), superior cerebellar artery (SCA), and anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territories. According to the TOAST classification, stroke was more prevalent in atrial fibrillation (26/107) and when the lesion was in the PICA territory (39/107). Pyramidal signs occurred in 29/107 of patients and were more prevalent when the lesion was distributed in more than two vascular regions (p = 0.00640). Mortality was higher among patients with ischemic lesion caused by cardiac sources (p = 0.00094) and with pyramidal signs (p = 0.00640). The TOAST classification is less useful in assessing supratentorial ischemic infarcts. Cardioembolic etiology, location of the ischemic lesion, and pyramidal signs support a negative prognosis.

  11. Language Impairment in Cerebellar Ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, Judith; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Oostveen, Judith; Knuijt, Simone; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Kremer, Berry (H. ) P. H.

    Background: Several studies have suggested that language impairment can be observed in patients with cerebellar pathology. The aim of this study was to investigate language performance in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Methods: We assessed speech and language in 29 SCA6 patients

  12. Cerebellar Zones: A Personal History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Voogd (Jan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCerebellar zones were there, of course, before anyone noticed them. Their history is that of young people, unhindered by preconceived ideas, who followed up their observations with available or new techniques. In the 1960s of the last century, the circumstances were fortunate because thr

  13. Language Impairment in Cerebellar Ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, Judith; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Oostveen, Judith; Knuijt, Simone; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Kremer, Berry (H. ) P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several studies have suggested that language impairment can be observed in patients with cerebellar pathology. The aim of this study was to investigate language performance in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Methods: We assessed speech and language in 29 SCA6 patients

  14. Cerebellar arteriovenous malformations in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, P.D. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Acad. Dept. of Radiol.; Blaser, S.; Armstrong, D.; Chuang, S.; Harwood-Nash, D. [Division of Neuroradiology, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Humphreys, R.P. [Division of Neurosurgery, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    1998-05-01

    We review the presentation, imaging findings and outcome in 18 children with cerebellar arteriovenous malformations (AVM). This group is of particular interest because of the reported poor outcome despite modern imaging and neurosurgical techniques. All children had CT and 15 underwent catheter angiography at presentation. Several of the children in the latter part of the study had MRI. Of the 18 children, 17 presented with a ruptured AVM producing intracranial haemorrhage. The remaining child presented with temporal lobe epilepsy and was shown to have temporal, vermian and cerebellar hemisphere AVM. This child had other stigmata of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. Three other children had pre-existing abnormalities of possible relevance. One had a vascular malformation of the cheek and mandible, one a documented chromosomal abnormality and another a midline cleft upper lip and palate. Six of the 17 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM died within 7 days of the ictus. Vascular pathology other than an AVM was found in 10 of the 14 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM who had angiography: 4 intranidal aneurysms, 5 venous aneurysms and 2 cases of venous outflow obstruction (one child having both an aneurysm and obstruction). The severity of clinical presentation was directly related to the size of the acute haematoma, which was a reasonable predictor of outcome. (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 tabs., 23 refs.

  15. Elongation and dilatation of the basilar artery in CT imaging; Wydluzenie i poszerzenie tetnicy podstawowej w obrazie KT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasek, W.; Burzynska-Makuch, M.; Pilecki, S.; Grzegorzewski, M.; Boron, Z. [Akademia Medyczna, Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    During two years 5 rare cases of elongation and dilatation of basilar artery were recognized in CT examination. In patients with cranial nerve deficits, cerebellar, brainstem and ponto-cerebellar angle signs artery megadolichobasilaris should be taken into account. CT examination is the sufficient method to see the diagnosis. (author). 15 refs, 3 tabs, 4 figs.

  16. Loss of connexin36 in rat hippocampus and cerebellar cortex in persistent Borna disease virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster-Patzlaff, Christiane; Hosseini, Seyed Mehdi; Reuss, Bernhard

    2009-03-01

    Neonatal Borna disease virus (BDV) infection of the Lewis rat leads to progressive degeneration of dentate gyrus granule cells, and cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Our aim here was to clarify whether BDV interfered with the formation of electrical synapses, and we, therefore, analysed expression of the neuronal gap junction protein connexin36 (Cx36) in the Lewis rat hippocampal formation, and cerebellar cortex, 4 and 8 weeks after neonatal infection. Semiquantitative RT-PCR, revealed a BDV-dependent decrease in Cx36 mRNA in the hippocampal formation 4 and 8 weeks post-infection (p.i.), and in the cerebellar cortex 8 weeks p.i. Correspondingly, immunofluorescent staining revealed reduced Cx36 immunoreactivity in both dentate gyrus, and ammons horn CA3 region, 4 and 8 weeks post-infection. In the cerebellar cortex, Cx36 immunoreactivity was detected only 8 weeks post-infection in the molecular layer, where it was down regulated by BDV. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, distinct BDV-dependent reductions in Cx36 mRNA and protein in the rat hippocampal formation and cerebellar cortex, suggesting altered neuronal network properties to be an important feature of persistent viral brain infections.

  17. Cerebellar ataxia and functional genomics : Identifying the routes to cerebellar neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C J L M; Verbeek, D S

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by atrophy of the cerebellum leading to motor dysfunction, balance problems, and limb and gait ataxia. These include among others, the dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias, recessive cerebellar ataxias such as

  18. Cerebellar ataxia and functional genomics : Identifying the routes to cerebellar neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C J L M; Verbeek, D S

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by atrophy of the cerebellum leading to motor dysfunction, balance problems, and limb and gait ataxia. These include among others, the dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias, recessive cerebellar ataxias such as Fried

  19. Nonsurgical cerebellar mutism (anarthria) in two children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewasingh, Leena D; Kadhim, Hazim; Christophe, Catherine; Christiaens, Florence J; Dan, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism (anarthria) is a well-described complication of posterior fossa tumor resection. It is accompanied by a characteristic behavior including irritability and autistic features. This syndrome is typically reversible within days to months. Underlying pathophysiology is unknown. We describe two children who presented with a similar clinical finding after nonsurgical cerebellar involvement, hemolytic-uremic syndrome in one and cerebellitis in the other. Postmortem pathologic findings in the first patient indicated cerebellar ischemic necrosis. Single-photon emission computed tomography in the second patient revealed diffuse cerebellar hypoperfusion with no supratentorial abnormalities, refuting a phenomenon of diaschisis between cerebellar and frontal connections. These findings confirm that this clinical syndrome may occur in a nonsurgical, nontraumatic context. They are consistent with recent integrative hypotheses explaining cerebellar anarthria.

  20. Postnatal Migration of Cerebellar Interneurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galas, Ludovic; Bénard, Magalie; Lebon, Alexis; Komuro, Yutaro; Schapman, Damien; Vaudry, Hubert; Vaudry, David; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Due to its continuing development after birth, the cerebellum represents a unique model for studying the postnatal orchestration of interneuron migration. The combination of fluorescent labeling and ex/in vivo imaging revealed a cellular highway network within cerebellar cortical layers (the external granular layer, the molecular layer, the Purkinje cell layer, and the internal granular layer). During the first two postnatal weeks, saltatory movements, transient stop phases, cell-cell interaction/contact, and degradation of the extracellular matrix mark out the route of cerebellar interneurons, notably granule cells and basket/stellate cells, to their final location. In addition, cortical-layer specific regulatory factors such as neuropeptides (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), somatostatin) or proteins (tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1)) have been shown to inhibit or stimulate the migratory process of interneurons. These factors show further complexity because somatostatin, PACAP, or tPA have opposite or no effect on interneuron migration depending on which layer or cell type they act upon. External factors originating from environmental conditions (light stimuli, pollutants), nutrients or drug of abuse (alcohol) also alter normal cell migration, leading to cerebellar disorders. PMID:28587295

  1. Crossed cerebral - cerebellar diaschisis : MRI evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty A

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available MRI, done later in life, in two patients with infantile hemiplegia syndrome showed significant volume loss in the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the side of the affected cerebrum. The cerebellar volume loss seemed to correlate with the degree of volume loss in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. These observations provide morphological evidence of the phenomenon of crossed cerebral-cerebellar diaschisis (CCD. Functional neuroimaging studies in support of the concept of CCD has been critically reviewed.

  2. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias : the current state of affairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, S.; van de Warrenburg, B. P. C.; Willemsen, M. A. A. P.; Cluitmans, M.; Scheffer, H.; Kremer, B. P.; Knoers, N. V. A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Among the hereditary ataxias, autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCAs) encompass a diverse group of rare neurodegenerative disorders in which a cerebellar syndrome is the key clinical feature. The clinical overlap between the different cerebellar ataxias, the occasional atypical phenotypes, an

  3. Genetics Home Reference: VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description VLDLR -associated cerebellar hypoplasia is an inherited condition that affects the development ...

  4. Crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion in brain perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinnouchi, Seishi; Nagamachi, Shigeki; Nishii, Ryuuichi; Futami, Shigemi; Tamura, Shozo [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan); Kawai, Keiichi

    2000-10-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis is a well-known brain SPECT finding in stroke patients. Few reports, however, have described supratentorial and contralateral cerebellar hyperperfusion (crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion, CCH). We assessed the incidence of CCH in 33 patients with cerebral hyperperfusion. Brain SPECT showed CCH in five patients out of 20 epilepsy and three of 13 patients with acute encephalitis. These eight patients with CCH had recent epileptic attack. CCH was found in ECD SPECT as well as HM-PAO. The contralateral cerebellar activity correlated with the cerebral activity in patients with CCH. CCH would have a relation with supratentrial hyperfunction in epilepsy and acute encephalitis. (author)

  5. [Peripheral neuropathies associated with hereditary cerebellar ataxias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anheim, M; Tranchant, C

    2011-01-01

    Inherited cerebellar ataxias constitute a complicated and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders affecting the cerebellum and/or spinocerebellar tract, spinal cord and peripheral nerves. A peripheral neuropathy is frequently seen in inherited cerebellar ataxias although it rarely reveals the disease. Moreover, the peripheral neuropathy is helpful for the diagnostic procedure and contributes to the functional prognosis of the disease. Thus, electroneuromyography is essential in the algorithm for the diagnosis of inherited cerebellar ataxias, as well as brain MRI (looking especially for cerebellar atrophy) and the assessment of several biomarkers (alpha-foetoprotein, vitamin E, albumin, LDL cholesterol, lactic acid, phytanic acid).

  6. The cerebellum, cerebellar disorders, and cerebellar research--two centuries of discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Research on the cerebellum is evolving rapidly. The exquisiteness of the cerebellar circuitry with a unique geometric arrangement has fascinated researchers from numerous disciplines. The painstaking works of pioneers of these last two centuries, such as Rolando, Flourens, Luciani, Babinski, Holmes, Cajal, Larsell, or Eccles, still exert a strong influence in the way we approach cerebellar functions. Advances in genetic studies, detailed molecular and cellular analyses, profusion of brain imaging techniques, emergence of behavioral assessments, and reshaping of models of cerebellar function are generating an immense amount of knowledge. Simultaneously, a better definition of cerebellar disorders encountered in the clinic is emerging. The essentials of a trans-disciplinary blending are expanding. The analysis of the literature published these last two decades indicates that the gaps between domains of research are vanishing. The launch of the society for research on the cerebellum (SRC) illustrates how cerebellar research is burgeoning. This special issue gathers the contributions of the inaugural conference of the SRC dedicated to the mechanisms of cerebellar function. Contributions were brought together around five themes: (1) cerebellar development, death, and regeneration; (2) cerebellar circuitry: processing and function; (3) mechanisms of cerebellar plasticity and learning; (4) cerebellar function: timing, prediction, and/or coordination?; (5) anatomical and disease perspectives on cerebellar function.

  7. The clinical presentation of preterm cerebellar haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Ecury-Goossen (Ginette); J. Dudink (Jeroen); M. Leguin (Maarten); M. Feijen-Roon (Monique); S. Horsch (Sandra); P. Govaert (Paul)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of this study was to evaluate clinical symptoms and findings on cranial ultrasound (CUS) in preterm infants with cerebellar haemorrhage through retrospective analysis of all preterm infants with a postnatal CUS or MRI diagnosis of cerebellar haemorrhage admitted in a tertia

  8. Consensus Paper: Management of Degenerative Cerebellar Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, W.; Bastian, A. J.; Boesch, S.; Burciu, R. G.; Celnik, P.; Claaßen, J.; Feil, K.; Kalla, R.; Miyai, I.; Nachbauer, W.; Schöls, L.; Strupp, M.; Synofzik, M.; Teufel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of motor symptoms of degenerative cerebellar ataxia remains difficult. Yet there are recent developments that are likely to lead to significant improvements in the future. Most desirable would be a causative treatment of the underlying cerebellar disease. This is currently available only for a very small subset of cerebellar ataxias with known metabolic dysfunction. However, increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of hereditary ataxia should lead to an increasing number of medically sensible drug trials. In this paper, data from recent drug trials in patients with recessive and dominant cerebellar ataxias will be summarized. There is consensus that up to date, no medication has been proven effective. Aminopyridines and acetazolamide are the only exception, which are beneficial in patients with episodic ataxia type 2. Aminopyridines are also effective in a subset of patients presenting with downbeat nystagmus. As such, all authors agreed that the mainstays of treatment of degenerative cerebellar ataxia are currently physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. For many years, well-controlled rehabilitation studies in patients with cerebellar ataxia were lacking. Data of recently published studies show that coordinative training improves motor function in both adult and juvenile patients with cerebellar degeneration. Given the well-known contribution of the cerebellum to motor learning, possible mechanisms underlying improvement will be outlined. There is consensus that evidence-based guidelines for the physiotherapy of degenerative cerebellar ataxia need to be developed. Future developments in physiotherapeutical interventions will be discussed including application of non-invasive brain stimulation. PMID:24222635

  9. Association of Chiari I malformation and cerebellar ectopia with sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haktanir, Alpay; Yücedağ, Fatih; Kaçar, Emre; Ulu, Sahin; Gültekin, Mehmet Ali; Ünlü, Ebru; Bucak, Abdülkadir; Ayçiçek, Abdullah

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to examine the prevalence of cerebellar tonsil ectopia and Chiari 1 malformation in sensorineural hearing loss (SHL) that has, to the best of our knowledge, not been studied previously. Magnetic resonance imaging records of 166 subjects with SHL and 50 controls without known otologic disturbances were included in the study. A tonsils descent more than 2 mm was assumed as cerebellar ectopia, and a descent equal to or more than 5 mm was assumed as Chiari 1 malformation. A tonsil descent group was also formed by summation of both groups. Transverse diameters of bilateral intracranial vertebral arteries and transverse sinuses were also measured, and all parameters were analyzed using appropriate statistics. A significant difference of frequencies of Chiari 1, ectopia, and tonsil descent was detected between patients and controls. In comparison of cerebellar ectopia and Chiari 1 groups, SHL did not show any significant difference. The left lateral sinus diameter showed positive correlation with tonsil descent. There was no significant correlation for the diameters of other vessels. A powerful correlation was detected between SHL and age. In addition, right and vertebral artery diameters showed positive correlations with age. Chiari 1 malformation and cerebellar ectopia showed an association with SHL. These patients should also be evaluated for otologic disturbances. Further high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging studies to explain the exact cause of this currently unknown association seems required.

  10. Altered cerebellar feedback projections in Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Marco; Jones, Derek K; Daly, Eileen; Embiricos, Nitzia; Deeley, Quinton; Pugliese, Luca; Curran, Sarah; Robertson, Dene; Murphy, Declan G M

    2008-07-15

    It has been proposed that the biological basis of autism spectrum disorder includes cerebellar 'disconnection'. However, direct in vivo evidence in support of this is lacking. Here, the microstructural integrity of cerebellar white matter in adults with Asperger syndrome was studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance tractography. Fifteen adults with Asperger syndrome and 16 age-IQ-gender-matched healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. For each subject, tract-specific measurements of mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were made within the inferior, middle, superior cerebellar peduncles and short intracerebellar fibres. No group differences were observed in mean diffusivity. However, people with Asperger syndrome had significantly lower fractional anisotropy in the short intracerebellar fibres (pAsperger syndrome. The localised abnormalities in the main cerebellar outflow pathway may prevent the cerebral cortex from receiving those cerebellar feedback inputs necessary for a successful adaptive social behaviour.

  11. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cerebellar Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador eMartinez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function.

  12. Cerebellar stroke-manifesting as mania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Jagadesan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed.

  13. A systematic study of the brain base arteries in the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarílis Díaz de Carvalho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Thirty heads with neck segments of turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo were dissected for a systematic study of the arteries. The frequency of the arteries found was: Cerebral carotid artery, intercarotid anastomosis and internal ophthalmic artery (100%. Caudal branch of the cerebral carotid artery to the right (R vestigial artery (70% and developed (30% and to the left (L developed (70% and vestigial artery (30%. Ventral tectal mesencephalic artery in (70% to R and (30% to L was the direct branch of the cerebral carotid artery to L (70% and to R (30% collateral branch of the developed caudal branch. Basilar artery to L in (70% and to R (30% formed from the developed caudal branch; rostral ventral cerebellar artery present (86.7% and absent (13.3% to R and L. Caudal ventral cerebellar artery to R single (73.3%, double (23.3% and triple (3.3%; caudal ventral cerebellar artery to L single (73.3% and double (26.7%. Dorsal spinal artery branch of caudal ventral cerebellar artery to R (80% and to L (73.3%. The rostral branch of cerebral carotid artery showed as collateral branches the single caudal cerebral artery to R (100% and to L (96.7% while in (3.3% it was double. The middle cerebral artery was single to R and L (100%. Cerebroethmoidal artery to R and L (100% with its collateral branch to single rostral cerebral artery (90% to R and (86.7% to L and double (10% to R and (13.3% to L. Ethmoidal artery to R and to L (100% single. The cerebral arterial circle was rostrally and caudally opened, so that the cerebral blood supply was exclusively made by the carotid system.

  14. Topography of cerebellar deficits in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Manto, Mario

    2012-06-01

    The cerebellum is a key-piece for information processing and is involved in numerous motor and nonmotor activities, thanks to the anatomical characteristics of the circuitry, the enormous computational capabilities and the high connectivity to other brain areas. Despite its uniform cytoarchitecture, cerebellar circuitry is segregated into functional zones. This functional parcellation is driven by the connectivity and the anatomo-functional heterogeneity of the numerous extra-cerebellar structures linked to the cerebellum, principally brain cortices, precerebellar nuclei and spinal cord. Major insights into cerebellar functions have been gained with a detailed analysis of the cerebellar outputs, with the evidence that fundamental aspects of cerebrocerebellar operations are the closed-loop circuit and the predictions of future states. Cerebellar diseases result in disturbances of accuracy of movements and lack of coordination. The cerebellar syndrome includes combinations of oculomotor disturbances, dysarthria and other speech deficits, ataxia of limbs, ataxia of stance and gait, as well as often more subtle cognitive/behavioral impairments. Our understanding of the corresponding anatomo-functional maps for the human cerebellum is continuously improving. We summarize the topography of the clinical deficits observed in cerebellar patients and the growing evidence of a regional subdivision into motor, sensory, sensorimotor, cognitive and affective domains. The recently described topographic dichotomy motor versus nonmotor cerebellum based upon anatomical, functional and neuropsychological studies is also discussed.

  15. Anatomical study of encephalic arterial circuit in Eira barbara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Costa de Macedo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Eira barbara is a mustelid with a wide distribution in Latin America, and it is commonly known as the grey-headed tayra. In view of the lack of information regarding the anatomy of mustelids, as well the importance of a vascular model for the understanding of neurological lesions in the central nervous system, this study aimed to determine the morphology and composition of the encephalic arterial circuit of E. barbara, to provide data for future studies. Accordingly, we used two young male specimens, obtained from the area of the Paragominas Bauxite Mine, PA, Brazil, donated to LaPMA after their death. The arterial system was filled with red-colored neoprene latex, and the specimens were then fixed in 10% formaldehyde and dissected for systematization of the blood vessels. The specimens showed the arterial circuit in the base of the brain supplied by the internal carotid arteries and basilar artery. The internal carotid artery, after crossing the dura mater, continued cranially giving rise to the medial cerebral arteries and ending as cranial cerebral arteries that anastomose, closing the arterial circuit rostrally. The caudal communicating arteries integrated the basilar artery with the arterial circle and gave rise to the caudal cerebral and rostral cerebellar arteries. The basilar artery formed the main branches, the medial and caudal cerebellar arteries.

  16. Cerebellar mutism syndrome and its relation to cerebellar cognitive and affective function: Review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yildiz Ozlem

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors of the cerebellum and brainstem account for half of all brain tumors in children. The realization that cerebellar lesions produce clinically relevant intellectual disability makes it important to determine whether neuropsychological abnormalities occur in long-term survivors of pediatric cerebellar tumors. Little is known about the neurobehavioral sequale resulting specifically from the resection of these tumors in this population. We therefore reviewed neuropsychological findings associated with postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome and discuss the further implications for cerebellar cognitive function.

  17. Cerebellar Involvement in Ataxia and Generalized Epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Kros (Lieke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The work described in this thesis was performed in order to elucidate the role of different cerebellar modules in ataxia and generalized epilepsy using various techniques including in vivo electrophysiology, optogenetics, pharmacological interventions, immunohistology a

  18. Effect of Methamidophos on cerebellar neuronal cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    TH-mediated cerebellar neuronal cell development and function, and consequently could interfere with TH-regulated neuronal ... 1972), decreased number of synapses between the. Purkinje .... 0.008%DNase and triturated in same solution to ...

  19. Synchrony and neural coding in cerebellar circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L Person

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum regulates complex movements and is also implicated in cognitive tasks, and cerebellar dysfunction is consequently associated not only with movement disorders, but also with conditions like autism and dyslexia. How information is encoded by specific cerebellar firing patterns remains debated, however. A central question is how the cerebellar cortex transmits its integrated output to the cerebellar nuclei via GABAergic synapses from Purkinje neurons. Possible answers come from accumulating evidence that subsets of Purkinje cells synchronize their firing during behaviors that require the cerebellum. Consistent with models predicting that coherent activity of inhibitory networks has the capacity to dictate firing patterns of target neurons, recent experimental work supports the idea that inhibitory synchrony may regulate the response of cerebellar nuclear cells to Purkinje inputs, owing to the interplay between unusually fast inhibitory synaptic responses and high rates of intrinsic activity. Data from multiple laboratories lead to a working hypothesis that synchronous inhibitory input from Purkinje cells can set the timing and rate of action potentials produced by cerebellar nuclear cells, thereby relaying information out of the cerebellum. If so, then changing spatiotemporal patterns of Purkinje activity would allow different subsets of inhibitory neurons to control cerebellar output at different times. Here we explore the evidence for and against the idea that a synchrony code defines, at least in part, the input-output function between the cerebellar cortex and nuclei. We consider the literature on the existence of simple spike synchrony, convergence of Purkinje neurons onto nuclear neurons, and intrinsic properties of nuclear neurons that contribute to responses to inhibition. Finally, we discuss factors that may disrupt or modulate a synchrony code and describe the potential contributions of inhibitory synchrony to other motor

  20. A novel approach for treating cerebellar ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Ben Taib, Nordeyn Oulad

    2008-01-01

    The terminology of cerebellar ataxias encompasses a variety of sporadic and inherited debilitating diseases. Patients exhibit disabling deficits such as dysmetria, kinetic tremor and ataxia of stance/gait. We are currently lacking effective treatments in degenerative cerebellar ataxias. Animal models of cerebellar disorders and studies in ataxic patients have demonstrated that the excitability of the sensorimotor cortex is severely depressed in case of cerebellar lesion. These reduced levels of excitability are associated with learning deficits. Recent experimental data show that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the premotor cortex and low-frequency repetitive stimulation of the motor cortex (LFRSM1) restore the excitability of the motor cortex in hemicerebellectomized rats, reinstating the ability of the motor cortex to adapt to sustained peripheral stimulation. The hypothesis is based on the possibility that the combination of tDCS and contralateral LFRSM1 can improve human cerebellar ataxias. The proposed treatment consists of delivering trains of tDCS either in conjunction or in alternance with contralateral LFRSM1, in addition to application of peripheral nerve stimulation to sensitize the sensorimotor cortex. This hypothesis is to be tested in a procedure made of 3 steps in patients exhibiting a sporadic or inherited cerebellar disorder. First, patients are assessed clinically using validated scales of cerebellar ataxias and performing accepted quantified tests. Second, trains of tDCS and LFRSM1 are delivered, using a sham procedure in a cross-over design. Trains of peripheral stimulation are applied at peripheral nerves. Third, patients are re-assessed clinically and with quantified tests. Although grafting of stem cells and gene therapy are being developed, they will not be available soon. A successful treatment of combined neurostimulation would lead to a new and readily available approach in the management of cerebellar ataxias. This new

  1. Cerebellar mutism: review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudrunardottir, Thora; Sehested, Astrid; Juhler, Marianne;

    2011-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a common complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. This article reviews current status with respect to incidence, anatomical substrate, pathophysiology, risk factors, surgical considerations, treatment options, prognosis and prevention.......Cerebellar mutism is a common complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. This article reviews current status with respect to incidence, anatomical substrate, pathophysiology, risk factors, surgical considerations, treatment options, prognosis and prevention....

  2. Cerebellar infarcts in the New England Medical Center Posterior Circulation Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, C J; Caplan, L R; Chung, C S; Tapia, J; Amarenco, P; Teal, P; Wityk, R; Estol, C; Tettenborn, B; Rosengart, A

    1994-08-01

    We report the clinical findings and stroke mechanisms of 63 patients with cerebellar infarcts. We divided the intracranial vertebrobasilar circulation into the proximal territory (P), fed by the intracranial vertebral arteries and their branches; the middle territory (M), fed by the proximal and middle basilar artery and its branches; and the distal territory (D), fed by the rostral basilar artery and its branches. Cerebellar infarcts were classified by vascular territories P, M, D, P&D, and middle-plus (P&M, M&D, and P&M&D). Patients with P infarcts (11 patients) frequently had vertigo, gait instability, limb ataxia, and headache, whereas patients with D infarcts (15 patients) most often had limb ataxia, gait instability, and dysarthria. Patients with P&D infarcts (17 patients) had signs and symptoms of both groups combined. Infarcts in which the middle territory was involved, either alone (three patients) or combined with other territories (17 patients) were dominated by brainstem signs and symptoms. The predominant stroke mechanisms in the P, D, and P&D groups were embolic due to intra-arterial or cardiac embolism. When the M territory was involved, either alone or with P, D, or P&D territories, stroke mechanisms were more varied, and there was often large-artery occlusion with hemodynamic ischemia.

  3. Bilateral Cerebellar Cortical Dysplasia without Other Malformations: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jung Seok; Ahn Kook Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Lee, Sun Jin; Park, Jeong Mi [Catholic University Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Recent advances in MRI have revealed congenital brain malformations and subtle developmental abnormalities of the cerebral and cerebellar cortical architecture. Typical cerebellar cortical dysplasia as a newly categorized cerebellar malformation, has been seen in patients with Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy. Cerebellar cortical dysplasia occurs at the embryonic stage and is often observed in healthy newborns. It is also incidentally and initially detected in adults without symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, cerebellar dysplasia without any related disorders is very rare. We describe the MRI findings in one patient with disorganized foliation of both cerebellar hemispheres without a related disorder or syndrome

  4. Impaired modulation of the otolithic function in acute unilateral cerebellar infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seo Young; Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Hyo Jung; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2014-06-01

    To define the cerebellar contribution in modulating the otolithic signals, we investigated the otolithic function in 27 patients with acute unilateral cerebellar infarctions in the territory of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA, n = 17, 63%), combined PICA and superior cerebellar artery (SCA) (n = 7, 30%), SCA (n = 2, 7%), and anterior inferior cerebellar artery (n = 1, 4%) from 2010 to 2012. The patients had evaluation of the ocular tilt reaction [head tilt, ocular torsion (OT), and skew deviation], tilt of the subjective visual vertical (SVV), cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) in response to air conducted tone bursts, and ocular VEMPs induced by tapping the head at AFz. The evaluation was completed within 2 weeks after symptom onset. Patients often showed OT or SVV tilt (15/27, 55.6%) that was either ipsi- (n = 6) or contraversive (n = 9). Overall, there were no differences in the amplitudes and latencies of cervical and ocular VEMPs between the ipsi- and contralesional sides. However, individual analyses revealed frequent abnormalities of cervical (11/27, 41%) and/or ocular (9/27, 33%) VEMPs. While 11 (73%) of the 15 patients with the OTR/SVV tilt showed abnormalities of cervical (n = 9) and/or ocular (n = 7) VEMP responses, only three (25%) of the 12 patients without the OTR/SVV tilt had abnormal cervical (n = 2) and/or ocular (n = 2) VEMPs (73% vs. 25%, Fisher's exact test, p = 0.021). The concordance rate in the results of cervical and ocular VEMPs was marginally significant (19/27, 70%, p = 0.052, binominal). Unilateral cerebellar lesions may generate otolithic imbalances, as evidenced by the OTR/SVV tilt and asymmetric ocular or cervical VEMP responses, but without directionality according to the lesion side. Patients with the OTR/SVV tilt had abnormal VEMPs more often than those without.

  5. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative, and f...

  6. Changes in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuit in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Peng; An, Jie; Tan, Xin; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Qiu, Shijun; Hu, Dewen

    2017-01-11

    Currently, 422 million adults suffer from diabetes worldwide, leading to tremendous disabilities and a great burden to families and society. Functional and structural MRIs have demonstrated that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) exhibit abnormalities in brain regions in the cerebral cortex. However, the changes of cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients remains unclear. In the current study, diffusion tensor imaging deterministic tractography and statistical analysis were employed to investigate abnormal cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients. This is the first study to investigate the altered cerebellar anatomical connectivity in T2DM patients. Decreased anatomical connections were found in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuits of T2DM patients, providing valuable new insights into the potential neuro-pathophysiology of diabetes-related motor and cognitive deficits.

  7. Cerebellar Atrophy in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cerebellar Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailion, Alyssa S; King, Tricia Z; Wang, Liya; Fox, Michelle E; Mao, Hui; Morris, Robin M; Crosson, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    The cerebellum (CB) is known for its role in supporting processing speed (PS) and cognitive efficiencies. The CB often sustains damage from treatment and resection in pediatric patients with posterior fossa tumors. Limited research suggests that CB atrophy may be associated with the radiation treatment experienced during childhood. The purpose of the study was to measure cerebellar atrophy to determine its neurobehavioral correlates. Brain magnetic resonance images were collected from 25 adult survivors of CB tumors and age- and gender-matched controls (M age= 24 years (SD=5), 52% female). Average age at diagnosis was 9 years (SD=5) and average time since diagnosis was 15 years (SD=5). PS was measured by the Symbol Digit Modality Test. To quantify atrophy, an objective formula was developed based on prior literature, in which Atrophy=[(CB White+CB Gray Volume)/Intracranial Vault (ICV)]controls-[(CB White+CB Gray+Lesion Size Volume)/ICV]survivors. Regression analyses found that the interaction term (age at diagnosis*radiation) predicts CB atrophy; regression equations included the Neurological Predictor Scale, lesion size, atrophy, and the interaction term and accounted for 33% of the variance in oral PS and 48% of the variance in written PS. Both interactions suggest that individuals with smaller CB lesion size but a greater degree of CB atrophy had slower PS, whereas individuals with a larger CB lesion size and less CB atrophy were less affected. The results of the current study suggest that young age at diagnosis and radiation is associated with CB atrophy, which interacts with lesion size to impact both written and oral PS.

  8. Effect of edaravone on acute brainstem-cerebellar infarction with vertigo and sudden hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuta; Yabe, Takao; Okada, Kazunari; Nakamura, Yuka

    2014-06-01

    We report 2 cases with acute brainstem and brainstem-cerebellar infarction showed improvement of their signs and symptoms after administration of edaravone. Case 1, a 74-year-old woman who experienced sudden vertigo, also had dysarthria and left hemiplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an abnormal region in the right ventrolateral medulla oblongata. The patient's vertigo and hemiplegia improved completely after treatment. Case 2, a 50-year-old man who experienced sudden vertigo and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), developed dysarthria after admission. MRI revealed acute infarction in the right cerebellar hemisphere. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed dissection of the basilar artery and occlusion of the right anterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient's vertigo and hearing remarkably improved. We have described 2 patients whose early symptoms were vertigo and sudden SNHL, but who were later shown to have ischemic lesions of the central nervous system. Edaravone is neuroprotective drug with free radical-scavenging actions. Free radicals in the ear are responsible for ischemic damage. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, may be useful in the treatment of vertigo and SNHL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 小脑后下动脉动脉瘤的血管内治疗与手术治疗(附21例报道)%Endovascular embolization and microsurgery of posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms (report of 21 cases)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖旭兴; 蔡瑜; 王辉; 梁学军; 段成斌; 胡建军; 邓其峻; 马廉亭

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the methods to treat posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms and their effects. Methods The clinical data of 21 patients with PICA aneurysms, of whom, 7 were treated by surgery, 13 by the endovascular embolization and 1 by conservative treatment from January, 2008 to December, 2013, were analyzed retrospectively. Results Five patients receiving the endovascular treatment died within 7 days after the embolization. Sixteen patients were followed up from 6 to 36 months. One patient receiving coils embolization was treated by stent-assisted coils embolization because the aneurysm recurred 1 year after the coils embolization. One patient undergoing the surgery still had ataxia during the following up. The aneurysm was unchanged 2 years after the conservative treatment in 1 patient. There were no recurrence of the aneurysms and complications in the other 13 patients during the following up. Conclusions The patency of the medullar branch of PICA is a prerequisite for treatment of PICA aneurysms. The method to treat PICA aneurysms should be selected according to the aneurysms and whether PICA is a superior blood vessel or not. The effects of the endovascular embolization and surgery on PICA aneurysms are good if the method to treat them is proper for PICA aneurysms.%目的:探讨小脑后下动脉(PICA)动脉瘤的血管内治疗与手术治疗效果。方法回顾性分析21例PICA动脉瘤患者的临床资料,其中近侧段11例行单纯弹簧圈栓塞1例,支架辅助弹簧圈栓塞7例,开颅夹闭术1例,行枕动脉-PICA血管吻合术1例,保守治疗1例;过渡段5例,行单纯弹簧圈栓塞2例,开颅夹闭术2例,开颅动脉瘤包裹术1例;远侧段5例,行弹簧圈闭塞载瘤动脉1例,NBCA闭塞载瘤动脉1例,Gluba胶闭塞载瘤动脉1例,开颅切除动脉瘤2例。结果术后1周内死亡5例,其余病例随访6~36个月,其中近侧段行单纯弹簧圈栓塞的1例复发,

  10. Cerebellar research: two centuries of discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Haines, Duane

    2012-06-01

    Numerous laboratories currently focus their activities on cerebellar research. The cerebellum is attractive due to its sophisticated circuitry, high degree of modifiability combined with unique operational mechanisms, and the growing awareness of its multiple roles. Works of pioneers of these last two centuries, such as Rolando, Flourens, Magendie, Luciani, Lugaro, Babinski, Holmes, Cajal, Larsell, Eccles, Voogd, Llinas, or Ito, still exert a strong influence in the way we investigate cerebellar functions. The amount of knowledge is exploding, thanks to advances in genetics, molecular and cellular analyses, profusion of brain imaging techniques, novel behavioral assessments, and reshaping of models of cerebellar function. More than ever, strong and consistent intellectual efforts are required to generate homogeneous research outcomes that might exert a significant influence in the forthcoming domains of research. Because research is often based on the results of our predecessors, The Cerebellum has launched a section called Cerebellar Classics. Papers selected represent key steps for the discovery of some of the secrets of the cerebellar circuitry. These seminal contributions offer a portal to the past to modern scholars.

  11. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-06-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD)) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis.

  12. Atypical Presentation of a Pediatric Cerebellar Ganglioglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bram, Richard; Seidman, Roberta J; Chesler, David

    2017-09-20

    Gangliogliomas (GGs) are rare central nervous system tumors occurring primarily in the supratentorial compartment with infratentorial instances most often involving the brain stem. Infratentorial GGs typically present with signs and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure (ICP), cranial nerve deficits, or focal cerebellar findings; rarely, these tumors have been associated with focal seizures. In this report, we describe an atypical presentation of a cerebellar GG in a 20-month-old male who initially presented with syncope and emesis in the absence of electrographic evidence of seizures, radiographic evidence of hydrocephalus, or elevated ICP. The epidemiology, radiographic, and pathological findings as well as the treatment of these tumors are also discussed. After gross total resection, the patient experienced full resolution of all his preoperative symptoms without the development of new neurological deficits. Unlike their supratentorial counterparts, infratentorial GGs do not commonly present with seizures although rare reports exist in the literature of seizures attributed to cerebellar GG. Moreover, cerebellar GGs may produce nonspecific symptoms in the absence of concrete diagnostic findings. Such a presentation should prompt further neurological evaluation. Most cases of isolated cerebellar GG can be successfully treated with surgical resection and carry a favorable prognosis. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions ARCA1 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 Printable PDF Open All Close All ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 ( ARCA1 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  14. Optogenetic mapping of cerebellar inhibitory circuitry reveals spatially biased coordination of interneurons via electrical synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinsook; Lee, Soojung; Tsuda, Sachiko; Zhang, Xuying; Asrican, Brent; Gloss, Bernd; Feng, Guoping; Augustine, George J

    2014-06-12

    We used high-speed optogenetic mapping technology to examine the spatial organization of local inhibitory circuits formed by cerebellar interneurons. Transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin-2 exclusively in molecular layer interneurons allowed us to focally photostimulate these neurons, while measuring resulting responses in postsynaptic Purkinje cells. This approach revealed that interneurons converge upon Purkinje cells over a broad area and that at least seven interneurons form functional synapses with a single Purkinje cell. The number of converging interneurons was reduced by treatment with gap junction blockers, revealing that electrical synapses between interneurons contribute substantially to the spatial convergence. Remarkably, gap junction blockers affected convergence in sagittal slices, but not in coronal slices, indicating a sagittal bias in electrical coupling between interneurons. We conclude that electrical synapse networks spatially coordinate interneurons in the cerebellum and may also serve this function in other brain regions.

  15. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  16. Brain morphometry and arterial circuit formation in New Zealand rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina de Oliveira Portugal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to describe the main ramifications of basilar artery, arterial circuit formation, and brain morphometry in adult rabbits of both sexes. We performed cannulation of the thoracic aorta through lateral incision, fixation with 10% formaldehyde solution, and filling of the arterial system with colored latex solution. We performed craniotomy, brain removal and morphometry, as well as dissection for observing the main ramifications of the basilar artery and arterial circuit formation. Mean and standard error of the basilar artery length were1.293 cm ± 0.024 in females and 1.227 cm ± 0.025 in males. In all rabbits dissected, the basilar artery stemmed from the anastomosis of vertebral arteries, right and left, giving rise to the caudal cerebellar artery, varied branches to bulb and pons, terminal branches, and rostral cerebellar arteries. Arteries at the base of the brain depended on the carotid and vertebral-basilar systems. The arterial brain circuit was rostrally closed in 10 males and 12 females and caudally closed in all animals dissected.

  17. POSITION OF CEREBELLAR TONSILS IN REFERENCE TO FORAMEN MAGNUM: AN MRI STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal position of the cerebellar tonsils is described to be at or above the foramen magnum. Western studies have shown the cerebellar tonsils to be below the foramen magnum. Position of tonsils is of great importance in assessing the hind brain deformity–Chiari malformation. There are no Indian studies to corroborate the findings. Hence, we proposed a basic study to find out the existence of tonsillar ectopia (Position of tonsils below the foramen magnum in normal population. Our study was conducted for a period of 8 months at the Radiology Department of SCTIMST, Trivandrum, Kerala; 515 patients with normal brain, spinal cord and normal craniovertebral junction (CVJ were selected from a group of patients who underwent MRI investigation of brain and cervical spine for various vague complaints. They ranged from 2 months to 80 years and of both sexes. Patients with raised intracranial tension and established CVJ anomalies were excluded. The study was done on the MR images obtained on the MR monitor directly during the scan. Foramen magnum and the inferior extent of cerebellar tonsils were marked. The position of the tonsils was noted in reference to foramen magnum and the data analysed. Tonsillar ectopia was noticed in 21% of the population. A downward descent in the position was observed in the fifth decade of life. In infancy and old age, higher positions were noted. The study indicates that the position of the tonsils below the foramen magnum is a normal occurrence.

  18. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  19. A probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarsen, K.M. van; Kleinnijenhuis, M.; Jbabdi, S.; Sotiropoulos, S.N.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Cappellen van Walsum, A.M. van

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei and their connectivity are gaining attraction, due to the important role the cerebellum plays in cognition and motor control. Atlases of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei are used to locate regions of interest in clinical and neuroscience studi

  20. Rhythmic finger tapping reveals cerebellar dysfunction in essential tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijink, A. W. G.; Broersma, M.; van der Stouwe, A. M. M.; van Wingen, G. A.; Groot, P. F. C.; Speelman, J. D.; Maurits, N. M.; van Rootselaar, A. F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebellar circuits are hypothesized to play a central role in the pathogenesis of essential tremor. Rhythmic finger tapping is known to strongly engage the cerebellar motor circuitry. We characterize cerebellar and, more specifically, dentate nucleus function, and neural correlates of

  1. Paraneoplastic cerebellar dysfunction in Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Sazzad Manir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL manifests as acute/sub-acute nature. We report a case of 21 yr old male presented with acute cerebellar signs along with underlying HL.MRI brain was normal. CSF study was unremarkable. Patient was treated with six cycles of chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. Neurological manifestations remarkably improved along with complete resolution of underlying HL. Anti-cancer therapy of underlying HL is the main strategy of treating associated PCD.

  2. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis in ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meneghetti, G; Vorstrup, S; Mickey, B

    1984-01-01

    Seventy measurements of CBF were performed in 12 stroke patients by 133Xe inhalation and a rapidly rotating single photon emission computerized tomograph. CBF was measured every other day during the acute phase and at 2- and 6-month follow-up visits. A persistent contralateral cerebellar blood flow....... It is concluded from this serial study that crossed cerebellar diaschisis is a common finding in completed stroke. It is probably caused by disconnection of the corticopontine pathways, a disconnection that tends to persist. The phenomenon is in fact less variable than the stroke-related CBF changes...

  3. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  4. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  5. Case of subacute cerebellar degeneration associated with pleocytosis and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Hiide; Anezaki, Toshiharu; Takashima, Noriko; Inuzuka, Takashi; Miyatake, Tadashi

    1988-02-01

    A 44 year old woman was healthy until January 3, 1986, when she had headache. On January 9, she developed gait ataxia and dysarthria. Cerebellar ataxia worsened rapidly. Aftar a week she could not sit without support and her consciousness was disturbed. Corticosteroid was administrated and consciousness proved alert, but cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria remained unchanged. The patient was found carcinoma of the lung in August 1986. Characteristic features of clinical and laboratory findings of this patient are acute progression, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis of 1,064/3 cells (860 mononuclear cell, 204 polymorphonuclear cell), and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning. Though the mechanism of acute cerebellar degeneration is still uncertained, inflammatory process was supported to exist in cerebellum of this case.

  6. Remote Cerebellar Hemorrhage Presenting with Cerebellar Mutism after Spinal Surgery: An Unusual Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Sen,Halil Murat; Guven, Mustafa; Aras, Adem Bozkurt; Cosar,Murat

    2017-01-01

    Dural injury during spinal surgery can subsequently give rise to a remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH). Although the incidence of such injury is low, the resulting hemorrhage can be life threatening. The mechanism underlying the formation of the hemorrhage is not known, but it is mostly thought to develop after venous infarction. Cerebellar mutism (CM) is a frequent complication of posterior fossa operations in children, but it is rarely seen in adults. The development of CM after an RCH has n...

  7. Microanatomical study of the nutrient artery of the glossopharyngeal nerve root

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhua Zheng; Xiaohua He

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Because the artery leading to the glossopharyngeal nerve is small and complex,insufficient blood supply can occur due to atherosclerosis,occlusion,or injury.This sometimes results in corresponding newe degeneration,demyelination,and/or arachnoid adhesion.OBJECTIVE:To observe the nutrient artery origin of the glossopharyngeal nerve root in the medulla oblongata region,as well as the relationship between the artery and glossopharyngeal nerve root,to verify dependence of primary glossopharyngeal neuralgia,which is related to contact and compression of the nutrient artery of the glossopharyngeal nerve root.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:Repetitive measurement.The experiment was performed at Harbin Medical University and Daqing Oilfields General Hospital between November 2006 and April 2007.MATERIALS:Ten cadaver heads(seven male and three female)were supplied bv the Department of Anatomy,Harbin Medical University.A total of 15 patients(nine male and six female),aged 38-56,that suffered from glossopharyngeal neuralgia were treated at Daqing Oilfields General Hospital and were between 38-56 years old.All cadaver heads were strictly handled according to the Guideline for Medical Ethics Committee.The patients agreed to the criteria set for the study objects.METHODS:(1)The bilateral veins of the nutrient artery were dissected under a surgery microscope.A sliding caliper was used to measure the length of the glossopharyngeal nerve from the oblongata to the iugular foramen.The origin of the nutrient artery was noted.as well as the courser and diameter to explore the relationship between the glossopharyngeal nerve root and the vertebral artery.posterior inferior cerebellar artery,anterior inferior cerebellar artery,as well as the branching veins.(2)A total of 15 patients received glossopharyngeal neuralgia surgery.Contact or oppression of the glossopharyngeal nerve with the posterior inferior cerebellar artery,the anterior inferior cerebellar artery,vertebral artery,and its

  8. Cerebellar cortical inhibition and classical eyeblink conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Shaowen; Chen, Lu; Kim, Jeansok J; Thompson, Richard F

    2002-02-01

    The cerebellum is considered a brain structure in which memories for learned motor responses (e.g., conditioned eyeblink responses) are stored. Within the cerebellum, however, the relative importance of the cortex and the deep nuclei in motor learning/memory is not entirely clear. In this study, we show that the cerebellar cortex exerts both basal and stimulus-activated inhibition to the deep nuclei. Sequential application of a gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) agonist and a noncompetitive GABA(A)R antagonist allows selective blockade of stimulus-activated inhibition. By using the same sequential agonist and antagonist methods in behaving animals, we demonstrate that the conditioned response (CR) expression and timing are completely dissociable and involve different inhibitory inputs; although the basal inhibition modulates CR expression, the conditioned stimulus-activated inhibition is required for the proper timing of the CR. In addition, complete blockade of cerebellar deep nuclear GABA(A)Rs prevents CR acquisition. Together, these results suggest that different aspects of the memories for eyeblink CRs are encoded in the cerebellar cortex and the cerebellar deep nuclei.

  9. Climbing fiber signaling and cerebellar gain control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Ohtsuki (Gen); C. Piochon (Claire); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe physiology of climbing fiber signals in cerebellar Purkinje cells has been studied since the early days of electrophysiology. Both the climbing fiber-evoked complex spike and the role of climbing fiber activity in the induction of long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-Purkinje

  10. The anatomical substrate of cerebellar mutism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarsen, K. van; Grotenhuis, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Up to 39% of children operated for a posterior fossa tumor develop the cerebellar mutism syndrome. Although they are alert and cooperative, with normal language comprehension, they are unable to speak. In addition, patients may demonstrate apathy, bladder and bowel incontinence and long-term

  11. Cerebellar mutism syndrome: cause and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E

    2017-04-01

    Mutism of cerebellar origin may occur in the context of various causes but is most frequent in children after resection of a large midline cerebellar tumour. In this review, the endeavour to reach a consensus on name and definition of postoperative mutism of cerebellar origin and associated symptoms is highlighted. In addition, progress in understanding of cause and risk factors for the syndrome is discussed as well as the rehabilitation issues. Consensus on the term cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS) has been reached. The exact pathogenesis of CMS remains unclear. Recently, attention was drawn to the hypothesis that thermal injury might be an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of CMS. Diffusion tensor imaging tractography was found to visualize the damage to relevant pathways that are associated with persistent impairments after recovery of CMS. There is still no established treatment for CMS to date. By reaching a consensus on terminology and description of CMS, a firm basis has been created for future research. The pathogenesis of CMS seems multifactorial and important risk factors have been found. However, CMS cannot be effectively prevented yet and no established or specific treatment is available, apart from very general rehabilitation and cognitive interventions.

  12. Ultrasonically detectable cerebellar haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Lisa Kenyon

    2011-07-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of cerebellar haemorrhage (CBH) on routine cranial ultrasound (cUS) imaging in infants of ≤32 weeks gestation, and to investigate how extremely preterm infants with CBH differ from those with severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH).

  13. Cerebellar liponeurocytoma: a case-report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Sreedhar Babu

    Full Text Available Cerebellar liponeurocytoma is a rare cerebellar neoplasm of adults with advanced neuronal / neurocytic and focal lipomatous differentiation, a low proliferative potential and a favorable clinical prognosis corresponding to World Health Organization grade I or II. Only a few cases have been described in the literature (approximately 20 cases by different names. A 48-years old female, presented with history of headache and dizziness associated with neck pain; restricted neck movements, drop attacks and occasional regurgitation of food since one year. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a right cerebellar mass lesion. Gross total resec- tion of the tumour was accomplished through a suboccipital craniotomy. The excised tissue was diagnosed as cerebellar liponeurocytoma, a rare entity, based on histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry. The morphological appearance of this neoplasm can be confused with that of oligodendroglioma, neurocytoma, ependymoma, medulloblastoma, solid hemangioblastoma and metastatic carcinomas etc., with unpredictable prognosis, which require postoperative radiotherapy, hence the importance of accurately diagnosing this rare neoplasm. This tumour should be added to the differential diagnosis of mass lesions of the posterior fossa.

  14. HISTOGENESIS OF HUMAN FOETAL CEREBELLAR CORTEX

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    External granular layer is observed at 13 weeks of gestation and purkinje cell layer is arranged at 17 weeks as a ... brain that begins first to differentiate but last to mature .... Development of human cerebellar granular layer: a morphometric ...

  15. Cerebellar endocannabinoids: retrograde signaling from purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaggi, Païkan

    2015-06-01

    The cerebellar cortex exhibits a strikingly high expression of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1), the cannabinoid binding protein responsible for the psychoactive effects of marijuana. CB1 is primarily found in presynaptic elements in the molecular layer. While the functional importance of cerebellar CB1 is supported by the effect of gene deletion or exogenous cannabinoids on animal behavior, evidence for a role of endocannabinoids in synaptic signaling is provided by in vitro experiments on superfused acute rodent cerebellar slices. These studies have demonstrated that endocannabinoids can be transiently released by Purkinje cells and signal at synapses in a direction opposite to information transfer (retrograde). Here, following a description of the reported expression pattern of the endocannabinoid system in the cerebellum, I review the accumulated in vitro data, which have addressed the mechanism of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling and identified 2-arachidonoylglycerol as the mediator of this signaling. The mechanisms leading to endocannabinoid release, the effects of CB1 activation, and the associated synaptic plasticity mechanisms are discussed and the remaining unknowns are pointed. Notably, it is argued that the spatial specificity of this signaling and the physiological conditions required for its induction need to be determined in order to understand endocannabinoid function in the cerebellar cortex.

  16. Improving cerebellar segmentation with statistical fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multiatlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non- Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  17. Cerebellar Hypoplasia and Dysmorphia in Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toelle, Sandra P; Poretti, Andrea; Weber, Peter; Seute, Tatjana; Bromberg, Jacoline E C; Scheer, Ianina; Boltshauser, Eugen

    2015-12-01

    Unidentified bright objects (UBO) and tumors are well-known cerebellar abnormalities in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Literature reports on malformative cerebellar anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), however, are scant. We retrospectively studied the clinical and neuroimaging findings of 5 patients with NF1 (4 females, age 6 to 29 years at last follow-up) and cerebellar anomalies. Cerebellar symptoms on neurological examination were mild or even not evident whereas learning disabilities were more or less pronounced in four patients. Two patients had cerebellar hypoplasia (diffusely enlarged cerebellar interfoliar spaces) and three cerebellar dysmorphias involving mainly one cerebellar hemisphere. In NF1, malformative cerebellar anomalies are rare (estimated prevalence of about 1%), but most likely underestimated and easily overlooked, because physicians tend to focus on more prevalent, obvious, and well-known findings such as optic pathway gliomas, other tumors, and UBO. This kind of cerebellar anomaly in NF1 has most likely a malformative origin, but the exact pathogenesis is unknown. The individual clinical significance is difficult to determine. We suggest that cerebellar anomalies should be systematically evaluated in neuroimaging studies of NF1 patients.

  18. Perinatal Cerebellar Injury in Human and Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Biran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar injury is increasingly recognized through advanced neonatal brain imaging as a complication of premature birth. Survivors of preterm birth demonstrate a constellation of long-term neurodevelopmental deficits, many of which are potentially referable to cerebellar injury, including impaired motor functions such as fine motor incoordination, impaired motor sequencing and also cognitive, behavioral dysfunction among older patients. This paper reviews the morphogenesis and histogenesis of the human and rodent developing cerebellum, and its more frequent injuries in preterm. Most cerebellar lesions are cerebellar hemorrhage and infarction usually leading to cerebellar abnormalities and/or atrophy, but the exact pathogenesis of lesions of the cerebellum is unknown. The different mechanisms involved have been investigated with animal models and are primarily hypoxia, ischemia, infection, and inflammation Exposure to drugs and undernutrition can also induce cerebellar abnormalities. Different models are detailed to analyze these various disturbances of cerebellar development around birth.

  19. Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We review the giant tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in ferromagnetic-insulator-ferromagnetic junctions discovered in recent years, which is the magnetoresistance (MR) associated with the spin-dependent tunneling between two ferromagnetic metal films separated by an insulating thin tunnel barrier. The theoretical and experimental results including junction conductance, magnetoresistance and their temperature and bias dependences are described.

  20. Stacked Josephson Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Find; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2010-01-01

    Long Josephson junctions have for some time been considered as a source of THz radiation. Solitons moving coherently in the junctions is a possible source for this radiation. Analytical computations of the bunched state and bunching-inducing methods are reviewed. Experiments showing THz radiation...

  1. Vertebral artery dissection associated with generalized convulsive seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Larsen, Vibeke Andrée; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2013-01-01

    showed a left-sided pontine infarction, an infarct in the left cerebellar hemisphere and a right vertebral artery dissection (VAD). The patient was treated with heparin and an oral anticoagulant for 6 months. Recovery of neurologic function was excellent. In patients with symptoms of disturbances...

  2. Chondromyxoid fibroma invasion of the transverse-sigmoid sinus junction causing posterior fossa hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, David S; Firempong, Alexander O; Chesler, David; Castellani, Rudolph J; Woodworth, Graeme F

    2016-02-01

    We report a 50-year-old woman with a chondromyxoid fibroma of the occipital bone, who presented with a cerebellar hemorrhage due to invasion of the adjacent sinus. Chondromyxoid fibromas are benign cartilaginous tumors. However, this case represents the first example, to our knowledge, of a chondromyxoid fibroma invading the transverse-sigmoid junction, resulting in intracranial hemorrhage. Our report highlights that the location of an intracranial chondromyxoid fibroma is an important factor in guiding surgical management.

  3. A probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baarsen, K M; Kleinnijenhuis, M; Jbabdi, S; Sotiropoulos, S N; Grotenhuis, J A; van Cappellen van Walsum, A M

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei and their connectivity are gaining attraction, due to the important role the cerebellum plays in cognition and motor control. Atlases of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei are used to locate regions of interest in clinical and neuroscience studies. However, the white matter that connects these relay stations is of at least similar functional importance. Damage to these cerebellar white matter tracts may lead to serious language, cognitive and emotional disturbances, although the pathophysiological mechanism behind it is still debated. Differences in white matter integrity between patients and controls might shed light on structure-function correlations. A probabilistic parcellation atlas of the cerebellar white matter would help these studies by facilitating automatic segmentation of the cerebellar peduncles, the localization of lesions and the comparison of white matter integrity between patients and controls. In this work a digital three-dimensional probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter is presented, based on high quality 3T, 1.25mm resolution diffusion MRI data from 90 subjects participating in the Human Connectome Project. The white matter tracts were estimated using probabilistic tractography. Results over 90 subjects were symmetrical and trajectories of superior, middle and inferior cerebellar peduncles resembled the anatomy as known from anatomical studies. This atlas will contribute to a better understanding of cerebellar white matter architecture. It may eventually aid in defining structure-function correlations in patients with cerebellar disorders.

  4. Patterns of spontaneous and head-shaking nystagmus in cerebellar infarction: imaging correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Young Eun; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-12-01

    Horizontal head-shaking may induce nystagmus in peripheral as well as central vestibular lesions. While the patterns and mechanism of head-shaking nystagmus are well established in peripheral vestibulopathy, they require further exploration in central vestibular disorders. To define the characteristics and mechanism of head-shaking nystagmus in central vestibulopathies, we investigated spontaneous nystagmus and head-shaking nystagmus in 72 patients with isolated cerebellar infarction. Spontaneous nystagmus was observed in 28 (39%) patients, and was mostly ipsilesional when observed in unilateral infarction (15/18, 83%). Head-shaking nystagmus developed in 37 (51%) patients, and the horizontal component of head-shaking nystagmus was uniformly ipsilesional when induced in patients with unilateral infarction. Perverted head-shaking nystagmus occurred in 23 (23/37, 62%) patients and was mostly downbeat (22/23, 96%). Lesion subtraction analyses revealed that damage to the uvula, nodulus and inferior tonsil was mostly responsible for generation of head-shaking nystagmus in patients with unilateral posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction. Ipsilesional head-shaking nystagmus in patients with unilateral cerebellar infarction may be explained by unilateral disruption of uvulonodular inhibition over the velocity storage. Perverted (downbeat) head-shaking nystagmus may be ascribed to impaired control over the spatial orientation of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex due to uvulonodular lesions or a build-up of vertical vestibular asymmetry favouring upward bias due to lesions involving the inferior tonsil.

  5. Changes of junctions of endothelial cells in coronary sclerosis:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Zi Zhang; Sun Lei

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major cause of cardiovascular diseases, has been a leading contributor to morbidity and mortality in the United States and it has been on the rise globally. Endothelial cellecell junctions are critical for vascular integrity and maintenance of vascular function. Endothelial cell junctions dysfunction is the onset step of future coronary events and coronary artery dis-ease.

  6. A toolbox to visually explore cerebellar shape changes in cerebellar disease and dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Yang, Zhen; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum plays an important role in motor control and is also involved in cognitive processes. Cerebellar function is specialized by location, although the exact topographic functional relationship is not fully understood. The spinocerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that cause regional atrophy in the cerebellum, yielding distinct motor and cognitive problems. The ability to study the region-specific atrophy patterns can provide insight into the problem of relating cerebellar function to location. In an effort to study these structural change patterns, we developed a toolbox in MATLAB to provide researchers a unique way to visually explore the correlation between cerebellar lobule shape changes and function loss, with a rich set of visualization and analysis modules. In this paper, we outline the functions and highlight the utility of the toolbox. The toolbox takes as input landmark shape representations of subjects' cerebellar substructures. A principal component analysis is used for dimension reduction. Following this, a linear discriminant analysis and a regression analysis can be performed to find the discriminant direction associated with a specific disease type, or the regression line of a specific functional measure can be generated. The characteristic structural change pattern of a disease type or of a functional score is visualized by sampling points on the discriminant or regression line. The sampled points are used to reconstruct synthetic cerebellar lobule shapes. We showed a few case studies highlighting the utility of the toolbox and we compare the analysis results with the literature.

  7. Cerebellar Dysfunction in a Patient with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Ibarra, Fernando; Abdul, Waheed; Eivaz-Mohammadi, Sahar; Foscue, Christopher; Gongireddy, Srinivas; Syed, Amer

    2014-01-01

    A 50-year-old AIDS patient with a CD4 T-cell count of 114/mm(3) was admitted with cerebellar symptoms of left CN XI weakness, wide-based gait with left-sided dysmetria, abnormal heel-knee-shin test, and dysdiadochokinesia. MRI showed region of hyperintensity in the left inferior cerebellar hemisphere involving the cortex and underlying white matter. Serological tests for HSV1, HSV2, and syphilis were negative. Her CSF contained high protein content and a WBC of 71/mm(3), predominantly lymphocytes. The CSF was also negative for cryptococcal antigen and VDRL. CSF culture did not grow microbes. CSF PCR assay was negative for HSV1 and HSV2 but was positive for JC virus (1,276 copies). The most likely diagnosis is granule cell neuronopathy (GCN), which can only be definitively confirmed with biopsy and immunohistochemistry.

  8. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  9. An update on Spino-cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banashree Mondal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dominantly inherited ataxias, also known as Spino-cerebellar ataxias (SCAs, are rapidly expanding entities. New mutations are being identified at remarkable regularity. Recent awareness of molecular abnormalities in SCAs has addressed some of the long sought questions, but gaps in knowledge still exist. Three major categories of SCAs, according to molecular mechanisms, have evolved over recent few years: Polyglutamate expansion ataxia, non-coding zone repeat ataxia, and ataxia due to conventional mutation. Using the fulcrum of these mechanisms, the article provides an update of SCAs. Shared and specific clinical features, genetic abnormalities, and possible links between molecular abnormalities and cerebellar degeneration have been discussed. Emphasis has been placed on the mechanisms of polyglutamate toxicity.

  10. Cerebellar Dysfunction in a Patient with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gonzalez-Ibarra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old AIDS patient with a CD4 T-cell count of 114/mm3 was admitted with cerebellar symptoms of left CN XI weakness, wide-based gait with left-sided dysmetria, abnormal heel-knee-shin test, and dysdiadochokinesia. MRI showed region of hyperintensity in the left inferior cerebellar hemisphere involving the cortex and underlying white matter. Serological tests for HSV1, HSV2, and syphilis were negative. Her CSF contained high protein content and a WBC of 71/mm3, predominantly lymphocytes. The CSF was also negative for cryptococcal antigen and VDRL. CSF culture did not grow microbes. CSF PCR assay was negative for HSV1 and HSV2 but was positive for JC virus (1,276 copies. The most likely diagnosis is granule cell neuronopathy (GCN, which can only be definitively confirmed with biopsy and immunohistochemistry.

  11. Memory consolidation in the cerebellar cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel O Kellett

    Full Text Available Several forms of learning, including classical conditioning of the eyeblink, depend upon the cerebellum. In examining mechanisms of eyeblink conditioning in rabbits, reversible inactivations of the control circuitry have begun to dissociate aspects of cerebellar cortical and nuclear function in memory consolidation. It was previously shown that post-training cerebellar cortical, but not nuclear, inactivations with the GABAA agonist muscimol prevented consolidation but these findings left open the question as to how final memory storage was partitioned across cortical and nuclear levels. Memory consolidation might be essentially cortical and directly disturbed by actions of the muscimol, or it might be nuclear, and sensitive to the raised excitability of the nuclear neurons following the loss of cortical inhibition. To resolve this question, we simultaneously inactivated cerebellar cortical lobule HVI and the anterior interpositus nucleus of rabbits during the post-training period, so protecting the nuclei from disinhibitory effects of cortical inactivation. Consolidation was impaired by these simultaneous inactivations. Because direct application of muscimol to the nuclei alone has no impact upon consolidation, we can conclude that post-training, consolidation processes and memory storage for eyeblink conditioning have critical cerebellar cortical components. The findings are consistent with a recent model that suggests the distribution of learning-related plasticity across cortical and nuclear levels is task-dependent. There can be transfer to nuclear or brainstem levels for control of high-frequency responses but learning with lower frequency response components, such as in eyeblink conditioning, remains mainly dependent upon cortical memory storage.

  12. Cerebellar and cerebral atrophy in trichothiodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Sargent, Michael A.; Poskitt, Kenneth J. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Prendiville, Julie S. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Division of Paediatric Dermatology, Department of Paediatrics, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    Trichothiodystrophy is a rare neuroectodermal disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance that is characterized by brittle hair, nail dysplasia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and gonadal failure. We describe a female patient whose cranial MRI revealed almost total lack of myelination in the supratentorial white matter, which is similar to the previously described cases. In addition, there was progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, which has not been well documented in association with trichothiodystrophy. (orig.)

  13. An integrator circuit in cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maex, Reinoud; Steuber, Volker

    2013-09-01

    The brain builds dynamic models of the body and the outside world to predict the consequences of actions and stimuli. A well-known example is the oculomotor integrator, which anticipates the position-dependent elasticity forces acting on the eye ball by mathematically integrating over time oculomotor velocity commands. Many models of neural integration have been proposed, based on feedback excitation, lateral inhibition or intrinsic neuronal nonlinearities. We report here that a computational model of the cerebellar cortex, a structure thought to implement dynamic models, reveals a hitherto unrecognized integrator circuit. In this model, comprising Purkinje cells, molecular layer interneurons and parallel fibres, Purkinje cells were able to generate responses lasting more than 10 s, to which both neuronal and network mechanisms contributed. Activation of the somatic fast sodium current by subthreshold voltage fluctuations was able to maintain pulse-evoked graded persistent activity, whereas lateral inhibition among Purkinje cells via recurrent axon collaterals further prolonged the responses to step and sine wave stimulation. The responses of Purkinje cells decayed with a time-constant whose value depended on their baseline spike rate, with integration vanishing at low ( 30 per s). The model predicts that the apparently fast circuit of the cerebellar cortex may control the timing of slow processes without having to rely on sensory feedback. Thus, the cerebellar cortex may contain an adaptive temporal integrator, with the sensitivity of integration to the baseline spike rate offering a potential mechanism of plasticity of the response time-constant.

  14. Computed tomography in hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, T.; Maki, Y.; Ono, Y.; Yoshizawa, T.; Tsuboi, K. (Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1981-11-01

    Fourteen cases of cerebellar hemorrhage were analysed from the point of CT-scan, and the following results were obtained. 1. The number of cases of cerebellar hemorrhage forms 4.4% of that of total intracranial hemorrhage. 2. Most of the cerebellar hematomas extend upward. Downward extension is rare. 3. In acute dead cases hematomas are 5 cm or more in diameter and lie over bilateral hemispheres with the extension to third or fourth ventricles in CT-scans. 4. Slowly progressive cases are detriorated by the secondary hydrocephalus. 5. In mild cases hematomas are 3cm or less in diameter on CT-scans and the hematoma evacuation is not indicated for these cases. 6. The shunt operation alone is sufficient for the life saving of the slowly progressive cases, but the hematoma evacuation is indicated in these cases if the functional prognosis is taken into consideration. 7. Immediate hematoma evacuation together with the ventricular drainage is considered to be effective for the life saving of the acute fulminant cases.

  15. Arterial vascularization of the brain of the agouti (Dasyprocta aguti Linnaeus, 1766

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Sávio Bessa da Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The agouti, a rodent that is geographically distributed throughout South America, is greatly valued for its meat. This paper describes the arterial vascularization of the base of the agouti’s brain, characterizing behavior, and arterial origin and distribution. Ten animals from the Center for the Multiplication of Wild Animals (CEMAS/UFERSA were used and the study was approved by SISBIO (report number 32413- 1 and the Ethics Committee on Animal Use (CEUA/UFERSA (protocol 02/2010. After euthanasia, the animals were incised in the thoracic cavity by an injection of red-stained Neoprene latex 650 and the skulls were subsequently opened. The brains were extracted from the skulls for ventral surface analysis and then fixed in an aqueous 10% formaldehyde solution. The agouti’s arterial vascularization of the brain has two main components, namely the carotid and vertebrobasilar systems. The agouti’s carotid system accounts for vascularization of almost the entire forebrain, while the vertebrobasilar system accounts for vascularization of almost the entire posterior brain (medulla oblongata, pyramid, trapezoid body, cerebellum, bridge, and part of the third caudal section of the forebrain through the caudal cerebral arteries originating from the terminal branches of the basilar artery. The main arteries on the brain surface include the basilar artery, which is unique, and the arterial pairs, specifically the vertebral arteries, cerebellar caudal arteries, trigeminal artery, rostral cerebellar artery, basilar terminal branch artery, cerebral caudal artery, communicating caudal branch of the cerebral carotid artery, cerebral carotid artery, communicating branch rostral cerebral carotid artery, choroidal rostral artery, medial branch of the communicating branch rostral artery, internal ophthalmic artery, middle cerebral artery, and rostral cerebral artery.

  16. Emotional disorders in patients with cerebellar damage – case studies

    OpenAIRE

    Siuda, Katarzyna; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Starowicz-Filip, Anna; Tereszko,Anna; Dudek, Dominika

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Growing number of research shows the role of the cerebellum in the regulation of affect. Lesions of the cerebellum can lead to emotional disregulation, a significant part of the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome. The aim of this article is to analyze the most recent studies concerning the cerebellar participation in emotional reactions and to present three cases: two female and one male who suffered from cerebellar damage and presented post-traumatic affective and personality chang...

  17. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Mello, Anila M; Stoodley, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD.

  18. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anila M. D'Mello

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. In contrast, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD.

  19. Remote Cerebellar Hemorrhage Presenting with Cerebellar Mutism after Spinal Surgery: An Unusual Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Halil Murat; Guven, Mustafa; Aras, Adem Bozkurt; Cosar, Murat

    2017-05-01

    Dural injury during spinal surgery can subsequently give rise to a remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH). Although the incidence of such injury is low, the resulting hemorrhage can be life threatening. The mechanism underlying the formation of the hemorrhage is not known, but it is mostly thought to develop after venous infarction. Cerebellar mutism (CM) is a frequent complication of posterior fossa operations in children, but it is rarely seen in adults. The development of CM after an RCH has not been described. We describe the case of a 65-year old female who lost cerebrospinal fluid after inadvertent opening of the dura during surgery. Computerized tomography performed when the patient became unable to speak revealed a bilateral cerebellar hemorrhage.

  20. Cerebellar damage produces selective deficits in verbal working memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravizza, Susan M; McCormick, Cristin A; Schlerf, John E; Justus, Timothy; Ivry, Richard B; Fiez, Julie A

    .... While patients with cerebellar damage occasionally exhibit a mild impairment on standard neuropsychological tests of working memory, these tests are not diagnostic for exploring these processes in detail...

  1. Pitch discrimination in cerebellar patients: evidence for a sensory deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Lawrence M; Petacchi, Augusto; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Bower, James M

    2009-12-15

    In the last two decades, a growing body of research showing cerebellar involvement in an increasing number of nonmotor tasks and systems has prompted an expansion of speculations concerning the function of the cerebellum. Here, we tested the predictions of a hypothesis positing cerebellar involvement in sensory data acquisition. Specifically, we examined the effect of global cerebellar degeneration on primary auditory sensory function by means of a pitch discrimination task. The just noticeable difference in pitch between two tones was measured in 15 healthy controls and in 15 high functioning patients afflicted with varying degrees of global cerebellar degeneration caused by hereditary, idiopathic, paraneoplastic, or postinfectious pancerebellitis. Participants also performed an auditory detection task assessing sustained attention, a test of verbal auditory working memory, and an audiometric test. Patient pitch discrimination thresholds were on average five and a half times those of controls and were proportional to the degree of cerebellar ataxia assessed independently. Patients and controls showed normal hearing thresholds and similar performance in control tasks in sustained attention and verbal auditory working memory. These results suggest there is an effect of cerebellar degeneration on primary auditory function. The findings are consistent with other recent demonstrations of cerebellar-related sensory impairments, and with robust cerebellar auditorily evoked activity, confirmed by quantitative meta-analysis, across a range of functional neuroimaging studies dissociated from attention, motor, affective, and cognitive variables. The data are interpreted in the context of a sensory hypothesis of cerebellar function.

  2. Cerebellar ataxia as the presenting manifestation of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arav-Boger, Ravit; Crawford, Thomas; Steere, Allen C; Halsey, Neal A

    2002-04-01

    A 7-year-old boy from suburban Baltimore who presented with cerebellar ataxia and headaches was found by magnetic resonance imaging to have multiple cerebellar enhancing lesions. He had no history of tick exposure. He was initially treated with steroids for presumptive postinfectious encephalitis. Lyme disease was diagnosed 10 weeks later after arthritis developed. Testing of the cerebrospinal fluid obtained at the time cerebellar ataxia was diagnosed revealed intrathecal antibody production to Borrelia burgdorferi. Treatment with intravenous antibiotics led to rapid resolution of persistent cerebellar findings.

  3. Equivalent Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyadjiev, T. L.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic field dependences of critical current are numerically constructed for a long Josephson junction with a shunt-or resistor-type microscopic inhomogeneities and compared to the critical curve of a junction with exponentially varying width. The numerical results show that it is adequate to replace the distributed inhomogeneity of a long Josephson junction by an inhomogeneity localized at one of its ends, which has certain technological advantages. It is also shown that the critical curves of junctions with exponentially varying width and inhomogeneities localized at the ends are unaffected by the mixed fluxon-antifluxon distributions of the magnetic flow. This fact may explain the improvement of the spectra of microwave radiation noted in the literature.

  4. Quantum Junction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Jiang

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO 2); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  5. The AMPA antagonist, NBQX, protects against ischemia-induced loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balchen, T.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1992-01-01

    Neuropathology, NBQX, AMPA antagonist, cerebellar cells, ischemia, rats, Purkinje, neuronal death......Neuropathology, NBQX, AMPA antagonist, cerebellar cells, ischemia, rats, Purkinje, neuronal death...

  6. Individualized management for intracranial vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHANG Yan-guo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the individualized management strategy for intracranial vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms. Methods Eighteen patients with intracranial vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms were treated with different surgical methods. Results Eighteen patients underwent different surgical treatment. Five patients underwent complete occlusion of the aneurysm and parent artery by coiling, 5 were treated by stent -assisted coiling (3 densely packed coiling and 2 non-densely packed coiling, 4 underwent stent-only therapy and 3 of them presented hemodynamic improvement after surgery, 3 were treated by direct surgical clipping, and 1 underwent occipital artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery bypass. Two aneurysms ruptured immaturely, in which one patient died on the third day after operation and one patient occurred moderate disablity. Only 1 patient who underwent complete occlusion of aneurysm and parent artery presented temporarily ischemic symptoms. No adverse effects were seen in other patients. Seventeen patients were followed up for 1 month to 3 years, and all the aneurysms were stable. Conclusion There are many kinds of therapeutic methods for intracranial vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms. The patients should be treated according to several factors such as the clinical manifestations, aneurysm configuration, and relationship with the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The treatment should be individualized.

  7. [Part of the vertebral artery in patients with sudden deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yisa; Lv, Fengquan; Cai, Huixiau; Wu, Hao

    2013-08-01

    To explore the characteristics of vertebral artery system in the patients with sudden deafness by using digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Thirty-four cases of sudden deafness with vertebrobasilar artery ischemia confirmed by the color doppler ultrasound were undergone DSA in both side. The characteristics of vertebral artery, basal artery and before-cerebellum artery were analysis before specific therapy. There is no related complication were occurred among 34 cases. Side vertebral artery was blocked in 2 cases, atherosclerosis was found in 5 cases. The right cerebellar artery anterior and the left cerebellar artery posterior were found filling defect or minor change in 29.4% (10/34) and 35.3% (12/34) of the patients, respectively. The right and the left arteria auditiva interna were found filling defect or minor change in 64.7% (22/34) and 73.5% (25/34) of the patients, respectively. After specific therapy, 8 cases were cured, the hearing of 9 cases were markedly improved, the hearing of 12 cases were improved efficient and 5 patients have no hearing improvement, the total effective rate was 85.3%. The arteria auditiva interna and inferior anterior arteria cerebelli caused inner ear ischemia were found in the patients with sudden deafness. The using of vasodilator may have satisfactory and positive curative effect in the therapy of sudden deafness.

  8. Encoding of whisker input by cerebellar Purkinje cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.W.J. Bosman (Laurens); S.K.E. Koekkoek (Bas); J. Shapiro (Joël); B.F.M. Rijken (Bianca); F. Zandstra (Froukje); B. van der Ende (Barry); C.B. Owens (Cullen); J.W. Potters (Jan Willem); J.R. de Gruijl (Jornt); T.J.H. Ruigrok (Tom); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe cerebellar cortex is crucial for sensorimotor integration. Sensorimotor inputs converge on cerebellar Purkinje cells via two afferent pathways: the climbing fibre pathway triggering complex spikes, and the mossy fibre-parallel fibre pathway, modulating the simple spike activities of

  9. Excitatory Cerebellar Nucleocortical Circuit Provides Internal Amplification during Associative Conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Zhenyu; Proietti-Onori, Martina; Lin, Zhanmin; Ten Brinke, Michiel M; Boele, Henk-Jan; Potters, Jan-Willem; Ruigrok, Tom J H; Hoebeek, Freek E; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2016-01-01

    Closed-loop circuitries between cortical and subcortical regions can facilitate precision of output patterns, but the role of such networks in the cerebellum remains to be elucidated. Here, we characterize the role of internal feedback from the cerebellar nuclei to the cerebellar cortex in classical

  10. Ataxic hemiparesis: neurophysiological analysis by cerebellar transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Saeko; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Moriya, Arata; Nakatani-Enomoto, Setsu; Nakamura, Koichiro; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate physiological mechanisms underlying ataxia in patients with ataxic hemiparesis. Subjects were three patients with ataxic hemiparesis, whose responsible lesion was located at the posterior limb of internal capsule (case 1), thalamus (case 2), or pre- and post-central gyri (case 3). Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technique was used to evaluate connectivity between the cerebellum and contralateral motor cortex. The conditioning cerebellar stimulus was given over the cerebellum and the test stimulus over the primary motor cortex. We studied how the conditioning stimulus modulated motor evoked potentials (MEPs) to the cortical test stimulus. In non-ataxic limbs, the cerebellar stimulus normally suppressed cortical MEPs. In ataxic limbs, the cerebellar inhibition was not elicited in patients with a lesion at the posterior limb of internal capsule (case 1) or thalamus (case 2). In contrast, normal cerebellar inhibition was elicited in the ataxic limb in a patient with a lesion at sensori-motor cortex (case 3). Lesions at the internal capsule and thalamus involved the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways and reduced the cerebellar suppression effect. On the other hand, a lesion at the pre- and post-central gyri should affect cortico-pontine pathway but not involve the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways. This lack of cerebello-talamo-cortical pathway involvement may explain normal suppression in this patient. The cerebellar TMS method can differentiate cerebellar efferent ataxic hemiparesis from cerebellar afferent ataxic hemiparesis.

  11. Drug-induced cerebellar ataxia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Kerstens, F.G.; Maas, R.P.P.W.M.; Harmark, L.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cerebellar ataxia can be induced by a large number of drugs. We here conducted a systemic review of the drugs that can lead to cerebellar ataxia as an adverse drug reaction (ADR). METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search in Pubmed (1966 to January 2014) and

  12. Cerebellar pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidich, M.J.; Walker, M.T.; Han, G. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Gottardi-Littell, N.R. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chandler, J.P. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2004-10-01

    We describe a case of cerebellar pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) occurring in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The histomorphology of this uncommon glial (astrocytic) neoplasm is discussed. The occurrence of this tumor within the posterior fossa is extremely rare. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a cerebellar PXA in a patient with NF1. (orig.)

  13. Cerebellar infarct patterns : The SMART-Medea study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Cocker, Laurens J L; Geerlings, Mirjam I; Hartkamp, NS; Grool, Anne M; Mali, Willem P; Van der Graaf, Yolanda; Kloppenborg, Raoul P; Hendrikse, J; Doevendans, PAFM

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Previous studies on cerebellar infarcts have been largely restricted to acute infarcts in patients with clinical symptoms, and cerebellar infarcts have been evaluated with the almost exclusive use of transversal MR images. We aimed to document the occurrence and 3D-imaging patterns of

  14. Cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation effects on saccade adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Avila (Eric); J.N. van der Geest (Jos); S. Kengne Kamga (Sandra); M.C. Verhage (M. Claire); O. Donchin (Opher); M.A. Frens (Maarten)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractSaccade adaptation is a cerebellar-mediated type of motor learning in which the oculomotor system is exposed to repetitive errors. Different types of saccade adaptations are thought to involve distinct underlying cerebellar mechanisms. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) induc

  15. Drug-induced cerebellar ataxia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Kerstens, F.G.; Maas, R.P.P.W.M.; Harmark, L.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cerebellar ataxia can be induced by a large number of drugs. We here conducted a systemic review of the drugs that can lead to cerebellar ataxia as an adverse drug reaction (ADR). METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search in Pubmed (1966 to January 2014) and EMB

  16. Molecular markers of neuronal progenitors in the embryonic cerebellar anlage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Daniver; Hatten, Mary E

    2006-11-22

    The cerebellum, like the cerebrum, includes a nuclear structure and an overlying cortical structure. Experiments in the past decade have expanded knowledge beyond the traditional function of the cerebellum to include critical roles in motor learning and memory and sensory discrimination. The initial steps in cerebellar development depend on inductive signaling involving FGF and Wnt proteins produced at the mesencephalic/metencephalic boundary. To address the issue of how individual cerebellar cell fates within the cerebellar territory are specified, we examined the expression of transcription factors, including mammalian homologues of LIM homeodomain-containing proteins, basic helix-loop-helix proteins, and three amino acid loop-containing proteins. The results of these studies show that combinatorial codes of transcription factors define precursors of the cerebellar nuclei, and both Purkinje cells and granule neurons of the cerebellar cortex. Examination of gene expression patterns in several hundred lines of Egfp-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mice in the GENSAT Project revealed numerous genes with restricted expression in cerebellar progenitor populations, including genes specific for cerebellar nuclear precursors and Purkinje cell precursors. In addition, we identified patterns of gene expression that link granule and Purkinje cells to their precerebellar nuclei. These results identify molecular pathways that offer new insights on the development of the nuclear and cortical structures of the cerebellum, as well as components of the cerebellar circuitry.

  17. [Surgery of AVM of the inferior medullary velum by the uvulotonsillar approach--advantage of moving of the cerebellar tonsil: technical case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeno, Taku; Kumai, Junichiro; Endo, Masaru; Hotta, Shinji

    2002-01-01

    An incidentally found arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the inferior medullary velum behind the medulla was removed by the lateral approach to the fourth ventricle originally described by Seeger in 1980. A wide posterior fossa craniotomy was performed to move the cerebellar tonsil laterally with C-1 laminectomy. The tela chroidea and inferior medullary velum, the two main sheets of tissue that form the lower half of the roof of the fourth ventricle can be exposed by gently displacing the tonsils laterally without splitting the vermis. Both the cerebellomedullary and uvulotonsillar spaces were exposed. Because the lateral cerebellomedullary cistern was also exposed, the moving of the cerebellar tonsil in a lateral direction was easy to do without injuring the cerebellar tissues. The nidus was located mainly in the extrapial plane that received feeding arteries from the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The nidus was removed in a dry field without bleeding. This report is the first report of surgical removal of unruptured AVM of the inferior medullary velum through the so-called telovelar or transcerebellomedullary fissure approach. We propose to call this approach the uvulotonsillar approach to emphasize the dissecting plane between the uvula and the tonsil.

  18. New evidence for the cerebellar involvement in personality traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora ePicerni

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the recognition of its role in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum has been involved in cognitive, emotional and even personality domains. This study investigated the relationships between cerebellar macro- and micro-structural variations and temperamental traits measured by Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI. High resolution T1-weighted and Diffusion Tensor Images of 100 healthy subjects aged 18-59 years were acquired by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance scanner. In multiple regression analyses, cerebellar Gray Matter (GM or White Matter (WM volumes, GM Mean Diffusivity (MD, and WM Fractional Anisotropy (FA were used as dependent variables, TCI scores as regressors, gender, age, and education years as covariates. Novelty Seeking scores were associated positively with the cerebellar GM volumes and FA, and negatively with MD. No significant association between Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence or Persistence scores and cerebellar structural measures was found. The present data put toward a cerebellar involvement in the management of novelty.

  19. The physiological basis of therapies for cerebellar ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Manto, Mario

    2016-09-01

    Cerebellar ataxias represent a group of heterogeneous disorders impacting on activities of daily living and quality of life. Various therapies have been proposed to improve symptoms in cerebellar ataxias. This review examines the physiological background of the various treatments currently administered worldwide. We analyze the mechanisms of action of drugs with a focus on aminopyridines and other antiataxic medications, of noninvasive cerebellar stimulation, and of motor rehabilitation. Considering the cerebellum as a controller, we propose the novel concept of 'restorable stage'. Because of its unique anatomical architecture and its diffuse connectivity in particular with the cerebral cortex, keeping in mind the anatomophysiology of the cerebellar circuitry is a necessary step to understand the rationale of therapies of cerebellar ataxias and develop novel therapeutic tools.

  20. New evidence for the cerebellar involvement in personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picerni, Eleonora; Petrosini, Laura; Piras, Fabrizio; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Cutuli, Debora; Chiapponi, Chiara; Fagioli, Sabrina; Girardi, Paolo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Following the recognition of its role in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum has been involved in cognitive, emotional, and even personality domains. This study investigated the relationships between cerebellar macro- and micro-structural variations and temperamental traits measured by Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). High resolution T1-weighted, and Diffusion Tensor Images of 100 healthy subjects aged 18-59 years were acquired by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance scanner. In multiple regression analyses, cerebellar Gray Matter (GM) or White Matter (WM) volumes, GM Mean Diffusivity (MD), and WM Fractional Anisotropy (FA) were used as dependent variables, TCI scores as regressors, gender, age, and education years as covariates. Novelty Seeking scores were associated positively with the cerebellar GM volumes and FA, and negatively with MD. No significant association between Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence or Persistence scores and cerebellar structural measures was found. The present data put toward a cerebellar involvement in the management of novelty.

  1. Cerebellar vermis plays a causal role in visual motion discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Renzi, Chiara; Casali, Stefano; Silvanto, Juha; Vecchi, Tomaso; Papagno, Costanza; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-09-01

    Cerebellar patients have been found to show deficits in visual motion discrimination, suggesting that the cerebellum may play a role in visual sensory processing beyond mediating motor control. Here we show that triple-pulse online transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over cerebellar vermis but not over the cerebellar hemispheres significantly impaired motion discrimination. Critically, the interference caused by vermis TMS on motion discrimination did not depend on an indirect effect of TMS over nearby visual areas, as demonstrated by a control experiment in which TMS over V1 but not over cerebellar vermis significantly impaired orientation discrimination. These findings demonstrate the causal role of the cerebellar vermis in visual motion processing in neurologically normal participants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Disorganized foliation of unilateral cerebellar hemisphere as cerebellar cortical dysplasia in patients with recurrent seizures: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Hye Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    We present a rare case of abnormal foliation for one cerebellar hemisphere on MR imaging, showing vertically-oriented folia. Foliation of contralateral cerebellar hemisphere and other structures in the posterior fossa were normal, and the patient has no neurologic deficits. This rare and unique abnormality is considered a kind of developmental error of the cerebellum.

  3. Cerebellar ependymal cyst in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss-Fluehmann, G; Konar, M; Jaggy, A; Vandevelde, M; Oevermann, A

    2008-11-01

    An 11-week-old, male, Staffordshire Bull Terrier had a history of generalized ataxia and falling since birth. The neurologic findings suggested a localization in the cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed. In all sequences the area of the cerebellum was almost replaced by fluid isointense to cerebrospinal fluid. A complete necropsy was performed after euthanasia. Histologically, the lesion was characterized by extensive loss of cerebellar tissue in both hemispheres and vermis. Toward the surface of the cerebellar defect, the cavity was confined by ruptured and folded membranes consisting of a layer of glial fibrillary acidic (GFAP)-positive glial cells covered multifocally by epithelial cells. Some of these cells bore apical cilia and were cytokeratin and GFAP negative, supporting their ependymal origin. The histopathologic features of our case are consistent with the diagnosis of an ependymal cyst. Its glial and ependymal nature as demonstrated by histopathologic and immunohistochemical examination differs from arachnoid cysts, which have also been reported in dogs. The origin of these cysts remains controversial, but it has been suggested that they develop during embryogenesis subsequent to sequestration of developing neuroectoderm. We speculate that the cyst could have been the result of a pre- or perinatal, possibly traumatic, insult because hemorrhage, and tissue destruction had occurred. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an ependymal cyst in the veterinary literature.

  4. Surgical Treatment for Occipital Condyle Fracture, C1 Dislocation, and Cerebellar Contusion with Hemorrhage after Blunt Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Ueda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Occipital condyle fractures (OCFs have been treated as rare traumatic injuries, but the number of reported OCFs has gradually increased because of the popularization of computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The patient in this report presented with OCFs and C1 dislocation, along with traumatic cerebellar hemorrhage, which led to craniovertebral junction instability. This case was also an extremely rare clinical condition in which the patient presented with traumatic lower cranial nerve palsy secondary to OCFs. When the patient was transferred to our hospital, the occipital bone remained defective extensively due to surgical treatment of cerebellar hemorrhage. For this reason, concurrent cranioplasty was performed with resin in order to fix the occipital bone plate strongly. The resin-made occipital bone was used to secure a titanium plate and screws enabled us to perform posterior fusion of the craniovertebral junction. Although the patient wore a halo vest for 3 months after surgery, lower cranial nerve symptoms, including not only neck pain but also paralysis of the throat and larynx, improved postoperatively. No complications were detected during outpatient follow-up, which continued for 5 years postoperatively.

  5. Vestibular and cerebellar contribution to gaze optimality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağlam, Murat; Glasauer, Stefan; Lehnen, Nadine

    2014-04-01

    Patients with chronic bilateral vestibular loss have large gaze variability and experience disturbing oscillopsia, which impacts physical and social functioning, and quality of life. Gaze variability and oscillopsia in these patients are attributed to a deficient vestibulo-ocular reflex, i.e. impaired online feedback motor control. Here, we assessed whether the lack of vestibular input also affects feed-forward motor learning, i.e. the ability to choose optimal movement parameters that minimize variability during active movements such as combined eye-head gaze shifts. A failure to learn from practice and reshape feed-forward motor commands in response to sensory error signals to achieve appropriate movements has been proposed to explain dysmetric gaze shifts in patients with cerebellar ataxia. We, therefore, assessed the differential roles of both sensory vestibular information and the cerebellum in choosing optimal movement kinematics. We have previously shown that, in the course of several gaze shifts, healthy subjects adjust the motor command to minimize endpoint variability also when movements are experimentally altered by an increase in the head moment of inertia. Here, we increased the head inertia in five patients with chronic complete bilateral vestibular loss (aged 45.4±7.1 years, mean±standard deviation), nine patients with cerebellar ataxia (aged 56.7±12.6 years), and 10 healthy control subjects (aged 39.7±6.3 years) while they performed large (75° and 80°) horizontal gaze shifts towards briefly flashed targets in darkness and, using our previous optimal control model, compared their gaze shift parameters to the expected optimal movements with increased head inertia. Patients with chronic bilateral vestibular loss failed to update any of the gaze shift parameters to the new optimum with increased head inertia. Consequently, they displayed highly variable, suboptimal gaze shifts. Patients with cerebellar ataxia updated some movement parameters to

  6. ZP123 increases gap junctional conductance and prevents reentrant ventricular tachycardia during myocardial ischemia in open chest dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Dezhi; Kjølbye, Anne Louise; Nielsen, Morten S

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to determine if the stable antiarrhythmic peptide (AAP) analogue ZP123 increases gap junctional intercellular conductance and prevents reentrant ventricular tachycardia (VT) during coronary artery occlusion. METHODS AND RESULTS: Voltage clamp experiments...

  7. The human myotendinous junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, A B; Larsen, M; Mackey, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a specialized structure in the musculotendinous system, where force is transmitted from muscle to tendon. Animal models have shown that the MTJ takes form of tendon finger-like processes merging with muscle tissue. The human MTJ is largely unknown and has never ...

  8. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T., E-mail: thierry.melin@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS-UMR8520, Avenue Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS-UMR7647, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  9. Cerebellar contributions to neurological soft signs in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirjak, Dusan; Thomann, Philipp A; Kubera, Katharina M; Stieltjes, Bram; Wolf, Robert C

    2016-02-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) are frequently found in psychiatric disorders of significant neurodevelopmental origin, e.g., in patients with schizophrenia and autism. Yet NSS are also present in healthy individuals suggesting a neurodevelopmental signature of motor function, probably as a continuum between health and disease. So far, little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying these motor phenomena in healthy persons, and it is even less known whether the cerebellum contributes to NSS expression. Thirty-seven healthy young adults (mean age = 23 years) were studied using high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and "resting-state" functional MRI at three Tesla. NSS levels were measured using the "Heidelberg Scale." Cerebellar gray matter volume was investigated using cerebellum-optimized voxel-based analysis methods. Cerebellar function was assessed using regional homogeneity (ReHo), a measure of local network strength. The relationship between cerebellar structure and function and NSS was analyzed using regression models. There was no significant relationship between cerebellar volume and NSS (p motor coordination" and "hard signs" NSS domains. A negative relationship was found between lobule VI activity and "complex motor task" domain (p < 0.005, uncorrected for height, p < 0.05 corrected for spatial extent). The data indicate that in healthy young adults, distinct NSS domains are related to cerebellar activity, specifically with activity of cerebellar subregions with known cortical somatomotor projections. In contrast, cerebellar volume is not predictive of NSS in healthy persons.

  10. Unmasking adrenoleukodystrophy in a cohort of cerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Hao; Lee, Yi-Chung; Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Guo, Yuh-Cherng; Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Huang, Jin-An

    2017-01-01

    Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a rare and progressive neurogenetic disease that may manifest disparate symptoms. The present study aims at investigating the role of ataxic variant of ALD (AVALD) in patients with adult-onset cerebellar ataxia, as well as characterizing their clinical features that distinguish AVALD from other cerebellar ataxias. Mutations in the ATP binding cassette subfamily D member 1 gene (ABCD1) were ascertained in 516 unrelated patients with ataxia. The patients were categorized into three groups: molecularly unassigned hereditary ataxia (n = 118), sporadic ataxia with autonomic dysfunctions (n = 296), and sporadic ataxia without autonomic dysfunctions (n = 102). Brain MRIs were scrutinized for white matter hyperintensity (WMH) in the parieto-occipital lobes, frontal lobes, corticospinal tracts, pons, middle cerebellar peduncles and cerebellar hemispheres. Two ABCD1 mutations (p.S108L and p.P623fs) previously linked to cerebral ALD and adrenomyeloneuropathy but not AVALD were identified. ALD accounts for 0.85% (1/118) of the patients with molecularly unassigned hereditary ataxia and 0.34% (1/296) of the patients with sporadic ataxia with autonomic dysfunctions. WMH in the corticospinal tracts and WMH in the cerebellar hemispheres were strongly associated with AVALD rather than other ataxias. To conclude, ALD accounts for approximately 0.39% (2/516) of adult-onset cerebellar ataxias. This study expands the mutational spectrum of AVALD and underscores the importance of considering ALD as a potential etiology of cerebellar ataxia. PMID:28481932

  11. Contribution of cerebellar sensorimotor adaptation to hippocampal spatial memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Passot

    Full Text Available Complementing its primary role in motor control, cerebellar learning has also a bottom-up influence on cognitive functions, where high-level representations build up from elementary sensorimotor memories. In this paper we examine the cerebellar contribution to both procedural and declarative components of spatial cognition. To do so, we model a functional interplay between the cerebellum and the hippocampal formation during goal-oriented navigation. We reinterpret and complete existing genetic behavioural observations by means of quantitative accounts that cross-link synaptic plasticity mechanisms, single cell and population coding properties, and behavioural responses. In contrast to earlier hypotheses positing only a purely procedural impact of cerebellar adaptation deficits, our results suggest a cerebellar involvement in high-level aspects of behaviour. In particular, we propose that cerebellar learning mechanisms may influence hippocampal place fields, by contributing to the path integration process. Our simulations predict differences in place-cell discharge properties between normal mice and L7-PKCI mutant mice lacking long-term depression at cerebellar parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. On the behavioural level, these results suggest that, by influencing the accuracy of hippocampal spatial codes, cerebellar deficits may impact the exploration-exploitation balance during spatial navigation.

  12. Update on the Pharmacotherapy of Cerebellar Ataxia and Nystagmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, Katharina; Bremova, Tatiana; Muth, Carolin; Schniepp, Roman; Teufel, Julian; Strupp, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Pharmacological treatment of cerebellar ataxias and cerebellar nystagmus still remains difficult. The efficacy of most of the agents recommended in the past for symptomatic or even causative therapy could not be proven in larger state-of-the art clinical trials. Exceptions are (a) 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) for episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2): one observational and one randomized controlled trial showed a significant effect on the number of attacks of ataxia and quality of life; (b) aminopyridines in cerebellar downbeat nystagmus (DBN): two randomized controlled trials and several observational studies demonstrate a significant improvement of the intensity of DBN, visual acuity, and postural imbalance. In both diseases the sustained-release form is evidently also efficient; (c) 4-AP in cerebellar gait ataxia: evidence comes from two observational studies. (d) chlorzoxazone in DBN which, however, was so far demonstrated in only one observational study; (e) the modified amino acid acetyl-DL-leucine: evidently effective in cerebellar ataxias, shown in three observational studies, one on patients with Niemann-Pick type C; its mode of action has to be evaluated in animal models and on a cellular/electrophysiological level. There are ongoing randomized placebo-controlled trials on EA2 with 4-AP versus acetazolamide (EAT-2-TREAT), cerebellar gait ataxia with 4-AP (FACEG), and a multinational trial on cerebellar ataxia with acetyl-DL-leucine (ALCAT).

  13. Junction trees of general graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofei WANG; Jianhua GUO

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,we study the maximal prime subgraphs and their corresponding structure for any undirected graph.We introduce the notion of junction trees and investigate their structural characteristics,including junction properties,induced-subtree properties,running-intersection properties and maximum-weight spanning tree properties.Furthermore,the characters of leaves and edges on junction trees are discussed.

  14. Engineering design of artificial vascular junctions for 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaoxiao; Bibb, Richard; Harris, Russell

    2016-06-20

    Vascular vessels, including arteries, veins and capillaries, are being printed using additive manufacturing technologies, also known as 3D printing. This paper demonstrates that it is important to follow the vascular design by nature as close as possible when 3D printing artificial vascular branches. In previous work, the authors developed an algorithm of computational geometry for constructing smooth junctions for 3D printing. In this work, computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) is used to compare the wall shear stress and blood velocity field for the junctions of different designs. The CFD model can reproduce the expected wall shear stress at locations remote from the junction. For large vessels such as veins, it is shown that ensuring the smoothness of the junction and using smaller joining angles as observed in nature is very important to avoid high wall shear stress and recirculation. The issue is however less significant for capillaries. Large joining angles make no difference to the hemodynamic behavior, which is also consistent with the fact that most capillary junctions have large joining angles. The combination of the CFD analysis and the junction construction method form a complete design method for artificial vascular vessels that can be 3D printed using additive manufacturing technologies.

  15. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting with cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Sassi, Samia; Mizouni, Habiba; Nabli, Fatma; Kallel, Lamia; Kefi, Mounir; Hentati, Fayçal

    2010-01-01

    Venous infarction in the cerebellum has been reported only rarely, probably because of the abundant venous collateral drainage in this region. Bilateral occipital infarction is a rare cause of visual loss in cerebral venous thrombosis. We describe a 50-year-old woman with a history of ulcerative colitis who developed acute cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness. She had bilateral cerebellar and occipital lesions related to sigmoid venous thrombosis and achieved complete recovery with anticoagulation therapy. Cerebral venous thrombosis should be considered in cases of simultaneous cerebellar and occipital vascular lesions.

  16. Occurrence of crossed cerebellar diaschisis in cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Hartmann, A.; Friedrich, G.; Froescher, M.; Reichmann, K.; Reske, S.N.; Knopp, R.

    1984-10-01

    In 31 patients with completed stroke (n = 30) or PRIND (n = 1) a brain SPECT with /sup 123/I-labeled amphetamines was performed. In 14 (= 45%) of the respective patients - suffering from long-lasting hemiplegia - crossed cerebellar diaschisis was present. The interval between onset of the disease and time of examination varied between 1 week and 7 years. On the other hand, patients without crossed cerebellar diaschisis did not, with one exception, suffer from hemiplegia. It is likely that this phenomenon is caused by the reduction of spino-cerebellar stimuli due to the paresis of the respective extremities.

  17. Consensus Paper: Revisiting the Symptoms and Signs of Cerebellar Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodranghien, Florian; Bastian, Amy; Casali, Carlo; Hallett, Mark; Louis, Elan D; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter; Nowak, Dennis A; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Serrao, Mariano; Steiner, Katharina Marie; Strupp, Michael; Tilikete, Caroline; Timmann, Dagmar; van Dun, Kim

    2016-06-01

    The cerebellum is involved in sensorimotor operations, cognitive tasks and affective processes. Here, we revisit the concept of the cerebellar syndrome in the light of recent advances in our understanding of cerebellar operations. The key symptoms and signs of cerebellar dysfunction, often grouped under the generic term of ataxia, are discussed. Vertigo, dizziness, and imbalance are associated with lesions of the vestibulo-cerebellar, vestibulo-spinal, or cerebellar ocular motor systems. The cerebellum plays a major role in the online to long-term control of eye movements (control of calibration, reduction of eye instability, maintenance of ocular alignment). Ocular instability, nystagmus, saccadic intrusions, impaired smooth pursuit, impaired vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and ocular misalignment are at the core of oculomotor cerebellar deficits. As a motor speech disorder, ataxic dysarthria is highly suggestive of cerebellar pathology. Regarding motor control of limbs, hypotonia, a- or dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetria, grasping deficits and various tremor phenomenologies are observed in cerebellar disorders to varying degrees. There is clear evidence that the cerebellum participates in force perception and proprioceptive sense during active movements. Gait is staggering with a wide base, and tandem gait is very often impaired in cerebellar disorders. In terms of cognitive and affective operations, impairments are found in executive functions, visual-spatial processing, linguistic function, and affective regulation (Schmahmann's syndrome). Nonmotor linguistic deficits including disruption of articulatory and graphomotor planning, language dynamics, verbal fluency, phonological, and semantic word retrieval, expressive and receptive syntax, and various aspects of reading and writing may be impaired after cerebellar damage. The cerebellum is organized into (a) a primary sensorimotor region in the anterior lobe and adjacent part of lobule VI, (b) a second sensorimotor

  18. Lissencephaly with brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia and congenital cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abumansour, Iman S; Wrogemann, Jens; Chudley, Albert E; Chodirker, Bernard N; Salman, Michael S

    2014-06-01

    Classical lissencephaly may be associated with cerebellar hypoplasia and when significant cerebellar abnormalities occur, defects in proteins encoded by TUBA1A, RELN, and very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) genes have been reported. We present a neonate with a severe neurologic phenotype associated with hypotonia, oropharyngeal incoordination that required a gastric tube for feeding, intractable epilepsy, and congenital cataracts. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed classical lissencephaly, ventriculomegaly, absent corpus callosum, globular and vertical hippocampi, and severe cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia. She died at 6 weeks of age. No specific molecular diagnosis was made. This likely represents a previously undescribed genetic lissencephaly syndrome.

  19. Endothelial derived hyperpolarization in renal interlobar arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Jens Christian; Sørensen, Charlotte M.

    2015-01-01

    In small arteries, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) are connect by myoendothelial junctions (MEJ), usually extending from the EC. Ca2+ activated K+ channels (IKCa and SKCa) located in the MEJ are suggested to play a role in NO-independent endothelium derived...

  20. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    , unipolar depression, epilepsy, migraine, and cognitive impairment was investigated. Genetic linkage analysis and sequencing of the SPG4 gene was performed and electrophysiologic investigations were carried out in six individuals and positron emission tomography (PET) in one patient. The disease was linked...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...... of these features to SPG4 is unclear. Electrophysiologic investigation showed increased central conduction time at somatosensory evoked potentials measured from the lower limbs as the only abnormal finding in two affected individuals with the SPG4 mutation. Moreover, PET of one patient showed significantly...

  1. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Sun Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes.

  2. Classically conditioned postural reflex in cerebellar patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, F P; Lachauer, S; Maschke, M; Timmann, D

    2004-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare postural responses to repetitive platform-evoked perturbations in cerebellar patients with those of healthy subjects using a classical conditioning paradigm. The perturbations consisted of tilting of the platform (unconditioned stimulus: US) at random time intervals, preceded by an auditory signal that represented the conditioning stimulus (CS). Physiological reactions were recorded biomechanically by measuring the vertical ground forces, yielding the center of vertical pressure (CVP), and electrophysiologically by EMG measurements of the main muscle groups of both legs. The recording session consisted of a control section with US-alone trials, a testing section with paired stimuli and a brief final section with US-alone trials. Healthy control subjects were divided into those establishing conditioned responses (CR) in all muscles tested (strategy I) and those with CR in the gastrocnemius muscles only (strategy II), suggesting an associative motor-related process is involved. Patients with a diffuse, non-localized disease were almost unable to establish CR. This was also true for a patient with a focal surgical lesion with no CR on the affected side but who, simultaneously, showed an essentially normal CR incidence on the intact side. During US-alone trials healthy controls exhibited a remarkable decay of the UR amplitude due to a non-associative motor-related process such as habituation. The decay was most prominent in the paired trials section. In contrast, patients showed no significant differences in the UR amplitude throughout the entire recording session. Analysis of the CVP supported the electrophysiological findings, showing CR in the controls only. The differences between the responses of control subjects and those of the cerebellar patients imply strongly that the cerebellum is involved critically in controlling associative and non-associative motor-related processes.

  3. Congenital rubella with agenesis of the inferior cerebellar vermis and total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluver, C; Meyer, R; Odendaal, H; Geerts, L

    2013-08-01

    Congenital rubella infection has been associated with a number of abnormalities including cardiac, central nervous system and placental complications. We present a case with multiple fetal abnormalities detected on prenatal ultrasound, and confirmed postnatally, that included a single umbilical artery, severe tricuspid regurgitation, micrognathia and agenesis of the inferior cerebellar vermis. Postnatal echocardiography additionally revealed unobstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage (TAPVD) into the coronary sinus. Placental examination showed signs of placentitis, and polymerase chain reaction on neonatal serum was positive for rubella. Following a multidisciplinary team review, it was decided to provide only supportive care, and the infant died at 6 months of age owing to a respiratory tract infection. To our knowledge, TAPVD and agenesis of the inferior cerebellar vermis have not been reported previously in association with congenital rubella infection. This case illustrates how congenital infection may present in atypical ways and stresses the importance of considering congenital infection in the differential diagnosis of fetal anomalies when multiple features are present.

  4. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidney can often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury or trauma to ...

  5. Familial cortical tremor with epilepsy and cerebellar pathological findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rootselaar, AF; Aronica, E; Steur, ENHJ; Rozemuller-Kwakkel, JM; de Vos, RAI; Tijssen, MAJ

    The clinical and neuropathological findings in a patient with familial cortical tremor with epilepsy (FCTE) are described. Clinically, the patient showed cortical myoclonus, tremor, and generalized seizures. Pathological investigation showed cerebellar degeneration and somal sprouting and loss of

  6. Anomalous cerebellar anatomy in Chinese children with dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hui eYang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia (DD claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children with dyslexia. In the present study, using voxel-based morphometry, we found decreased gray matter volume in the left cerebellum in Chinese children with dyslexia relative to age-matched controls. The positive correlation between reading performance and regional gray matter volume suggests that the abnormal structure in the left cerebellum is responsible for reading disability in Chinese children with dyslexia.

  7. Cerebellar blood flow in methylmercury poisoning (Minamata disease)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, K.; Korogi, Y.; Tomiguchi, S.; Takahashi, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine (Japan); Okajima, T. [Dept. of Neurology, Johnan Hospital, Maihara, Johnan-mochi (Japan); Sato, H. [Dept. of Neurology, Minamata City General Hospital and Medical Centre (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    We looked at regional cerebellar blood flow in patients with Minamata disease (MD) using technetium-99 m ethyl cysteinate dimer (99m-Tc-ECD). We carried out single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on 15 patients with MD (eight men, seven women, aged 51-78 years, mean 70.5 years) and 11 control subjects (eight men, three women, aged 62-80 years, mean 72.5 years). Regional blood flow was measured in the superior, middle, and inferior portions of the cerebellar hemispheres, and the frontal, temporal and occipital cerebral lobes. The degree of cerebellar atrophy was assessed on MRI. There were significant differences in regional blood flow in all parts of the cerebellum between patients and control, but no significant decrease was observed in the cerebrum. Blood flow was lower in the inferior cerebellum than in the other parts. Even in patients without cerebellar atrophy, flow was significantly decreased regional blood flow in the inferior part. (orig.)

  8. Cerebellar blood flow in methylmercury poisoning (Minamata disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, K; Korogi, Y; Tomiguchi, S; Takahashi, M; Okajima, T; Sato, H

    2001-04-01

    We looked at regional cerebellar blood flow in patients with Minamata disease (MD) using technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (99m-Tc-ECD). We carried out single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on 15 patients with MD (eight men, seven women, aged 51-78 years, mean 70.5 years) and 11 control subjects (eight men, three women, aged 62-80 years, mean 72.5 years). Regional blood flow was measured in the superior, middle, and inferior portions of the cerebellar hemispheres, and the frontal, temporal and occipital cerebral lobes. The degree of cerebellar atrophy was assessed on MRI. There were significant differences in regional blood flow in all parts of the cerebellum between patients and control, but no significant decrease was observed in the cerebrum. Blood flow was lower in the inferior cerebellum than in the other parts. Even in patients without cerebellar atrophy, flow was significantly decreased regional blood flow in the inferior part.

  9. Bilateral cerebellar activation in unilaterally challenged essential tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Broersma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results expand on previous findings of bilateral cerebellar involvement in ET. We have identified specific areas in the bilateral somatomotor regions of the cerebellum: lobules V, VI and VIII.

  10. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different.

  11. Cerebellar infarct patterns: The SMART-Medea study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens J.L. De Cocker, MD

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Small cerebellar infarcts proved to be much more common than larger infarcts, and preferentially involved the cortex. Small cortical infarcts predominantly involved the posterior lobes, showed sparing of subcortical white matter and occurred in characteristic topographic patterns.

  12. Whole-Cell Properties of Cerebellar Nuclei Neurons In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canto, Cathrin B; Witter, L.; De Zeeuw, C.I.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar nuclei neurons integrate sensorimotor information and form the final output of the cerebellum, projecting to premotor brainstem targets. This implies that, in contrast to specialized neurons and interneurons in cortical regions, neurons within the nuclei encode and integrate complex

  13. Microstructural Observations on Nissl Substances in the Cerebellar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    intramuscularly with liquid quinine, 16mg/kg body weight as a start dose, followed by 8mg/kg ... Conclusion: The observed degenerative changes in the Nissl substances in the cerebellar .... conceptional development in pregnant rats in.

  14. Past, Present and Future Therapeutics for Cerebellar Ataxias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmolino, D; Manto, M

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are a group of disabling neurological disorders. Patients exhibit a cerebellar syndrome and can also present with extra-cerebellar deficits, namely pigmentary retinopathy, extrapyramidal movement disorders, pyramidal signs, cortical symptoms (seizures, cognitive impairment/behavioural symptoms), and peripheral neuropathy. Recently, deficits in cognitive operations have been unraveled. Cerebellar ataxias are heterogeneous both at the phenotypic and genotypic point of view. Therapeutical trials performed during these last 4 decades have failed in most cases, in particular because drugs were not targeting a deleterious pathway, but were given to counteract putative defects in neurotransmission. The identification of the causative mutations of many hereditary ataxias, the development of relevant animal models and the recent identifications of the molecular mechanisms underlying ataxias are impacting on the development of new drugs. We provide an overview of the pharmacological treatments currently used in the clinical practice and we discuss the drugs under development. PMID:20808545

  15. Holliday junction resolvases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Haley D M; West, Stephen C

    2014-09-02

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  16. Wireless Josephson Junction Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Laura

    2015-03-01

    We report low temperature, microwave transmission measurements on a wireless two- dimensional network of Josephson junction arrays composed of superconductor-insulator -superconductor tunnel junctions. Unlike their biased counterparts, by removing all electrical contacts to the arrays and superfluous microwave components and interconnects in the transmission line, we observe new collective behavior in the transmission spectra. In particular we will show emergent behavior that systematically responds to changes in microwave power at fixed temperature. Likewise we will show the dynamic and collective response of the arrays while tuning the temperature at fixed microwave power. We discuss these spectra in terms of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and Shapiro steps. We gratefully acknowledge the support Prof. Steven Anlage at the University of Maryland and Prof. Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota. Physics and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  17. Isolated intermittent vertigo: A presenting feature of persistent trigeminal artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajsrinivas Parthasarathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic carotid – basilar anastomosis when persistent in adult life can present with a variety of neurological symptoms. We present a patient with isolated intermittent vertigo attributable to the embryonic anastomosis and describe the different types of persistent trigeminal artery. A 76-year-old Caucasian man presented with isolated intermittent vertigo and symptoms suggestive of anterior and posterior circulation strokes. Impaired vasomotor reactivity was demonstrated on insonation of the anterior and posterior cerebral arteries in this patient with a persistent left trigeminal artery and 75% stenosis of the left internal carotid artery (ICA. The symptom of intermittent vertigo resolved with carotid endarterectomy. Decreased flow across the stenotic segment of the ICA which subserved the posterior circulation resulted in basilar insufficiency. Hypoperfusion to the flocculonodular lobe supplied by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery is a likely cause for the intermittent vertigo.

  18. Cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation in neurological disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrucci, Roberta; Bocci, Tommaso; Cortese, Francesca; Ruggiero, Fabiana; Priori, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have highlighted the therapeutic potential of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with neurological diseases, including dementia, epilepsy, post-stroke dysfunctions, movement disorders, and other pathological conditions. Because of this technique’s ability to modify cerebellar excitability without significant side effects, cerebellar tDCS is a new, interesting, and powerful tool to induce plastic modifications in the cerebellum. In this report, we review...

  19. Cerebellar disorders: clinical/radiologic findings and modern imaging tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Habas, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar disorders, also called cerebellar ataxias, comprise a large group of sporadic and genetic diseases. Their core clinical features include impaired control of coordination and gait, as well as cognitive/behavioral deficits usually not detectable by a standard neurologic examination and therefore often overlooked. Two forms of cognitive/behavioral syndromes are now well identified: (1) the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome, which combines an impairment of executive functions, including planning and working memory, deficits in visuospatial skills, linguistic deficiencies such as agrammatism, and inappropriate behavior; and (2) the posterior fossa syndrome, a very acute form of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome occurring essentially in children. Sporadic ataxias include stroke, toxic causes, immune ataxias, infectious/parainfectious ataxias, traumatic causes, neoplasias and paraneoplastic syndromes, endocrine disorders affecting the cerebellum, and the so-called "degenerative ataxias" (multiple system atrophy, and sporadic adult-onset ataxias). Genetic ataxias include mainly four groups of disorders: autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias, autosomal-dominant ataxias (spinocerebellar ataxias and episodic ataxias), mitochondrial disorders, and X-linked ataxias. In addition to biochemical studies and genetic tests, brain imaging techniques are a cornerstone for the diagnosis, clinicoanatomic correlations, and follow-up of cerebellar ataxias. Modern radiologic tools to assess cerebellar ataxias include: functional imaging studies, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, volumetric studies, and tractography. These complementary methods provide a multimodal appreciation of the whole long-range cerebellar network functioning, and allow the extraction of potential biomarkers for prognosis and rating level of recovery after treatment. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Oxidative Stress in Autism: Elevated Cerebellar 3-nitrotyrosine Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Sajdel-Sulkowska

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that oxidative stress and/or mercury compounds play an important role in the pathophysiology of autism. This study compared for the first time the cerebellar levels of the oxidative stress marker 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT, mercury (Hg and the antioxidant selenium (Se levels between control and autistic subjects. Tissue homogenates were prepared in the presence of protease inhibitors from the frozen cerebellar tissue of control (n=10; mean age, 15.5 years; mean PMI, 15.5 hours and autistic (n=9; mean age 12.1 years; mean PMI, 19.3 hours subjects. The concentration of cerebellar 3-NT, determined by ELISA, in controls ranged from 13.69 to 49.04 pmol g-1 of tissue; the concentration of 3-NT in autistic cases ranged from 3.91 to 333.03 pmol g-1 of tissue. Mean cerebellar 3-NT was elevated in autism by 68.9% and the increase was statistically significant (p=0.045. Cerebellar Hg, measured by atomic absorption spectrometry ranged from 0.9 to 35 pmol g-1 tissue in controls (n=10 and from 3.2 to 80.7 pmol g-1 tissue in autistic cases (n=9; the 68.2% increase in cerebellar Hg was not statistically significant. However, there was a positive correlation between cerebellar 3-NT and Hg levels (r=0.7961, p=0.0001. A small decrease in cerebellar Se levels in autism, measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy, was not statistically significant but was accompanied by a 42.9% reduction in the molar ratio of Se to Hg in the autistic cerebellum. While preliminary, the results of the present study add elevated oxidative stress markers in brain to the growing body of data reflecting greater oxidative stress in autism.

  1. Verbal Memory Impairments in Children after Cerebellar Tumor Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Kirschen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate cerebellar lobular contributions to specific cognitive deficits observed after cerebellar tumor resection. Verbal working memory (VWM tasks were administered to children following surgical resection of cerebellar pilocytic astrocytomas and age-matched controls. Anatomical MRI scans were used to quantify the extent of cerebellar lobular damage from each patient's resection. Patients exhibited significantly reduced digit span for auditory but not visual stimuli, relative to controls, and damage to left hemispheral lobule VIII was significantly correlated with this deficit. Patients also showed reduced effects of articulatory suppression and this was correlated with damage to the vermis and hemispheral lobule IV/V bilaterally. Phonological similarity and recency effects did not differ overall between patients and controls, but outlier patients with abnormal phonological similarity effects to either auditory or visual stimuli were found to have damage to hemispheral lobule VIII/VIIB on the left and right, respectively. We postulate that damage to left hemispheral lobule VIII may interfere with encoding of auditory stimuli into the phonological store. These data corroborate neuroimaging studies showing focal cerebellar activation during VWM paradigms, and thereby allow us to predict with greater accuracy which specific neurocognitive processes will be affected by a cerebellar tumor resection.

  2. Proprioceptive Localization Deficits in People With Cerebellar Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Heidi M; Therrien, Amanda S; Bastian, Amy J

    2017-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that an important function of the cerebellum is predicting the state of the body during movement. Yet, the extent of cerebellar involvement in perception of limb state (i.e., proprioception, specifically limb position sense) has yet to be determined. Here, we investigated whether patients with cerebellar damage have deficits when trying to locate their hand in space (i.e., proprioceptive localization), which is highly important for everyday movements. By comparing performance during passive robot-controlled and active self-made multi-joint movements, we were able to determine that some cerebellar patients show improved precision during active movement (i.e., active benefit), comparable to controls, whereas other patients have reduced active benefit. Importantly, the differences in patient performance are not explained by patient diagnosis or clinical ratings of impairment. Furthermore, a subsequent experiment confirmed that active deficits in proprioceptive localization occur during both single-joint and multi-joint movements. As such, it is unlikely that localization deficits can be explained by the multi-joint coordination deficits occurring after cerebellar damage. Our results suggest that cerebellar damage may cause varied impairments to different elements of proprioceptive sense. It follows that proprioceptive localization should be adequately accounted for in clinical testing and rehabilitation of people with cerebellar damage.

  3. Aberrant cerebellar connectivity in bipolar disorder with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Ann K; Roh, Youkyung S; Ravichandran, Caitlin T; Baker, Justin T; Öngür, Dost; Cohen, Bruce M

    2017-07-01

    The cerebellum, which modulates affect and cognition in addition to motor functions, may contribute substantially to the pathophysiology of mood and psychotic disorders, such as bipolar disorder. A growing literature points to cerebellar abnormalities in bipolar disorder. However, no studies have investigated the topographic representations of resting state cerebellar networks in bipolar disorder, specifically their functional connectivity to cerebral cortical networks. Using a well-defined cerebral cortical parcellation scheme as functional connectivity seeds, we compared ten cerebellar resting state networks in 49 patients with bipolar disorder and a lifetime history of psychotic features and 55 healthy control participants matched for age, sex, and image signal-to-noise ratio. Patients with psychotic bipolar disorder showed reduced cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity in somatomotor A, ventral attention, salience, and frontoparietal control A and B networks relative to healthy control participants. These findings were not significantly correlated with current symptoms. Patients with psychotic bipolar disorder showed evidence of cerebro-cerebellar dysconnectivity in selective networks. These disease-related changes were substantial and not explained by medication exposure or substance use. Therefore, they may be mechanistically relevant to the underlying susceptibility to mood dysregulation and psychosis. Cerebellar mechanisms deserve further exploration in psychiatric conditions, and this study's findings may have value in guiding future studies on pathophysiology and treatment of mood and psychotic disorders, in particular.

  4. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis in acute isolated thalamic infarction detected by dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Förster

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD is a state of neural depression caused by loss of connections to injured neural structures remote from the cerebellum usually evaluated by positron emission tomography. Recently it has been shown that dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion weighted MRI (PWI may also be feasible to detect the phenomenon. In this study we aimed to assess the frequency of CCD on PWI in patients with acute thalamic infarction. METHODS: From a MRI report database we identified patients with acute isolated thalamic infarction. Contralateral cerebellar hypoperfusion was identified by inspection of time to peak (TTP maps and evaluated quantitatively on TTP, mean transit time (MTT, cerebral blood flow and volume (CBF, CBV maps. A competing cerebellar pathology or an underlying vascular pathology were excluded. RESULTS: A total of 39 patients was included. Common symptoms were hemiparesis (53.8%, hemihypaesthesia (38.5%, dysarthria (30.8%, aphasia (17.9%, and ataxia (15.4%. In 9 patients (23.1% PWI showed hypoperfusion in the contralateral cerebellar hemisphere. All of these had lesions in the territory of the tuberothalamic, paramedian, or inferolateral arteries. Dysarthria was observed more frequently in patients with CCD (6/9 vs. 6/30; OR 8.00; 95%CI 1.54-41.64, p = 0.01. In patients with CCD, the median ischemic lesion volume on DWI (0.91 cm³, IQR 0.49-1.54 cm³ was larger compared to patients with unremarkable PWI (0.51 cm³, IQR 0.32-0.74, p = 0.05. The most pronounced changes were found in CBF (0.94±0.11 and MTT (1.06±0.13 signal ratios, followed by TTP (1.05±0.02. CONCLUSIONS: Multimodal MRI demonstrates CCD in about 20% of acute isolated thalamic infarction patients. Lesion size seems to be a relevant factor in its pathophysiology.

  5. Relationship between the cerebellar function and cerebellar atrophy in Minamata disease. Investigations using body balance analyzer and MR imaging method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okajima, Toru [Johnan Hospital, Minami, Kumamoto (Japan); Ikeda, Osamu; Sannomiya, Kunihiro; Korogi, Yukinori; Uchino, Makoto

    1995-11-01

    Interrelations between the cerebellar function and cerebellar atrophy were studied in the cases with Minamata disease and spinocerebellar degeneration and in the healthy subjects. For evaluation of the cerebellar function, the statokinesigraph (SKG) was recorded and the shifting length (L-SKG) and moving area (A-SKG) of postural sway were obtained using body balance analyzer. Cerebellar atrophy was evaluated by the rostrocaudal and ventrodorsal diameters of whole vermis and the total area of upper and lower parts (area-UL) of vermis on the midsagittal plane of MR imaging. It was disclosed that there was significant correlation between the L-SKG and the measurement of rostrocaudal diameter as well as the area-UL of vermis through the patients with Minamata disease and the healthy subjects. When added the patients with spinocerebellar degeneration, the significant correlation was not obtainable probably because of the progressive processes of the disease. (author).

  6. Schizencephaly with occlusion or absence of middle cerebral artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Bouzas, A.; Harmony, T.; Santiago-Rodriguez, E.; Ricardo-Garcell, J.; Fernandez, T.; Avila-Acosta, D. [Instituto de Neurobiologia de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) Campus Juriquilla, Juriquilla, QRO (Mexico)

    2006-03-15

    In a study of 160 infants with prenatal and/or perinatal risk factors for brain damage, we observed three cases of schizencephaly. All cases were unilateral, and the clefts had open lips. In two cases, magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion or absence of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) on the affected side. Two of the patients, including one with absent flow in the MCA of the affected side, had ipsilateral cerebellar atrophy. (orig.)

  7. Case report on vertebral artery dissection in mixed martial arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowey, Michael; Maw, Graeme; Furyk, Jeremy

    2012-04-01

    A 41-year-old man presented to the ED with severe vertigo 2 days after a grappling injury while training in mixed martial arts. Imaging revealed a cerebellar infarct with complete occlusion of the right vertebral artery secondary to dissection. Management options are discussed as is the ongoing controversy regarding the safety of the sport. © 2011 The Authors. EMA © 2011 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  8. Cerebellar Ataxia and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariño, Helena; Gresa-Arribas, Nuria; Blanco, Yolanda; Martínez-Hernández, Eugenia; Sabater, Lidia; Petit-Pedrol, Mar; Rouco, Idoia; Bataller, Luis; Dalmau, Josep O.; Saiz, Albert; Graus, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Current clinical and immunologic knowledge on cerebellar ataxia (CA) with glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 antibodies (GAD65-Abs) is based on case reports and small series with short-term follow-up data. OBJECTIVE To report the symptoms, additional antibodies, prognostic factors, and long-term outcomes in a cohort of patients with CA and GAD65-Abs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study and laboratory investigations at a center for autoimmune neurologic disorders among 34 patients with CA and GAD65-Abs, including 25 with long-term follow-up data (median, 5.4 years; interquartile range, 3.1-10.3 years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Analysis of clinicoimmunologic features and predictors of response to immunotherapy. Immunochemistry on rat brain, cultured neurons, and human embryonic kidney cells expressing GAD65, GAD67, α1-subunit of the glycine receptor, and a repertoire of known cell surface autoantigens were used to identify additional antibodies. Twenty-eight patients with stiff person syndrome and GAD65-Abs served as controls. RESULTS The median age of patients was 58 years (range, 33-80 years); 28 of 34 patients (82%) were women. Nine patients (26%) reported episodes of brainstem and cerebellar dysfunction or persistent vertigo several months before developing CA. The clinical presentation was subacute during a period of weeks in 13 patients (38%). Nine patients (26%) had coexisting stiff person syndrome symptoms. Systemic organ-specific autoimmunities (type 1 diabetes mellitus and others) were present in 29 patients (85%). Twenty of 25 patients with long-term follow-up data received immunotherapy (intravenous immunoglobulin in 10 and corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin or other immunosuppressors in 10), and 7 of them (35%) improved. Predictors of clinical response included subacute onset of CA (odds ratio [OR], 0.50; 95% CI, 0.25-0.99; P = .047) and prompt immunotherapy (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-0.99; P = .01). Similar

  9. Gap junctions in the control of vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Xavier F; Duling, Brian R

    2009-02-01

    Direct intercellular communication via gap junctions is critical in the control and coordination of vascular function. In the cardiovascular system, gap junctions are made up of one or more of four connexin proteins: Cx37, Cx40, Cx43, and Cx45. The expression of more than one gap-junction protein in the vasculature is not redundant. Rather, vascular connexins work in concert, first during the development of the cardiovascular system, and then in integrating smooth muscle and endothelial cell function, and in coordinating cell function along the length of the vessel wall. In addition, connexin-based channels have emerged as an important signaling pathway in the astrocyte-mediated neurovascular coupling. Direct electrical communication between endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells via gap junctions is thought to play a relevant role in the control of vasomotor tone, providing the signaling pathway known as endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). Consistent with the importance of gap junctions in the regulation of vasomotor tone and arterial blood pressure, the expression of connexins is altered in diseases associated with vascular complications. In this review, we discuss the participation of connexin-based channels in the control of vascular function in physiologic and pathologic conditions, with a special emphasis on hypertension and diabetes.

  10. Vertebral artery variations and osseous anomaly at the C1-2 level diagnosed by 3D CT angiography in normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakao, Norimitsu; Kamiya, Mitsuhiro [Aichi Medical University, Department of Spine Center, Aichi (Japan); Aichi Medical University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Hirasawa, Atsuhiko; Kawanami, Katsuhisa; Takayasu, Masakazu [Aichi Medical University, Department of Spine Center, Aichi (Japan); Nishimura, Manabu [Aichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Riew, K.D. [Washington University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, St. Louis, MO (United States); Imagama, Shiro [Nagoya University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Sato, Keiji [Aichi Medical University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    The craniovertebral junction is anatomically complicated. Representative vertebral artery (VA) variations include the persistent first intersegmental artery (FIA), fenestration of the VA above and below C1 (FEN), posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) from C1/2, and high-riding VA (HRVA). The ponticulus posticus (PP) is a well-known osseous anomaly at C1. Although those anomalies are frequent in patients with cervical deformity, the prevalence of these in subjects with normal cervical spines is still unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the variations and prevalence of vascular and osseous anomalies based on three-dimensional computed tomographic (3D CT) angiography in patients without any cervical diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Klippel-Feil syndrome, or Down syndrome. Eligible subjects were patients who underwent 3D CT angiography by the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Internal Medicine from January 2009 to October 2013 in our institution. The authors defined a HRVA as a C2 pedicle with a maximum diameter of 4 mm or less. Among 480 subjects with a mean age of 63.1 years, 387 patients were eligible. One hundred and eighteen subjects were female, and 269 were male. HRVA was observed in 10.1 % of patients (39 out of 387 cases), FIA in 1.8 % (7 cases), FEN in 1.3 % (5 cases), and PICA in 1.3 % (5 cases). PP was observed in 6.2 % of patients (24 cases). According to past reports, many VA anomalies could be attributed to congenital or acquired conditions (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis). However, VA anomalies appear to exist even in patients without any such cervical diseases. (orig.)

  11. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  12. Imaging calcium waves in cerebellar Bergmann glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beierlein, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This protocol describes methods for recording synaptically evoked Ca(2+) waves from individual Bergmann glia (BG) in slices of cerebellar cortex. Unlike protoplasmic, star-shaped astrocytes, whose thin processes pose a serious challenge to stable Ca(2+) measurements, BG are large radial cells, with several main processes that run over distances of several hundred micrometers toward the pia and ensheathe thousands of parallel fiber (PF) synapses. Stimulation of PF synapses with brief bursts can trigger long-lasting Ca(2+) responses in BG processes, which can be reliably recorded using a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. This protocol was developed to enable measurements of Ca(2+) waves in individual BG loaded with a high-affinity Ca(2+) indicator such as Fura-2 for up to 2 h. Because BG recorded in slices rarely display spontaneous (i.e., tetrodotoxin [TTX]-sensitive) or intrinsic Ca(2+) transients, Ca(2+) waves can be evoked repeatedly and reliably, which permits quantitative studies using pharmacological tools. Fluorescence measurements obtained using CCD technology offer a straightforward means of characterizing the mechanisms and potential functional consequences of widespread and long-lasting, store-mediated Ca(2+) increases in astrocytes.

  13. Electrophysiological mapping of novel prefrontal - cerebellar pathways

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    Thomas C Watson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Whilst the cerebellum is predominantly considered a sensorimotor control structure, accumulating evidence suggests that it may also subserve non motor functions during cognition. However, this possibility is not universally accepted, not least because the nature and pattern of links between higher cortical structures and the cerebellum are poorly characterized. We have therefore used in vivo electrophysiological methods in anaesthetized rats to directly investigate connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex (prelimbic subdivision, PrL and the cerebellum. Stimulation of deep layers of PrL evoked distinct field potentials in the cerebellar cortex with a mean latency to peak of approximately 35ms. These responses showed a well-defined topography, and were maximal in lobule VII of the contralateral vermis (a known oculomotor centre; they were not attenuated by local anesthesia of the overlying M2 motor cortex, though M2 stimulation did evoke field potentials in lobule VII with a shorter latency. Single-unit recordings showed that prelimbic cortical stimulation elicits complex spikes in lobule VII Purkinje cells, indicating transmission via a previously undescribed cerebro-olivocerebellar pathway. Our results therefore establish a physiological basis for communication between PrL and the cerebellum. The role(s of this pathway remain to be resolved, but presumably relate to control of eye movements and/or distributed networks associated with integrated prefrontal cortical functions.

  14. Sudden stopping in patients with cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Mariano; Conte, Carmela; Casali, Carlo; Ranavolo, Alberto; Mari, Silvia; Di Fabio, Roberto; Perrotta, Armando; Coppola, Gianluca; Padua, Luca; Monamì, Stefano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Pierelli, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    Stopping during walking, a dynamic motor task frequent in everyday life, is very challenging for ataxic patients, as it reduces their gait stability and increases the incidence of falls. This study was conducted to analyse the biomechanical characteristics of upper and lower body segments during abrupt stopping in ataxic patients in order to identify possible strategies used to counteract the instability in the sagittal and frontal plane. Twelve patients with primary degenerative cerebellar ataxia and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were studied. Time-distance parameters, dynamic stability of the centre of mass, upper body measures and lower joint kinematic and kinetic parameters were analysed. The results indicate that ataxic patients have a great difficulty in stopping abruptly during walking and adopt a multi-step stopping strategy, occasionally with feet parallel, to compensate for their inability to coordinate the upper body and to generate a well-coordinated lower limb joint flexor-extensor pattern and appropriate braking forces for progressively decelerating the progression of the body in the sagittal plane. A specific rehabilitation treatment designed to improve the ability of ataxic patients to transform unplanned stopping into planned stopping, to coordinate upper body and to execute an effective flexion-extension pattern of the hip and knee joints may be useful in these patients in order to improve their stopping performance and prevent falls.

  15. Cerebellar development in the absence of Gbx function in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chen-Ying; Kemp, Hilary A; Moens, Cecilia B

    2014-02-01

    The midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) is a well-known organizing center during vertebrate brain development. The MHB forms at the expression boundary of Otx2 and Gbx2, mutually repressive homeodomain transcription factors expressed in the midbrain/forebrain and anterior hindbrain, respectively. The genetic hierarchy of gene expression at the MHB is complex, involving multiple positive and negative feedback loops that result in the establishment of non-overlapping domains of Wnt1 and Fgf8 on either side of the boundary and the consequent specification of the cerebellum. The cerebellum derives from the dorsal part of the anterior-most hindbrain segment, rhombomere 1 (r1), which undergoes a distinctive morphogenesis to give rise to the cerebellar primordium within which the various cerebellar neuron types are specified. Previous studies in the mouse have shown that Gbx2 is essential for cerebellar development. Using zebrafish mutants we show here that in the zebrafish gbx1 and gbx2 are required redundantly for morphogenesis of the cerebellar primordium and subsequent cerebellar differentiation, but that this requirement is alleviated by knocking down Otx. Expression of fgf8, wnt1 and the entire MHB genetic program is progressively lost in gbx1-;gbx2- double mutants but is rescued by Otx knock-down. This rescue of the MHB genetic program depends on rescued Fgf signaling, however the rescue of cerebellar primordium morphogenesis is independent of both Gbx and Fgf. Based on our findings we propose a revised model for the role of Gbx in cerebellar development.

  16. A cerebellar neuroprosthetic system: computational architecture and in vivo experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan eHerreros Alonso

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Emulating the input-output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuro-prosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model's inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuro-prosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step towards replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuro-prosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuro-prosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step towards the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term

  17. Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome CCAS – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starowicz-Filip, Anna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the study was to describe a case of the patient with cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome CCAS, characterize the role of cerebellum in the regulation of cognitive functions and present theprocedure of neuropsychological diagnosis useful in indicating the specific cognitive and emotional problems in patients with cerebellar damage.Case report. A 41- year old man with an ischemic cerebellar stroke of its right hemisphere manifested the neuropsychological symptoms typical for the frontal damage: euphoric mood, disorganized behavior,lack of criticism and mental plasticity, tendency to shorten the personal distance, problems with mistake correction. In neuropsychological diagnosis we used following methods: Raven Progressive Matrices Test, Mini Mental Stage Examination (MMSE, Trail Making Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Stroop Interference Test, Word Fluency Test, Auditory Verbal Learning Test by Łuria, Benton Visual Retention Test, Digit Span.Results. Analyzing the obtained results we observed the significant decrease of all executive functions: planning, abstract thinking, cognitive flexibility, adaptation to new situations as well as memory impairments and changes in emotional and behavioral state similar to frontal syndrome. The whole of impairments including the typical cerebellar symptoms (ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria,hypotonia create the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome CCAS with leading role of dysexecutive syndrome.Conclusions. The cerebellum takes part in the regulation of cognitive functions. The cerebellar damages can imitate the emotional- cognitive problems of patients after frontal damages what additionally stress the functional link between these two brain structures. Patient’s with cerebellar damages should have neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric diagnosis and care.

  18. Cerebellar infarct patterns: The SMART-Medea study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cocker, Laurens J L; Geerlings, Mirjam I; Hartkamp, Nolan S; Grool, Anne M; Mali, Willem P; Van der Graaf, Yolanda; Kloppenborg, Raoul P; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on cerebellar infarcts have been largely restricted to acute infarcts in patients with clinical symptoms, and cerebellar infarcts have been evaluated with the almost exclusive use of transversal MR images. We aimed to document the occurrence and 3D-imaging patterns of cerebellar infarcts presenting as an incidental finding on MRI. We analysed the 1.5 Tesla MRI, including 3D T1-weighted datasets, of 636 patients (mean age 62 ± 9 years, 81% male) from the SMART-Medea study. Cerebellar infarct analyses included an assessment of size, cavitation and gliosis, of grey and white matter involvement, and of infarct topography. One or more cerebellar infarcts (mean 1.97; range 1-11) were detected in 70 out of 636 patients (11%), with a total amount of 138 infarcts identified, 135 of which showed evidence of cavitation. The average mean axial diameter was 7 mm (range 2-54 mm), and 131 infarcts (95%) were smaller than 20 mm. Hundred-thirty-four infarcts (97%) involved the cortex, of which 12 in combination with subcortical white matter. No infarcts were restricted to subcortical branches of white matter. Small cortical infarcts involved the apex of a deep (pattern 1) or shallow fissure (pattern 2), or occurred alongside one (pattern 3) or opposite sides (pattern 4) of a fissure. Most (87%) cerebellar infarcts were situated in the posterior lobe. Small cerebellar infarcts proved to be much more common than larger infarcts, and preferentially involved the cortex. Small cortical infarcts predominantly involved the posterior lobes, showed sparing of subcortical white matter and occurred in characteristic topographic patterns.

  19. Abnormal cerebellar volume in acute and remitted major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depping, Malte S; Wolf, Nadine D; Vasic, Nenad; Sambataro, Fabio; Hirjak, Dusan; Thomann, Philipp A; Wolf, Robert C

    2016-11-01

    Abnormal cortical volume is well-documented in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), but cerebellar findings have been heterogeneous. It is unclear whether abnormal cerebellar structure relates to disease state or medication. In this study, using structural MRI, we investigated cerebellar volume in clinically acute (with and without psychotropic treatment) and remitted MDD patients. High-resolution structural MRI data at 3T were obtained from acute medicated (n=29), acute unmedicated (n=14) and remitted patients (n=16). Data from 29 healthy controls were used for comparison purposes. Cerebellar volume was investigated using cerebellum-optimized voxel-based analysis methods. Patients with an acute MDD episode showed increased volume of left cerebellar area IX, and this was true for both medicated and unmedicated individuals (pvolume. In remitted, but not in acutely ill patients, area IX volume was significantly associated with measures of depression severity, as assessed by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD). In addition, area IX volume in remitted patients was significantly related to the duration of antidepressant treatment. In acutely ill patients, no significant relationships were established using clinical variables, such as HAMD, illness or treatment duration and number of depressive episodes. The data suggest that cerebellar area IX, a non-motor region that belongs to a large-scale brain functional network with known relevance to core depressive symptom expression, exhibits abnormal volume in patients independent of clinical severity or medication. Thus, the data imply a possible trait marker of the disorder. However, given bilaterality and an association with clinical scores at least in remitted patients, the current findings raise the possibility that cerebellar volume may be reflective of successful treatment as well.

  20. Ethanol-Induced Cerebellar Ataxia: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, M Saeed

    2015-08-01

    The cerebellum is an important target of ethanol toxicity given that cerebellar ataxia is the most consistent physical manifestation of acute ethanol consumption. Despite the significance of the cerebellum in ethanol-induced cerebellar ataxia (EICA), the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying EICA are incompletely understood. However, two important findings have shed greater light on this phenomenon. First, ethanol-induced blockade of cerebellar adenosine uptake in rodent models points to a role for adenosinergic A1 modulation of EICA. Second, the consistent observation that intracerebellar administration of nicotine in mice leads to antagonism of EICA provides evidence for a critical role of cerebellar nitric oxide (NO) in EICA reversal. Based on these two important findings, this review discusses the potential molecular events at two key synaptic sites (mossy fiber-granule cell-Golgi cell (MGG synaptic site) and granule cell parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (GPP synaptic site) that lead to EICA. Specifically, ethanol-induced neuronal NOS inhibition at the MGG synaptic site acts as a critical trigger for Golgi cell activation which leads to granule cell deafferentation. Concurrently, ethanol-induced inhibition of adenosine uptake at the GPP synaptic site produces adenosine accumulation which decreases glutamate release and leads to the profound activation of Purkinje cells (PCs). These molecular events at the MGG and GPP synaptic sites are mutually reinforcing and lead to cerebellar dysfunction, decreased excitatory output of deep cerebellar nuclei, and EICA. The critical importance of PCs as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex suggests normalization of PC function could have important therapeutic implications.

  1. Ruptured venous aneurysm of cervicomedullary junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ruptured venous aneurysm is often seen with arterio-venous malformation (AVM or developmental venous anomaly (DVA. However, isolated venous aneurysm is unusual. Case Description: We present a case of ruptured venous aneurysm that presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH. Digital substraction angiography (DSA revealed a saccular contrast filling pouch in the left lateral aspect of cervicomedullary junction (CMJ. Endovascular intervention was not a viable option. During surgery, a saccular pliable structure approx. 1.5 Χ 1 cm was found in the subarachnoid space that was clipped and excised. There were no arterial feeders, no evidence of surrounding AVM, and no dilated perimedullary vein. Conclusion: This is perhaps the first reported case of ruptured venous aneurysm (without associated AVM of CMJ, which was successfully managed surgically. The possible etiologies remain an unnoticed head trauma or a congenital vessel wall abnormality. Surgically clipping and excision remains the treatment of choice for such lesion.

  2. Upregulation of cortico-cerebellar functional connectivity after motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrkanoon, Saeid; Boonstra, Tjeerd W; Breakspear, Michael; Hinder, Mark; Summers, Jeffery J

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between the cerebellum and primary motor cortex are crucial for the acquisition of new motor skills. Recent neuroimaging studies indicate that learning motor skills is associated with subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the cerebellar and cerebral cortices. The neuronal processes underlying the motor-learning-induced plasticity are not well understood. Here, we investigate changes in functional connectivity in source-reconstructed electroencephalography (EEG) following the performance of a single session of a dynamic force task in twenty young adults. Source activity was reconstructed in 112 regions of interest (ROIs) and the functional connectivity between all ROIs was estimated using the imaginary part of coherence. Significant changes in resting-state connectivity were assessed using partial least squares (PLS). We found that subjects adapted their motor performance during the training session and showed improved accuracy but with slower movement times. A number of connections were significantly upregulated after motor training, principally involving connections within the cerebellum and between the cerebellum and motor cortex. Increased connectivity was confined to specific frequency ranges in the mu- and beta-bands. Post hoc analysis of the phase spectra of these cerebellar and cortico-cerebellar connections revealed an increased phase lag between motor cortical and cerebellar activity following motor practice. These findings show a reorganization of intrinsic cortico-cerebellar connectivity related to motor adaptation and demonstrate the potential of EEG connectivity analysis in source space to reveal the neuronal processes that underpin neural plasticity.

  3. Development of the cerebellar cortex in the mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangshu Cheng; Jin Du; Dongming Yu; Qiying Jiang; Yanqiu Hu; Lei Wang; Mingshan Li; Jinbo Deng

    2011-01-01

    The cerebellum is a highly conserved structure in the central nervous system of vertebrates, and is involved in the coordination of voluntary motor behavior. Supporting this function, the cerebellar cortex presents a layered structure which requires precise spatial and temporal coordination of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis events. The formation of the layered structure in the developing cerebellum remains unclear. The present study investigated the development of the cerebellar cortex. The results demonstrate that the primordium of the cerebellum comprises the ependymal, mantle, and marginal layers at embryonic day 12 (E12). Subsequently, the laminated cerebellar cortex undergoes cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, and at about postnatal day 0 (P0), the cerebellar cortex presents an external granular layer, a molecular layer, a Purkinje layer, and an internal granular layer. The external granular layer is thickest at P6/7 and disappears at P20. From P0 to P30, the internal granular cells and the Purkinje cells gradually differentiate and develop until maturity. Apoptotic neurons are evident in the layered structure in the developing cerebellar cortex. The external granular layer disappears gradually because of cell migration and apoptosis. The cells of the other layers primarily undergo differentiation, development, and apoptosis.

  4. Thalamic, brainstem, and cerebellar glucose metabolism in the hemiplegic monkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoyama, I.; Dauth, G.W.; Gilman, S.; Frey, K.A.; Penney, J.B. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Unilateral ablation of cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 of Brodmann in the macaque monkey results in a contralateral hemiplegia that resolves partially with time. During the phase of dense hemiplegia, local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG1c) is decreased significantly in most of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation, and there are slight contralateral decreases. The lCMRGlc is reduced bilaterally in most of the brainstem nuclei and bilaterally in the deep cerebellar nuclei, but only in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. During the phase of partial motor recovery, lCMRGlc is incompletely restored in many of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation and completely restored in the contralateral nuclei. In the brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei, poor to moderate recovery occurs bilaterally. Moderate recovery occurs in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. The findings demonstrate that a unilateral cerebral cortical lesion strongly affects lCMRGlc in the thalamus ipsilaterally and in the cerebellar cortex contralaterally, but in the brainstem bilaterally. Partial recovery of lCMRGlc accompanies the progressive motor recovery. The structures affected include those with direct, and also those with indirect, connections to the areas ablated.

  5. Decreased cortical inhibition and yet cerebellar pathology in 'familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; van der Salm, Sandra M. A.; Bour, Lo J.; Edwards, Mark J.; Brown, Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Rozemuller-Kwakkel, Johanna M.; Koehler, Peter J.; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Rothwell, John C.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Cortical hyperexcitability is a feature of "familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy" (FCMTE). However, neuropathological investigations in a single FCMTE patient showed isolated cerebellar pathology. Pathological investigations in a second FCMTE patient, reported here, confirmed cerebellar

  6. Mitotic Events in Cerebellar Granule Progenitor Cells that Expand Cerebellar Surface Area Are Critical for Normal Cerebellar Cortical Lamination in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joshua C.; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-01-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereological principles. We demonstrate that during the proliferative phase of the external granule layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The topological constraints indicate that during proliferative phases, migration out of the EGL is balanced by self-renewal. Progenitor self-renewal must, therefore, include mitotic events yielding either 2 cells in the same layer to increase surface area (β-events) and mitotic events yielding 2 cells, with 1 cell in a superficial layer and 1 cell in a deeper layer (α-events). As the cerebellum grows, therefore, β-events lie upstream of α-events. Using a mathematical model constrained by the measurements of volume and surface area, we could quantify inter-mitotic times for β-events on a per-cell basis in post-natal mouse cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that loss of CCNA2, which decreases EGL proliferation and secondarily induces cerebellar cortical dyslamination, shows preserved α-type events. Thus, CCNA2-null cerebellar granule progenitor cells are capable of self-renewal of the EGL stem cell niche; this is concordant with prior findings of extensive apoptosis in CCNA2-null mice. Similar methodologies may provide another layer of depth to the interpretation of results from stereological studies. PMID:25668568

  7. Mixing in T-junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jacobus B.W.; van der Wal, S.

    1996-01-01

    The transport processes that are involved in the mixing of two gases in a T-junction mixer are investigated. The turbulent flow field is calculated for the T-junction with the k- turbulence model by FLOW3D. In the mathematical model the transport of species is described with a mixture fraction

  8. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louiza B Thomsen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A TTX-sensitive fast Na+ spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers. Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none tetrodotoxin (TTX -sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than one second affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be modulated locally, suggesting that cerebellar glomeruli may be dynamically sub-compartmentalized due to ongoing inhibition mediated by Golgi cells. This could provide a fine-grained control of mossy fibre-granule cell information transfer and synaptic plasticity within a mossy fibre rosette.

  9. Clinical and radiological evaluation in vertebral artery dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Çabalar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, vertebral artery dissection (VAD is reported more frequently as a cause of young cerebrovascular accidents. It can occur spontaneously or following a neck manipulation and trauma. The patients were 3 females (mean age: 35±26 years and 7 males (mean age: 37.71±4.96 years. Only 2 patients described neck trauma. Cerebellar findings were prominent in all cases. On radiological investigation, vascular changes of vertebral arteries were detected bilaterally in 2 cases, right in 5 and left in 3 cases. All the cases were treated with anticoagulant therapy and cured but 1 with sequela. Prognosis of vertebral artery dissection is generally good by early diagnosis and treatment. In this article, we reported clinical and radiological properties of 10 vertebral artery dissection cases.

  10. Exploring safety impacts of pedestrian-crossing configurations at signalized junctions on urban roads with public transport routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitelman, Victoria; Carmel, Roby; Doveh, Etti; Hakkert, Shalom

    2017-04-07

    This study explored the impacts of pedestrian-crossing configurations and other design features, on accident occurrences at signalized junctions situated on central public transport routes (PTRs) of urban arterials. Statistical tests and negative-binomial regression models were applied to identify factors affecting accidents and to examine accident numbers of the PTR junctions as opposed to comparison-sites. At the PTR junctions, a consistent impact of pedestrian-crossing configurations on accidents was found, where a gradated-crossing with mixed-shifting is the least safe. Four-legged junctions tend to higher accident numbers relative to the three-legged junctions. PTR junctions are characterized by higher accident numbers, related to comparison-sites, when controlling for other design characteristics. The study findings may assist in selecting preferable design solutions while planning PTR.

  11. Arterial Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... way of keeping the blood pressure up. The arterial catheter allows accurate, second-to-second measurement of the blood pressure; repeated meas- urement is called monitoring. ■ High blood pressure (hypertension)— In some sit- uations, ...

  12. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan) Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Hasuo, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Uchida, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Matsumoto, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Tsukamoto, Y. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Ohno, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Masuda, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1993-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of seven patients with olivary degeneration caused by cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhages were reviewed. In four patients with cerebellar haemorrhage, old haematomas were identified as being located in the dentate nucleus; the contralateral inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense on proton-density- and T2-weighted images. In two patients with pontine haemorrhages, the old haematomas were in the tegmentum and the ipsilateral inferior olivary nuclei, which were hyperintense. In one case of midbrain haemorrhage, the inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense bilaterally. The briefest interval from the ictus to MRI was 2 months. Hypertrophic olivary nuclei were observed only at least 4 months after the ictus. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage should not be confused with ischaemic, neoplastic, or other primary pathological conditions of the medulla. (orig.)

  13. An unusual cause of adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Ramshekhar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of sporadic adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism. A 40-year-old unmarried man presented with progressive ataxia and dysarthria along with complaints of non-development of secondary sexual characteristics and erectile dysfunction. There were complaints of intermittent diarrhea. Clinical examination revealed a pan-cerebellar syndrome with features of hypoandrogenism. No eye movement abnormalities were evident. There were signs of malabsorption. Investigations confirmed the presence of auto-antibodies found in celiac disease, and a duodenal biopsy confirmed the same. Hypoandrogenism was postulated to be due to hypergonadotropic hypogonadism which has been mentioned in a few patients of celiac disease. However, the pattern seen in our patient was of a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. This is probably secondary to an autoimmune hypophysitis seen in some patients in the absence of other clinical manifestations. Autoantibody testing should be a diagnostic necessity in any adult with a sporadic cerebellar ataxia.

  14. Congenital cerebellar dysplasia in White Leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sayuri; Ochiai, Kenji; Yabushita, Hiroki; Abe, Asumi

    2014-01-01

    Congenital cerebellar anomalies have been rarely reported in birds. We examined cerebellums with disorganized folia from seven specific-pathogen-free White Leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus). Islands of heterotopic cortex were distributed from the deeper cortices to the medulla in the cerebellum. The characteristic lesions were composed of randomly admixed components of the cerebellar cortex, including Purkinje cells, a molecular layer and granular cells. Immunofluorescent analysis revealed Purkinje cells with haphazardly extended dendrites and a lack of Bergmann's glial fibres in the foci. Chicken parvovirus, Aino virus and avian retrovirus were not detected in the affected birds by polymerase chain reaction. This is the first report of cerebellar dysplasia in chickens possibly caused by a genetic abnormality.

  15. Cerebellar Development and Autism Spectrum Disorder in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Maria; Sahin, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 50% of patients with the genetic disease tuberous sclerosis complex present with autism spectrum disorder. Although a number of studies have investigated the link between autism and tuberous sclerosis complex, the etiology of autism spectrum disorder in these patients remains unclear. Abnormal cerebellar function during critical phases of development could disrupt functional processes in the brain, leading to development of autistic features. Accordingly, the authors review the potential role of cerebellar dysfunction in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorder in tuberous sclerosis complex. The authors also introduce conditional knockout mouse models of Tsc1 and Tsc2 that link cerebellar circuitry to the development of autistic-like features. Taken together, these preclinical and clinical investigations indicate the cerebellum has a profound regulatory role during development of social communication and repetitive behaviors.

  16. Arterial Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    Stiffness of large arteries has been long recognized as a significant determinant of pulse pressure. However, it is only in recent decades, with the accumulation of longitudinal data from large and varied epidemiological studies of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease, that it has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. This has generated substantial interest in investigations related to intrinsic causative and associated factors responsible for the alteration of mechanical properties of the arterial wall, with the aim to uncover specific pathways that could be interrogated to prevent or reverse arterial stiffening. Much has been written on the haemodynamic relevance of arterial stiffness in terms of the quantification of pulsatile relationships of blood pressure and flow in conduit arteries. Indeed, much of this early work regarded blood vessels as passive elastic conduits, with the endothelial layer considered as an inactive lining of the lumen and as an interface to flowing blood. However, recent advances in molecular biology and increased technological sophistication for the detection of low concentrations of biochemical compounds have elucidated the highly important regulatory role of the endothelial cell affecting vascular function. These techniques have enabled research into the interaction of the underlying passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall with the active cellular and molecular processes that regulate the local environment of the load-bearing components. This review addresses these emerging concepts.

  17. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. File list: InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  12. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  16. File list: NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  18. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  19. A composite neurobehavioral test to evaluate acute functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Devin W; Nowrangi, Derek; Kaur, Harpreet; Wu, Guangyong; Huang, Lei; Lekic, Tim; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2017-01-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhage accounts for 5-10% of all intracerebral haemorrhages and leads to severe, long-lasting functional deficits. Currently, there is limited research on this stroke subtype, which may be due to the lack of a suitable composite neuroscoring system specific for cerebellar injury in rodents. The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive composite neuroscore test for cerebellar injury using a rat model of cerebellar haemorrhage. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or cerebellar haemorrhage. Twenty-four hours post-injury, neurological behaviour was evaluated using 17 cost-effective and easy-to-perform tests, and a composite neuroscore was developed. The composite neuroscore was then used to assess functional recovery over seven days after cerebellar haemorrhage. Differences in the composite neuroscore deficits for the mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage models were observed for up to five days post-ictus. Until now, a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was not available for rodent studies. Herein, using mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage rat models a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was developed and used to assess functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage. This composite neuroscore may also be useful for other cerebellar injury models.

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  1. File list: NoD.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  6. Cerebellar substrates for error correction in motor conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, M A; Allen, M T; Myers, C E; Thompson, R F

    2001-11-01

    The authors evaluate a mapping of Rescorla and Wagner's (1972) behavioral model of classical conditioning onto the cerebellar substrates for motor reflex learning and illustrate how the limitations of the Rescorla-Wagner model are just as useful as its successes for guiding the development of new psychobiological theories of learning. They postulate that the inhibitory pathway that returns conditioned response information from the cerebellar interpositus nucleus back to the inferior olive is the neural basis for the error correction learning proposed by Rescorla and Wagner (Gluck, Myers, & Thompson, 1994; Thompson, 1986). The authors' cerebellar model expects that behavioral processes described by the Rescorla-Wagner model will be localized within the cerebellum and related brain stem structures, whereas behavioral processes beyond the scope of the Rescorla-Wagner model will depend on extracerebellar structures such as the hippocampus and related cortical regions. Simulations presented here support both implications. Several novel implications of the authors' cerebellar error-correcting model are described including a recent empirical study by Kim, Krupa, and Thompson (1998), who verified that suppressing the putative error correction pathway should interfere with the Kamin (1969) blocking effect, a behavioral manifestation of error correction learning. The authors also discuss the model's implications for understanding the limits of cerebellar contributions to associative learning and how this informs our understanding of hippocampal function in conditioning. This leads to a more integrative view of the neural substrates of conditioning in which the authors' real-time circuit-level model of the cerebellum can be viewed as a generalization of the long-term memory module of Gluck and Myers' (1993) trial-level theory of cerebellar-hippocampal interaction in motor conditioning.

  7. Cerebellar diaschisis in pontine infractions: a report of five cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, Yoshiyasu [Kagawa Medical School (Japan). Second Dept. of Internal Medicine; Ayada, Yoshihide [Kagawa Medical School (Japan). Second Dept. of Internal Medicine; Izumi, Yoshinari [Kagawa Medical School (Japan). Second Dept. of Internal Medicine; Ichihara, Sin-Ichiro [Kagawa Medical School (Japan). Second Dept. of Internal Medicine; Hosomi, Naohisa [Kagawa Medical School (Japan). Second Dept. of Internal Medicine; Ohkawa, Motoomi [Kagawa Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Matsuo, Hirohide [Kagawa Medical School (Japan). Second Dept. of Internal Medicine

    1995-05-01

    We evaluate regional cerebral and cerebellar perfusion to prove the occurrence and follow the persistence of crossed cerebellar diaschisis in infratentorial pontine infarction. Six consecutive patients exhibiting mild hemiparetic symptoms or a heavy feeling in the head (mean age 65 years; four women, two men) and diagnosed as having pontine infarction by magnetic resonance imaging were sugjected to evaluation. Lesions due to infarction were located at the upper basis pontis in five partients and the upper tegmentum pontis in one, and medially at the paramedian portion in four and laterally in two. Regional cerebral and cerebellar perfusion was evaluated semiquantitatively by iodine-123 N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) single-photon emission tomography (SPET); this was done during the acute stage in five cases (mean time after onset: 0.7 months) and during the chronic stage in three (mean time after onset: 14.8 months) Significant asymmetry in cerebellar perfusion, which was reduced in the contralateral or ipsilateral cerebellar hemisphere, was demonstrated semiquantitatively in four cases during the acute stage and in one during the chronic stage, as compared with normal controls. This asymmetry continued to the chronic stage (6.5 and 33.0 months) in two cases, while no patient showed any significant asymmetries in cerebral perdusion in any region of interest in either SPET study. The pontine lesion may damage the pyramidal tract and corticocerebellar pathway, and interruption of the cerebrocerebellar pontine circuits may be regarded as the cause of the crossed cerebellar diaschisis observed in five of the six reported patients with pontine infarction. (orig.)

  8. Emotional disorders in patients with cerebellar damage – case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siuda, Katarzyna

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Growing number of research shows the role of the cerebellum in the regulation of affect. Lesions of the cerebellum can lead to emotional disregulation, a significant part of the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome. The aim of this article is to analyze the most recent studies concerning the cerebellar participation in emotional reactions and to present three cases: two female and one male who suffered from cerebellar damage and presented post-traumatic affective and personality change. Method: The patients’ neuropsychological examination was performed with Raven’s Progressive Matrices Test – standard version, Trial Making Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Auditory Verbal Learning Test by Łuria, Benton Visual Retention Test, Verbal Fluency Test, Stroop Interference Test, Attention and Perceptivity Test (Test Uwagi i Spostrzegawczości TUS, Frontal Behavioral Inventory (FBI. Results: The review of the literature suggest cerebellar participation, especially teh vermis and paravermial regions, in the detection, integration and filtration of emotional information and in regulation of autonomic emotional responses. In the described patients we observed: oversensitivity, irritability, impulsivity and self-neglect. The man and the woman with right-sided lesions presented similar symptoms: rigidity of thought, stubbornness, lack of criticism, jocular and inappropriate behavior. The woman with left-sided cerebellar lesion was adynamic, apathic and passive, she presented emotional blunting, social isolation, lack of interests and motivation, general cognitive slowdown. Conclusions: Both the analyzed research and the described cases indicate the connection between the cerebellum and emotion regulation. The symptoms presented by the described patients were most probably a consequence of damaged cerebellar projections to subcortical structures (the limbic system and frontal areas. The diversification of symptoms depending on the localization

  9. Choline Uptake by Glomerular Synapses Isolated from Bovine Cerebellar Vermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    28 034 UNCLASSIFIED -7t. holing uptake by glomerular aynapaea isolated from bovine cerebellar venni - . 1) N1 IrRRIAN.E L NfISINndwr EtIIOMAS86 .t...w. -%FAt~Jr~a~etn 0,oAAM TX78215-5301 IL’SAJ) A-xpid ( kaolin 22nd. 19W5) hh.lhoac-anln uplake -ainalnnn 177 DIOMIDICAL DmIVIIN,~ F-5’. . Brain...Research. 366 (1986) 401-404 401 Elsevier BRE 21387 Choline uptake by glomerular synapses isolated from bovine cerebellar vermis D.M. TERRIAN, E.L

  10. Inside the Thompson laboratory during the "cerebellar years" and the continuing cerebellar story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavond, D G; Wikgren, J; Nokia, M S

    2011-02-01

    This paper is based on the talk by one of the authors (DL) given at the symposium for the retirement of RF Thompson (RF Thompson: A bridge between 20th and 21st century neuroscience). We first make some informal observations of the historical times and research conditions in the Thompson laboratory when the cerebellum was found to play a critical role in eye lid classical conditioning, the "cerebellar years". These conditions influenced our collaborative international program on the phenomenon known as "transfer of training" or "savings". Our research shows that the appearance of "savings" is an artifact of the order of testing, and depends upon the functioning of the contralateral interpositus nucleus (IPN) in a way that is complementary to the role of the IPN in normal eyelid classical conditioning.

  11. 119例小脑梗死的临床分析%Analysis for Clinical Features of Cerebellar Infarction in 119 Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴菁; 陈伟; 董幼镕; 翟宇; 孙旭红; 潘辉; 李强; 方洁; 刘建仁

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim To investigate the etiological type of Chinese Ischemic Stroke Subclassiifcation (CISS), the lesion distribution, the concomitant lesions outside the cerebellum and the clinical manifestations in patients with acute cerebellar infarction.MethodsThe MRI images, the etiological examination ifndings and the clinical manifestations of 119 patients with acute cerebellar infarction who were admitted to our hospital from January 2012 to December 2015 were retrospectively analyzed.ResultsAmong 119 cases of cerebellar infarction patients, 78 cases were classiifed to unilateral cerebellar infarction (UCI), 41 caseswere bilateral cerebellar infarction (BCI). The main etiological type of CISS was large artery atherosclerosis (LAA), followed by cardiogenic stroke (CS), mixing mechanism, penetrating artery disease (PAD) and other etiologies. There was no signiifcant difference in CISS between the BCI group and the UCI group. In the UCI group, posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) infarction had the highest occurrence rate (36%), and there was a difference between the two groups (P The main etiology of cerebellar infarction was large artery atherosclerosis, PICA infarction could be observed most frequently in unilateral cerebellar infarction. Bilateral cerebellar infarction was often associated with concomitant lesions outside the cerebellum in posterior circulation. Unilateral and bilateral cerebellar infarction had certain differences in cerebellar artery involvement and concomitant lesions outside the cerebellum, prompting difference of their mechanism. Bilateral cerebellar infarction tended to present more conscious disturbance and other serious CNS function defect than unilateral cerebellar infarction.%目的:探讨小脑梗死的中国缺血性脑卒中分型诊断(CISS)、受累血管区域、合并小脑外梗死病灶以及临床表现。方法回顾性分析自2012年1月至2015年12月119例急性小脑梗死住院患者的头颅MRI影像、病因

  12. Metallic Junction Thermoelectric Device Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzik, Adam J.; Choi, Sang H.

    2017-01-01

    Thermoelectric junctions made of semiconductors have existed in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) for deep space missions, but are currently being adapted for terrestrial energy harvesting. Unfortunately, these devices are inefficient, operating at only 7% efficiency. This low efficiency has driven efforts to make high-figure-of-merit thermoelectric devices, which require a high electrical conductivity but a low thermal conductivity, a combination that is difficult to achieve. Lowered thermal conductivity has increased efficiency, but at the cost of power output. An alternative setup is to use metallic junctions rather than semiconductors as thermoelectric devices. Metals have orders of magnitude more electrons and electronic conductivities higher than semiconductors, but thermal conductivity is higher as well. To evaluate the viability of metallic junction thermoelectrics, a two dimensional heat transfer MATLAB simulation was constructed to calculate efficiency and power output. High Seebeck coefficient alloys, Chromel (90%Ni-10%Cr) and Constantan (55%Cu-45%Ni), produced efficiencies of around 20-30%. Parameters such as the number of layers of junctions, lateral junction density, and junction sizes for both series- and parallel-connected junctions were explored.

  13. Dyslexic Children Show Atypical Cerebellar Activation and Cerebro-Cerebellar Functional Connectivity in Orthographic and Phonological Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoxia; Li, Le; Zhang, Manli; Yang, Xiujie; Tian, Mengyu; Xie, Weiyi; Lu, Yao; Liu, Li; Bélanger, Nathalie N; Meng, Xiangzhi; Ding, Guosheng

    2017-04-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have found atypical cerebellar activation in individuals with dyslexia in either motor-related tasks or language tasks. However, studies investigating atypical cerebellar activation in individuals with dyslexia have mostly used tasks tapping phonological processing. A question that is yet unanswered is whether the cerebellum in individuals with dyslexia functions properly during orthographic processing of words, as growing evidence shows that the cerebellum is also involved in visual and spatial processing. Here, we investigated cerebellar activation and cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity during word processing in dyslexic readers and typically developing readers using tasks that tap orthographic and phonological codes. In children with dyslexia, we observed an abnormally higher engagement of the bilateral cerebellum for the orthographic task, which was negatively correlated with literacy measures. The greater the reading impairment was for young dyslexic readers, the stronger the cerebellar activation was. This suggests a compensatory role of the cerebellum in reading for children with dyslexia. In addition, a tendency for higher cerebellar activation in dyslexic readers was found in the phonological task. Moreover, the functional connectivity was stronger for dyslexic readers relative to typically developing readers between the lobule VI of the right cerebellum and the left fusiform gyrus during the orthographic task and between the lobule VI of the left cerebellum and the left supramarginal gyrus during the phonological task. This pattern of results suggests that the cerebellum compensates for reading impairment through the connections with specific brain regions responsible for the ongoing reading task. These findings enhance our understanding of the cerebellum's involvement in reading and reading impairment.

  14. Postural Ataxia in Cerebellar Downbeat Nystagmus: Its Relation to Visual, Proprioceptive and Vestibular Signals and Cerebellar Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmchen, Christoph; Kirchhoff, Jan-Birger; Göttlich, Martin; Sprenger, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Background The cerebellum integrates proprioceptive, vestibular and visual signals for postural control. Cerebellar patients with downbeat nystagmus (DBN) complain of unsteadiness of stance and gait as well as blurred vision and oscillopsia. Objectives The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential role of visual input, gaze eccentricity, vestibular and proprioceptive input on the postural stability in a large cohort of cerebellar patients with DBN, in comparison to healthy age-matched control subjects. Methods Oculomotor (nystagmus, smooth pursuit eye movements) and postural (postural sway speed) parameters were recorded and related to each other and volumetric changes of the cerebellum (voxel-based morphometry, SPM). Results Twenty-seven patients showed larger postural instability in all experimental conditions. Postural sway increased with nystagmus in the eyes closed condition but not with the eyes open. Romberg’s ratio remained stable and was not different from healthy controls. Postural sway did not change with gaze position or graviceptive input. It increased with attenuated proprioceptive input and on tandem stance in both groups but Romberg’s ratio also did not differ. Cerebellar atrophy (vermal lobule VI, VIII) correlated with the severity of impaired smooth pursuit eye movements of DBN patients. Conclusions Postural ataxia of cerebellar patients with DBN cannot be explained by impaired visual feedback. Despite oscillopsia visual feedback control on cerebellar postural control seems to be preserved as postural sway was strongest on visual deprivation. The increase in postural ataxia is neither related to modulations of single components characterizing nystagmus nor to deprivation of single sensory (visual, proprioceptive) inputs usually stabilizing stance. Re-weighting of multisensory signals and/or inappropriate cerebellar motor commands might account for this postural ataxia. PMID:28056109

  15. Preserved Glucose Metabolism of Deep Cerebellar Nuclei in a Case of Multiple System Atrophy with Predominant Cerebellar Ataxia: F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Dae Kwon

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar glucose metabolism of multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C is known to be decreased but is not defined among areas of cerebellum. We encountered a 54-year-old man who developed dizziness and progressive ataxia followed by urinary incontinence and orthostatic hypotension, all of those symptoms progressed relentlessly and the symptoms responded poorly to levodopa therapy. Visual analysis and statistical parametric mapping analysis of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed hypometabolism of both cerebellar hemisphere, severe at cortical area, and pons. There was clear sparing of deep cerebellar nuclei. Our report, as we know, shows the first case of preserved glucose metabolism of deep cerebellar nuclei relative to cerebellar cortex in an MSA-C patient.

  16. Significance of postoperative crossed cerebellar hypoperfusion in patients with cerebral hyperperfusion following carotid endarterectomy: SPECT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Suga, Yasunori; Chida, Kohei; Saito, Hideo; Komoribayashi, Nobukazu; Otawara, Yasunari; Ogawa, Akira [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan); Iwate Medical University, Cyclotron Research Center, Morioka (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    Cerebral hyperperfusion after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) results in cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome and cognitive impairment. The goal of the present study was to clarify the clinical significance of postoperative crossed cerebellar hypoperfusion (CCH) in patients with cerebral hyperperfusion after CEA by assessing brain perfusion with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Brain perfusion was quantitatively measured using SPECT and the [{sup 123}I]N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine-autoradiography method before and immediately after CEA and on the third postoperative day in 80 patients with ipsilateral internal carotid artery stenosis ({>=}70%). Postoperative CCH was determined by differences between asymmetry of perfusion in bilateral cerebellar hemispheres before and after CEA. Neuropsychological testing was also performed preoperatively and at the first postoperative month. Eleven patients developed cerebral hyperperfusion (cerebral blood flow increase of {>=}100% compared with preoperative values) on SPECT imaging performed immediately after CEA. In seven of these patients, CCH was observed on the third postoperative day. All three patients with hyperperfusion syndrome exhibited cerebral hyperperfusion and CCH on the third postoperative day and developed postoperative cognitive impairment. Of the eight patients with asymptomatic hyperperfusion, four exhibited CCH despite resolution of cerebral hyperperfusion on the third postoperative day, and three of these patients experienced postoperative cognitive impairment. In contrast, four patients without postoperative CCH did not experience postoperative cognitive impairment. The presence of postoperative CCH with concomitant cerebral hyperperfusion reflects the development of hyperperfusion syndrome. Further, the presence of postoperative CCH in patients with cerebral hyperperfusion following CEA suggests development of postoperative cognitive impairment, even when asymptomatic. (orig.)

  17. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  18. Localizing role of hemodynamics in atherosclerosis in several human vertebrobasilar junction geometries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravensbergen, J; Ravensbergen, JW; Krijger, JKB; Hillen, B; Hoogstraten, HW

    1998-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a common finding in the vertebrobasilar junction and in the basilar artery. Several theories try to link the process of atherogenesis with the forces exerted by the flowing blood. An attractive relation has been found between the locations in vessels at which atherosclerotic plaqu

  19. The nanostructure of myoendothelial junctions contributes to signal rectification between endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Jens Christian; Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Micro-anatomical structures in tissues have potential physiological effects. In arteries and arterioles smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells are separated by the internal elastic lamina, but the two cell layers often make contact through micro protrusions called myoendothelial junctions. Cross...

  20. Mapping the development of cerebellar Purkinje cells in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamling, Kyla R; Tobias, Zachary J C; Weissman, Tamily A

    2015-11-01

    The cells that comprise the cerebellum perform a complex integration of neural inputs to influence motor control and coordination. The functioning of this circuit depends upon Purkinje cells and other cerebellar neurons forming in the precise place and time during development. Zebrafish provide a useful platform for modeling disease and studying gene function, thus a quantitative metric of normal zebrafish cerebellar development is key for understanding how gene mutations affect the cerebellum. To begin to quantitatively measure cerebellar development in zebrafish, we have characterized the spatial and temporal patterning of Purkinje cells during the first 2 weeks of development. Differentiated Purkinje cells first emerged by 2.8 days post fertilization and were spatially patterned into separate dorsomedial and ventrolateral clusters that merged at around 4 days. Quantification of the Purkinje cell layer revealed that there was a logarithmic increase in both Purkinje cell number as well as overall volume during the first 2 weeks, while the entire region curved forward in an anterior, then ventral direction. Purkinje cell dendrites were positioned next to parallel fibers as early as 3.3 days, and Purkinje cell diameter decreased significantly from 3.3 to 14 days, possibly due to cytoplasmic reappropriation into maturing dendritic arbors. A nearest neighbor analysis showed that Purkinje cells moved slightly apart from each other from 3 to 14 days, perhaps spreading as the organized monolayer forms. This study establishes a quantitative spatiotemporal map of Purkinje cell development in zebrafish that provides an important metric for studies of cerebellar development and disease.

  1. Cerebellar Damage Produces Selective Deficits in Verbal Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravizza, Susan M.; Mccormick, Cristin A.; Schlerf, John E.; Justus, Timothy; Ivry, Richard B.; Fiez, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    The cerebellum is often active in imaging studies of verbal working memory, consistent with a putative role in articulatory rehearsal. While patients with cerebellar damage occasionally exhibit a mild impairment on standard neuropsychological tests of working memory, these tests are not diagnostic for exploring these processes in detail. The…

  2. Neurophysiological evidence for cerebellar dysfunction in primary focal dystonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teo, J.T.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Schneider, S.A.; Rothwell, J.C.; Bhatia, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that there may be functional and structural changes in the cerebellum of patients with adult onset primary focal dystonia. The aim of this study was to establish whether there is any neurophysiological indicator of abnormal cerebellar function, using the classic eyeblin

  3. Cerebellar rTMS disrupts predictive language processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Elise; Morgan, Blaire E.; Olson, Andrew C.; Meyer, Antje S.; Miall, R. Chris

    2012-01-01

    Summary The human cerebellum plays an important role in language, amongst other cognitive and motor functions [1], but a unifying theoretical framework about cerebellar language function is lacking. In an established model of motor control, the cerebellum is seen as a predictive machine, making short-term estimations about the outcome of motor commands. This allows for flexible control, on-line correction, and coordination of movements [2]. The homogeneous cytoarchitecture of the cerebellar cortex suggests that similar computations occur throughout the structure, operating on different input signals and with different output targets [3]. Several authors have therefore argued that this ‘motor’ model may extend to cerebellar nonmotor functions [3–5], and that the cerebellum may support prediction in language processing [6]. However, this hypothesis has never been directly tested. Here, we used the ‘Visual World’ paradigm [7], where on-line processing of spoken sentence content can be assessed by recording the latencies of listeners' eye movements towards objects mentioned. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was used to disrupt function in the right cerebellum, a region implicated in language [8]. After cerebellar rTMS, listeners showed delayed eye fixations to target objects predicted by sentence content, while there was no effect on eye fixations in sentences without predictable content. The prediction deficit was absent in two control groups. Our findings support the hypothesis that computational operations performed by the cerebellum may support prediction during both motor control and language processing. PMID:23017990

  4. Consensus paper on post-operative pediatric cerebellar mutism syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudrunardottir, Thora; Morgan, Angela T; Lux, Andrew L

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Confusion has surrounded the description of post-operative mutism and associated morbidity in pediatric patients with cerebellar tumors for years. The heterogeneity of definitions and diagnostic features has hampered research progress within the field, and to date, no international ...

  5. Long-Term Sequelae after Cerebellar Astrocytoma Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The long-term effects on neurologic, neuropsychological, and behavioral functioning in a consecutive series of 23 children treated surgically for cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma without additional radio- and chemotherapy are determined in a study at Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, and other medical centers.

  6. Early Cerebellar Network Shifting in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, M I; Gomez, C M; Chen, E E; Shereen, A; Solodkin, A

    2016-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 6 (SCA6), an autosomal dominant degenerative disease, is characterized by diplopia, gait ataxia, and incoordination due to severe progressive degeneration of Purkinje cells in the vestibulo- and spinocerebellum. Ocular motor deficits are common, including difficulty fixating on moving objects, nystagmus and disruption of smooth pursuit movements. In presymptomatic SCA6, there are alterations in saccades and smooth-pursuit movements. We sought to assess functional and structural changes in cerebellar connectivity associated with a visual task, hypothesizing that gradual changes would parallel disease progression. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data during a passive smooth-pursuit task in 14 SCA6 patients, representing a range of disease duration and severity, and performed a cross-sectional comparison of cerebellar networks compared with healthy controls. We identified a shift in activation from vermis in presymptomatic individuals to lateral cerebellum in moderate-to-severe cases. Concomitantly, effective connectivity between regions of cerebral cortex and cerebellum was at its highest in moderate cases, and disappeared in severe cases. Finally, we noted structural differences in the cerebral and cerebellar peduncles. These unique results, spanning both functional and structural domains, highlight widespread changes in SCA6 and compensatory mechanisms associated with cerebellar physiology that could be utilized in developing new therapies.

  7. Very Preterm Birth, Cerebellar Development and Neuropsychological Outcome in Adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar volumes were measured on structural MRI at adolescence and adulthood in 65 preterm individuals (born before 33 weeks’ gestation, and a term-born comparison group, in a study at King’s College, Great Ormond Street Hospital, and University College, London; and Seoul National University College of Medicine, Korea.

  8. [Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias in the Netherlands: a national inventory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide a comprehensive estimate of the number of Dutch autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA) families and patients and thus estimate the minimal prevalence of ADCA in the Netherlands. Furthermore, to observe the relative frequency of SCA mutations and to study genotype-phenotyp

  9. Role of Calcium in Cerebellar Learning and Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Gao (Zhenyu)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe cerebellum, which means little brain in Latin, occupies most of the posterior cranial fossa and connects with the dorsal brainstem (Kandel et al., 2000). The cerebellar cortex is one of the most foliated brain structures, which accounts for 10% of the total volume and over half of th

  10. Is a Cerebellar Deficit the Underlying Cause of Reading Disabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irannejad, Shahrzad; Savage, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether children with dyslexia differed in their performance on reading, phonological, rapid naming, motor, and cerebellar-related tasks and automaticity measures compared to reading age (RA)-matched and chronological age (CA)-matched control groups. Participants were 51 children attending mainstream English elementary…

  11. Cerebellar heterokaryon formation increases with age and after irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersema, Anita; Dijk, Freark; Dontje, Bert; van der Want, Johannes J.; de Haan, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells have been demonstrated to survive in many nonhematopoietic tissues after transplantation. Apparent "bone marrow-derived" cerebellar Purkinje cells in fact result from fusion events and it has been suggested that fusion may be a natural physiological phenomenon to rescue dysfuncti

  12. Cerebellar Control of Locomotion in Health and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F. Vinueza Veloz (Maria)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Modern neuroscience is paving the way for new insight into cerebellar functions including the control of cognitive, autonomic and emotional processes. Yet, how the cerebellum contributes to complex motor behaviors, such as locomotion, is still only partially understood.

  13. Reevaluating the Role of LTD in Cerebellar Motor Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schonewille (Martijn); Z. Gao (Zhenyu); H.J. Boele (Henk-Jan); M.F. Vinueza Veloz (Maria); W.E. Amerika; A. Šimek (Antonia); M.T.G. Jeu (Marcel); J. Steinberg (Jordan); K. Takamiya (Kogo); F.E. Hoebeek (Freek); D. Linden (David); R. Huganir (Richard); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractLong-term depression at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses (PF-PC LTD) has been proposed to be required for cerebellar motor learning. To date, tests of this hypothesis have sought to interfere with receptors (mGluR1) and enzymes (PKC, PKG, or αCamKII) necessary for induction of PF-PC

  14. Cerebro-cerebellar interactions underlying temporal information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Kenji; Hanakawa, Takashi; Aso, Toshihiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2010-12-01

    The neural basis of temporal information processing remains unclear, but it is proposed that the cerebellum plays an important role through its internal clock or feed-forward computation functions. In this study, fMRI was used to investigate the brain networks engaged in perceptual and motor aspects of subsecond temporal processing without accompanying coprocessing of spatial information. Direct comparison between perceptual and motor aspects of time processing was made with a categorical-design analysis. The right lateral cerebellum (lobule VI) was active during a time discrimination task, whereas the left cerebellar lobule VI was activated during a timed movement generation task. These findings were consistent with the idea that the cerebellum contributed to subsecond time processing in both perceptual and motor aspects. The feed-forward computational theory of the cerebellum predicted increased cerebro-cerebellar interactions during time information processing. In fact, a psychophysiological interaction analysis identified the supplementary motor and dorsal premotor areas, which had a significant functional connectivity with the right cerebellar region during a time discrimination task and with the left lateral cerebellum during a timed movement generation task. The involvement of cerebro-cerebellar interactions may provide supportive evidence that temporal information processing relies on the simulation of timing information through feed-forward computation in the cerebellum.

  15. [Case of sporadic hemiplegic migraine with cerebellar ataxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaka, Yukio; Okada, Kazumasa; Akamatsu, Naoki; Uozumi, Takenori; Adachi, Yoshiki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2009-05-01

    A 34-year-old man was admitted with his unsteady gait, difficulty in speech and a paroxysmal severe headache accompanied with sensori-motor disturbance of the right extremities and aphasic symptom. His family history was unremarkable. His unsteadiness has progressed very slowly from childhood. He noted to be inarticulate at the age of 18 years. At the age of 33 years, he suddenly had an attack of severe throbbing headache, which was mainly left parietal, with nausea and photophobia. During the headache, his right extremities were paralyzed and he became aphasic. He had lost a partial memory of the event All these symptoms had gone within 24 hours. Thereafter, the same headache occurred about once a month. Neurological examination revealed a mild truncal ataxia and ataxic dysarthria. Electroencephalography (EEG) showed intermittent delta waves restricted over the left fronto-temporal region. Brain MRI showed a moderate atrophy of superior cerebellar vermis and anterior cerebellar lobe. The diagnosis of sporadic hemiplegic migraine (SHM) with cerebellar ataxia was made. Our case was very similar to familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) 1, of which some families are accompanied with transient amnesia, cerebellar ataxia and EEG abnormality. Although we did not detect any mutations in CACNA1A gene previously reported in FHM1, our case might share same pathogenesis with FHM1.

  16. Reduced contralateral hemispheric flow measured by SPECT in cerebellar lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sönmezoğlu, K; Sperling, B; Henriksen, T

    1993-01-01

    to the cerebellar lesion CBF showed variable alterations. A relative CBF decrease was seen in upper part of basal ganglia in all four cases, but it was not a constant phenomenon. A relative CBF increase in both early and late SPECT scans was seen at low levels of neostriatum in two cases. The remote CBF changes...

  17. Mutations in PTF1A cause pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sellick, GS; Barker, KT; Stolte-Dijkstra, [No Value; Fleischmann, C; Coleman, RJ; Garrett, C; Gloyn, AL; Edghill, EL; Hattersley, AT; Wellauer, PK; Goodwin, G; Houlston, RS

    2004-01-01

    Individuals with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus usually present within the first three months of life and require insulin treatment(1,2). We recently identified a locus on chromosome 10p13-p12.1 involved in permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus associated with pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis

  18. Imaging of cervicothoracic junction trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wongwaisayawan S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirote Wongwaisayawan,1 Ruedeekorn Suwannanon,2 Rathachai Kaewlai11Department of Radiology, Ramathibodi Hospital and Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, ThailandAbstract: Cervicothoracic junction trauma is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. Imaging has played an important role in identifying injuries and guiding appropriate, timely therapy. Computed tomography is currently a method of choice for diagnosing cervicothoracic junction trauma, in which the pattern of injuries often suggests possible mechanisms and potential injuries. In this article, the authors describe and illustrate common and uncommon injuries that can occur in the cervicothoracic junction.Keywords: cervicothoracic junction, cervical spine, trauma, imaging, radiology

  19. Post-Plasmodium vivax malaria cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis: A new form of delayed cerebellar ataxia or cerebellar variant of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav M Kasundra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM is commonly seen after viral and bacterial infections, immunization, and Plasmodium falciparum (PF malaria. Plasmodium vivax (PV rarely causes ADEM. We report a 14-year-old female patient who presented with acute onset bilateral cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis, 2 weeks after recovery from PV. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral cerebellar hyperintensities suggestive of ADEM. No specific viral etiology was found on cerebrospinal fluid examination. Patient responded well to treatment without any sequelae. Thus, PV too is an important cause of ADEM along with PF. Two of the previously reported cases had co-infection with falciparum malaria. The only other two reported cases, as also this patient, are from Asia. A geographical or racial predisposition needs to be evaluated. Also, a possibility of post-PV delayed cerebellar ataxia, which is classically described post-PF infection, may be considered as it may be clinically, radiologically, and prognostically indistinguishable from a milder presentation of ADEM.

  20. Acute arterial infarcts in patients with severe head injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Agrawal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To study the incidence, demographic profile, and outcome of patients with severe closed head injuries who develop acute arterial infarcts. Materials and Methods: Patients with severe head injury (Glasgow coma score (GCS ≤8 presenting within 8 h of injury in the Department of Neurosurgery over a period of 5 months were enrolled in the study. Patients with penetrating head injury, infarct due to herniation and iatrogenic arterial injuries were excluded from the study. Only arterial infarcts developing within 8 h of injury were included in the study. A computed tomography (CT head was done on all patients within 8 h of injury and repeated if necessary. Arterial infarct was defined as well-demarcated wedge-shaped hypodensity corresponding to an arterial territory on plain CT of the head. Outcome was assessed using Glasgow outcome score (GOS at 1 month post-injury or at death (whichever came earlier. Results: Forty-four patients of severe head injury were included in the study during the above period. Of these, four patients (9.1% had arterial infarcts on the initial CT scan. The male:female ratio was 1:3. The mean age was 54 years (range 3-85 years. Two patients had infarcts in the middle cerebral artery distribution and two in the superior cerebellar artery distribution. Poor outcome (GOS 1-3 was seen in 100% of the patients with arterial infarct compared to 52.5% (n=21 in patients with severe head injury without arterial infarct. Conclusions: A significant percentage of patients with severe head injury have arterial infarcts on admission, which may imply arterial injury. Our study shows that these patients have a poorer prognosis vis-a-vis patient without these findings.

  1. Demonstrated Anomalous Pancreaticobiliary Ductal Junction

    OpenAIRE

    Koçkar, Cem; ?ENOL, Altu?; BA?TÜRK, Abdulkadir; AYDIN, Bünyamin; Cüre, Erkan

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies of the pancreaticobiliary junction are rare. Clinically anomalies of the pancreaticobiliary junction are uncommonly symptomatic but may present themselves with associated conditions ranging from benign acute abdominal pain to carcinomas. A 52 years old man was admitted to gastroenterology service with complaints of fever, nausea, vomiting and recurrent epigastric pain. He was diagnosed with biliary pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreato-graphy was performed. Papilla ...

  2. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, Georg Hermann

    2012-03-04

    We report on the fabrication of superconductor/insulator/ferromagnetic metal/superconductor (Nb/AlO{sub x}/Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18}/Nb) Josephson junctions (SIFS JJs) with high critical current densities, large normal resistance times area products, and high quality factors. For these junctions, a transition from 0- to {pi}-coupling is observed for a thickness d{sub F}=6 nm of the ferromagnetic Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} interlayer. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current of the junctions demonstrates good spatial homogeneity of the tunneling barrier and ferromagnetic interlayer. Magnetic characterization shows that the Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} has an out-of-plane anisotropy and large saturation magnetization indicating negligible dead layers at the interfaces. A careful analysis of Fiske modes up to about 400 GHz provides valuable information on the junction quality factor and the relevant damping mechanisms. Whereas losses due to quasiparticle tunneling dominate at low frequencies, at high frequencies the damping is explained by the finite surface resistance of the junction electrodes. High quality factors of up to 30 around 200 GHz have been achieved. They allow to study the junction dynamics, in particular the switching probability from the zero-voltage into the voltage state with and without microwave irradiation. The experiments with microwave irradiation are well explained within semi-classical models and numerical simulations. In contrast, at mK temperature the switching dynamics without applied microwaves clearly shows secondary quantum effects. Here, we could observe for the first time macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson junctions with a ferromagnetic interlayer. This observation excludes fluctuations of the critical current as a consequence of an unstable magnetic domain structure of the ferromagnetic interlayer and affirms the suitability of SIFS Josephson junctions for quantum information processing.

  3. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  4. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  5. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Human Cerebellar Pathways and their Interplay with Cerebral Macrostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer eKeser

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar white matter connections to the central nervous system are classified functionally into the spinocerebellar, vestibulocerebellar, and cerebrocerebellar subdivisions. The Spinocerebellar (SC pathways project from spinal cord to cerebellum, whereas the vestibulocerebellar (VC pathways project from vestibular organs of the inner ear. Cerebrocerebellar connections are composed of feed forward and feedback connections between cerebrum and cerebellum including the cortico-ponto-cerebellar (CPC pathways being of cortical origin and the dentate-rubro-thalamo-cortical (DRTC pathway being of cerebellar origin. In this study we systematically quantified the whole cerebellar system connections using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI. Ten right-handed healthy subjects (7 males and 3 females, age range 20-51 years were studied. DT-MRI data were acquired with a voxel size = 2mm x 2mm x 2 mm at a 3.0 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. The DT-MRI data were prepared and analyzed using anatomically-guided deterministic tractography methods to reconstruct the SC, DRTC, fronto-ponto-cerebellar (FPC, parieto-ponto-cerebellar (PPC, temporo-ponto-cerebellar (TPC and occipito-ponto-cerebellar (OPC. The DTI-attributes or the cerebellar tracts along with their cortical representation (Brodmann areas were presented in standard Montréal Neurological Institute space. All cerebellar tract volumes were quantified and correlated with volumes of cerebral cortical, subcortical gray matter (GM, cerebral white matter (WM and cerebellar GM, and cerebellar WM. On our healthy cohort, the ratio of total cerebellar GM-to-WM was ~ 3.29 ± 0.24, whereas the ratio of cerebral GM-to-WM was approximately 1.10 ± 0.11. The sum of all cerebellar tract volumes is ~ 25.8 ± 7.3 mL, or a percentage of 1.52 ± 0.43 of the total intracranial volume.

  6. Long lasting cerebellar alterations after perinatal asphyxia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanille, Verónica; Saraceno, G Ezequiel; Rivière, Stéphanie; Logica, Tamara; Kölliker, Rodolfo; Capani, Francisco; Castilla, Rocío

    2015-07-01

    The developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to injury before, at and after birth. Among possible insults, hypoxia suffered as a consequence of perinatal asphyxia (PA) exhibits the highest incidence levels and the cerebellar circuitry appears to be particularly susceptible, as the cellular makeup and the quantity of inputs change quickly during days and weeks following birth. In this work, we have used a murine model to induce severe global PA in rats at the time of birth. Short-term cerebellar alterations within this PA model have been previously reported but whether such alterations remain in adulthood has not been conclusively determined yet. For this reason, and given the crucial cerebellar role in determining connectivity patterns in the brain, the aim of our work is to unveil long-term cerebellum histomorphology following a PA insult. Morphological and cytological neuronal changes and glial reaction in the cerebellar cortex were analyzed at postnatal 120 (P120) following injury performed at birth. As compared to control, PA animals exhibited: (1) an increase in molecular and granular thickness, both presenting lower cellular density; (2) a disarrayed Purkinje cell layer presenting a higher number of anomalous calbindin-stained cells. (3) focal swelling and marked fragmentation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) in Purkinje cell dendrites and, (4) an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in Bergmann cells and the granular layer. In conclusion, we demonstrate that PA produces long-term damage in cellular histomorphology in rat cerebellar cortex which could be involved in the pathogenesis of cognitive deficits observed in both animals and humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Adaptive robotic control driven by a versatile spiking cerebellar network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellato, Claudia; Antonietti, Alberto; Garrido, Jesus A; Carrillo, Richard R; Luque, Niceto R; Ros, Eduardo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in a large number of different neural processes, especially in associative learning and in fine motor control. To develop a comprehensive theory of sensorimotor learning and control, it is crucial to determine the neural basis of coding and plasticity embedded into the cerebellar neural circuit and how they are translated into behavioral outcomes in learning paradigms. Learning has to be inferred from the interaction of an embodied system with its real environment, and the same cerebellar principles derived from cell physiology have to be able to drive a variety of tasks of different nature, calling for complex timing and movement patterns. We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN) with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. Encoding and decoding strategies based on neuronal firing rates were applied. Adaptive motor control protocols with acquisition and extinction phases have been designed and tested, including an associative Pavlovian task (Eye blinking classical conditioning), a vestibulo-ocular task and a perturbed arm reaching task operating in closed-loop. The SNN processed in real-time mossy fiber inputs as arbitrary contextual signals, irrespective of whether they conveyed a tone, a vestibular stimulus or the position of a limb. A bidirectional long-term plasticity rule implemented at parallel fibers-Purkinje cell synapses modulated the output activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. In all tasks, the neurorobot learned to adjust timing and gain of the motor responses by tuning its output discharge. It succeeded in reproducing how human biological systems acquire, extinguish and express knowledge of a noisy and changing world. By varying stimuli and perturbations patterns, real-time control robustness and generalizability were validated. The implicit spiking dynamics of the cerebellar model fulfill timing, prediction and learning functions.

  8. Adaptive robotic control driven by a versatile spiking cerebellar network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Casellato

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is involved in a large number of different neural processes, especially in associative learning and in fine motor control. To develop a comprehensive theory of sensorimotor learning and control, it is crucial to determine the neural basis of coding and plasticity embedded into the cerebellar neural circuit and how they are translated into behavioral outcomes in learning paradigms. Learning has to be inferred from the interaction of an embodied system with its real environment, and the same cerebellar principles derived from cell physiology have to be able to drive a variety of tasks of different nature, calling for complex timing and movement patterns. We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. Encoding and decoding strategies based on neuronal firing rates were applied. Adaptive motor control protocols with acquisition and extinction phases have been designed and tested, including an associative Pavlovian task (Eye blinking classical conditioning, a vestibulo-ocular task and a perturbed arm reaching task operating in closed-loop. The SNN processed in real-time mossy fiber inputs as arbitrary contextual signals, irrespective of whether they conveyed a tone, a vestibular stimulus or the position of a limb. A bidirectional long-term plasticity rule implemented at parallel fibers-Purkinje cell synapses modulated the output activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. In all tasks, the neurorobot learned to adjust timing and gain of the motor responses by tuning its output discharge. It succeeded in reproducing how human biological systems acquire, extinguish and express knowledge of a noisy and changing world. By varying stimuli and perturbations patterns, real-time control robustness and generalizability were validated. The implicit spiking dynamics of the cerebellar model fulfill timing, prediction and learning functions.

  9. Cerebellar motor learning: when is cortical plasticity not enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Porrill

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Classical Marr-Albus theories of cerebellar learning employ only cortical sites of plasticity. However, tests of these theories using adaptive calibration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR have indicated plasticity in both cerebellar cortex and the brainstem. To resolve this long-standing conflict, we attempted to identify the computational role of the brainstem site, by using an adaptive filter version of the cerebellar microcircuit to model VOR calibration for changes in the oculomotor plant. With only cortical plasticity, introducing a realistic delay in the retinal-slip error signal of 100 ms prevented learning at frequencies higher than 2.5 Hz, although the VOR itself is accurate up to at least 25 Hz. However, the introduction of an additional brainstem site of plasticity, driven by the correlation between cerebellar and vestibular inputs, overcame the 2.5 Hz limitation and allowed learning of accurate high-frequency gains. This "cortex-first" learning mechanism is consistent with a wide variety of evidence concerning the role of the flocculus in VOR calibration, and complements rather than replaces the previously proposed "brainstem-first" mechanism that operates when ocular tracking mechanisms are effective. These results (i describe a process whereby information originally learnt in one area of the brain (cerebellar cortex can be transferred and expressed in another (brainstem, and (ii indicate for the first time why a brainstem site of plasticity is actually required by Marr-Albus type models when high-frequency gains must be learned in the presence of error delay.

  10. Cerebellar and pontine tegmental hypermetabolism in miller-fisher syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Kyrong; Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) has been considered as a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a type of acute immune neuropathies involving peripheral nerve system. Unlike GBS, presence of cerebellar type ataxia and supranuclear ophthalmioplesia in MFS suggests additional involvement of the central nervous system. To determine involvement of the central nervous system in MFS, we investigated the cerebral metabolic abnormalities in patients with MFS using FDG PET. Nine patients who were diagnosed as MFS based on acute ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia without other identifiable causes participated in this study. In six patients, serum antibodies possibly related with symptom of MFS (anti- GQ1b or anti-GM1) were detected at the time of the study. With the interval of 25 26 days (range: 3-83 days) from the symptom on set, brain FDG PET were underwent in patients and compared with those from healthy controls. In group analysis comparing with healthy controls, FDG PET of patients revealed increased metabolism in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, and the thalamus. In contrast, the occipital cortex showed decreased metabolism. Individual analyses disclosed hypermetabolism in the cerebellar vermis or hemispheres in 5, and in the pontine tegmentum in 2 of the 9 patients. We also found that the cerebellar vermian hypermetabolism was inversely correlated with the interval between from the symptom on set to PET study. Moreover, follow-up PET of a patient demonstrated that cerebellar hypermetabolism decreased markedly with an improvement of the ophthalmoplegia and ataxia. These findings indicate an involvement of the central nervous system in MFS and suggest an antibody-associated acute inflammatory process as a mechanism of this disorder.

  11. GDNF-induced cerebellar toxicity: A brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Matthias; Mohr, Erich; Fibiger, H Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant-methionyl human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is known for its neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects in rodent and primate models of Parkinson's disease (PD). When administered locally into the putamen of Parkinsonian subjects, early clinical studies showed its potential promise as a disease-modifying agent. However, the development of GDNF for the treatment of PD has been significantly clouded by findings of cerebellar toxicity after continuous intraputamenal high-dose administration in a 6-month treatment/3-month recovery toxicology study in rhesus monkeys. Specifically, multifocal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss affecting 1-21% of the cerebellar cortex was observed in 4 of 15 (26.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.5-52.4%) animals treated at the highest dose level tested (3000μg/month). No cerebellar toxicity was observed at lower doses (450 and 900μg/month) in the same study, or at similar or higher doses (up to 10,000μg/month) in subchronic or chronic toxicology studies testing intermittent intracerebroventricular administration. While seemingly associated with the use of GDNF, the pathogenesis of the cerebellar lesions has not been fully understood to date. This review integrates available information to evaluate potential pathogenic mechanisms and provide a consolidated assessment of the findings. While other explanations are considered, the existing evidence is most consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of GDNF into cerebrospinal fluid during chronic infusions into the putamen down-regulates GDNF receptors on Purkinje cells, and that subsequent acute withdrawal of GDNF generates the observed lesions. The implications of these findings for clinical studies with GDNF are discussed.

  12. Coronary artery fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital heart defect - coronary artery fistula; Birth defect heart - coronary artery fistula ... A coronary artery fistula is often congenital, meaning that it is present at birth. It generally occurs when one of the coronary arteries ...

  13. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  14. Defects in the CAPN1 Gene Result in Alterations in Cerebellar Development and Cerebellar Ataxia in Mice and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous or heterozygous CAPN1-null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knockout (KO mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1-mediated cleavage of PH domain and leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1, which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans.

  15. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS): A Novel Approach to Understanding Cerebellar Function in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J; Edwards, Dylan J; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar-motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar-thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions.

  16. Distal basilar artery aneurysms: conditions for safe and secure clipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagomi, Tadayoshi

    2014-01-01

    In general, vertebro-basilar aneurysms are good indications for endovascular treatment. However, basilar artery (BA) bifurcation aneurysms, BA-superior cerebellar artery (SCA) aneurysms, and sometimes mid-basilar aneurysms are also good indications for clipping. In this paper, conditions for safe and secure clipping for distal basilar aneurysms are discussed.There are several tips for the clipping of distal BA aneurysms. Among them, the following are very important: patency of the perforators, posterior cerebral artery (P1), and SCA must always be maintained. Several modalities including micro-Doppler ultrasonography and indocyanine green video-angiography (ICGVA) should be used to confirm the patency of these vessels. Each confirmation of patency of the vessels after clipping must be compared to those from before the clipping. Intra-operative digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is needed for large or giant aneurysms.

  17. Cerebellar white matter pathways are associated with reading skills in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Katherine E; Leitner, Yael; Feldman, Heidi M; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Reading is a critical life skill in the modern world. The neural basis of reading incorporates a distributed network of cortical areas and their white matter connections. The cerebellum has also been implicated in reading and reading disabilities. However, little is known about the contribution of cerebellar white matter pathways to major component skills of reading. We used diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) with tractography to identify the cerebellar peduncles in a group of 9- to 17-year-old children and adolescents born full term (FT, n = 19) or preterm (PT, n = 26). In this cohort, no significant differences were found between fractional anisotropy (FA) measures of the peduncles in the PT and FT groups. FA of the cerebellar peduncles correlated significantly with measures of decoding and reading comprehension in the combined sample of FT and PT subjects. Correlations were negative in the superior and inferior cerebellar peduncles and positive in the middle cerebellar peduncle. Additional analyses revealed that FT and PT groups demonstrated similar patterns of reading associations within the left superior cerebellar peduncle, middle cerebellar peduncle, and left inferior cerebellar peduncle. Partial correlation analyses showed that distinct sub-skills of reading were associated with FA in segments of different cerebellar peduncles. Overall, the present findings are the first to document associations of microstructure of the cerebellar peduncles and the component skills of reading. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Modelling of Dual-Junction Solar Cells including Tunnel Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz Amine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monolithically stacked multijunction solar cells based on III–V semiconductors materials are the state-of-art of approach for high efficiency photovoltaic energy conversion, in particular for space applications. The individual subcells of the multi-junction structure are interconnected via tunnel diodes which must be optically transparent and connect the component cells with a minimum electrical resistance. The quality of these diodes determines the output performance of the solar cell. The purpose of this work is to contribute to the investigation of the tunnel electrical resistance of such a multi-junction cell through the analysis of the current-voltage (J-V characteristics under illumination. Our approach is based on an equivalent circuit model of a diode for each subcell. We examine the effect of tunnel resistance on the performance of a multi-junction cell using minimization of the least squares technique.

  19. Ruptured aneurysm of the PICA communicating artery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Daisuke; Kuroki, Takao; Andoh, Shunpei; Nemoto, Masaaki; Sugo, Nobuo; Nagao, Takeki

    2014-01-01

    A 47-year-old man presented with a rare aneurysm arising from the posterior inferior cerebellar artery communicating artery (PICA com A), manifesting as subarachnoid with intraventricular hemorrhage. Cerebral angiography showed a defect of the left PICA, and the left PICA region was supplied by a communicating artery formed by the fusion of branches from the right PICA and right vertebral artery. Aneurysms arose in the communicating artery, and a small, unruptured fusiform aneurysm was observed adjacent to a ruptured aneurysm. Trapping was performed for the 2 aneurysms with occipital artery (OA)-PICA bypass. Six cases of aneurysms occurring in this vessel including ours have been reported, and hemodynamic factors and congenital fragility of the arterial wall have been suggested as causative factors. Ours is the first case in which a ruptured aneurysm of this vessel was treated surgically with concurrent vascular reconstruction. If the aneurysm has a shape that is difficult to clip, the affected vessel is difficult to preserve, and collateral blood flow to the affected PICA region is considered insufficient, trapping with OA-PICA bypass is recommended.

  20. Fatal Vertebral Artery Injury in Penetrating Cervical Spine Trauma

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    Chadi Tannoury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design. This case illustrates complications to a vertebral artery injury (VAI resulting from penetrating cervical spine trauma. Objectives. To discuss the management of both VAI and cervical spine trauma after penetrating gunshot wound to the neck. Summary of Background Data. Vertebral artery injury following cervical spine trauma is infrequent, and a unilateral VAI often occurs without neurologic sequela. Nevertheless, devastating complications of stroke and death do occur. Methods. A gunshot wound to the neck resulted in a C6 vertebral body fracture and C5–C7 transverse foramina fractures. Neck CT angiogram identified a left vertebral artery occlusion. A cerebral angiography confirmed occlusion of the left extracranial vertebral artery and patency of the remaining cerebrovascular system. Following anterior cervical corpectomy and stabilization, brainstem infarction occurred and resulted in death. Results. A fatal outcome resulted from vertebral artery thrombus propagation with occlusion of the basilar artery triggering basilar ischemia and subsequent brainstem and cerebellar infarction. Conclusions. Vertebral artery injury secondary to cervical spine trauma can lead to potentially devastating neurologic sequela. Early surgical stabilization, along with anticoagulation therapy, contributes towards managing the combination of injuries. Unfortunately, despite efforts, a poor outcome is sometimes inevitable when cervical spine trauma is coupled with a VAI.

  1. Abnormality in cerebellar blood flow in solo vertigo patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagahori, Takeshi [Shakaihoken Takaoka Hospital, Toyama (Japan); Nishijima, Michiharu; Endo, Shunro; Takaku, Akira

    1997-03-01

    Little is known about the blood flow of the vertebrobasilar system as a cause of vertigo and dizziness. We used Xe-CT to study cerebellar blood flow in 53 patients who ranged in age from 35 to 85 years. The patients were divided into two groups. One of them was the vertigo group that comprised 28 patients with rotatory sensation, and the other, the non-vertigo group of 25 patients with a sensation other than rotation. At the stage of severe symptoms, there was decreased cerebellar blood flow in all patients of both, the vertigo and the non-vertigo groups, and a decrease in the bilateral cerebellar hemisphere was observed in five patients and in a unilateral hemisphere in three patients of the vertigo group. By comparison, in the non-vertigo group, unilateral decrease of cerebellar blood flow was observed in only one patient, and a bilateral decrease in five. At the stage of severe symptoms, the mean regional cerebellar blood flow was 40.5{+-}8.0 ml/100 g/min (n=16 sides) in the vertigo group and 45.3{+-}9.5 ml/100 g/min (n=12 sides) in the non-vertigo group. At the stage of moderate symptoms, blood flow image was normal in four of 14 vertigo patients and in seven of 12 non-vertigo patients. The mean regional blood flow was 47.8{+-}8.6 ml/100 g/min (n=28 sides) in the vertigo group and 47.1{+-}5.1 ml/100 g/min (n=24 sides) in the non-vertigo group. At the asymptomatic stage, a high proportion of normal blood flow images (nine of 16 vertigo patients and 10 of 10 non-vertigo patients) was observed. The mean regional cerebellar blood flow was 51.6{+-}10.7 ml/100 g/min (n=32 sides) in the vertigo group and 52.8{+-}8.5 ml/100 g/min (n=20 sides) in the non-vertigo group. This study demonstrates that a unilateral or bilateral decrease in blood flow of the vertebrobasilar system may cause vertigo and dizziness. It also shows that Xe-CT of the cerebellum may be a valuable examination modality for the diagnosis and treatment of vertigo and dizziness. (author)

  2. Correlation between vestibular habituation and postural recovery in cerebellar patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, H; Caffa, C; Macadar, O

    1992-01-01

    Vestibular habituation was studied in normal subjects and in patients with cerebellar disease using a stimulation paradigm proposed in this paper. Six caloric stimuli were repeated daily in the same ear during six days and electronystagmographic responses at the beginning and the end of that period were compared. The normal behaviour was a clear reduction of the response across time. Two groups of cerebellar patients were identified by their ability to recover from positional imbalance after treatment. Compensated patients responded to repeated caloric stimulation in the same way as normal subjects. Conversely, uncompensated patients increased their response after the stimulation paradigm. The role played by the cerebellum in vestibular plasticity is discussed together with the observed correlation between vestibular habituation and the ability for postural recovery to occur.

  3. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis demonstrated by SPECT in hemiplegic children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Nara, Takahiro; Nozaki, Hidetsugu; Fukushima, Kiyomi (Saitama Children' s Medical Center, Iwatsuki (Japan)); Imai, Masayuki; Kumagai, Koumei; Maekawa, Kihei

    1991-01-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) in twenty five children with hemiplegia were studied using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-I-123-iodoamphetamine. Seven of twenty-five patients had cerebral palsy, and the others were impaired by acquired brain injury between ten months and fourteen years of age. CCD was demonstrated in five patients (20%), who were impaired by acquired brain injury after seven years of age. CCD could never be detected in patients with cerebral palsy. Ipsilateral cerebellar diaschisis was also demonstrated in two patients with cerebral palsy and three with early acquired brain injury before three years of age. It is suggested that diaschisis presents itself as a different form in a contralateral and ipsilateral cerebellum before three years of age from a form which presents after seven years of age. (author).

  4. Cerebellar deficits and hyperactivity in mice lacking Smad4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong-Xing; Zhao, Mingrui; Li, Dan; Shimazu, Kazuhiro; Sakata, Kazuko; Deng, Chu-Xia; Lu, Bai

    2003-10-24

    Smad4 is a central mediator of TGF-beta signals, which are known to play essential roles in many biological processes. Using a Cre-loxP approach to overcome early embryonic lethality, we have studied functions of TGF-beta/Smad4 signals in the central nervous system (CNS). No obvious deficits were detected in mice carrying the targeted disruption of Smad4 in the CNS. The overall morphology of the hippocampus appeared normal. There was no change in the proliferation of neuronal precursor cells, nor in several forms of synaptic plasticity. In contrast, deletion of Smad4 resulted in a marked decrease in the number of cerebellar Purkinje cells and parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Accompanied by the abnormality in the cerebellum, mutant mice also exhibited significantly increased vertical activity. Thus, our study reveals an unexpected role for Smad4 in cerebellar development and in the control of motor function.

  5. Ca2+ Signaling in Cerebellar Purkinje Neurons - EDITORIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruol, Donna; Manto, Mario; Haines, Duane

    2012-01-01

    Tight regulation of calcium (Ca2+) dynamics is critical for all neurons. Ca2+ is a major mediator of cellular excitability, synaptic plasticity, regulation of transcription, amongst others. Recent years have seen major developments in terms of understanding the roles of Ca2+ signals in the cerebellar circuitry, especially for Purkinje neurons and granule cells. The unique morphology of Purkinje neurons serves as a platform to unravel the secrets of Ca2+ homeostasis in cerebellar microcircuits. This special issue covers recent advances in Ca2+ signaling and imaging, and highlights the importance of spatio-temporal compartmentalization underlying Ca2+ dynamics. Sorting out the pieces of the puzzle of homeostatic regulation of Ca2+ remains an instrumental step to start rational therapies of Ca2+ deregulation. PMID:22806980

  6. A Study Of Sporadic Adult Onset Degenerative Cerebellar Ataxias

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    Sinha K K

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four cases of sporadic olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA of adult onset were studied over a period of two years. Results suggest that this disorder has its usual onset in the 5th and 6th decade of life with a male: female ratio of 2:1. It manifests clinically with gait ataxia in all, dysarthria, other cerebellar signs and autonomic involvement in vast majority. There were features of basal ganglia involvement in some. No known identifiable environmental cause was found and genetically they are quite distinct from the known autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias though sporadic occurrence in recessive inheritance or a de novo mutation could not be ruled out completely, but it is unlikely.

  7. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis

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    Shailesh Solanki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis.

  8. Degenerative cerebellar diseases and differential diagnoses; Degenerative Kleinhirnerkrankungen und Differenzialdiagnosen

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    Reith, W.; Roumia, S.; Dietrich, P. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Cerebellar syndromes result in distinct clinical symptoms, such as ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria, intention tremor and eye movement disorders. In addition to the medical history and clinical examination, imaging is particularly important to differentiate other diseases, such as hydrocephalus and multi-infarct dementia from degenerative cerebellar diseases. Degenerative diseases with cerebellar involvement include Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy as well as other diseases including spinocerebellar ataxia. In addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging investigations are also helpful for the differentiation. Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted sequences can sometimes show a signal increase in the pons as a sign of degeneration of pontine neurons and transverse fibers in the basilar part of the pons. The imaging is particularly necessary to exclude other diseases, such as normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), multi-infarct dementia and cerebellar lesions. (orig.) [German] Klinisch imponieren Kleinhirnsyndrome durch Ataxie, Dysarthrie, Dysmetrie, Intentionstremor und Augenbewegungsstoerungen. Neben der Anamnese und klinischen Untersuchung ist die Bildgebung v. a. wichtig um andere Erkrankungen wie Hydrozephalus und Multiinfarktdemenz von degenerativen Kleinhirnerkrankungen zu differenzieren. Zu den degenerativen Erkrankungen mit Kleinhirnbeteiligung gehoeren der Morbus Parkinson, die Multisystematrophie sowie weitere Erkrankungen einschliesslich der spinozerebellaeren Ataxien. Neben der MRT sind auch nuklearmedizinische Untersuchungen zur Differenzierung hilfreich. Axiale Fluid-attenuated-inversion-recovery(FLAIR)- und T2-gewichtete Sequenzen koennen mitunter eine Signalsteigerung im Pons als Ausdruck einer Degeneration der pontinen Neuronen und transversalen Bahnen im Brueckenfuss zeigen. Die Bildgebung ist aber v. a. notwendig, um andere Erkrankungen wie Normaldruckhydrozephalus

  9. Apraxia of speech and cerebellar mutism syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    De Witte, E.; Wilssens, I.; De Surgeloose, D.; Dua, G.; Moens, M.; Verhoeven, J.; Manto, M; Marien, P.

    2017-01-01

    Background\\ud Cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS) or posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) consists of a constellation of neuropsychiatric, neuropsychological and neurogenic speech and language deficits. It is most commonly observed in children after posterior fossa tumor surgery. The most prominent feature of CMS is mutism, which generally starts after a few days after the operation, has a limited duration and is typically followed by motor speech deficits. However, the core speech disorder subserving...

  10. Cerebellar Herniation after Lumbar Puncture in Galactosemic Newborn

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    Salih Kalay

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral edema resulting in elevated intracranial pressure is a well-known complication of galactosemia. Lumbar puncture was performed for the diagnosis of clinically suspected bacterial meningitis. Herniation of cerebral tissue through the foramen magnum is not a common problem in neonatal intensive care units because of the open fontanelle in infants. We present the case of a 3-week-old infant with galactosemia who presented with signs of cerebellar herniation after lumbar puncture.

  11. Patterns of regional cerebellar atrophy in genetic frontotemporal dementia

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    Martina Bocchetta

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: There appears to be a differential pattern of cerebellar atrophy in the major genetic forms of FTD, being relatively spared in GRN, localized to the lobule VIIa-Crus I in the superior-posterior region of the cerebellum in C9orf72, the area connected via the thalamus to the prefrontal cortex and involved in cognitive function, and localized to the vermis in MAPT, the ‘limbic cerebellum’ involved in emotional processing.

  12. Successful treatment of isolated cerebellar cysticercosis with albendazole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱利平; 石尧忠; 潘孝彰; 莫凌; 翁心华

    2003-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic disease of the central nervous system (CNS) found world-wide.1 NCC is the most common cause of parasitic infection of CNS in China. Patients with NCC are treated successfully with chemotherapy. However, isolated cystic lesions sited in the cerebellum are usually treated by direct surgical excision as a primary therapeutic modality.2 We present here a case of isolated cerebellar vermis cysticercosis successfully treated with albendazole.

  13. Phenytoin-induced cerebellar atrophy in an epileptic boy

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    Nithin Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is an important health problem due to its high prevalence and potential for causing long-term morbidity. It is commonly treated in children with phenytoin sodium. It has wide pharmacokinetic variability and a narrow therapeutic range that leads to toxicity. Here, we report a case of phenytoin-induced cerebellar atrophy in a 16-year-old epileptic boy who presented to the hospital with a viral infection.

  14. Hereditary lissencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia in Churra lambs

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Pérez, Valentín; Suárez-Vega, Aroa; Fuertes, M.; Benavides, Julio; Delgado, L.; Ferreras, Mª del Carmen; Arranz, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Lissencephaly is a rare developmental brain disorder in veterinary and human medicine associated with defects in neuronal migration leading to a characteristic marked reduction or absence of the convolutional pattern of the cerebral hemispheres. In many human cases the disease has a genetic basis. In sheep, brain malformations, mainly cerebellar hypoplasia and forms of hydrocephalus, are frequently due to in utero viral infections. Although breed-related malformations of t...

  15. Cerebellar damage impairs internal predictions for sensory and motor function

    OpenAIRE

    Therrien, Amanda S.; Bastian, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is connected to cerebral areas that subserve a range of sensory and motor functions. In this review, we summarize new literature demonstrating deficits in visual perception, proprioception, motor control, and motor learning performance following cerebellar damage. In particular, we highlight novel results that together suggest a general role of the cerebellum in estimating and predicting movement dynamics of the body and environmental stimuli. These findings agree with the hypo...

  16. Acute cerebellar ataxia: A neurological manifestation in malaria

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    Peddametla Shravan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the bite of an infected female anopheles mosquito presents with varied clinical manifestations. Neurological manifestations include headaches, confusion, convulsions, hemiplegia, ataxia, cerebral palsy, cortical blindness, and Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. We are presenting a case report of acute cerebellar ataxia in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with fever and positive for Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria antibodies.

  17. Patient adaptable cerebellar retractor system: Use in posterior fossa surgery

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    Hamid Borghei-Razavi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new patient adaptable dual use soft tissue spreader and cerebellar retractor system designed for use during surgery of the posterior fossa is described. We found that this new retractor design allowed for excellent exposure, plus greater freedom and dexterity during the posterior fossa surgery. This novel instrument is an improvement over the existing instrument, because it provided more force/power transmission from pins/connectors to the brain spatula via the shorter flexible arm.

  18. Successfull management of a life threatening cerebellar haemorrhage following spine surgery - a case report -.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, Johan; Belaïd, Hayat; Aldea, Sorin

    2009-06-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhages are rare life-threatening complications following spine surgery that present challenges for their diagnostic and their therapeutic management. Their patho-physiology remains unclear.We report a case of a life-threatening cerebellar haemorrhage secondary to an occult dural tear following a planned L5-S1 laminectomy. The patient was treated with emergent external ventriculostomy following by a posterior fossa decompressive craniectomy. Cerebellar haemorrhages have to be suspected systematically when unexpected neurological signs occur after spine surgery since their rapid management lead to favourable outcomes. The present imaging findings allow us proposing that cerebellar haemorrhages result primarily from superior cerebellar venous stretching and tearing, and that cerebellar infarction and swelling occur secondarily.

  19. Gap junctions - guards of excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroemlund, Line Waring; Jensen, Christa Funch; Qvortrup, Klaus; Delmar, Mario; Nielsen, Morten Schak

    2015-06-01

    Cardiomyocytes are connected by mechanical and electrical junctions located at the intercalated discs (IDs). Although these structures have long been known, it is becoming increasingly clear that their components interact. This review describes the involvement of the ID in electrical disturbances of the heart and focuses on the role of the gap junctional protein connexin 43 (Cx43). Current evidence shows that Cx43 plays a crucial role in organizing microtubules at the intercalated disc and thereby regulating the trafficking of the cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 to the membrane.

  20. The Changeable Nervous System: Studies On Neuroplasticity In Cerebellar Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seil, Fredrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Circuit reorganization after injury was studied in a cerebellar culture model. When cerebellar cultures derived from newborn mice were exposed at explantation to a preparation of cytosine arabinoside that destroyed granule cells and oligodendrocytes and compromised astrocytes, Purkinje cells surviving in greater than usual numbers were unensheathed by astrocytic processes and received twice the control number of inhibitory axosomatic synapses. Purkinje cell axon collaterals sprouted and many of their terminals formed heterotypical synapses with other Purkinje cell dendritic spines. The resulting circuit reorganization preserved inhibition in the cerebellar cortex. Following this reorganization, replacement of the missing granule cells and glia was followed by a restitution of the normal circuitry. Most of these developmental and reconstructive changes were not dependent on neuronal activity, the major exception being inhibitory synaptogenesis. The full complement of inhibitory synapses did not develop in the absence of neuronal activity, which could be mitigated by application of exogenous TrkB receptor ligands. Inhibitory synaptogenesis could also be promoted by activity-induced release of endogenous TrkB receptor ligands or by antibody activation of the TrkB receptor. PMID:24933693

  1. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with anti-Yo antibodies - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Anand; Opal, Puneet

    2016-08-01

    The ataxic syndrome associated with Anti-Yo antibody, or Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody type 1 (PCA1), is the most common variant of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). The typical presentation involves the subacute development of pancerebellar deficits with a clinical plateau within 6 months. The vast majority of cases have been reported in women with pelvic or breast tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain is often normal in the early stages, with cerebellar atrophy seen later. The underlying mechanism is believed to be an immunological reaction to cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2 (CDR2), a protein usually found in the cerebellum that is ectopically produced by tumor cells. Although both B- and T-cell abnormalities are seen, there is debate about the relative importance of the autoantibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the neuronal loss. Cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities, primarily elevated protein, lymphocytic pleocytosis, and oligoclonal bands, are common in the early stages. The low prevalence of this condition has not allowed for large-scale randomized controlled trials. Immunotherapies, such as steroids, intravenous immune globulins, and plasma exchange, have been extensively used in managing this condition, with limited success. Although some reports indicate benefit from antitumor therapies like surgery and chemotherapy, this has not been consistently observed. The prognosis for anti-Yo PCD is almost uniformly poor, with most patients left bedridden. Further studies are required to clarify the pathophysiology and provide evidence-based treatment options.

  2. Longitudinal cerebellar diffusion tensor imaging changes in posterior fossa syndrome

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    Sean D. McEvoy, MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior fossa syndrome is a severe transient loss of language that frequently complicates resection of tumors of the cerebellum. The associated pathophysiology and relevant anatomy to this language deficit remains controversial. We performed a retrospective analysis of all cerebellar tumor resections at Seattle Children's Hospital from 2010 to 2015. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed on each of the patients as part of their clinical scan. Patients included in the study were divided into groups based on language functioning following resection: intact (N = 19, mild deficit (N = 19, and posterior fossa syndrome (N = 9. Patients with posterior fossa syndrome showed white matter changes evidenced by reductions in fractional anisotropy in the left and right superior cerebellar peduncle following resection, and these changes were still evident 1-year after surgery. These changes were greater in the superior cerebellar peduncle than elsewhere in the cerebellum. Prior to surgery, posterior fossa patients did not show changes in fractional anisotropy however differences were observed in mean and radial diffusivity measures in comparison to other groups which may provide a radiographic marker of those at greatest risk of developing post-operative language loss.

  3. Inpatient Rehabilitation Performance of Patients with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jack B.; Raj, Vishwa S.; Asher, Arash; Lee, Jay; Guo, Ying; Konzen, Benedict S.; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the functional improvement of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Design Retrospective Review Setting Three tertiary referral based hospitals. Interventions Medical records were retrospectively analyzed for demographic, laboratory, medical and functional data. Main Outcome Measure Functional Independence Measure (FIM) Participants Cancer rehabilitation inpatients admitted to three different cancer centers with a diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (n=7). Results All 7 patients were white females. Median age was 62. Primary cancers included ovarian carcinoma (2), small cell lung cancer (2), uterine carcinoma (2), and invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Mean admission total FIM score was 61.0 (SD=23.97). Mean discharge total FIM score was 73.6 (SD=29.35). The mean change in total FIM score was 12.6 (p=.0018). The mean length of rehabilitation stay was 17.1 days. The mean total FIM efficiency was 0.73. 5/7 (71%) patients were discharged home. 1/7 (14%) was discharged to a nursing home. 1/7 (14%) transferred to the primary acute care service. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the functional performance of a group of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Despite the poor neurologic prognosis associated with this syndrome, these patients made significant functional improvements on inpatient rehabilitation. When appropriate, inpatient rehabilitation should be considered. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed. PMID:25051460

  4. Sustained Reduction of Cerebellar Activity in Experimental Epilepsy

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    Kim Rijkers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental evidence suggests a role for the cerebellum in seizure control, while no data are available on cerebellar activity between seizures. We hypothesized that interictal regional activity of the deep cerebellar nuclei is reduced in epilepsy and tested this in an animal model by using ΔFosB and cytochrome oxidase (COX (immunohistochemistry. The expression of these two markers of neuronal activity was analysed in the dentate nucleus (DN, interpositus nucleus (IN, and fastigial nucleus (FN of the cerebellum of fully amygdala kindled rats that were sacrificed 48 hours after their last seizure. The DN and FN of kindled rats exhibited 25 to 29% less ΔFosB immunopositive cells than their respective counterpart in sham controls (P<0.05. COX expression in the DN and FN of kindled animals was reduced by 32 to 33% compared to respective control values (P<0.05. These results indicate that an epileptogenic state is characterized by decreased activity of deep cerebellar nuclei, especially the DN and FN. Possible consequences may include a decreased activation of the thalamus, contributing to further seizure spread. Restoration of FN activity by low frequency electrical stimulation is suggested as a possible treatment option in chronic epilepsy.

  5. Cerebellar vermis H₂ receptors mediate fear memory consolidation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianlorenço, A C L; Riboldi, A M; Silva-Marques, B; Mattioli, R

    2015-02-01

    Histaminergic fibers are present in the molecular and granular layers of the cerebellum and have a high density in the vermis and flocullus. Evidence supports that the cerebellar histaminergic system is involved in memory consolidation. Our recent study showed that histamine injections facilitate the retention of an inhibitory avoidance task, which was abolished by pretreatment with an H2 receptor antagonist. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intracerebellar post training injections of H1 and H2 receptor antagonists as well as the selective H2 receptor agonist on fear memory consolidation. The cerebellar vermi of male mice were implanted with guide cannulae, and after three days of recovery, the inhibitory avoidance test was performed. Immediately after a training session, animals received a microinjection of the following histaminergic drugs: experiment 1, saline or chlorpheniramine (0.016, 0.052 or 0.16 nmol); experiment 2, saline or ranitidine (0.57, 2.85 or 5.07 nmol); and experiment 3, saline or dimaprit (1, 2 or 4 nmol). Twenty-four hours later, a retention test was performed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests. Animals microinjected with chlorpheniramine did not show any behavioral effects at the doses that we used. Intra-cerebellar injection of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine inhibited, while the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit facilitated, memory consolidation, suggesting that H2 receptors mediate memory consolidation in the inhibitory avoidance task in mice.

  6. Behavior modification after inactivation of cerebellar dentate nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Todd C; Villatoro, Lee; Arneson, Tom; Ahuja, Brittany; Voss, Stephanie; Swain, Rodney A

    2012-08-01

    Effort-based decision making occurs when subjects are given a choice between a reward available at a high response cost and a reward available at a low response cost and is altered in individuals with disorders such as autism or particular patterns of brain injury. The current study explored the relationship between effort-based decision making and reinforcement characteristics in the T maze. This was done using both normal animals and animals with bilateral inactivation of the cerebellar dentate nuclei. Rats chose between alternatives in which one arm contained high-density reinforcement (HR) and the other arm contained low-density reinforcement (LR). During training, the HR arm was obstructed and the point at which the animal no longer worked for reinforcement (breaking point) was determined. The cerebellar dentate nuclei were then transiently inactivated and once again breaking points were assessed. The results indicated that inactivation of the dentate nucleus disrupted effort-based decision making. Additionally, altering both the palatability and the magnitude of the reinforcement were assessed in an attempt to reestablish the original preinactivation breaking point. It was hypothesized that an increase in the strength or magnitude of the reinforcement would promote an increase in the breaking point of the animal even when the cerebellum was inactivated. The results indicated that with both strategies animals effectively reestablished original breaking points. The results of this study will inform the current literature regarding the modification of behavior after brain injury and further the understanding of the behavioral deficits associated with cerebellar dysfunction.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of cerebellar ataxias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Takase, Sadao; Mochizuki, Hiroshi; Kogure, Kyuya; Yamada, Kenji; Hishinuma, Takashi; Matsuzawa, Taiju.

    1987-11-01

    Radiological evaluation in order to quantitatively analyse the size of structures in the posterior fossa using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in the patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD). The subjects consisted of 17 patients including 11 OPCA (olivopontocerebellar atrophy)-type and 6 LCCA (late cortical cerebellar atrophy)-type SCD patients, and their disease was in the initial phase. Using a mid-line sagittal view, quantitative measurements of the cerebellum, pons and the medulla oblongata were performed. In the OPCA-type SCD patients, the area, and the longitudinal and anteroposterior diameters of the cerebellar vermis, the area and the anteroposterior diameter of the pons, the height of the fourth ventricle, and the anteroposterior diameter of the medulla oblongata were significantly smaller than those of normal subjects. In the LCCA-type SCD patients, only the area and the anteroposterior diameter of the cerebellar vermis were smaller than those of the normal. As a result, MRI is useful in the diagnosis of SCD, and in the differential diagnosis between the OPCA-type and the LCCA-type SCDs.

  8. β-Catenin is critical for cerebellar foliation and lamination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wen

    Full Text Available The cerebellum has a conserved foliation pattern and a well-organized layered structure. The process of foliation and lamination begins around birth. β-catenin is a downstream molecule of Wnt signaling pathway, which plays a critical role in tissue organization. Lack of β-catenin at early embryonic stages leads to either prenatal or neonatal death, therefore it has been difficult to resolve its role in cerebellar foliation and lamination. Here we used GFAP-Cre to ablate β-catenin in neuronal cells of the cerebellum after embryonic day 12.5, and found an unexpected role of β-catenin in determination of the foliation pattern. In the mutant mice, the positions of fissure formation were changed, and the meninges were improperly incorporated into fissures. At later stages, some lobules were formed by Purkinje cells remaining in deep regions of the cerebellum and the laminar structure was dramatically altered. Our results suggest that β-catenin is critical for cerebellar foliation and lamination. We also found a non cell-autonomous role of β-catenin in some developmental properties of major cerebellar cell types during specific stages.

  9. Neuronal correlates of cognitive function in patients with childhood cerebellar tumor lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Reichert, Johanna L.; Chocholous, Monika; Leiss, Ulrike; Pletschko, Thomas; Kasprian, Gregor; Furtner, Julia; Kollndorfer, Kathrin; Krajnik, Jacqueline; Slavc, Irene; Prayer, Daniela; Czech, Thomas; Sch?pf, Veronika; Dorfer, Christian

    2017-01-01

    While it has been shown that cerebellar tumor lesions have an impact on cognitive functions, the extent to which they shape distant neuronal pathways is still largely undescribed. Thus, the present neuroimaging study was designed to investigate different aspects of cognitive function and their neuronal correlates in patients after childhood cerebellar tumor surgery. An alertness task, a working memory task and an incompatibility task were performed by 11 patients after childhood cerebellar tu...

  10. Activation of cerebellar lobules VI-VII during motor imagery but not during motor activation in unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habas, Christophe; Manto, Mario

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 25 year-old patient who underwent morphological and functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate a left neocerebellar hypoplasia discovered incidentally. We compared brain activation during overt and covert finger movements, and haptic discrimination. The contralateral cerebellar hemisphere compensated for mental imagery of hand movements and haptic discrimination, but not for motor execution. Moreover, the resting-state functional connectivity did not show compensatory functional coherence between the right cerebellum and cerebral areas connected with the hypoplastic cerebellum. Our case illustrates for the first time that cerebellar compensatory recruitment is an active, specific process related to task complexity and under the control of executive networks.

  11. Reversible cardiogenic shock caused by atrioventricular junctional rhythm after percutaneous coronary intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Wang; Qi-Gao Zhang; Xiao-Min Cai; Li-Jun Wang; Jian-Bin Gong; Shi-Sen Jiang

    2012-01-01

    An 82-year-old female patient undergoing cardiogenic shock caused by atrioventricular junctional rhythm immediately after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is described. Pharmacotherapy was invalid, and subsequent application of atrial pacing reversed the cardiogenic shock. PCI-related injury of sinuatrial nodal artery leading to acute atrial contractility loss, accompanied by atrioventricular junctional arrhythmia, was diagnosed. We recommend that preoperative risk evaluation be required for multi-risk patients. Likewise, emergent measures should to be established in advance. This case reminds us that atrial pacing can be an optimal management technique once cardiogenic shock has occurred.

  12. Control over Rectification in Supramolecular Tunneling Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wimbush, K.S.; Wimbush, Kim S.; Reus, William F.; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; Reinhoudt, David; Whitesides, George M.; Nijhuis, C.A.; Velders, Aldrik

    2010-01-01

    In complete control: The magnitude of current rectification in well-defined supramolecular tunneling junctions can be controlled by changing the terminal functionality (red spheres) of dendrimers (gray spheres) immobilized on a supramolecular platform (see picture). Junctions containing biferrocene

  13. Congenital Cerebellar Mixed Germ Cell Tumor Presenting with Hemorrhage in a Newborn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Mok; Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, So Young; Park, Won Soon; Jang, Yun Sil; Shin, Hyung Jin; Suh, Yeon Lim [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    We report here on a neonate with congenital cerebellar mixed germ cell tumor, and this initially presented as cerebellar hemorrhage. Postnatal cranial ultrasonography revealed an echogenic cerebellar mass that exhibited the signal characteristics of hemorrhage rather than tumor on MR images. The short-term follow-up images also suggested a resolving cerebellar hemorrhage. One month later, the neonate developed vomiting. A second set of MR images demonstrated an enlarged mass that exhibited changed signal intensity at the same site, which suggested a neoplasm. Histological examination after the surgical resection revealed a mixed germ cell tumor.

  14. Differentiating cerebellar and brainstem lesions with ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Hung; Young, Yi-Ho

    2011-06-01

    This study applied both ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) tests in patients with cerebellar disorders to determine whether VEMP test can differentiate between cerebellar and brainstem lesions. A total of 12 patients with cerebellar disorder, including extended cerebellar lesion (involving the brainstem) in 8 and localized cerebellar lesion (excluding the brainstem) in 4, were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent caloric, visual suppression, and oVEMP and cVEMP tests via bone-conducted vibration stimuli. The abnormal rates for the caloric, visual suppression, and oVEMP and cVEMP tests were 62, 83, 88 and 75% in patients with extended cerebellar lesion and 0, 25, 0 and 0% in those with localized cerebellar lesion, respectively. The rate of abnormal oVEMP results significantly differed between the two groups, but caloric, visual suppression and cVEMP test results did not differ. In another ten healthy subjects, characteristic parameters of oVEMPs obtained under light and dark conditions did not significantly differ. In conclusion, ocular VEMP test can differentiate between cerebellar and brainstem lesions. Abnormal oVEMPs in patients with cerebellar disorder may indicate adjacent brainstem involvement.

  15. Metalinguistic deficits in patients with cerebellar dysfunction: empirical support for the dysmetria of thought theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guell, Xavier; Hoche, Franziska; Schmahmann, Jeremy D

    2015-02-01

    The cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS) includes disruption of linguistic processing such as verbal fluency, verbal working memory, grammar, and speech perception. We set out to examine linguistic capabilities in patients with cerebellar lesions to determine which domains are spared and which impaired and to evaluate the underlying cognitive structure of these deficits. Forty-four patients with cerebellar disease were compared to 40 healthy controls on the Oral Sentence Production Test (OSPT) which assesses production of sentences with correct syntactic structure and semantic quality. Twenty-five of these cerebellar patients and 25 controls received the Test of Language Competence-Expanded (TLC-E) that assesses metalinguistic ability. The OSPT failed to reveal differences between patients and controls. In contrast, all cerebellar patients were impaired on each of the four TLC-E subtests. Differences between isolated cerebellar and complex cerebrocerebellar patients were nonsignificant. These results confirm and extend prior observations of the TLC-E in patients with cerebellar lesions and suggest three separate but related language impairments following cerebellar dysfunction: (1) disruption in automatic adjustment of intact grammatical and semantic abilities to a linguistic context in sentence production, (2) disruption in automatic adjustment to a linguistic context in sentence interpretation, and (3) disruption of cognitive processes essential for linguistic skills, such as analysis and sequential logical reasoning. These findings are consistent with the unifying framework of the universal cerebellar transform and the dysmetria of thought theory and provide new insights into the nature of the cognitive impairments in patients with the CCAS.

  16. Medical management of cerebellar abscess: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ryan C; Dodson, Sean C; Rosen, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    A large abscess of the posterior fossa often warrants surgical intervention. We report a case of a 50-year-old male presenting with a cerebellar abscess measuring 2.8 cm x 1.6 cm located in the left cerebellar hemisphere at the level of the middle cerebellar peduncle that was treated conservatively and successfully with antibiotics. Therapeutic management options are discussed in regards to this case specifically as well as a review of the literature. This case illustrates the successful medical management of a cerebellar abscess of otogenic origin in an adult, a unique result in terms of abscess size and age of the patient.

  17. The clinical impact of cerebellar grey matter pathology in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Damasceno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cerebellum is an important site for cortical demyelination in multiple sclerosis, but the functional significance of this finding is not fully understood. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical and cognitive impact of cerebellar grey-matter pathology in multiple sclerosis patients. METHODS: Forty-two relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and 30 controls underwent clinical assessment including the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS and cerebellar functional system (FS score, and cognitive evaluation, including the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT and the Symbol-Digit Modalities Test (SDMT. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed with a 3T scanner and variables of interest were: brain white-matter and cortical lesion load, cerebellar intracortical and leukocortical lesion volumes, and brain cortical and cerebellar white-matter and grey-matter volumes. RESULTS: After multivariate analysis high burden of cerebellar intracortical lesions was the only predictor for the EDSS (p<0.001, cerebellar FS (p = 0.002, arm function (p = 0.049, and for leg function (p<0.001. Patients with high burden of cerebellar leukocortical lesions had lower PASAT scores (p = 0.013, while patients with greater volumes of cerebellar intracortical lesions had worse SDMT scores (p = 0.015. CONCLUSIONS: Cerebellar grey-matter pathology is widely present and contributes to clinical dysfunction in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, independently of brain grey-matter damage.

  18. Microvascular decompression of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery for intermediate nerve neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Kluge Schroeder

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: INN should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases with atypical facial neuralgia, and microvascular decompression is an effective treatment option that can provide optimal pain relief.

  19. De novo superior cerebellar artery aneurysm following radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joseph C T; Chao, Kuo; Rahimian, Javad

    2017-04-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is a commonly used method for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Radiation has been known to be a factor in the later development of aneurysms. Aneurysms have been reported to occur after radiation delivered in a variety of methods including both externally delivered radiation radiosurgery and brachytherapy. We report here an incidence of a de novo aneurysm presenting following radiosurgery treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. The patient was treated using frame-based LINAC radiosurgery receiving 90Gy to the mid cisternal extent of the nerve via a 4mm conical collimator. The patient presented with progressive hypoesthesia 11years after treatment. Imaging evaluation demonstrated the presence of an aneurysm abutting the treated trigeminal nerve. The aneurysm was successfully coil embolized. The patient's facial hypoesthesia, however, did not improve following embolization. We believe that this is the first report of such an aneurysm occurring after radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. De novo aneurysms are a recognized long term complication of radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatment. This report shows such aneurysms can occur with very small treatment volumes. Late sensory changes following radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia should prompt workup for de novo aneurysms as well as other late adverse radiation effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nano-Molecular Junctions on STM Tips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Huang∗; Jianshu Yang

    2011-01-01

    We present a technique for building metal-organic-metal junctions, which contain ten or fewer conjugated molecules between each of such junction, and the investigations of the I-V response of these junctions. The junctions are made by self assembling thiolated molecules onto gold coated tips for use in scanning tunneling microscopy. We show that this easy technique probes the qualitative properties of the molecules. Current-voltage characteristics of a Tour wire and a new molecular rectifier are presented.

  1. Nano-Molecular Junctions on STM Tips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Huang; Jianshu Yang

    2011-01-01

    We present a technique for building metal-organic-metal junctions, which contain ten or fewer conjugated molecules between each of such junction, and the investigations of the I-V response of these junctions.The junctions are made by self assembling thiolated molecules onto gold coated tips for use in scanning tunneling microscopy. We show that this easy technique probes the qualitative properties of the molecules. Currentvoltage characteristics of a Tour wire and a new molecular rectifier are presented.

  2. Current noise in tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, Moritz; Grabert, Hermann [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, 79104, Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    We study current fluctuations in tunnel junctions driven by a voltage source. The voltage is applied to the tunneling element via an impedance providing an electromagnetic environment of the junction. We use circuit theory to relate the fluctuations of the current flowing in the leads of the junction with the voltage fluctuations generated by the environmental impedance and the fluctuations of the tunneling current. The spectrum of current fluctuations is found to consist of three parts: a term arising from the environmental Johnson-Nyquist noise, a term due to the shot noise of the tunneling current and a third term describing the cross-correlation between these two noise sources. Our phenomenological theory reproduces previous results based on the Hamiltonian model for the dynamical Coulomb blockade and provides a simple understanding of the current fluctuation spectrum in terms of circuit theory and properties of the average current. Specific results are given for a tunnel junction driven through a resonator. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Josephson tunnel junction microwave attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Shchukin, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    A new element for superconducting electronic circuitry-a variable attenuator-has been proposed, designed, and successfully tested. The principle of operation is based on the change in the microwave impedance of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Josephson tunnel junction when dc bias...

  4. PERSISTENT MEDIAN ARTERY ASSOCIATED WITH SUPERFICIA L RADIAL ARTERY AT THE WRIST- A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasabarinathan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Vascular variations are usually the result of deve lopmental anomaly during the formation of blood vessels in any respective part of the body. In this case a rare unilateral variation was found on the left upper limb during rou tine dissection in the Department of Anatomy. Brachial artery divided into radial artery and a common trunk. The common trunk in turn divided into ulnar, median and common inteross eous artery. The median artery was palmar type, had two proper palmar digital branches in t he palm. The radial artery had normal course in the forearm till the junction between upper two third and lower one third where it turned dorsally and reached the anatomical snuff bo x and ran superficial to the abductor pollicis longus, extensor carpi radialis brevis and extensor carpi radialis longus along the cephalic vein medially and superficial branch of radial nerve late rally. The median artery, arose from the common trunk, had pierced the median nerve about 4cm from its origin then ran along the median nerve in the forearm thereby reached the palm where it gave off two common palmar digital branches but did not anastomose with the ul nar artery hence formed incomplete superficial palmar arch. But on the right side no suc h variations found. These vascular variations have been studied in detail and their cl inical implications and embryological significance are emphasized.

  5. Contralateral cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathways reconstruction in humans in vivo: implications for reciprocal cerebro-cerebellar structural connectivity in motor and non-motor areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palesi, Fulvia; De Rinaldis, Andrea; Castellazzi, Gloria; Calamante, Fernando; Muhlert, Nils; Chard, Declan; Tournier, J Donald; Magenes, Giovanni; D'Angelo, Egidio; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M

    2017-10-09

    Cerebellar involvement in cognition, as well as in sensorimotor control, is increasingly recognized and is thought to depend on connections with the cerebral cortex. Anatomical investigations in animals and post-mortem humans have established that cerebro-cerebellar connections are contralateral to each other and include the cerebello-thalamo-cortical (CTC) and cortico-ponto-cerebellar (CPC) pathways. CTC and CPC characterization in humans in vivo is still challenging. Here advanced tractography was combined with quantitative indices to compare CPC to CTC pathways in healthy subjects. Differently to previous studies, our findings reveal that cerebellar cognitive areas are reached by the largest proportion of the reconstructed CPC, supporting the hypothesis that a CTC-CPC loop provides a substrate for cerebro-cerebellar communication during cognitive processing. Amongst the cerebral areas identified using in vivo tractography, in addition to the cerebral motor cortex, major portions of CPC streamlines leave the prefrontal and temporal cortices. These findings are useful since provide MRI-based indications of possible subtending connectivity and, if confirmed, they are going to be a milestone for instructing computational models of brain function. These results, together with further multi-modal investigations, are warranted to provide important cues on how the cerebro-cerebellar loops operate and on how pathologies involving cerebro-cerebellar connectivity are generated.

  6. Stability of large-area molecular junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Hylke B.; Kronemeijer, Auke J.; Harkema, Jan; van Hal, Paul A.; Smits, Edsger C. P.; de Leeuw, Dago M.; Blom, Paul W. M.

    The stability of molecular junctions is crucial for any application of molecular electronics. Degradation of molecular junctions when exposed to ambient conditions is regularly observed. In this report the stability of large-area molecular junctions under ambient conditions for more than two years

  7. Soliton bunching in annular Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernik, I.V; Lazarides, Nickos; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    1996-01-01

    By studying soliton (fluxon) motion in long annular Josephson junctions it is possible to avoid the influence of the boundaries and soliton-soliton collisions present in linear junctions. A new experimental design consisting of a niobium coil placed on top of an annular junction has been used...

  8. Long Range Magnetic Interaction between Josephson Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1995-01-01

    A new model for magnetic coupling between long Josephson junctions is proposed. The coupling mechanism is a result of the magnetic fields outside the junctions and is consequently effective over long distances between junctions. We give specific expressions for the form and magnitude of the inter...

  9. Dynamics of pi-junction interferometer circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornkev, V.K.; Mozhaev, P.B.; Borisenko, I.V.;

    2002-01-01

    The pi-junction superconducting circuit dynamics was studied by means of numerical simulation technique. Parallel arrays consisting of Josephson junctions of both 0- and pi-type were studied as a model of high-T-c grain-boundary Josephson junction. The array dynamics and the critical current...

  10. Dynamics of pi-junction interferometer circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornkev, V.K.; Mozhaev, P.B.; Borisenko, I.V.

    2002-01-01

    The pi-junction superconducting circuit dynamics was studied by means of numerical simulation technique. Parallel arrays consisting of Josephson junctions of both 0- and pi-type were studied as a model of high-T-c grain-boundary Josephson junction. The array dynamics and the critical current...

  11. Arterial spin-labeling MR imaging of cerebral hemorrhages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Tomoyuki [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Saga University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Saga (Japan); Nishihara, Masashi; Egashira, Yoshiaki; Azama, Shinya; Hirai, Tetsuyoshi; Kitano, Isao; Irie, Hiroyuki [Saga University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Saga (Japan); Yakushiji, Yusuke [Saga University, Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Saga (Japan); Kawashima, Masatou [Saga University, Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Saga (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to identify the characteristics of brain perfusion measured by arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (ASL-MRI) in cerebral hemorrhages. Brain blood flow values (CBF-ASL values) for cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres and segmented cerebral regions were measured by ASL-MRI in 19 putaminal hemorrhage patients and 20 thalamic hemorrhage patients in acute or subacute stages. We assessed the lateralities of CBF-ASL values and the relationships between CBF-ASL values and other imaging findings and clinical manifestations. Both the 19 putaminal hemorrhage patients and the 20 thalamic hemorrhage patients had significantly low CBF-ASL values of the contralateral cerebellum in subacute stage, suggesting that ASL-MRI might delineate crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD). Ipsilateral low CBF-ASL values were observed in frontal lobes and thalami with a putaminal hemorrhage and lentiform nuclei, temporal lobes, and parietal lobes with a thalamic hemorrhage, suggesting that ASL-MRI showed the ipsilateral cerebral diaschisis (ICD). In the putaminal hemorrhage patients, the hematoma volume negatively affected both the bilateral cerebellar and cerebral hemispheric CBF-ASL values. In the thalamic hemorrhage patients, a concomitant intraventricular hemorrhage caused low cerebral hemispheric CBF-ASL values. The use of ASL-MRI is sensitive to the perfusion abnormalities and could thus be helpful to estimate functional abnormalities in cerebral hemorrhage patients. (orig.)

  12. Morphological expression of the anterior spinal artery and the intracranial segment of the vertebral artery: a direct anatomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, L; Forero, P; Quintero, I

    2013-01-01

    Given its importance for clinical diagnosis and management, the purpose of this study was to determine the morphological expression of the intracranial segment of both vertebral and spinal arteries. Ninety-five fresh cadaveric specimens autopsied at the Instituto de Medicina Legal of Bucaramanga (Colombia) were perfused with polyester resins at the vertebrobasilar vascular bed, by canalizing the proximal segment of the internal carotids and vertebral arteries. The intracranial segment of the vertebral arteries (VA) had a length of 33.2±5.2 mm and a caliber of 3.03±0.81 mm. The left vertebral artery had a caliber of 3.12±0.85 mm, this being greater than the caliber of the right artery in 59.6% of the cases. The VA junction was seen at the level of the ponto-medullary sulcus in 44.2%, above this level in 30.5%, and below it in 25.3%. The distance from the origin of the anterior spinal branches (ASBs) to the VA junction was 7.34±2.71 mm, with a greater distance corresponding to the right ASBs, a difference that did not reach statistical significance (p=0.32). The anterior spinal arteries (ASA) had a bilateral origin in 65.3% of the cases, with the caliber being balanced in 37 (39%) and dominant at the right side in 15.8%. A right unilateral origin of the ASA was observed in 13.7% and a left unilateral origin in 9.5% of the specimens. There is disagreement in the literature as to the level of the junction of the two vertebral arteries. The unilateral origin of the spinal arteries is more frequent than most prior studies have indicated.

  13. Peripheral arterial line (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A peripheral arterial line is a small, short plastic catheter placed through the skin into an artery of the arm or leg. The purpose of a peripheral arterial line is to allow continuous monitoring of ...

  14. A systematic study of the brain base arteries in the rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Souza

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The brains of 30 New Zealand rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus were injected with red stained latex. The arteries of the ventral surface of the brain were systematized on the right (R and on the left (L side with the respective percentage of appearance: the aortic arch emitted the braquicephalic trunk and the left subclavian artery (83.3%; or the braquicephalic trunk, the left common carotid artery and the left subclavian artery (16.7%. The braquicephalic trunk emitted the right and the left common carotid arteries and the right subclavian artery (83.3%; or the right common carotid artery and the right subclavian artery (16.7%. The common carotid arteries were divided into external and internal carotid arteries (96.7% on the R, 100% on the L.. The internal carotid artery to the R was present (96.7% and absent (3.3%, and to the L, was present (100%. The rostral choroidal artery to the R was collateral branch of the rostral branch of the internal carotid artery (83.3%, collateral branch of caudal branch of the internal carotid artery (16.7%, and to the L was collateral branch of the rostral branch of the internal carotid artery (93.3%, collateral branch of the caudal branch of the internal carotid artery (6.7%. The middle cerebral artery to the R and to the L was single (80% and double (20%. The rostral cerebral artery to the R had middle caliber (90%, thin caliber (6.7% and too thin caliber (3.3%, and to the L had middle caliber (76.7%, thin caliber (16.7% and too thin caliber (6.7%. The internal ethmoidal artery was absent (73.3%, present and single (26.7%. The caudal cerebral artery to the R was single (66.7%, double (26.7% and triple (6.7%, and to the L was single (63.3% and double (36.7%. The terminal branches of the right and left vertebral arteries were present (100%, and formed the basilar artery (100%. The ventral spinal artery was present (100%. The caudal cerebellar artery, to the R was single (43.3%, single with labyrinthic artery

  15. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jaskólski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF. The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system.

  16. Fabrication of high quality ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weides, M. [Institute for Solid State Research, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany) and CNI-Center of Nanoelectronic Systems for Information Technology, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: m.weides@fz-juelich.de; Tillmann, K. [Institute for Solid State Research, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kohlstedt, H. [Institute for Solid State Research, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); CNI-Center of Nanoelectronic Systems for Information Technology, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Department of Material Science and Engineering and Department of Physics, University of Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    We present ferromagnetic Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni{sub 60}Cu{sub 40}/Nb Josephson junctions (SIFS) with an ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barrier. The junction fabrication was optimized regarding junction insulation and homogeneity of current transport. Using ion-beam-etching and anodic oxidation we defined and insulated the junction mesas. The additional 2 nm thin Cu-layer below the ferromagnetic NiCu (SINFS) lowered interface roughness and ensured very homogeneous current transport. A high yield of junctional devices with j {sub c} spreads less than 2% was obtained.

  17. Clinical and genetic analysis of a four-generation family with a distinct autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, H J; Ippel, P F; Hageman, G; Sinke, R J; van der Laan, E N; Beemer, F A

    2001-01-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterised by progressive cerebellar dysfunction in combination with a variety of other associative features. Since 1993 ADCAs have been increasingly characterised in terms of their genetic

  18. Clinical and genetic analysis of a four-generation family with a distinct autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, H J; Ippel, P F; Hageman, G; Sinke, R J; van der Laan, E N; Beemer, F A

    2001-01-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterised by progressive cerebellar dysfunction in combination with a variety of other associative features. Since 1993 ADCAs have been increasingly characterised in terms of their genetic

  19. Morphological features of encephalopathy after chronic administration of the antiepileptic drug valproate to rats. A transmission electron microscopic study of capillaries in the cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, M E; Sobaniec, W

    1996-01-01

    Long-term intragastric application of the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate (Vupral "Polfa") at the effective dose of 200 mg/kg b. w. once daily to rats for 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months revealed neurological disorders indicating cerebellum damage ("valproate encephalopathy"). The first ultrastructural changes in structural elements of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) in the cerebellar cortex were detectable after 3 months of the experiment. They became more severe in the later months of the experiment, and were most severe after 12 months, located mainly in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Lesions of the capillary included necrosis of endothelial cells. Organelles of these cells, in particular the mitochondria (increased number and size, distinct degeneration of their matrix and cristae) and Golgi apparatus were altered. Reduced size of capillary lumen and occlusion were caused by swollen endothelial cells which had luminal protrusions and swollen microvilli. Pressure on the vessel wall was produced by enlarged perivascular astrocytic processes. Fragments of necrotic endothelial cells were in the vascular lumens and in these there was loosening and breaking of tight cellular junctions. Damage to the vascular basement lamina was also observed. Damage to the capillary was accompanied by marked damage to neuroglial cells, mainly to perivascular processes of astrocytes. The proliferation of astrocytes (Bergmann's in particular) and occasionally of oligodendrocytes was found. Alterations in the structural elements of the BBB coexisted with marked lesions of neurons of the cerebellum (Purkinje cells are earliest). In electron micrographs both luminal and antiluminal sides of the BBB of the cerebellar cortex had similar lesions. The possible influence of the hepatic damage, mainly hyperammonemia, upon the development of valproate encephalopathy is discussed.

  20. Selective permeability of gap junction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Gary S; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter R

    2004-03-23

    Gap junctions mediate the transfer of small cytoplasmic molecules between adjacent cells. A family of gap junction proteins exist that form channels with unique properties, and differ in their ability to mediate the transfer of specific molecules. Mutations in a number of individual gap junction proteins, called connexins, cause specific human diseases. Therefore, it is important to understand how gap junctions selectively move molecules between cells. Rules that dictate the ability of a molecule to travel through gap junction channels are complex. In addition to molecular weight and size, the ability of a solute to transverse these channels depends on its net charge, shape, and interactions with specific connexins that constitute gap junctions in particular cells. This review presents some data and interpretations pertaining to mechanisms that govern the differential transfer of signals through gap junction channels.

  1. Tumour type and size are high risk factors for the syndrome of "cerebellar" mutism and subsequent dysarthria

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: "Cerebellar mutis" and subsequent dysarthria (MSD) is a documented complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. In this prospective study the following risk factors for MSD were assessed: type, size and site of the tumour; hydrocephalus at presentation and after surgery, cerebellar incision site, postoperative infection, and cerebellar swelling. METHODS: In a consecutive series of 42 children with a cerebellar tumour, speech and neuroradiological studies (CT and...

  2. Aberrant cerebellar connectivity in motor and association networks in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann K. Shinn

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a devastating illness characterized by disturbances in multiple domains. The cerebellum is involved in both motor and non-motor functions, and the cognitive dysmetria and dysmetria of thought models propose that abnormalities of the cerebellum may contribute to schizophrenia signs and symptoms. The cerebellum and cerebral cortex are reciprocally connected via a modular, closed-loop network architecture, but few schizophrenia neuroimaging studies have taken into account the topographical and functional heterogeneity of the cerebellum. In this study, using a previously defined 17-network cerebral cortical parcellation system as the basis for our functional connectivity seeds, we systematically investigated connectivity abnormalities within the cerebellum of 44 schizophrenia patients and 28 healthy control participants. We found selective alterations in cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity. Specifically, schizophrenia patients showed decreased cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity in higher level association networks (ventral attention, salience, control, and default mode networks relative to healthy control participants. Schizophrenia patients also showed increased cerebro-cerebellar connectivity in somatomotor and default mode networks, with the latter showing no overlap with the regions found to be hypoconnected within the same default mode network. Finally, we found evidence to suggest that somatomotor and default mode networks may be inappropriately linked in schizophrenia. The relationship of these dysconnectivities to schizophrenia symptoms, such as neurological soft signs and altered sense of agency, is discussed. We conclude that the cerebellum ought to be considered for analysis in all future studies of network abnormalities in SZ, and further suggest the cerebellum as a potential target for further elucidation, and possibly treatment, of the underlying mechanisms and network abnormalities producing symptoms of

  3. Properties of bilateral spinocerebellar activation of cerebellar cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontus eGeborek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to explore the cerebellar cortical inputs from two spinocerebellar pathways, the spinal border cell-component of the ventral spinocerebellar tract (SBC-VSCT and the dorsal spinocerebellar tract (DSCT, respectively, in the sublobule C1 of the cerebellar posterior lobe. The two pathways were activated by electrical stimulation of the contralateral lateral funiculus (coLF and the ipsilateral LF (iLF at lower thoracic levels. Most granule cells in sublobule C1 did not respond at all but part of the granule cell population displayed high-intensity responses to either coLF or iLF stimulation. As a rule, Golgi cells and Purkinje cell simple spikes responded to input from both LFs, although Golgi cells could be more selective. In addition, a small population of granule cells responded to input from both the coLF and the iLF. However, in these cases, similarities in the temporal topography and magnitude of the responses suggested that the same axons were stimulated from the two LFs, i.e. that the axons of individual spinocerebellar neurons could be present in both funiculi. This was also confirmed for a population of spinal neurons located within known locations of SBC-VSCT neurons and dorsal horn DSCT neurons. We conclude that bilateral spinocerebellar responses can occur in cerebellar granule cells, but the VSCT and DSCT systems that provide the input can also be organized bilaterally. The implications for the traditional functional separation of VSCT and DSCT systems and the issue whether granule cells primarily integrate functionally similar information or not are discussed.

  4. Probabilistic identification of cerebellar cortical neurones across species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Van Dijck

    Full Text Available Despite our fine-grain anatomical knowledge of the cerebellar cortex, electrophysiological studies of circuit information processing over the last fifty years have been hampered by the difficulty of reliably assigning signals to identified cell types. We approached this problem by assessing the spontaneous activity signatures of identified cerebellar cortical neurones. A range of statistics describing firing frequency and irregularity were then used, individually and in combination, to build Gaussian Process Classifiers (GPC leading to a probabilistic classification of each neurone type and the computation of equi-probable decision boundaries between cell classes. Firing frequency statistics were useful for separating Purkinje cells from granular layer units, whilst firing irregularity measures proved most useful for distinguishing cells within granular layer cell classes. Considered as single statistics, we achieved classification accuracies of 72.5% and 92.7% for granular layer and molecular layer units respectively. Combining statistics to form twin-variate GPC models substantially improved classification accuracies with the combination of mean spike frequency and log-interval entropy offering classification accuracies of 92.7% and 99.2% for our molecular and granular layer models, respectively. A cross-species comparison was performed, using data drawn from anaesthetised mice and decerebrate cats, where our models offered 80% and 100% classification accuracy. We then used our models to assess non-identified data from awake monkeys and rabbits in order to highlight subsets of neurones with the greatest degree of similarity to identified cell classes. In this way, our GPC-based approach for tentatively identifying neurones from their spontaneous activity signatures, in the absence of an established ground-truth, nonetheless affords the experimenter a statistically robust means of grouping cells with properties matching known cell classes. Our

  5. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P.; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J.; Edwards, Dylan J.; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M.; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R. Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A.; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S. Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar–motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar–thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions. PMID:25406224

  6. CSF analysis differentiates multiple-system atrophy from idiopathic late-onset cerebellar ataxia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdo, W.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Munneke, M.; Geel, W.J.A. van; Bloem, B.R.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Differentiating idiopathic late-onset cerebellar ataxia (ILOCA) from ataxia due to the cerebellar subtype of multiple-system atrophy (MSA-C) can be difficult in the early stages of the disease METHODS: The authors analyzed the levels of various CSF biomarkers in 27 patients with MSA-C

  7. A distinctive pattern of cortical excitability in patients with the syndrome of dystonia and cerebellar ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talelli, P.; Hoffland, B.S.; Schneider, S.A.; Edwards, M.; Bhatia, K.P.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Rothwell, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The syndrome of dystonia and cerebellar ataxia (DYTCA) is a recently described condition where cervical dystonia and mild cerebellar ataxia are the major clinical features. Here we attempted to explore the pathophysiology of this condition by comparing measurements of cortical excitabilit

  8. Parvovirus associated cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus in day-old broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus were detected in day-old broiler chickens. Brains of chickens evaluated at necropsy appeared to be abnormal; some were disfigured and cerebellae appeared to be smaller than normal. Histopathologic examination of brains revealed cerebellar folia that were sho...

  9. Cerebellar motor learning deficits in medicated and medication-free men with recent-onset schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.H. Coesmans (Michiel); C. Röder (Constantin); A.E. Smit (Albertine Eline); S.K.E. Koekkoek (Bas); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); M.A. Frens (Maarten); J.N. van der Geest (Jos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The notion that cerebellar deficits may underlie clinical symptoms in people with schizophrenia is tested by evaluating 2 forms of cerebellar learning in patients with recent-onset schizophrenia. A potential medication effect is evaluated by including patients with or without

  10. Cerebellar motor learning deficits in medicated and medication-free men with recent-onset schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coesmans, Michael; Röder, Christian H; Smit, Albertine E; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Frens, Maarten A; van der Geest, Josef N

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The notion that cerebellar deficits may underlie clinical symptoms in people with schizophrenia is tested by evaluating 2 forms of cerebellar learning in patients with recent-onset schizophrenia. A potential medication effect is evaluated by including patients with or without antipsychot

  11. Socioeconomic status and the cerebellar grey matter volume. Data from a well-characterised population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Jonathan; Krishnadas, Rajeev; Batty, G David; Burns, Harry; Deans, Kevin A; Ford, Ian; McConnachie, Alex; McGinty, Agnes; McLean, Jennifer S; Millar, Keith; Sattar, Naveed; Shiels, Paul G; Tannahill, Carol; Velupillai, Yoga N; Packard, Chris J; McLean, John

    2013-12-01

    The cerebellum is highly sensitive to adverse environmental factors throughout the life span. Socioeconomic deprivation has been associated with greater inflammatory and cardiometabolic risk, and poor neurocognitive function. Given the increasing awareness of the association between early-life adversities on cerebellar structure, we aimed to explore the relationship between early life (ESES) and current socioeconomic status (CSES) and cerebellar volume. T1-weighted MRI was used to create models of cerebellar grey matter volumes in 42 adult neurologically healthy males selected from the Psychological, Social and Biological Determinants of Ill Health study. The relationship between potential risk factors, including ESES, CSES and cerebellar grey matter volumes were examined using multiple regression techniques. We also examined if greater multisystem physiological risk index-derived from inflammatory and cardiometabolic risk markers-mediated the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and cerebellar grey matter volume. Both ESES and CSES explained the greatest variance in cerebellar grey matter volume, with age and alcohol use as a covariate in the model. Low CSES explained additional significant variance to low ESES on grey matter decrease. The multisystem physiological risk index mediated the relationship between both early life and current SES and grey matter volume in cerebellum. In a randomly selected sample of neurologically healthy males, poorer socioeconomic status was associated with a smaller cerebellar volume. Early and current socioeconomic status and the multisystem physiological risk index also apparently influence cerebellar volume. These findings provide data on the relationship between socioeconomic deprivation and a brain region highly sensitive to environmental factors.

  12. Behavioral Analysis and Rescue of a Novel Cerebellar Mouse Model of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    cerebellar abnormality on cognitive and motor functions in the cerebellum: an fMRI study of autism. Am J Psychiatry. 160, 262-73. Asano, E., et al...Paulus, K. S., et al., 2004. Pure post- stroke cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome: a case report. Neurol Sci. 25, 220-4. Peca, J., et al

  13. Early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes : foot deformity in a first grade family member

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, HJ; Van der Hulst, M; Ippel, E; Prevo, RL; Hageman, G

    1999-01-01

    Early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (EOCA) is a clinical syndrome characterised by progressive cerebellar ataxia with an onset before the age of 25 years and a wide spectrum of associated features. It is distinguished from Friedreich's ataxia (FA) mainly by the preservation

  14. Incidence of Dysarthria in Children with Cerebellar Tumors: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, S.; Schoch, B.; Ozimek, A.; Gorissen, B.; Hein-Kropp, C.; Kaiser, O.; Hovel, M.; Wieland, R.; Gizewski, E.; Timmann, D.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated dysarthric symptoms in children with cerebellar tumors. Ten children with cerebellar tumors and 10 orthopedic control children were tested prior and one week after surgery. Clinical dysarthric symptoms were quantified in spontaneous speech. Syllable durations were analyzed in syllable repetition and sentence…

  15. Early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes : foot deformity in a first grade family member

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, HJ; Van der Hulst, M; Ippel, E; Prevo, RL; Hageman, G

    1999-01-01

    Early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (EOCA) is a clinical syndrome characterised by progressive cerebellar ataxia with an onset before the age of 25 years and a wide spectrum of associated features. It is distinguished from Friedreich's ataxia (FA) mainly by the preservation o

  16. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia caused by mutations in the PEX2 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Sevin; S. Ferdinandusse; H.R. Waterham; R.J. Wanders; P. Aubourg

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To expand the spectrum of genetic causes of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA). Case report: Two brothers are described who developed progressive cerebellar ataxia at 3 1/2 and 18 years, respectively. After ruling out known common genetic causes of ARCA, analysis of bl

  17. Optogenetics in the cerebellum: Purkinje cell-specific approaches for understanding local cerebellar functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Tadashi; Ohashi, Yohei; Tamura, Keita

    2013-10-15

    The cerebellum consists of the cerebellar cortex and the cerebellar nuclei. Although the basic neuronal circuitry of the cerebellar cortex is uniform everywhere, anatomical data demonstrate that the input and output relationships of the cortex are spatially segregated between different cortical areas, which suggests that there are functional distinctions between these different areas. Perturbation of cerebellar cortical functions in a spatially restricted fashion is thus essential for investigating the distinctions among different cortical areas. In the cerebellar cortex, Purkinje cells are the sole output neurons that send information to downstream cerebellar and vestibular nuclei. Therefore, selective manipulation of Purkinje cell activities, without disturbing other neuronal types and passing fibers within the cortex, is a direct approach to spatially restrict the effects of perturbations. Although this type of approach has for many years been technically difficult, recent advances in optogenetics now enable selective activation or inhibition of Purkinje cell activities, with high temporal resolution. Here we discuss the effectiveness of using Purkinje cell-specific optogenetic approaches to elucidate the functions of local cerebellar cortex regions. We also discuss what improvements to current methods are necessary for future investigations of cerebellar functions to provide further advances.

  18. Precise spatial relationships between mossy fibers and climbing fibers in rat cerebellar cortical zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.C.T.M. Pijpers (Angelique); R. Apps (Richard); J. Pardoe (Joanne); J. Voogd (Jan); T.J.H. Ruigrok (Tom)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractClassically, mossy fiber and climbing fiber terminals are regarded as having very different spatial distributions in the cerebellar cortex. However, previous anatomical studies have not studied these two major cerebellar inputs with sufficient resolution to confirm this assumption. Here,

  19. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  20. Electron transport in molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun

    This thesis addresses the electron transport in molecular junctions, focusing on the energy level alignment and correlation effects. Various levels of theory have been applied to study the structural and electronic effects in different molecular junctions, starting from the single particle density...... charge position are in quantitative agreement with the experiments, while pure DFT is not. This is the consequence of the accurate energy level alignment, where the DFT+∑ method corrects the self-interaction error in the standard DFT functional and uses a static image charge model to include the image...... charge effect on the energy level renormalization. Additionally, the gating of the 4,4’-bipyridine (44BP) molecule contacted to either Ni or Au electrodes has been investigated. Here it is found that the gating mechanism is conceptually different between two cases. In the case of Ni contacts where...

  1. How coherent are Josephson junctions?

    CERN Document Server

    Paik, Hanhee; Bishop, Lev S; Kirchmair, G; Catelani, G; Sears, A P; Johnson, B R; Reagor, M J; Frunzio, L; Glazman, L; Schoelkopf, R J

    2011-01-01

    Attaining sufficient coherence is a requirement for realizing a large-scale quantum computer. We present a new implementation of a superconducting transmon qubit that is strongly coupled to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity. We observe a reproducible increase in the coherence times of qubit (both $T_1$ and $T_2$ > 10 microseconds) and cavity ($T_{cav}$ ~ 50 microseconds) by more than an order of magnitude compared to the current state-of-art superconducting qubits. This enables the study of the stability and quality of Josephson junctions at precisions exceeding one part per million. Surprisingly, we see no evidence for $1/f$ critical current noise. At elevated temperatures, we observe the dissipation due to a small density (< 1 - 10 ppm) of thermally-excited quasiparticles. The results suggest that the overall quality of Josephson junctions will allow error rates of a few $10^{-4}$, approaching the error correction threshold.

  2. Morphogenesis of rat myotendinous junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curzi, Davide; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Burattini, Sabrina

    2013-10-01

    Myotendinous junction (MTJ) is the highly specialized complex which connects the skeletal muscle to the tendon for transmitting the contractile force between the two tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the MTJ development and rat EDL was chosen as a model. 1, 15, 30 day animals were considered and the junctions were analyzed by light and electron microscopy. The MTJ interface architecture increased during the development, extending the interaction between muscle and tendon. 1-day-old rats showed disorganized myofibril bundles, spread cytosol and incomplete rough endoplasmic reticulum, features partially improved in 15-day-old rats, and completely developed in 30-day-old animals. These findings indicate that muscle-tendon interface displays, during rat lifetime, numerically increased and longer tendon interdigitations, correlated with an improved organization of both tissues and with a progressive acquirement of full functionality.

  3. Endoscopic evacuation of cerebellar hematoma in a term newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriverdi, Sema Rala; Turhan, Tuncer; Uygur, Ozgun; Koroglu, Ozge Altun; Yalaz, Mehmet; Kultursay, Nilgun

    2013-10-01

    Intracerebellar hemorrhage is very rare in term infants and only severe cases with massive intracranial hemorrhage, posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and clinical deterioration due to increased intracranial pressure require neurosurgical evacuation. In recent adult studies endoscopic hematoma evacuation has been shown as a rapid, effective, and safe technique. A term newborn hospitalized for meconium aspiration syndrome showed hypertonia, jitteriness and abnormal amplitude integrated electroencephalogram findings. He was diagnosed with cerebellar hematoma which caused hydrocephalus by cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The hematoma was successfully evacuated neuroendoscopically as the first case in literature to our knowledge. Neurologic, a-EEG and MRI findings resolved.

  4. Cerebellar clear cell ependymoma in a 10 year old girl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thinzar Aye Nyein; Moon, Ah Rim; Hwang, Sun Chul; Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, A Leum; Chang, Kee Hyun; Kim, Hee Kyung; Chin, Su Sie [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Sang [Soonchunhyang University Gumi Hospital, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Clear cell ependymoma (CCE) is a histological rare variant (1–5%) of ependymoma, which is distinguished from other histological subtypes by the presence of fusiform cells arrayed radially around small blood vessels. These alleged perivascular pseudorosettes are significant characteristic features of ependymomas. About 95% of infratentorial ependymomas are found in the fourth ventricle and the remainder occurs as cerebellopontine angle lesions. In previous reports, the cerebellum is found to be a rare location for ependymoma. In this study we report one case of CCE originating from the cerebellar hemisphere, showing unusual morphology on 3T MRI.

  5. A comprehensive gaze stabilization controller based on cerebellar internal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannucci, Lorenzo; Falotico, Egidio; Tolu, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    based on the coordination of VCR and VOR and OKR. The model, inspired by neuroscientific cerebellar theories, is provided with learning and adaptation capabilities based on internal models. We present the results for the gaze stabilization model on three sets of experiments conducted on the SABIAN robot...... and on the iCub simulator, validating the robustness of the proposed control method. The first set of experiments focused on the controller response to a set of disturbance frequencies along the vertical plane. The second shows the performances of the system under three-dimensional disturbances. The last set...

  6. Dysarthria in children with cerebellar or brainstem tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, M; Catsman-Berrevoets, C E; Yousef-Bak, E; Paquier, P F; van Dongen, H R

    1998-05-01

    Speech features were perceptually analyzed in two groups of children. The first group (n = 6) had undergone cerebellar tumor resection, and the second group (n = 6) included children with brainstem tumors. Children belonging to the first group became dysarthric after a postoperative mute phase. Slow speech rate was a specific feature, but scanning speech and irregular articulatory breakdown (i.e., prominent characteristics in adult ataxic dysarthria) were not observed. In the second group, hypernasality was a prominent characteristic and resembled flaccid dysarthria in adults. These findings suggest that acquired childhood dysarthria needs a proper classification.

  7. Changes in a cerebellar peduncle lesion in a patient with Dandy-Walker malformation A diffusion tensor imaging study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ah Young Lee; Sung Ho Jang; Sang Seok Yeo; Ensil Lee; Yun Woo Cho; Su Min Son

    2013-01-01

    We report a patient with severe ataxia due to Dandy-Walker malformation, who showed functional recovery over 10 months corresponding to a change in a cerebellar peduncle lesion. A 20-month-old female patient who was diagnosed with Dandy-Walker syndrome and six age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled. The superior cerebellar peduncle, the middle cerebellar peduncle, and the inferior cerebellar peduncle were evaluated using fractional anisotropy and the apparent diffusion coefficient. The patients' functional ambulation category was 0 at the initial visit, but improved to 2 at the follow-up evaluation, and Berg's balance scale score also improved from 0 to 7. Initial diffusion tensor tractography revealed that the inferior cerebellar peduncle was not detected, that the fractional anisotropy of the superior cerebellar peduncle and middle cerebellar peduncle decreased by two standard deviations below, and that the apparent diffusion coefficient increased by two standard deviations over normal control values. However, on follow-up diffusion tensor tractography, both inferior cerebellar peduncles could be detected, and the fractional anisotropy of superior cerebellar peduncle increased to within two standard deviations of normal controls. The functional improvement in this patient appeared to correspond to changes in these cerebellar peduncles. We believe that evaluating cerebellar peduncles using diffusion tensor imaging is useful in cases when a cerebellar peduncle lesion is suspected.

  8. File list: NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perroni, C. A.; Ninno, D.; Cataudella, V.

    2016-09-01

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  16. Bland-White-Garland syndrome of anomalous left coronary artery arising from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA): a historical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowles, Robert A. [Morgan Stanley Children' s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian, Division of Pediatric Surgery,Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (United States); Berdon, Walter E. [Morgan Stanley Children' s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (United States)

    2007-09-15

    The landmark 1933 case report from Massachusetts General Hospital by Bland, White and Garland (Am Heart J 8:787-801) described a 3-month-old child with progressive feeding problems, cardiomegaly on chest radiography, and EKG evidence of left ventricular damage. Of interest was the fact that the vigilant father of the infant was Aubrey Hampton, a radiologist and future chairman of radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital. At autopsy, the left coronary artery originated from the pulmonary artery rather than from the aorta. Effective treatment for this condition was not available until 1960 when Sabiston, Neill and Taussig showed that the blood flowed from the left coronary artery toward the pulmonary artery. The anomalous left coronary artery was ligated at its junction with the pulmonary artery and the child survived. This historical review of Bland-White-Garland syndrome, now known as anomalous left coronary artery arising from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA), stresses the continued diagnostic significance of cardiomegaly on chest radiography and EKG changes suggesting left ventricular damage in 2- to 3-month-old infants with feeding intolerance or irritability. With a high index of suspicion, an echocardiogram can be obtained to confirm the diagnosis. Modern surgical methods involve left coronary artery translocation and afford excellent outcomes. (orig.)

  17. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in a child with Ataxia-Telangiectasia showing unrelated cerebellar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piane, Maria; Molinaro, Anna; Soresina, Annarosa; Costa, Silvia; Maffeis, Marianna; Germani, Aldo; Pinelli, Lorenzo; Meschini, Roberta; Plebani, Alessandro; Chessa, Luciana; Micheli, Roberto

    2016-12-15

    We report the case of a 6-year-old female patient with Ataxia Telangiectasia, an extremely rare condition, who developed in addition a left cerebellar astrocytoma and a right cerebellar infarction, considered as two independent events. Children with AT have an increased risk of developing cancer, but only few cases of glioma are reported and, at our knowledge, no other case of unrelated cerebellar glioma and cerebellar infarction in with the same AT patient have been described. The molecular analysis of ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated) gene showed that the patient is compound heterozygote for two previously unreported mutations: c.3291delC (p.Phe1097fs) at exon 25 and c.8198A>C (p.Gln2733Pro) at exon 58. The role of the identified ATM gene mutations in the pathogenesis of Ataxia Telangiectasia and the coexisting cerebellar disorders is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Babinski's contributions to cerebellar symptomatology: building the basis of the neurological examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luiz Pedroso

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Several assumptions about the function of the cerebellum and semiotic signs have been described over the centuries. Among the long list of famous researchers who have provided a strong contribution and who have left their names on the highway of cerebellar research, Joseph Babinski appears as a prominent name. The description of various forms of cerebellar symptomatology was a major part of Babinski's work, and clinical terms that he introduced, namely hypermetry , diadochokinesia , and asynergy , remain part of contemporary clinical vocabulary. Babinski studied cerebellar signs in many patients and was able to conduct longitudinal studies that permitted him to understand the evolution of cerebellar dysfunction. Babinski contributions to cerebellar symptomatology continue to influence the most modern theories, including functional and neuropathological studies.

  19. Instigation of endothelial Nlrp3 inflammasome by adipokine visfatin promotes inter-endothelial junction disruption: role of HMGB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Pitzer, Ashley L; Li, Xiang; Li, Pin-Lan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the inflammasome plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. However, the pathological relevance of this inflammasome activation, particularly in vascular cells, remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of endothelial (Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain) NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain containing three (Nlrp3) inflammasomes in modulating inter-endothelial junction proteins, which are associated with endothelial barrier dysfunction, an early onset of obesity-associated endothelial injury. Our findings demonstrate that the activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome by visfatin markedly decreased the expression of inter-endothelial junction proteins including tight junction proteins ZO-1, ZO-2 and occludin, and adherens junction protein VE-cadherin in cultured mouse vascular endothelial (VE) cell monolayers. Such visfatin-induced down-regulation of junction proteins in endothelial cells was attributed to high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) release derived from endothelial inflammasome-dependent caspase-1 activity. Similarly, in the coronary arteries of wild-type mice, high-fat diet (HFD) treatment caused a down-regulation of inter-endothelial junction proteins ZO-1, ZO-2, occludin and VE-cadherin, which was accompanied with enhanced inflammasome activation and HMGB1 expression in the endothelium as well as transmigration of CD43(+) T cells into the coronary arterial wall. In contrast, all these HFD-induced alterations in coronary arteries were prevented in mice with Nlrp3 gene deletion. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the activation of endothelial Nlrp3 inflammasomes as a result of the increased actions of injurious adipokines such as visfatin produces HMGB1, which act in paracrine or autocrine fashion to disrupt inter-endothelial junctions and increase paracellular permeability of the endothelium contributing to the early onset of endothelial injury during metabolic

  20. Location of lesion determines motor vs. cognitive consequences in patients with cerebellar stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine J. Stoodley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar lesions can cause motor deficits and/or the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS; Schmahmann's syndrome. We used voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping to test the hypothesis that the cerebellar motor syndrome results from anterior lobe damage whereas lesions in the posterolateral cerebellum produce the CCAS. Eighteen patients with isolated cerebellar stroke (13 males, 5 females; 20–66 years old were evaluated using measures of ataxia and neurocognitive ability. Patients showed a wide range of motor and cognitive performance, from normal to severely impaired; individual deficits varied according to lesion location within the cerebellum. Patients with damage to cerebellar lobules III–VI had worse ataxia scores: as predicted, the cerebellar motor syndrome resulted from lesions involving the anterior cerebellum. Poorer performance on fine motor tasks was associated primarily with strokes affecting the anterior lobe extending into lobule VI, with right-handed finger tapping and peg-placement associated with damage to the right cerebellum, and left-handed finger tapping associated with left cerebellar damage. Patients with the CCAS in the absence of cerebellar motor syndrome had damage to posterior lobe regions, with lesions leading to significantly poorer scores on language (e.g. right Crus I and II extending through IX, spatial (bilateral Crus I, Crus II, and right lobule VIII, and executive function measures (lobules VII–VIII. These data reveal clinically significant functional regions underpinning movement and cognition in the cerebellum, with a broad anterior-posterior distinction. Motor and cognitive outcomes following cerebellar damage appear to reflect the disruption of different cerebro-cerebellar motor and cognitive loops.