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Sample records for ceramide pathway metagene

  1. Assessment of an RNA interference screen-derived mitotic and ceramide pathway metagene as a predictor of response to neoadjuvant paclitaxel for primary triple-negative breast cancer: a retrospective analysis of five clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Nicolai Stefan; Szallasi, Zoltan Imre; Eklund, Aron Charles

    2010-01-01

    -negative breast cancer. METHODS: We derived a paclitaxel response metagene based on mitotic and ceramide genes identified by functional genomics studies. We used area under the curve (AUC) analysis and multivariate logistic regression to retrospectively assess the metagene in six cohorts of patients with triple......-paclitaxel treated cohorts (0.53 [0.31-0.77], 0.59 [0.22-0.82], 0.53 [0.36-0.71], 0.64 [0.43-0.81]). In multivariate logistic regression, the metagene was associated with pCR (OR 19.92, 2.62-151.57; p=0.0039) with paclitaxel-containing chemotherapy. INTERPRETATION: The paclitaxel response metagene shows promise...... as a paclitaxel-specific predictor of pCR in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. The metagene is suitable for development into a reverse transcription-PCR assay, for which clinically relevant thresholds could be established in randomised clinical trials. These results highlight the potential...

  2. A critical role for ceramide synthase 2 in liver homeostasis: I. alterations in lipid metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Park, Hyejung; Laviad, Elad L; Silva, Liana C; Lahiri, Sujoy; Stiban, Johnny; Erez-Roman, Racheli; Brügger, Britta; Sachsenheimer, Timo; Wieland, Felix; Prieto, Manuel; Merrill, Alfred H; Futerman, Anthony H

    2010-04-02

    Ceramide is an important lipid signaling molecule that plays critical roles in regulating cell behavior. Ceramide synthesis is surprisingly complex and is orchestrated by six mammalian ceramide synthases, each of which produces ceramides with restricted acyl chain lengths. We have generated a CerS2 null mouse and characterized the changes in the long chain base and sphingolipid composition of livers from these mice. Ceramide and downstream sphingolipids were devoid of very long (C22-C24) acyl chains, consistent with the substrate specificity of CerS2 toward acyl-CoAs. Unexpectedly, C16-ceramide levels were elevated, and as a result, total ceramide levels were unaltered; however, C16-ceramide synthesis in vitro was not increased. Levels of sphinganine were also significantly elevated, by up to 50-fold, reminiscent of the effect of the ceramide synthase inhibitor, fumonisin B1. With the exceptions of glucosylceramide synthase and neutral sphingomyelinase 2, none of the other enzymes tested in either the sphingolipid biosynthetic or degradative pathways were significantly changed. Total glycerophospholipid and cholesterol levels were unaltered, although there was a marked elevation in C18:1 and C18:2 fatty acids in phosphatidylethanolamine, concomitant with a reduction in C18:0 and C20:4 fatty acids. Finally, differences were observed in the biophysical properties of lipid extracts isolated from liver microsomes, with membranes from CerS2 null mice displaying higher membrane fluidity and showing morphological changes. Together, these results demonstrate novel modes of cross-talk and regulation between the various branches of lipid metabolic pathways upon inhibition of very long acyl chain ceramide synthesis.

  3. A novel pathway of ceramide metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voynova, Natalia S; Vionnet, Christine; Ejsing, Christer S.

    2012-01-01

    with PHS (phytosphingosine) or DHS (dihydrosphingosine) and thus synthesize ceramides. When incubating microsomes with [H-3]palmitate and PHS, we not only obtained the ceramide PHS-[H-3]C-16:0, but also a more hydrophobic compound, which was transformed into PHS-[H-3]C-16:0 upon mild base treatment....... Lro1p acylates NBD ceramide by attaching a fatty acid to the hydroxy group on the first carbon atom of the long-chain base. Acylceramides are mobilized when cells are diluted into fresh medium in the presence of cerulenin, an inhibitor of fatty acid biosynthesis....

  4. Targeting ceramide metabolic pathway induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines

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    Vethakanraj, Helen Shiphrah; Babu, Thabraz Ahmed; Sudarsanan, Ganesh Babu; Duraisamy, Prabhu Kumar; Ashok Kumar, Sekar, E-mail: sekarashok@gmail.com

    2015-08-28

    The sphingolipid ceramide is a pro apoptotic molecule of ceramide metabolic pathway and is hydrolyzed to proliferative metabolite, sphingosine 1 phosphate by the action of acid ceramidase. Being upregulated in the tumors of breast, acid ceramidase acts as a potential target for breast cancer therapy. We aimed at targeting this enzyme with a small molecule acid ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 in human breast cancer cell lines MCF 7 and MDA MB 231. Ceranib 2 effectively inhibited the growth of both the cell lines in dose and time dependant manner. Morphological apoptotic hallmarks such as chromatin condensation, fragmented chromatin were observed in AO/EtBr staining. Moreover, ladder pattern of fragmented DNA observed in DNA gel electrophoresis proved the apoptotic activity of Ceranib 2 in breast cancer cell lines. The apoptotic events were associated with significant increase in the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (Bad, Bax and Bid) and down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (Bcl 2). Interestingly, increase in sub G1 population of cell cycle phase analysis and elevated Annexin V positive cells after Ceranib 2 treatment substantiated its apoptotic activity in MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines. Thus, we report Ceranib 2 as a potent therapeutic agent against both ER{sup +} and ER{sup −} breast cancer cell lines. - Highlights: • Acid Ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 induced apoptosis in Breast cancer cell lines (MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines). • Apoptosis is mediated by DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest. • Ceranib 2 upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic genes and down regulated anti-apoptotic gene expression. • More potent compared to the standard drug Tamoxifen.

  5. Sustained Action of Ceramide on the Insulin Signaling Pathway in Muscle Cells: IMPLICATION OF THE DOUBLE-STRANDED RNA-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE.

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    Hage Hassan, Rima; Pacheco de Sousa, Ana Catarina; Mahfouz, Rana; Hainault, Isabelle; Blachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka; Bourron, Olivier; Koskas, Fabien; Górski, Jan; Ferré, Pascal; Foufelle, Fabienne; Hajduch, Eric

    2016-02-01

    In vivo, ectopic accumulation of fatty acids in muscles leads to alterations in insulin signaling at both the IRS1 and Akt steps. However, in vitro treatments with saturated fatty acids or their derivative ceramide demonstrate an effect only at the Akt step. In this study, we adapted our experimental procedures to mimic the in vivo situation and show that the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is involved in the long-term effects of saturated fatty acids on IRS1. C2C12 or human muscle cells were incubated with palmitate or directly with ceramide for short or long periods, and insulin signaling pathway activity was evaluated. PKR involvement was assessed through pharmacological and genetic studies. Short-term treatments of myotubes with palmitate, a ceramide precursor, or directly with ceramide induce an inhibition of Akt, whereas prolonged periods of treatment show an additive inhibition of insulin signaling through increased IRS1 serine 307 phosphorylation. PKR mRNA, protein, and phosphorylation are increased in insulin-resistant muscles. When PKR activity is reduced (siRNA or a pharmacological inhibitor), serine phosphorylation of IRS1 is reduced, and insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt is improved. Finally, we show that JNK mediates ceramide-activated PKR inhibitory action on IRS1. Together, in the long term, our results show that ceramide acts at two distinct levels of the insulin signaling pathway (IRS1 and Akt). PKR, which is induced by both inflammation signals and ceramide, could play a major role in the development of insulin resistance in muscle cells.

  6. Glioma cell death induced by irradiation or alkylating agent chemotherapy is independent of the intrinsic ceramide pathway.

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    Dorothee Gramatzki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Resistance to genotoxic therapy is a characteristic feature of glioma cells. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide and glucosylceramide synthase (GCS catalyzes ceramide metabolism. Increased ceramide levels have been suggested to enhance chemotherapy-induced death of cancer cells. METHODS: Microarray and clinical data for ASM and GCS in astrocytomas WHO grade II-IV were acquired from the Rembrandt database. Moreover, the glioblastoma database of the Cancer Genome Atlas network (TCGA was used for survival data of glioblastoma patients. For in vitro studies, increases in ceramide levels were achieved either by ASM overexpression or by the GCS inhibitor DL-threo-1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PPMP in human glioma cell lines. Combinations of alkylating chemotherapy or irradiation and ASM overexpression, PPMP or exogenous ceramide were applied in parental cells. The anti-glioma effects were investigated by assessing proliferation, metabolic activity, viability and clonogenicity. Finally, viability and clonogenicity were assessed in temozolomide (TMZ-resistant cells upon treatment with PPMP, exogenous ceramide, alkylating chemotherapy, irradiation or their combinations. RESULTS: Interrogations from the Rembrandt and TCGA database showed a better survival of glioblastoma patients with low expression of ASM or GCS. ASM overexpression or PPMP treatment alone led to ceramide accumulation but did not enhance the anti-glioma activity of alkylating chemotherapy or irradiation. PPMP or exogenous ceramide induced acute cytotoxicity in glioblastoma cells. Combined treatments with chemotherapy or irradiation led to additive, but not synergistic effects. Finally, no synergy was found when TMZ-resistant cells were treated with exogenous ceramide or PPMP alone or in combination with TMZ or irradiation. CONCLUSION: Modulation of intrinsic glioma cell ceramide levels by ASM overexpression or GCS

  7. Keratinocyte differentiation and upregulation of ceramide synthesis induced by an oat lipid extract via the activation of PPAR pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Su-Hyoun; Tannahill, Ruth; Yao, Xiang; Southall, Michael D; Pappas, Apostolos

    2015-04-01

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) has been shown to have an important role in skin barrier function by regulating differentiation and lipid synthesis in keratinocytes. Oat (Avena sativa) has long been used as a soothing agent to relieve skin irritations, and the clinical benefits of topical oat formulations have been proven; however, the mechanistic understanding of oat's mode of action remains unknown. We investigated whether an oat lipid extract could activate PPARs and subsequently increase epidermal lipid synthesis and differentiation markers. Primary human epidermal keratinocytes and transformed cell lines were treated with PPAR agonists and oat lipid extracts to investigate the PPAR agonism. PPAR target genes and epidermal differentiation markers were analysed using quantitative real-time PCR and HPTLC analysis. Oat lipid extract demonstrated robust dual agonism for PPARα and PPARβ/δ, and increased direct PPAR target gene induction in primary human keratinocytes. In addition, oat oil treatment increased both receptor expression and, consistent with the literature on PPARs, oat oil treatment resulted in a significant upregulation of differentiation genes (involucrin, SPRRs and transglutaminase 1) and ceramide processing genes (β-glucocerebrosidase, sphingomyelinases 3 and ABCA12). Further, oat oil treatment in keratinocytes significantly increased ceramide levels (70%), suggesting a functional translation of PPAR activation by oat oil in keratinocytes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that oat lipids possess robust dual agonistic activities for PPARα and PPARβ/δ, increase their gene expression and induce differentiation and ceramide synthesis in keratinocytes, which can collectively improve skin barrier function.

  8. Ganglioside GM1-mediated transcytosis of cholera toxin bypasses the retrograde pathway and depends on the structure of the ceramide domain.

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    Saslowsky, David E; te Welscher, Yvonne M; Chinnapen, Daniel J-F; Wagner, Jessica S; Wan, Joy; Kern, Eli; Lencer, Wayne I

    2013-09-06

    Cholera toxin causes diarrheal disease by binding ganglioside GM1 on the apical membrane of polarized intestinal epithelial cells and trafficking retrograde through sorting endosomes, the trans-Golgi network (TGN), and into the endoplasmic reticulum. A fraction of toxin also moves from endosomes across the cell to the basolateral plasma membrane by transcytosis, thus breeching the intestinal barrier. Here we find that sorting of cholera toxin into this transcytotic pathway bypasses retrograde transport to the TGN. We also find that GM1 sphingolipids can traffic from apical to basolateral membranes by transcytosis in the absence of toxin binding but only if the GM1 species contain cis-unsaturated or short acyl chains in the ceramide domain. We found previously that the same GM1 species are needed to efficiently traffic retrograde into the TGN and endoplasmic reticulum and into the recycling endosome, implicating a shared mechanism of action for sorting by lipid shape among these pathways.

  9. Mechanisms of ceramide-induced COX-2-dependent apoptosis in human ovarian cancer OVCAR-3 cells partially overlapped with resveratrol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Hung-Yun; Delmas, Dominique; Vang, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Ceramide is a member of the sphingolipid family of bioactive molecules demonstrated to have profound, diverse biological activities. Ceramide is a potential chemotherapeutic agent via the induction of apoptosis. Exposure to ceramide activates extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2- and p......-dependent signal transduction pathway and change in mitochondrial potential are also involved in ceramide-induced apoptosis....

  10. Consistent metagenes from cancer expression profiles yield agent specific predictors of chemotherapy response

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    Pusztai Lajos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome scale expression profiling of human tumor samples is likely to yield improved cancer treatment decisions. However, identification of clinically predictive or prognostic classifiers can be challenging when a large number of genes are measured in a small number of tumors. Results We describe an unsupervised method to extract robust, consistent metagenes from multiple analogous data sets. We applied this method to expression profiles from five "double negative breast cancer" (DNBC (not expressing ESR1 or HER2 cohorts and derived four metagenes. We assessed these metagenes in four similar but independent cohorts and found strong associations between three of the metagenes and agent-specific response to neoadjuvant therapy. Furthermore, we applied the method to ovarian and early stage lung cancer, two tumor types that lack reliable predictors of outcome, and found that the metagenes yield predictors of survival for both. Conclusions These results suggest that the use of multiple data sets to derive potential biomarkers can filter out data set-specific noise and can increase the efficiency in identifying clinically accurate biomarkers.

  11. Ceramide mediates caspase-independent programmed cell death.

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    Thon, Lutz; Möhlig, Heike; Mathieu, Sabine; Lange, Arne; Bulanova, Elena; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Schütze, Stefan; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia; Adam, Dieter

    2005-12-01

    Although numerous studies have implicated the sphingolipid ceramide in the induction of cell death, a causative function of ceramide in caspase-dependent apoptosis remains a highly debated issue. Here, we show that ceramide is a key mediator of a distinct route to programmed cell death (PCD), i.e., caspase-independent PCD. Under conditions where apoptosis is either not initiated or actively inhibited, TNF induces caspase-independent PCD in L929 fibrosarcoma cells, NIH3T3 fibroblasts, human leukemic Jurkat T cells, and lung fibroblasts by increasing intracellular ceramide levels prior to the onset of cell death. Survival is significantly enhanced when ceramide accumulation is prevented, as demonstrated in fibroblasts genetically deficient for acid sphingomyelinase, in L929 cells overexpressing acid ceramidase, by pharmacological intervention, or by RNA interference. Jurkat cells deficient for receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) do not accumulate ceramide and therefore are fully resistant to caspase-independent PCD whereas Jurkat cells overexpressing the mitochondrial protein Bcl-2 are partially protected, implicating RIP1 and mitochondria as components of the ceramide death pathway. Our data point to a role of caspases (but not cathepsins) in suppressing the ceramide death pathway under physiological conditions. Moreover, clonogenic survival of tumor cells is clearly reduced by induction of the ceramide death pathway, promising additional options for the development of novel tumor therapies.

  12. Ceramide and ceramide 1-phosphate are negative regulators of TNF-α production induced by lipopolysaccharide.

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    Józefowski, Szczepan; Czerkies, Maciej; Łukasik, Anna; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Sobota, Andrzej

    2010-12-01

    LPS is a constituent of cell walls of Gram-negative bacteria that, acting through the CD14/TLR4 receptor complex, causes strong proinflammatory activation of macrophages. In murine peritoneal macrophages and J774 cells, LPS at 1-2 ng/ml induced maximal TNF-α and MIP-2 release, and higher LPS concentrations were less effective, which suggested a negative control of LPS action. While studying the mechanism of this negative regulation, we found that in J774 cells, LPS activated both acid sphingomyelinase and neutral sphingomyelinase and moderately elevated ceramide, ceramide 1-phosphate, and sphingosine levels. Lowering of the acid sphingomyelinase and neutral sphingomyelinase activities using inhibitors or gene silencing upregulated TNF-α and MIP-2 production in J774 cells and macrophages. Accordingly, treatment of those cells with exogenous C8-ceramide diminished TNF-α and MIP-2 production after LPS stimulation. Exposure of J774 cells to bacterial sphingomyelinase or interference with ceramide hydrolysis using inhibitors of ceramidases also lowered the LPS-induced TNF-α production. The latter result indicates that ceramide rather than sphingosine suppresses TNF-α and MIP-2 production. Of these two cytokines, only TNF-α was negatively regulated by ceramide 1-phosphate as was indicated by upregulated TNF-α production after silencing of ceramide kinase gene expression. None of the above treatments diminished NO or RANTES production induced by LPS. Together the data indicate that ceramide negatively regulates production of TNF-α and MIP-2 in response to LPS with the former being sensitive to ceramide 1-phosphate as well. We hypothesize that the ceramide-mediated anti-inflammatory pathway may play a role in preventing endotoxic shock and in limiting inflammation.

  13. Introduction to tools and techniques for ceramide-centered research.

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    Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Luberto, Chiara

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipids are important components of eukaryotic cells, many of which function as bioactive signaling molecules. As thoroughly discussed elsewhere in this volume, ceramide, central metabolite of the sphingolipid pathway, plays key roles in a variety of cellular responses. Since the discovery of the bioactive function of ceramide, a growing number of tools and techniques have been and still are being developed in order to better decipher the complexity and implications of ceramide-mediated signaling. With this chapter it is our intention to provide new comers to the sphingolipid arena with a short overview of tools and techniques currently available for the study ofsphingolipid metabolism, with the focus on ceramide.

  14. metagene Profiles Analyses Reveal Regulatory Element's Factor-Specific Recruitment Patterns.

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    Joly Beauparlant, Charles; Lamaze, Fabien C; Deschênes, Astrid; Samb, Rawane; Lemaçon, Audrey; Belleau, Pascal; Bilodeau, Steve; Droit, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    ChIP-Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) provides a vast amount of information regarding the localization of proteins across the genome. The aggregation of ChIP-Seq enrichment signal in a metagene plot is an approach commonly used to summarize data complexity and to obtain a high level visual representation of the general occupancy pattern of a protein. Here we present the R package metagene, the graphical interface Imetagene and the companion package similaRpeak. Together, they provide a framework to integrate, summarize and compare the ChIP-Seq enrichment signal from complex experimental designs. Those packages identify and quantify similarities or dissimilarities in patterns between large numbers of ChIP-Seq profiles. We used metagene to investigate the differential occupancy of regulatory factors at noncoding regulatory regions (promoters and enhancers) in relation to transcriptional activity in GM12878 B-lymphocytes. The relationships between occupancy patterns and transcriptional activity suggest two different mechanisms of action for transcriptional control: i) a "gradient effect" where the regulatory factor occupancy levels follow transcription and ii) a "threshold effect" where the regulatory factor occupancy levels max out prior to reaching maximal transcription. metagene, Imetagene and similaRpeak are implemented in R under the Artistic license 2.0 and are available on Bioconductor.

  15. metagene Profiles Analyses Reveal Regulatory Element’s Factor-Specific Recruitment Patterns

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    Samb, Rawane; Lemaçon, Audrey; Bilodeau, Steve; Droit, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    ChIP-Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) provides a vast amount of information regarding the localization of proteins across the genome. The aggregation of ChIP-Seq enrichment signal in a metagene plot is an approach commonly used to summarize data complexity and to obtain a high level visual representation of the general occupancy pattern of a protein. Here we present the R package metagene, the graphical interface Imetagene and the companion package similaRpeak. Together, they provide a framework to integrate, summarize and compare the ChIP-Seq enrichment signal from complex experimental designs. Those packages identify and quantify similarities or dissimilarities in patterns between large numbers of ChIP-Seq profiles. We used metagene to investigate the differential occupancy of regulatory factors at noncoding regulatory regions (promoters and enhancers) in relation to transcriptional activity in GM12878 B-lymphocytes. The relationships between occupancy patterns and transcriptional activity suggest two different mechanisms of action for transcriptional control: i) a “gradient effect” where the regulatory factor occupancy levels follow transcription and ii) a “threshold effect” where the regulatory factor occupancy levels max out prior to reaching maximal transcription. metagene, Imetagene and similaRpeak are implemented in R under the Artistic license 2.0 and are available on Bioconductor. PMID:27538250

  16. Characterization of genes involved in ceramide metabolism in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas

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    Timmins-Schiffman Emma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lipid signaling molecule, ceramide, is a key component of the vertebrate stress response, however, there is limited information concerning its role in invertebrate species. In order to identify genes involved in ceramide metabolism in bivalve molluscs, Pacific oyster genomic resources were examined for genes associated with ceramide metabolism and signaling. Results Several genes were identified including full-length sequences characterized for serine palmitoyltransferase-1, 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase, acid ceramidase, and ceramide glucosyltransferase. Genes involved in ceramide synthesis and metabolism are conserved across taxa in both form and function. Expression analysis as assessed by quantitative PCR indicated all genes were expressed at high levels in gill tissue. The role of the ceramide pathway genes in the invertebrate stress response was also explored by measuring expression levels in adult oysters exposed to Vibrio vulnificus. Two genes demonstrated increased expression during the bacterial challenge: a gene involved in hydrolytic breakdown of ceramide (acid ceramidase and a gene involved in de novo generation of ceramide (3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase, suggesting a possible role of ceramide in the invertebrate stress and immune responses. Conclusions In silico and laboratory results support that Pacific oysters have the basic components of the ceramide metabolism pathway. These results also indicate that ceramide may have analogous functions in vertebrates and invertebrates. The gene expression pattern of acid ceramidase and 3-kethodihydrosphingosine reductase in response to bacterial exposure especially supports that ceramide and sphingolipid metabolism may be involved in the oyster’s stress and/or immune responses.

  17. Ceramide is involved in alcohol-induced neural proliferation****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhixin Wang; Tongxing Deng; Jiexin Deng; Jinbo Deng; Xiaoqun Gao; Yuanyuan Shi; Bin Liu; Zhanyou Ma; Haixiao Jin

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure, especial y during early pregnancy, can lead to fetal alcohol syndrome. The pharmacological and toxicological mechanisms of ethanol are related to the effects of ceramide. In this study, we established an alcohol exposure model in wild-type mice and in knockout mice for the key enzyme involved in ceramide metabolism, sphingomyelin synthase 2. This model received daily intragastric administration of 25%ethanol, and pups were used at postnatal days 0, 7, 14, 30 for experiments. Serology and immunofluorescence staining found that ethanol exposure dose-dependently reduced blood sphingomyelin levels in two genotypes of pups, and increased neural cel proliferation and the number of new neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Western blot analysis showed that the relative expression level of protein kinase C α increased in two notypes of pups after ethanol exposure. Compared with wild-type pups, the expression level of the important activator protein of the ceramide/ceramide-1-phosphate pathway, protein kinase Cα, was reduced in the hippocampus of sphingomyelin synthase 2 knockouts. Our findings il ustrate that ceramide is involved in alcohol-induced neural proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of pups after prenatal ethanol exposure, and the mechanism may be associated with increased pression of protein kinase Cαactivating the ceramide/ceramide-1-phosphate pathway.

  18. Inhibition of ceramide production reverses TNF-induced insulin resistance.

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    Grigsby, R J; Dobrowsky, R T

    2001-10-12

    Ceramide has been implicated as a mediator of insulin resistance induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) in adipocytes. Adipocytes contain numerous caveolae, sphingolipid and cholesterol-enriched lipid microdomains, that are also enriched in insulin receptor (IR). Since caveolae may be important sites for crosstalk between tyrosine kinase and sphingolipid signaling pathways, we examined the role of increased caveolar pools of ceramide in regulating tyrosine phosphorylation of the IR and its main substrate, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). Neither exogenous short-chain ceramide analogs nor pharmacologic increases in endogenous caveolar pools of ceramide inhibited insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the IR and IRS-1. However, inhibition of TNF-induced caveolar ceramide production reversed the decrease in IR tyrosine phosphorylation in response to TNF. These results suggest that TNF-independent increases in caveolar pools of ceramide are not sufficient to inhibit insulin signaling but that in conjunction with other TNF-dependent signals, caveolar pools of ceramide are a critical component for insulin resistance by TNF.

  19. Enzymatic Production of Ceramide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Long

    en muligt ved brug af et rekombinant humant neutralt ceramidase. Efter 24 timers reaktionstid opnåedes et udbytte på 50 %. Sammenfatningvis har dette studie ført til udvikling af en effektiv og skalerbar metode til enzymatisk production af ceramid og vigtig, ny og detailleret viden som kan bruges til...

  20. Prognostic evaluation of the B cell/IL-8 metagene in different intrinsic breast cancer subtypes.

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    Hanker, Lars C; Rody, Achim; Holtrich, Uwe; Pusztai, Lajos; Ruckhaeberle, Eugen; Liedtke, Cornelia; Ahr, Andre; Heinrich, Tomas M; Sänger, Nicole; Becker, Sven; Karn, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that a ratio of high B cell and low IL-8 metagene expression identified 32 % of triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) with good prognosis and was the only significant predictor in multivariate analysis including routine clinicopathological variables. However, the clinical relevance of this signature in other breast cancer subtypes remains unclear. We compiled Affymetrix gene expression datasets from 4,467 primary breast cancer samples and excluded 329 triple negative samples which were used as discovery cohort in our previous study. Molecular classification of the remaining 4,138 samples was performed by two methods, including single genes (ER, PgR, HER2, and Ki67) and a centroid-based method using the intrinsic gene list. The prognostic value within the respective subtypes was assessed by analyzing the event-free survival of patients as a function of the B cell/IL-8 metagene ratio using previously published cutoff. ER-negative subtypes had the highest expression of the B cell and the IL-8 metagenes. The IL-8/B cell signature assigned a considerable fraction of samples (range 20.7-42.0 %) into the "good prognosis" group. However, a significant prognostic value was only observed in the subgroup of triple negative breast cancer (P = 0.035). The prognostic value of the B cell/IL-8 ratio is mainly confined to the basal-like and TNBC subtypes of breast cancer. This result underlines the importance of subtype-specific analyses and suggests a sequential multistep approach to developing and applying outcome predictors in the clinic.

  1. Synthesis and photochemical properties of PEGylated coumarin-caged ceramides for cell studies.

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    Kim, Young Ah; Day, Jenna; Lirette, Carol Ann; Costain, Willard J; Johnston, Linda J; Bittman, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Caged ceramide analogues (C6-, C16-, C18-, C22- and C24-Cer) have been prepared by introducing a hydrophilic coumarin-based cage bearing a short polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain. (6-Bromo-7-mTEGylated-coumarin-4-yl)methyl (Btc) caged ceramide showed efficient photo-uncaging to release the parent ceramide upon direct exposure to 350 nm UV light; in contrast (7-mTEGylated-coumarin-4-yl)methyl (Tc) caged ceramide was photolysed more slowly. In preliminary experiments, Btc-caged ceramides were taken up by cells and their photolysis led to decreases in cell viability, but not to activation of caspase enzymes, suggesting that either reactive oxygen species or an alternate caspase-independent pathway may be responsible for the decreases in cell viability caused by photolysis of caged ceramides.

  2. Hyperthyroidism Evokes Myocardial Ceramide Accumulation

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    Agnieszka Mikłosz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thyroid hormones (THs are key regulators of cardiac physiology as well as modulators of different cellular signals including the sphingomyelin/ceramide pathway. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of hyperthyroidism on the metabolism of sphingolipids in the muscle heart. Methods: Male Wistar rats were treated for 10 days with triiodothyronine (T3 at a dose of 50µg/100g of body weight. Animals were then anaesthetized and samples of the left ventricle were excised. Results: We have demonstrated that prolonged, in vivo, T3 treatment increased the content of sphinganine (SFA, sphingosine (SFO, ceramide (CER and sphingomyelin (SM, but decreased the level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P in cardiac muscle. Accordingly, the changes in sphingolipids content were accompanied by a lesser activity of neutral sphingomyelinase and without significant changes in ceramidases activity. Hyperthyroidism also induced activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK with subsequently increased expression of mitochondrial proteins: cytochrome c oxidase IV (COX IV, β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD, carnityne palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I and nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC1α. Conclusions: We conclude that prolonged T3 treatment increases sphingolipids metabolism which is reflected by higher concentration of SFA and CER in heart muscle. Furthermore, hyperthyroidism-induced increase in heart sphingomyelin (SM concentration might be one of the mechanisms underlying maintenance of CER at relatively low level by its conversion to SM together with decreased S1P content.

  3. Ceramide in primary astrocytes from cerebellum: metabolism and role in cell proliferation.

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    Riboni, Laura; Tettamanti, Guido; Viani, Paola

    2002-04-01

    Cerebellar astrocytes are equipped with an efficient molecular machinery able to control the levels, and possibly the subcellular location, of ceramide. The major metabolic routes that contribute to the maintenance and variation of the cellular ceramide include ceramide biosynthesis, by de novo pathway or sphingosine recycling, ceramide formation from complex sphingolipids degradation and ceramide catabolism. In cerebellar astrocytes from rat cerebellum a peculiar metabolism of sphingomyelin occurs. This includes the preponderance of acidic sphingomyelinase, paralleled by a deficiency of the neutral Mg2+-dependent enzyme, as well as the presence of an extra-Golgi form of sphingomyelin synthase, which shares many characteristics with PC-PLC. Moreover these cells are characterized by a high efficiency in converting sphingosine to ceramide, possibly functional to the role played by astrocytes in the prevention of neuronal damage by high sphingosine concentration. Recent evidence demonstrates that a change of ceramide level is one of the key steps in the chain of reactions elicited by mitogenic stimuli. In fact, low cellular levels of ceramide characterize, and appear to be required for, the proliferation of cerebellar astrocytes. In particular mitogenic stimuli, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), rapidly down regulate the cellular levels of ceramide by stimulating sphingomyelin synthase. Ceramide acts as an intracellular physiological inhibitor of cell growth, being able to counteract the effect of bFGF by inhibiting the MAP kinase pathway. Although many questions remain in this field, the present knowledge strongly supports that ceramide represents a crucial member within lipid mediators, involved in the signaling pathways underlying cell proliferation in cerebellar astrocytes.

  4. Ceramide signaling in mammalian epidermis.

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    Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2014-03-01

    Ceramide, the backbone structure of all sphingolipids, as well as a minor component of cellular membranes, has a unique role in the skin, by forming the epidermal permeability barrier at the extracellular domains of the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, which is required for terrestrial mammalian survival. In contrast to the role of ceramide in forming the permeability barrier, the signaling roles of ceramide and its metabolites have not yet been recognized. Ceramide and/or its metabolites regulate proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in epidermal keratinocytes. Recent studies have further demonstrated that a ceramide metabolite, sphingosine-1-phosphate, modulates innate immune function. Ceramide has already been applied to therapeutic approaches for treatment of eczema associated with attenuated epidermal permeability barrier function. Pharmacological modulation of ceramide and its metabolites' signaling can also be applied to cutaneous disease prevention and therapy. The author here describes the signaling roles of ceramide and its metabolites in mammalian cells and tissues, including the epidermis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous Barrier. Guest Editors: Kenneth R. Feingold and Peter Elias.

  5. Ceramide inhibits PKCθ by regulating its phosphorylation and translocation to lipid rafts in Jurkat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage-Sleiman, Rouba; Hamze, Asmaa B; El-Hed, Aimée F; Attieh, Randa; Kozhaya, Lina; Kabbani, Sarah; Dbaibo, Ghassan

    2016-08-01

    Protein kinase C theta (PKCθ) is a novel, calcium-independent member of the PKC family of kinases that was identified as a central player in T cell signaling and proliferation. Upon T cell activation by antigen-presenting cells, PKCθ gets phosphorylated and activated prior to its translocation to the immunological synapse where it couples with downstream effectors. PKCθ may be regulated by ceramide, a crucial sphingolipid that is known to promote differentiation, growth arrest, and apoptosis. To further investigate the mechanism, we stimulated human Jurkat T cells with either PMA or anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies following induction of ceramide accumulation by adding exogenous ceramide, bacterial sphingomyelinase, or Fas ligation. Our results suggest that ceramide regulates the PKCθ pathway through preventing its critical threonine 538 (Thr538) phosphorylation and subsequent activation, thereby inhibiting the kinase's translocation to lipid rafts. Moreover, this inhibition is not likely to be a generic effect of ceramide on membrane reorganization. Other lipids, namely dihydroceramide, palmitate, and sphingosine, did not produce similar effects on PKCθ. Addition of the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and calyculin A reversed the inhibition exerted by ceramide, and this suggests involvement of a ceramide-activated protein phosphatase. Such previously undescribed mechanism of regulation of PKCθ raises the possibility that ceramide, or one of its derivatives, and may prove valuable in novel therapeutic approaches for disorders involving autoimmunity or excessive inflammation-where PKCθ plays a critical role.

  6. Macrophages transfer antigens to dendritic cells by releasing exosomes containing dead-cell-associated antigens partially through a ceramide-dependent pathway to enhance CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingping; Liu, Yi; Yang, Chunqing; Kang, Li; Wang, Meixiang; Hu, Jingxia; He, Hao; Song, Wengang; Tang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Defects in rapid clearance of apoptotic cells lead to an accumulation of dead cells (late apoptotic or secondary necrotic cells), which results in an aberrant immune response. However, little is known about whether and how macrophages (Mφs) cooperate with dendritic cells (DCs) in the presentation of dead-cell-associated antigens in this process. By transferring high numbers of dead cells to mimic a failure of apoptotic cell clearance in vivo, we found that Mφs and neutrophils were the predominant phagocytes in the uptake of dead cells in the spleen. Moreover, both Mφs and DCs were required for an optimal CD4(+) T-cell response triggered by dead-cell-associated antigens. Importantly, although Mφs alone had a poor capacity for antigen presentation, they could transfer phagocytosed antigens to DCs for potent antigen presentation to enhance T-cell responses. Finally, we found that exosomes released from Mφs acted as a transmitter to convey antigens to DCs partially in a ceramide-dependent manner, since treatment with the neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor GW4869 and spiroepoxide resulted in a significant reduction of T-cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. These findings point to a novel pathway of cross-talk between Mφs and DCs, which will be helpful to explain possible mechanisms for autoimmune diseases characterized by increased rates of apoptosis.

  7. Ceramide and ceramide 1-phosphate in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Muñoz Antonio

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sphingolipids are essential components of cell membranes, and many of them regulate vital cell functions. In particular, ceramide plays crucial roles in cell signaling processes. Two major actions of ceramides are the promotion of cell cycle arrest and the induction of apoptosis. Phosphorylation of ceramide produces ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P, which has opposite effects to ceramide. C1P is mitogenic and has prosurvival properties. In addition, C1P is an important mediator of inflammatory responses, an action that takes place through stimulation of cytosolic phospholipase A2, and the subsequent release of arachidonic acid and prostaglandin formation. All of the former actions are thought to be mediated by intracellularly generated C1P. However, the recent observation that C1P stimulates macrophage chemotaxis implicates specific plasma membrane receptors that are coupled to Gi proteins. Hence, it can be concluded that C1P has dual actions in cells, as it can act as an intracellular second messenger to promote cell survival, or as an extracellular receptor agonist to stimulate cell migration.

  8. Ceramide synthesis in the epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabionet, Mariona; Gorgas, Karin; Sandhoff, Roger

    2014-03-01

    The epidermis and in particular its outermost layer the stratum corneum provides terrestrial vertebrates with a pivotal defensive barrier against water loss, xenobiotics and harmful pathogens. A vital demand for this epidermal permeability barrier is the lipid-enriched lamellar matrix that embeds the enucleated corneocytes. Ceramides are the major components of these highly ordered intercellular lamellar structures, in which linoleic acid- and protein-esterified ceramides are crucial for structuring and maintaining skin barrier integrity. In this review, we describe the fascinating diversity of epidermal ceramides including 1-O-acylceramides. We focus on epidermal ceramide biosynthesis emphasizing its metabolic and topological requirements and discuss enzymes that may be involved in α- and ω-hydroxylation. Finally, we turn to epidermal ceramide regulation, highlighting transcription factors and liposensors recently described to play crucial roles in modulating skin lipid metabolism and epidermal barrier homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous Barrier.

  9. Ceramide triggers Weibel-Palade body exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Rinky; Matsushita, Kenji; Yamakuchi, Munekazu; Morrell, Craig N; Cao, Wangsen; Lowenstein, Charles J

    2004-08-06

    The sphingolipid ceramide mediates a variety of stress responses, including vascular inflammation and thrombosis. Activated endothelial cells release Weibel-Palade bodies, granules containing von Willebrand factor (vWF) and P-selectin, which induce leukocyte rolling and platelet adhesion and aggregation. We hypothesized that ceramide induces vascular inflammation and thrombosis in part by triggering Weibel-Palade body exocytosis. We added ceramide to human aortic endothelial cells and assayed Weibel-Palade body exocytosis by measuring the concentration of vWF released into the media. Exogenous ceramide induces vWF release from endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Activators of endogenous ceramide production, neutral sphingomyelinase, or tumor necrosis factor-alpha also induce Weibel-Palade body exocytosis. We next studied NO effects on ceramide-induced Weibel-Palade body exocytosis because NO can inhibit vascular inflammation. The NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine decreases ceramide-induced vWF release in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester increases ceramide-induced vWF release. In summary, our findings show that endogenous ceramide triggers Weibel-Palade body exocytosis, and that endogenous NO inhibits ceramide-induced exocytosis. These data suggest a novel mechanism by which ceramide induces vascular inflammation and thrombosis.

  10. Ceramides and barrier function in healthy skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutanu Jungersted, Jakob; Hellgren, Lars; Høgh, Julie Kaae

    2010-01-01

    Lipids in the stratum corneum are key components in the barrier function of the skin. Changes in lipid composition related to eczematous diseases are well known, but limited data are available on variations within healthy skin. The objective of the present study was to compare ceramide subgroups...... and ceramide/cholesterol ratios in young, old, male and female healthy skin. A total of 55 participants with healthy skin was included in the study. Lipid profiles were correlated with transepidermal water loss and with information on dry skin from a questionnaire including 16 people. No statistically...... significant differences were found between young and old skin for ceramide subgroups or ceramide/cholesterol ratios, and there was no statistically significant correlation between answers about dry skin and ceramide levels. Interestingly, a statistically significant higher ceramide/cholesterol ratio was found...

  11. Ceramides and barrier function in healthy skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutanu Jungersted, Jakob; Hellgren, Lars I; Høgh, Julie K; Drachmann, T; Jemec, Gregor B E; Agner, Tove

    2010-07-01

    Lipids in the stratum corneum are key components in the barrier function of the skin. Changes in lipid composition related to eczematous diseases are well known, but limited data are available on variations within healthy skin. The objective of the present study was to compare ceramide subgroups and ceramide/cholesterol ratios in young, old, male and female healthy skin. A total of 55 participants with healthy skin was included in the study. Lipid profiles were correlated with transepidermal water loss and with information on dry skin from a questionnaire including 16 people. No statistically significant differences were found between young and old skin for ceramide subgroups or ceramide/cholesterol ratios, and there was no statistically significant correlation between answers about dry skin and ceramide levels. Interestingly, a statistically significant higher ceramide/cholesterol ratio was found for men than for women (p = 0.02).

  12. New ceramides from Acnistus arborescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maia, Ana Isabel V.; Veras, Maria Leopoldina; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Silveira, Edilberto R.; Pessoa, Otilia Deusdenia L., E-mail: opessoa@ufc.b [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica; Lopes, Norberto P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Fisica e Quimica

    2010-07-01

    Two new ceramides, N-(4-hydroxyphenethyl)octacosamide (1) and rel-(2S,3S,4R,16E)-2- [(2'R)-2'-hydroxynonadecanoylamino]-heneicosadec-16-ene-1,3,4-triol (2) were isolated from the EtOH extract of Acnistus arborescens. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic (1D and 2D NMR experiments, HR-ESI-MS, LR-MS and IR) methods. (author)

  13. Potential Mechanisms Involved in Ceramide-induced Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer HT29 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING WANG; XIAO-WEN LV; YU-GUO DU

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential mechanisms of cell death after the treatment with ceramide. Methods MTT assay,DNA ladder, reporter assay, FACS and Western blot assay were employed to investigate the potential mechanisms of cell death after the treatment with C2-ceramide. Results A short-time treatment with C2-ceramide induced cell death, which was associated with p38 MAP kinase activation, but had no links with typical caspase activation or PARP degradation. Rather than caspase inhibitor, Inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase blocked cell death induced by a short-time treatment with ceramide (12 h). Moreover, incubation of cells with ceramide for a long time (>12 h) increased subGl, but reduced S phase accompanied by caspase-dependent and caspase-independent changes including NFκB activation. Conclusion Ceramide-induced cell apoptosis involves both caspase-dependent and -independent signaling pathway. Caspase-independent cell death occurring in a relatively early stage, which is mediated via p38 MAP kinase, can progress into a stage involving both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms accompanied by cell signaling of MAPKs and NFκB.

  14. Survival response to increased ceramide involves metabolic adaptation through novel regulators of glycolysis and lipolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niraj K Nirala

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The sphingolipid ceramide elicits several stress responses, however, organisms survive despite increased ceramide but how they do so is poorly understood. We demonstrate here that the AKT/FOXO pathway regulates survival in increased ceramide environment by metabolic adaptation involving changes in glycolysis and lipolysis through novel downstream targets. We show that ceramide kinase mutants accumulate ceramide and this leads to reduction in energy levels due to compromised oxidative phosphorylation. Mutants show increased activation of Akt and a consequent decrease in FOXO levels. These changes lead to enhanced glycolysis by upregulating the activity of phosphoglyceromutase, enolase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase to provide energy. A second major consequence of AKT/FOXO reprogramming in the mutants is the increased mobilization of lipid from the gut through novel lipase targets, CG8093 and CG6277 for energy contribution. Ubiquitous reduction of these targets by knockdown experiments results in semi or total lethality of the mutants, demonstrating the importance of activating them. The efficiency of these adaptive mechanisms decreases with age and leads to reduction in adult life span of the mutants. In particular, mutants develop cardiac dysfunction with age, likely reflecting the high energy requirement of a well-functioning heart. The lipases also regulate physiological triacylglycerol homeostasis and are important for energy metabolism since midgut specific reduction of them in wild type flies results in increased sensitivity to starvation and accumulation of triglycerides leading to cardiac defects. The central findings of increased AKT activation, decreased FOXO level and activation of phosphoglyceromutase and pyruvate kinase are also observed in mice heterozygous for ceramide transfer protein suggesting a conserved role of this pathway in mammals. These data reveal novel glycolytic and non-autonomous lipolytic pathways in

  15. Inhibition of caspases but not of calpains temporarily protect against C2-ceramide-induced death of CAD cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda, Gonzalo; Waters, Catherine; Gibson, Rosemary

    2007-06-29

    Evidence has implicated apoptosis as a mechanism underlying cell death in diverse neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). Endogenous agents such as TNF-alpha, INF-gamma, IL-1beta and others stress signals activate the sphingomyelin pathway increasing ceramide levels. Ceramide triggers apoptotic pathways while inhibiting survival signalling, and is involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and compartmentalisation. The contribution of caspases in neuronal apoptosis has been highlighted by the increased survival exerted by caspase inhibition, but the involvement of calpains during neuronal apoptosis and the potential benefit of their inhibition is still controversial. In the present paper, we have analysed the contribution of caspases and calpains to cell death of CAD cells, a catecholaminergic cell line of mesencephalic origin, following C2-ceramide exposure. Ceramide caused CAD cell death by a dose and time dependant mechanism. 25microM of C2-ceramide caused apoptosis. Analysis of activation of caspases and calpains by differential cleavage of alpha-fodrin showed that although calpains are activated before caspases following C2-ceramide exposure, only caspase inhibition increased cell survival. These results demonstrate the activation of caspases and calpains in C2-ceramide-induced cell death, and support the role of caspase inhibition as a neuroprotective strategy and a plausible therapeutic approach to decrease catecholaminergic cell death.

  16. Enzymatic production of ceramide from sphingomyelin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Long; Hellgren, Lars; Xu, Xuebing

    2006-01-01

    Due to its major role in maintaining the water-retaining properties of the epidermis, ceramide is of great commercial potentials in cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries such as in hair and skin care products. Chemical synthesis of ceramide is a costly process, and developments of alternative cost...

  17. Ceramide Accumulation in Yeast Yarrowia lipolitica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周全; 陈国强

    2005-01-01

    Ceramides are a class of lipid molecules widely distributed in eukaryotic cells in small amount. To investigate the possibility of ceramide production by yeast, a yeast strain Yarrowia lipolitica was grown under different conditions including changing carbon/nitrogen ratio, and serine concentration, dissolved oxygen and presence of ethanol. It was found that increased dissolved oxygen supply increased the ceramide content in the yeast 2.5 fold of its normal control level. Ethanol treatment could also enhance ceramide accumulation by 3.3 fold compared with the control although the cell growth was negatively affected. Cellular redox potential was shown to affect ceramide accumulation by the yeast. This was possibly related to the cellular reactive oxygen species presented in the yeast.

  18. The yins and yangs of ceramide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KAMALSHARMA; YUFANGSHI

    1999-01-01

    Since their discovery over 100 years ago,sphingolipids have caught the eyes and the imagination of scientists.Modern science has made many new insights on the cell biology and day-to-day functions of many integral sphingolipids,especially those of ceramids.Ceramide is recognized as a vital second messenger in the signal transduction process mediated by receptors of many cytokines and growth factors.A great part of our current understanding of ceramide has been achieved from apoptosis-related studies,however recent data in the fields of immunology,endocrinology and neurobiology,also suggest a fundamental involvement of ceramide in the onset of diseases.Therefore,understanding the diology of ceramide could be a key to unraveling many biological mechanisms and provide information for the treatment of some common diseases.

  19. Ceramide profile in hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J. M.; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Background. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a rare genetic disease. The clinical presentation includes lack of sweating ability, and an often widely spread dermatitis resembling atopic dermatitis (AD). In AD, the skin‐barrier defect is partly ascribed to the altered lipid profile...... in the stratum corneum and partly to mutations of the filaggrin genes. To our knowledge, no data are available about the epidermal lipid profile of HED. Aim. To compare the ceramide profile for patients with HED and AD. Methods. The ceramide profile and ceramide/cholesterol ratio were compared between patients...... ceramide 1, which was significantly higher in HED (P = 0.04). Conclusions. The increased ceramide 1 level found in HED compared with AD is known to play a role in the structure of the lipid bilayers. However, further studies are needed to identify the functional significance of these observations...

  20. Ceramides in Alzheimer’s Disease: Key Mediators of Neuronal Apoptosis Induced by Oxidative Stress and Aβ Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Jazvinšćak Jembrek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the most common chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by extracellular deposits of amyloid β-peptides (Aβ and intracellular deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau (phospho-tau protein. Ceramides, the major molecules of sphingolipid metabolism and lipid second messengers, have been associated with AD progression and pathology via Aβ generation. Enhanced levels of ceramides directly increase Aβ through stabilization of β-secretase, the key enzyme in the amyloidogenic processing of Aβ precursor protein (APP. As a positive feedback loop, the generated oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ induces a further increase in ceramide levels by activating sphingomyelinases that catalyze the catabolic breakdown of sphingomyelin to ceramide. Evidence also supports important role of ceramides in neuronal apoptosis. Ceramides may initiate a cascade of biochemical alterations, which ultimately leads to neuronal death by diverse mechanisms, including depolarization and permeabilization of mitochondria, increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, cytochrome c release, Bcl-2 depletion, and caspase-3 activation, mainly by modulating intracellular signalling, particularly along the pathways related to Akt/PKB kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs. This review summarizes recent findings related to the role of ceramides in oxidative stress-driven neuronal apoptosis and interplay with Aβ in the cascade of events ending in neuronal degeneration.

  1. Regulation of Ceramide Synthase by Casein Kinase 2-dependent Phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresques, Tara; Niles, Brad; Aronova, Sofia; Mogri, Huzefa; Rakhshandehroo, Taha; Powers, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Complex sphingolipids are important components of eukaryotic cell membranes and, together with their biosynthetic precursors, including sphingoid long chain bases and ceramides, have important signaling functions crucial for cell growth and survival. Ceramides are produced at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by a multicomponent enzyme complex termed ceramide synthase (CerS). In budding yeast, this complex is composed of two catalytic subunits, Lac1 and Lag1, as well as an essential regulatory subunit, Lip1. Proper formation of ceramides by CerS has been shown previously to require the Cka2 subunit of casein kinase 2 (CK2), a ubiquitous enzyme with multiple cellular functions, but the precise mechanism involved has remained unidentified. Here we present evidence that Lac1 and Lag1 are direct targets for CK2 and that phosphorylation at conserved positions within the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of each protein is required for optimal CerS activity. Our data suggest that phosphorylation of Lac1 and Lag1 is important for proper localization and distribution of CerS within the ER membrane and that phosphorylation of these sites is functionally linked to the COP I-dependent C-terminal dilysine ER retrieval pathway. Together, our data identify CK2 as an important regulator of sphingolipid metabolism, and additionally, because both ceramides and CK2 have been implicated in the regulation of cancer, our findings may lead to an enhanced understanding of their relationship in health and disease. PMID:25429105

  2. Regulation of ceramide synthase by casein kinase 2-dependent phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresques, Tara; Niles, Brad; Aronova, Sofia; Mogri, Huzefa; Rakhshandehroo, Taha; Powers, Ted

    2015-01-16

    Complex sphingolipids are important components of eukaryotic cell membranes and, together with their biosynthetic precursors, including sphingoid long chain bases and ceramides, have important signaling functions crucial for cell growth and survival. Ceramides are produced at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by a multicomponent enzyme complex termed ceramide synthase (CerS). In budding yeast, this complex is composed of two catalytic subunits, Lac1 and Lag1, as well as an essential regulatory subunit, Lip1. Proper formation of ceramides by CerS has been shown previously to require the Cka2 subunit of casein kinase 2 (CK2), a ubiquitous enzyme with multiple cellular functions, but the precise mechanism involved has remained unidentified. Here we present evidence that Lac1 and Lag1 are direct targets for CK2 and that phosphorylation at conserved positions within the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of each protein is required for optimal CerS activity. Our data suggest that phosphorylation of Lac1 and Lag1 is important for proper localization and distribution of CerS within the ER membrane and that phosphorylation of these sites is functionally linked to the COP I-dependent C-terminal dilysine ER retrieval pathway. Together, our data identify CK2 as an important regulator of sphingolipid metabolism, and additionally, because both ceramides and CK2 have been implicated in the regulation of cancer, our findings may lead to an enhanced understanding of their relationship in health and disease.

  3. Ceramides and barrier function in healthy skin

    OpenAIRE

    Jungerstedt, J; Hellgren, Lars; Drachmann, Tue; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Jemec, GBE; Agner, T

    2010-01-01

    Lipids in the stratum corneum are key components in the barrier function of the skin. Changes in lipid composition related to eczematous diseases are well known, but limited data are available on variations within healthy skin. The objective of the present study was to compare ceramide subgroups and ceramide/cholesterol ratios in young, old, male and female healthy skin. A total of 55 participants with healthy skin was included in the study. Lipid profiles were correlated with transepidermal ...

  4. Ethnicity and stratum corneum ceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J.M.; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The barrier function of the skin is dependent on an optimal composition of the stratum corneum lipids, exemplified by the altered lipid profile in patients with atopic eczema (AE). Differences in the global prevalence of AE point to the environment as an important factor in AE. Studies...... on filaggrin point to a genetic aspect in AE. The influence of environment and genes needs to be explored. OBJECTIVES: To investigate possible differences in stratum corneum lipids between different healthy ethnicities living in the same environment. METHODS: Healthy participants without any major skin...... diseases were enrolled in the study. Twenty-five participants of Asian origin (Asians), 18 of African origin (Africans) and 28 of Danish origin (white-skinned), all students at universities in the Copenhagen area of Denmark, had the ceramide profile of their stratum corneum examined using the cyanoacrylate...

  5. Characterising the inhibitory actions of ceramide upon insulin signaling in different skeletal muscle cell models: a mechanistic insight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Mahfouz

    Full Text Available Ceramides are known to promote insulin resistance in a number of metabolically important tissues including skeletal muscle, the predominant site of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Depending on cell type, these lipid intermediates have been shown to inhibit protein kinase B (PKB/Akt, a key mediator of the metabolic actions of insulin, via two distinct pathways: one involving the action of atypical protein kinase C (aPKC isoforms, and the second dependent on protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A. The main aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms by which ceramide inhibits PKB/Akt in three different skeletal muscle-derived cell culture models; rat L6 myotubes, mouse C2C12 myotubes and primary human skeletal muscle cells. Our findings indicate that the mechanism by which ceramide acts to repress PKB/Akt is related to the myocellular abundance of caveolin-enriched domains (CEM present at the plasma membrane. Here, we show that ceramide-enriched-CEMs are markedly more abundant in L6 myotubes compared to C2C12 myotubes, consistent with their previously reported role in coordinating aPKC-directed repression of PKB/Akt in L6 muscle cells. In contrast, a PP2A-dependent pathway predominantly mediates ceramide-induced inhibition of PKB/Akt in C2C12 myotubes. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time that ceramide engages an aPKC-dependent pathway to suppress insulin-induced PKB/Akt activation in palmitate-treated cultured human muscle cells as well as in muscle cells from diabetic patients. Collectively, this work identifies key mechanistic differences, which may be linked to variations in plasma membrane composition, underlying the insulin-desensitising effects of ceramide in different skeletal muscle cell models that are extensively used in signal transduction and metabolic studies.

  6. Role of Intracellular Lipid Logistics in the Preferential Usage of Very Long Chain-Ceramides in Glucosylceramide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Yamaji

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ceramide is a common precursor of sphingomyelin (SM and glycosphingolipids (GSLs in mammalian cells. Ceramide synthase 2 (CERS2, one of the six ceramide synthase isoforms, is responsible for the synthesis of very long chain fatty acid (C20–26 fatty acids (VLC-containing ceramides (VLC-Cer. It is known that the proportion of VLC species in GSLs is higher than that in SM. To address the mechanism of the VLC-preference of GSLs, we used genome editing to establish three HeLa cell mutants that expressed different amounts of CERS2 and compared the acyl chain lengths of SM and GSLs by metabolic labeling experiments. VLC-sphingolipid expression was increased along with that of CERS2, and the proportion of VLC species in glucosylceramide (GlcCer was higher than that in SM for all expression levels of CERS2. This higher proportion was still maintained even when the proportion of C16-Cer to the total ceramides was increased by disrupting the ceramide transport protein (CERT-dependent C16-Cer delivery pathway for SM synthesis. On the other hand, merging the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER by Brefeldin A decreased the proportion of VLC species in GlcCer probably due to higher accessibility of UDP-glucose ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG to C16-rich ceramides. These results suggest the existence of a yet-to-be-identified mechanism rendering VLC-Cer more accessible than C16-Cer to UGCG, which is independent of CERT.

  7. Role of Intracellular Lipid Logistics in the Preferential Usage of Very Long Chain-Ceramides in Glucosylceramide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Toshiyuki; Horie, Aya; Tachida, Yuriko; Sakuma, Chisato; Suzuki, Yusuke; Kushi, Yasunori; Hanada, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide is a common precursor of sphingomyelin (SM) and glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in mammalian cells. Ceramide synthase 2 (CERS2), one of the six ceramide synthase isoforms, is responsible for the synthesis of very long chain fatty acid (C20–26 fatty acids) (VLC)-containing ceramides (VLC-Cer). It is known that the proportion of VLC species in GSLs is higher than that in SM. To address the mechanism of the VLC-preference of GSLs, we used genome editing to establish three HeLa cell mutants that expressed different amounts of CERS2 and compared the acyl chain lengths of SM and GSLs by metabolic labeling experiments. VLC-sphingolipid expression was increased along with that of CERS2, and the proportion of VLC species in glucosylceramide (GlcCer) was higher than that in SM for all expression levels of CERS2. This higher proportion was still maintained even when the proportion of C16-Cer to the total ceramides was increased by disrupting the ceramide transport protein (CERT)-dependent C16-Cer delivery pathway for SM synthesis. On the other hand, merging the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by Brefeldin A decreased the proportion of VLC species in GlcCer probably due to higher accessibility of UDP-glucose ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG) to C16-rich ceramides. These results suggest the existence of a yet-to-be-identified mechanism rendering VLC-Cer more accessible than C16-Cer to UGCG, which is independent of CERT. PMID:27775668

  8. Molecular-dynamics simulation of a ceramide bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Sagar A.; Scott, H. Larry

    2006-01-01

    Ceramide is the simplest lipid in the biologically important class of glycosphingolipids. Ceramide is an important signaling molecule and a major component of the strateum corneum layer in the skin. In order to begin to understand the biophysical properties of ceramide, we have carried out a molecular-dynamics simulation of a hydrated 16:0 ceramide lipid bilayer at 368K (5° above the main phase transition). In this paper we describe the simulation and present the resulting properties of the bilayer. We compare the properties of the simulated ceramide bilayer to an earlier simulation of 18:0 sphingomyelin, and we discuss the results as they relate to experimental data for ceramide and other sphingolipids. The most significant differences arise at the lipid/water interface, where the lack of a large ceramide polar group leads to a different electron density and a different electrostatic potential but, surprisingly, not a different overall "dipole potential," when ceramide is compared to sphingomyelin.

  9. Development and characterization of a novel anti-ceramide antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Kannan; Dasgupta, Somsankar; Bieberich, Erhard

    2007-04-01

    Ceramide is emerging as a key sphingolipid that regulates a variety of cellular processes. To facilitate the study of ceramide localization and its interaction with cellular proteins, we have developed a novel antibody against ceramide. Our results indicate that the antibody (rabbit IgG) specifically recognizes ceramide in lipid overlay assays and detects ceramide species with different fatty acid chain lengths that include C2, C8, C16, C18, C20, and C24. The new antibody was compared with the commercially available anti-ceramide antibody (mouse IgM) in immunocytochemistry experiments to study the localization of ceramide. Although both antibodies stain the same regions on the cell membrane, the rabbit IgG reveals the distribution of ceramide in compartments that are not well identified with the commercially available antibody. In addition to staining of ceramide in protrusions of the plasma membrane, the rabbit IgG also detects ceramide in the Golgi apparatus. Pharmacological depletion or increase of ceramide levels results in a corresponding change in staining intensity, confirming the specificity of the antibody. These results indicate that the rabbit IgG is a suitable antibody to determine the localization of ceramide and its interaction with proteins by immunocytochemistry.

  10. Enhanced de novo ceramide generation through activation of serine palmitoyltransferase by the P-glycoprotein antagonist SDZ PSC 833 in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongtao; Giuliano, Armando E; Cabot, Myles C

    2002-07-01

    SDZ PSC 833 (PSC 833), a P-glycoprotein-targeted multidrug resistance modulator, sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy. Here we show that PSC 833 also potentiates the formation of ceramide. Because ceramide is a second messenger in chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, knowledge of the lipid pathways influenced by PSC 833 is of relevance. In intact MDA-MB 468 breast cancer cells, ceramide generation increased 3-fold 1 h after PSC 833 addition (5.0 microM). Cyclosporine A, a structural analogue, failed to impact ceramide metabolism. Sphinganine, the upstream precursor of ceramide, also increased in response to PSC 833, and this could be blocked by adding L-cycloserine, a serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) inhibitor. Exposure of cultured cells to PSC 833 (30 min to 4 h; 1-10 microM), followed by isolation of microsomes for in vitro assay, increased SPT activity 60%, whereas palmitoyl CoA synthetase and ceramide synthase activities were not altered. SPT activity was also heightened by pretreating cells with either paclitaxel, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide, etoposide, or daunorubicin; however, activation was half that attained by PSC 833. PSC 833 stimulated ceramide generation in other breast cancer cell lines as well, including BT-20, MDA-MB 231, Hs 578T, T-47D, and MCF-7. In summary, several types of anticancer agents and the P-glycoprotein modulator PSC 833 share the ability to increase cellular ceramide levels by activation of SPT, the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo pathway of ceramide synthesis. These data provide novel insight in the area of lipid-mediated cell death.

  11. Ceramides and barrier function in healthy skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungerstedt, J; Hellgren, Lars; Drachmann, Tue;

    2010-01-01

    Lipids in the stratum corneum are key components in the barrier function of the skin. Changes in lipid composition related to eczematous diseases are well known, but limited data are available on variations within healthy skin. The objective of the present study was to compare ceramide subgroups...... and ceramide/cholesterol ratios in young, old, male and female healthy skin. A total of 55 participants with healthy skin was included in the study. Lipid profiles were correlated with transepidermal water loss and with information on dry skin from a questionnaire including 16 people. No statistically...

  12. Lipid functions in skin: Differential effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on cutaneous ceramides, in a human skin organ culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Alexandra C; Kiezel-Tsugunova, Magdalena; Brownbridge, Luke C; Harwood, John L; Nicolaou, Anna

    2017-03-21

    the epidermis, but not the dermis, increased in response to EPA, but not DHA. This ex vivo study shows that dietary supplementation with EPA has the potential to alter the ceramide profile of the skin, and this may contribute to its anti-inflammatory profile. This has implications for formation of the epidermal lipid barrier, and signalling pathways within the skin mediated by ceramides and other sphingolipid species. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo Escríba-Ruíz.

  13. Ceramides in the skin lipid membranes: length matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolová, Barbora; Janůšová, Barbora; Zbytovská, Jarmila; Gooris, Gert; Bouwstra, Joke; Slepička, Petr; Berka, Pavel; Roh, Jaroslav; Palát, Karel; Hrabálek, Alexandr; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2013-12-17

    Ceramides are essential constituents of the skin barrier that allow humans to live on dry land. Reduced levels of ceramides have been associated with skin diseases, e.g., atopic dermatitis. However, the structural requirements and mechanisms of action of ceramides are not fully understood. Here, we report the effects of ceramide acyl chain length on the permeabilities and biophysics of lipid membranes composed of ceramides (or free sphingosine), fatty acids, cholesterol, and cholesterol sulfate. Short-chain ceramides increased the permeability of the lipid membranes compared to a long-chain ceramide with maxima at 4-6 carbons in the acyl. By a combination of differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Langmuir monolayers, and atomic force microscopy, we found that the reason for this effect in short ceramides was a lower proportion of tight orthorhombic packing and phase separation of continuous short ceramide-enriched domains with shorter lamellar periodicity compared to native long ceramides. Thus, long acyl chains in ceramides are essential for the formation of tightly packed impermeable lipid lamellae. Moreover, the model skin lipid membranes are a valuable tool to study the relationships between the lipid structure and composition, lipid organization, and the membrane permeability.

  14. Identifying causal networks linking cancer processes and anti-tumor immunity using Bayesian network inference and metagene constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Jacob L; Bland, Cassidy L; Klinke, David J

    2016-03-01

    Cancer arises from a deregulation of both intracellular and intercellular networks that maintain system homeostasis. Identifying the architecture of these networks and how they are changed in cancer is a pre-requisite for designing drugs to restore homeostasis. Since intercellular networks only appear in intact systems, it is difficult to identify how these networks become altered in human cancer using many of the common experimental models. To overcome this, we used the diversity in normal and malignant human tissue samples from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database of human breast cancer to identify the topology associated with intercellular networks in vivo. To improve the underlying biological signals, we constructed Bayesian networks using metagene constructs, which represented groups of genes that are concomitantly associated with different immune and cancer states. We also used bootstrap resampling to establish the significance associated with the inferred networks. In short, we found opposing relationships between cell proliferation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) with regards to macrophage polarization. These results were consistent across multiple carcinomas in that proliferation was associated with a type 1 cell-mediated anti-tumor immune response and EMT was associated with a pro-tumor anti-inflammatory response. To address the identifiability of these networks from other datasets, we could identify the relationship between EMT and macrophage polarization with fewer samples when the Bayesian network was generated from malignant samples alone. However, the relationship between proliferation and macrophage polarization was identified with fewer samples when the samples were taken from a combination of the normal and malignant samples. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:470-479, 2016.

  15. Mechanisms involved in ceramide-induced cell cycle arrest in human hepatocarcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Xiao-Wen Lv; Jie-Ping Shi; Xiao-Song Hu

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of ceramide on the cell cycle in human hepatocarcinoma Bel7402 cells.Possible molecular mechanisms were explored.METHODS:[3-(4,5)-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide(MTT)assay,plasmid transfection,reporter assay,FACS and Western blotting analyses were employed to investigate the effect and the related molecular mechanisms of C2-ceramide on the cell cycle of Bel7402 cells.RESULTS:C2-ceramide was found to inhibit the growth of Bel7402 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest.During the process,the expression of p21 protein increased,while that of cyclinD1,phospho-ERK1/2 and c-myc decreased.Furthermore,the level of CDK7 was downregulated,while the transcriptional activity of PPARγ was upregulated.Addition of GW9662,which is a PPARγ specific antagonist,could reserve the modulation action on CDK7.CONCLUSION:Our results support the hypothesis that cell cycle arrest induced by C2-ceramide may be mediated via accumulation of p21 and reduction of cyclinD1 and CDK7,at least partly,through PPARγ activation.The ERK signaling pathway was involved in this process.

  16. Activation of the Drosophila MLK by ceramide reveals TNF-alpha and ceramide as agonists of mammalian MLK3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayana, Pradeep; Barthwal, Manoj K; Kundu, Chanakya N; Lane, Mary Ellen; Bergmann, Andreas; Tzivion, Guri; Rana, Ajay

    2002-12-01

    Mixed lineage kinases (MLKs) are MAPKKK members that activate JNK and reportedly lead to cell death. However, the agonist(s) that regulate MLK activity remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate ceramide as the activator of Drosophila MLK (dMLK) and identify ceramide and TNF-alpha as agonists of mammalian MLK3. dMLK and MLK3 are activated by a ceramide analog and bacterial sphingomyelinase in vivo, whereas a low nanomolar concentration of natural ceramide activates them in vitro. Specific inhibition of dMLK and MLK3 significantly attenuates activation of JNK by ceramide in vivo without affecting ceramide-induced p38 or ERK activation. In addition, TNF-alpha also activates MLK3 and evidently leads to JNK activation in vivo. Thus, the ceramide serves as a common agonist of dMLK and MLK3, and MLK3 contributes to JNK activation induced by TNF-alpha.

  17. Structure of cholesterol/ceramide monolayer mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheffer, L.; Solomonov, I.; Weygand, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of monolayers of cholesterol/ ceramide mixtures was investigated using grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, immunofluorescence, and atomic force microscopy techniques. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements showed the existence of a crystalline mixed phase of the two...

  18. Endurance and Resistance Training Affect High Fat Diet-Induced Increase of Ceramides, Inflammasome Expression, and Systemic Inflammation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardare, Cornelia; Krüger, Karsten; Liebisch, Gerhard; Seimetz, Michael; Couturier, Aline; Ringseis, Robert; Wilhelm, Jochen; Weissmann, Norbert; Eder, Klaus; Mooren, Frank-Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effects of differentiated exercise regimes on high fat-induced metabolic and inflammatory pathways. Mice were fed a standard diet (ST) or a high fat diet (HFD) and subjected to regular endurance training (ET) or resistance training (RT). After 10 weeks body weight, glucose tolerance, fatty acids (FAs), circulating ceramides, cytokines, and immunological mediators were determined. The HFD induced a significant increase in body weight and a disturbed glucose tolerance (p resistance training decreased body weight (p induced complications possibly through a reduction of ceramides, the reduction of inflammasome activation in adipose tissues, and a systemic downregulation of inflammatory cytokines.

  19. Ceramide biosynthesis in keratinocyte and its role in skin function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Yukiko; Mitsutake, Susumu; Tsuji, Kiyomi; Kihara, Akio; Igarashi, Yasuyuki

    2009-06-01

    The enucleate layer of the epidermis, i.e. the stratum corneum, is responsible for certain critical protective functions, such as epidermal permeability barrier function. Within the epidermal membrane lamella component, ceramides are the dominant lipid class by weight (over 50%) and exhibit the greatest molecular heterogeneity in terms of sphingoid base and fatty acid composition. It is now evermore important to understand how ceramide production and functions are controlled in the epidermis, since decreased epidermal ceramide content has been linked to water loss and barrier dysfunction. During the past several years, critical enzymes in ceramide biosynthesis have been identified, including ceramide synthases (CerS) and ceramide hydroxylase/desaturase. In this review, we describe the molecular heterogeneity of ceramides synthesized in the epidermis and their possible roles in epidermal permeability barrier functions. We also describe recent studies that identified the family of CerS (CerS1-CerS6) in mammals. We further focus on the roles of specific isoforms of these enzymes in synthesizing the epidermal ceramides, especially in relation to chain-length specificity. In addition, we provide experimental information, including our recent findings, as to how applying ceramide or ceramide-containing substances to skin, orally or directly, can benefit skin health.

  20. Intramyocellular ceramides and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration are partially regulated by Toll-like receptor 4 during hindlimb unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh Sung; Nelson, Daniel S; Barrows, Katherine M; O'Connell, Ryan M; Drummond, Micah J

    2016-11-01

    Physical inactivity and disuse result in skeletal muscle metabolic disruption, including insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. The role of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway in contributing to metabolic decline with muscle disuse is unknown. Therefore, our goal was to determine whether TLR4 is an underlying mechanism of insulin resistance, mitochondrial dysfunction, and skeletal muscle ceramide accumulation following muscle disuse in mice. To address this hypothesis, we subjected (n = 6-8/group) male WT and TLR4(-/-) mice to 2 wk of hindlimb unloading (HU), while a second group of mice served as ambulatory wild-type controls (WT CON, TLR4(-/-) CON). Mice were assessed for insulin resistance [homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glucose tolerance], and hindlimb muscles (soleus and gastrocnemius) were used to assess muscle sphingolipid abundance, mitochondrial respiration [respiratory control ratio (RCR)], and NF-κB signaling. The primary finding was that HU resulted in insulin resistance, increased total ceramides, specifically Cer18:0 and Cer20:0, and decreased skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration. Importantly, TLR4(-/-) HU mice were protected from insulin resistance and altered NF-κB signaling and were partly resistant to muscle atrophy, ceramide accumulation, and decreased RCR. Skeletal muscle ceramides and RCR were correlated with insulin resistance. We conclude that TLR4 is an upstream regulator of insulin sensitivity, while partly upregulating muscle ceramides and worsening mitochondrial respiration during 2 wk of HU.

  1. Lipid alterations in experimental murine colitis: role of ceramide and imipramine for matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression.

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    Jessica Bauer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dietary lipids or pharmacologic modulation of lipid metabolism are potential therapeutic strategies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Therefore, we analysed alterations of bioactive lipids in experimental models of colitis and examined the functional consequence of the second messenger ceramide in inflammatory pathways leading to tissue destruction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chronic colitis was induced by dextran-sulphate-sodium (DSS or transfer of CD4(+CD62L(+ cells into RAG1(-/--mice. Lipid content of isolated murine intestinal epithelial cells (IEC was analysed by tandem mass spectrometry. Concentrations of MMP-1 in supernatants of Caco-2-IEC and human intestinal fibroblasts from patients with ulcerative colitis were determined by ELISA. Imipramine was used for pharmacologic inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM. Ceramide increased by 71% in chronic DSS-induced colitis and by 159% in the transfer model of colitis. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC decreased by 22% in both models. No changes were detected for phosphatidylcholine. Generation of ceramide by exogenous SMase increased MMP-1-protein production of Caco-2-IEC up to 7-fold. Inhibition of ASM completely abolished the induction of MMP-1 by TNF or IL-1beta in Caco-2-IEC and human intestinal fibroblasts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mucosal inflammation leads to accumulation of ceramide and decrease of LPC in the intestinal epithelium. One aspect of ceramide generation is an increase of MMP-1. Induction of MMP-1 by TNF or IL-1beta is completely blocked by inhibition of ASM with imipramine. Therefore, inhibition of ASM may offer a treatment strategy to reduce MMP-1 expression and tissue destruction in inflammatory conditions.

  2. Anti-Plasmodium activity of ceramide analogs

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    Gatt Shimon

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sphingolipids are key molecules regulating many essential functions in eukaryotic cells and ceramide plays a central role in sphingolipid metabolism. A sphingolipid metabolism occurs in the intraerythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum and is associated with essential biological processes. It constitutes an attractive and potential target for the development of new antimalarial drugs. Methods The anti-Plasmodium activity of a series of ceramide analogs containing different linkages (amide, methylene or thiourea linkages between the fatty acid part of ceramide and the sphingoid core was investigated in culture and compared to the sphingolipid analog PPMP (d,1-threo-1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol. This analog is known to inhibit the parasite sphingomyelin synthase activity and block parasite development by preventing the formation of the tubovesicular network that extends from the parasitophorous vacuole to the red cell membrane and delivers essential extracellular nutrients to the parasite. Results Analogs containing methylene linkage showed a considerably higher anti-Plasmodium activity (IC50 in the low nanomolar range than PPMP and their counterparts with a natural amide linkage (IC50 in the micromolar range. The methylene analogs blocked irreversibly P. falciparum development leading to parasite eradication in contrast to PPMP whose effect is cytostatic. A high sensitivity of action towards the parasite was observed when compared to their effect on the human MRC-5 cell growth. The toxicity towards parasites did not correlate with the inhibition by methylene analogs of the parasite sphingomyelin synthase activity and the tubovesicular network formation, indicating that this enzyme is not their primary target. Conclusions It has been shown that ceramide analogs were potent inhibitors of P. falciparum growth in culture. Interestingly, the nature of the linkage between the fatty acid part and the

  3. Ceramide induces release of mitochondrial proapoptotic proteins in caspase-dependent and -independent manner in HT-29 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the release of mitochondrial proapoptotic intermembrane space proteins induced by exogenous C2-ceramide in human colon carcinoma (HT-29) cell line was investigated. HT-29 cells were treated with 12.5, 25 and 50 μmol/L C2-ceramide in vitro. Flow cytometer was used to detect the mitochondrial membrane potential (△Ψm). Subcellular fractions were extracted by Mitochondrial/Cytosol Fractionation Kit after C2-ceramide treatment for 24 h. SDS-PAGE was used to determine the level of cytochrome c (Cyt c), high temperature requirement A2 (HtrA2) and second mitochondrial-derived activator of caspases (Smac) released from mitochondria, the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and caspase-3 for 24 h. The results showed that △Ψm began to decrease from 6 h after 25 and 50 μmol/L C2-ceramide treatment (P<0.05) and cyclosporin A (CsA) could inhibit the collapse of △Ψm through regulating mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore. There was no effect of C2-ceramide on the expression of Cyt c, HtrA2 and Smac in the total levels. 12.5, 25 and 50 μmol/L C2-ceramide could induce Cyt c, HtrA2 and Smac to release from mitochondria to cytosol and down-regulate the expression of XIAP (P<0.05). Also there was expression of cleaved caspase-3 with C2-ceramide treatment. After the treatment with caspase inhibitor, C2-ceramide still induced the release of Cyt c and HtrA2, but Smac did not. Therefore, C2-ceramide could induce apoptosis of HT-29 cells through the mitochondria pathway. The release of Cyt c, HtrA2 and Smac from mitochondria did not occur via the same mechanism, the release of Cyt c and HtrA2 was caspase-independent and the release of Smac was caspase-dependent.

  4. A global in vivo Drosophila RNAi screen identifies a key role of ceramide phosphoethanolamine for glial ensheathment of axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniket Ghosh

    Full Text Available Glia are of vital importance for all complex nervous system. One of the many functions of glia is to insulate and provide trophic and metabolic support to axons. Here, using glial-specific RNAi knockdown in Drosophila, we silenced 6930 conserved genes in adult flies to identify essential genes and pathways. Among our screening hits, metabolic processes were highly represented, and genes involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways appeared to be essential in glia. One critical pathway identified was de novo ceramide synthesis. Glial knockdown of lace, a subunit of the serine palmitoyltransferase associated with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies in humans, resulted in ensheathment defects of peripheral nerves in Drosophila. A genetic dissection study combined with shotgun high-resolution mass spectrometry of lipids showed that levels of ceramide phosphoethanolamine are crucial for axonal ensheathment by glia. A detailed morphological and functional analysis demonstrated that the depletion of ceramide phosphoethanolamine resulted in axonal defasciculation, slowed spike propagation, and failure of wrapping glia to enwrap peripheral axons. Supplementing sphingosine into the diet rescued the neuropathy in flies. Thus, our RNAi study in Drosophila identifies a key role of ceramide phosphoethanolamine in wrapping of axons by glia.

  5. On the physical-chemical properties of ceramide C16

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Sofia Leite

    2012-01-01

    Dissertation presented to obtain the Ph.D degree in Chemistry. Ceramides are known to be involved in cell signalling and are proposed to assist in the formation of laterally segregated membrane domains, known as ceramide rich domains in cell lipid bilayers. The lipid matrix of the stratum corneum, the uppermost layer of the skin, which is responsible for its water barrier properties, is mainly composed of ceramides, associated with cholesterol, long chain fatty acids and cholesteryl esters...

  6. Lipid domain morphologies in phosphatidylcholine-ceramide monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karttunen, Mikko; Haataja, Mikko P; Säily, Matti;

    2009-01-01

    In cells, one of the main roles of ceramide-enriched membrane domains is to recruit or exclude intracellular signaling molecules and receptors, thereby facilitating signal transduction cascades. Accordingly, in model membranes, even low contents of ceramide segregate into lateral domains. The imp...

  7. New Immunosuppressive Sphingoid Base and Ceramide Analogues in Wild Cordyceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Jia-Ning; Han, Yuwei; Xu, Yingqiong; Kou, Junping; Wang, Jing-Rong; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2016-12-14

    A comprehensive identification of sphingoid bases and ceramides in wild Cordyceps was performed by integrating a sequential chromatographic enrichment procedure and an UHPLC-ultrahigh definition-Q-TOF-MS based sphingolipidomic approach. A total of 43 sphingoid bases and 303 ceramides were identified from wild Cordyceps, including 12 new sphingoid base analogues and 159 new ceramide analogues based on high-resolution MS and MS/MS data, isotope distribution, matching with the comprehensive personal sphingolipid database, confirmation by sphingolipid standards and chromatographic retention time rule. The immunosuppressive bioassay results demonstrated that Cordyceps sphingoid base fraction exhibits more potent immunosuppressive activity than ceramide fraction, elucidating the immunosuppressive ingredients of wild Cordyceps. This study represented the most comprehensive identification of sphingoid bases and ceramides from a natural source. The findings of this study provided an insight into therapeutic application of wild Cordyceps.

  8. Morphological effects of ceramide on DMPC/DHPC bicelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Barros, L; De la Maza, A; Walther, P; Estelrich, J; López, O

    2008-04-01

    Freeze fracture electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering were applied to characterize the morphological changes of DMPC/DHPC bicellar systems induced by the addition of ceramides. The results demonstrate a tendency of the DMPC/DHPC aggregates to evolve forming elongated or tubular structures with the increase of the temperature. At 20 degrees C, low concentrations of ceramide promote the appearance of elongated structures with twisted zones. Higher concentrations of this lipid lead to the formation of liposomes along the elongated structures. The increase of the temperature to 40 degrees C induces the growth of the structures containing low concentrations of ceramide forming branched aggregates. In samples with high amounts of ceramide, the increase of temperature causes phase separation and the formation of a mixed system composed by liposomes and multilamellar tubules. The morphological effects induced by ceramides in this new membrane model give new insights for the role played by this lipid in biological membranes.

  9. Novel roles for ceramides, calpains and caspases in kidney proximal tubule cell apoptosis: lessons from in vitro cadmium toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wing-Kee; Thévenod, Frank

    2008-12-01

    Apoptosis is a tightly regulated physiological process, which can be initiated by toxic stimuli, such as cadmium (Cd2+). Cd2+ (10-50 microM) induces a rapid increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) (> or = 30 min) in a cell line derived from the S1 segment of rat kidney proximal tubule, without any apparent mitochondrial dysfunction. The sphingolipid ceramide is an important second messenger in apoptosis. Short exposure to Cd2+ (3h) causes an increase in ceramides, which occurs downstream of ROS formation, and may interact with cellular components, such as endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Following apoptosis initiation, execution must take place. The classical executioners of apoptosis are caspases, a family of cysteine proteases. However, increasing studies report caspase-independent apoptosis, which questions the essentiality of caspases for apoptosis implementation. With low micromolar Cd2+ concentrations (calpains, has emerged. Calpain activation by Cd2+ (3-6h) seems to be regulated by ceramide levels, in order to induce apoptosis. Calpain and caspase substrates overlap but yield different fragments, which may explain their diverse downstream targets. Furthermore, calpains and caspases may interact with one another to enhance, as seen by Cd2+, or diminish apoptosis. In this review, we discuss novel roles for ceramides, calpains and caspases as part of Cd2+-induced apoptotic signalling pathways in the kidney proximal tubule and their in vivo relevance to Cd2+-induced nephrotoxicity.

  10. Osh proteins regulate COPII-mediated vesicular transport of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Kentaro; Ikeda, Atsuko; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Castillon, Guillaume A; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Hanada, Kentaro; Riezman, Howard; Muñiz, Manuel; Funato, Kouichi

    2014-01-15

    Lipids synthesized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are delivered to the Golgi by vesicular and non-vesicular pathways. ER-to-Golgi transport is crucial for maintaining the different membrane lipid composition and identities of organelles. Despite their importance, mechanisms regulating transport remain elusive. Here we report that in yeast coat protein complex II (COPII) vesicle-mediated transport of ceramide from the ER to the Golgi requires oxysterol-binding protein homologs, Osh proteins, which have been implicated in lipid homeostasis. Because Osh proteins are not required to transport proteins to the Golgi, these results indicate a specific requirement for the Osh proteins in the transport of ceramide. In addition, we provide evidence that Osh proteins play a negative role in COPII vesicle biogenesis. Together, our data suggest that ceramide transport and sphingolipid levels between the ER and Golgi are maintained by two distinct functions of Osh proteins, which negatively regulate COPII vesicle formation and positively control a later stage, presumably fusion of ceramide-enriched vesicles with Golgi compartments.

  11. Endurance and Resistance Training Affect High Fat Diet-Induced Increase of Ceramides, Inflammasome Expression, and Systemic Inflammation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Mardare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to investigate the effects of differentiated exercise regimes on high fat-induced metabolic and inflammatory pathways. Mice were fed a standard diet (ST or a high fat diet (HFD and subjected to regular endurance training (ET or resistance training (RT. After 10 weeks body weight, glucose tolerance, fatty acids (FAs, circulating ceramides, cytokines, and immunological mediators were determined. The HFD induced a significant increase in body weight and a disturbed glucose tolerance (p<0.05. An increase of plasma FA, ceramides, and inflammatory mediators in adipose tissue and serum was found (p<0.05. Both endurance and resistance training decreased body weight (p<0.05 and reduced serum ceramides (p<0.005. While RT attenuated the increase of NLRP-3 (RT expression in adipose tissue, ET was effective in reducing TNF-α and IL-18 expression. Furthermore, ET reduced levels of MIP-1γ, while RT decreased levels of IL-18, MIP-1γ, Timp-1, and CD40 in serum (p<0.001, respectively. Although both exercise regimes improved glucose tolerance (p<0.001, ET was more effective than RT. These results suggest that exercise improves HFD-induced complications possibly through a reduction of ceramides, the reduction of inflammasome activation in adipose tissues, and a systemic downregulation of inflammatory cytokines.

  12. The plant defensin RsAFP2 induces cell wall stress, septin mislocalization and accumulation of ceramides in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevissen, Karin; de Mello Tavares, Patricia; Xu, Deming; Blankenship, Jill; Vandenbosch, Davy; Idkowiak-Baldys, Jolanta; Govaert, Gilmer; Bink, Anna; Rozental, Sonia; de Groot, Piet W.J.; Davis, Talya R.; Kumamoto, Carol A.; Vargas, Gabriele; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Coenye, Tom; Mitchell, Aaron; Roemer, Terry; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Cammue, Bruno P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The antifungal plant defensin RsAFP2 isolated from radish interacts with fungal glucosylceramides and induces apoptosis in Candida albicans. To further unravel the mechanism of RsAFP2 antifungal action and tolerance mechanisms, we screened a library of 2,868 heterozygous C. albicans deletion mutants and identified 30 RsAFP2-hypersensitive mutants. The most prominent group of RsAFP2 tolerance genes was involved in cell wall integrity and hyphal growth/septin ring formation. Consistent with these genetic data, we demonstrated that RsAFP2 interacts with the cell wall of C. albicans, which also contains glucosylceramides, and activates the cell wall integrity pathway. Moreover, we found that RsAFP2 induces mislocalization of septins and blocks the yeast-to-hypha transition in C. albicans. Increased ceramide levels have previously been shown to result in apoptosis and septin mislocalization. Therefore, ceramide levels in C. albicans membranes were analyzed following RsAFP2 treatment and, as expected, increased accumulation of phytoC24-ceramides in membranes of RsAFP2-treated C. albicans cells was detected. This is the first report on the interaction of a plant defensin with glucosylceramides in the fungal cell wall, causing cell wall stress, and on the effects of a defensin on septin localization and ceramide accumulation. PMID:22384976

  13. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of skin ceramides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, J; Hrabálek, A; Vávrová, K

    2010-01-01

    Ceramides are a complex group of lipids that has gained much attention as cell signaling molecules and skin barrier constituents. In the skin, these sphingolipids form a major part of the stratum corneum intercellular lipid matrix, which is the barrier for penetration of most compounds. The development of such a protective layer was a critical step in the evolution of life on a dry land. Moreover, prominent skin diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis are associated with diminished ceramide levels and may be effectively improved by exogenous ceramides or their analogues. Since ceramides are not obtained from natural sources in pure form, they are of synthetic interest since 1950's. In this review, we describe sphingosine syntheses from 1998 until 2008, and the synthetic approaches to the unique epidermal ceramides, including the 6-hydroxysphingosine-based ones, the alpha- and omega-hydroxy forms and the omega-acyloxy species. Moreover, the structural requirements of ceramides for a competent skin barrier are discussed, including acyl chain length, trans double bond, acyl alpha-hydroxyl, stereochemistry, omega-linoleyloxy species and ceramide conformation.

  14. Quantitative Determination of Ceramide Molecular Species in Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Al Makdessi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The activation of acid sphingomyelinase by cellular stress or receptors or the de novo synthesis lead to the formation of ceramide (N-acylsphingosine, which in turn modifies the biophysical properties of cellular membrane and greatly amplifies the intensity of the initial signal. Ceramide, which acts by re-organizing a given signalosome rather than being a second messenger, has many functions in infection biology, cancer, cardiovascular syndromes, and immune regulation. Experimental studies on the infection of human cells with different bacterial agents demonstrated the activation of the acid sphingomyelinase/ceramide system. Moreover, the release of ceramide was found to be a requisite for the uptake of the pathogen. Considering the particular importance of the cellular role of ceramide, it was necessary to develop sensitive and accurate methods for its quantification. Methods: Here, we describe a method quantifying ceramide in dendritic cells and defining the different fatty acids (FA bound to sphingosine. The main steps of the method include extraction of total lipids, separation of the ceramide by thin-layer chromatography, derivatization of ceramide-fatty acids (Cer-FA, and quantitation of these acids in their methyl form by gas chromatography on polar capillary columns. The identification of FA was achieved by means of known standards and confirmed by mass spectrometry. Results: FA ranging between C10 and C24 could be detected and quantified. The concentration of the sum of Cer-FA amounted to 14.88 ± 8.98 nmol/106 cells (n=10. Oleic acid, which accounted for approximately half of Cer-FA (7.73 ± 6.52 nmol/106 cells was the predominant fatty acid followed by palmitic acid (3.47 ± 1.54 nmol/106 cells. Conclusion: This highly sensitive method allows the quantification of different molecular species of ceramides.

  15. Imipramine blocks ethanol-induced ASMase activation, ceramide generation, and PP2A activation, and ameliorates hepatic steatosis in ethanol-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Rahmini, Yasmeen; Ross, Ruth A; Zhao, Zhenwen; Xu, Yan; Crabb, David W

    2012-03-01

    Our previous data showed the inhibitory effect of ethanol on AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, which appears to be mediated, in part, through increased levels of hepatic ceramide and activation of protein phosphatase 2A (Liangpunsakul S, Sozio MS, Shin E, Zhao Z, Xu Y, Ross RA, Zeng Y, Crabb DW. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 298: G1004-G1012, 2010). The effect of ethanol on AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was reversed by imipramine, suggesting that the generation of ceramide via acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) is stimulated by ethanol. In this study, we determined the effects of imipramine on the development of hepatic steatosis, the generation of ceramide, and downstream effects of ceramide on inflammatory, insulin, and apoptotic signaling pathways, in ethanol-fed mice. The effect of ethanol and imipramine (10 μg/g body wt ip) on ceramide levels, as well as inflammatory, insulin, and apoptotic signaling pathways, was studied in C57BL/6J mice fed the Lieber-DeCarli diet. Ethanol-fed mice developed the expected steatosis, and cotreatment with imipramine for the last 2 wk of ethanol feeding resulted in improvement in hepatic steatosis. Ethanol feeding for 4 wk induced impaired glucose tolerance compared with controls, and this was modestly improved with imipramine treatment. There was a significant decrease in total ceramide concentrations in response to imipramine in ethanol-fed mice treated with and without imipramine (287 ± 11 vs. 348 ± 12 pmol/mg tissue). The magnitude and specificity of inhibition on each ceramide species differed. A significant decrease was observed for C16 (28 ± 3 vs. 33 ± 2 pmol/mg tissue) and C24 (164 ± 9 vs. 201 ± 4 pmol/mg tissue) ceramide. Ethanol feeding increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of ERK slightly and increased phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK substantially. The levels of phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK were reduced by treatment with imipramine. The activation of ASMase and generation

  16. Hyaluronan tetrasaccharides stimulate ceramide production through upregulated mRNA expression of ceramide synthesis-associated enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kage, Madoka; Tokudome, Yoshihiro

    2016-03-01

    It has been reported that hyaluronan has different physiological functions as suggested by variation in molecular weight. In addition, it has also been reported that CD44, the major hyaluronan receptor, was demonstrated to induce keratinocyte differentiation and lipid synthesis of cholesterol. We focus attention on the hyaluronan tetrasaccharides (HA4) which is the smallest unit of hyaluronan. We previously reported that HA4 induced keratinocyte differentiation and that CD44 may be involved. For the purpose of clarifying the influence of HA4 on ceramide synthesis, we evaluated both of these factors in keratinocytes in vitro and in vivo. The mRNA expression of ceramide synthesis-associated enzymes and intracellular ceramide content were evaluated after HA4 treatment in normal human epidermal keratinocytes. In addition, the ceramide increasing effect of HA4 on skin in UVA-irradiated hairless mice was assessed by water content of stratum corneum (SC) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) methods. The mRNA expression of ceramide synthesis-associated enzymes and intracellular ceramide content after HA4 treatment were increased compared with the control. Furthermore, HA4 treatment increased water content of SC and decreased TEWL. These findings suggest that HA4 affected ceramide synthesis and is involved in the improvement of UV-induced skin damage.

  17. Calcium and mitochondrial metabolism in ceramide-induced cardiomyocyte death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Valentina; Moraga, Francisco; Kuzmicic, Jovan; López-Crisosto, Camila; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Torrealba, Natalia; Criollo, Alfredo; Díaz-Elizondo, Jessica; Rothermel, Beverly A; Quest, Andrew F G; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-08-01

    Ceramides are important intermediates in the biosynthesis and degradation of sphingolipids that regulate numerous cellular processes, including cell cycle progression, cell growth, differentiation and death. In cardiomyocytes, ceramides induce apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential and promoting cytochrome-c release. Ca(2+) overload is a common feature of all types of cell death. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ceramides on cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels, mitochondrial function and cardiomyocyte death. Our data show that C2-ceramide induces apoptosis and necrosis in cultured cardiomyocytes by a mechanism involving increased Ca(2+) influx, mitochondrial network fragmentation and loss of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffer capacity. These biochemical events increase cytosolic Ca(2+) levels and trigger cardiomyocyte death via the activation of calpains.

  18. Phase behavior of stratum corneum lipid mixtures based on human ceramides: the role of natural and synthetic ceramide 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwstra, Joke A; Gooris, Gert S; Dubbelaar, Frank E R; Ponec, Maja

    2002-04-01

    In a recent study the lipid phase behavior of mixtures of human ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids has been examined. We observed in cholesterol: human ceramide mixtures a prominent formation of the 12.8 nm lamellar phase (referred to as the long periodicity phase). Addition of free fatty acids promoted the formation of a 5.6 nm lamellar phase (referred to as the short periodicity phase) and increased the subpopulation of lipids forming a fluid phase. In this study we focused on the role of human ceramide 1, as the presence of this ceramide appeared to be crucial for proper lipid phase behavior in mixtures prepared with ceramide isolated from pig stratum corneum. In order to do this, mixtures of cholesterol and free fatty acids were prepared with human ceramides, in which natural human ceramide 1 was replaced by either synthetic CER1-linoleate (CER1-lin), or CER1-oleate (CER1-ol), or CER1-stearate (CER1-ste). After substitution of natural human ceramide 1 by synthetic ceramide 1 the following observations were made. (i) In the presence of synthetic CER1-ste no long periodicity phase and no liquid phase could be detected. (ii) In the presence of HCER1-ol a liquid phase was more prominently formed than in the presence of HCER1-lin. (iii) In cholesterol:human ceramide mixtures in the presence of CER1-lin the long periodicity phase was more prominently present than in the presence of CER1-ol. (iv) In the presence of CER1-ste neither a long periodicity phase nor a liquid lateral packing could be detected. The results of these studies further indicate that for the formation of the long periodicity phase a certain (optimal) fraction of lipids has to form a liquid phase. When the fraction forming this liquid phase is either too low or too high, the formation of the short periodicity phase is increased at the expense of the formation of the long periodicity phase. Based on the results of this and previous studies we offer an explanation for the deviation in lipid

  19. Modulation of ceramide-induced cell death and superoxide production by mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory chain defects in Rattus xenocybrid mouse cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trounce, Ian A; Crouch, Peter J; Carey, Kirstyn T; McKenzie, Matthew

    2013-07-01

    Mitochondria play an integral role in cell death signaling, yet how mitochondrial defects disrupt this important function is not well understood. We have used a mouse L-cell fibroblast model harboring Rattus norvegicus mtDNA (Rn xenocybrids) to examine the effects of multiple oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cell death signaling. Blue native-PAGE analyses of Rn xenocybrids revealed defects in OXPHOS complex biogenesis with reduced steady-state levels of complexes I, III and IV. Isolated Rn xenocybrid mitochondria exhibited deficiencies in complex II+III and III activities, with CIII-stimulated ROS generation 66% higher than in control mitochondria. Rn xenocybrid cells were resistant to staurosporine-induced cell death, but exhibited a four-fold increase in sensitivity to ceramide-induced cell death that was caspase-3 independent and did not induce chromosomal DNA degradation. Furthermore, ceramide directly inhibited Rn xenocybrid complex II+III activity by 97%, although this inhibition could be completely abolished by exogenous decylubiquinone. Ceramide also induced a further increase in ROS output from Rn xenocybrid complex III by 42%. These results suggest that the interaction of ceramide with OXPHOS complex III is significantly enhanced by the presence of the xenotypic Rattus cytochrome b in complex III, likely due to the increased affinity for ceramide at the ubiquinone binding site. We propose a novel mechanism of altered mitochondrial cell death signaling due to mtDNA mutations whereby ceramide directly induces OXPHOS complex ROS generation to initiate cell death pathways.

  20. Ceramide Production Mediates Aldosterone-Induced Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell (HUVEC) Damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumei; Pan, Yu; Bian, Zhixiang; Chen, Peihua; Zhu, Shijian; Gu, Huiyi; Guo, Liping; Hu, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the underlying mechanism of aldosterone (Aldo)-induced vascular endothelial cell damages by focusing on ceramide. We confirmed that Aldo (at nmol/L) inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) survival, and induced considerable cell apoptosis. We propose that ceramide (mainly C18) production might be responsible for Aldo-mediated damages in HUVECs. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an anti-ceramide lipid, attenuated Aldo-induced ceramide production and following HUVEC damages. On the other hand, the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor PDMP or the ceramide (C6) potentiated Aldo-induced HUVEC apoptosis. Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, almost completely blocked Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production and HUVEC damages. Molecularly, ceramide synthase 1 (CerS-1) is required for C18 ceramide production by Aldo. Knockdown of CerS-1 by targeted-shRNA inhibited Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and protected HUVECs from Aldo. Reversely, CerS-1 overexpression facilitated Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and potentiated HUVEC damages. Together, these results suggest that C18 ceramide production mediates Aldo-mediated HUVEC damages. MR and CerS-1 could be the two signaling molecule regulating C18 ceramide production by Aldo.

  1. Ceramide Production Mediates Aldosterone-Induced Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell (HUVEC Damages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Zhang

    Full Text Available Here, we studied the underlying mechanism of aldosterone (Aldo-induced vascular endothelial cell damages by focusing on ceramide. We confirmed that Aldo (at nmol/L inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC survival, and induced considerable cell apoptosis. We propose that ceramide (mainly C18 production might be responsible for Aldo-mediated damages in HUVECs. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, an anti-ceramide lipid, attenuated Aldo-induced ceramide production and following HUVEC damages. On the other hand, the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS inhibitor PDMP or the ceramide (C6 potentiated Aldo-induced HUVEC apoptosis. Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR antagonist, almost completely blocked Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production and HUVEC damages. Molecularly, ceramide synthase 1 (CerS-1 is required for C18 ceramide production by Aldo. Knockdown of CerS-1 by targeted-shRNA inhibited Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and protected HUVECs from Aldo. Reversely, CerS-1 overexpression facilitated Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and potentiated HUVEC damages. Together, these results suggest that C18 ceramide production mediates Aldo-mediated HUVEC damages. MR and CerS-1 could be the two signaling molecule regulating C18 ceramide production by Aldo.

  2. Topically applied ceramide accumulates in skin glyphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qihong; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard; Mao, Guangru; Pappas, Apostolos; Mack, M Catherine; Walters, Russel M; Southall, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Ceramides (CERs), structural components of the stratum corneum (SC), impart essential barrier properties to this thin outer layer of the epidermis. Variations in CER species within this layer have been linked to several skin diseases. A recent proliferation of CER-containing topical skin-care products warrants the elucidation of CER penetration profiles in both healthy and diseased skin. In the current study, the spatial distributions of CER concentration profiles, following topical application of two species of CER, were tracked using infrared imaging. Suspensions of single-chain perdeuterated sphingosine and phytosphingosine CER in oleic acid were applied, in separate experiments, to the surface of healthy intact ex vivo human skin using Franz diffusion cells. Following either a 24- or 48-hour incubation period at 34°C, infrared images were acquired from microtomed skin sections. Both CER species accumulated in glyph regions of the skin and penetrated into the SC, to a limited extent, only in these regions. The concentration profiles observed herein were independent of the CER species and incubation time utilized in the study. As a result, a very heterogeneous, sparse, spatial distribution of CERs in the SC was revealed. In contrast, oleic acid was found to be fairly homogeneously distributed throughout the SC and viable epidermis, albeit at lower concentrations in the latter. A more uniform, lateral distribution of CERs in the SC would likely be important for barrier efficacy or enhancement. PMID:26170709

  3. Caraterización Metagenómica del Microbioma Intestinal y Heces del lechon (sus escrofa) y Evaluación Probiótica de Cepas Ácido Lácticas Identificadas Molecularmente.

    OpenAIRE

    Fabián Dominguez, Fredy

    2016-01-01

    RESUMEN La resistencia de microorganismos patógenos a los antibióticos y la posible presencia de residuos de los mismos en los productos de origen animal, en particular de cerdos, son motivos de preocupación creciente en la salud pública. Una alternativa para reducir o eliminar el uso de estos antibióticos sería la administración, en la dieta, de bacterias probióticas nativas. En esta vía, un análisis metagenómico permitió identificar 174 especies de bacterias, con 17 % relacionadas al Or...

  4. Molecular dynamics modelling of EGCG clusters on ceramide bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Jingjie; Cheng, Yuan; Li, Weifeng; Zhang, Yong-Wei [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, 138632 (Singapore)

    2015-12-31

    A novel method of atomistic modelling and characterization of both pure ceramide and mixed lipid bilayers is being developed, using only the General Amber ForceField. Lipid bilayers modelled as pure ceramides adopt hexagonal packing after equilibration, and the area per lipid and bilayer thickness are consistent with previously reported theoretical results. Mixed lipid bilayers are modelled as a combination of ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. This model is shown to be stable after equilibration. Green tea extract, also known as epigallocatechin-3-gallate, is introduced as a spherical cluster on the surface of the mixed lipid bilayer. It is demonstrated that the cluster is able to bind to the bilayers as a cluster without diffusing into the surrounding water.

  5. Intrinsic, pro-apoptotic effects of IGFBP-3 on breast cancer cells are reversible: Involvement of PKA, Rho and ceramide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Perks

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We established previously that IGFBP-3 could exert positive or negative effects on cell function depending upon the extracellular matrix composition and by interacting with integrin signalling. To elicit its pro-apoptotic effects IGFBP-3 bound to caveolin-1 and the beta 1 integrin receptor and increased their association culminating in MAPK activation. Disruption of these complexes or blocking the beta 1 integrin receptor reversed these intrinsic actions of IGFBP-3. In this study we have examined the signalling pathway between integrin receptor binding and MAPK activation that mediates the intrinsic, pro-apoptotic actions of IGFBP-3. We found on inhibiting protein kinase A(PKA, Rho associated kinase (ROCK and ceramide, the accentuating effects of IGFBP-3 on apoptotic triggers were reversed, such that IGFBP-3 then conferred cell survival. We established that IGFBP-3 activated Rho, the upstream regulator of ROCK and that beta1 integrin and PKA were upstream of Rho activation, whereas the involvement of ceramide was downstream. The beta 1 integrin, PKA, Rho and ceramide were all upstream of MAPK activation. These data highlight key components involved in the pro-apoptotic effects of IGFBP-3 and that inhibiting them leads to a reversal in the action of IGFBP-3.

  6. Undulating tubular liposomes through incorporation of a synthetic skin ceramide into phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Tan, Grace; Zhou, Jia; He, Jibao; Lawson, Louise B; McPherson, Gary L; John, Vijay T

    2009-09-15

    Nonspherical liposomes were prepared by doping L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (PC) with ceramide VI (a skin lipid). Cryo-transmission electron microscopy shows the liposome shape changing from spherical to an undulating tubular morphology, when the amount of ceramide VI is increased. The formation of tubular liposomes is energetically favorable and is attributed to the association of ceramide VI with PC creating regions of lower curvature. Since ceramides are the major component of skin lipids in the stratum corneum, tubular liposomes containing ceramide may potentially serve as self-enhanced nanocarriers for transdermal delivery.

  7. Topically applied ceramide accumulates in skin glyphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Q

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Qihong Zhang,1 Carol R Flach,1 Richard Mendelsohn,1 Guangru Mao,2 Apostolos Pappas,2 M Catherine Mack,2 Russel M Walters,2 Michael D Southall2 1Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Newark, 2Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies, Inc., Skillman, NJ, USAAbstract: Ceramides (CERs, structural components of the stratum corneum (SC, impart essential barrier properties to this thin outer layer of the epidermis. Variations in CER species within this layer have been linked to several skin diseases. A recent proliferation of CER-containing topical skin-care products warrants the elucidation of CER penetration profiles in both healthy and diseased skin. In the current study, the spatial distributions of CER concentration profiles, following topical application of two species of CER, were tracked using infrared imaging. Suspensions of single-chain perdeuterated sphingosine and phytosphingosine CER in oleic acid were applied, in separate experiments, to the surface of healthy intact ex vivo human skin using Franz diffusion cells. Following either a 24- or 48-hour incubation period at 34°C, infrared images were acquired from microtomed skin sections. Both CER species accumulated in glyph regions of the skin and penetrated into the SC, to a limited extent, only in these regions. The concentration profiles observed herein were independent of the CER species and incubation time utilized in the study. As a result, a very heterogeneous, sparse, spatial distribution of CERs in the SC was revealed. In contrast, oleic acid was found to be fairly homogeneously distributed throughout the SC and viable epidermis, albeit at lower concentrations in the latter. A more uniform, lateral distribution of CERs in the SC would likely be important for barrier efficacy or enhancement.Keywords: stratum corneum, infrared imaging, topical delivery, oleic acid

  8. Ceramide Synthase 5 Is Essential to Maintain C16:0-Ceramide Pools and Contributes to the Development of Diet-induced Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosejacob, Dominic; Jäger, Philipp S; Vom Dorp, Katharina; Frejno, Martin; Carstensen, Anne C; Köhnke, Monika; Degen, Joachim; Dörmann, Peter; Hoch, Michael

    2016-03-25

    Ceramides are bioactive sphingolipids, which are composed of sphingoid bases carrying acyl chains of various lengths. Ceramides are synthesized by a family of six ceramide synthases (CerS) in mammals, which produce ceramides with differentN-linked acyl chains. Increased ceramide levels are known to contribute to the development of obesity and insulin resistance. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the ceramide acylation pattern is of particular importance for an organism to maintain energy homeostasis. However, which of theCerSfamily members are involved in this process is not yet completely known. Using newly developedCerS5knock-out mice, we show here thatCerS5is essential to maintain cellular C16:0sphingolipid pools in lung, spleen, muscle, liver, and white adipose tissue. Glycerophospholipid levels inCerS5-deficient mice were not altered. We found a strong impact of CerS5-dependent ceramide synthesis in white adipose tissue after high fat diet feeding. In skeletal muscle, liver, and spleen, C16:0-ceramide levels were altered independent of feeding conditions. The loss ofCerS5is associated with reduced weight gain and improved systemic health, including maintenance of glucose homeostasis and reduced white adipose tissue inflammation after high fat diet challenge. Our findings indicate that reduction of endogenous C16:0-ceramide by genetic inhibition ofCerS5is sufficient to ameliorate obesity and its comorbidities.

  9. Regulation of Ceramide Synthase-Mediated Crypt Epithelium Apoptosis by DNA Damage Repair Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotolo, Jimmy A.; Mesicek, Judith; Maj, Jerzy; Truman, Jean-Philip; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Kolesnick, Richard; Fuks, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    Acute endothelial cell apoptosis and microvascular compromise couple GI tract irradiation to reproductive death of intestinal crypt stem cell clonogens (SCCs) following high-dose radiation. Genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of endothelial apoptosis prevents intestinal damage, but as the radiation dose is escalated, SCCs become directly susceptible to an alternate cell death mechanism, mediated via ceramide synthase (CS)-stimulated de novo synthesis of the pro-apoptotic sphingolipid ceramide, and p53-independent apoptosis of crypt SCCs. We previously reported that ATM deficiency resets the primary radiation lethal pathway, allowing CS-mediated apoptosis at the low-dose range of radiation. The mechanism for this event, termed target reordering, remains unknown. Here we show that inactivation of DNA damage repair pathways signal CS-mediated apoptosis in crypt SCCs, presumably via persistent unrepaired DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Genetic loss-of-function of sensors and transducers of DNA DSB repair confers the CS-mediated lethal pathway in intestines of sv129/B6Mre11ATLD1/ATLD1 and C57BL/6Prkdc/SCID (SCID) mice exposed to low-dose radiation. In contrast, CS-mediated SCC lethality was mitigated in irradiated gain-of-function Rad50S/S mice, and epistasis studies order Rad50 upstream of Mre11. These studies suggest unrepaired DNA DSBs as causative in target re-ordering in intestinal SCCs. As such, we provide an in vivo model of DNA damage repair that is standardized, can be exploited to understand allele-specific regulation in intact tissue, and is pharmacologically tractable. PMID:20086180

  10. Kinetic study of sphingomyelin hydrolysis for ceramide production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Long; Hellgren, Lars; Xu, Xuebing

    2008-01-01

    in cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries such as in hair and skin care products. The enzymatic hydrolysis of sphingomyelin has been proved to be a feasible method to produce ceramide. The kinetic performance of sphingomyelin hydrolysis in the optimal two-phase (water:organic solvent) reaction system...

  11. Effect of Laser and LED on Enzymatic Production of Ceramide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hongyu, Zhang; Zhang, Long; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    An enzyme (Phospholipase C Type I from Clostridium perfringens) was exposed to 0-810J/cm2 of energy using laser light at wavelengths 808 nm, 532nm, 1064 nm, and 1342 nm and two LED light sources at wavelengths 810 nm and 640 nm. Enzyme responses were evaluated by measuring ceramide concentration ...

  12. A lipidomic platform establishment for structural identification of skin ceramides with non-hydroxyacyl chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-Hoon; Shon, Jong Cheol; Lee, Kyohoon; Kim, Sunki; Park, Chang Seo; Choi, Eung Ho; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Hye Suk; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon

    2014-03-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) is the outermost layer of skin that functions as a barrier and protects against environmental influences and transepidermal water loss. Its unique morphology consists of keratin-enriched corneocytes embedded in a distinctive mixture of lipids containing mainly ceramides, free fatty acids, and cholesterol. Ceramides are sphingolipids consisting of sphingoid bases, which are linked to fatty acids by an amide bond. Typical sphingoid bases in the skin are composed of dihydrosphingosine (dS), sphingosine (S), phytosphingosine (P), and 6-hydroxysphingosine (H), and the fatty acid acyl chains are composed of non-hydroxy fatty acid (N), α-hydroxy fatty acid (A), ω-hydroxy fatty acid (O), and esterified ω-hydroxy fatty acid (E). The 16 ceramide classes include several combinations of sphingoid bases and fatty acid acyl chains. Among them, N-type ceramides are the most abundant in the SC. Mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analysis of N-type ceramides using chip-based direct infusion nanoelectrospray-ion trap mass spectrometry generated the characteristic fragmentation pattern of both acyl and sphingoid units, which could be applied to structural identification of ceramides. Based on the MS/MS fragmentation patterns of N-type ceramides, comprehensive fragmentation schemes were proposed. In addition, mass fragmentation patterns, which are specific to the sphingoid backbone of N-type ceramides, were found in higher m/z regions of tandem mass spectra. These characteristic and general fragmentation patterns were used to identify N-type ceramides in human SC. Based on established MS/MS fragmentation patterns of N-type ceramides, 52 ceramides (including different classes of NS, NdS, NP, and NH) were identified in human SC. The MS/MS fragmentation patterns of N-type ceramides were characterized by interpreting their product ion scan mass spectra. This information may be used to identify N-type ceramides in the SC of human, rat, and mouse skin.

  13. Differential protection by wildtype vs. organelle-specific Bcl-2 suggests a combined requirement of both the ER and mitochondria in ceramide-mediated caspase-independent programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belka Claus

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Programmed cell death (PCD is essential for development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms and can occur by caspase-dependent apoptosis or alternatively, by caspase-independent PCD (ciPCD. Bcl-2, a central regulator of apoptosis, localizes to both mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Whereas a function of mitochondrial and ER-specific Bcl-2 in apoptosis has been established in multiple studies, corresponding data for ciPCD do not exist. Methods We utilized Bcl-2 constructs specifically localizing to mitochondria (Bcl-2 ActA, the ER (Bcl-2 cb5, both (Bcl-2 WT or the cytosol/nucleus (Bcl-2 ΔTM and determined their protective effect on ceramide-mediated ciPCD in transiently and stably transfected Jurkat cells. Expression of the constructs was verified by immunoblots. Ceramide-mediated ciPCD was induced by treatment with human recombinant tumor necrosis factor and determined by flow cytometric measurement of propidium iodide uptake as well as by optical analysis of cell morphology. Results Only wildtype Bcl-2 had the ability to efficiently protect from ceramide-mediated ciPCD, whereas expression of Bcl-2 solely at mitochondria, the ER, or the cytosol/nucleus did not prevent ceramide-mediated ciPCD. Conclusion Our data suggest a combined requirement for both mitochondria and the ER in the induction and the signaling pathways of ciPCD mediated by ceramide.

  14. Undulating tubular liposomes through incorporation of a synthetic skin ceramide into phospholipid bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Peng; Tan, Grace; Zhou, Jia; He, Jibao; Lawson, Louise B.; McPherson, Gary L.; John, Vijay T.

    2009-01-01

    Non-spherical liposomes were prepared by doping L-α-phosphatidylcholine (PC) with ceramide VI (a skin lipid). Cryo-transmission electron microscopy shows the liposome shape changing from spherical to an undulating tubular morphology, when the amount ofceramide VI is increased. The formation of tubular liposomes is energetically favorableand is attributed to the association of ceramide VI with PC creating regions of lower curvature. Since ceramides are the major component of skin lipids inthe ...

  15. Treating atopic dermatitis: safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of a ceramide hyaluronic acid emollient foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacha O

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Omar Pacha, Adelaide A HebertDepartment of Dermatology, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Advances in current understanding of the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis have led to improved targeting of the structural deficiencies in atopic skin. Ceramide deficiency appears to be one of the major alterations in atopic dermatitis and the replenishment of this epidermal component through topically applied ceramide based emollients appears to be safe, well tolerated, and effective. Recently a ceramide hyaluronic acid foam has become commercially available and increasing evidence supports its safety and efficacy in patients who suffer from atopic dermatitis.Keywords: atopic dermatitis, ceramide, Hylatopic, eczema, non-steroidal, dermatology

  16. Two new ceramides from the stems of Piper betle L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Two new ceramides,(2S,3S,4R)-2-N-[(2'R)-2'-hydroxypentacosanoylamino]-nonacosane-1,3,4-triol(1) and(2S,3S,4R,8E)-2- N-[(2'R)-2'-hydroxytetracosanoylamino]-8-eicosylene-1,3,4-triol(2) have been isolated from the stems of Piper betle L.collected from Baoshan city of Yunnan Province in China.Their structures were determined by spectroscopic and chemical methods.

  17. New ceramides from the flower of Albizia julibrissin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Kang; Chang Hong Huo; Zhe Li; Zuo Ping Li

    2007-01-01

    A new ceramide and its glycoside were isolated from the flower of Albizia julibrissin. Their structures were established as(2S,3S,4R,8E)-2-[(2'R)-hydroxyhexadecanoylamino]-8-tetra-cosene-1,3,4-triol (Ⅰ) and 1-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(2S,3S,4R,8E)-2-[(2'R)-hydroxy-hexade-canoylamino]-8-tetracosene-1,3,4-triol (H) on the basis of chemical and spectroscopic studies.

  18. Insulin treatment increases myocardial ceramide accumulation and disrupts cardiometabolic function

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background States of hyperinsulinemia, particularly insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus, are becoming remarkably common, with roughly half a billion people likely to suffer from the disorder within the next 15 years. Along with this rise has been an associated increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Considering type 2 diabetics treated with insulin are more likely to suffer from heart complications, we sought to determine the specific effect of insulin on ceramide-dependent ca...

  19. Rationalization of reduced penetration of drugs through ceramide gel phase membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloncýová, Markéta; DeVane, Russell H; Murch, Bruce P; Berka, Karel; Otyepka, Michal

    2014-11-25

    Since computing resources have advanced enough to allow routine molecular simulation studies of drug molecules interacting with biologically relevant membranes, a considerable amount of work has been carried out with fluid phospholipid systems. However, there is very little work in the literature on drug interactions with gel phase lipids. This poses a significant limitation for understanding permeation through the stratum corneum where the primary pathway is expected to be through a highly ordered lipid matrix. To address this point, we analyzed the interactions of p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) and its ethyl (benzocaine) and butyl (butamben) esters with two membrane bilayers, which differ in their fluidity at ambient conditions. We considered a dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayer in a fluid state and a ceramide 2 (CER2, ceramide NS) bilayer in a gel phase. We carried out unbiased (100 ns long) and biased z-constraint molecular dynamics simulations and calculated the free energy profiles of all molecules along the bilayer normal. The free energy profiles converged significantly slower for the gel phase. While the compounds have comparable affinities for both membranes, they exhibit penetration barriers almost 3 times higher in the gel phase CER2 bilayer. This elevated barrier and slower diffusion in the CER2 bilayer, which are caused by the high ordering of CER2 lipid chains, explain the low permeability of the gel phase membranes. We also compared the free energy profiles from MD simulations with those obtained from COSMOmic. This method provided the same trends in behavior for the guest molecules in both bilayers; however, the penetration barriers calculated by COSMOmic did not differ between membranes. In conclusion, we show how membrane fluid properties affect the interaction of drug-like molecules with membranes.

  20. Simulation study of the structure and phase behavior of ceramide bilayers and the role of lipid head group chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Shan; Moore, Timothy C.; Iacovella, Christopher R.; Strickland, L. Anderson; McCabe, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Ceramides are known to be a key component of the stratum corneum, the outermost protective layer of the skin that controls barrier function. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are used to examine the behavior of ceramide bilayers, focusing on non-hydroxy sphingosine (NS) and non-hydroxy phytosphingosine (NP) ceramides. Here, we propose a modified version of the CHARMM force field for ceramide simulation, which is directly compared to the more commonly used GROMOS-based force field o...

  1. Sphingolipid and Ceramide Homeostasis: Potential Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A. Young

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells where they have been attributed a plethora of functions from the formation of structural domains to polarized cellular trafficking and signal transduction. Recent research has identified and characterised many of the key enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism and this has led to a heightened interest in the possibility of targeting these processes for therapies against cancers, Alzheimer's disease, and numerous important human pathogens. In this paper we outline the major pathways in eukaryotic sphingolipid metabolism and discuss these in relation to disease and therapy for both chronic and infectious conditions.

  2. Structural identification of skin ceramides containing ω-hydroxy acyl chains using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhexue; Shon, Jong Cheol; Kim, Jong Yei; Cho, Yunhi; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon

    2016-10-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) acts as a barrier that protects organisms against the environment and from transepidermal water loss. It consists of corneocytes embedded in a matrix of lipid metabolites (ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids). Of these lipids, ceramides are sphingolipids consisting of sphingoid bases, linked to fatty acyl chains. Typical fatty acid acyl chains are composed of α-hydroxy fatty acids (A), esterified ω-hydroxy fatty acids (EO), non-hydroxy fatty acids (N), and ω-hydroxy fatty acids (O). Of these, O-type ceramides are ester-linked via their ω-hydroxyl group to proteins in the cornified envelope and can be released and extracted following mild alkaline hydrolysis. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis of O-type ceramides using chip-based direct infusion nanoelectrospray-ion trap mass spectrometry generated the characteristic fragmentation pattern of both acyl and sphingoid units, suggesting that this method could be applied to the structural identification of O-type ceramides. Based on the MS/MS fragmentation patterns of O-type ceramides, comprehensive fragmentation schemes are proposed. In addition, we have also developed a method for identifying and profiling O-type ceramides in the mouse and guinea pig SC. This information may be used to identify O-type ceramides in the SC of animal skin.

  3. Shear and compression rheology of Langmuir monolayers of natural ceramides: solid character and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Montero, Iván; Catapano, Elisa R; Espinosa, Gabriel; Arriaga, Laura R; Langevin, Dominique; Monroy, Francisco

    2013-06-04

    The present work addresses the fundamental question of membrane elasticity of ceramide layers with a special focus on the plastic regime. The compression and shear viscoelasticity of egg-ceramide Langmuir monolayers were investigated using oscillatory surface rheology in the linear regime and beyond. High compression and shear moduli were measured at room temperature-a clear signature for a solid behavior. At deformations larger than one per mill, egg-ceramide monolayers display plastic features characterized by a decrease of the storage modulus followed by a viscous regime typical of fluid lipids. This behavior is accompanied by a marked decrease of the loss modulus with increasing stress above a yield point. The results permit to univocally classify ceramide monolayers as 2D solids able to undergo plastic deformations, at the difference of typical fluid lipid monolayers. These unusual features are likely to have consequences in the mechanical behavior of ceramide-rich emplacements in biological membranes.

  4. Producing human ceramide-NS by metabolic engineering using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Suguru; Shimamoto, Toshi; Nagano, Hideaki; Tsuruno, Masahiro; Okuhara, Hiroaki; Hatanaka, Haruyo; Tojo, Hiromasa; Kodama, Yukiko; Funato, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Ceramide is one of the most important intercellular components responsible for the barrier and moisture retention functions of the skin. Because of the risks involved with using products of animal origin and the low productivity of plants, the availability of ceramides is currently limited. In this study, we successfully developed a system that produces sphingosine-containing human ceramide-NS in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by eliminating the genes for yeast sphingolipid hydroxylases (encoded by SUR2 and SCS7) and introducing the gene for a human sphingolipid desaturase (encoded by DES1). The inactivation of the ceramidase gene YDC1, overexpression of the inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C gene ISC1, and endoplasmic reticulum localization of the DES1 gene product resulted in enhanced production of ceramide-NS. The engineered yeast strains can serve as hosts not only for providing a sustainable source of ceramide-NS but also for developing further systems to produce sphingosine-containing sphingolipids.

  5. The impact of ultraviolet therapy on stratum corneum ceramides and barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The ceramide profile as well as the barrier function is known to be deteriorated in atopic eczema and psoriasis, and ultraviolet (UV) light is known to improve the barrier function. The impact of UV light on ceramides, however, is not clarified.The aim of this study was to examine the effect of U...... therapy in dermatological patients on ceramides and skin barrier function.We found that UV light treatment does not change the ratio of important stratum corneum lipids, but we confirm earlier findings of decreased susceptibility to irritants after UV- therapy.......The ceramide profile as well as the barrier function is known to be deteriorated in atopic eczema and psoriasis, and ultraviolet (UV) light is known to improve the barrier function. The impact of UV light on ceramides, however, is not clarified.The aim of this study was to examine the effect of UV...

  6. The impact of ultraviolet therapy on stratum corneum ceramides and barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The ceramide profile as well as the barrier function is known to be deteriorated in atopic eczema and psoriasis, and ultraviolet (UV) light is known to improve the barrier function. The impact of UV light on ceramides, however, is not clarified. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of ...... therapy in dermatological patients on ceramides and skin barrier function. We found that UV light treatment does not change the ratio of important stratum corneum lipids, but we confirm earlier findings of decreased susceptibility to irritants after UV- therapy.......The ceramide profile as well as the barrier function is known to be deteriorated in atopic eczema and psoriasis, and ultraviolet (UV) light is known to improve the barrier function. The impact of UV light on ceramides, however, is not clarified. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of UV...

  7. Functional loss of two ceramide synthases elicits autophagy-dependent lifespan extension in C. elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Mai-Britt; Kruse, Rikke; Harvald, Eva Bang;

    2013-01-01

    Ceramide and its metabolites constitute a diverse group of lipids, which play important roles as structural entities of biological membranes as well as regulators of cellular growth, differentiation, and development. The C. elegans genome comprises three ceramide synthase genes; hyl-1, hyl-2...... that hyl-1;lagr-1 animals display reduced feeding, increased resistance to heat, and reduced reproduction. Collectively, our data suggest that specific sphingolipids produced by different ceramide synthases have opposing roles in determination of C. elegans lifespan. We propose that loss of HYL-1 and LAGR......, and lagr-1. HYL-1 function is required for synthesis of ceramides and sphingolipids containing very long acyl-chains (≥C24), while HYL-2 is required for synthesis of ceramides and sphingolipids containing shorter acyl-chains (≤C22). Here we show that functional loss of HYL-2 decreases lifespan, while loss...

  8. Phospholipase C-catalyzed sphingomyelin hydrolysis in a membrane reactor for ceramide production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Long; Liang, Shanshan; Hellgren, Lars

    2008-01-01

    A membrane reactor for the production of ceramide through sphingomyelin hydrolysis with phospholipase C from Clostridium perfringens was studied for the first time. Ceramide has raised a large interest as an active component in both pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry. The enzymatic hydrolysis o...... demonstrated the improved enzyme reusability, the fast immobilization process, the straightforward up-scaling and the combination of the hydrolysis with the product separation in the membrane reactor developed.......A membrane reactor for the production of ceramide through sphingomyelin hydrolysis with phospholipase C from Clostridium perfringens was studied for the first time. Ceramide has raised a large interest as an active component in both pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry. The enzymatic hydrolysis...... of sphingomyelin has been proven to be a feasible method to produce ceramide. In the membrane reactor constructed, the aqueous phase and the organic phase were separated by a membrane containing the immobilized enzyme, while the organic phasewas continuously circulated. Among the 10 selected membranes, the enzyme...

  9. Myristic acid potentiates palmitic acid-induced lipotoxicity and steatohepatitis associated with lipodystrophy by sustaning de novo ceramide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Laura; Torres, Sandra; Baulies, Anna; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Elena, Montserrat; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Caballeria, Joan; Fernandez-Checa, Jose C; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2015-12-08

    Palmitic acid (PA) induces hepatocyte apoptosis and fuels de novo ceramide synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Myristic acid (MA), a free fatty acid highly abundant in copra/palmist oils, is a predictor of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and stimulates ceramide synthesis. Here we investigated the synergism between MA and PA in ceramide synthesis, ER stress, lipotoxicity and NASH. Unlike PA, MA is not lipotoxic but potentiated PA-mediated lipoapoptosis, ER stress, caspase-3 activation and cytochrome c release in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). Moreover, MA kinetically sustained PA-induced total ceramide content by stimulating dehydroceramide desaturase and switched the ceramide profile from decreased to increased ceramide 14:0/ceramide16:0, without changing medium and long-chain ceramide species. PMH were more sensitive to equimolar ceramide14:0/ceramide16:0 exposure, which mimics the outcome of PA plus MA treatment on ceramide homeostasis, than to either ceramide alone. Treatment with myriocin to inhibit ceramide synthesis and tauroursodeoxycholic acid to prevent ER stress ameliorated PA plus MA induced apoptosis, similar to the protection afforded by the antioxidant BHA, the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-Fmk and JNK inhibition. Moreover, ruthenium red protected PMH against PA and MA-induced cell death. Recapitulating in vitro findings, mice fed a diet enriched in PA plus MA exhibited lipodystrophy, hepatosplenomegaly, increased liver ceramide content and cholesterol levels, ER stress, liver damage, inflammation and fibrosis compared to mice fed diets enriched in PA or MA alone. The deleterious effects of PA plus MA-enriched diet were largely prevented by in vivo myriocin treatment. These findings indicate a causal link between ceramide synthesis and ER stress in lipotoxicity, and imply that the consumption of diets enriched in MA and PA can cause NASH associated with lipodystrophy.

  10. Disruption of sphingolipid metabolism augments ceramide-induced autophagy in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melland-Smith, Megan; Ermini, Leonardo; Chauvin, Sarah; Craig-Barnes, Hayley; Tagliaferro, Andrea; Todros, Tullia; Post, Martin; Caniggia, Isabella

    2015-04-01

    Bioactive sphingolipids including ceramides are involved in a variety of pathophysiological processes by regulating cell death and survival. The objective of the current study was to examine ceramide metabolism in preeclampsia, a serious disorder of pregnancy characterized by oxidative stress, and increased trophoblast cell death and autophagy. Maternal circulating and placental ceramide levels quantified by tandem mass spectrometry were elevated in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. Placental ceramides were elevated due to greater de novo synthesis via high serine palmitoyltransferase activity and reduced lysosomal breakdown via diminished ASAH1 expression caused by TGFB3-induced E2F4 transcriptional repression. SMPD1 activity was reduced; hence, sphingomyelin degradation by SMPD1 did not contribute to elevated ceramide levels in preeclampsia. Oxidative stress triggered similar changes in ceramide levels and acid hydrolase expression in villous explants and trophoblast cells. MALDI-imaging mass spectrometry localized the ceramide increases to the trophophoblast layers and syncytial knots of placentae from pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. ASAH1 inhibition or ceramide treatment induced autophagy in human trophoblast cells via a shift of the BOK-MCL1 rheostat toward prodeath BOK. Pharmacological inhibition of ASAH1 activity in pregnant mice resulted in increased placental ceramide content, abnormal placentation, reduced fetal growth, and increased autophagy via a similar shift in the BOK-MCL1 system. Our results reveal that oxidative stress-induced reduction of lysosomal hydrolase activities in combination with elevated de novo synthesis leads to ceramide overload, resulting in increased trophoblast cell autophagy, and typifies preeclampsia as a sphingolipid storage disorder.

  11. Separation and Detection of Ceramides by HPLC Followed by Evaporative Light-Scattering Detection and Thin Layer Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琳; 周全; 傅学奇; 陈国强

    2002-01-01

    Ceramides are important signaling molecules involved in a variety of cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Currently, different methods are used for ceramide analysis, some of which are insensitive or cumbersome. This paper described methods utilizing thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) followed by evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) to detect ceramide directly in cell extracts without derivatization, which was proved to be efficient and reproducible. Five kinds of ceramides were used as standards. Both TLC and normal-phase HPLC/ELSD results indicate that yeast contains several kinds of ceramides.

  12. Multivesicular Emulsion Ceramide-containing Moisturizers: An Evaluation of Their Role in the Management of Common Skin Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, James Q.

    2016-01-01

    Proper stratum corneum function plays a pivotal role in maintenance of skin health, and improper function leads to skin disease. The stratum corneum is comprised of corneocytes surrounded by intercelluar lipids including ceramides, free fatty acids, and cholesterol. Ceramide predominant moisturizers have become a mainstay of treatment of skin disease. New technologies for delivery of ceramides include multivesicular emulsions, which deposit ceramides in a timerelease manner for a continuous rather than burst effect. Here, the authors review the available data on the use of multivesicular emulsion ceramide moisturizers in various skin diseases. PMID:28210396

  13. Reduced ceramide synthase 2 activity causes progressive myoclonic epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Mai-Britt; Olsen, Anne S B; Neess, Ditte;

    2014-01-01

    with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (PME). Mass spectrometry and fluorescence microscopy were used to examine the effects of reduced CERS2 activity on cellular lipid composition and plasma membrane functions. RESULTS: We identify a novel 27 kb heterozygous deletion including the CERS2 gene in a proband diagnosed...... with PME. Compared to parental controls, levels of CERS2 mRNA, protein, and activity were reduced by ˜50% in fibroblasts isolated from this proband, resulting in significantly reduced levels of ceramides and sphingomyelins containing the very long-chain fatty acids C24:0 and C26:0. The change in SL...... to development of PME....

  14. Ceramide synthesis from free fatty acids in rat brain: function of NADPH and substrate specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, I.

    1983-06-01

    At the subcellular level, the synthesis of ceramide from free lignoceric acid and sphingosine in brain required reconstituted enzyme system (particulate fraction, heat-stable and heat-labile factors) and pyridine nucleotide (NADPH). The mitochondrial electron transfer inhibitors (KCN and antimycin A), energy uncouplers (oligomycin and 2,4-dinitrophenol), and carboxyatractyloside, which prevents the transport of ATP and ADP through the mitochondrial wall, inhibit the synthesis of ceramide in the presence of NADPH but have very little effect in the presence of ATP. Similar to the synthesis of ceramide, the synthesis of ATP from NADPH and NADH by the particulate fraction also required cytoplasmic factors (heat-stable and heat-labile factors). Moreover, ATP, but not its analog (AMP-CH2-P-O-P), can replace NADPH, thus suggesting that the function of the pyridine nucleotide is to provide ATP for the synthesis of ceramide. The cytoplasmic factors were not required for the synthesis of ceramide in the presence of ATP. The maximum velocity for synthesis of ceramide from free fatty acids of different chain lengths (C16-C26) was bimodal, with maxima around stearic acid (C18) and behenic acid (C22). The relative rate of synthesis of ceramide parallels the relative distribution of these fatty acids in brain cerebrosides and sulfatides.

  15. Loss of ceramide synthase 3 causes lethal skin barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennemann, Richard; Rabionet, Mariona; Gorgas, Karin; Epstein, Sharon; Dalpke, Alexander; Rothermel, Ulrike; Bayerle, Aline; van der Hoeven, Franciscus; Imgrund, Silke; Kirsch, Joachim; Nickel, Walter; Willecke, Klaus; Riezman, Howard; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Sandhoff, Roger

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum as the outermost epidermal layer protects against exsiccation and infection. Both the underlying cornified envelope (CE) and the intercellular lipid matrix contribute essentially to these two main protective barriers. Epidermis-unique ceramides with ultra-long-chain acyl moities (ULC-Cers) are key components of extracellular lipid lamellae (ELL) and are bound to CE proteins, thereby contributing to the cornified lipid envelope (CLE). Here, we identified human and mouse ceramide synthase 3 (CerS3), among CerS1-6, to be exclusively required for the ULC-Cer synthesis in vitro and of mouse CerS3 in vivo. Deficiency of CerS3 in mice results in complete loss of ULC-Cers (≥C26), lack of continuous ELL and a non-functional CLE. Consequently, newborn mutant mice die shortly after birth from transepidermal water loss. Mutant skin is prone to Candida albicans infection highlighting ULC-Cers to be pivotal for both barrier functions. Persistent periderm, hyperkeratosis and deficient cornification are hallmarks of mutant skin demonstrating loss of Cers to trigger a keratinocyte maturation arrest at an embryonic pre-barrier stage.

  16. Immobilization of phospholipase C for the production of ceramide from sphingomyelin hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Long; Hellgren, Lars; Xu, Xuebing

    2007-01-01

    The immobilization of Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C was studied for the first time and the catalytic properties of the immobilized enzyme were investigated for the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide. Ceramide is of great commercial potentials in cosmetic and pharmaceutical...... industries such as in hair and skin care products, due to its major role in maintaining the water-retaining properties of the epidermis. The feasibility of enzymatic production of ceramide through hydrolysis of sphingomyelin has previously been proven. In order to improve the reusability of the enzyme...

  17. Ceramide metabolism analysis in a model of binge drinking reveals both neuroprotective and toxic effects of ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Mihyun; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Patel, Neha; Haughey, Norman J.

    2014-01-01

    Binge drinking is a common form of alcohol abuse that involves repeated rounds of intoxication followed by withdrawal. The episodic effects of binge drinking and withdrawal on brain resident cells are thought to contribute to neural remodeling and neurological damage. However, the molecular mechanisms for these neurodegenerative effects are not understood. Ethanol (EtOH) regulates the metabolism of ceramide, a highly bioactive lipid that is enriched in brain. We used a mouse model of binge drinking to determine the effects of EtOH intoxication and withdrawal on brain ceramide metabolism. Intoxication and acute alcohol withdrawal were each associated with distinct changes in ceramide regulatory genes and metabolic products. EtOH intoxication was accompanied by decreased concentrations of multiple ceramides, coincident with reductions in the expression of enzymes involved in the production of ceramides, and increased expression of ceramide degrading enzymes. EtOH withdrawal was associated with specific increases in ceramide C16:0, C18:0 and C20:0 and increased expression of enzymes involved with ceramide production. These data suggest that EtOH intoxication may evoke a ceramide phenotype that is neuroprotective, while EtOH withdrawal results in a metabolic shift that increases the production of potentially toxic ceramide species. PMID:25060779

  18. Dynamics of the Heat Stress Response of Ceramides with Different Fatty-Acyl Chain Lengths in Baker's Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Wei Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article demonstrates that computational modeling has the capacity to convert metabolic snapshots, taken sequentially over time, into a description of cellular, dynamic strategies. The specific application is a detailed analysis of a set of actions with which Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to heat stress. Using time dependent metabolic concentration data, we use a combination of mathematical modeling, reverse engineering, and optimization to infer dynamic changes in enzyme activities within the sphingolipid pathway. The details of the sphingolipid responses to heat stress are important, because they guide some of the longer-term alterations in gene expression, with which the cells adapt to the increased temperature. The analysis indicates that all enzyme activities in the system are affected and that the shapes of the time trends in activities depend on the fatty-acyl CoA chain lengths of the different ceramide species in the system.

  19. Disposition of ceramide in model lipid membranes determined by neutron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, D; Gooris, G S; Barlow, D J; Lawrence, M J; van Mechelen, J B; Demé, B; Bouwstra, J A

    2011-03-16

    The lipid matrix present in the uppermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, plays a crucial role in the skin barrier function. The lipids are organized into two lamellar phases. To gain more insight into the molecular organization of one of these lamellar phases, we performed neutron diffraction studies. In the diffraction pattern, five diffraction orders were observed attributed to a lamellar phase with a repeat distance of 5.4 nm. Using contrast variation, the scattering length density profile could be calculated showing a typical bilayer arrangement. To obtain information on the arrangement of ceramides in the unit cell, a mixture that included a partly deuterated ceramide was also examined. The scattering length density profile of the 5.4-nm phase containing this deuterated ceramide demonstrated a symmetric arrangement of the ceramides with interdigitating acyl chains in the center of the unit cell.

  20. Smart drugs for smarter stem cells: making SENSe (sphingolipid-enhanced neural stem cells) of ceramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieberich, Erhard

    2008-01-01

    Ceramide and its derivative sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are important signaling sphingolipids for neural stem cell apoptosis and differentiation. Most recently, our group has shown that novel ceramide analogs can be used to eliminate teratoma (stem cell tumor)-forming cells from a neural stem cell graft. In new studies, we found that S1P promotes survival of specific neural precursor cells that undergo differentiation to cells expressing oligodendroglial markers. Our studies suggest that a combination of novel ceramide and S1P analogs eliminates tumor-forming stem cells and at the same time, triggers oligodendroglial differentiation. This review discusses recent studies on the function of ceramide and S1P for the regulation of apoptosis, differentiation, and polarity in stem cells. We will also discuss results from ongoing studies in our laboratory on the use of sphingolipids in stem cell therapy.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Long-Chain Tartaric Acid Diamides as Novel Ceramide-Like Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisztina Takács-Novák

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramides play a crucial role in the barrier function of the skin as well as in transmembrane signaling. In this study long aliphatic chain tartaric acid diamides able to replace ceramides in an in vitro model of the stratum corneum lipid matrix due to their similar physico-chemical properties were synthesized from diacetoxysuccinic anhydride in four steps. Their pro-apoptotic effect on fibroblast cells was also investigated.

  2. Adiponectin inhibits insulin function in primary trophoblasts by PPARα-mediated ceramide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Irving L M H; Gao, Xiaoli; Weintraub, Susan T; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2014-04-01

    Maternal adiponectin (ADN) levels are inversely correlated with birth weight, and ADN infusion in pregnant mice down-regulates placental nutrient transporters and decreases fetal growth. In contrast to the insulin-sensitizing effects in adipose tissue and muscle, ADN inhibits insulin signaling in the placenta. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are unknown. We hypothesized that ADN inhibits insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα)-mediated ceramide synthesis. Primary human term trophoblast cells were treated with ADN and/or insulin. ADN increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and PPARα. ADN inhibited insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated amino acid transport. This effect was dependent on PPARα, because activation of PPARα with an agonist (GW7647) inhibited insulin signaling and function, whereas PPARα-small interfering RNA reversed the effects of ADN on the insulin response. ADN increased ceramide synthase expression and stimulated ceramide production. C2-ceramide inhibited insulin signaling and function, whereas inhibition of ceramide synthase (with Fumonisin B1) reversed the effects of ADN on insulin signaling and amino acid transport. These findings are consistent with the model that maternal ADN limits fetal growth mediated by activation of placental PPARα and ceramide synthesis, which inhibits placental insulin signaling and amino acid transport, resulting in reduced fetal nutrient availability.

  3. Role of Ceramide from Glycosphingolipids and Its Metabolites in Immunological and Inflammatory Responses in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Iwabuchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosphingolipids (GSLs are composed of hydrophobic ceramide and hydrophilic sugar chains. GSLs cluster to form membrane microdomains (lipid rafts on plasma membranes, along with several kinds of transducer molecules, including Src family kinases and small G proteins. However, GSL-mediated biological functions remain unclear. Lactosylceramide (LacCer, CDw17 is highly expressed on the plasma membranes of human phagocytes and mediates several immunological and inflammatory reactions, including phagocytosis, chemotaxis, and superoxide generation. LacCer forms membrane microdomains with the Src family tyrosine kinase Lyn and the Gαi subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. The very long fatty acids C24:0 and C24:1 are the main ceramide components of LacCer in neutrophil plasma membranes and are directly connected with the fatty acids of Lyn and Gαi. These observations suggest that the very long fatty acid chains of ceramide are critical for GSL-mediated outside-in signaling. Sphingosine is another component of ceramide, with the hydrolysis of ceramide by ceramidase producing sphingosine and fatty acids. Sphingosine is phosphorylated by sphingosine kinase to sphingosine-1-phosphate, which is involved in a wide range of cellular functions, including growth, differentiation, survival, chemotaxis, angiogenesis, and embryogenesis, in various types of cells. This review describes the role of ceramide moiety of GSLs and its metabolites in immunological and inflammatory reactions in human.

  4. Phytosphingosine, sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine ceramides in model skin lipid membranes: permeability and biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Školová, Barbora; Kováčik, Andrej; Tesař, Ondřej; Opálka, Lukáš; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2017-05-01

    Ceramides based on phytosphingosine, sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine are essential constituents of the skin lipid barrier that protects the body from excessive water loss. The roles of the individual ceramide subclasses in regulating skin permeability and the reasons for C4-hydroxylation of these sphingolipids are not completely understood. We investigated the chain length-dependent effects of dihydroceramides, sphingosine ceramides (with C4-unsaturation) and phytoceramides (with C4-hydroxyl) on the permeability, lipid organization and thermotropic behavior of model stratum corneum lipid membranes composed of ceramide/lignoceric acid/cholesterol/cholesteryl sulfate. Phytoceramides with very long C24 acyl chains increased the permeability of the model lipid membranes compared to dihydroceramides or sphingosine ceramides with the same chain lengths. Either unsaturation or C4-hydroxylation of dihydroceramides induced chain length-dependent increases in membrane permeability. Infrared spectroscopy showed that C4-hydroxylation of the sphingoid base decreased the relative ratio of orthorhombic chain packing in the membrane and lowered the miscibility of C24 phytoceramide with lignoceric acid. The phase separation in phytoceramide membranes was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. In contrast, phytoceramides formed strong hydrogen bonds and highly thermostable domains. Thus, the large heterogeneity in ceramide structures and in their aggregation mechanisms may confer resistance towards the heterogeneous external stressors that are constantly faced by the skin barrier.

  5. Fabrication of pseudo-ceramide-based lipid microparticles for recovery of skin barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hoon; Park, Woo Ram; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Cho, Eun Chul; An, Eun Jung; Kim, Jin-Woong; Oh, Seong-Geun

    2012-06-01

    The recovery of skin barrier functions was investigated with pseudo-ceramide-based lipid microparticles. The microparticles were prepared by using a fluid bed technique where lipid components (a pseudo-ceramide, cholesterol and a fatty acid) were coated on a sugar seed, and a polymer was subsequently coated on the lipid microparticles. The microparticles contained large amount of pseudo-ceramide, and the pseudo-ceramide was in the form of lamellar structures mixed with other lipid components. In addition, the microparticles were stably dispersed in aqueous media or emulsion systems without any disruption of the microparticles' structures, thereby supplying sufficient amount of the pseudo-ceramide to skins for improving skin barrier functions such as preventing water loss. Such a role of the microparticles was proven by evaluating in vivo the efficacy of the lipid microparticles in reducing a trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) of impaired murine skins. As a result, the novel pseudo-ceramide-based lipid microparticles for barrier recovery may potentially be applied in the field of dermatology, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals.

  6. Effect of ceramide acyl chain length on skin permeability and thermotropic phase behavior of model stratum corneum lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janůšová, Barbora; Zbytovská, Jarmila; Lorenc, Petr; Vavrysová, Helena; Palát, Karel; Hrabálek, Alexandr; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2011-03-01

    Stratum corneum ceramides play an essential role in the barrier properties of skin. However, their structure-activity relationships are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of acyl chain length in the non-hydroxy acyl sphingosine type (NS) ceramides on the skin permeability and their thermotropic phase behavior. Neither the long- to medium-chain ceramides (8-24 C) nor free sphingosine produced any changes of the skin barrier function. In contrast, the short-chain ceramides decreased skin electrical impedance and increased skin permeability for two marker drugs, theophylline and indomethacin, with maxima in the 4-6C acyl ceramides. The thermotropic phase behavior of pure ceramides and model stratum corneum lipid membranes composed of ceramide/lignoceric acid/cholesterol/cholesterol sulfate was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy. Differences in thermotropic phase behavior of these lipids were found: those ceramides that had the greatest impact on the skin barrier properties displayed the lowest phase transitions and formed the least dense model stratum corneum lipid membranes at 32°C. In conclusion, the long hydrophobic chains in the NS-type ceramides are essential for maintaining the skin barrier function. However, this ability is not shared by their short-chain counterparts despite their having the same polar head structure and hydrogen bonding ability.

  7. Properties of ceramides and their impact on the stratum corneum structure. Part 2: stratum corneum lipid model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessner, D; Ruettinger, A; Kiselev, M A; Wartewig, S; Neubert, R H H

    2008-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) represents the outermost layer of the mammalian skin, exhibits the main skin barrier and plays an important role in the water penetration pathway through the SC. Knowing the structure and properties of the SC at the molecular level is essential for studying drug penetration through the SC and for the development of new dermal drug delivery systems. Therefore, research interest is focused on the SC lipid matrix and on water diffusion through it. Thus, the ultimate aim is to design a lipid mixture that mimics the barrier properties of the human SC to a high extent and that can substitute the SC in drug delivery systems. This review summarizes various studies performed on either isolated animal or human ceramide based SC model systems, coming to the result that using synthetic lipids with a well-defined architecture allows good extrapolation to the in vivo situation. This review is the continuation of part 1 that is focused on a detailed description of the thermotropic and/or lyotropic phase behaviour of single ceramide types obtained by various experimental techniques. The objective of part 2 is to reflect the numerous studies on SC lipid model systems, namely binary, ternary and multicomponent systems, during the last decade. In this context, neutron diffraction as a prospective tool for analyzing the internal membrane structure is addressed in particular. Based on these new insights, current SC models are presented, whose validations are still under discussion. A profound knowledge about SC lipid organization at the molecular level is still missing.

  8. Synthesis of fluorescent C24-ceramide: evidence for acyl chain length dependent differences in penetration of exogenous NBD-ceramides into human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, Jakub; Pospechová, Katerina; Hrabálek, Alexandr; Cáp, Robert; Vávrová, Katerina

    2009-12-15

    Topical skin lipid supplementation may provide opportunities for controlling ceramide (Cer) deficiency in skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis or psoriasis. Here we describe the synthesis of a long-chain 7-nitrobenzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl (NBD)-labeled Cer and its different penetration through human skin compared to widely used short-chain fluorescent Cer tools.

  9. Sphingomyelinase D activity in model membranes: structural effects of in situ generation of ceramide-1-phosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto P Stock

    Full Text Available The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing sphingomyelin were examined. The findings indicate that: 1 ceramide-1-phosphate (particularly lauroyl ceramide-1-phosphate can be incorporated into sphingomyelin bilayers in a concentration-dependent manner and generates coexistence of liquid disordered/solid ordered domains, 2 the activity of sphingomyelinase D is clearly influenced by the supramolecular organization of its substrate in membranes and, 3 in situ ceramide-1-phosphate generation by enzymatic activity profoundly alters the lateral structure and morphology of the target membranes.

  10. Apoptosis of human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells induced by ceramide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Feng Zhang; Bai-Xiang Li; Chun-Yan Dong; Rui Ren

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of exogenous ceramideinduced apoptosis on human colon carcinoma HT-29cells.METHODS: Light microscope, transmission electron microscope and fluorescence microscope were used to observe the morphology change of apoptosis in HT-29cells. Agarose gel electrophoresis was performed to detect the DNA fragment. Mitochondrial function was detected by MTT assay. mRNA expression of Bcl-2 family gene members was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay.RESULTS: After C2-ceramide treatment, typical characteristics of apoptosis, such as nuclear chromatin breakage, apoptotic body and DNA ladder, could be observed. After exposure to 50 μmol/L C2-ceramide for 12 and 24 h, cell apoptosis was 64.1% and 81.3% respectively, which had a time-and dose-effect relationship. Mitochondrial function started to decrease from 6 h after exposure to ceramide. Meanwhile,ceramide up-regulated or down-regulated the mRNA expression of Bcl-2 family gene members.CONCLUSION: Ceramide induces apoptosis of human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells by affecting the expression of Bcl-2 family gene members and impacting the mitochondrial function.

  11. Ceramides and cytotoxic constituents from Ficus glumosa Del. (Moraceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nana, Frederic; Sandjo, Louis Pergaud; Keumedjio, Felix; Ambassa, Pantaleon [Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Yaounde I, Yaounde (Cameroon); Malik, Rizwana [H.E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry, International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Karachi, Karachi (Pakistan); Kuete, Victor; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal [Department of Biochemistry, University of Dschang, Dschang (Cameroon); Rincheval, Vincent [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire Batiment Fermat, University of Versailles, St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); Ngadjui, Bonaventure Tchaleu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Traditional Pharmacopeia, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaounde I, Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2012-03-15

    Chemical investigation of the stem bark of Ficus glumosa (Moraceae) yielded two new ceramides (2R,7E)-2-hydroxy-N-[(2S,3S,4R)-1,3,4-trihydroxyhexadecan-2-yl] hexacos-7-enamide and (2R)-N-{l_brace}(2S,3S,4R,9Z)-1-O-[({beta}-D-glucopyranosyl]-3,4-dihydroxyheptadec -9-en-2-yl{r_brace}-2-hydroxypentacosanamide together with twenty one known compounds. The structures were established using NMR data, mass spectrometry, chemical transformation and by comparison with the reported data. Twenty one compounds were further tested against the prostate cancer PC-3 cell line and six of them revealed cytotoxic effect. Dongnoside E was the most active compound with an IC{sub 50} 0.75 {mu}mol L{sup -1}against the cancer cells line PC-3 while the reference drug doxorubicin displayed 0.91 {mu}mol L{sup -1}. This compound also proved to inhibit the cell growth of the fibrosarcoma cancer HT1080 (IC{sub 50} 0.7 {mu}mol L{sup -1}). (author)

  12. Ceramide displaces cholesterol from lipid rafts and decreases the association of the cholesterol binding protein caveolin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cuijuan; Alterman, Michail; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2005-08-01

    Addition of exogenous ceramide causes a significant displacement of cholesterol in lipid raft model membranes. However, whether ceramide-induced cholesterol displacement is sufficient to alter the protein composition of caveolin-enriched lipid raft membranes is unknown. Therefore, we examined whether increasing endogenous ceramide levels with bacterial sphingomyelinase (bSMase) depleted cholesterol and changed the protein composition of caveolin-enriched membranes (CEMs) isolated from immortalized Schwann cells. bSMase increased ceramide levels severalfold and decreased the cholesterol content of detergent-insoluble CEMs by 25-50% within 2 h. To examine the effect of ceramide on the protein composition of the CEMs, we performed a quantitative proteomic analysis using stable isotope labeling of cells in culture and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Although ceramide rapidly depleted lipid raft cholesterol, the levels of the cholesterol binding protein caveolin-1 (Cav-1) decreased by 25% only after 8 h. Importantly, replenishing the cells with cholesterol rapidly reversed the loss of Cav-1 from the CEMs. Ceramide-induced cholesterol depletion increased the association of 5'-nucleotidase and ATP synthase beta-subunit with the CEMs but had a minimal effect on changing the abundance of other lipid raft proteins, such as flotillin-1 and G-proteins. These results suggest that the ceramide-induced loss of cholesterol from CEMs may contribute to altering the lipid raft proteome.

  13. Lipid mixtures prepared with well-defined synthetic ceramides closely mimic the unique stratum corneum lipid phase behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Miranda W; Gooris, Gert S; Ponec, Maria; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2005-12-01

    Lipid lamellae present in the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, form the main barrier for the diffusion of molecules through the skin. The presence of a unique 13 nm lamellar phase and its high crystallinity are characteristic for the stratum corneum lipid phase behavior. In the present study, small-angle and wide-angle X-ray diffraction were used to examine the organization in lipid mixtures prepared with a unique set of well-defined synthetic ceramides, varying from each other in head group architecture and acyl chain length. The results show that equimolar mixtures of cholesterol, free fatty acids, and synthetic ceramides (resembling the composition of pig ceramides) closely resemble the lamellar and lateral stratum corneum lipid organization, both at room and higher temperatures. Exclusion of several ceramide classes from the mixture does not affect the lipid organization. However, complete substitution of ceramide 1 (acylceramide with a sphingosine base) with ceramide 9 (acylceramide with a phytosphingosine base) reduces the formation of the long periodicity lamellar phase. This indicates that the head group architecture of acylceramides affects the lipid organization. In conclusion, lipid mixtures prepared with well-defined synthetic ceramides offer an attractive tool with which to unravel the importance of the molecular structure of individual ceramides for proper lipid organization.

  14. Ceramides with a pentadecasphingosine chain and short acyls have strong permeabilization effects on skin and model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Školová, Barbora; Janůšová, Barbora; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2016-02-01

    The composition and organization of stratum corneum lipids play an essential role in skin barrier function. Ceramides represent essential components of this lipid matrix; however, the importance of the individual structural features in ceramides is not fully understood. To probe the structure-permeability relationships in ceramides, we prepared analogs of N-lignoceroylsphingosine with shortened sphingosine (15 and 12 carbons) and acyl chains (2, 4 and 6 carbons) and studied their behavior in skin and in model lipid membranes. Ceramide analogs with pentadecasphingosine (15C) chains were more barrier-perturbing than 12C- and 18C-sphingosine ceramides; the greatest effects were found with 4 to 6C acyls (up to 15 times higher skin permeability compared to an untreated control and up to 79 times higher permeability of model stratum corneum lipid membranes compared to native very long-chain ceramides). Infrared spectroscopy using deuterated lipids and X-ray powder diffraction showed surprisingly similar behavior of the short ceramide membranes in terms of lipid chain order and packing, phase transitions and domain formation. The high- and low-permeability membranes differed in their amide I band shape and lamellar organization. These skin and membrane permeabilization properties of some short ceramides may be explored, for example, for the rational design of permeation enhancers for transdermal drug delivery.

  15. Inhibition of ceramide synthesis ameliorates glucocorticoid-, saturated-fat-, and obesity-induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, William L; Brozinick, Joseph T; Wang, Li-Ping; Hawkins, Eric D; Sargent, Katherine M; Liu, Yanqi; Narra, Krishna; Hoehn, Kyle L; Knotts, Trina A; Siesky, Angela; Nelson, Don H; Karathanasis, Sotirios K; Fontenot, Greg K; Birnbaum, Morris J; Summers, Scott A

    2007-03-01

    Insulin resistance occurs in 20%-25% of the human population, and the condition is a chief component of type 2 diabetes mellitus and a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and certain forms of cancer. Herein, we demonstrate that the sphingolipid ceramide is a common molecular intermediate linking several different pathological metabolic stresses (i.e., glucocorticoids and saturated fats, but not unsaturated fats) to the induction of insulin resistance. Moreover, inhibition of ceramide synthesis markedly improves glucose tolerance and prevents the onset of frank diabetes in obese rodents. Collectively, these data have two important implications. First, they indicate that different fatty acids induce insulin resistance by distinct mechanisms discerned by their reliance on sphingolipid synthesis. Second, they identify enzymes required for ceramide synthesis as therapeutic targets for combating insulin resistance caused by nutrient excess or glucocorticoid therapy.

  16. Aureobasidin A arrests growth of yeast cells through both ceramide intoxication and deprivation of essential inositolphosphorylceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerantola, Vanessa; Guillas, Isabelle; Roubaty, Carole

    2009-01-01

    , 2Delta.YDC1 cells stop growing when exposed to Aureobasidin A (AbA), an inhibitor of the inositolphosphorylceramide synthase AUR1, yet their ceramide levels remain very low. This finding argues against a current hypothesis saying that yeast cells do not require inositolphosphorylceramides and die...... in the presence of AbA only because ceramides build up to toxic concentrations. Moreover, W303lag1Delta lac1Delta ypc1Delta ydc1Delta cells, reported to be AbA resistant, stop growing on AbA after a certain number of cell divisions, most likely because AbA blocks the biosynthesis of anomalous...... inositolphosphorylsphingosides. Thus, data argue that inositolphosphorylceramides of yeast, the equivalent of mammalian sphingomyelins, are essential for growth. Data also clearly confirm that wild-type strains, when exposed to AbA, immediately stop growing because of ceramide intoxication, long before...

  17. Ceramide transfer protein deficiency compromises organelle function and leads to senescence in primary cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra Pralhada Rao

    Full Text Available Ceramide transfer protein (CERT transfers ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to the Golgi complex. Its deficiency in mouse leads to embryonic death at E11.5. CERT deficient embryos die from cardiac failure due to defective organogenesis, but not due to ceramide induced apoptotic or necrotic cell death. In the current study we examined the effect of CERT deficiency in a primary cell line, namely, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. We show that in MEFs, unlike in mutant embryos, lack of CERT does not lead to increased ceramide but causes an accumulation of hexosylceramides. Nevertheless, the defects due to defective sphingolipid metabolism that ensue, when ceramide fails to be trafficked from ER to the Golgi complex, compromise the viability of the cell. Therefore, MEFs display an incipient ER stress. While we observe that ceramide trafficking from ER to the Golgi complex is compromised, the forward transport of VSVG-GFP protein is unhindered from ER to Golgi complex to the plasma membrane. However, retrograde trafficking of the plasma membrane-associated cholera toxin B to the Golgi complex is reduced. The dysregulated sphingolipid metabolism also leads to increased mitochondrial hexosylceramide. The mitochondrial functions are also compromised in mutant MEFs since they have reduced ATP levels, have increased reactive oxygen species, and show increased glutathione reductase activity. Live-cell imaging shows that the mutant mitochondria exhibit reduced fission and fusion events. The mitochondrial dysfunction leads to an increased mitophagy in the CERT mutant MEFs. The compromised organelle function compromise cell viability and results in premature senescence of these MEFs.

  18. Quantitative study of stratum corneum ceramides contents in patients with sensitive skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hee Jin; Chung, Bo Young; Lee, Hee Bong; Kim, Hye One; Park, Chun Wook; Lee, Cheol Heon

    2012-03-01

    People with sensitive skin (SS) are those who state their skin is more sensitive than that of average persons. The stratum corneum is responsible for maintaining skin barrier function. Ceramides, major constituents of stratum corneum lipids, have been shown to predominantly contribute to the role. It has been suggested that barrier function in SS is decreased. However, we could find very few reports about stratum corneum ceramides in SS. This study was done to find out differences in stratum corneum ceramides between SS and non-SS groups. Fifty individuals (20 with SS and 30 with non-SS) were recruited. Lactic acid sting test (LAST) was performed on the left cheek. On six sites including the right cheek, arm, thigh, leg, back and palm, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and erythema index (EI) were measured. On the above six sites, stratum corneum sheets were obtained by stripping with cyanoacrylate resin and stratum corneum lipids were extracted, then, analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. LAST scores were higher in the SS group, but not statistically significant. There were no differences in TEWL and EI values between the two groups. The mean value of the quantity of stratum corneum ceramides on the face was significantly lower in the SS group. On other sites, mean values were also lower in the SS group, but not statistically significant. The quantity of ceramides was significantly decreased in the face of the SS group compared to that of the non-SS group. These results suggest that the decrease in stratum corneum ceramides on facial skin could be related to SS development.

  19. Sphingomyelinase D activity in model membranes: structural effects of in situ generation of ceramide-1-phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stock, Roberto; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Wagner, Kerstin;

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model...... membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy...

  20. Influence of calcium on ceramide-1-phosphate monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana S. L. Oliveira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P plays an important role in several biological processes, being identified as a key regulator of many protein functions. For instance, it acts as a mediator of inflammatory responses. The mediation of the inflammation process happens due to the interaction of C1P with the C2 domain of cPLA2α, an effector protein that needs the presence of submicromolar concentrations of calcium ions. The aim of this study was to determine the phase behaviour and structural properties of C1P in the presence and absence of millimolar quantities of calcium in a well-defined pH environment. For that purpose, we used monomolecular films of C1P at the soft air/liquid interface with calcium ions in the subphase. The pH was varied to change the protonation degree of the C1P head group. We used surface pressure versus molecular area isotherms coupled with other monolayer techniques as Brewster angle microscopy (BAM, infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD. The isotherms indicate that C1P monolayers are in a condensed state in the presence of calcium ions, regardless of the pH. At higher pH without calcium ions, the monolayer is in a liquid-expanded state due to repulsion between the negatively charged phosphate groups of the C1P molecules. When divalent calcium ions are added, they are able to bridge the highly charged phosphate groups, enhancing the regular arrangement of the head groups. Similar solidification of the monolayer structure can be seen in the presence of a 150 times larger concentration of monovalent sodium ions. Therefore, calcium ions have clearly a strong affinity for the phosphomonoester of C1P.

  1. Development and characterization of oral liposomes of vegetal ceramide based amphotericin B having enhanced dry solubility and solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiba-Lahiani, Malika; Hallouard, François; Mehenni, Lyes; Fessi, Hatem; Skiba, Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    Despite the development of new antifungal, amphotericin B remains one of the most effective agents in the treatment of systemic fungal infections. Many patients exhibit nevertheless intolerance to amphotericin B at higher dosages and parenteral formulations present unlike per os ones, associated risks and high care cost. Free amphotericin B per os showed however an apparently poor absorption. In this study, we evaluate the potential of amphotericin B liposomes formulated with vegetal ceramides for oral administration. Ceramides, one of the constituents of cellular cytoplasmic membranes, constitute an important element in the construction and stability of their lipid bilayer. To fulfill this objective, vegetal ceramides, composed essentially of glucosylceramides, were firstly incorporated in various liposome preparations, entrapping or not amphotericin B, in comparison with phosphatidylcholine liposomes. Then, these preparations were introduced in an "Artificial-Stomach-Duodenum" model to improve their stability for oral administration. The formulation of amphotericin B liposomes containing ceramides presented a mean hydrodynamic size of about 200nm. We showed also that cholesterol and phospholipids are required to prevent drug leakage and to obtain lamellar structure respectively. In "Artificial-Stomach-Duodenum" model, ceramides conferred to liposomes better membrane stability. In addition, ceramides did not alter their drug encapsulation yield being by 75%. This could be explained by the fact that ceramides as we proved, limited the detergent effect of bile salts on liposome membranes.

  2. Coarse-grain simulations of skin ceramide NS with newly derived parameters clarify structure of melted phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovová, Žofie; Berka, Karel; Otyepka, Michal; Jurečka, Petr

    2015-03-12

    Ceramides are lipids that are involved in numerous biologically important structures (e.g., the stratum corneum and ceramide-rich platforms) and processes (e.g., signal transduction and membrane fusion), but their behavior is not fully understood. We report coarse-grain force field parameters for N-lignocerylsphingosine (ceramide NS, also known as ceramide 2) that are consistent with the Martini force field. These parameters were optimized for simulations in the gel phase and validated against atomistic simulations. Coarse-grained simulations with our parameters provide areas per lipid, membrane thicknesses, and electron density profiles that are in good agreement with atomistic simulations. Properties of the simulated membranes are compared with available experimental data. The obtained parameters were used to model the phase behavior of ceramide NS as a function of temperature and hydration. At low water content and above the main phase transition temperature, the bilayer melts into an irregular phase, which may correspond to the unstructured melted-chain phase observed in X-ray diffraction experiments. The developed parameters also reproduce the extended conformation of ceramide, which may occur in the stratum corneum. The parameters presented herein will facilitate studies on important complex functional structures such as the uppermost layer of the skin and ceramide-rich platforms in phospholipid membranes.

  3. The novel HDAC inhibitor AR-42-induced anti-colon cancer cell activity is associated with ceramide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weihong; Xu, Bin; Yao, Yiting; Yu, Xiaoling [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Tongren Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shen, Jie, E-mail: tongrensj163@163.com [Department of Administrative, Tongren Hospital, No. 786 Yuyuan Road, Changning District, Shanghai (China)

    2015-08-07

    In the current study, we investigated the potential activity of AR-42, a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, against colon cancer cells. Our in vitro results showed that AR-42 induced ceramide production, exerted potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities in established (SW-620 and HCT-116 lines) and primary human colon cancer cells. Exogenously-added sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) suppressed AR-42-induced activity, yet a cell-permeable ceramide (C4) facilitated AR-42-induced cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In addition, AR-42-induced ceramide production and anti-colon cancer cell activity were inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1, but were exacerbated by PDMP, which is a ceramide glucosylation inhibitor. In vivo, oral administration of a single dose of AR-42 dramatically inhibited SW-620 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, without inducing overt toxicities. Together, these results show that AR-42 dramatically inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and ceramide production might be the key mechanism responsible for its actions. - Highlights: • AR-42 is anti-proliferative against primary/established colon cancer cells. • AR-42 induces significant apoptotic death in primary/established colon cancer cells. • Ceramide production mediates AR-42-induced cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells. • AR-42 oral administration potently inhibits SW-620 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  4. Ceramide transport from endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi apparatus is not vesicle-mediated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, JW; Babia, T; Klappe, K; Egea, G; Hoekstra, D

    1998-01-01

    Ceramide (Cer) transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus was measured under conditions that block vesicle-mediated protein transfer. This was done either in intact cells by reducing the incubation temperature to 15 degrees C, or in streptolysin O-permeabilized cells by mani

  5. Synthesis of non-hydroxy-galactosylceramides and galactosyldiglycerides by hydroxy-ceramide galactosyltransferase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bijl, Petra; Strous, G.J.A.M.; Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Thomas-Oates, J.E.; van Meer, G.

    1996-01-01

    Galactosylceramide (GalCer) is the major glycolipid in brain. In order to characterize the activity of brain UDPgalactose: ceramide galactosyltransferase (CGalT), it has been stably expressed in CGalT-negative Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. After fractionation of transfected cells, CHO-CGT, on s

  6. Ceramide in lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition: an innocent bystander?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. Groener; M.J. Serlie; A. Poppema; M. Mirzaian; J.M.F.G. Aerts

    2011-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease is a prevalent and severe complication of long term parenteral nutrition. We present here for the first time data on the presence of ceramide, a bioactive compound involved in a variety of metabolic processes, in different lipid emulsions used in parente

  7. B-cell receptor triggers drug sensitivity of primary CLL cells by controlling glucosylation of ceramides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamb, Janine; Feldhaus, Valeska; Baumann, Michael; Patz, Michaela; Brodesser, Susanne; Brinker, Reinhild; Claasen, Julia; Pallasch, Christian P; Hallek, Michael; Wendtner, Clemens-Martin; Frenzel, Lukas P

    2012-11-08

    Survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells is triggered by several stimuli, such as the B-cell receptor (BCR), CD40 ligand (CD40L), or interleukin-4 (IL-4). We identified that these stimuli regulate apoptosis resistance by modulating sphingolipid metabolism. Applying liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry, we revealed a significant decrease of proapoptotic ceramide in BCR/IL-4/CD40L-stimulated primary CLL cells compared with untreated controls. Antiapoptotic glucosylceramide levels were significantly increased after BCR cross-linking. We identified BCR engagement to catalyze the crucial modification of ceramide to glucosylceramide via UDP-glucose ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG). Besides specific UGCG inhibitors, our data demonstrate that IgM-mediated UGCG expression was inhibited by the novel and highly effective PI3Kδ and BTK inhibitors CAL-101 and PCI-32765, which reverted IgM-induced resistance toward apoptosis of CLL cells. Sphingolipids were recently shown to be crucial for mediation of apoptosis via mitochondria. Our data reveal ABT-737, a mitochondria-targeting drug, as interesting candidate partner for PI3Kδ and BTK inhibition, resulting in synergistic apoptosis, even under protection by the BCR. In summary, we identified the mode of action of novel kinase inhibitors CAL-101 and PCI-32765 by controlling the UGCG-mediated ceramide/glucosylceramide equilibrium as a downstream molecular switch of BCR signaling, also providing novel targeted treatment options beyond current chemotherapy-based regimens.

  8. Phytoceramide in vertebrate tissues: one step chromatography separation for molecular characterization of ceramide species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsankar Dasgupta

    Full Text Available Ceramide is a precursor for complex sphingolipids in vertebrates, while plants contain phytoceramide. By using a novel chromatography purification method we show that phytoceramide comprises a significant proportion of animal sphingolipids. Total ceramide including phytoceramide from mouse tissue (brain, heart, liver lipid extracts and cell culture (mouse primary astrocytes, human oligodendroglioma cells was eluted as a single homogenous fraction, and then analyzed by thin layer chromatography, and further characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. We detected a unique band that migrated between non-hydroxy fatty acyl ceramide and hydroxy fatty acyl ceramide, and identified it as phytoceramide. Using RT-PCR, we confirmed that mouse tissues expressed desaturase 2, an enzyme that has been reported to generate phytoceramide from dihydroceramide. Previously, only trace amounts of phytoceramide were reported in vertebrate intestine, kidney, and skin. While its function is still elusive, this is the first report of phytoceramide characterization in glial cells and vertebrate brain, heart, and liver.

  9. Structural Changes in Ceramide Bilayers Rationalize Increased Permeation through Stratum Corneum Models with Shorter Acyl Tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloncýová, Markéta; Vávrová, Kateřina; Sovová, Žofie; DeVane, Russell; Otyepka, Michal; Berka, Karel

    2015-07-30

    Ceramides are indispensable constituents of the stratum corneum (SC), the uppermost impermeable layer of human skin. Ceramides with shorter (four- to eight-carbon acyl chains) fatty acid chains increase skin and model membrane permeability, while further shortening of the chain leads to increased resistance to penetration almost as good as that of ceramides from healthy skin (24 carbons long on average). Here we address the extent to which the atomistic CHARMM36 and coarse-grain MARTINI molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reflect the skin permeability data. As a result, we observed the same bell-shaped permeability trend for water that was observed in the skin and multilayer membrane experiments for model compounds. We showed that the enhanced permeability of the short ceramides is mainly caused by the disturbance of their headgroup conformation because of their inability to accommodate the shorter lipid acyl chain into a typical hairpin conformation, which further led to their destabilization and phase separation. As MD simulations described well delicate structural features of SC membranes, they seem to be suitable for further studies of the SC superstructure, including the development of skin penetration enhancers for transdermal drug delivery and skin toxicity risk assessment studies.

  10. Ceramide formation is involved in Lactobacillus acidophilus-induced IFN-beta response in dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Eva; Henningsen, Louise; Frøkiær, Hanne

    The sphingolipid ceramide is known to play a role in lipid raft fusion and receptor clustering in the plasma membrane (PM). Upon bacterial encounter, dendritic cells (DCs) endocytose the bacteria and initiate a bacteria-specific downstream signaling event. We hypothesized that conversion...

  11. Application of glucosylceramide based liposomes increased the ceramide content in a three-dimensional cultured skin epidermis

    OpenAIRE

    徳留, 嘉寛; 遠藤, 麻未子; 橋本, フミ惠

    2014-01-01

    Ceramide is an intercellular lipid of the stratum corneum and is one of the most important components of the epidermal permeability barrier. Glucosylceramide (GlcCer), a ceramide precursor, was applied to three-dimensional skin culture to regulate ceramide. GlcCer/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) = 4/4 (molar ratio and GlcCer/DMPC/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) = 4/4/1(molar ratio) liposomes were prepared by the thin-layer method. The particle diameters of GlcCer/DMPC and GlcCer/...

  12. 4,8-Sphingadienine and 4-hydroxy-8-sphingenine activate ceramide production in the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirakura Yoshiyuki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ingestion of glucosylceramide improves transepidermal water loss (TEWL from the skin, but the underlying mechanism by which a small amount of dietary glucosylceramide can vastly improve skin conditions remains unclear. In a previous report, glucosylceramides were shown to be digested to sphingoids, which were shown to be absorbed through the intestinal epithelium. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that sphingoids are the key molecules facilitating endogenous ceramide production. In this study, we assessed the effect of 4,8-sphingadienine (d18:2 and 4-hydroxy-8-sphingenine (t18:1, derived from konjac glucosylceramide, on stimulating ceramide production. Methods Konjac glucosylceramide acidolysis was performed using hydrochloric acid; the resulting d18:2 and t18:1 were fractionated by column chromatography. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR was performed to assess the effect of d18:2 and t18:1 on gene expression in normal human epidermal keratinocytes, while their effect on the nuclear receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ, was measured using a receptor-cofactor assay system. The effect of d18:2 and t18:1 on stimulating ceramide production was evaluated using HPTLC analysis in a 3-dimensional human skin model. Results We noted the upregulation of genes related to de novo ceramide synthesis as well as of those encoding the elongases of very long-chain fatty acids by d18:2 and t18:1, but not by glucosylceramide and 4-sphingenine. Both these sphingoids also facilitated the expression of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ; moreover, they also demonstrated ligand activity for PPARγ. These results indicated that d18:2 and t18:1 promote the differentiation of keratinocytes. Analysis of the lipids within the 3-dimensional human skin model indicated that treatment with d18:2 and t18:1 not only upregulated gene expression but also increased ceramide production. Conclusions The sphingoids d18:2 and t18:1 activated genes

  13. Chronic Voluntary Ethanol Consumption Induces Favorable Ceramide Profiles in Selectively Bred Alcohol-Preferring (P Rats.

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    Jessica Godfrey

    Full Text Available Heavy alcohol consumption has detrimental neurologic effects, inducing widespread neuronal loss in both fetuses and adults. One proposed mechanism of ethanol-induced cell loss with sufficient exposure is an elevation in concentrations of bioactive lipids that mediate apoptosis, including the membrane sphingolipid metabolites ceramide and sphingosine. While these naturally-occurring lipids serve as important modulators of normal neuronal development, elevated levels resulting from various extracellular insults have been implicated in pathological apoptosis of neurons and oligodendrocytes in several neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Prior work has shown that acute administration of ethanol to developing mice increases levels of ceramide in multiple brain regions, hypothesized to be a mediator of fetal alcohol-induced neuronal loss. Elevated ceramide levels have also been implicated in ethanol-mediated neurodegeneration in adult animals and humans. Here, we determined the effect of chronic voluntary ethanol consumption on lipid profiles in brain and peripheral tissues from adult alcohol-preferring (P rats to further examine alterations in lipid composition as a potential contributor to ethanol-induced cellular damage. P rats were exposed for 13 weeks to a 20% ethanol intermittent-access drinking paradigm (45 ethanol sessions total or were given access only to water (control. Following the final session, tissues were collected for subsequent chromatographic analysis of lipid content and enzymatic gene expression. Contrary to expectations, ethanol-exposed rats displayed substantial reductions in concentrations of ceramides in forebrain and heart relative to non-exposed controls, and modest but significant decreases in liver cholesterol. qRT-PCR analysis showed a reduction in the expression of sphingolipid delta(4-desaturase (Degs2, an enzyme involved in de novo ceramide synthesis. These findings indicate that ethanol intake levels

  14. Chronic Voluntary Ethanol Consumption Induces Favorable Ceramide Profiles in Selectively Bred Alcohol-Preferring (P) Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Jessica; Jeanguenin, Lisa; Castro, Norma; Olney, Jeffrey J; Dudley, Jason; Pipkin, Joseph; Walls, Stanley M; Wang, Wei; Herr, Deron R; Harris, Greg L; Brasser, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Heavy alcohol consumption has detrimental neurologic effects, inducing widespread neuronal loss in both fetuses and adults. One proposed mechanism of ethanol-induced cell loss with sufficient exposure is an elevation in concentrations of bioactive lipids that mediate apoptosis, including the membrane sphingolipid metabolites ceramide and sphingosine. While these naturally-occurring lipids serve as important modulators of normal neuronal development, elevated levels resulting from various extracellular insults have been implicated in pathological apoptosis of neurons and oligodendrocytes in several neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Prior work has shown that acute administration of ethanol to developing mice increases levels of ceramide in multiple brain regions, hypothesized to be a mediator of fetal alcohol-induced neuronal loss. Elevated ceramide levels have also been implicated in ethanol-mediated neurodegeneration in adult animals and humans. Here, we determined the effect of chronic voluntary ethanol consumption on lipid profiles in brain and peripheral tissues from adult alcohol-preferring (P) rats to further examine alterations in lipid composition as a potential contributor to ethanol-induced cellular damage. P rats were exposed for 13 weeks to a 20% ethanol intermittent-access drinking paradigm (45 ethanol sessions total) or were given access only to water (control). Following the final session, tissues were collected for subsequent chromatographic analysis of lipid content and enzymatic gene expression. Contrary to expectations, ethanol-exposed rats displayed substantial reductions in concentrations of ceramides in forebrain and heart relative to non-exposed controls, and modest but significant decreases in liver cholesterol. qRT-PCR analysis showed a reduction in the expression of sphingolipid delta(4)-desaturase (Degs2), an enzyme involved in de novo ceramide synthesis. These findings indicate that ethanol intake levels achieved by

  15. Incorporation of Ceramides into Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Proteins Can Be Monitored In Vitro▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosson, Régine; Guillas, Isabelle; Vionnet, Christine; Roubaty, Carole; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    After glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) are added to GPI proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a fatty acid of the diacylglycerol moiety is exchanged for a C26:0 fatty acid through the subsequent actions of Per1 and Gup1. In most GPI anchors this modified diacylglycerol-based anchor is subsequently transformed into a ceramide-containing anchor, a reaction which requires Cwh43. Here we show that the last step of this GPI anchor lipid remodeling can be monitored in microsomes. The assay uses microsomes from cells that have been grown in the presence of myriocin, a compound that blocks the biosynthesis of dihydrosphingosine (DHS) and thus inhibits the biosynthesis of ceramide-based anchors. Such microsomes, when incubated with [3H]DHS, generate radiolabeled, ceramide-containing anchor lipids of the same structure as made by intact cells. Microsomes from cwh43Δ or mcd4Δ mutants, which are unable to make ceramide-based anchors in vivo, do not incorporate [3H]DHS into anchors in vitro. Moreover, gup1Δ microsomes incorporate [3H]DHS into the same abnormal anchor lipids as gup1Δ cells synthesize in vivo. Thus, the in vitro assay of ceramide incorporation into GPI anchors faithfully reproduces the events that occur in mutant cells. Incorporation of [3H]DHS into GPI proteins is observed with microsomes alone, but the reaction is stimulated by cytosol or bovine serum albumin, ATP plus coenzyme A (CoA), or C26:0-CoA, particularly if microsomes are depleted of acyl-CoA. Thus, [3H]DHS cannot be incorporated into proteins in the absence of acyl-CoA. PMID:19074599

  16. Incorporation of ceramides into Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins can be monitored in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosson, Régine; Guillas, Isabelle; Vionnet, Christine; Roubaty, Carole; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    After glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) are added to GPI proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a fatty acid of the diacylglycerol moiety is exchanged for a C(26:0) fatty acid through the subsequent actions of Per1 and Gup1. In most GPI anchors this modified diacylglycerol-based anchor is subsequently transformed into a ceramide-containing anchor, a reaction which requires Cwh43. Here we show that the last step of this GPI anchor lipid remodeling can be monitored in microsomes. The assay uses microsomes from cells that have been grown in the presence of myriocin, a compound that blocks the biosynthesis of dihydrosphingosine (DHS) and thus inhibits the biosynthesis of ceramide-based anchors. Such microsomes, when incubated with [(3)H]DHS, generate radiolabeled, ceramide-containing anchor lipids of the same structure as made by intact cells. Microsomes from cwh43Delta or mcd4Delta mutants, which are unable to make ceramide-based anchors in vivo, do not incorporate [(3)H]DHS into anchors in vitro. Moreover, gup1Delta microsomes incorporate [(3)H]DHS into the same abnormal anchor lipids as gup1Delta cells synthesize in vivo. Thus, the in vitro assay of ceramide incorporation into GPI anchors faithfully reproduces the events that occur in mutant cells. Incorporation of [(3)H]DHS into GPI proteins is observed with microsomes alone, but the reaction is stimulated by cytosol or bovine serum albumin, ATP plus coenzyme A (CoA), or C(26:0)-CoA, particularly if microsomes are depleted of acyl-CoA. Thus, [(3)H]DHS cannot be incorporated into proteins in the absence of acyl-CoA.

  17. Functional loss of two ceramide synthases elicits autophagy-dependent lifespan extension in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai-Britt Mosbech

    Full Text Available Ceramide and its metabolites constitute a diverse group of lipids, which play important roles as structural entities of biological membranes as well as regulators of cellular growth, differentiation, and development. The C. elegans genome comprises three ceramide synthase genes; hyl-1, hyl-2, and lagr-1. HYL-1 function is required for synthesis of ceramides and sphingolipids containing very long acyl-chains (≥C24, while HYL-2 is required for synthesis of ceramides and sphingolipids containing shorter acyl-chains (≤C22. Here we show that functional loss of HYL-2 decreases lifespan, while loss of HYL-1 or LAGR-1 does not affect lifespan. We show that loss of HYL-1 and LAGR-1 functions extend lifespan in an autophagy-dependent manner, as knock down of the autophagy-associated gene ATG-12 abolishes hyl-1;lagr-1 longevity. The transcription factors PHA-4/FOXA, DAF-16/FOXO, and SKN-1 are also required for the observed lifespan extension, as well as the increased number of autophagosomes in hyl-1;lagr-1 animals. Both autophagic events and the transcription factors PHA-4/FOXA, DAF-16, and SKN-1 have previously been associated with dietary restriction-induced longevity. Accordingly, we find that hyl-1;lagr-1 animals display reduced feeding, increased resistance to heat, and reduced reproduction. Collectively, our data suggest that specific sphingolipids produced by different ceramide synthases have opposing roles in determination of C. elegans lifespan. We propose that loss of HYL-1 and LAGR-1 result in dietary restriction-induced autophagy and consequently prolonged longevity.

  18. Magnesium deficiency upregulates sphingomyelinases in cardiovascular tissues and cells: cross-talk among proto-oncogenes, Mg(2+), NF-κB and ceramide and their potential relationships to resistant hypertension, atherogenesis and cardiac failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altura, Burton M; Shah, Nilank C; Shah, Gatha J; Li, Wenyan; Zhang, Aimin; Zheng, Tao; Li, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Perez-Albela, Jose Luis; Altura, Bella T

    2013-01-01

    The present study tested the hypotheses that 1) short-term (ST) dietary deficiency of magnesium (MgD; 21 days) in rats would result in the upregulation of neutral-, acid-, and alkaline- sphingomyelinases SMases) in cardiac and vascular smooth muscles (VSMCs), 2) ST MgD would result in an upregulation of proto-oncogenes, i.e., c-Fos and c-Jun, as well as the p65 and c-Rel components of NF-κB in cardiac and VSMCs, 3) low levels of Mg(2+) added to drinking water would either prevent or greatly reduce the upregulation of the SMases and proto-oncogene expression, 4) exposure of primary cultured VSMCs to low extracellular Mg(2+) concentration would lead to release of ceramide in both cerebral and aortic VSMCs, 5) specific inhibitors of neutral- and acid-SMAs would reduce the release of ceramide in cultured VSMCs exposed to low extracellular Mg(2+), and 6) specific inhibitors of neutral- and acid-SMases would lead to reductions in the expression of c-fos, c-Jun, and NF-κB components. The data indicate that neutral-, acid-and alkaline-SMases exist in rat cardiac and VSMCs. ST MgD resulted in over 150% increases in SMase activity and proto-oncogene expression in left and right ventricular muscle, atrial muscle, and abdominal aortic smooth muscle; even very low levels of Mg(2+) added to drinking water either prevented or ameliorated the activation of all 3-SMases as well as expression of c-Fos and c-Jun; scyphostatin and desipramine reduced the low Mg(2+) - induced expression of the proto-oncogenes as well as p65 and c-Rel in VSMCs. Exposure of the VSMCs to low Mg(2+) resulted in more than a 100% increase in release of ceramide; scyphostatin and desipramine reduced greatly the release of ceramide from the VSMCs. We believe when the present data are viewed in light of our previous, recent findings on the effects of Mg deficiency on most of the major enzymes in the sphingomyelin-ceramide pathway, that they could provide a rational basis for the treatment and prevention of

  19. C6-pyridinium ceramide sensitizes SCC17B human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppana, Nithin B; Stochaj, Ursula; Kodiha, Mohamed; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Pierce, Jason S; Korbelik, Mladen; Separovic, Duska

    2015-02-01

    Combining photodynamic therapy (PDT) with another anticancer treatment modality is an important strategy for improved efficacy. PDT with Pc4, a silicon phthalocyanine photosensitizer, was combined with C6-pyridinium ceramide (LCL29) to determine their potential to promote death of SCC17B human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells. PDT+LCL29-induced enhanced cell death was inhibited by zVAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, and fumonisin B1 (FB), a ceramide synthase inhibitor. Quantitative confocal microscopy showed that combining PDT with LCL29 enhanced FB-sensitive ceramide accumulation in the mitochondria. Furthermore, PDT+LCL29 induced enhanced FB-sensitive redistribution of cytochrome c and caspase-3 activation. Overall, the data indicate that PDT+LCL29 enhanced cell death via FB-sensitive, mitochondrial ceramide accumulation and apoptosis.

  20. Muscle ceramide content in man is higher in type I than type II fibers and not influenced by glycogen content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordby, P; Prats, C; Kristensen, D;

    2010-01-01

    Human muscle is studied during glycogen depletion and repletion to understand the influence of exercise and muscle glycogen on total ceramide content. In addition, fiber-type-specific ceramide storage is investigated. Ten healthy males (26.4 +/- 0.9 years, BMI 24.4 +/- 0.7 kg m(-2) and VO2max 57...... +/- 2 mL O2 min(-1) kg(-1)) participated in the study. On the first day, one leg was glycogen-depleted (DL) by exhaustive intermittent exercise followed by low carbohydrate diet. Next day, in the overnight fasted condition, muscle biopsies were excised from vastus lateralis before and after exhaustive...... exercise from both DL and control leg (CL). Muscle glycogen was analyzed biochemically and total muscle ceramide content by 2D quantitative lipidomic approach. Furthermore, fiber-type ceramide content was determined by fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Basal muscle glycogen was decreased (P

  1. Ceramide content is higher in type I compared to type II fibers in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ditte Bech; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Ara, Ignacio;

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated fiber-type-specific muscle ceramide content in obese subjects and type 2 diabetes patients. Two substudies, one which compared type 2 diabetes patients to both lean- and obese BMI-matched subjects and the other study which compared lean body-matched post-obese, obese...... index was higher in lean compared to type 2 diabetes patients and obese controls. Also in control and post-obese subjects, a higher insulin sensitivity was observed compared to obese subjects. Ceramide content was consistently higher in type I than in type II muscle fibers and higher in deltoideus than...... vastus lateralis across all groups. No significant differences between groups were observed in ceramide content in either of the two substudies. In human skeletal muscle, ceramide content was higher in type I than in type II fibers in patients with type 2 diabetes and in obese subjects, but overall...

  2. Ceramide profiles of the uninvolved skin in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are comparable to those of healthy skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farwanah, Hany; Raith, Klaus; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Wohlrab, Johannes

    2005-05-01

    Ceramides are sphingolipids consisting of sphingoidbases, which are amide-linked to fatty acids. In the stratum corneum, they represent the major constituent of the free extractable intercellular lipids and play a significant role in maintaining and structuring the water permeability barrier of the skin. Using thin layer chromatography, which represents the method of the first choice in analyzing the stratum corneum ceramides, at least seven classes can be distinguished. Each ceramide class contains various species, which have the same head group and different chain lengths. As in many other skin disorders, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis show derangements in content and profile of the ceramides. Such derangements were reported for both the lesional involved as well as for the normal-appearing uninvolved skin. In this study, we focused on investigating the stratum corneum ceramides of the uninvolved skin in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis patients compared to healthy skin. The aim of the investigations was to explore possible significant and specific differences which can be accomplished for purposes of early diagnostics. The skin lipids were collected by means of an in vivo topical extraction procedure using an extraction mixture consisting of n-hexane and ethanol, (2:1). An automated multiple development-high performance thin layer chromatography (AMD-HPTLC) method with photodensitometric detection were applied to separate the ceramides and to estimate their contents. For studying their molecular profile within each ceramide class, a new method of normal phase HPLC with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry were used. The results obtained by AMD-HPTLC exposed no significant alterations regarding the relative composition of the major stratum corneum lipids and primarily the ceramides. In addition, the mass spectrometric profiles within each ceramide class were similar in the patients and the healthy control subjects. In conclusion, this study

  3. Decreased activity and enhanced nuclear export of CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein beta during inhibition of adipogenesis by ceramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprott, Kam M; Chumley, Michael J; Hanson, Janean M; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2002-07-01

    To identify novel molecular mechanisms by which ceramide regulates cell differentiation, we examined its effect on adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Hormonal stimulation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes induced formation of triacylglycerol-laden adipocytes over 7 days; in part, via the co-ordinated action of CCAAT-enhancer-binding proteins alpha, beta and delta (C/EBP-alpha, -beta and -delta) and peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma). The addition of exogenous N-acetylsphingosine (C2-ceramide) or increasing endogenous ceramide levels inhibited the expression of C/EBPalpha and PPARgamma, and blocked adipocyte development. C2-ceramide did not decrease the cellular expression of C/EBPbeta, which is required for expression of C/EBPalpha and PPARgamma, but significantly blocked its transcriptional activity from a promoter construct after 24 h. The ceramide-induced decrease in the transcriptional activity of C/EBPbeta correlated with a strong decrease in its phosphorylation, DNA-binding ability and nuclear localization at 24 h. However, ceramide did not change the nuclear level of C/EBPbeta after a period of 4 or 16 h, suggesting that it was not affecting nuclear import. CRM1 (more recently named 'exportin-1') is a nuclear membrane protein that regulates protein export from the nucleus by binding to a specific nuclear export sequence. Leptomycin B is an inhibitor of CRM1/exportin-1, and reversed the ceramide-induced decrease in nuclear C/EBPbeta at 24 h. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that ceramide may inhibit adipogenesis, at least in part, by enhancing dephosphorylation and premature nuclear export of C/EBPbeta at a time when its maximal transcriptional activity is required to drive adipogenesis.

  4. Topical effects of N-acetyl-L-hydroxyproline on ceramide synthesis and alleviation of pruritus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashizume E

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Erika Hashizume,1 Tetsuo Nakano,2 Ayako Kamimura,1 Koji Morishita31Healthcare Products Development Center, Kyowa Hakko Bio, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 2Technical Research Laboratories, Kyowa Hakko Bio, Hofu, Yamaguchi, 3Technology Development and Research Department, Kyowa Hakko Bio, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: N-acetyl-l-hydroxyproline (AHYP is an acetylated form of l-hydroxyproline that is used to treat skin ulcers and porphyria cutanea tarda. Its other biological and physiological effects on the skin have not been elucidated. We investigated the effects of AHYP on the skin-barrier function, focusing on ceramide synthesis and the effects of topical AHYP on atopic dermatitis.Materials and methods: AHYP was applied to a three-dimensional cultured skin model. Ceramides were quantified by high-performance thin-layer chromatography. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT is the rate-limiting enzyme in de novo ceramide synthesis, and the mRNA of its long-chain base subunit 1 (SPTLC1 was evaluated by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. A clinical trial in the form of an intraindividual, comparative, double-blind, randomized, vehicle-controlled test involving 15 female subjects suffering from slight atopic dermatitis was performed. Subjects applied 1% (w/w AHYP cream to one forearm and a control cream to the other forearm twice daily for 4 weeks. Skin condition was evaluated by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL. Dermatological observations were made by a dermatologist, and subjects evaluated their own pruritus intensity before beginning treatment and 4 weeks after the start of treatment.Results: SPTLC1 expression and ceramide synthesis were significantly increased in an AHYP-treated skin model (P < 0.05. In the clinical trial, no adverse effects were observed in any subjects. TEWL was increased in the control-treated region of the forearm (P < 0.05 after 4 weeks' application, whereas there was no change in the AHYP-treated region of the

  5. Ceramide, a mediator of interleukin 1, tumour necrosis factor α, as well as Fas receptor signalling, induces apoptosis of rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mizushima, N; Kohsaka, H.; Miyasaka, N

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To examine the effects of ceramide, which is a lipid second messenger of cell surface receptors, including tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin 1 (IL1), and Fas receptors, on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial cells.
METHODS—Synovial cells from RA patients and normal skin fibroblasts were cultured with cell permeable ceramide (C2-ceramide). Apoptosis was assessed by microscopic observation of morphological changes, nuclear staining, and DNA electrophoresis. DNA synthesis wa...

  6. Functions of Ceramide Synthase Paralogs YPR114w and YJR116w of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mallela, Shamroop K; Almeida, Reinaldo; Ejsing, Christer S;

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide is synthesized in yeast by two redundant acyl-CoA dependent synthases, Lag1 and Lac1. In lag1∆ lac1∆ cells, free fatty acids and sphingoid bases are elevated, and ceramides are produced through the redundant alkaline ceramidases Ypc1 and Ydc1, working backwards. Even with all four...... of these genes deleted, cells are surviving and continue to contain small amounts of complex sphingolipids. Here we show that these residual sphingolipids are not synthesized by YPR114w or YJR116w, proteins of unknown function showing a high degree of homology to Lag1 and Lac1. Indeed, the hextuple lag1∆ lac1...... type, before and after diauxic shift. Ypr114w∆/ypr114w∆ have an increased chronological life span. Thus, Yjr116w and Ypr114w are related, but not functionally redundant....

  7. Isolation and characterization of new ceramides from aerial parts of Lepidaploa cotoneaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Edlene O; Meira, Marilena; do Vale, Ademir E; David, Jorge M; de Queiróz, Luciano P; David, Juceni P

    2012-06-01

    Two new ceramides were isolated from the bulbs of Lepidaploa cotoneaster (Willd. ex Spreng.) H. Rob. [Vernonia cotoneaster (Willd. ex Spreng.) Less.)], in addition to germanicol, beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol, 3-beta-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-sitosterol, lupeol, lupeoyl acetate and tiliroside. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by spectral techniques (MS, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, HSQC, HMBC, DEPT, and TOCSY) and were compared with data reported in literature, and were established as 2S*,2'R*,3S*,4R*,11E)-N-[2'-hydroxyhenicosanoyl]-2-amino-nonadec-11-ene-1,3,4-triol (1) and (2S*,2'R*,3S*,4R*,8E)-N-[2'-hydroxytricosanoyl]-2-amino-nonadec-8-ene-1,3,4-triol (2). To establish the structure and to locate the double bond, the methyl ester of the fatty acid and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) derivatives were prepared for both ceramides.

  8. Functions of Ceramide Synthase Paralogs YPR114w and YJR116w of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamroop K Mallela

    Full Text Available Ceramide is synthesized in yeast by two redundant acyl-CoA dependent synthases, Lag1 and Lac1. In lag1∆ lac1∆ cells, free fatty acids and sphingoid bases are elevated, and ceramides are produced through the redundant alkaline ceramidases Ypc1 and Ydc1, working backwards. Even with all four of these genes deleted, cells are surviving and continue to contain small amounts of complex sphingolipids. Here we show that these residual sphingolipids are not synthesized by YPR114w or YJR116w, proteins of unknown function showing a high degree of homology to Lag1 and Lac1. Indeed, the hextuple lag1∆ lac1∆ ypc1∆ ydc1∆ ypr114w∆ yjr116w∆ mutant still contains ceramides and complex sphingolipids. Yjr116w∆ exhibit an oxygen-dependent hypersensitivity to Cu2+ due to an increased mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and a mitochondrially orchestrated programmed cell death in presence of copper, but also a general copper hypersensitivity that cannot be counteracted by the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC. Myriocin efficiently represses the synthesis of sphingoid bases of ypr114w∆, but not its growth. Both yjr116w∆ and ypr114w∆ have fragmented vacuoles and produce less ROS than wild type, before and after diauxic shift. Ypr114w∆/ypr114w∆ have an increased chronological life span. Thus, Yjr116w and Ypr114w are related, but not functionally redundant.

  9. Functions of Ceramide Synthase Paralogs YPR114w and YJR116w of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallela, Shamroop K; Almeida, Reinaldo; Ejsing, Christer S; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide is synthesized in yeast by two redundant acyl-CoA dependent synthases, Lag1 and Lac1. In lag1∆ lac1∆ cells, free fatty acids and sphingoid bases are elevated, and ceramides are produced through the redundant alkaline ceramidases Ypc1 and Ydc1, working backwards. Even with all four of these genes deleted, cells are surviving and continue to contain small amounts of complex sphingolipids. Here we show that these residual sphingolipids are not synthesized by YPR114w or YJR116w, proteins of unknown function showing a high degree of homology to Lag1 and Lac1. Indeed, the hextuple lag1∆ lac1∆ ypc1∆ ydc1∆ ypr114w∆ yjr116w∆ mutant still contains ceramides and complex sphingolipids. Yjr116w∆ exhibit an oxygen-dependent hypersensitivity to Cu2+ due to an increased mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a mitochondrially orchestrated programmed cell death in presence of copper, but also a general copper hypersensitivity that cannot be counteracted by the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). Myriocin efficiently represses the synthesis of sphingoid bases of ypr114w∆, but not its growth. Both yjr116w∆ and ypr114w∆ have fragmented vacuoles and produce less ROS than wild type, before and after diauxic shift. Ypr114w∆/ypr114w∆ have an increased chronological life span. Thus, Yjr116w and Ypr114w are related, but not functionally redundant.

  10. Exercise and training effects on ceramide metabolism in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Dobrzyn, Agnieszka; Saltin, Bengt;

    2004-01-01

    In rat skeletal muscle prolonged exercise affects the content and composition of ceramides, but in human skeletal muscle no data are available on this compound. Our aim was to examine the content of ceramide- and sphingomyelin fatty acids and neutral, Mg(2+)-dependent sphingomyelinase activity in...... and in trained subjects and this may influence muscle cell adaptation and metabolism....... in skeletal muscle in untrained and trained subjects before and after prolonged exercise. Healthy male subjects were recruited into an untrained (n = 8, VO2,max 3.8 +/- 0.2 1 min1) and a trained (n = 8, Vo2,max 5.1 +/- 0.1 1 min2) group. Before and after a 3-h exercise bout (58 +/- 1% VO2,max) a muscle biopsy...... was measured using N-[14CH3]-sphingomyelin as a substrate. Prior to exercise, the muscle total ceramide fatty acid content in both groups was similar (201 +/- 18 and 197 +/- 9 nmol g(-1) in the untrained and trained group, respectively) and after exercise a 25% increase in the content was observed in each...

  11. Lamellar gel (lβ) phases of ternary lipid composition containing ceramide and cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busto, Jon V; García-Arribas, Aritz B; Sot, Jesús; Torrecillas, Alejandro; Gómez-Fernández, Juan C; Goñi, Félix M; Alonso, Alicia

    2014-02-04

    Lipid lateral segregation into specific domains in cellular membranes is associated with cell signaling and metabolic regulation. This phenomenon partially arises as a consequence of the very distinct bilayer-associated lipid physico-chemical properties that give rise to defined phase states at a given temperature. Until now lamellar gel (Lβ) phases have been described in detail in single or two-lipid systems. Using x-ray scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, confocal fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy, we have characterized phases of ternary lipid compositions in the presence of saturated phospholipids, cholesterol, and palmitoyl ceramide mixtures. These phases stabilized by direct cholesterol-ceramide interaction can exist either with palmitoyl sphingomyelin or with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and present intermediate properties between raft-associated phospholipid-cholesterol liquid-ordered and phospholipid-ceramide Lβ phases. The present data provide novel, to our knowledge, evidence of a chemically defined, multicomponent lipid system that could cooperate in building heterogeneous segregated platforms in cell membranes.

  12. 神经酰胺与皮肤屏障%Ceramide and Skin Barrier Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴金燕; 蒋献

    2011-01-01

    Ceramide is one of the lipids in human stratum corneum. The alteration of the ceramide will lead to the change of the lipids, and then the destruction of skin barrier function happens. It plays an important role in the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of keratinocytes. Many dermatogic diseases can destroy skin barrier function, and the destruction of barrier function will also result in skin diseases or aggravate the diseases. In a word, increasing attentions are paid to the ceramide's function in the skin.%神经酰胺是人体角质层脂质的主要成分,在皮肤的合成和分布有一定的规律.其质和量的变化可以导致脂质结构的改变,从而影响皮肤屏障功能.不同亚型神经酰胺作用不同,在角质形成细胞增殖、分化及凋亡中起重要作用,是皮肤屏障损伤修复后期重要的效应物质.许多皮肤病可导致角质层屏障功能的破坏,而屏障功能的破坏又是一些皮肤病的病因或加重因素.故神经酰胺在皮肤中的作用越来越受重视.

  13. Application of glucosylceramide-based liposomes increased the ceramide content in a three-dimensional cultured skin epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokudome, Y; Endo, M; Hashimoto, F

    2014-01-01

    Ceramide is an intercellular lipid of the stratum corneum and is one of the most important components of the epidermal permeability barrier. Glucosylceramide (GlcCer), a ceramide precursor, was applied to three-dimensional skin culture to regulate ceramide. GlcCer/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) = 4/4 (molar ratio and GlcCer/DMPC/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) = 4/4/1(molar ratio) liposomes were prepared by the thin-layer method. The particle diameters of GlcCer/DMPC and GlcCer/DMPC/DMPG liposomes were 124.0 ± 0.6 and 119.3 ± 18.9 nm, and the zeta potentials were 1.3 ± 0.3 and -19.9 ± 0.3 mV, respectively. Stability of these GlcCer liposomes was measured by transmission light scattering. Transmission light scattering of neutrally charged GlcCer (GlcCer/DMPC) liposomes increased in a time dependent manner. In contrast, negatively charged GlcCer (GlcCer/DMPC/DMPG) liposomes were not changed. β-Glucocerebrosidase activity was measured in a cultured human skin model. Results confirmed that the cultured human skin model has β-glucocerebrosidase activity. GlcCer/DMPC/DMPG liposomes were applied to the three-dimensional cultured human skin model, and ceramide NS, NP, AS, and AP were extracted from it. The various extracted ceramides were separated by high-performance thin-layer chromatography and quantified by a densitometer. The amount of ceramide AS only in the cultured skin model was significantly higher with the application of GlcCer-based liposomes than that of the nonapplication group, and was also dose dependent. Thus, GlcCer-based liposomes are useful for enriching the ceramide AS levels in a three-dimensional cultured skin model.

  14. Efficient inhibition of infectious prions multiplication and release by targeting the exosomal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilette, Didier; Laulagnier, Karine; Huor, Alvina; Alais, Sandrine; Simoes, Sabrina; Maryse, Romao; Provansal, Monique; Lehmann, Sylvain; Andreoletti, Olivier; Schaeffer, Laurent; Raposo, Graça; Leblanc, Pascal

    2015-11-01

    Exosomes are secreted membrane vesicles of endosomal origin present in biological fluids. Exosomes may serve as shuttles for amyloidogenic proteins, notably infectious prions, and may participate in their spreading in vivo. To explore the significance of the exosome pathway on prion infectivity and release, we investigated the role of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery and the need for ceramide, both involved in exosome biogenesis. Silencing of HRS-ESCRT-0 subunit drastically impairs the formation of cellular infectious prion due to an altered trafficking of cholesterol. Depletion of Tsg101-ESCRT-I subunit or impairment of the production of ceramide significantly strongly decreases infectious prion release. Together, our data reveal that ESCRT-dependent and -independent pathways can concomitantly regulate the exosomal secretion of infectious prion, showing that both pathways operate for the exosomal trafficking of a particular cargo. These data open up a new avenue to regulate prion release and propagation.

  15. Fenofibrate Reverses Palmitate Induced Impairment in Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle Cells by Preventing Cytosolic Ceramide Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarshan Bhattacharjee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds/Aims: The lipid induced insulin resistance is a major pathophysiologic mechanism underlying glucose intolerance of varying severity. PPARα-agonists are proven as effective hypolipidemic agents. The aim of this study was to see if impaired glucose uptake in palmitate treated myotubes is reversed by fenofibrate. Methods: Palmitate-treated myotubes were used as a model for insulin resistance, impaired glucose uptake, fatty acid oxidation and ceramide synthesis. mRNA levels of CPT1 and CPT2 were determined by PCR array and Q-PCR. Results: The incubation of myotubes with 750 uM palmitate not only reduced glucose uptake but also impaired fatty acid oxidation and cytosolic ceramide accumulation. Palmitate upregulated CPT1b expression in L6 myotubes, while CPT2 expression level remained unchanged. The altered stoichiometric ratio between the two CPT isoforms led to reduced fatty acid oxidation (FAO, ceramide accumulation and impaired glucose uptake, whereas administration of 200 µM fenofibrate signifcantly reversed the above abnormalities by increasing CPT2 mRNA levels and restoring CPT1b to CPT2 ratio. Conclusion: Palmitate-induced alteration in the stoichiometric ratio of mitochondrial CPT isoforms leads to incomplete FAO and enhanced cytosolic ceramide accumulation that lead to insulin resistance. Fenofibrate ameliorated insulin resistance by restoring the altered stoichiometry by upregulating CPT2 and preventing, cytoplasmic ceramide accumulation.

  16. Plasma ceramide and glucosylceramide metabolism is altered in sporadic Parkinson's disease and associated with cognitive impairment: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Mielke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in the gene coding for glucocerebrosidase (GBA, which metabolizes glucosylceramide (a monohexosylceramide into glucose and ceramide, is the most common genetic risk factor for sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD. GBA mutation carriers are more likely to have an earlier age of onset and to develop cognitive impairment and dementia. We hypothesized that plasma levels of lipids involved in ceramide metabolism would also be altered in PD non-GBA mutation carriers and associated with worse cognition. METHODS: Plasma ceramide, monohexosylceramide, and lactosylceramide levels in 26 cognitively normal PD patients, 26 PD patients with cognitive impairment or dementia, and 5 cognitively normal non-PD controls were determined by LC/ESI/MS/MS. RESULTS: Levels of all lipid species were higher in PD patients versus controls. Among PD patients, levels of ceramide C16:0, C18:0, C20:0, C22:0, and C24:1 and monohexosylceramide C16:0, C20:0 and C24:0 species were higher (all P<0.05 in those with versus without cognitive impairment. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that plasma ceramide and monohexosylceramide metabolism is altered in PD non-GBA mutation carriers and that higher levels are associated with worse cognition. Additional studies with larger sample sizes, including cognitively normal controls, are needed to confirm these findings.

  17. Association of the golgi UDP-galactose transporter with UDP-galactose: ceramide galactosyltransferase allows UDP-galactose import in the endoplasmic reticulum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprong, H.; Degroote, S.; Nilsson, T.; Kawakita, M.; Ishida, N.; van der Sluijs, P.; van Meer, G.

    2003-01-01

    UDP-galactose reaches the Golgi lumen through the UDP-galactose transporter (UGT) and is used for the galactosylation of proteins and lipids. Ceramides and diglycerides are galactosylated within the endoplasmic reticulum by the UDP-galactose: ceramide galactosyltransferase. It is not known how UDP-g

  18. Ceramide Accumulation in Yeast Yarrowia lipolitica%解脂假丝酵母中神经酰胺的积累研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周全; 陈国强

    2005-01-01

    Ceramides are a class of lipid molecules widely distributed in eukaryotic cells in small amount. To investigate the possibility of ceramide production by yeast, a yeast strain Yarrowia lipolitica was grown under different conditions including changing carbon/nitrogen ratio, and serine concentration, dissolved oxygen and presence of ethanol It was found that increased dissolved oxygen supply increased the ceramide content in the yeast 2.5 fold of its normal control level. Ethanol treatment could also enhance ceramide accumulation by 3.3 fold compared with the control although the cell growth was negatively affected. Cellular redox potential was shown to affect ceramide accumulation by the yeast. This was possibly related to the cellular reactive oxygen species presented in the yeast.

  19. Extending the Glucosyl Ceramide Cassette Approach: Application in the Total Synthesis of Ganglioside GalNAc-GM1b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miku Konishi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of a novel cyclic glucosyl ceramide cassette acceptor for efficient glycolipid syntheses was investigated. p-Methoxybenzyl (PMB groups were selected as protecting groups at C2 and C3 of the glucose residue with the aim of improving the functionality of the cassette acceptor. The choice of the PMB group resulted in a loss of β-selectivity, which was corrected by using an appropriate tether to control the spatial arrangement and the nitrile solvent effect. To investigate the effect of linker structure on the β-selectivity of intramolecular glycosylation, several linkers for tethering the glucose and ceramide moiety were designed and prepared, namely, succinyl, glutaryl, dimethylmalonyl, and phthaloyl esters. The succinyl ester linker was the best for accessing the cassette form. The newly designed glucosyl ceramide cassette acceptor was then applied in the total synthesis of ganglioside GalNAc-GM1b.

  20. The Human Skin Barrier Is Organized as Stacked Bilayers of Fully Extended Ceramides with Cholesterol Molecules Associated with the Ceramide Sphingoid Moiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwai, Ichiro; Han, Hongmei; Hollander, Lianne den

    2012-01-01

    The skin barrier is fundamental to terrestrial life and its evolution; it upholds homeostasis and protects against the environment. Skin barrier capacity is controlled by lipids that fill the extracellular space of the skin's surface layer-the stratum corneum. Here we report on the determination...... of the molecular organization of the skin's lipid matrix in situ, in its near-native state, using a methodological approach combining very high magnification cryo-electron microscopy (EM) of vitreous skin section defocus series, molecular modeling, and EM simulation. The lipids are organized in an arrangement...... not previously described in a biological system-stacked bilayers of fully extended ceramides (CERs) with cholesterol molecules associated with the CER sphingoid moiety. This arrangement rationalizes the skin's low permeability toward water and toward hydrophilic and lipophilic substances, as well as the skin...

  1. The human skin barrier is organized as stacked bilayers of fully extended ceramides with cholesterol molecules associated with the ceramide sphingoid moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Ichiro; Han, HongMei; den Hollander, Lianne; Svensson, Stina; Ofverstedt, Lars-Göran; Anwar, Jamshed; Brewer, Jonathan; Bloksgaard, Maria; Laloeuf, Aurelie; Nosek, Daniel; Masich, Sergej; Bagatolli, Luis A; Skoglund, Ulf; Norlén, Lars

    2012-09-01

    The skin barrier is fundamental to terrestrial life and its evolution; it upholds homeostasis and protects against the environment. Skin barrier capacity is controlled by lipids that fill the extracellular space of the skin's surface layer--the stratum corneum. Here we report on the determination of the molecular organization of the skin's lipid matrix in situ, in its near-native state, using a methodological approach combining very high magnification cryo-electron microscopy (EM) of vitreous skin section defocus series, molecular modeling, and EM simulation. The lipids are organized in an arrangement not previously described in a biological system-stacked bilayers of fully extended ceramides (CERs) with cholesterol molecules associated with the CER sphingoid moiety. This arrangement rationalizes the skin's low permeability toward water and toward hydrophilic and lipophilic substances, as well as the skin barrier's robustness toward hydration and dehydration, environmental temperature and pressure changes, stretching, compression, bending, and shearing.

  2. Revised stereochemistry of ceramide-trafficking inhibitor HPA-12 by X-ray crystallography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masaharu; Huang, Yi-Yong; Yamano, Akihito; Kobayashi, Shū

    2013-06-07

    In response to Berkeš's report revising the stereochemistry of HPA-12, an important ceramide-trafficking inhibitor that was discovered and synthesized and its stereochemistry determined in 2001, the synthesis and the stereochemistry were reinvestigated. A large-scale synthetic method for HPA-12 based on a Zn-catalyzed asymmetric Mannich-type reaction in water was developed. Single crystals of HPA-12 for X-ray crystallographic analysis were obtained from ethyl propionate/n-hexane, and the stereochemistry was definitely determined to be 1R,3S, consistent with Berkeš's revised structure.

  3. Thermotropic phase transitions in model membranes of the outer skin layer based on ceramide 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzinov, A. Yu.; Kiselev, M. A.; Ermakova, E. V.; Zabelin, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    The lipid intercellular matrix stratum corneum of the outer skin layer is a multilayer membrane consisting of a complex mixture of different lipids: ceramides, fatty acids, cholesterol, and its derivatives. The basis of the multilayer membrane is the lipid bilayer, i.e., a two-dimensional liquid crystal. Currently, it is known that the main way of substance penetration through the skin is the lipid matrix. The complexity of the actual biological system does not allow reliable direct study of its properties; therefore, system modeling is often used. Phase transitions in the lipid system whose composition simulates the native lipid matrix are studied by the X-ray synchrotron radiation diffraction method.

  4. Preclinical development of a C6-ceramide NanoLiposome, a novel sphingolipid therapeutic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kester, Mark; Bassler, Jocelyn; Fox, Todd E; Carter, Carly J; Davidson, Jeff A; Parette, Mylisa R

    2015-06-01

    Despite the therapeutic potential of sphingolipids, the ability to develop this class of compounds as active pharmaceutical ingredients has been hampered by issues of solubility and delivery. Beyond these technical hurdles, significant challenges in completing the necessary preclinical studies to support regulatory review are necessary for commercialization. This review seeks to identify the obstacles and potential solutions in the translation of a novel liposomal technology from the academic bench to investigational new drug (IND) stage by discussing the preclinical development of the Ceramide NanoLiposome (CNL), which is currently being developed as an anticancer drug for the initial indication of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

  5. HOS3, an ELO-Like Gene, Inhibits Effects of ABA and Implicates a S-1-P/Ceramide Control System for Abiotic Stress Responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tanya M. Quist; Irina Sokolchik; Huazhong Shi; Robert J. Joly; Ray A. Bressan; Albino Maggio; Meena Narsimhan; Xia Li

    2009-01-01

    A hyper-osmotically sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, designated hos3-1 (high expression of osmotically responsive genes), was identified based on its hyper-luminescence of RD29A:LUC promoter fusion plants upon treatment with NaCI and ABA. These responses implicate the disrupted gene as a direct or indirect negative regulator of the RD29A stress-responsive pathway. By sequencing the flanking regions of the T-DNA borders, it was determined that the disrupted gene is at locus At4g36830, annotated as encoding a putative protein with high homology to CIG30 (ELO2/FEN1).CIG30 has been implicated in synthesis of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA), which are essential precursors for sphingolipids and ceramides. Altered stress responses characteristic of ABA-hypersensitivity, including reduced root growth inhibition and reduced germination with ABA treatment and reduced water loss from leaves, were exhibited by allelic hos3-1 and hos3-2 mutants. The hos3-2 mutant is partially suppressed in its transcript abundance and is inherited as a recessive trait. Further, the HOS30RF under the control of the 35SCaMV promoter restored wild-type NaCI- and ABA-root growth sensitivity as well as RD29A:LUC luminescence in mutant plants. We also show here that the HOS3 wild-type gene functionally complements the sensitivity of elo2 and elo3 yeast mutants to monensin. Furthermore, both hos3-1 and hos3-2 alleles shared increased sensitivity to the herbicide Metolachlor, which inhibits acyl chain elongation in synthesis of VLCFA, and HOS3 functionally complemented both elo2 and elo3 and restored levels of VLCFA. Together, these data establish that HOS3 inhibits ABA-mediated stress responses and implicate the VLCFA pathway and products as control points for several aspects of abiotic stress signaling and responses. The results also provide support for a role of ceramide in the control of stomatal behavior.

  6. Important roles of brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase and ceramide metabolism in leptin hypothalamic control of feeding%Important roles of brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase and ceramide metabolism in leptin hypothalamic control of feeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In a recent issue of PNAS, Professor Wu Donghai of Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health (GIBH) and his colleagues published a paper titled "Important roles of brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase and ceramide metabolism in leptin hypothalamic control of feeding". Prof. Wu has receivedsustained support from NSFC since 2006.

  7. Ceramide analogue 14S24 ((S)-2-tetracosanoylamino-3-hydroxypropionic acid tetradecyl ester) is effective in skin barrier repair in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vávrová, Katerina; Zbytovská, Jarmila; Palát, Karel; Holas, Tomás; Klimentová, Jana; Hrabálek, Alexandr; Dolezal, Pavel

    2004-04-01

    Stratum corneum ceramides are fundamental for maintaining the skin barrier properties. Their content is decreased in some skin diseases, e.g. atopic dermatitis, and ceramide supplementation is one of the therapeutic approaches. In the present study we have designed novel ceramide analogue 14S24 ((S)-2-tetracosanoylamino-3-hydroxypropionic acid tetradecyl ester) as a potential barrier-repairing agent. We report a convenient two-step synthesis of this analogue with high yields. The ability of 14S24 to repair the disturbed skin barrier was evaluated in vitro on the porcine skin. After 2h application of 14S24 on the skin disrupted by lipid extraction, the permeability decreased significantly almost to the values of the native skin. The compound is effective in 0.1% aqueous suspension and its effect is comparable with physiological skin lipids under the same condition. The comparison of 14S24 and skin ceramides was made via computer modelling and the in silico physico-chemical parameters are reported. We suggest that allylic hydroxyl, that is essential for the apoptogenic activity of ceramides, is not a necessary component of the skin barrier-forming ceramides. The main result of this study is to demonstrate that simpler and easier-to-synthesise ceramide analogues could be effective in the skin barrier repair.

  8. Self-assembled polymeric nanoparticle of PEGylated chitosan-ceramide conjugate for systemic delivery of paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battogtokh, Gantumur; Ko, Young Tag

    2014-11-01

    Chitosan has been widely explored as one of the most favorable biomaterials for various pharmaceutical applications due to its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Here, we report novel PEGylated-chitosan-ceramide (PEG-CS-CE) that forms stable polymeric nanoparticles capable of functioning as efficient carriers of hydrophobic drug molecules. The chitosan-ceramide conjugate (CS-CE) was linked with amine-polyethyleneglycol (NH2-PEG2000) by using dicyclohexylcarbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide (DCC-NHS) to obtain PEG-CS-CE that could exhibit steric stabilization in biological environments. The structure of the conjugate was determined by proton ((1)H) NMR and FT-IR spectrometry. Under suitable conditions, the PEG-CS-CE self-assembled to form colloidally stable nanoparticles with a mean diameter of ∼ 200 nm. Further, hydrophobic anti-tumor agent paclitaxel (PTX) was incorporated into the polymeric nanoparticle with 90% loading efficiency and 11.3% loading capacity via an emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The PTX-loaded PEG-CS-CE nanoparticle showed sustained release and exhibited higher cellular uptake and a comparable cytotoxic efficacy to that of free PTX on B16F10 melanoma and MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines. The empty nanoparticle showed no toxicity, indicating that the co-polymer is safe to use in drug delivery. The polymeric nanoparticle PEG-CS-CE developed by us represent promising nanocarriers of hydrophobic drug molecules.

  9. Digestion of Ceramide 2-Aminoethylphosphonate, a Sphingolipid from the Jumbo Flying Squid Dosidicus gigas, in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomonaga, Nami; Manabe, Yuki; Sugawara, Tatsuya

    2017-04-01

    Ceramide 2-aminoethylphosphonate (CAEP), a sphingophosphonolipid containing a carbon-phosphorus bond, is frequently found in marine organisms and has a unique triene type of sphingoid base in its structure. CAEP has not been evaluated as a food ingredient, although it is generally contained in Mollusca organisms such as squids and shellfish, which are consumed worldwide. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the effects of CAEP as a food component by evaluating the digestion of CAEP extracted from the skin of the jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas. Our results revealed that dietary CAEP was digested to free sphingoid bases via ceramides by the mouse small intestinal mucosa. At pH 7.2, CAEP was hydrolyzed more rapidly than the major mammalian sphingolipid sphingomyelin; however, the hydrolysis of CAEP was similar to that of sphingomyelin at pH 9.0. Thus, the digestion of CAEP may be catalyzed by alkaline spingomyelinase and other enzymes. Our findings provide important insights into the digestion of the dietary sphingophosphonolipid CAEP in marine foods.

  10. Cytochrome c oxidase deficiency accelerates mitochondrial apoptosis by activating ceramide synthase 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüll, S; Günther, S D; Brodesser, S; Seeger, J M; Tosetti, B; Wiegmann, K; Pongratz, C; Diaz, F; Witt, A; Andree, M; Brinkmann, K; Krönke, M; Wiesner, R J; Kashkar, H

    2015-03-12

    Although numerous pathogenic changes within the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) have been associated with an elevated occurrence of apoptosis within the affected tissues, the mechanistic insight into how mitochondrial dysfunction initiates apoptotic cell death is still unknown. In this study, we show that the specific alteration of the cytochrome c oxidase (COX), representing a common defect found in mitochondrial diseases, facilitates mitochondrial apoptosis in response to oxidative stress. Our data identified an increased ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6) activity as an important pro-apoptotic response to COX dysfunction induced either by chemical or genetic approaches. The elevated CerS6 activity resulted in accumulation of the pro-apoptotic C16 : 0 ceramide, which facilitates the mitochondrial apoptosis in response to oxidative stress. Accordingly, inhibition of CerS6 or its specific knockdown diminished the increased susceptibility of COX-deficient cells to oxidative stress. Our results provide new insights into how mitochondrial RC dysfunction mechanistically interferes with the apoptotic machinery. On the basis of its pivotal role in regulating cell death upon COX dysfunction, CerS6 might potentially represent a novel target for therapeutic intervention in mitochondrial diseases caused by COX dysfunction.

  11. Organization and Dynamics of Fas Transmembrane Domain in Raft Membranes and Modulation by Ceramide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Bruno M.; de Almeida, Rodrigo F.M.; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Fedorov, Aleksander; Prieto, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    To comprehend the molecular processes that lead to the Fas death receptor clustering in lipid rafts, a 21-mer peptide corresponding to its single transmembrane domain (TMD) was reconstituted into mammalian raft model membranes composed of an unsaturated glycerophospholipid, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol. The peptide membrane lateral organization and dynamics, and its influence on membrane properties, were studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques and by attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Our results show that Fas TMD is preferentially localized in liquid-disordered membrane regions and undergoes a strong reorganization as the membrane composition is changed toward the liquid-ordered phase. This results from the strong hydrophobic mismatch between the length of the peptide hydrophobic stretch and the hydrophobic thickness of liquid-ordered membranes. The stability of nonclustered Fas TMD in liquid-disordered domains suggests that its sequence may have a protective function against nonligand-induced Fas clustering in lipid rafts. It has been reported that ceramide induces Fas oligomerization in lipid rafts. Here, it is shown that neither Fas TMD membrane organization nor its conformation is affected by ceramide. These results are discussed within the framework of Fas membrane signaling events. PMID:21961589

  12. Characterization of eicosanoid synthesis in a genetic ablation model of ceramide kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mietla, Jennifer A; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan S; Hoeferlin, L Alexis; Shultz, Michael D; Natarajan, Ramesh; Fowler, Alpha A; Chalfant, Charles E

    2013-07-01

    Multiple reports have demonstrated a role for ceramide kinase (CERK) in the production of eicosanoids. To examine the effects of the genetic ablation of CERK on eicosanoid synthesis, primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and macrophages were isolated from CERK(-/-) and CERK(+/+) mice, and the ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) and eicosanoid profiles were investigated. Significant decreases were observed in multiple C1P subspecies in CERK-/- cells as compared to CERK(+/+) cells with overall 24% and 48% decreases in total C1P. In baseline experiments, the levels of multiple eicosanoids were significantly lower in the CERK(-/-) cells compared with wild-type cells. Importantly, induction of eicosanoid synthesis by calcium ionophore was significantly reduced in the CERK(-/-) MEFs. Our studies also demonstrate that the CERK(-/-) mouse has adapted to loss of CERK in regards to airway hyper-responsiveness as compared with CERK siRNA treatment. Overall, we demonstrate that there are significant differences in eicosanoid levels in ex vivo CERK(-/-) cells compared with wild-type counterparts, but the effect of the genetic ablation of CERK on eicosanoid synthesis and the serum levels of C1P was not apparent in vivo.

  13. ABCA12 maintains the epidermal lipid permeability barrier by facilitating formation of ceramide linoleic esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Ying; Zhuang, Debbie Z; Han, Rong; Isaac, Giorgis; Tobin, Jennifer J; McKee, Mary; Welti, Ruth; Brissette, Janice L; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Freeman, Mason W

    2008-12-26

    Harlequin ichthyosis is a congenital scaling syndrome of the skin in which affected infants have epidermal hyperkeratosis and a defective permeability barrier. Mutations in the gene encoding a member of the ABCA transporter family, ABCA12, have been linked to harlequin ichthyosis, but the molecular function of the protein is unknown. To investigate the activity of ABCA12, we generated Abca12 null mice and analyzed the impact on skin function and lipid content. Abca12-/- mice are born with a thickened epidermis and die shortly after birth, as water rapidly evaporates from their skin. In vivo skin proliferation measurements suggest a lack of desquamation of the skin cells, rather than enhanced proliferation of basal layer keratinocytes, accounts for the 5-fold thickening of the Abca12-/- stratum corneum. Electron microscopy revealed a loss of the lamellar permeability barrier in Abca12-/- skin. This was associated with a profound reduction in skin linoleic esters of long-chain omega-hydroxyceramides and a corresponding increase in their glucosyl ceramide precursors. Because omega-hydroxyceramides are required for the barrier function of the skin, these results establish that ABCA12 activity is required for the generation of long-chain ceramide esters that are essential for the development of normal skin structure and function.

  14. Studying the lateral chain packing in a ceramide bilayer with molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, N. I.; Karozis, S. N.; Kainourgiakis, M. E.; Charalambopoulou, G. Ch

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a novel technique, based on molecular dynamics simulations, that allows the study of the lateral chain packing in a lipid bilayer. It utilizes the radial distribution function of the alkyl chains to determine the arrangement of the chains along the bilayer plane. The positions of the mass centres of the chains are projected onto the bilayer plane and a 2D radial distribution function is calculated for these projections. The proposed technique can be particularly useful for lipid bilayers in the gel (solid) phase where the chains present a limited degree of mobility. As a case study, we have examined a bilayer that consists of ceramide NS 24:0. Ceramide bilayers can be found in the lipid domain of the skin where they have a significant role in its barrier function. The specific bilayer was found (at 300 K) to adopt a strictly hexagonal chain packing with a separation distance between the chains of 0.466 nm, in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  15. Skin ceramide alterations in first-episode schizophrenia indicate abnormal sphingolipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smesny, Stefan; Schmelzer, Christian E H; Hinder, Anke; Köhler, Alexandra; Schneider, Christiane; Rudzok, Maria; Schmidt, Ulrike; Milleit, Berko; Milleit, Christine; Nenadic, Igor; Sauer, Heinrich; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2013-07-01

    There is considerable evidence for specific pathology of lipid metabolism in schizophrenia, affecting polyunsaturated fatty acids and in particular sphingolipids. These deficits are assumed to interfere with neuronal membrane functioning and the development and maintenance of myelin sheaths. Recent studies suggest that some of these lipid pathologies might also be detected in peripheral skin tests. In this study, we examined different skin lipids and their relation to schizophrenia. We assessed epidermal lipid profiles in 22 first-episode antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients and 22 healthy controls matched for age and gender using a hexan/ethanol extraction technique and combined high-performance thin-layer chromatography/gas-chromatography. We found highly significant increase of ceramide AH and NH/AS classes in patients and decrease of EOS and NP ceramide classes. This is the first demonstration of specific peripheral sphingolipid alterations in schizophrenia. The results support recent models of systemic lipid pathology and in particular of specific sphingolipids, which are crucial in neuronal membrane integrity. Given recent findings showing amelioration of psychopathology using fatty acid supplementation, our findings also bear relevance for sphingolipids as potential biomarkers of the disease.

  16. Skin efficacy of liposomes composed of internal wool lipids rich in ceramides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, R; Martí, M; Barba, C; Méndez, S; Parra, J L; Coderch, L

    2010-01-01

    Ceramides from intercellular lipids of skin stratum corneum are known to play an essential role in maintaining and structuring the lipid barrier of the skin. Internal wool lipids (IWL), which are also rich in ceramides, have a composition similar to that of the stratum corneum lipids. IWL extracted with chloroform/methanol azeotrope at the laboratory scale have been shown to be capable of forming liposomes with a stable bilayer structure. Furthermore, topical application of these IWL liposomes on intact and compromised skin has been demonstrated to improve barrier skin properties.In this study we evaluated the effect on human skin repair of different IWL extract compositions obtained by two extraction methodologies. The formation and characteristics of the liposomes prepared were greatly influenced by the IWL composition, primarily the sterol sulfate content. The IWL liposomes improved skin barrier integrity and increased skin hydration when applied onto intact skin. These improvements were slightly enhanced in the case of IWL liposomes that were richer in polar lipids.

  17. Plasma membrane ubiquinone controls ceramide production and prevents cell death induced by serum withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, M P; Gómez-Díaz, C; Villalba, J M; Burón, M I; López-Lluch, G; Navas, P

    1997-06-01

    Serum provides cultured cells with survival factors required to maintain growth. Its withdrawal induces the development of programmed cell death. HL-60 cells were sensitive to serum removal, and an increase of lipid peroxidation and apoptosis was observed. Long-term treatment with ethidium bromide induced the mitochondria-deficient rho(o)HL-60 cell line. These cells were surprisingly more resistant to serum removal, displaying fewer apoptotic cells and lower lipid peroxidation. HL-60 cells contained less ubiquinone at the plasma membrane than rho(o)HL-60 cells. Both cell types increased plasma membrane ubiquinone in response to serum removal, although this increase was much higher in rho(o) cells. Addition of ubiquinone to both cell cultures in the absence of serum improved cell survival with decreasing lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. Ceramide was accumulated after serum removal in HL-60 but not in rho(o)HL-60 cells, and exogenous ubiquinone reduced this accumulation. These results demonstrate a relationship between ubiquinone levels in the plasma membrane and the induction of serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis, and ceramide accumulation. Thus, ubiquinone, which is a central component of the plasma membrane electron transport system, can represent a first level of protection against oxidative damage caused by serum withdrawal.

  18. A tendem mass spectrometric approach for determining the structure of molecular species of ceramide in the marine sponge, Haliclona cribricutis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tilvi, S.; Majik, M.; Naik, C.G.

    , “Squid nerve Sphingomyelin containing an unusual sphingoid base”, J. Lipid Res. 41, 1118 (2000). 24. J.D. Watts, M. Gu, A.J. Polverino, S.D. Patterson and R. Aebersold, “Fas-induced apoptosis of T cells occurs independently of ceramide generation...

  19. A role for ceramide, but not diacylglycerol, in the antagonism of insulin signal transduction by saturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Jose Antonio; Knotts, Trina A; Wang, Li-Ping; Li, Guibin; Dobrowsky, Rick T; Florant, Gregory L; Summers, Scott A

    2003-03-21

    Multiple studies suggest that lipid oversupply to skeletal muscle contributes to the development of insulin resistance, perhaps by promoting the accumulation of lipid metabolites capable of inhibiting signal transduction. Herein we demonstrate that exposing muscle cells to particular saturated free fatty acids (FFAs), but not mono-unsaturated FFAs, inhibits insulin stimulation of Akt/protein kinase B, a serine/threonine kinase that is a central mediator of insulin-stimulated anabolic metabolism. These saturated FFAs concomitantly induced the accumulation of ceramide and diacylglycerol, two products of fatty acyl-CoA that have been shown to accumulate in insulin-resistant tissues and to inhibit early steps in insulin signaling. Preventing de novo ceramide synthesis negated the antagonistic effect of saturated FFAs toward Akt/protein kinase B. Moreover, inducing ceramide buildup recapitulated and augmented the inhibitory effect of saturated FFAs. By contrast, diacylglycerol proved dispensable for these FFA effects. Collectively these results identify ceramide as a necessary and sufficient intermediate linking saturated fats to the inhibition of insulin signaling.

  20. Evidence for Fumonisin inhibition of ceramide synthase in humans: validation in follow-up studies in Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumonisins (FB) are mycotoxins found in corn. FB1 is the most common FB. It is the cause of farm animal diseases and is carcinogenic in rodents. The mode of action is the inhibition of ceramide synthase (CerS). Inhibition of CerS in mice causes a dose-dependent accumulation of sphinganine 1-phosphat...

  1. The stimulation of ketogenesis by cannabinoids in cultured astrocytes defines carnitine palmitoyltransferase I as a new ceramide-activated enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez, C; Sánchez, C; Daza, A; Galve-Roperh, I; Guzmán, M

    1999-04-01

    The effects of cannabinoids on ketogenesis in primary cultures of rat astrocytes were studied. Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major active component of marijuana, produced a malonyl-CoA-independent stimulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I) and ketogenesis from [14C]palmitate. The THC-induced stimulation of ketogenesis was mimicked by the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210 and was prevented by pertussis toxin and the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716. Experiments performed with different cellular modulators indicated that the THC-induced stimulation of ketogenesis was independent of cyclic AMP, Ca2+, protein kinase C, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The possible involvement of ceramide in the activation of ketogenesis by cannabinoids was subsequently studied. THC produced a CB1 receptor-dependent stimulation of sphingomyelin breakdown that was concomitant to an elevation of intracellular ceramide levels. Addition of exogenous sphingomyelinase to the astrocyte culture medium led to a MAPK-independent activation of ketogenesis that was quantitatively similar and not additive to that exerted by THC. Furthermore, ceramide activated CPT-I in astrocyte mitochondria. Results thus indicate that cannabinoids stimulate ketogenesis in astrocytes by a mechanism that may rely on CB1 receptor activation, sphingomyelin hydrolysis, and ceramide-mediated activation of CPT-I.

  2. Increase in short-chain ceramides correlates with an altered lipid organization and decreased barrier function in atopic eczema patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Janssens (Michelle); J. van Smeden (Jeroen); G.S. Gooris (Gert); W. Bras (Wim); G. Portale (Guiseppe); P.J. Caspers (Peter); R. Vreeken (Rob); T. Hankemeier (Thomas); S. Kezic (Sanja); R. Wolterbeek (Ron); A.P.M. Lavrijsen (Adriana); J.A. Bouwstra (Joke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractA hallmark of atopic eczema (AE) is skin barrier dysfunction. Lipids in the stratum corneum (SC), primarily ceramides, fatty acids, and cholesterol, are crucial for the barrier function, but their role in relation to AE is indistinct. Filaggrin is an epithelial barrier protein with a cen

  3. Increase in short-chain ceramides correlates with an altered lipid organization and decreased barrier function in atopic eczema patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Michelle; van Smeden, Jeroen; Gooris, Gert S; Bras, Wim; Portale, Guiseppe; Caspers, Peter J; Vreeken, Rob J; Hankemeier, Thomas; Kezic, Sanja; Wolterbeek, Ron; Lavrijsen, Adriana P; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2012-12-01

    A hallmark of atopic eczema (AE) is skin barrier dysfunction. Lipids in the stratum corneum (SC), primarily ceramides, fatty acids, and cholesterol, are crucial for the barrier function, but their role in relation to AE is indistinct. Filaggrin is an epithelial barrier protein with a central role in the pathogenesis of AE. Nevertheless, the precise causes of AE-associated barrier dysfunction are largely unknown. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of ceramide composition and lipid organization in nonlesional SC of AE patients and control subjects was performed by means of mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. In addition, the skin barrier and clinical state of the disease were examined. The level of ceramides with an extreme short chain length is drastically increased in SC of AE patients, which leads to an aberrant lipid organization and a decreased skin barrier function. Changes in SC lipid properties correlate with disease severity but are independent of filaggrin mutations. We demonstrate for the first time that changes in ceramide chain length and lipid organization are directly correlated with the skin barrier defects in nonlesional skin of AE patients. We envisage that these insights will provide a new therapeutic entry in therapy and prevention of AE.

  4. Palmitic acid feeding increases ceramide supply in association with increased milk yield, circulating nonesterified fatty acids, and adipose tissue responsiveness to a glucose challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, J E; Mathews, A T; Lovett, J; Haughey, N J; McFadden, J W

    2016-11-01

    Reduced insulin action is a key adaptation that facilitates glucose partitioning to the mammary gland for milk synthesis and enhances adipose tissue lipolysis during early lactation. The progressive recovery of insulin sensitivity as cows advance toward late lactation is accompanied by reductions in circulating nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and milk yield. Because palmitic acid can promote insulin resistance in monogastrics through sphingolipid ceramide-dependent mechanisms, palmitic acid (C16:0) feeding may enhance milk production by restoring homeorhetic responses. We hypothesized that feeding C16:0 to mid-lactation cows would enhance ceramide supply and ceramide would be positively associated with milk yield. Twenty multiparous mid-lactation Holstein cows were enrolled in a study consisting of a 5-d covariate, 49-d treatment, and 14-d posttreatment period. All cows were randomly assigned to a sorghum silage-based diet containing no supplemental fat (control; n=10; 138±45 d in milk) or C16:0 at 4% of ration dry matter (PALM; 98% C16:0; n=10; 136±44 d in milk). Blood and milk were collected at routine intervals. Liver and skeletal muscle tissue were biopsied at d 47 of treatment. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests (300mg/kg of body weight) were performed at d -1, 24, and 49 relative to start of treatment. The plasma and tissue concentrations of ceramide and glycosylated ceramide were determined using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Data were analyzed as repeated measures using a mixed model with fixed effects of treatment and time, and milk yield served as a covariate. The PALM treatment increased milk yield, energy-corrected milk, and milk fat yield. The most abundant plasma and tissue sphingolipids detected were C24:0-ceramide, C24:0-monohexosylceramide (GlcCer), and C16:0-lactosylceramide. Plasma concentrations of total ceramide and GlcCer decreased as lactation advanced, and ceramide and GlcCer were elevated in cows fed PALM

  5. Conformation of ceramide 6 molecules and chain-flip transitions in the lipid matrix of the outermost layer of mammalian skin, the stratum corneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, M. A.

    2007-05-01

    Neutron diffraction from oriented multilamellar model stratum corneum (SC) membranes provides information on the internal nanostructure and hydration of the lipid bilayer. The main distinguishing feature of model SC membranes based on ceramide 6 is the extremely small intermembrane space (1 Å). The role of the fully extended (FE) conformation of ceramide 6 molecules in the organization of the nanostructure of the lipid matrix is discussed. The FE conformation gives rise to extremely strong intermembrane attractions (armature reinforcement), which tighten the adjacent bilayers to form steric contacts. Chain-flip transitions in the conformation of ceramide molecules account for structural alterations in native and model SC membranes upon their hydration.

  6. Influence of palmitoyl pentapeptide and Ceramide III B on the droplet size of nanoemulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondari, Dewi; Haryono, Agus; Harmami, Sri Budi; Randy, Ahmad

    2010-05-01

    The influence of the Palmitoyl Pentapeptide (PPp) and Ceramide IIIB (Cm III B) as active ingredients on the droplet size of nano-emulsion was studied using different kinds of oil (avocado oil, sweet almond oil, jojoba oil, mineral oil and squalene). The formation of nano-emulsions were prepared in water mixed non ionic surfactant/oils system using the spontaneous emulsification mechanism. The aqueous solution, which consist of water and Tween® 20 as a hydrophilic surfactant was mixed homogenously. The organic solution, which consist of oil and Span® 80 as a lipophilic surfactant was mixed homogenously in ethanol. Ethanol was used as a water miscible solvent, which can help the formation of nano-emulsion. The oil phase (containing the blend of surfactant Span® 80, ethanol, oil and active ingredient) and the aqueous phase (containing water and Tween® 20) were separately prepared at room temperatures. The oil phase was slowly added into aqueous phase under continuous mechanical agitation (18000 rpm). All samples were subsequently homogenized with Ultra-Turrax for 30 minutes. The characterizations of nano-emulsion were carried out using photo-microscope and particle size analyzer. Addition of active ingredients on the formation of nano-emulsion gave smallest droplet size compared without active ingredients addition on the formation of nano-emulsion. Squalene oil with Palmitoyl Pentapeptide (PPm) and Ceramide IIIB (Cm IIIB) gave smallest droplet size (184.0 nm) compared without Palmitoyl Pentapeptide and Ceramide IIIB (214.9 nm), however the droplets size of the emulsion prepared by the other oils still in the range of nano-emulsion (below 500 nm). The stability of nano-emulsion was observed using two methods. In one method, the stability of nano-emulsion was observed for three months at temperature of 5°C and 50°C, while in the other method, the stability nano-emulsion was observed by centrifuged at 12000 rpm for 30 minutes. Nanoemulsion with active ingredient

  7. Use of ceramides and related products for childhood-onset eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Kam L; Leung, Alexander K C

    2013-01-01

    Atopic eczema or dermatitis (AD) is a chronically relapsing dermatosis associated with pruritus, sleep disturbance and impaired quality of life. AD affects 10 to 20% of school-aged children. The prevalence has increased two to three folds over the past three decades in industrialized countries and there is evidence to suggest that this prevalence is increasing. AD is frustrating to both patients and caregivers and can impose considerable financial impact on the families. The pruritus and sleep disturbance can be intractable and the disease has important physical and psychological implications. Filaggrin (filament-aggregating protein) has an important function in epidermal differentiation and barrier function. Null mutations within the filaggrin gene cause ichthyosis vulgaris and are major risk factors for developing AD. The affected skin of atopic individuals is deficient in natural moisturizing factors (derived from deiminated filaggrin peptides filaggrin) or ceramides (a family of lipid molecules, composed of sphingosine and a fatty acid, found in high concentrations within the cell membrane of cells in the stratum corneum). Avoidance of triggering factors, optimal skin care and topical corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy for AD. There are two important dermatologic facets to its management, namely, preventive and therapeutic measures. Preventive measures refer to the frequent and proper application of skin moisturizers. When these preventive measures fail to control the disease exacerbation, therapeutic measures such as topical/systemic corticosteroids, antibiotics and immunomodulating agents may be required to control the skin inflammation. Proper moisturizer therapy can reduce the frequency of flares and the demand of topical corticosteroids or topical calcineurin inhibitors. Regular topical application of a moisturizer is the key in the management of patients with AD. Moisturizer therapy of childhood-onset AD is significantly complicated by the

  8. Imaging mass spectrometry visualizes ceramides and the pathogenesis of dorfman-chanarin syndrome due to ceramide metabolic abnormality in the skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Goto-Inoue

    Full Text Available Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS is a useful cutting edge technology used to investigate the distribution of biomolecules such as drugs and metabolites, as well as to identify molecular species in tissues and cells without labeling. To protect against excess water loss that is essential for survival in a terrestrial environment, mammalian skin possesses a competent permeability barrier in the stratum corneum (SC, the outermost layer of the epidermis. The key lipids constituting this barrier in the SC are the ceramides (Cers comprising of a heterogeneous molecular species. Alterations in Cer composition have been reported in several skin diseases that display abnormalities in the epidermal permeability barrier function. Not only the amounts of different Cers, but also their localizations are critical for the barrier function. We have employed our new imaging system, capable of high-lateral-resolution IMS with an atmospheric-pressure ionization source, to directly visualize the distribution of Cers. Moreover, we show an ichthyotic disease pathogenesis due to abnormal Cer metabolism in Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, a neutral lipid storage disorder with ichthyosis in human skin, demonstrating that IMS is a novel diagnostic approach for assessing lipid abnormalities in clinical setting, as well as for investigating physiological roles of lipids in cells/tissues.

  9. Imaging mass spectrometry visualizes ceramides and the pathogenesis of dorfman-chanarin syndrome due to ceramide metabolic abnormality in the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Nakajima, Kimiko; Holleran, Walter M; Sano, Shigetoshi; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2012-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a useful cutting edge technology used to investigate the distribution of biomolecules such as drugs and metabolites, as well as to identify molecular species in tissues and cells without labeling. To protect against excess water loss that is essential for survival in a terrestrial environment, mammalian skin possesses a competent permeability barrier in the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the epidermis. The key lipids constituting this barrier in the SC are the ceramides (Cers) comprising of a heterogeneous molecular species. Alterations in Cer composition have been reported in several skin diseases that display abnormalities in the epidermal permeability barrier function. Not only the amounts of different Cers, but also their localizations are critical for the barrier function. We have employed our new imaging system, capable of high-lateral-resolution IMS with an atmospheric-pressure ionization source, to directly visualize the distribution of Cers. Moreover, we show an ichthyotic disease pathogenesis due to abnormal Cer metabolism in Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, a neutral lipid storage disorder with ichthyosis in human skin, demonstrating that IMS is a novel diagnostic approach for assessing lipid abnormalities in clinical setting, as well as for investigating physiological roles of lipids in cells/tissues.

  10. Plasma ceramides are elevated in overweight Holstein dairy cows experiencing greater lipolysis and insulin resistance during the transition from late pregnancy to early lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, J E; Bandaru, V V R; Dorskind, J M; Haughey, N J; McFadden, J W

    2015-11-01

    Insulin resistance is a homeorhetic adaptation to parturition in dairy cows transitioning from late pregnancy to early lactation. An increase in prepartum adiposity can predispose periparturient cows to greater lipolysis and insulin resistance, thus increasing the risk for metabolic disease. Mechanisms mediating the development of insulin resistance in overweight peripartal dairy cows may depend on ceramide metabolism. The sphingolipid ceramide accumulates in plasma and tissues of overweight monogastric animals, and facilitates saturated fatty acid-induced insulin resistance. Considering this evidence, we hypothesized that plasma ceramides would be elevated in periparturient dairy cattle and that these sphingolipids would correlate with the magnitude of lipolysis and insulin resistance. To test our central hypothesis, multiparous Holstein cows were allocated into 2 groups according to their body condition score (BCS) at d -30 prepartum: lean (BCS BCS >4.0; n=11). Blood samples were collected at d -45, -30, -15, and -7, relative to expected parturition, and at d 4 postpartum. Plasma glucose, insulin, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) concentrations were measured, and insulin sensitivity was estimated. The concentrations of individual plasma ceramide and glycosylated ceramide were determined using liquid chromatography-based mass spectrometry. Results demonstrated that greater adiposity was associated with a greater loss in body condition during late pregnancy. Overweight cows had greater circulating concentrations of glucose, insulin, and NEFA, and lower insulin sensitivity relative to lean cows. We detected 30 different sphingolipids across 6 lipid classes with acyl chains ranging from 16 to 26 carbons. The most abundant plasma sphingolipids detected were C24:0-ceramide, C24:0-monohexosylceramide, and C16:0-lactosylceramide. Plasma concentrations of total ceramide and monohexosylceramide increased as lactation approached, and saturated

  11. Ceramide lipids in alive and thermally stressed mussels: an investigation by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Laura; Losito, Ilario; Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Palmisano, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization-Fourier transform mass spectrometry was employed to study ceramide lipids occurring in mussels of sp. Mytilus galloprovincialis. Lipid extracts from alive mussels and mussels deliberately subjected to specific thermal treatments were analyzed. In particular, single and tandem MS measurements were performed on a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer and then complemented by MS(n) analyses (n = 2, 3) achieved by a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. This approach enabled the characterization of 66 ceramide lipids, encompassing ceramide phosphoethanolamines (CPE), ceramide aminoethylphosphonates (CAEP) and N-monomethylated CAEP. The sphingoid and acyl chains of each ceramide lipid could be distinctly recognized in terms of numbers of carbon atoms and C=C bonds, and indications on the possible location of the latter on the sphingoid chain could be often inferred from fragmentation patterns. The occurrence of several species hydroxylated on the α carbon of the acyl chain was also discovered. On the other hand, the sphingoid chain of ceramide lipids was never found to be involved in oxidation processes, unless forced exposure of the mussel lipid extracts to atmospheric oxygen was performed. CPE(d19:3/16:0) and its hydroxylated form, CPE(d19:3/2-OH-16:0), were found to be the prevailing species among CPE, whereas CAEP(d18:2/16:0), CAEP(d19:3/16:0) and CAEP(d19:3/2-OH-16:0) were the most abundant CAEP. Finally, ceramide lipids showed a remarkably higher stability, compared with glycerophospholipids, in mussels subjected to different thermal treatments. This finding opens interesting perspectives on the role of ceramide-based lipids in the adaptation of aquatic organisms to thermal stresses. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Saturated- and n-6 polyunsaturated-fat diets each induce ceramide accumulation in mouse skeletal muscle: reversal and improvement of glucose tolerance by lipid metabolism inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioudakis, G; Garrard, J; Raddatz, K; Nadler, J L; Mitchell, T W; Schmitz-Peiffer, C

    2010-09-01

    Lipid-induced insulin resistance is associated with intracellular accumulation of inhibitory intermediates depending on the prevalent fatty acid (FA) species. In cultured myotubes, ceramide and phosphatidic acid (PA) mediate the effects of the saturated FA palmitate and the unsaturated FA linoleate, respectively. We hypothesized that myriocin (MYR), an inhibitor of de novo ceramide synthesis, would protect against glucose intolerance in saturated fat-fed mice, while lisofylline (LSF), a functional inhibitor of PA synthesis, would protect unsaturated fat-fed mice. Mice were fed diets enriched in saturated fat, n-6 polyunsaturated fat, or chow for 6 wk. Saline, LSF (25 mg/kg x d), or MYR (0.3 mg/kg x d) were administered by mini-pumps in the final 4 wk. Glucose homeostasis was examined by glucose tolerance test. Muscle ceramide and PA were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Expression of LASS isoforms (ceramide synthases) was evaluated by immunoblotting. Both saturated and polyunsaturated fat diets increased muscle ceramide and induced glucose intolerance. MYR and LSF reduced ceramide levels in saturated and unsaturated fat-fed mice. Both inhibitors also improved glucose tolerance in unsaturated fat-fed mice, but only LSF was effective in saturated fat-fed mice. The discrepancy between ceramide and glucose tolerance suggests these improvements may not be related directly to changes in muscle ceramide and may involve other insulin-responsive tissues. Changes in the expression of LASS1 were, however, inversely correlated with alterations in glucose tolerance. The demonstration that LSF can ameliorate glucose intolerance in vivo independent of the dietary FA type indicates it may be a novel intervention for the treatment of insulin resistance.

  13. Thermodynamic Insights and Conceptual Design of Skin-Sensitive Chitosan Coated Ceramide/PLGA Nanodrug for Regeneration of Stratum Corneum on Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sang-Myung Jung; Gwang Heum Yoon; Hoo Chul Lee; Moon Hee Jung; Sun Il Yu; Seung Ju Yeon; Seul Ki Min; Yeo Seon Kwon; Jin Ha Hwang; Hwa Sung Shin

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex skin disease primarily characterized by psoriasis of the stratum corneum. AD drugs have usually been used in acidic and hydrophilic solvents to supply moisture and prevent lipid defects. Ceramide is a typical treatment agent to regenerate the stratum corneum and relieve symptoms of AD. However, ceramide has limitation on direct use for skin because of its low dispersion properties in hydrophilic phase and side effects at excessive treatment. In this study, ...

  14. Ceramide formation is involved in Lactobacillus acidophilus-induced IFN-beta response in dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Eva; Henningsen, Louise; Frøkiær, Hanne

    of sphingomyelin to ceramide by acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) at the outer leaflet of the PM is a key event in endocytosis of gram-positive Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) and the subsequent induction of IFN-beta in DCs and, as the gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) does not induce appreciable...... amounts of IFN-beta, the ASMase activity would affect endocytosis and the ensuing cytokine response of L. acidophilus and E. coli differently. SMase or an inhibitor of ASMase and acid ceramidase, chlorpromazine (CPZ), was added to DCs prior to stimulation with either of the bacteria. Endocytosis...... of fluorescent bacteria +/- FITC-dextran was measured by flow cytometry and gene expression and cytokine response of IFN-beta and IL-12 was measured by qPCR and ELISA, respectively. Addition of SMase increased the uptake of L. acidophilus and L. acidophilus-induced IL-12/IFN-beta but showed no effect...

  15. Cholesterol Depletion from a Ceramide/Cholesterol Mixed Monolayer: A Brewster Angle Microscope Study

    KAUST Repository

    Mandal, Pritam

    2016-06-01

    Cholesterol is crucial to the mechanical properties of cell membranes that are important to cells’ behavior. Its depletion from the cell membranes could be dramatic. Among cyclodextrins (CDs), methyl beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) is the most efficient to deplete cholesterol (Chol) from biomembranes. Here, we focus on the depletion of cholesterol from a C16 ceramide/cholesterol (C16-Cer/Chol) mixed monolayer using MβCD. While the removal of cholesterol by MβCD depends on the cholesterol concentration in most mixed lipid monolayers, it does not depend very much on the concentration of cholesterol in C16-Cer/Chol monolayers. The surface pressure decay during depletion were described by a stretched exponential that suggested that the cholesterol molecules are unable to diffuse laterally and behave like static traps for the MβCD molecules. Cholesterol depletion causes morphology changes of domains but these disrupted monolayers domains seem to reform even when cholesterol level was low.

  16. Novel structural features of the immunocompetent ceramide phospho-inositol glycan core from Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Christian; Wang, Zhirui; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; Fichorova, Raina N; Singh, Bibhuti N

    2016-01-01

    The ceramide phosphoinositol glycan core (CPI-GC) of the lipophosphoglycan of Trichomonas vaginalis is a major virulent factor of this common genitourinary parasite. While its carbohydrate composition has been reported before, its structure has remained largely unknown. We isolated the glycan portions of CPI-GC by nitrous acid deamination and hydrofluoric acid treatment and investigated their structures by methylation analysis and 1- and 2-D NMR. We found that the α-anomer of galactose is a major constituent of CPI-GC. The β-anomer was found exclusively at the non-reducing end of CPI-GC side chains. Furthermore the data showed that the rhamnan backbone is more complex than previously thought and that the inositol residue at the reducing end is linked to a 4-linked α-glucuronic acid (GlcA) residue. This appears to be the most striking and novel feature of this GPI-anchor type molecule.

  17. Two new ceramides from the fruit pulp of Acanthopanax senticosus (Rupr. et Maxim) Harms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhaowei; Liu, Jinping; Lu, Dan; Narlawar, Rajeshwar; Groundwater, Paul; Li, Pingya

    2014-01-01

    Two new ceramides, (3S,4S,5R)-3-octadecanoylamino-4-hydroxy-5-dodecane-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrofuran (1) and (3S,4S,5R)-3-[(2R)-2-hydroxyhexacosanoylamino]-4-hydroxy-5-[(4E)-dodecane-4-ene]-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrofuran (2), together with eight known compounds, eleutheroside A (3), eleutheroside B (4), eleutheroside E (5), 7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-coumarin (6), 6,7-dimethoxycoumarin (7), 5α,8α-epidioxyergosta-6,22-dien-3-ol (8), stigmasterol (9) and rutin (10), were isolated from the fruit pulp of Acanthopanax senticosus (Rupr. et Maxim) Harms. Their structures were elucidated by means of physicochemical properties and spectroscopic methods (1D, 2D NMR and MS).

  18. The effect of synthetic ceramide analogues on gastritis and esophagitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hyo; Um, Seung In; Nam, Yoonjin; Park, Sun Young; Dong, Je Hyun; Ko, Sung Kwon; Sohn, Uy Dong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-09-01

    The effects of ceremide analogues on esophagitis and gastritis in rats were examined. Gastritis induced by indomethacin was significantly reduced after CY3325 and CY3723 treatment, whereas other analogues had no effect. The amount of malondialdehyde in gastritis was significantly reduced by CY3325 or CY 3723. CY3325 or CY 3723 decreased the glutathione levels in gastritis. The myeloperoxidase level in gastritis is increased, and its increment was decreased by CY3325 and CY3723. In reflux esophagitis, the ulceration was decreased by CY3325, CY3723. The gastric volume and acid output are reduced, whereas the pH value is increased by CY3325 or CY3723 after esophagitis. These results suggest that ceramide analogues, CY3325 and CY3723, can prevent the development of gastritis and reflux esophagitis in rats.

  19. Characterization of glycosyl inositol phosphoryl ceramides from plants and fungi by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buré, Corinne; Cacas, Jean-Luc; Mongrand, Sébastien; Schmitter, Jean-Marie

    2014-02-01

    Although glycosyl inositol phosphoryl ceramides (GIPCs) represent the most abundant class of sphingolipids in plants, they still remain poorly characterized in terms of structure and biodiversity. More than 50 years after their discovery, little is known about their subcellular distribution and their exact roles in membrane structure and biological functions. This review is focused on extraction and characterization methods of GIPCs occurring in plants and fungi. Global methods for characterizing ceramide moieties of GIPCs revealed the structures of long-chain bases (LCBs) and fatty acids (FAs): LCBs are dominated by tri-hydroxylated molecules such as monounsaturated and saturated phytosphingosine (t18:1 and t18:0, respectively) in plants and mainly phytosphingosine (t18:0 and t20:0) in fungi; FA are generally 14-26 carbon atoms long in plants and 16-26 carbon atoms long in fungi, these chains being often hydroxylated in position 2. Mass spectrometry plays a pivotal role in the assessment of GIPC diversity and the characterization of their structures. Indeed, it allowed to determine that the core structure of GIPC polar heads in plants is Hex(R1)-HexA-IPC, with R1 being a hydroxyl, an amine, or a N-acetylamine group, whereas the core structure in fungi is Man-IPC. Notably, information gained from tandem mass spectrometry spectra was most useful to describe the huge variety of structures encountered in plants and fungi and reveal GIPCs with yet uncharacterized polar head structures, such as hexose-inositol phosphoceramide in Chondracanthus acicularis and (hexuronic acid)4-inositol phosphoceramide and hexose-(hexuronic acid)3-inositol phosphoceramide in Ulva lactuca.

  20. Cationic ceramides and analogues, LCL30 and LCL85, as adjuvants to photodynamic therapy of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Zhang, Wei; Saw, Kyi Min; Szulc, Zdzislaw M; Bielawska, Alicja; Separovic, Duska

    2013-09-05

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is known to alter the expression of various genes in treated cells. This prompted us to examine the activity of genes encoding two important enzymes in sphingolipid (SL) metabolism, dihydroceramide desaturase (DES) and sphingosine kinase (SPHK), in mouse SCCVII tumor cells treated by PDT using either the porphyrin-based photosensitizer Photofrin or silicon phthalocyanine Pc4. The results revealed that PDT induced an upregulation in the expression of two major isoforms of both genes (DES1 and DES2 as well as SPHK1 and SPHK2). While the changes were generally moderate (2-3-fold gains), the increase in DES2 expression was more pronounced and it was much greater with Photofrin-PDT than with Pc4-PDT (over 23-fold vs. less than 5-fold). Combining either Photofrin-PDT or Pc4-PDT with the cationic C16-ceramide LCL30 (20mg/kg i.p.) for treatment of subcutaneously growing SCCVII tumors rendered important differences in the therapy outcome. Photofrin-PDT, used at a dose that attained good initial response but no tumor cures, produced 50% cures when combined with a single LCL30 treatment. In contrast, the same LCL30 treatment combined with Pc4-PDT had no significant effect on tumor response. The optimal timing of LCL30 injection was immediately after Photofrin-PDT. The therapeutic benefit was lost when LCL30 was given in two 20mg/kg injections encompassing intervals before and after PDT. LCL85, the cationic B13 ceramide analogue and SL-modulating agent, also increased cure rates of Photofrin-PDT treated tumors, but the therapeutic benefit was less pronounced than with LCL30. These results with LCL30 and LCL85, and our previous findings for LCL29 (another SL analogue), assert the potential of SLs for use as adjuvants to augment the efficacy of PDT-mediated tumor destruction.

  1. A Coarse-grained Model of Stratum Corneum Lipids: Free Fatty Acids and Ceramide NS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Timothy C.; Iacovella, Christopher R.; Hartkamp, Remco; Bunge, Annette L.; McCabe, Clare

    2017-01-01

    Ceramide (CER)-based biological membranes are used both experimentally and in simulations as simplified model systems of the skin barrier. Molecular dynamics studies have generally focused on simulating preassembled structures using atomistically detailed models of CERs, which limit the system sizes and timescales that can practically be probed, rendering them ineffective for studying particular phenomena, including self-assembly into bilayer and lamellar superstructures. Here, we report on the development of a coarse-grained (CG) model for CER NS, the most abundant CER in human stratum corneum. Multistate iterative Boltzmann inversion is used to derive the intermolecular pair potentials, resulting in a force field that is applicable over a range of state points and suitable for studying ceramide self-assembly. The chosen CG mapping, which includes explicit interaction sites for hydroxyl groups, captures the directional nature of hydrogen bonding and allows for accurate predictions of several key structural properties of CER NS bilayers. Simulated wetting experiments allow the hydrophobicity of CG beads to be accurately tuned to match atomistic wetting behavior, which affects the whole system since inaccurate hydrophobic character is found to unphysically alter the lipid packing in hydrated lamellar states. We find that CER NS can self-assemble into multilamellar structures, enabling the study of lipid systems more representative of the multilamellar lipid structures present in the skin barrier. The coarse-grained force field derived herein represents an important step in using molecular dynamics to study the human skin barrier, which gives a resolution not available through experiment alone. PMID:27564869

  2. Differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes is dependent on glucosylceramide:ceramide processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amen, Nicole; Mathow, Daniel; Rabionet, Mariona; Sandhoff, Roger; Langbein, Lutz; Gretz, Norbert; Jäckel, Carsten; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Jennemann, Richard

    2013-10-15

    Skin barrier function is primarily assigned to the outer epidermal layer, the stratum corneum (SC), mainly composed of corneocytes and lipid-enriched extracellular matrix. Epidermal ceramides (Cers) are essential barrier lipids, containing ultra-long-chain (ULC) fatty acids (FAs) with a unique ω-hydroxy group, which is necessary for binding to corneocyte proteins. In the SC, Cers are believed to derive from glucosylated intermediates, namely glucosylceramides (GlcCers), as surmised from human Gaucher's disease and related mouse models. Tamoxifen (TAM)-induced deletion of the endogenous GlcCer-synthesizing enzyme UDP-glucose:ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG) in keratin K14-positive cells resulted in epidermal GlcCer depletion. Although free extractable Cers were elevated in total epidermis and as well in SC, protein-bound Cers decreased significantly in Ugcg(f/fK14CreERT2) mice, indicating glucosylation to be required for regular Cer processing as well as arrangement and extrusion of lipid lamellae. The almost complete loss of protein-bound Cers led to a disruption of the water permeability barrier (WPB). UGCG-deficient mice developed an ichthyosis-like skin phenotype marked by impaired keratinocyte differentiation associated with delayed wound healing. Gene expression profiling of Ugcg-mutant skin revealed a subset of differentially expressed genes involved in lipid signaling and epidermal differentiation/proliferation, correlating to human skin diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta (PPARβ/δ), a Cer-sensitive transcription factor was identified as potential mediator of the altered gene sets.

  3. Efficient trafficking of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus requires a VAMP-associated protein-interacting FFAT motif of CERT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Miyuki; Kumagai, Keigo; Nishijima, Masahiro; Hanada, Kentaro

    2006-10-01

    Ceramide is synthesized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transported to the Golgi apparatus by CERT for its conversion to sphingomyelin in mammalian cells. CERT has a pleck-strin homology (PH) domain for Golgi targeting and a START domain catalyzing the intermembrane transfer of ceramide. The region between the two domains contains a short peptide motif designated FFAT, which is supposed to interact with the ER-resident proteins VAP-A and VAP-B. Both VAPs were actually co-immunoprecipitated with CERT, and the CERT/VAP interaction was abolished by mutations in the FFAT motif. These mutations did not affect the Golgi targeting activity of CERT. Whereas mutations of neither the FFAT motif nor the PH domain inhibited the ceramide transfer activity of CERT in a cell-free system, they impaired the ER-to-Golgi transport of ceramide in intact and in semi-intact cells at near endogenous expression levels. By contrast, when overexpressed, both the FFAT motif and the PH domain mutants of CERT substantially supported the transport of ceramide from the ER to the site where sphingomyelin is produced. These results suggest that the Golgi-targeting PH domain and ER-interacting FFAT motif of CERT spatially restrict the random ceramide transfer activity of the START domain in cells.

  4. p35/Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 is required for protection against beta-amyloid-induced cell death but not tau phosphorylation by ceramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyb, Kathleen I; Ansar, Sabah; Li, Guibin; Bean, Jennifer; Michaelis, Mary L; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2007-01-01

    Ceramide is a bioactive sphingolipid that can prevent calpain activation and beta-amyloid (A beta) neurotoxicity in cortical neurons. Recent evidence supports A beta induction of a calpain-dependent cleavage of the cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5) regulatory protein p35 that contributes to tau hyperphosphorylation and neuronal death. Using cortical neurons isolated from wild-type and p35 knockout mice, we investigated whether ceramide required p35/cdk5 to protect against A beta-induced cell death and tau phosphorylation. Ceramide inhibited A beta-induced calpain activation and cdk5 activity in wild-type neurons and protected against neuronal death and tau hyperphosphorylation. Interestingly, A beta also increased cdk5 activity in p35-/- neurons, suggesting that the alternate cdk5 regulatory protein, p39, might mediate this effect. In p35 null neurons, ceramide blocked A beta-induced calpain activation but did not inhibit cdk5 activity or cell death. However, ceramide blocked tau hyperphosphorylation potentially via inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta. These data suggest that ceramide can regulate A beta cell toxicity in a p35/cdk5-dependent manner.

  5. Thermodynamic Insights and Conceptual Design of Skin-Sensitive Chitosan Coated Ceramide/PLGA Nanodrug for Regeneration of Stratum Corneum on Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sang-Myung; Yoon, Gwang Heum; Lee, Hoo Chul; Jung, Moon Hee; Yu, Sun Il; Yeon, Seung Ju; Min, Seul Ki; Kwon, Yeo Seon; Hwang, Jin Ha; Shin, Hwa Sung

    2015-12-15

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex skin disease primarily characterized by psoriasis of the stratum corneum. AD drugs have usually been used in acidic and hydrophilic solvents to supply moisture and prevent lipid defects. Ceramide is a typical treatment agent to regenerate the stratum corneum and relieve symptoms of AD. However, ceramide has limitation on direct use for skin because of its low dispersion properties in hydrophilic phase and side effects at excessive treatment. In this study, ceramide imbedded PLGA nanoparticles were developed with chitosan coating (Chi-PLGA/Cer) to overcome this problem. The chitosan coating enhanced initial adherence to the skin and prevented the initial burst of ceramide, but was degraded by the weakly acidic nature of skin, resulting in controlled release of ceramide with additional driving force of the squeezed PLGA nanoparticles. Additionally, the coating kinetics of chitosan were controlled by manipulating the reaction conditions and then mathematically modeled. The Chi-PLGA/Cer was not found to be cytotoxic and ceramide release was controlled by pH, temperature, and chitosan coating. Finally, Chi-PLGA/Cer was demonstrated to be effective at stratum corneum regeneration in a rat AD model. Overall, the results presented herein indicated that Chi-PLGA/Cer is a novel nanodrug for treatment of AD.

  6. Phosphoregulation of the ceramide transport protein CERT at serine 315 in the interaction with VAMP-associated protein (VAP) for inter-organelle trafficking of ceramide in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Keigo; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Hanada, Kentaro

    2014-04-11

    The ceramide transport protein CERT mediates the inter-organelle transport of ceramide for the synthesis of sphingomyelin, presumably through endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi membrane contact sites. CERT has a short peptide motif named FFAT, which associates with the ER-resident membrane protein VAP. We show that the phosphorylation of CERT at serine 315, which is adjacent to the FFAT motif, markedly enhanced the interaction of CERT with VAP. The phosphomimetic CERT S315E mutant exhibited higher activity to support the ER-to-Golgi transport of ceramide than the wild-type control in a semi-intact cell system, and this enhanced activity was abrogated when its FFAT motif was deleted. The level of phosphorylation of CERT at Ser-315 increased in HeLa cells treated with a sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitor or exogenous sphingomyelinase. Expression of CERT S315E induced intracellular punctate structures, to which CERT and VAP were co-localized, and the occurrence of the structure was dependent on both phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate binding and VAP binding activities of CERT. Phosphorylation of another region (named a serine-rich motif) in CERT is known to down-regulate the activity of CERT. Analysis of various CERT mutant constructs showed that the de-phosphorylation of the serine-rich motif and the phosphorylation of Ser-315 likely have the additive contribution to enhance the activity of CERT. These results demonstrate that the phosphorylation of CERT at the FFAT motif-adjacent serine affected its affinity for VAP, which may regulate the inter-organelle trafficking of ceramide in response to the perturbation of cellular sphingomyelin and/or other sphingolipids.

  7. Phosphoregulation of the Ceramide Transport Protein CERT at Serine 315 in the Interaction with VAMP-associated Protein (VAP) for Inter-organelle Trafficking of Ceramide in Mammalian Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Keigo; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Hanada, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    The ceramide transport protein CERT mediates the inter-organelle transport of ceramide for the synthesis of sphingomyelin, presumably through endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi membrane contact sites. CERT has a short peptide motif named FFAT, which associates with the ER-resident membrane protein VAP. We show that the phosphorylation of CERT at serine 315, which is adjacent to the FFAT motif, markedly enhanced the interaction of CERT with VAP. The phosphomimetic CERT S315E mutant exhibited higher activity to support the ER-to-Golgi transport of ceramide than the wild-type control in a semi-intact cell system, and this enhanced activity was abrogated when its FFAT motif was deleted. The level of phosphorylation of CERT at Ser-315 increased in HeLa cells treated with a sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitor or exogenous sphingomyelinase. Expression of CERT S315E induced intracellular punctate structures, to which CERT and VAP were co-localized, and the occurrence of the structure was dependent on both phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate binding and VAP binding activities of CERT. Phosphorylation of another region (named a serine-rich motif) in CERT is known to down-regulate the activity of CERT. Analysis of various CERT mutant constructs showed that the de-phosphorylation of the serine-rich motif and the phosphorylation of Ser-315 likely have the additive contribution to enhance the activity of CERT. These results demonstrate that the phosphorylation of CERT at the FFAT motif-adjacent serine affected its affinity for VAP, which may regulate the inter-organelle trafficking of ceramide in response to the perturbation of cellular sphingomyelin and/or other sphingolipids. PMID:24569996

  8. C16-Ceramide Analog Combined with Pc 4 Photodynamic Therapy Evokes Enhanced Total Ceramide Accumulation, Promotion of DEVDase Activation in the Absence of Apoptosis, and Augmented Overall Cell Killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duska Separovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the failure of single modality approaches, combination therapy for cancer treatment is a promising alternative. Sphingolipid analogs, with or without anticancer drugs, can improve tumor response. C16-pyridinium ceramide analog LCL30, was used in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT, an anticancer treatment modality, to test the hypothesis that the combined treatment will trigger changes in the sphingolipid profile and promote cell death. Using SCCVII mouse squamous carcinoma cells, and the silicone phthalocyanine Pc 4 for PDT, we showed that combining PDT with LCL30 (PDT/LCL30 was more effective than individual treatments in raising global ceramide levels, as well as in reducing dihydrosphingosine levels. Unlike LCL30, PDT, alone or combined, increased total dihydroceramide levels. Sphingosine levels were unaffected by LCL30, but were abolished after PDT or the combination. LCL30-triggered rise in sphingosine-1-phosphate was reversed post-PDT or the combination. DEVDase activation was evoked after PDT or LCL30, and was promoted post- PDT/LCL30. Neither mitochondrial depolarization nor apoptosis were observed after any of the treatments. Notably, treatment with the combination resulted in augmented overall cell killing. Our data demonstrate that treatment with PDT/LCL30 leads to enhanced global ceramide levels and DEVDase activation in the absence of apoptosis, and promotion of total cell killing.

  9. Analysis of the Involvement of Different Ceramide Variants in the Response to Hydroxyurea Stress in Baker's Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Wei Chen

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids have been identified as important signaling compounds in stress responses. However, it is not always clear how different sphingolipid profiles are achieved in a particular stress situation. Here we propose a detailed mass action model, containing 42 dependent variables and 137 reactions, that offers explanations of the roles of variant ceramides species, which differ in the lengths of their fatty acyl chains and their saturation state, in the response to hydroxyurea stress. The simulations demonstrate that the cells manage to achieve hydroxyurea tolerance through a well-coordinated, differential usage of the variant ceramide species. Moreover, the results suggest that key enzymes have different affinities toward saturated and unsaturated fatty acyl chains, which implies that the saturation state affords the cells with an additional mode of regulation that had not been recognized so far. These conclusions from our computational analysis are yet to be validated experimentally.

  10. Effects of Topical Corticosteroid and Tacrolimus on Ceramides and Irritancy to Sodium Lauryl Sulphate in Healthy Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The skin barrier, located in the stratum corneum, is influenced mainly by the lipid and protein composition of this layer. In eczematous diseases impairment of the skin barrier is thought to be of prime importance. Topical anti-inflammatory drugs and emollients are the most widely used eczema....... For evaluation of the skin barrier, transepidermal water loss, erythema and electrical capacitance were measured. The ceramide/cholesterol ratio was increased in betamethasone- (p = 0.008) and tacrolimus-treated (p = 0.025) skin compared with emollient-treated skin. No differences in ceramide subgroups were...... treatments. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of topically applied corticosteroid, tacrolimus and emollient on stratum corneum lipids and barrier parameters. Nineteen healthy volunteers participated in the study. Both forearms of the subjects were divided into four areas, which were treated...

  11. Effects of topical corticosteroid and tacrolimus on ceramides and irritancy to sodium lauryl sulphate in healthy skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellegren, Lars I

    2011-01-01

    The skin barrier, located in the stratum corneum, is influenced mainly by the lipid and protein composition of this layer. In eczematous diseases impairment of the skin barrier is thought to be of prime importance. Topical anti-inflammatory drugs and emollients are the most widely used eczema....... For evaluation of the skin barrier, transepidermal water loss, erythema and electrical capacitance were measured. The ceramide/cholesterol ratio was increased in betamethasone- (p¿=¿0.008) and tacrolimus-treated (p¿=¿0.025) skin compared with emollient-treated skin. No differences in ceramide subgroups were...... treatments. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of topically applied corticosteroid, tacrolimus and emollient on stratum corneum lipids and barrier parameters. Nineteen healthy volunteers participated in the study. Both forearms of the subjects were divided into four areas, which were treated...

  12. The microstructure of the stratum corneum lipid barrier: mid-infrared spectroscopic studies of hydrated ceramide:palmitic acid:cholesterol model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garidel, Patrick; Fölting, Bettina; Schaller, Ingrid; Kerth, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    The current mid-infrared spectroscopic study is a systematic investigation of hydrated stratum corneum lipid barrier model systems composed of an equimolar mixture of a ceramide, free palmitic acid and cholesterol. Four different ceramide molecules (CER NS, CER NP, CER NP-18:1, CER AS) were investigated with regard to their microstructure arrangement in a stratum corneum lipid barrier model system. Ceramide molecules were chosen from the sphingosine and phytosphingosine groups. The main differences in the used ceramide molecules result from their polar head group architecture as well as hydrocarbon chain properties. The mixing properties with cholesterol and palmitic acid are considered. This is feasible by using perdeuterated palmitic acid and proteated ceramides. Both molecules can be monitored separately, within the same experiment, using mid-infrared spectroscopy; no external label is necessary. At physiological relevant temperatures, between 30 and 35 degrees C, orthorhombic as well as hexagonal chain packing of the ceramide molecules is observed. The formation of these chain packings are extremely dependent on lipid hydration, with a decrease in ceramide hydration favouring the formation of orthorhombic hydrocarbon chain packing, as well as temperature. The presented data suggest in specific cases phase segregation in ceramide and palmitic acid rich phases. However, other ceramides like CER NP-18:1 show a rather high miscibility with palmitic acid and cholesterol. For all investigated ternary systems, more or less mixing of palmitic acid with cholesterol is observed. The investigated stratum corneum mixtures exhibit a rich polymorphism from crystalline domains with heterogeneous lipid composition to a "fluid" homogeneous phase. Thus, a single gel phase is not evident for the presented stratum corneum model systems. The study shows, that under skin physiological conditions (pH 5.5, hydrated, 30-35 degrees C) ternary systems composed of an equimolar ratio of

  13. Training Does Not Alter Muscle Ceramide and Diacylglycerol in Offsprings of Type 2 Diabetic Patients Despite Improved Insulin Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditte Søgaard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramide and diacylglycerol (DAG may be involved in the early phase of insulin resistance but data are inconsistent in man. We evaluated if an increase in insulin sensitivity after endurance training was accompanied by changes in these lipids in skeletal muscle. Nineteen first-degree type 2 diabetes Offsprings (Offsprings (age: 33.1±1.4 yrs; BMI: 26.4±0.4 kg/m2 and sixteen matched Controls (age: 31.3±1.5 yrs; BMI: 25.3±0.7 kg/m2 performed 10 weeks of endurance training three times a week at 70% of VO2max on a bicycle ergometer. Before and after the intervention a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and VO2max test were performed and muscle biopsies obtained. Insulin sensitivity was significantly lower in Offsprings compared to control subjects (p<0.01 but improved in both groups after 10 weeks of endurance training (Off: 17±6%; Con: 12±9%, p<0.01. The content of muscle ceramide, DAG, and their subspecies were similar between groups and did not change in response to the endurance training except for an overall reduction in C22:0-Cer (p<0.05. Finally, the intervention induced an increase in AKT protein expression (Off: 27±11%; Con: 20±24%, p<0.05. This study showed no relation between insulin sensitivity and ceramide or DAG content suggesting that ceramide and DAG are not major players in the early phase of insulin resistance in human muscle.

  14. Downregulation of lipin-1 induces insulin resistance by increasing intracellular ceramide accumulation in C2C12 myotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shujuan; Huang, Suling; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Qingli; Liu, Jia; Leng, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle is involved in the development of insulin resistance. Mutations in lipin-1, a key lipid metabolism regulator leads to significant systemic insulin resistance in fld mice. However, the function of lipin-1 on lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle is still unclear. Herein we demonstrated that downregulation of lipin-1 in C2C12 myotubes by siRNA transfection suppressed insulin action, characterized by reduced insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake. Correspondingly, decreased lipin-1 expression was observed in palmitate-induced insulin resistance in C2C12 myotubes, suggested that lipin-1 might play a role in the etiology of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. The insulin resistance induced by lipin-1 downregulation was related to the disturbance of lipid homeostasis. Lipin-1 silencing reduced intracellular DAG and TAG levels, but elevated ceramide accumulation in C2C12 myotubes. Moreover, the impaired insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake caused by lipin-1 silencing could be blocked by the pretreatment with SPT inhibitor myriocin, ceramide synthase inhibitor FB1, or PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid, suggested that the increased ceramide accumulation might be responsible for the development of insulin resistance induced by lipin-1 silencing in C2C12 myotubes. Meanwhile, decreased lipin-1 expression also impaired mitochondrial function in C2C12 myotubes. Therefore, our study suggests that lipin-1 plays an important role in lipid metabolism and downregulation of lipin-1 induces insulin resistance by increasing intracellular ceramide accumulation in C2C12 myotubes. These results offer a molecular insight into the role of lipin-1 in the development of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. PMID:28123341

  15. Training Does Not Alter Muscle Ceramide and Diacylglycerol in Offsprings of Type 2 Diabetic Patients Despite Improved Insulin Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Ditte; Østergård, Torben; Blachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka U;

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide and diacylglycerol (DAG) may be involved in the early phase of insulin resistance but data are inconsistent in man. We evaluated if an increase in insulin sensitivity after endurance training was accompanied by changes in these lipids in skeletal muscle. Nineteen first-degree type 2...... a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and VO2max test were performed and muscle biopsies obtained. Insulin sensitivity was significantly lower in Offsprings compared to control subjects (p

  16. Saturated and unsaturated fat induce hepatic insulin resistance independently of TLR-4 signaling and ceramide synthesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbo, Thomas; Perry, Rachel J; Jurczak, Michael J; Camporez, João-Paulo G; Alves, Tiago C; Kahn, Mario; Guigni, Blas A; Serr, Julie; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T; Shulman, Gerald I

    2013-07-30

    Hepatic insulin resistance is a principal component of type 2 diabetes, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for its pathogenesis remain unknown. Recent studies have suggested that saturated fatty acids induce hepatic insulin resistance through activation of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) receptor in the liver, which in turn transcriptionally activates hepatic ceramide synthesis leading to inhibition of insulin signaling. In this study, we demonstrate that TLR-4 receptor signaling is not directly required for saturated or unsaturated fat-induced hepatic insulin resistance in both TLR-4 antisense oligonucleotide treated and TLR-4 knockout mice, and that ceramide accumulation is not dependent on TLR-4 signaling or a primary event in hepatic steatosis and impairment of insulin signaling. Further, we show that both saturated and unsaturated fats lead to hepatic accumulation of diacylglycerols, activation of PKCε, and impairment of insulin-stimulated IRS-2 signaling. These data demonstrate that saturated fat-induced insulin resistance is independent of TLR-4 activation and ceramides.

  17. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies of lipid domain formation in normal and ceramide deficient stratum corneum lipid models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorcea, Mihaela; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Moore, David J; Lane, Majella E

    2012-10-01

    The current work describes thermotropic and kinetic Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of lipid dynamics and domain formation in normal and ceramide (CER) deficient lipid samples designed as simple models of the stratum corneum (SC). For the first time, this work focuses on the time dependence of lipid reorganization and domain formation in CER deficient models. By utilizing deuterated fatty acid (FA) and simultaneously monitoring the methylene vibrational modes of both CER and FA chains these experiments follow the time evolution of lipid organization in these SC lipid models following an external stress. Kinetic and thermotropic experiments demonstrate differences in both CER and FA chain fluidity and ordered domain formation with decreased levels of CER. In the CER deficient model, the formation of CER orthorhombic domains is retarded compared to the normal model. Furthermore, there is little evidence of hexongally packed (or mixed) FA domains in the CER deficient model compared to the models of normal SC. These data demonstrate that barrier lipid organization, in terms of ceramide domain formation, is altered in the ceramide deficient model. This work highlights the successful development of an experimental methodology to study time dependent changes in lipid biophysics in simple SC model membranes and suggests this approach will prove useful for understanding some of the biophysical changes that underlie impaired physiological barrier function in diseased skin.

  18. Effects of topical corticosteroid and tacrolimus on ceramides and irritancy to sodium lauryl sulphate in healthy skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie K; Hellegren, Lars I; Jemec, Gregor B E; Agner, Tove

    2011-05-01

    The skin barrier, located in the stratum corneum, is influenced mainly by the lipid and protein composition of this layer. In eczematous diseases impairment of the skin barrier is thought to be of prime importance. Topical anti-inflammatory drugs and emollients are the most widely used eczema treatments. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of topically applied corticosteroid, tacrolimus and emollient on stratum corneum lipids and barrier parameters. Nineteen healthy volunteers participated in the study. Both forearms of the subjects were divided into four areas, which were treated twice daily for one week with betamethasone, tacrolimus, emollient, or left untreated, respectively. After one week each area was challenged with a 24 h sodium lauryl sulphate patch test. The lipids were collected using the cyanoacrylate method and evaluated by high performance thin layer chromatography. For evaluation of the skin barrier, transepidermal water loss, erythema and electrical capacitance were measured. The ceramide/cholesterol ratio was increased in betamethasone- (p = 0.008) and tacrolimus-treated (p = 0.025) skin compared with emollient-treated skin. No differences in ceramide subgroups were found between treatment regimes. Pretreatment with betamethasone (p = 0.01) or with tacrolimus (p = 0.001) causes a decreased inflammatory response to sodium lauryl sulphate compared with emollient. In conclusion, treatment with betamethasone and tacrolimus has a positive effect on the ceramide/cholesterol ratio and susceptibility to irritant reaction compared with an emollient.

  19. Increased transepidermal water loss and decreased ceramide content in lesional and non-lesional skin of dogs with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kenichiro; Yoon, Ji-Seon; Yoshihara, Toru; Iwasaki, Toshiroh; Nishifuji, Koji

    2009-10-01

    This study evaluated changes in transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration and intercorneal lipid content in dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD). TEWL and skin hydration were measured in the inguinal skin of 10 dogs with AD and 30 normal dogs. TEWL was significantly higher in both lesional skin (94.3 +/- 38.8 g/m(2)/h) and non-lesional skin (28.8 +/- 9.5) of dogs with AD than healthy controls (12.3 +/- 2.3) (P skin of dogs with AD (15.8 +/- 7.0 AU) was significantly lower than that of controls (24.2 +/- 8.8) (P skin of dogs with AD and controls. To compare the lipid content between lesional and non-lesional skin of dogs with AD and controls, intercorneal lipids, extracted from the stratum corneum, were quantified by thin-layer chromatography. The relative amounts of ceramides in the lesional skin (24.4 +/- 5.6%) and non-lesional skin (25.6 +/- 3.8%) of dogs with AD were significantly lower than those in controls (31.4 +/- 6.9%) (P ceramides, but not those of cholesterols and FFA, in both lesional and non-lesional skin of dogs with AD. These results strongly suggest that decreased ceramide content accelerates TEWL in dogs with AD, similar to the situation seen in the corresponding human disease.

  20. A look at epidermal barrier function in atopic dermatitis: physiologic lipid replacement and the role of ceramides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajić, D; Asiniwasis, R; Skotnicki-Grant, S

    2012-07-01

    This review summarizes and discusses the role and efficacy of moisturizers, particularly the more recently introduced ceramide-based formulations, in the skin care regimen of patients with both active and quiescent atopic dermatitis (AD). It is now well established that a complex interplay of environmental and genetic factors are responsible for disease onset and chronicity. Indeed, several novel genetic mechanisms have been recently discovered to be associated with AD pathogenesis. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that the epidermal barrier plays a critical role in the initiation, perpetuation, and exacerbation of AD. The skin of patients with AD harbors several defects in epidermal barrier function, including filaggrin and ceramides. An improved understanding of these etiopathogenic factors has led to the development of topical ceramide-dominant moisturizers to replace the deficient molecules and re-establish the integrity of barrier defenses. Some of these products have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of adult and childhood AD that are similar to mid-potency topical steroids. More importantly, they have been shown to be safe with very few associated side-effects. We recommend the addition of such new agents as both the first step of treatment and in the maintenance of clinically quiescent skin of patients with AD.

  1. Interferon-beta increases plasma ceramides of specific chain length in multiple sclerosis patients, unlike fingolimod or natalizumab

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    Florian Ottenlinger

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fingolimod is used for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS and targets receptors for the bioactive sphingolipid sphingosine-1-phosphate. Whether fingolimod or other MS therapies conversely affect plasma concentrations of sphingolipids has, however, not yet been analyzed. Herein, we quantified 15 representative sphingolipid species by mass spectrometry in plasma from relapsing-remitting MS patients currently under fingolimod (n=24, natalizumab (n=16 or IFN-β (n=18 treatment. Healthy controls (n=21 and untreated MS patients (n=11 served as control groups. IFN-ß treatment strongly increased plasma level of C16:0, C18:0, C20:0 and C24:1 ceramides compared to healthy controls, untreated patients, or patients receiving fingolimod or natalizumab medication. Natalizumab treatment increased plasma concentrations of both sphingosine-1-phosphate and sphinganine-1-phosphate, whereas fingolimod treatment did not affect any of these lipids. Correlations of sphingolipids with the Expanded Disability Status Scale and other disease specific parameters revealed no systemic change of sphingolipids in MS, independent of the respective treatment regime. These results indicate type I interferon treatment to cause a strong and specific increase in ceramide level. If confirmed in larger cohorts, these data have implications for the efficacy and adverse effects of IFN-β. Moreover, quantification of ceramides soon after therapy initiation may help to identify therapy-responsive patients.

  2. The ceramide-enriched trans-Golgi compartments reorganize together with other parts of the Golgi apparatus in response to ATP-depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisslitzer-Ruppitsch, Claudia; Röhrl, Clemens; Ranftler, Carmen; Neumüller, Josef; Vetterlein, Monika; Ellinger, Adolf; Pavelka, Margit

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the ceramide-enriched trans-Golgi compartments representing sites of synthesis of sphingomyelin and higher organized lipids were visualized in control and ATP-depleted hepatoma and endothelial cells using internalization of BODIPY-ceramide and the diaminobenzidine photooxidation method for combined light-electron microscopical exploration. Metabolic stress induced by lowering the cellular ATP-levels leads to reorganizations of the Golgi apparatus and the appearance of tubulo-glomerular bodies and networks. The results obtained with three different protocols, in which BODIPY-ceramide either was applied prior to, concomitantly with, or after ATP-depletion, revealed that the ceramide-enriched compartments reorganize together with other parts of the Golgi apparatus under these conditions. They were found closely associated with and integrated in the tubulo-glomerular bodies formed in response to ATP-depletion. This is in line with the changes of the staining patterns obtained with the Helix pomatia lectin and the GM130 and TGN46 immuno-reactions occurring in response to ATP-depletion and is confirmed by 3D electron tomography. The 3D reconstructions underlined the glomerular character of the reorganized Golgi apparatus and demonstrated continuities of ceramide positive and negative parts. Most interestingly, BODIPY-ceramide becomes concentrated in compartments of the tubulo-glomerular Golgi bodies, even though the reorganization took place before BODIPY-ceramide administration. This indicates maintained functionalities although the regular Golgi stack organization is abolished; the results provide novel insights into Golgi structure-function relationships, which might be relevant for cells affected by metabolic stress.

  3. C6 ceramide sensitizes the anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) activity by AZD-8055, a novel mTORC1/2 dual inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mo; Gu, Peng; Guo, Wenjia; Fan, Xiwen

    2016-08-01

    Aberrant activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays pivotal roles in promoting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. Here, we tested the potential anti-HCC activity by a novel mTOR complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor AZD-8055 and, more importantly, the potential AZD-8055 sensitization effect by a cell-permeable short-chain ceramide (C6). We showed that AZD-8055 mainly exerted moderate cytotoxic effect against a panel of HCC cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, and SMMC-7721). Co-treatment of C6 ceramide remarkably augmented AZD-8055-induced HCC cytotoxicity. Meanwhile, C6 ceramide dramatically potentiated AZD-8055-induced HCC cell apoptotic death. Further studies demonstrated that AZD-8055 and C6 ceramide synergistically induced anti-survival and pro-apoptotic activity in primary cultured human HCC cells, but not in the non-cancerous human hepatocytes. Signaling studies showed that AZD-8055 and C6 ceramide synergistically suppressed Akt-mTOR complex 1/2 cascade activation. In vivo, AZD-8055 oral administration suppressed HepG2 hepatoma xenograft growth in nude mice, while moderately improving mice survival. Its anti-tumor activity was dramatically potentiated with co-administration of a liposome-packed C6 ceramide. Together, these results demonstrate that concurrent targeting mTORC1/2 by AZD-8055 exerts anti-tumor ability in preclinical HCC models, and its activity is further sensitized with co-administration of C6 ceramide.

  4. [Topical application of vitamins, phytosterols and ceramides. Protection against increased expression of interstital collagenase and reduced collagen-I expression after single exposure to UVA irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether-Beck, S; Mühlberg, K; Brenden, H; Krutmann, J

    2008-07-01

    Photoaged skin is characterized by a decrease of dermal collagen fibers, resulting from an increased breakdown and a diminished de novo synthesis. The increased breakdown results from an increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The main building blocks involved in de novo synthesis of collagen fibers are collagen 1A1 and 1A2, the expression of which is reduced in photoaged skin. We studied the effect of topical application of vitamins, phytosterols and ceramides on UV-induced up-regulation of the expression of MMP-1 and on UV-induced down-regulation of COL1A1 and COL1A2. The study was conducted with 10 subjects with healthy skin who were comparatively treated for 10 days with (i) a basic preparation containing jojoba oil, (ii) the basic preparation supplemented with vitamins, (iii) the basic preparation supplemented with phytosterols and ceramides, and (iv) the basic preparation supplemented with vitamins, phytosterols and ceramides. All four preparations inhibited the UV induced up-regulation of MMP-1. Neither the basic product nor that supplemented with vitamins inhibited down-regulation of COL1A1 and COL1A2, but addition of phytosterols and ceramides caused a decreased down-regulation of the expression of these genes. Our results indicate that phytosterols and ceramides are effective in blocking the reduced collagen synthesis after UV irradiation and even stimulating synthesis. They may be useful additions to anti-aging products.

  5. Sphingosine Kinase 2 and Ceramide Transport as Key Targets of the Natural Flavonoid Luteolin to Induce Apoptosis in Colon Cancer Cells.

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    Loubna Abdel Hadi

    Full Text Available The plant flavonoid luteolin exhibits different biological effects, including anticancer properties. Little is known on the molecular mechanisms underlying its actions in colorectal cancer (CRC. Here we investigated the effects of luteolin on colon cancer cells, focusing on the balance between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, two sphingoid mediators with opposite roles on cell fate. Using cultured cells, we found that physiological concentrations of luteolin induce the elevation of ceramide, followed by apoptotic death of colon cancer cells, but not of differentiated enterocytes. Pulse studies revealed that luteolin inhibits ceramide anabolism to complex sphingolipids. Further experiments led us to demonstrate that luteolin induces an alteration of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER-Golgi flow of ceramide, pivotal to its metabolic processing to complex sphingolipids. We report that luteolin exerts its action by inhibiting both Akt activation, and sphingosine kinase (SphK 2, with the consequent reduction of S1P, an Akt stimulator. S1P administration protected colon cancer cells from luteolin-induced apoptosis, most likely by an intracellular, receptor-independent mechanism. Overall this study reveals for the first time that the dietary flavonoid luteolin exerts toxic effects on colon cancer cells by inhibiting both S1P biosynthesis and ceramide traffic, suggesting its dietary introduction/supplementation as a potential strategy to improve existing treatments in CRC.

  6. Ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1 inhibits apoptotic cell death in SCC17B human head and neck squamous carcinoma cells after Pc4 photosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppana, Nithin B; Kodiha, Mohamed; Stochaj, Ursula; Lin, Ho-sheng; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Divine, George W; Boyd, John A; Korbelik, Mladen; Separovic, Duska

    2014-11-01

    The sphingolipid ceramide modulates stress-induced cell death and apoptosis. We have shown that ceramide generated via de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis is required to initiate apoptosis after photodynamic therapy (PDT). The objective of this study was to define the role of ceramide synthase (CERS) in PDT-induced cell death and apoptosis using fumonisin B1 (FB), a CERS inhibitor. We used the silicon phthalocyanine Pc4 for PDT, and SCC17B cells, as a clinically-relevant model of human head and neck squamous carcinoma. zVAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, as well as FB, protected cells from death after PDT. In contrast, ABT199, an inhibitor of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2, enhanced cell killing after PDT. PDT-induced accumulation of ceramide in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria was inhibited by FB. PDT-induced Bax translocation to the mitochondria and cytochrome c release were also inhibited by FB. These novel data suggest that PDT-induced cell death via apoptosis is CERS/ceramide-dependent.

  7. The combined effect of encapsulating curcumin and C6 ceramide in liposomal nanoparticles against osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhule, Santosh S; Penfornis, Patrice; He, Jibao; Harris, Michael R; Terry, Treniece; John, Vijay; Pochampally, Radhika

    2014-02-01

    This study examines the antitumor potential of curcumin and C6 ceramide (C6) against osteosarcoma (OS) cell lines when both are encapsulated in the bilayer of liposomal nanoparticles. Three liposomal formulations were prepared: curcumin liposomes, C6 liposomes and C6-curcumin liposomes. Curcumin in combination with C6 showed 1.5 times enhanced cytotoxic effect in the case of MG-63 and KHOS OS cell lines, in comparison with curcumin liposomes alone. Importantly, C6-curcumin liposomes were found to be less toxic on untransformed primary human cells (human mesenchymal stem cells) in comparison to OS cell lines. In addition, cell cycle assays on a KHOS cell line after treatment revealed that curcumin only liposomes induced G2/M arrest by upregulation of cyclin B1, while C6 only liposomes induced G1 arrest by downregulation of cyclin D1. C6-curcumin liposomes induced G2/M arrest and showed a combined effect in the expression levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1. The efficiency of the preparations was tested in vivo using a human osteosarcoma xenograft assay. Using pegylated liposomes to increase the plasma half-life and tagging with folate (FA) for targeted delivery in vivo, a significant reduction in tumor size was observed with C6-curcumin-FA liposomes. The encapsulation of two water insoluble drugs, curcumin and C6, in the lipid bilayer of liposomes enhances the cytotoxic effect and validates the potential of combined drug therapy.

  8. Molecular cloning, chromosomal mapping, and characterization of the mouse UDP-galactose: Ceramide galactosyltransferase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coetzee, T.; Fujita, N.; Marcus, J. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    UDP-galactose:ceramide galactosyltransferase (CGT) (EC 2.11.62) catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of galactocerebroside, a glycosphingolipid characteristically abundant in myelin. In this report, we describe the isolation of genomic clones spanning the mouse CGT gene. The mouse CGT gene consists of six exons that span a minimum of 70 kb of DNA and that encode a 541 amino acid translation product with extensive sequence similarity to the rat CGT enzyme and to UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT). The 5{prime}-untranslated region of the mouse CGT gene is encoded by a separate exon located approximately 25 kb upstream of the first protein-encoding exon. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the five encoding region exons of the mouse CGT gene resembles that of the human UGT1 and rat UGT2B1 genes. Finally, analysis of somatic cell hybrids by PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes has localized the mouse CGT gene to chromosome 3, bands E3-F1. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A deficiency of ceramide biosynthesis causes cerebellar purkinje cell neurodegeneration and lipofuscin accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Zhao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids, lipids with a common sphingoid base (also termed long chain base backbone, play essential cellular structural and signaling functions. Alterations of sphingolipid levels have been implicated in many diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, it remains largely unclear whether sphingolipid changes in these diseases are pathological events or homeostatic responses. Furthermore, how changes in sphingolipid homeostasis shape the progression of aging and neurodegeneration remains to be clarified. We identified two mouse strains, flincher (fln and toppler (to, with spontaneous recessive mutations that cause cerebellar ataxia and Purkinje cell degeneration. Positional cloning demonstrated that these mutations reside in the Lass1 gene. Lass1 encodes (dihydroceramide synthase 1 (CerS1, which is highly expressed in neurons. Both fln and to mutations caused complete loss of CerS1 catalytic activity, which resulted in a reduction in sphingolipid biosynthesis in the brain and dramatic changes in steady-state levels of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases. In addition to Purkinje cell death, deficiency of CerS1 function also induced accumulation of lipofuscin with ubiquitylated proteins in many brain regions. Our results demonstrate clearly that ceramide biosynthesis deficiency can cause neurodegeneration and suggest a novel mechanism of lipofuscin formation, a common phenomenon that occurs during normal aging and in some neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Synergistic Enhancement of Cancer Therapy Using a Combination of Ceramide and Docetaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Xia Feng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ceramide (CE-based combination therapy (CE combination as a novel therapeutic strategy has attracted great attention in the field of anti-cancer therapy. The principal purposes of this study were to investigate the synergistic effect of CE in combination with docetaxel (DTX (CE + DTX and to explore the synergy mechanisms of CE + DTX. The 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT and combination index (CI assay showed that simultaneous administration of CE and DTX with a molar ratio of 0.5:1 could generate the optimal synergistic effect on murine malignant melanoma cell (B16, CI = 0.31 and human breast carcinoma cell (MCF-7, CI = 0.48. The apoptosis, cell cycle, and cytoskeleton destruction study demonstrated that CE could target and destruct the microfilament actin, subsequently activate Caspase-3 and induce apoptosis. Meanwhile, DTX could target and disrupt the microtubules cytoskeleton, leading to a high proportion of cancer cells in G2/M-phase arrest. Moreover, CE plus DTX could cause a synergistic destruction of cytoskeleton, which resulted in a significantly higher apoptosis and a significantly higher arrest in G2/M arrest comparing with either agent alone (p < 0.01. The in vivo antitumor study evaluated in B16 tumor-bearing mice also validated the synergistic effects. All these results suggested that CE could enhance the antitumor activity of DTX in a synergistic manner, which suggest promising application prospects of CE + DTX combination treatment.

  11. The role of ceramide chain length distribution on the barrier properties of the skin lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojumdar, E H; Kariman, Z; van Kerckhove, L; Gooris, G S; Bouwstra, J A

    2014-10-01

    The skin barrier function is provided by the stratum corneum (SC). The lipids in the SC are composed of three lipid classes: ceramides (CERs), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acids (FFAs) which form two crystalline lamellar structures. In the present study, we investigate the effect of CER chain length distribution on the barrier properties of model lipid membranes mimicking the lipid composition and organization of SC. The membranes were prepared with either isolated pig CERs (PCERs) or synthetic CERs. While PCERs have a wide chain length distribution, the synthetic CERs are quite uniform in chain length. The barrier properties were examined by means of permeation studies using hydrocortisone as a model drug. Our studies revealed a reduced barrier in lipid membranes prepared with PCERs compared to synthetic CERs. Additional studies revealed that a wider chain length distribution of PCERs results in an enhanced hexagonal packing and increased conformational disordering of the lipid tails compared to synthetic CERs, while the lamellar phases did not change. This demonstrates that the chain length distribution affects the lipid barrier by reducing the lipid ordering and density within the lipid lamellae. In subsequent studies, the effect of increased levels of FFAs or CERs with a long acyl chain in the PCERs membranes was also studied. These changes in lipid composition enhanced the level of orthorhombic packing, reduced the conformational disordering and increased the barrier of the lipid membranes. In conclusion, the CER chain length distribution is an important key factor for maintaining a proper barrier.

  12. LC/MS analysis of stratum corneum lipids: ceramide profiling and discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Hoppel, Louise; van der Heijden, Rob; Hankemeier, Thomas; Vreeken, Rob J; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2011-06-01

    Ceramides (CERs) in the upper layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), play a key role in the skin barrier function. In human SC, the literature currently reports 11 CER subclasses that have been identified. In this paper, a novel quick and robust LC/MS method is presented that allows the separation and analysis of all known human SC CER subclasses using only limited sample preparation. Besides all 11 known and identified subclasses, a 3D multi-mass chromatogram shows the presence of other lipid subclasses. Using LC/MS/MS with an ion trap (IT) system, a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance system, and a triple quadrupole system, we were able to identify one of these lipid subclasses as a new CER subclass: the ester-linked ω-hydroxy fatty acid with a dihydrosphingosine base (CER [EOdS]). Besides the identification of a new CER subclass, this paper also describes the applicability and robustness of the developed LC/MS method by analyzing three (biological) SC samples: SC from human dermatomed skin, human SC obtained by tape stripping, and SC from full-thickness skin explants. All three biological samples showed all known CER subclasses and slight differences were observed in CER profile.

  13. Novel preparation of intercellular lipid models of the stratum corneum containing stereoactive ceramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Obata, Yasuko; Onuki, Yoshinori; Ishida, Kenya; Takayama, Kozo

    2010-03-01

    The microstructure formed by intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum is important for the barrier function of the skin. However, the correlation between lipid composition and microstructure has not yet been clarified. To elucidate the microstructure of intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum, an intercellular lipid model was prepared from ceramide 5 (CER5), cholesterol (CHOL), and palmitic acid (PA), considering the nonuniformity of the lipid components of the stratum corneum. A response surface method incorporating thin-plate spline interpolation (RSM-S) was employed to prepare the CER5/CHOL/PA lipid bilayers. Fluorescence anisotropy of the CER5/CHOL/PA bilayers showed four distinct clusters based on Kohonen's self-organizing maps (SOM). At the centroid formulation of those clusters, the microstructures of CER5/CHOL/PA bilayers were determined using synchrotron X-ray scattering. Three kinds of lamellar structures and two kinds of lateral packing-namely, hexagonal and orthorhombic-were formed. The microstructure of the CER5/CHOL/PA bilayers was likely to be intrinsic to the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum. In conclusion, the CER5/CHOL/PA bilayers prepared based on RSM-S and SOM were useful as models of the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum.

  14. Ketogenic essential amino acids modulate lipid synthetic pathways and prevent hepatic steatosis in mice.

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    Yasushi Noguchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although dietary ketogenic essential amino acid (KAA content modifies accumulation of hepatic lipids, the molecular interactions between KAAs and lipid metabolism are yet to be fully elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We designed a diet with a high ratio (E/N of essential amino acids (EAAs to non-EAAs by partially replacing dietary protein with 5 major free KAAs (Leu, Ile, Val, Lys and Thr without altering carbohydrate and fat content. This high-KAA diet was assessed for its preventive effects on diet-induced hepatic steatosis and whole-animal insulin resistance. C57B6 mice were fed with a high-fat diet, and hyperinsulinemic ob/ob mice were fed with a high-fat or high-sucrose diet. The high-KAA diet improved hepatic steatosis with decreased de novo lipogenesis (DNL fluxes as well as reduced expressions of lipogenic genes. In C57B6 mice, the high-KAA diet lowered postprandial insulin secretion and improved glucose tolerance, in association with restored expression of muscle insulin signaling proteins repressed by the high-fat diet. Lipotoxic metabolites and their synthetic fluxes were also evaluated with reference to insulin resistance. The high-KAA diet lowered muscle and liver ceramides, both by reducing dietary lipid incorporation into muscular ceramides and preventing incorporation of DNL-derived fatty acids into hepatic ceramides. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that dietary KAA intake improves hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by modulating lipid synthetic pathways.

  15. Combined gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry of sphingolipids. I. Glucosyl sphingosine, ceramides and cerebrosides of the spleen in Gaucher's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, M; Ariga, T; Murata, T

    1977-08-01

    Trimethylsilylated glucosyl sphingosine, ceramides and glucocerebrosides were analysed by combined gas chromatography (GC)-chemical ionization (CI) mass spectrometry. Isobutane, methane and ammonia were used as reactant gasses for chemical ionization. Essentially the same fragment ions were detected in the spectra with the different reactant gases. Purified glucocerebrosides isolated from the spleen of a patient with Gaucher's disease were clearly separated into their 8 molecular species by gas chromatography. Three other minor components were detected by spectrometry, and these 11 molecular species of glucocerbrosides from the spleen of the patient with Gaucher's disease have been analysed. The ceramides obtained by periodate oxidation and then alkaline reduction of the glucocerebrosides were also separated into 11 molecular species by GC-CI mass spectrometry. Molecular weight could be determined using the major fragment ion of m/e (M+-90) in the spectra of ceramides and cerebrosides. The chemical ionization method is useful for structural analysis and determination of the molecular species of sphingoglycolipids.

  16. Enhanced killing of SCC17B human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells after photodynamic therapy plus fenretinide via the de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis pathway and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppana, Nithin B; Stochaj, Ursula; Kodiha, Mohamed; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Pierce, Jason S; Korbelik, Mladen; Separovic, Duska

    2015-05-01

    Because photodynamic therapy (PDT) alone is not always effective as an anticancer treatment, PDT is combined with other anticancer agents for improved efficacy. The clinically-relevant fenretinide [N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide; 4HPR], was combined with the silicon phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc4-mediated PDT to test for their potential to enhance killing of SCC17B cells, a clinically-relevant model of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Because each of these treatments induces apoptosis and regulates the de novo sphingolipid (SL) biosynthesis pathway, the role of ceramide synthase, the pathway-associated enzyme, in PDT+4HPR-induced apoptotic cell death was determined using the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1 (FB). PDT+4HPR enhanced loss of clonogenicity. zVAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, and FB, protected cells from death post-PDT+4HPR. In contrast, the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 inhibitor ABT199 enhanced cell killing after PDT+4HPR. Combining PDT with 4HPR led to FB-sensitive, enhanced Bax associated with mitochondria and cytochrome c redistribution. Mass spectrometry data showed that the accumulation of C16-dihydroceramide, a precursor of ceramide in the de novo SL biosynthesis pathway, was enhanced after PDT+4HPR. Using quantitative confocal microscopy, we found that PDT+4HPR enhanced dihydroceramide/ceramide accumulation in the ER, which was inhibited by FB. The results suggest that SCC17B cells are sensitized to PDT by 4HPR via the de novo SL biosynthesis pathway and apoptosis, and imply potential clinical relevance of the combination for cancer treatment.

  17. A phase i study of daily treatment with a ceramide-dominant triple lipid mixture commencing in neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowe Adrian J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defects in skin barrier function are associated with an increase risk of eczema and atopic sensitisation. Ceramide-dominant triple lipid mixture may improve and maintain the infant skin barrier function, and if shown to be safe and feasible, may therefore offer an effective approach to reduce the incidence of eczema and subsequent atopic sensitisation. We sort to assess the safety and compliance with daily application of a ceramide-dominant triple lipid formula (EpiCeram™ commencing in the neonatal period for the prevention of eczema. Methods Ten infants (0-4 weeks of age with a family history of allergic disease were recruited into an open-label, phase one trial of daily application of EpiCeram™ for six weeks. The primary outcomes were rate of compliance and adverse events. Data on development of eczema, and physiological properties of the skin (transepidermal water loss, hydration, and surface pH were also measured. Results Eighty percent (8/10 of mothers applied the study cream on 80% or more of days during the six week intervention period. Though a number of adverse events unrelated to study product were reported, there were no adverse skin reactions to the study cream. Conclusions These preliminary results support the safety and parental compliance with daily applications of a ceramide-dominant formula for the prevention of eczema, providing the necessary ground work for a randomised clinical trial to evaluate EpiCeram™ for the prevention of eczema. Trial registration The study was listed at the Australian/New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ANZCTR: reg. no. ACTRN12609000727246.

  18. Tetanus Toxin Hc Fragment Induces the Formation of Ceramide Platforms and Protects Neuronal Cells against Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Cubí

    Full Text Available Tetanus toxin (TeTx is the protein, synthesized by the anaerobic bacteria Clostridium tetani, which causes tetanus disease. TeTx gains entry into target cells by means of its interaction with lipid rafts, which are membrane domains enriched in sphingomyelin and cholesterol. However, the exact mechanism of host membrane binding remains to be fully established. In the present study we used the recombinant carboxyl terminal fragment from TeTx (Hc-TeTx, the domain responsible for target neuron binding, showing that Hc-TeTx induces a moderate but rapid and sustained increase in the ceramide/sphingomyelin ratio in primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons and in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells, as well as induces the formation of ceramide platforms in the plasma membrane. The mentioned increase is due to the promotion of neutral sphingomyelinase activity and not to the de novo synthesis, since GW4869, a specific neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor, prevents neutral sphingomyelinase activity increase and formation of ceramide platforms. Moreover, neutral sphingomyelinase inhibition with GW4869 prevents Hc-TeTx-triggered signaling (Akt phosphorylation, as well as the protective effect of Hc-TeTx on PC12 cells subjected to oxidative stress, while siRNA directed against nSM2 prevents protection by Hc-TeTx of NSC-34 cells against oxidative insult. Finally, neutral sphingomyelinase activity seems not to be related with the internalization of Hc-TeTx into PC12 cells. Thus, the presented data shed light on the mechanisms triggered by TeTx after membrane binding, which could be related with the events leading to the neuroprotective action exerted by the Hc-TeTx fragment.

  19. Dynamic GLUT4 sorting through a syntaxin-6 compartment in muscle cells is derailed by insulin resistance-causing ceramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kevin P; Klip, Amira

    2014-04-04

    GLUT4 constitutively recycles between the plasma membrane and intracellular depots. Insulin shifts this dynamic equilibrium towards the plasma membrane by recruiting GLUT4 to the plasma membrane from insulin-responsive vesicles. Muscle is the primary site for dietary glucose deposition; however, how GLUT4 sorts into insulin-responsive vesicles, and if and how insulin resistance affects this process, is unknown. In L6 myoblasts stably expressing myc-tagged GLUT4, we analyzed the intracellular itinerary of GLUT4 as it internalizes from the cell surface and examined if such sorting is perturbed by C2-ceramide, a lipid metabolite causing insulin resistance. Surface-labeled GLUT4myc that internalized for 30 min accumulated in a Syntaxin-6 (Stx6)- and Stx16-positive perinuclear sub-compartment devoid of furin or internalized transferrin, and displayed insulin-responsive re-exocytosis. C2-ceramide dispersed the Stx6-positive sub-compartment and prevented insulin-responsive re-exocytosis of internalized GLUT4myc, even under conditions not affecting insulin-stimulated signaling towards Akt. Microtubule disruption with nocodazole prevented pre-internalized GLUT4myc from reaching the Stx6-positive perinuclear sub-compartment and from undergoing insulin-responsive exocytosis. Removing nocodazole allowed both parameters to recover, suggesting that the Stx6-positive perinuclear sub-compartment was required for GLUT4 insulin-responsiveness. Accordingly, Stx6 knockdown inhibited by ∼50% the ability of internalized GLUT4myc to undergo insulin-responsive re-exocytosis without altering its overall perinuclear accumulation. We propose that Stx6 defines the insulin-responsive compartment in muscle cells. Our data are consistent with a model where ceramide could cause insulin resistance by altering intracellular GLUT4 sorting.

  20. C6-ceramide nanoliposome suppresses tumor metastasis by eliciting PI3K and PKCζ tumor-suppressive activities and regulating integrin affinity modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Pu; Fu, Changliang; Hu, Yijuan; Dong, Cheng; Song, Yang; Song, Erqun

    2015-01-01

    Nanoliposomal formulation of C6-ceramide, a proapoptotic sphingolipid metabolite, presents an effective way to treat malignant tumor. Here, we provide evidence that acute treatment (30 min) of melanoma and breast cancer cells with nanoliposomal C6-ceramide (NaL-C6) may suppress cell migration without inducing cell death. By employing a novel flow migration assay, we demonstrated that NaL-C6 decreased tumor extravasation under shear conditions. Compared with ghost nanoliposome, NaL-C6 triggere...

  1. Expression of ceramide glucosyltransferases, which are essential for glycosphingolipid synthesis, is only required in a small subset of C. elegans cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marza, Esther; Simonsen, Karina T; Færgeman, Nils J;

    2009-01-01

    mutants with essentially no GSLs. The C. elegans genome encodes three ceramide glucosyltransferase (CGT) genes, which encode enzymes required for GSL biosynthesis. Animals lacking CGT do not synthesize GSLs, arrest growth at the first larval stage, and display defects in a subset of cells...... suggest that GSLs are dispensable in most C. elegans cells, including those of the nervous system.......Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are glycosylated derivatives of ceramide in the lipid bilayer. Their ubiquitous distribution and complexity suggest that they have important functions, but what these are in vivo is still poorly understood. Here, we characterize the phenotype of Caenorhabditis elegans...

  2. Ceramide-Enriched Membrane Domains in Red Blood Cells and the Mechanism ofSphingomyelinase-Induced Hot-Cold Hemolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes, Ruth; Lopez, David; Sot, Jesus;

    2008-01-01

    Hot-cold hemolysis is the phenomenon whereby red blood cells, preincubated at 37 °C in the presence of certain agents, undergo rapid hemolysis when transferred to 4 °C. The mechanism of this phenomenon is not understood. PlcHR2, a phospholipase C/sphingomyelinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... cooling down to 4 °C, the erythrocyte ghost membranes arising from hemolysis contain large, ceramide-rich domains. We suggest that formation of these rigid domains in the originally flexible cell makes it fragile, thus highly susceptible to hemolysis. We also interpret the slow hemolysis observed at 37 °C...

  3. Isolation,structural determination and cytotoxic activity of two new ceramides from the root of Isatis indigotica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Two new ceramides were isolated from the 95% EtOH extract of traditional Chinese medicinal plant Isatis indigotica. Their structures were elucidated as 1-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(2S, 3R)-N-(2’-hydroxypentacosanoyl)-octadeca-11E-sphingenine (1) and 1-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(2S,3R)-N-(2’-hydroxyhe xacosanoyl)-octadeca-11E-sphingenine (2) on the basis of spectroscopic data. Their cytotoxic effects were evaluated by using MTT method.

  4. HCV NS5A and NS5B Enhance Expression of Human Ceramide Glucosyltransferase Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Guo; Ran Yan; Guo-dong Xu; Cong-yi Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Host genes involved in lipid metabolism are differentially affected during the early stages of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection.Here we demonstrate that artificial up-regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis has a positive effect on the replication of the HCV full-length replicon when cells were treated with nystatin.Conversely,the HCV RNA replication was decreased when fatty acid biosynthesis was inhibited with 25-hydroxycholesterol and PDMP(D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3- morpholino-1-propanol).In agreement with these results,the expression level of GlcT-1(ceramide glucosyltransferase),a host glucosyltransferase in the first step of GSL (glycosphingolipid) biosynthesis,was found to be closely associated with the expression and replication of HCV RNA.On the other hand,the viral RNA can also activate GlcT-1 in the early stage of viral RNA transfection in vitro.To identify viral factors that are responsible for GlcT-1 activation,we constructed ten stable Vero cell lines that express individual HCV proteins.Based on the analyses of these cell lines and transient transfection assay of the GlcT-1 promoter regions,we conclude that HCV proteins,especially NS5A and NS5B,have positive effects on the expression of GlcT-1.It is possible that NS5A and NS5B stimulate transcription factor(s) to activate the expression of GlcT-1 by increasing its transcription level.

  5. Implication of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 in ceramide 1-phosphate-stimulated macrophage migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez, Marta; Rivera, Io-Guané; Presa, Natalia; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Cell migration is a complex biological function involved in both physiologic and pathologic processes. Although this is a subject of intense investigation, the mechanisms by which cell migration is regulated are not completely understood. In this study we show that the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), which is involved in inflammatory responses, causes upregulation of metalloproteinases (MMP) -2 and -9 in J774A.1 macrophages. This effect was shown to be dependent on stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellularly regulated kinases 1-2 (ERK1-2) as demonstrated by treating the cells with specific siRNA to knockdown the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K, or ERK1-2. Inhibition of MMP-2 or MMP-9 pharmacologically or with specific siRNA to silence the genes encoding these MMPs abrogated C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. Also, C1P induced actin polymerization and potently increased phosphorylation of the focal adhesion protein paxillin, which are essential factors in the regulation of cell migration. As expected, blockade of paxillin activation with specific siRNA significantly reduced actin polymerization. In addition, inhibition of actin polymerization with cytochalasin D completely blocked C1P-induced MMP-2 and -9 expression as well as C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. It was also observed that pertussis toxin (Ptx) inhibited Akt, ERK1-2, and paxillin phosphorylation, and completely blocked cell migration. The latter findings support the notion that C1P-stimulated macrophage migration is a receptor mediated effect, and point to MMP-2 and -9 as possible therapeutic targets to control inflammation.

  6. Hydration effects on the barrier function of stratum corneum lipids: Raman analysis of ceramides 2, III and 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfayli, Ali; Jamal, Dima; Vyumvuhore, Raoul; Manfait, Michel; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette

    2013-11-07

    The stratum corneum is the outermost layer of the skin; its barrier function is highly dependent on the composition and the structure as well as the organization of lipids in its extracellular matrix. Ceramides, free fatty acids and cholesterol represent the major lipid classes present in this matrix. They play an important role in maintaining the normal hydration levels required for the normal physiological function. Despite the advancement in the understanding of the structure, composition and the function of the stratum corneum (SC), the concern of "dry skin" remains important in dermatology and care research. Most studies focus on the quantification of water in the skin using different techniques including Raman spectroscopy, while the studies that investigate the effect of hydration on the quality of the barrier function of the skin are limited. Raman spectroscopy provides structural, conformational and organizational information that could help elucidate the effect of hydration on the barrier function of the skin. In order to assess the effect of relative humidity on the lipid barrier function; we used Raman spectroscopy to follow-up the evolution of the conformation and the organization of three synthetic ceramides (CER) differing from each other by the nature of their polar heads (sphingosine, phytosphingosine and α hydroxyl sphingosine), CER 2, III and 5 respectively. CER III and 5 showed a more compact and ordered organization with stronger polar interactions at intermediate relative humidity values, while CER 2 showed opposite tendencies to those observed with CER III and 5.

  7. Muscle ceramide content is similar after 3 weeks’ consumption of fat or carbohydrate diet in a crossover design in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, J. W.; Tobin, L.; Drachmann, Tue

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of prolonged adaptation to fat- or carbohydrate-rich diet on muscle ceramide in type 2 diabetes patients, using a longitudinal crossover study. Eleven type 2 diabetes patients consumed isocaloric fat- or carbohydrate-rich diet for 3 weeks in random order...

  8. Acyl-CoA-binding protein, Acb1p, is required for normal vacuole function and ceramide synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Feddersen, Søren; Christiansen, Janne K;

    2004-01-01

    -sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors) Nyv1p, Vam3p and Vti1p, and are unable to fuse in vitro. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed a dramatic reduction in the content of ceramides in whole-cell lipids and in vacuoles isolated from Acb1p-depleted cells. Maturation of yeast aminopeptidase I...

  9. Disruption of ceramide biosynthesis and accumulation of sphingoid bases and sphingoid base 1-phosphates: A mechanism for Fusarium verticillioides effects in maize-seedling disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In sweet corn at the seedling and seed maturation stages, Fusarium can be a serious field problem. The fungus Fusarium verticillioides infects maize and produces fumonisins, inhibitors of ceramide synthase. To determine the role of fumonisins in maize seedling disease, seeds were inoculated with fu...

  10. Distinct roles of two ceramide synthases, CaLag1p and CaLac1p, in the morphogenesis of Candida albicans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheon, Seon Ah; Bal, Jyotiranjan; Song, Yunkyoung

    2012-01-01

    Lag1p and Lac1p catalyse ceramide synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This study shows that Lag1 family proteins are generally required for polarized growth in hemiascomycetous yeast. However, in contrast to S. cerevisiae where these proteins are functionally redundant, C. albicans Lag1p (CaLa...

  11. Sphingosine-1-phosphate and ceramide are associated with health and atresia of bovine ovarian antral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Coronado, C G; Guzmán, A; Espinosa-Cervantes, R; Romano, M C; Verde-Calvo, J R; Rosales-Torres, A M

    2015-02-01

    The follicle destiny towards ovulation or atresia is multi-factorial in nature and involves outcries, paracrine and endocrine factors that promote cell proliferation and survival (development) or unchain apoptosis as part of the atresia process. In several types of cells, sphingosine-1-phospate (S1P) promotes cellular proliferation and survival, whereas ceramide (CER) triggers cell death, and the S1P/CER ratio may determine the fate of the cell. The aim of present study was to quantify S1P and CER concentrations and their ratio in bovine antral follicles of 8 to 17 mm classified as healthy and atretic antral follicles. Follicles were dissected from cow ovaries collected from a local abattoir. The theca cell layer, the granulosa cells and follicular fluid were separated, and 17β-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) concentrations were measured in the follicular fluid by radioimmunoassay. Based on the E2/P4 ratio, the follicles were classified as healthy (2.2±0.3) or atretic (0.2±0.3). In both follicular compartments (granulosa and theca cell layer), sphingolipids were extracted and S1P and CER concentrations were quantified by HPLC (XTerra RP18; 5 µm, 3.0×150 mm column). Results showed that in both follicular compartments, S1P concentrations were higher in healthy antral follicles than in atretic antral follicles (P<0.05). The concentration of CER in the granulosa cells was higher in atretic antral follicles than in healthy antral follicles, but no differences were observed in the theca cell layer. The S1P/CER ratio in both follicular compartments was also higher in healthy antral follicles. Interestingly, in these follicles, there was a 45-fold greater concentration of S1P than CER in the granulosa cells (P<0.05), whereas in the theca cell layer, S1P had only a 14-fold greater concentration than CER when compared with atretic antral follicles. These results suggest that S1P plays a role in follicle health, increasing cellular proliferation and survival. In

  12. Metronomic Ceramide Analogs Inhibit Angiogenesis in Pancreatic Cancer through Up-regulation of Caveolin-1 and Thrombospondin-1 and Down-regulation of Cyclin D1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Bocci

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To evaluate the antitumor and antiangiogenic activity of metronomic ceramide analogs and their relevant molecular mechanisms. METHODS: Human endothelial cells [human dermal microvascular endothelial cells and human umbilical vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC] and pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1 and MIA PaCa-2 were treated with the ceramide analogs (C2, AL6, C6, and C8, at low concentrations for 144 hours to evaluate any antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects and inhibition of migration and to measure the expression of caveolin-1 (CAV-1 and thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 mRNAs by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Assessment of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and of CAV-1 and cyclin D1 protein expression was performed by ELISA. Maximum tolerated dose (MTD gemcitabine was compared against metronomic doses of the ceramide analogs by evaluating the inhibition of MIA PaCa-2 subcutaneous tumor growth in nude mice. RESULTS: Metronomic ceramide analogs preferentially inhibited cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in endothelial cells. Low concentrations of AL6 and C2 caused a significant inhibition of HUVEC migration. ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation were significantly decreased after metronomic ceramide analog treatment. Such treatment caused the overexpression of CAV-1 and TSP-1 mRNAs and proteins in endothelial cells, whereas cyclin D1 protein levels were reduced. The antiangiogenic and antitumor impact in vivo of metronomic C2 and AL6 regimens was similar to that caused by MTD gemcitabine. CONCLUSIONS: Metronomic C2 and AL6 analogs have antitumor and antiangiogenic activity, determining the up-regulation of CAV-1 and TSP-1 and the suppression of cyclin D1.

  13. Apoptosis and the activity of ceramide, Bax and Bcl-2 in the lungs of neonatal rats exposed to limited and prolonged hyperoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitar Fadi F

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study is to examine the effect of limited and prolonged hyperoxia on neonatal rat lung. This is done by examining the morphologic changes of apoptosis, the expression of ceramide, an important mediator of apoptosis, the expression of inflammatory mediators represented by IL-1β and the expression of 2 proto-oncogenes that appear to modulate apoptosis (Bax and Bcl-2. Methods Newborn rats were placed in chambers containing room air or oxygen above 90% for 7 days. The rats were sacrificed at 3, 7 or 14 days and their lungs removed. Sections were fixed, subjected to TUNEL, Hoechst, and E-Cadherin Staining. Sections were also incubated with anti-Bcl-2 and anti-Bax antisera. Bcl-2 and Bax were quantitated by immunohistochemistry. Lipids were extracted, and ceramide measured through a modified diacylglycerol kinase assay. RT-PCR was utilized to assess IL-1β expression. Results TUNEL staining showed significant apoptosis in the hyperoxia-exposed lungs at 3 days only. Co-staining of the apoptotic cells with Hoechst, and E-Cadherin indicated that apoptotic cells were mainly epithelial cells. The expression of Bax and ceramide was significantly higher in the hyperoxia-exposed lungs at 3 and 14 days of age, but not at 7 days. Bcl-2 was significantly elevated in the hyperoxia-exposed lungs at 3 and 14 days. IL-1β expression was significantly increased at 14 days. Conclusion Exposure of neonatal rat lung to hyperoxia results in early apoptosis documented by TUNEL assay. The early rise in Bax and ceramide appears to overcome the anti-apoptotic activity of Bcl-2. Further exposure did not result in late apoptotic changes. This suggests that apoptotic response to hyperoxia is time sensitive. Prolonged hyperoxia results in acute lung injury and the shifting balance of ceramide, Bax and Bcl-2 may be related to the evolution of the inflammatory process.

  14. Saturated fatty acids alter the late secretory pathway by modulating membrane properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payet, Laurie-Anne; Pineau, Ludovic; Snyder, Ellen C R; Colas, Jenny; Moussa, Ahmed; Vannier, Brigitte; Bigay, Joelle; Clarhaut, Jonathan; Becq, Frédéric; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Ferreira, Thierry

    2013-12-01

    Saturated fatty acids (SFA) have been reported to alter organelle integrity and function in many cell types, including muscle and pancreatic β-cells, adipocytes, hepatocytes and cardiomyocytes. SFA accumulation results in increased amounts of ceramides/sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids (PL). In this study, using a yeast-based model that recapitulates most of the trademarks of SFA-induced lipotoxicity in mammalian cells, we demonstrate that these lipid species act at different levels of the secretory pathway. Ceramides mostly appear to modulate the induction of the unfolded protein response and the transcription of nutrient transporters destined to the cell surface. On the other hand, saturated PL, by altering membrane properties, directly impact vesicular budding at later steps in the secretory pathway, i.e. at the trans-Golgi Network level. They appear to do so by increasing lipid order within intracellular membranes which, in turn, alters the recruitment of loose lipid packing-sensing proteins, required for optimal budding, to nascent vesicles. We propose that this latter general mechanism could account for the well-documented deleterious impacts of fatty acids on the last steps of the secretory pathway in several cell types.

  15. The structure, function, and importance of ceramides in skin and their use as therapeutic agents in skin-care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckfessel, Matthew H; Brandt, Staci

    2014-07-01

    Ceramides (CERs) are epidermal lipids that are important for skin barrier function. Much research has been devoted to identifying the numerous CERs found in human skin and their function. Alterations in CER content are associated with a number of skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis. Newer formulations of skin-care products have incorporated CERs into their formulations with the goal of exogenously applying CERs to help skin barrier function. CERs are a complex class of molecules and because of their growing ubiquity in skin-care products, a clear understanding of their role in skin and use in skin-care products is essential for clinicians treating patients with skin diseases. This review provides an overview of the structure, function, and importance of skin CERs in diseased skin and how CERs are being used in skin-care products to improve or restore skin barrier function.

  16. Palmitic Acid Reduces Circulating Bone Formation Markers in Obese Animals and Impairs Osteoblast Activity via C16-Ceramide Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahli, Ahmad; Kiefhaber, Kathryn; Gold, Tziporah; Muluke, Munira; Jiang, Hongfeng; Cremers, Serge; Schulze-Späte, Ulrike

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and impaired lipid metabolism increase circulating and local fatty acid (FA) levels. Our previous studies showed that a high high-saturated -fat diet induced greater bone loss in mice than a high high-unsaturated-fat diet due to increased osteoclast numbers and activity. The impact of elevated FA levels on osteoblasts is not yet clear. We induced obesity in 4 week old male mice using a palmitic acid (PA)- or oleic acid (OA)-enriched high fat high-fat diet (HFD) (20 % of calories from FA), and compared them to mice on a normal (R) caloric diet (10 % of calories from FA). We collected serum to determine FA and bone metabolism marker levels. Primary osteoblasts were isolated; cultured in PA, OA, or control (C) medium; and assessed for mineralization activity, gene expression, and ceramide levels. Obese animals in the PA and OA groups had significantly lower serum levels of bone formation markers P1NP and OC compared to normal weight animals (*p < 0.001), with the lowest marker levels in animals on an PA-enriched HFD (*p < 0.001). Accordingly, elevated levels of PA significantly reduced osteoblast mineralization activity in vitro (*p < 0.05). Elevated PA intake significantly increased C16 ceramide accumulation. This accumulation was preventable through inhibition of SPT2 (serine palmitoyl transferase 2) using myriocin. Elevated levels of PA reduce osteoblast function in vitro and bone formation markers in vivo. Our findings suggest that saturated PA can compromise bone health by affecting osteoblasts, and identify a potential mechanism through which obesity promotes bone loss.

  17. A neurotoxic glycerophosphocholine impacts PtdIns-4, 5-bisphosphate and TORC2 signaling by altering ceramide biosynthesis in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Michael A; Gable, Kenneth; Niewola-Staszkowska, Karolina; Abreu, Susana; Johnston, Anne; Harris, Linda J; Reggiori, Fulvio; Loewith, Robbie; Dunn, Teresa; Bennett, Steffany A L; Baetz, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Unbiased lipidomic approaches have identified impairments in glycerophosphocholine second messenger metabolism in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, we have shown that amyloid-β42 signals the intraneuronal accumulation of PC(O-16:0/2:0) which is associated with neurotoxicity. Similar to neuronal cells, intracellular accumulation of PC(O-16:0/2:0) is also toxic to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, making yeast an excellent model to decipher the pathological effects of this lipid. We previously reported that phospholipase D, a phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2)-binding protein, was relocalized in response to PC(O-16:0/2:0), suggesting that this neurotoxic lipid may remodel lipid signaling networks. Here we show that PC(O-16:0/2:0) regulates the distribution of the PtdIns(4)P 5-kinase Mss4 and its product PtdIns(4,5)P2 leading to the formation of invaginations at the plasma membrane (PM). We further demonstrate that the effects of PC(O-16:0/2:0) on the distribution of PM PtdIns(4,5)P2 pools are in part mediated by changes in the biosynthesis of long chain bases (LCBs) and ceramides. A combination of genetic, biochemical and cell imaging approaches revealed that PC(O-16:0/2:0) is also a potent inhibitor of signaling through the Target of rampamycin complex 2 (TORC2). Together, these data provide mechanistic insight into how specific disruptions in phosphocholine second messenger metabolism associated with Alzheimer's disease may trigger larger network-wide disruptions in ceramide and phosphoinositide second messenger biosynthesis and signaling which have been previously implicated in disease progression.

  18. A neurotoxic glycerophosphocholine impacts PtdIns-4, 5-bisphosphate and TORC2 signaling by altering ceramide biosynthesis in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Kennedy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Unbiased lipidomic approaches have identified impairments in glycerophosphocholine second messenger metabolism in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, we have shown that amyloid-β42 signals the intraneuronal accumulation of PC(O-16:0/2:0 which is associated with neurotoxicity. Similar to neuronal cells, intracellular accumulation of PC(O-16:0/2:0 is also toxic to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, making yeast an excellent model to decipher the pathological effects of this lipid. We previously reported that phospholipase D, a phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5P2-binding protein, was relocalized in response to PC(O-16:0/2:0, suggesting that this neurotoxic lipid may remodel lipid signaling networks. Here we show that PC(O-16:0/2:0 regulates the distribution of the PtdIns(4P 5-kinase Mss4 and its product PtdIns(4,5P2 leading to the formation of invaginations at the plasma membrane (PM. We further demonstrate that the effects of PC(O-16:0/2:0 on the distribution of PM PtdIns(4,5P2 pools are in part mediated by changes in the biosynthesis of long chain bases (LCBs and ceramides. A combination of genetic, biochemical and cell imaging approaches revealed that PC(O-16:0/2:0 is also a potent inhibitor of signaling through the Target of rampamycin complex 2 (TORC2. Together, these data provide mechanistic insight into how specific disruptions in phosphocholine second messenger metabolism associated with Alzheimer's disease may trigger larger network-wide disruptions in ceramide and phosphoinositide second messenger biosynthesis and signaling which have been previously implicated in disease progression.

  19. Controlled penetration of ceramides into and across the stratum corneum using various types of microemulsions and formulation associated toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahle, Fitsum F; Wohlrab, Johannes; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2014-02-01

    Several skin diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis are associated with the depletion or disturbance of stratum corneum (SC) lipids such as ceramides (CERs), free fatty acids and cholesterol. Studies suggested that replenishment of these lipids might help to treat diseased, affected or aged skin. With this premises in mind, there are some formulations in the market that contain SC lipids and currently, to facilitate permeation of the lipids deep into the SC, various CERs, and other SC lipid microemulsions (MEs) were developed and characterised using lecithin or TEGO® CARE PL 4 (TCPL4) as base surfactants. However, to date, there are no reports that involve the permeability of SC lipids into and across the SC, and therefore, the penetration of CER [NP] as a model ceramide from various formulations was investigated ex vivo using Franz diffusion cell. Besides, the toxicity of the MEs was assessed using hen's egg test chorioallantoic membrane (HET-CAM). The results of the study showed that CER [NP] could not permeate into deeper layers of the SC from a conventional hydrophilic cream. Unlike the cream, CER [NP] permeated into the deeper layers of the SC from both type of MEs, where permeation of the CER was more and into deeper layers from droplet type and lecithin-based MEs than bicontinuous (BC) type and TCPL4 based MEs, respectively. The CER also permeated into deeper layers from ME gels which was, however, shallow and to a lesser extent when compared with the MEs. The results of HET-CAM showed that both MEs are safe to be used topically, with lecithin-based MEs exhibiting better safety profiles than TCPL4 based MEs. Concluding, the study showed that the MEs are safe to be used on the skin for the controlled penetration of CER [NP] deep into the SC.

  20. EXOGENOUS CERAMIDE-INDUCED APOPTOSIS IN COLON CARCINOMA LoVo CELLS%神经酰胺诱导大肠癌LoVo细胞的凋亡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭晓华; 张亚历; 周殿元

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate exogenous ceramide-induced apoptosis in colon carcinoma LoVo cells.Methods LoVo cells were pretreated for 3 h with or without the presence of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a potent protein kinase C (PKC) stimulator, later treated with C2-, C6-ceramide or C2-dihydroceramide, and then passed through gel electrophoresis, Heochest 33342 fluorescence staining and flow cytometry with Annexin V/PI staining. The treated LoVo cells were observed for biochemical and morphologic changes. Results Treatment with C2- or C6-ceramide in the range of indicated concentrations (10~25 μmol/L) for 12 to 24 hours resulted in apoptosis in LoVo cells, whereas C2-dihydroceramide, which is similar to C2-ceramide in configuration but lacks the trans double bond at C4-C5 of the sphingoid base backbone, did not induce the apoptosis at the same or even higher concentrations, indicating that the ceramide-induced apoptosis was stereospecific. Moreover, the exogenous ceramide-induced apoptosis in LoVo cells was inhibited in part by PMA. Conclusion Ceramide takes part in the process of apoptotic signal transduction in LoVo cells. PKC may be one of downstream target molecules acted by ceramide.%目的 探讨外源性神经酰胺诱导大肠癌LoVo细胞凋亡的作用。方法 在有或无蛋白激酶C激活剂PMA预处理LoVo细胞3 h的条件下,分别用C2-和C6-神经酰胺以及C2-二羟基神经酰胺处理指数生长期的LoVo细胞,用琼脂糖凝胶电泳,Heochest 33342荧光染色和Annexin V/PI双染色流式细胞仪观测LoVo细胞的形态学和生化特征方面的改变。结果 C2-和C6-神经酰胺在一定的浓度范围内(10-25 μmol/L)处理LoVo细胞12~24 h可诱导其凋亡,但浓度超过50 μmol/L则引起LoVo细胞的坏死增多,而与神经酰胺结构相似但缺乏鞘脂碱基骨架C4-C5反式双键的C2-二羟基神经酰胺在相同甚至更大的剂量时都不引起LoVo细胞的凋亡;PMA对C2-和C6

  1. Probing the role of the ceramide acyl chain length and sphingosine unsaturation in model skin barrier lipid mixtures by (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlberg, Sören; Školová, Barbora; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K; Vogel, Alexander; Vávrová, Kateřina; Huster, Daniel

    2015-05-05

    We investigated equimolar mixtures of ceramides with lignoceric acid and cholesterol as models for the human stratum corneum by differential scanning calorimetry and (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Our reference system consisted of lignoceroyl sphingosine (Cer[NS24]), which represents one of the ceramides in the human stratum corneum. Furthermore, the effect of ceramide acyl chain truncation to 16 carbons as in Cer[NS16] and the loss of the C4 trans double bond as in dihydroceramide Cer[NDS24] were studied. Fully relaxed (2)H NMR spectra were acquired for each deuterated component of each mixture separately, allowing the quantitative determination of the individual lipid phases. At skin temperature, the reference system containing Cer[NS24] is characterized by large portions of each component of the mixture in a crystalline phase, which largely restricts the permeability of the skin lipid barrier. The loss of the C4 trans double bond in Cer[NDS24] leads to the replacement of more than 25% of the crystalline phase by an isotropic phase of the dihydroceramide that shows the importance of dihydroceramide desaturation in the formation of the skin lipid barrier. The truncated Cer[NS16] is mostly found in the gel phase at skin temperature, which may explain its negative effect on the transepidermal water loss in atopic dermatitis patients. These significant alterations in the phase behavior of all lipids are further reflected at elevated temperatures. The molecular insights of our study may help us to understand the importance of the structural parameters of ceramides in healthy and compromised skin barriers.

  2. C6-ceramide nanoliposome suppresses tumor metastasis by eliciting PI3K and PKCζ tumor-suppressive activities and regulating integrin affinity modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pu; Fu, Changliang; Hu, Yijuan; Dong, Cheng; Song, Yang; Song, Erqun

    2015-03-20

    Nanoliposomal formulation of C6-ceramide, a proapoptotic sphingolipid metabolite, presents an effective way to treat malignant tumor. Here, we provide evidence that acute treatment (30 min) of melanoma and breast cancer cells with nanoliposomal C6-ceramide (NaL-C6) may suppress cell migration without inducing cell death. By employing a novel flow migration assay, we demonstrated that NaL-C6 decreased tumor extravasation under shear conditions. Compared with ghost nanoliposome, NaL-C6 triggered phosphorylation of PI3K and PKCζ and dephosphorylation of PKCα. Concomitantly, activated PKCζ translocated into cell membrane. siRNA knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of PKCζ or PI3K rescued NaL-C6-mediated suppression of tumor migration. By inducing dephosphorylation of paxillin, PKCζ was responsible for NaL-C6-mediated stress fiber depolymerization and focal adhesion disassembly in the metastatic tumor cells. PKCζ and PI3K regulated cell shear-resistant adhesion in a way that required integrin αvβ3 affinity modulation. In conclusion, we identified a novel role of acute nanoliposomal ceramide treatment in reducing integrin affinity and inhibiting melanoma metastasis by conferring PI3K and PKCζ tumor-suppressive activities.

  3. Development and validation of an HPLC-MS method for the simultaneous quantification of key oxysterols, endocannabinoids, and ceramides: variations in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutemberezi, Valentin; Masquelier, Julien; Guillemot-Legris, Owein; Muccioli, Giulio G

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterols, ceramides, and endocannabinoids are three families of bioactive lipids suggested to be involved in obesity and metabolic syndrome. To facilitate the quantification of these potentially interconnected lipids, we have developed and validated a liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry method allowing for their simultaneous quantification from tissues. Sample purification is of great importance when quantifying oxysterols due to the potential artifactual conversion of cholesterol into oxysterols. Therefore, we developed a novel solid-phase extraction procedure and demonstrated that it allowed for good recoveries of the three families of analytes without artifactual oxidation of cholesterol. The oxysterols, ceramides, and endocannabinoids and their respective internal standards were chromatographically separated by HPLC and ionized using the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source of an LTQ-orbitrap mass spectrometer. The repeatability and bias were within the acceptance limits for all 23 lipids of interest. The sensitivity (limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ)) and specificity of the method allowed us to quantify all the analytes in the liver and adipose tissue of control and high-fat diet-fed C57BL/6 mice. We found that 16 weeks of high-fat diet strongly impacted the hepatic levels of several oxysterols, ceramides, and endocannabinoids. A partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) based on the variations of the hepatic levels of these 23 bioactive lipids allowed differentiating the lean mice from the obese mice.

  4. Blueberry treatment antagonizes C-2 ceramide-induced stress signaling in muscarinic receptor-transfected COS-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, James A; Bielinski, Donna F; Fisher, Derek R

    2010-03-24

    Previous research has shown that muscarinic receptors (MAChRs) show loss of sensitivity in aging and AD and are selectively sensitive to oxidative stress (OS). Thus, COS-7 cells transfected (tn) with MAChR subtype M1 show > OS sensitivity [as reflected in the ability of the cell to extrude or sequester Ca(2+) following depolarization (recovery) by oxotremorine (oxo) and exposure to dopamine (DA) or amyloid beta (Abeta)] than M3-transfected COS-7 cells. Blueberry (BB) extract pretreatment prevented these deficits. Research has also indicated that C2 ceramide (Cer) has several age-related negative cellular effects (e.g., OS). When these cells were treated with Cer, the significant decrements in the ability of both types of tn cells to initially respond to oxo were antagonized by BB treatment. Present experiments assessed signaling mechanisms involved in BB protection in the presence or absence of DA, Abeta, and/or Cer in this model. Thus, control or BB-treated M1 and M3 tn COS-7 cells were exposed to DA or Abeta(42) in the presence or absence of Cer. Primarily, results showed that the effects of DA or Abeta(42) were to increase stress (e.g., PKCgamma, p38MAPK) and protective signals (e.g., pMAPK). Cer also appeared to raise several of the stress and protective signals in the absence of the other stressors, including PKCgamma, pJNK, pNfkappaB, p53, and p38MAPK, while not significantly altering MAPK, or Akt. pArc was, however, increased by Cer in both types of transfected cells. The protective effects of BB when combined with Cer generally showed greater protection when BB extract was applied prior to Cer, except for one protective signal (pArc) where a greater effect was seen in the M3 cells exposed to Abeta(42.) In the absence of the Abeta(42) or DA, for several of the stress signals (e.g., pNfkappaB, p53), BB lowered their Cer-induced increases in M1- and M3-transfected cells. We are exploring these interactions further, but it is clear that increases in ceramide

  5. Molecular pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    that 45% of deaths in the developed world are linked to fibrotic disease. Fibrosis and cancer are known to be inextricably linked; however, we are only just beginning to understand the common and overlapping molecular pathways between the two. Here, we discuss what is known about the intersection...... of fibrosis and cancer, with a focus on cancer metastasis, and highlight some of the exciting new potential clinical targets that are emerging from analysis of the molecular pathways associated with these two devastating diseases. Clin Cancer Res; 20(14); 3637-43. ©2014 AACR....

  6. Priming with ceramide-1 phosphate promotes the therapeutic effect of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells on pulmonary artery hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jisun; Kim, YongHwan; Heo, Jinbeom; Kim, Kang-Hyun; Lee, Seungun; Lee, Sei Won; Kim, Kyunggon; Kim, In-Gyu; Shin, Dong-Myung

    2016-04-22

    Some molecules enriched in damaged organs can contribute to tissue repair by stimulating the mobilization of stem cells. These so-called "priming" factors include bioactive lipids, complement components, and cationic peptides. However, their therapeutic significance remains to be determined. Here, we show that priming of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) with ceramide-1 phosphate (C1P), a bioactive lipid, enhances their therapeutic efficacy in pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). Human bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs treated with 100 or 200 μM C1P showed improved migration activity in Transwell assays compared with non-primed MSCs and concomitantly activated MAPK(p42/44) and AKT signaling cascades. Although C1P priming had little effect on cell surface marker phenotypes and the multipotency of MSCs, it potentiated their proliferative, colony-forming unit-fibroblast, and anti-inflammatory activities. In a monocrotaline-induced PAH animal model, a single administration of human MSCs primed with C1P significantly attenuated the PAH-related increase in right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and thickness of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells around the vessel wall. Thus, this study shows that C1P priming increases the effects of MSC therapy by enhancing the migratory, self-renewal, and anti-inflammatory activity of MSCs and that MSC therapy optimized with priming protocols might be a promising option for the treatment of PAH patients.

  7. Persistence of HCV in Acutely-Infected Patients Depletes C24-Ceramide and Upregulates Sphingosine and Sphinganine Serum Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikos, Georgios; Dietz, Julia; Ferreiros, Nerea; Koch, Alexander; Dultz, Georg; Bon, Dimitra; Karakasiliotis, Ioannis; Lutz, Thomas; Knecht, Gaby; Gute, Peter; Herrmann, Eva; Zeuzem, Stefan; Mavromara, Penelope; Sarrazin, Christoph; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) substantially affects lipid metabolism, and remodeling of sphingolipids appears to be essential for HCV persistence in vitro. The aim of the current study is the evaluation of serum sphingolipid variations during acute HCV infection. We enrolled prospectively 60 consecutive patients with acute HCV infection, most of them already infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and serum was collected at the time of diagnosis and longitudinally over a six-month period until initiation of antiviral therapy or confirmed spontaneous clearance. Quantification of serum sphingolipids was performed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Spontaneous clearance was observed in 11 out of 60 patients (18.3%), a sustained viral response (SVR) in 43 out of 45 patients (95.5%) receiving an antiviral treatment after follow-up, whereas persistence of HCV occurred in six out of 60 patients (10%). C24-ceramide (C24-Cer)-levels increased at follow-up in patients with spontaneous HCV eradication (p < 0.01), as compared to baseline. Sphingosine and sphinganine values were significantly upregulated in patients unable to clear HCV over time compared to patients with spontaneous clearance of HCV infection on follow-up (p = 0.013 and 0.006, respectively). In summary, the persistence of HCV after acute infection induces a downregulation of C24Cer and a simultaneous elevation of serum sphingosine and sphinganine concentrations. PMID:27304952

  8. Changes in skin barrier during treatment with systemic alitretinoin: focus on skin susceptibility and stratum corneum ceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Alitretinoin is a new drug for systemic treatment of chronic hand eczema. Previous functional tests of skin topically treated with retinoids have indicated impaired skin barrier function, but no data are available on barrier parameters after systemic alitretinoin treatment. To investigate the eff....... No significant changes in stratum corneum lipids were found after 2 months of treatment. In conclusion, systemic alitretinoin does not influence skin susceptibility to irritants or the ceramide profile of stratum corneum....... the effect of systemic alitretinoin on skin barrier function and response to irritants, a secondary objective was to determine if changes occur in the lipid profile of stratum corneum after treatment with systemic alitretinoin. We conducted an open clinical intervention study on eight people ascribed......) was performed on the volar forearm and evaluated by trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema, and a cyanoacrylate skin sample was obtained for lipid analysis. We found no significant changes in response to SLS irritation as evaluated by TEWL and erythema, after treatment with alitretinoin for 2 months...

  9. Effects of sphingomyelin/ceramide ratio on the permeability and microstructure of model stratum corneum lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullmannová, Petra; Staňková, Klára; Pospíšilová, Markéta; Skolová, Barbora; Zbytovská, Jarmila; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2014-08-01

    The conversion of sphingomyelin (SM) to a ceramide (Cer) by acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) is an important event in skin barrier development. A deficiency in aSMase in diseases such as Niemann-Pick disease and atopic dermatitis coincides with impaired skin barrier recovery after disruption. We studied how an increased SM/Cer ratio influences the barrier function and microstructure of model stratum corneum (SC) lipid membranes. In the membranes composed of isolated human SC Cer (hCer)/cholesterol/free fatty acids/cholesteryl sulfate, partial or full replacement of hCer by SM increased water loss. Partial replacement of 25% and 50% of hCer by SM also increased the membrane permeability to theophylline and alternating electric current, while a higher SM content either did not alter or even decreased the membrane permeability. In contrast, in a simple membrane model with only one type of Cer (nonhydroxyacyl sphingosine, CerNS), an increased SM/Cer ratio provided a similar or better barrier against the permeation of various markers. X-ray powder diffraction revealed that the replacement of hCer by SM interferes with the formation of the long periodicity lamellar phase with a repeat distance of d=12.7nm. Our results suggest that SM-to-Cer processing in the human epidermis is essential for preventing excessive water loss, while the permeability barrier to exogenous compounds is less sensitive to the presence of sphingomyelin.

  10. Changes in skin barrier during treatment with systemic alitretinoin: focus on skin susceptibility and stratum corneum ceramides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie K; Hellgren, Lars I; Jemec, Gregor B E; Agner, Tove

    2010-11-01

    Alitretinoin is a new drug for systemic treatment of chronic hand eczema. Previous functional tests of skin topically treated with retinoids have indicated impaired skin barrier function, but no data are available on barrier parameters after systemic alitretinoin treatment. To investigate the effect of systemic alitretinoin on skin barrier function and response to irritants, a secondary objective was to determine if changes occur in the lipid profile of stratum corneum after treatment with systemic alitretinoin. We conducted an open clinical intervention study on eight people ascribed to systemic alitretinoin treatment. The criteria for being ascribed to alitretinoin were chronic hand eczema and insufficient therapeutic response to potent topical corticosteroids. Before initiation and after 2 months of systemic treatment with 30 mg alitretinoin, a challenge with sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) was performed on the volar forearm and evaluated by trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema, and a cyanoacrylate skin sample was obtained for lipid analysis. We found no significant changes in response to SLS irritation as evaluated by TEWL and erythema, after treatment with alitretinoin for 2 months. No significant changes in stratum corneum lipids were found after 2 months of treatment. In conclusion, systemic alitretinoin does not influence skin susceptibility to irritants or the ceramide profile of stratum corneum.

  11. Characterization of lipid model membranes designed for studying impact of ceramide species on drug diffusion and penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochalek, M; Heissler, S; Wohlrab, J; Neubert, R H H

    2012-05-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) intercellular lipid matrix plays a crucial role in the skin barrier function. In the present study, lipid model membranes mimicking its phase behavior were prepared and characterized using different analytical techniques (i.a. SAXD, HPTLC, ESEM, confocal Raman imaging, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy) in order to obtain well-standardized model membranes for diffusion and penetration studies. The lipid model membranes should be used in the future for studying the impact of each ceramide species on the diffusion and penetration of drugs. The SAXD study confirmed that the lipids within artificial lipid systems are arranged similarly to the lipids in the human SC. The polarization microscopic and ESEM images showed the homogenous deposition of lipids on the polycarbonate filter. Both the HPTLC and confocal Raman imaging studies proved the homogenous distribution of individual lipid classes within the lipid model membranes. First in vitro diffusion experiments (performed using an ATR-FTIR diffusion cell) of the hydrophilic compound, urea, revealed that the lipid model membrane represents even stronger diffusion barrier than the human SC.

  12. Genetics of the ceramide/sphingosine-1-phosphate rheostat in blood pressure regulation and hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Mogens; Linneberg, Allan; Jørgensen, Torben;

    2011-01-01

    . Recently it has been suggested that components of the sphingolipid metabolism pathways may be of importance in vascular physiology. The basic metabolic network of sphingolipids has been established, but the influence of genetic variations on the blood pressure is not known. In the approach presented here......Several attempts to decipher the genetics of hypertension of unknown causes have been made including large-scale genome-wide association analysis (GWA), but only a few genes have been identified. Unsolved heterogeneity of the regulation of blood pressure and the shortcomings of the prevailing...... monogenic approach to capture genetic effects in a polygenic condition are the main reasons for the modest results. The level of the blood pressure is the consequence of the genotypic state of the presumably vast network of genes involved in regulating the vascular tonus and hence the blood pressure...

  13. Different Effects of Long- and Short-Chain Ceramides on the Gel-Fluid and Lamellar-Hexagonal Transitions of Phospholipids: A Calorimetric, NMR, and X-Ray Diffraction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sot, Jesús; Aranda, Francisco J.; Collado, M.-Isabel; Goñi, Félix M.; Alonso, Alicia

    2005-01-01

    The effects on dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DEPE) bilayers of ceramides containing different N-acyl chains have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry small angle x-ray diffraction and 31P-NMR spectroscopy. N-palmitoyl (Cer16), N-hexanoyl (Cer6), and N-acetyl (Cer2) sphingosines have been used. Both the gel-fluid and the lamellar-inverted hexagonal transitions of DEPE have been examined in the presence of the various ceramides in the 0-25 mol % concentration range. Pure hydrated ceramides exhibit cooperative endothermic order-disorder transitions at 93°C (Cer16), 60°C (Cer6), and 54°C (Cer2). In DEPE bilayers, Cer16 does not mix with the phospholipid in the gel phase, giving rise to high-melting ceramide-rich domains. Cer16 favors the lamellar-hexagonal transition of DEPE, decreasing the transition temperature. Cer2, on the other hand, is soluble in the gel phase of DEPE, decreasing the gel-fluid and increasing the lamellar-hexagonal transition temperatures, thus effectively stabilizing the lamellar fluid phase. In addition, Cer2 was peculiar in that no equilibrium could be reached for the Cer2-DEPE mixture above 60°C, the lamellar-hexagonal transition shifting with time to temperatures beyond the instrumental range. The properties of Cer6 are intermediate between those of the other two, this ceramide decreasing both the gel-fluid and lamellar-hexagonal transition temperatures. Temperature-composition diagrams have been constructed for the mixtures of DEPE with each of the three ceramides. The different behavior of the long- and short-chain ceramides can be rationalized in terms of their different molecular geometries, Cer16 favoring negative curvature in the monolayers, thus inverted phases, and the opposite being true of the micelle-forming Cer2. These differences may be at the origin of the different physiological effects that are sometimes observed for the long- and short-chain ceramides. PMID:15695626

  14. Loss of Ceramide Synthases Elicits a PHA-4/FoxA-, SKN-1-, and Autophagy-Dependent Lifespan Extension in C. elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mai-Britt Mosbech; Færgeman, Nils J.; Ejsing, Christer S.;

    2011-01-01

    , these lipid species are recognized as bioactive signalling molecules involved in regulation of cell growth, differentiation, senescence, and apoptosis, and thus a delicate equilibrium between the levels of these interconvertible lipid species underlies the balance between cell survival and death. The C....... elegans genome comprises three ceramide synthase genes; hyl-1, hyl-2, and lagr-1. Here we show that functional loss of HYL-1 and LAGR-1 depletes 43:1;3 sphingolipids and extends lifespan in a PHA-4-, SKN-1-, and ATG-12-dependent manner. The transcription factors PHA-4 and SKN-1 as well as ATG-12, which...

  15. Ceramide 1-Phosphate Increases P-Glycoprotein Transport Activity at the Blood-Brain Barrier via Prostaglandin E2 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesev, Emily V; Miller, David S; Cannon, Ronald E

    2017-04-01

    P-glycoprotein, an ATP-driven efflux pump, regulates permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Sphingolipids, endogenous to brain tissue, influence inflammatory responses and cell survival in vitro. Our laboratory has previously shown that sphingolipid signaling by sphingosine 1-phosphate decreases basal P-glycoprotein transport activity. Here, we investigated the potential for another sphingolipid, ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), to modulate efflux pumps at the BBB. Using confocal microscopy and measuring luminal accumulation of fluorescent substrates, we assessed the transport activity of several efflux pumps in isolated rat brain capillaries. C1P treatment induced P-glycoprotein transport activity in brain capillaries rapidly and reversibly. In contrast, C1P did not affect transport activity of two other major efflux transporters, multidrug resistance protein 2 and breast cancer resistance protein. C1P induced P-glycoprotein transport activity without changing transporter protein expression. Inhibition of the key signaling components in the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 signaling cascade (phospholipase A2, COX-2, multidrug resistance protein 4, and G-protein-coupled prostaglandin E2 receptors 1 and 2), abolished P-glycoprotein induction by C1P. We show that COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 are required for C1P-mediated increases in P-glycoprotein activity independent of transporter protein expression. This work describes how C1P activates a signaling cascade to dynamically regulate P-glycoprotein transport at the BBB and offers potential clinical targets to modulate neuroprotection and drug delivery to the CNS.

  16. By activating Fas/ceramide synthase 6/p38 kinase in lipid rafts, stichoposide D inhibits growth of leukemia xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Park, Eun-Seon; Shin, Sung-Won; Ju, Mi-Ha; Han, Jin-Yeong; Jeong, Jin-Sook; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Stonik, Valentin A; Kwak, Jong-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2015-09-29

    Stichoposide D (STD) is a marine triterpene glycoside isolated from sea cucumbers. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor activity of STD in human leukemia cells. The role of Fas (CD95), ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6) and p38 kinase during STD-induced apoptosis was examined in human leukemia cells. In addition, the antitumor effects of STD in K562 and HL-60 leukemia xenograft models were investigated. We found that STD induces Fas translocation to lipid rafts, and thus mediates cell apoptosis. We also observed the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase during STD-induced apoptosis. The use of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and nystatin to disrupt lipid rafts prevents the clustering of Fas and the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase, and also inhibits STD-induced apoptosis. Specific inhibition by Fas, CerS6, and p38 kinase siRNA transfection partially blocked STD-induced apoptosis. In addition, STD has antitumor activity through the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase without displaying any toxicity in HL-60 and K562 xenograft models. We observed that the anti-tumor effect of STD is partially prevented in CerS6 shRNA-silenced xenograft models. We first report that Fas/CerS6/p38 kinase activation in lipid rafts by STD is involved in its anti-leukemic activity. We also established that STD is able to enhance the chemosensitivity of K562 cells to etoposide or Ara-C. These data suggest that STD may be used alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents to treat leukemia.

  17. Arrangement of ceramide [EOS] in a stratum corneum lipid model matrix: new aspects revealed by neutron diffraction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessner, Doreen; Kiselev, Mikhail; Dante, Silvia; Hauss, Thomas; Lersch, Peter; Wartewig, Siegfried; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2008-07-01

    The lipid matrix in stratum corneum (SC) plays a key role in the barrier function of the mammalian skin. The major lipids are ceramides (CER), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acids (FFA). Especially the unique-structured omega-acylceramide CER[EOS] is regarded to be essential for skin barrier properties by inducing the formation of a long-periodicity phase of 130 angstroms (LPP). In the present study, the arrangement of CER[EOS], either mixed with CER[AP] and CHOL or with CER[AP], CHOL and palmitic acid (PA), inside a SC lipid model membrane has been studied for the first time by neutron diffraction. For a mixed CER[EOS]/CER[AP]/CHOL membrane in a partly dehydrated state, the internal membrane nanostructure, i.e. the neutron scattering length density profile in the direction normal to the surface, was obtained by Fourier synthesis from the experimental diffraction patterns. The membrane repeat distance is equal to that of the formerly used SC lipid model system composed of CER[AP]/CHOL/PA/ChS. By comparing both the neutron scattering length density profiles, a possible arrangement of synthetic long-chain CER[EOS] molecules inside a SC lipid model matrix is suggested. The analysis of the internal membrane nanostructure implies that one CER[EOS] molecule penetrates from one membrane layer into an adjacent layer. A 130 angstroms periodicity phase could not be observed under experimental conditions, either in CER/CHOL mixtures or in CER/CHOL/FFA mixture. CER[EOS] can be arranged inside a phase with a repeat unit of 45.2 angstroms which is predominately formed by short-chain CER[AP] with distinct polarity.

  18. Analysis of Molecular Species Profiles of Ceramide-1-phosphate and Sphingomyelin Using MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Ryouhei; Tabata, Yumika; Iga, Erina; Nakao, Michiyasu; Sano, Shigeki; Kogure, Kentaro; Tokumura, Akira; Tanaka, Tamotsu

    2016-02-01

    Ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) is a potential signaling molecule that modulates various cellular functions in animals. It has been known that C1P with different N-acyl lengths induce biological responses differently. However, molecular species profiles of the C1P in animal tissues have not been extensively examined yet. Here, we developed a method for determination of the molecular species of a C1P using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with Phos-tag, a phosphate capture molecule. The amounts of total C1P in skin, brain, liver, kidney and small intestine of mice were determined to be 344, 151, 198, 96 and 90 pmol/g wet weight, respectively. We found a C1P species having an α-hydroxypalmitoyl residue (h-C1P, 44 pmol/g wet weight) in mouse skin. The h-C1P was detected only in the skin, and not other tissues of mice. The same analysis was applied to sphingomyelin after conversion of sphingomyelin to C1P by Streptomyces chromofuscus phospholipase D. We found that molecular species profiles of sphingomyelin in skin, kidney and small intestine of mice were similar to those of C1P in corresponding tissues. In contrast, molecular species profiles of sphingomyelin in liver and brain were quite different from those of C1P in these tissues, indicating selective synthesis or degradation of C1P in these tissues. The method described here will be useful for detection of changes in molecular species profiles of C1P and sphingomyelin.

  19. Designing pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, John Damm

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical background in this chapter is organizational studies and especially theories about design and design processes in organizations. The concept of design is defined as a particular kind of work aimed at making arrangements in order to change existing situations into desired ones....... The illustrative case example is the introduction of clinical pathways in a psychiatric department. The contribution to a general core of design research is the development of the concept of design work and a critical discussion of the role of technological rules in design work....

  20. Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/C16 : 0-ceramide binary liposomes studied by differential scanning calorimetry and wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holopainen, J.M.; Lemmich, J.; Richter, F.

    2000-01-01

    hydrated binary membranes composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and N-palmitoyl-ceramide (C16:0-ceramide, up to a mole fraction X-cer = 0.35) were resolved in further detail by high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction. Both methods reveal very strong...... of the studied compositions there is an endotherm in the region close to the T-m for DMPC. At X-cer greater than or equal to 0.03 a second endotherm is evident at higher temperatures, starting at 32.1 degrees C and reaching 54.6 degrees C at X-cer = 0.30. X-ray small-angle reflection heating scans reveal.......35. In the fluid phase increasing X-cer from 0.06 to 0.35 augments d from 61 Angstrom to 64 Angstrom. An L-beta/L-alpha (ripple/fluid) phase coexistence region is observed at high temperatures (from 31 to 56.5 degrees C) when X-cer > 0.03. With cooling from temperatures above 50 degrees C we observe a slow...

  1. Linear ion-trap MSn with high resolution mass spectrometry reveals structural diversity of epidermal 1-O-acyl ceramide family in mouse epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meei-Hua; Miner, Jeffery; Turk, John; Hsu, Fong-Fu

    2017-02-02

    1-O-acylceramide is a new class of epidermal ceramide found in humans and mice. Here, we report ESI linear ion-trap (LIT) multiple stage mass spectrometric (MSn) approach with high resolution towards structural characterization of this lipid family isolated from mice. Molecular species desorbed as the [M + H]+ ions was subjected to LIT MS2 to yield predominately the [M + H - H2O]+ ions, followed by MS3 to cleave the 1-O-acyl residue to yield the [M + H - H2O - (1-O-fatty acid)]+ ions. The structures of the N-acyl chain and long-chain base (LCB) of the molecule were determined by MS4 on ([M + H - H2O - (1-O-fatty acid)]+) ions that yielded multiple sets of specific ions. Using this approach, isomers varied in the 1-O-acyl (from 14:0- to 26:0-O-acyl) and N-acyl chains (from 20:0- to 26:0-N-acyl) with 18:1-sphingosine as the major LCB were found for the entire family. Minor isomers consisting of 16:1- 17:1-, 18:2-, and 19:1-sphingosine LCB, with odd fatty acyl chain, or with monounsaturated N- or O- fatty acyl substituents were also identified. An estimation of more than 700 1-O-acylceramide species, largely isobaric isomers are present, underscoring the complexity of this ceramide family.

  2. Development and validation of LC/ESI-MS method for the detection and quantification of exogenous ceramide NP in stratum corneum and other layers of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahle, Fitsum F; Lange, Stefan; Dobner, Bodo; Wohlrab, Johannes; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2012-02-23

    Ceramides (CERs) are integral parts of the intercellular lipid lamellae of the stratum corneum (SC), which provide the barrier function of the skin. Administration of CERs deep into the SC may help to restore the barrier function in affected or aged skin. However, quantification of the amount of CER penetrated into the target site needs a selective and sensitive analytical method. Therefore, an LC/ESI-MS method was developed and validated for the detection and quantification of exogenous CER [NP] in the SC as well as other skin layers. The strategy involved synthesis of ceramide [NP]-D3-18 (deuterated CER [NP]) to distinguish it from the endogenous CER [NP] in MS on weight basis. The method was linear over 10-800 ng/ml and sensitive with a limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of 3 and 10 ng/ml, respectively. It was also accurate with within-run and between-run percentage recoveries of 97.1-103.2 and 99.0-104.9, respectively. The within-run and between-run relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 0.9-5.4% and 2.1-7.4%, respectively, suggesting the method is precise. The method was highly selective and the matrix effect was too minimal with matrix factor (MF) mean and RSD values of 1.002 and 4.57%, respectively.

  3. Endogenous β-glucocerebrosidase activity in Abca12⁻/⁻epidermis elevates ceramide levels after topical lipid application but does not restore barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Jorge F; Cavallaro, Paul; Hernandez, Nicholas J; Dolat, Lee; Soscia, Stephanie J; Welti, Ruth; Grabowski, Gregory A; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Freeman, Mason W

    2014-03-01

    ABCA12 mutations disrupt the skin barrier and cause harlequin ichthyosis. We previously showed Abca12(-/-) skin has increased glucosylceramide (GlcCer) and correspondingly lower amounts of ceramide (Cer). To examine why loss of ABCA12 leads to accumulation of GlcCer, de novo sphingolipid synthesis was assayed using [(14)C]serine labeling in ex vivo skin cultures. A defect was found in β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase) processing of newly synthesized GlcCer species. This was not due to a decline in GCase function. Abca12(-/-) epidermis had 5-fold more GCase protein (n = 4, P skin showed a typical interstitial distribution of the GCase protein in the Abca12(-/-) stratum corneum. Hence, we tested whether the block in GlcCer conversion could be circumvented by topically providing GlcCer. This approach restored up to 15% of the lost Cer products of GCase activity in the Abca12(-/-) epidermis. However, this level of barrier ceramide replacement did not significantly reduce trans-epidermal water loss function. Our results indicate loss of ABCA12 function results in a failure of precursor GlcCer substrate to productively interact with an intact GCase enzyme, and they support a model of ABCA12 function that is critical for transporting GlcCer into lamellar bodies.

  4. Probing the Role of Ceramide Headgroup Polarity in Short-Chain Model Skin Barrier Lipid Mixtures by ²H Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlberg, Sören; Lange, Stefan; Dobner, Bodo; Huster, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The thermoptropic phase behaviors of two stratum corneum model lipid mixtures composed of equimolar contributions of either Cer[NS18] or Cer[NP18] with stearic acid and cholesterol were compared. Each component of the mixture was specifically deuterated such that the temperature-dependent (2)H NMR spectra allowed disentanglement of the complicated phase polymorphism of these lipid mixtures. While Cer[NS] is based on the sphingosine backbone, Cer[NP] features a phytosphingosine, which introduces an additional hydroxyl group into the headgroup of the ceramide and abolishes the double bond. From the NMR spectra, the individual contributions of all lipids to the respective phases could be determined. The comparison of the two lipid mixtures reveals that Cer[NP] containing mixtures have a tendency to form more fluid phases. It is concluded that the additional hydroxyl group of the phytosphingosine-containing ceramide Cer[NP18] in mixture with chain-matched stearic acid and cholesterol creates a packing defect that destabilizes the orthorhombic phase state of canonical SC mixtures. This steric clash favors the gel phase and promotes formation of fluid phases of Cer[NP] containing lipid mixtures at lower temperature compared to those containing Cer[NS18].

  5. Different phase behavior and packing of ceramides with long (C16) and very long (C24) acyls in model membranes: infrared spectroscopy using deuterated lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Školová, Barbora; Hudská, Klára; Pullmannová, Petra; Kováčik, Andrej; Palát, Karel; Roh, Jaroslav; Fleddermann, Jana; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2014-09-04

    Ceramides (Cer) are the central molecules in sphingolipid metabolism that participate in cellular signaling and also prevent excessive water loss by the skin. Previous studies showed that sphingosine-based Cer with a long 16C chain (CerNS16) and very long 24C-chain ceramides (CerNS24) differ in their biological actions. Increased levels of long CerNS16 at the expense of the very long CerNS24 have been found in atopic dermatitis patients, and this change correlated with the skin barrier properties. To probe the membrane behavior of the long CerNS16 and the very long chain CerNS24, we studied their interactions with fatty acids and cholesterol in model stratum corneum membranes using infrared spectroscopy. Using Cer with deuterated acyls and/or deuterated fatty acids, we showed differences in lipid mixing, packing, and thermotropic phase behavior between long and very long Cer. These differences were observed in the presence of lignoceric acid or a heterogeneous fatty acid mixture (C16-C24), in the presence or absence of cholesterol sulfate, and at 5-95% humidity. In these membranes, very long CerNS24 prefers an extended (splayed-chain) conformation in which the fatty acid is associated with the very long Cer chain. In contrast, the shorter CerNS16 and fatty acids are mostly phase separated.

  6. Controlled Penetration of a Novel Dimeric Ceramide into and across the Stratum Corneum Using Microemulsions and Various Types of Semisolid Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, Reinhard H H; Sonnenberger, Stefan; Dobner, Bodo; Gray, Charles W; Barger, K Natalie; Sevi-Maxwell, Kara; Sommer, Elfi; Wohlrab, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Ceramides (CERs) are integral parts of the intercellular lipid lamellae of the stratum corneum (SC), which is responsible for the barrier function of the skin. Many skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are associated with the depletion or disturbance of the level of CERs in the SC. Administration of an exogenous novel dimeric ceramide (dCER) deep into the SC may help to stabilize the SC barrier substantially and to treat some skin disease conditions. Consequently, with the help of the existing technology, it might be possible to formulate various pharmaceutical dosage forms that can facilitate penetration of dCER into the SC. Therefore, the penetration of dCER was studied using a high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric-pressure ionization/mass spectrometry method for the detection and quantification of exogenous dCER in the SC as well as other skin layers. Penetration studies were carried out in the Franz diffusion cell using excised human skin ex vivo. Penetration of dCER was studied with 3 model formulations: a colloidal formulation (microemulsion), a cream formulation with ethoxydiglycol as penetration enhancer and a nanoformulation. The highest concentrations of dCER in the different skin layers were found after application of the cream with penetration enhancer. Surprisingly, the lowest concentrations of dCER in the different skin layers were found after application of the microemulsion.

  7. Carbon nanoparticles induce ceramide- and lipid raft-dependent signalling in lung epithelial cells: a target for a preventive strategy against environmentally-induced lung inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peuschel Henrike

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particulate air pollution in lung epithelial cells induces pathogenic endpoints like proliferation, apoptosis, and pro-inflammatory reactions. The activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a key event responsible for signalling events involving mitogen activated protein kinases specific for these endpoints. The molecular events leading to receptor activation however are not well understood. These events are relevant for the toxicological evaluation of inhalable particles as well as for potential preventive strategies in situations when particulate air pollution cannot be avoided. The current study therefore had the objective to elucidate membrane-coupled events leading to EGFR activation and the subsequent signalling cascade in lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, we aimed to identify the molecular target of ectoine, a biophysical active substance which we described to prevent carbon nanoparticle-induced lung inflammation. Methods Membrane signalling events were investigated in isolated lipid rafts from lung epithelial cells with regard to lipid and protein content of the signalling platforms. Using positive and negative intervention approaches, lipid raft changes, subsequent signalling events, and lung inflammation were investigated in vitro in lung epithelial cells (RLE-6TN and in vivo in exposed animals. Results Carbon nanoparticle treatment specifically led to an accumulation of ceramides in lipid rafts. Detailed analyses demonstrated a causal link of ceramides and subsequent EGFR activation coupled with a loss of the receptor in the lipid raft fractions. In vitro and in vivo investigations demonstrate the relevance of these events for carbon nanoparticle-induced lung inflammation. Moreover, the compatible solute ectoine was able to prevent ceramide-mediated EGFR phosphorylation and subsequent signalling as well as lung inflammation in vivo. Conclusion The data identify a so far unknown event in pro

  8. Activation of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) and serum- and glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase 1 (SGK1) by short-chain sphingolipid C4-ceramide rescues the trafficking defect of ΔF508-cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ΔF508-CFTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caohuy, Hung; Yang, Qingfeng; Eudy, Yvonne; Ha, Thien-An; Xu, Andrew E; Glover, Matthew; Frizzell, Raymond A; Jozwik, Catherine; Pollard, Harvey B

    2014-12-26

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is due to a folding defect in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The most common mutation, ΔF508, prevents CFTR from trafficking to the apical plasma membrane. Here we show that activation of the PDK1/SGK1 signaling pathway with C4-ceramide (C4-CER), a non-toxic small molecule, functionally corrects the trafficking defect in both cultured CF cells and primary epithelial cell explants from CF patients. The mechanism of C4-CER action involves a series of mutual autophosphorylation and phosphorylation events between PDK1 and SGK1. Detailed mechanistic studies indicate that C4-CER initially induces autophosphorylation of SGK1 at Ser(422). SGK1[Ser(P)(422)] and C4-CER coincidently bind PDK1 and permit PDK1 to autophosphorylate at Ser(241). Then PDK1[Ser(P)(241)] phosphorylates SGK1[Ser(P)(422)] at Thr(256) to generate fully activated SGK1[Ser(422), Thr(P)(256)]. SGK1[Ser(P)(422),Thr(P)(256)] phosphorylates and inactivates the E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2. ΔF508-CFTR is thus free to traffic to the plasma membrane. Importantly, C4-CER-mediated activation of both PDK1 and SGK1 is independent of the PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway. Physiologically, C4-CER significantly increases maturation and stability of ΔF508-CFTR (t½ ∼10 h), enhances cAMP-activated chloride secretion, and suppresses hypersecretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8). We suggest that candidate drugs for CF directed against the PDK1/SGK1 signaling pathway, such as C4-CER, provide a novel therapeutic strategy for a life-limiting disorder that affects one child, on average, each day.

  9. Influence of ceramide 2 on in vitro skin permeation and retention of 5-ALA and its ester derivatives, for Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bernadete Riemma Pierre

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT based on topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA, an endogenous precursor of protoporphyrin, is an interesting approach for the treatment of skin cancer. However, 5-ALA is a hydrophilic molecule and such a characteristic limits its appropriate cutaneous penetration and retention. In this way, more lipophilic molecules, such as esterified 5-ALA derivatives, have been under investigation in order to improve the skin penetration of this molecule. Drug formulation can also alter 5-ALA skin penetration. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the influence of ceramide 2 - the main lipid of the SC- on the cutaneous delivery of 5-ALA and its ester derivatives in vitro, using Franz diffusion cell. The skin permeation of all studied drugs was decreased in the presence of ceramide, representing a desirable characteristic in order to avoid the risk of systemic side effects. Nevertheless, the SC and [epidermis + dermis] retention after 16 h has also been decreased in the presence of ceramide, as compared to control. In conclusion, ceramide was not a good adjuvant, meaning that research of other vehicles could be useful to improve cutaneous delivery of 5-ALA.A Terapia Fotodinâmica (TFD tópica com um precursor das porfirinas endógenas, o ácido 5-aminolevulínico (5-ALA, constitui uma nova modalidade para o tratamento do câncer de pele. Entretanto, o 5-ALA é uma molécula hidrofílica, o que limita sua penetração e retenção cutânea apropriadas. Moléculas mais lipofílicas, tais como derivados esterificados do 5-ALA, estão sob intensa investigação para melhorar a penetração cutânea desta molécula. A formulação que contém o fármaco também pode alterar a penetração cutânea do 5-ALA. Desta forma, o objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a influência da ceramida 2 - o principal lipídeo do EC- sobre a penetração cutânea de 5-ALA e seus derivados esterificados usando células de difusão de Franz. A permea

  10. Neural differentiation from embryonic stem cells in vitro :An overview of the signaling pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jen-Hua Chuang; Li-Chu Tung; Yenshou Lin

    2015-01-01

    Neurons derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs)have gained great merit in both basic research andregenerative medicine. Here we review and summarizethe signaling pathways that have been reported tobe involved in the neuronal differentiation of ESCs,particularly those associated with in vitro differentiation.The inducers and pathways explored include retinoicacid, Wnt/b-catenin, transforming growth factor/bonemorphogenetic protein, Notch, fibroblast growthfactor, cytokine, Hedgehog, c-Jun N-terminal kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase and others. Someother miscellaneous molecular factors that have beenreported in the literature are also summarized anddiscussed. These include calcium, calcium receptor,calcineurin, estrogen receptor, Hox protein, ceramide,glycosaminioglycan, ginsenoside Rg1, opioids, two porechannel 2, nitric oxide, chemically defined medium, cellcellinteractions, and physical stimuli. The interaction orcrosstalk between these signaling pathways and factorswill be explored. Elucidating these signals in detail shouldmake a significant contribution to future progress in stemcell biology and allow, for example, better comparisonsto be made between differentiation in vivo and in vitro .Of equal importance, a comprehensive understandingof the pathways that are involved in the developmentof neurons from ESCs in vitro will also accelerate theirapplication as part of translational medicine.

  11. Depletion of ceramides with very long chain fatty acids causes defective skin permeability barrier function, and neonatal lethality in ELOVL4 deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenmei Li, Roger Sandhoff, Mari Kono, Patricia Zerfas, Vickie Hoffmann, Bryan Char-Hoa Ding, Richard L. Proia, Chu-Xia Deng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA, either free or as components of glycerolipids and sphingolipids, are present in many organs. Elongation of very long chain fatty acids-4 (ELOVL4 belongs to a family of 6 members of putative fatty acid elongases that are involved in the formation of VLCFA. Mutations in ELOVL4 were found to be responsible for an autosomal dominant form of Stargardt's-like macular dystrophy (STGD3 in human. We have previously disrupted the mouse Elovl4 gene, and found that Elovl4+/- mice were developmentally normal, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of ELOVL4 is not a cause for the juvenile retinal degeneration in STGD3 patients. However, Elovl4-/- mice died within several hours of birth for unknown reason(s. To study functions of ELOVL4 further, we have explored the causes for the postnatal lethality in Elovl4-/- mice. Our data indicated that the mutant mice exhibited reduced thickness of the dermis, delayed differentiation of keratinocytes, and abnormal structure of the stratum corneum. We showed that all Elovl4-/- mice exhibited defective skin water permeability barrier function, leading to the early postnatal death. We further showed that the absence of ELOVL4 results in depletion in the epidermis of ceramides with ω-hydroxy very long chain fatty acids (≥C28 and accumulation of ceramides with non ω-hydroxy fatty acids of C26, implicating C26 fatty acids as possible substrates of ELOVL4. These data demonstrate that ELOVL4 is required for VLCFA synthesis that is essential for water permeability barrier function of skin.

  12. Bioactive lipids sphingosine-1-phosphate and ceramide-1-phosphate are pro-metastatic factors in human rhabdomyosarcomas cell lines, and their tissue level increases in response to radio/chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Gabriela; Bryndza, Ewa; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Ratajczak, Janina; Maj, Magdalena; Tarnowski, Maciej; Klyachkin, Yurij; Houghton, Peter; Morris, Andrew J.; Vater, Axel; Klussmann, Sven; Kucia, Magdalena; Mariusz Z. Ratajczak

    2013-01-01

    We observed that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) strongly enhance in vitro motility and adhesion of human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cells. This effect was observed at physiological concentrations of both bioactive lipids, which are present in biological fluids, and is much stronger than the effects observed in response to known RMS pro-metastatic factors such as stromal derived factors-1 (SDF-1) or hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF). We a...

  13. CD40L induces multidrug resistance to apoptosis in breast carcinoma and lymphoma cells through caspase independent and dependent pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blay Jean-Yves

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD40L was found to reduce doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines through caspase-3 dependent mechanism. Whether this represents a general mechanism for other tumor types is unknown. Methods The resistance induced by CD40L against apoptosis induced by a panel of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic drugs in non Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast carcinoma cell lines was investigated. Results Doxorubicin, cisplatyl, etoposide, vinblastin and paclitaxel increased apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in breast carcinoma as well as in non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. Co-culture with irradiated L cells expressing CD40L significantly reduced the percentage of apoptotic cells in breast carcinoma and non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines treated with these drugs. In breast carcinoma cell lines, these 5 drugs induced an inconsistent increase of caspase-3/7 activity, while in non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines all 5 drugs increased caspase-3/7 activity up to 28-fold above baseline. Co-culture with CD40L L cells reduced (-39% to -89% the activation of caspase-3/7 induced by these agents in all 5 non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines, but in none of the 2 breast carcinoma cell lines. Co culture with CD40L L cells also blocked the apoptosis induced by exogenous ceramides in breast carcinoma and non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines through a caspase-3-like, 8-like and 9-like dependent pathways. Conclusion These results indicate that CD40L expressed on adjacent non tumoral cells induces multidrug resistance to cytotoxic agents and ceramides in both breast carcinoma and non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines, albeit through a caspase independent and dependent pathway respectively.

  14. A pilot study examining the impact of exercise training on skeletal muscle genes related to the TLR signaling pathway in older adults following hip fracture recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Alec I; Briggs, Robert A; Barrows, Katherine M; Nelson, Daniel S; Kwon, Oh Sung; Hopkins, Paul N; Higgins, Thomas F; Marcus, Robin L; Drummond, Micah J

    2017-01-01

    Older adults after hip fracture surgery experience progressive muscle atrophy and weakness, limiting full recovery. Further understanding of the molecular mechanisms in muscle with adaptation to exercise training in this vulnerable population is necessary. Therefore, we conducted a pilot study to investigate the skeletal muscle inflammatory and ceramide biosynthesis gene expression levels associated with the toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway before (Pre) and following a 3-mo multicomponent exercise training program in older adults (3M, 4F; 78.4 ± 13.3 yr; 25.5 ± 2.3 kg/m(2)) ~4 mo after repair from hip fracture (HipFx). Vastus lateralis biopsies from the surgical limb were obtained before (Pre) and after training. Molecular end points and muscle function data were also compared with matched nonexercise healthy controls (CON). As a follow-up analysis, we evaluated specific sphingolipid pools in HipFx and CON muscle. Following training, quadriceps cross-sectional area, strength, and 6-min walk (6MW) increased in the surgical limb (P exercise training alters skeletal muscle inflammation and ceramide metabolism associated with TLR signaling in older adults recovering from hip fracture surgery and may be related to improvements in muscle function recovery.

  15. Modulation of Apoptosis Pathways by Oxidative Stress and Autophagy in β Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maorong Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human islets isolated for transplantation are exposed to multiple stresses including oxidative stress and hypoxia resulting in significant loss of functional β cell mass. In this study we examined the modulation of apoptosis pathway genes in islets exposed to hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, hypoxia, and cytokines. We observed parallel induction of pro- and antiapoptotic pathways and identified several novel genes including BFAR, CARD8, BNIP3, and CIDE-A. As BNIP3 is an inducer of autophagy, we examined this pathway in MIN6 cells, a mouse beta cell line and in human islets. Culture of MIN6 cells under low serum conditions increased the levels of several proteins in autophagy pathway, including ATG4, Beclin 1, LAMP-2, and UVRAG. Amino acid deprivation led to induction of autophagy in human islets. Preconditioning of islets with inducers of autophagy protected them from hypoxia-induced apoptosis. However, induction of autophagy during hypoxia exacerbated apoptotic cell death. ER stress led to induction of autophagy and apoptosis in β cells. Overexpression of MnSOD, an enzyme that scavenges free radicals, resulted in protection of MIN6 cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis. Ceramide, a mediator of cytokine-induced injury, reduced the active phosphorylated form of Akt and downregulated the promoter activity of the antiapoptotic gene bcl-2. Furthermore, cytokine-stimulated JNK pathway downregulated the bcl-2 promoter activity which was reversed by preincubation with SP600125, a JNK inhibitor. Our findings suggest that β cell apoptosis by multiple stresses in islets isolated for transplantation is the result of orchestrated gene expression in apoptosis pathway.

  16. Andrographolide, a Novel NF-κB Inhibitor, Induces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Apoptosis via a Ceramide-p47phox-ROS Signaling Cascade

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    Yu-Ying Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is linked with the development of many cardiovascular complications. Abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs plays a crucial role in the development of atherosclerosis. Accordingly, the apoptosis of VSMCs, which occurs in the progression of vascular proliferation, may provide a beneficial strategy for managing cardiovascular diseases. Andrographolide, a novel nuclear factor-κB inhibitor, is the most active and critical constituent isolated from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata. Recent studies have indicated that andrographolide is a potential therapeutic agent for treating cancer through the induction of apoptosis. In this study, the apoptosis-inducing activity and mechanisms in andrographolide-treated rat VSMCs were characterized. Andrographolide significantly induced reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, p53 activation, Bax, and active caspase-3 expression, and these phenomena were suppressed by pretreating the cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a ROS scavenger, or diphenylene iodonium, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase (Nox inhibitor. Furthermore, p47phox, a Nox subunit protein, was phosphorylated in andrographolide-treated rat VSMCs. However, pretreatment with 3-O-methyl-sphingomyelin, a neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor, significantly inhibited andrographolide-induced p47phox phosphorylation as well as Bax and active caspase-3 expression. Our results collectively demonstrate that andrographolide-reduced cell viability can be attributed to apoptosis in VSMCs, and this apoptosis-inducing activity was associated with the ceramide-p47phox-ROS signaling cascade.

  17. Formation of lysosulfatide, 3',6'-anhydropsychosine, ceramide, and sphingosine by saponification of cerebroside sulfate. Effect of the sulfate group on the hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, G; Kishimoto, Y; Seyama, Y; Yamakawa, T

    1979-02-01

    Saponification of cerebroside sulfate (sulfatide) by refluxing with 1 N KOH in 90% n-butanol for 1 h yielded ceramide, sphingosine, lysosulfatide (psychosine-3'-sulfate ester) and a hitherto unknown compound. The latter compound was identified as 3,6-anhydrogalactosyl sphingosine (3',6'-anhydropsychosine) from its mass spectrum. The structure of lysosulfatide was confirmed by reacylating it to sulfatide by condensing it with lignoceroyl chloride. The resulting sulfatide, which was chromatographically identical to control sulfatides, was not oxidized by periodate. The sulfatide was also permethylated and methanolyzed. The sugar moiety obtained was identified as methyl 2,4,6-tri-O-methylgalactoside by gas-liquid chromatography and thin-layer chromatography. The presence of the sulfate group in lysosulfatide was further confirmed by IR spectroscopy and the presence of radioactivity when it was prepared from [35S]sulfatide. The effect of the sulfate group on cleavage of the galactoside linkage and on the formation of the 3,6-anhydro derivative is discussed.

  18. A new analytical bench assay for the determination of arylsulfatase a activity toward galactosyl-3-sulfate ceramide: implication for metachromatic leukodystrophy diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morena, Francesco; di Girolamo, Ilaria; Emiliani, Carla; Gritti, Angela; Biffi, Alessandra; Martino, Sabata

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present the design and validation of a new assay for the diagnosis of metachromatic leukodystrophy. The method is highly specific, simple, reproducible, and straightforward. In our spectrophotometric method, the determination of arylsulfatase A (ARSA) activity toward the natural substrate, galactosyl-3-sulfate ceramide (or sulfatide), is performed using neat sulfatide without chemical modification. This confers to the assay high analytical specificity. The hydrolyzed sulfatide is monitored upon inclusion of the colorimetric reagent Azure A. The nonhydrolyzed sulfatide-Azure A is recovered and measured at a wavelength of λ = 650 nm. Thus, ARSA activity toward the sulfatide is obtained by subtracting the nonhydrolyzed sulfatide from the total sulfatide used in the enzyme reaction (sulfatide-Azure A present in a parallel assay performed in the absence of ARSA). Within a clinical context, our method definitely discriminated between healthy subject samples and metachromatic leukodystrophy patient samples, and, therefore, it is suitable for diagnostic applications and for monitoring the efficacy of therapeutic treatments in patients or animal models.

  19. The role of the trans double bond in skin barrier sphingolipids: permeability and infrared spectroscopic study of model ceramide and dihydroceramide membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolová, Barbora; Jandovská, Kateřina; Pullmannová, Petra; Tesař, Ondřej; Roh, Jaroslav; Hrabálek, Alexandr; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2014-05-20

    Dihydroceramides (dCer) are members of the sphingolipid family that lack the C4 trans double bond in their sphingoid backbone. In addition to being precursors of ceramides (Cer) and phytoceramides, dCer have also been found in the extracellular lipid membranes of the epidermal barrier, the stratum corneum. However, their role in barrier homeostasis is not known. We studied how the lack of the trans double bond in dCer compared to Cer influences the permeability, lipid chain order, and packing of multilamellar membranes composed of the major skin barrier lipids: (d)Cer, fatty acids, cholesterol, and cholesteryl sulfate. The permeability of the membranes with long-chain dCer was measured using various markers and was either comparable to or only slightly greater than (by up to 35%, not significant) that of the Cer membranes. The dCer were less sensitive to acyl chain shortening than Cer (the short dCer membranes were up to 6-fold less permeable that the corresponding short Cer membranes). Infrared spectroscopy showed that long dCer mixed less with fatty acids but formed more thermally stable ordered domains than Cer. The key parameter explaining the differences in permeability in the short dCer and Cer was the proportion of the orthorhombic phase. Our results suggest that the presence of the trans double bond in Cer is not crucial for the permeability of skin lipid membranes and that dCer may be underappreciated members of the stratum corneum lipid barrier that increase its heterogeneity.

  20. The caveolae-mediated sv40 entry pathway bypasses the golgi complex en route to the endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuksin Dmitry

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simian virus 40 (SV40 enters cells via an atypical caveolae-mediated endocytic pathway, which delivers the virus to a new intermediary compartment, the caveosome. The virus then is believed to go directly from the caveosome to the endoplasmic reticulum. Cholera toxin likewise enters via caveolae and traffics to caveosomes. But, in contrast to SV40, cholera toxin is transported from caveosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum via the Golgi. For that reason, and because the caveosome and Golgi may have some common markers, we revisited the issue of whether SV40 might access the endoplasmic reticulum via the Golgi. Results We confirmed our earlier finding that SV40 co localizes with the Golgi marker β-COP. However, we show that the virus does not co localize with the more discriminating Golgi markers, golgin 97 and BODIPY-ceramide. Conclusion The caveolae-mediated SV40 entry pathway does not intersect the Golgi. SV40 is seen to co localize with β-COP because that protein is a marker for caveosomes as well as the Golgi. Moreover, these results are consistent with the likelihood that the caveosome is a sorting organelle. In addition, there are at least two distinct but related routes by which a ligand might traffic from the caveosome to the ER; one route involving transport through the Golgi, and another pathway that does not involve the Golgi.

  1. Consistent metagenes from cancer expression profiles yield agent specific predictors of chemotherapy response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiyuan; Eklund, Aron Charles; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome scale expression profiling of human tumor samples is likely to yield improved cancer treatment decisions. However, identification of clinically predictive or prognostic classifiers can be challenging when a large number of genes are measured in a small number of tumors. RESULTS...

  2. DMPD: Regulatory pathways in inflammation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17967718 Regulatory pathways in inflammation. Mantovani A, Garlanda C, Locati M, Ro....html) (.csml) Show Regulatory pathways in inflammation. PubmedID 17967718 Title Regulatory pathways in infl... B, Vecchi A. Publication Autoimmun Rev. 2007 Nov;7(1):8-11. Epub 2007 Mar 26. Pathway - PNG File (.png) SVG

  3. Clinical Pathway for Thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar del Moral, Jesús María; Soria Aledo, Víctor; Colina Alonso, Alberto; Flores Pastor, Benito; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, María Teresa; Ortega Serrano, Joaquín; Parra Hidalgo, Pedro; Ros López, Susana

    2015-05-01

    Clinical pathways are care plans applicable to patient care procedures that present variations in practice and a predictable clinical course. They are designed not as a substitute for clinical judgment, but rather as a means to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the procedures. This clinical pathway is the result of a collaborative work of the Sections of Endocrine Surgery and Quality Management of the Spanish Association of Surgeons. It attempts to provide a framework for standardizing the performance of thyroidectomy, the most frequently performed operation in endocrine surgery. Along with the usual documents of clinical pathways (temporary matrix, variance tracking and information sheets, assessment indicators and a satisfaction questionnaire) it includes a review of the scientific evidence around different aspects of pre, intra and postoperative management. Among others, antibiotic and antithrombotic prophylaxis, preoperative preparation in hyperthyroidism, intraoperative neuromonitoring and systems for obtaining hemostasis are included, along with management of postoperative hypocalcemia.

  4. Pathway analysis of IMC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrypnyuk, Nataliya; Nielson, Flemming; Pilegaard, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    We present the ongoing work on the pathway analysis of a stochastic calculus. Firstly we present a particular stochastic calculus that we have chosen for our modeling - the Interactive Markov Chains calculus, IMC for short. After that we specify a few restrictions that we have introduced into the......We present the ongoing work on the pathway analysis of a stochastic calculus. Firstly we present a particular stochastic calculus that we have chosen for our modeling - the Interactive Markov Chains calculus, IMC for short. After that we specify a few restrictions that we have introduced...

  5. Policies built upon pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Musterd; Z. Kovács

    2013-01-01

    After the general introductions, the first substantive part of this volume (Part II) provides concise research-based discussions of policies developed in recognition of the important role played by the pathways along which city-regions have travelled. Our research has shown that it is highly importa

  6. Dexter energy transfer pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skourtis, Spiros S; Liu, Chaoren; Antoniou, Panayiotis; Virshup, Aaron M; Beratan, David N

    2016-07-19

    Energy transfer with an associated spin change of the donor and acceptor, Dexter energy transfer, is critically important in solar energy harvesting assemblies, damage protection schemes of photobiology, and organometallic opto-electronic materials. Dexter transfer between chemically linked donors and acceptors is bridge mediated, presenting an enticing analogy with bridge-mediated electron and hole transfer. However, Dexter coupling pathways must convey both an electron and a hole from donor to acceptor, and this adds considerable richness to the mediation process. We dissect the bridge-mediated Dexter coupling mechanisms and formulate a theory for triplet energy transfer coupling pathways. Virtual donor-acceptor charge-transfer exciton intermediates dominate at shorter distances or higher tunneling energy gaps, whereas virtual intermediates with an electron and a hole both on the bridge (virtual bridge excitons) dominate for longer distances or lower energy gaps. The effects of virtual bridge excitons were neglected in earlier treatments. The two-particle pathway framework developed here shows how Dexter energy-transfer rates depend on donor, bridge, and acceptor energetics, as well as on orbital symmetry and quantum interference among pathways.

  7. Mining biological pathways using WikiPathways web services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kelder

    Full Text Available WikiPathways is a platform for creating, updating, and sharing biological pathways [1]. Pathways can be edited and downloaded using the wiki-style website. Here we present a SOAP web service that provides programmatic access to WikiPathways that is complementary to the website. We describe the functionality that this web service offers and discuss several use cases in detail. Exposing WikiPathways through a web service opens up new ways of utilizing pathway information and assisting the community curation process.

  8. Mining biological pathways using WikiPathways web services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelder, Thomas; Pico, Alexander R; Hanspers, Kristina; van Iersel, Martijn P; Evelo, Chris; Conklin, Bruce R

    2009-07-30

    WikiPathways is a platform for creating, updating, and sharing biological pathways [1]. Pathways can be edited and downloaded using the wiki-style website. Here we present a SOAP web service that provides programmatic access to WikiPathways that is complementary to the website. We describe the functionality that this web service offers and discuss several use cases in detail. Exposing WikiPathways through a web service opens up new ways of utilizing pathway information and assisting the community curation process.

  9. Eczema and ceramides: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Agner, Tove

    2013-01-01

    types of treatment. We also consider the genetic influence on stratum corneum lipids. The review is an update on research indexed in PubMed following the discovery of the filaggrin mutations in atopic dermatitis in 2006, but when newer publications cannot stand alone, we include publications from before...

  10. Ethnicity and stratum corneum ceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J M; Høgh, J K; Hellgren, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The barrier function of the skin is dependent on an optimal composition of the stratum corneum lipids, exemplified by the altered lipid profile in patients with atopic eczema (AE). Differences in the global prevalence of AE point to the environment as an important factor in AE. Studies on filaggrin...

  11. Inhibition of steroidogenesis and induction of apoptosis in rat luteal cells by cell-permeable ceramide in vitro%细胞渗透性神经酰胺可抑制大鼠离体黄体细胞甾体激素生成并诱导细胞凋亡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆雷; 倪江; 边淑玲; 姚兰春; 朱辉; 张玮

    2001-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of ceramide on progesterone production and apoptosis in rat luteal cells in vitro. Luteal cells were prepared from the ovaries of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) primed female Wistar rats and incubated with cell permeable C2-ceramide. The effects of ceramide on progesterone production and apoptosis in luteal cells were assessed by radio immunoassay (RIA) and flow cytometry analysis. In addition, changes in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and nitric oxide (NO) production by luteal cells treated with C2-ceramide were also evaluated. Ceramide was found to reduce hCG-stimulated progesterone production in a dose-dependent manner, whereas it had little effect on basal progesterone content. Spontaneous apoptosis in luteal cells was observed after a 12-hour incubation in vitro and 5 μmol/L of ceramide significantly increased the apoptotic rate (P<0.05). Enhanced apoptotic peak was seen in the histogram by flow cytometry. Moreover, 50 μmol/L of C2-ceramide significantly increased NOS activity (P<0.01) and NO production (P<0.001). It is suggested that ceramide may serve as an important signaling molecule mediating certain ovarian processes, such as luteal regression.%本文旨在观察神经酰胺对离体孵育的大鼠黄体细胞孕酮分泌及细胞凋亡的影响。以PMSG-hCG处理的雌性Wistar大鼠为模型, 分离制备黄体细胞。将外源性细胞渗透性神经酰胺与黄体细胞共同孵育, 分别用放免法和流式细胞仪分析神经酰胺对黄体细胞孕酮生成和凋亡的影响,同时还检测了一氧化氮合酶 (NOS)活性和一氧化氮(NO)水平的变化。结果显示,神经酰胺可以剂量相关方式抑制hCG-诱导的孕酮分泌,而对基础孕酮没有显著影响。离体孵育12 h的大鼠黄体细胞存在自发性凋亡, 5 μmol/L神经酰胺能显著增加凋亡率(P<0.05), 流式细胞仪分析可见

  12. Identifying dysregulated pathways in cancers from pathway interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ke-Qin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancers, a group of multifactorial complex diseases, are generally caused by mutation of multiple genes or dysregulation of pathways. Identifying biomarkers that can characterize cancers would help to understand and diagnose cancers. Traditional computational methods that detect genes differentially expressed between cancer and normal samples fail to work due to small sample size and independent assumption among genes. On the other hand, genes work in concert to perform their functions. Therefore, it is expected that dysregulated pathways will serve as better biomarkers compared with single genes. Results In this paper, we propose a novel approach to identify dysregulated pathways in cancer based on a pathway interaction network. Our contribution is three-fold. Firstly, we present a new method to construct pathway interaction network based on gene expression, protein-protein interactions and cellular pathways. Secondly, the identification of dysregulated pathways in cancer is treated as a feature selection problem, which is biologically reasonable and easy to interpret. Thirdly, the dysregulated pathways are identified as subnetworks from the pathway interaction networks, where the subnetworks characterize very well the functional dependency or crosstalk between pathways. The benchmarking results on several distinct cancer datasets demonstrate that our method can obtain more reliable and accurate results compared with existing state of the art methods. Further functional analysis and independent literature evidence also confirm that our identified potential pathogenic pathways are biologically reasonable, indicating the effectiveness of our method. Conclusions Dysregulated pathways can serve as better biomarkers compared with single genes. In this work, by utilizing pathway interaction networks and gene expression data, we propose a novel approach that effectively identifies dysregulated pathways, which can not only be used

  13. Expression of ceramide galactosy transferase in sciatic nerve of rats with diabetic peripheral neuropathy after electroacupuncture at Zusanli and Shenshu points

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongsheng Dong; Yunyun Zhang; Yin Shi; Min Zheng; Qiujuan Zhang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ceramide galactosyltransferase (GGT) protein and mRNA expression defect can cause the abnormal morphology and slowing conduction velocity of peripheral nerve. Morphologic change and functional disorder of myelin sheath and axon appear when diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) occurs. Whether electroacupuncture at Zusanli(ST 36) and Shenshu(BL 32) points can enhance the expression of CGT protein and mRNA in the DPN tissue?OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of electroacupuncture at Zusanli and Shenshu points on motor, sensory conduction velocity and CGT mRNA and its protein expression of sciatic nerve in rats with DPN.DESIGN: A randomized and controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Department of Neurology and Central Laboratory, Yueyang Hospital of Traditional Chinese & Western Medicine, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.MATERIALS : Totally 60 healthy male Wistar rats of clean grade, aged 4 month, with body mass of 200 to 220 g, were enrolled in this study. Streptozotocin (STZ, Sigma Company of USA, Batch No. S-0130).METHODS: This study was carried out in the Animal Experimental Center and Central Laboratory, YueyangHospital of Traditional Chinese & Western Medicine during February 2005 to March 2006. ① Fifteen rats were randomly chosen,serving as normal group.All the other rets were intraperitoneally injected once with STZ to develop experimental diabetic rat models. If fasting blood glucose was ≥ 15 mmol/L,sensory nerve and motor nerve conduction velocity of sciatic nerve was obviously slowed, tail-swaying temperature threshold was increased and myelinated nerve fiber of sciatic nerve changed, DPN models were successful. The successful model rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups: model group, control group(electroacupuncture at non-meridian-non-acupoint)and electroacupuncture group [electroacupuncture at Zusanli and Shenshu points], with 15 rats each. The rats in the normal group and model group were untouched. In the

  14. Mapping Nursing Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Birks

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Articulated education pathways between the vocational education training sector and universities provide opportunities for students wishing to progress to higher qualifications. Enrolled nurses seeking to advance their career in nursing can choose to enter baccalaureate degree programs through such alternative entry routes. Awarding of credit for prior studies is dependent on accurate assessment of the existing qualification against that which is sought. This study employed a modified Delphi method to inform the development of an evidence-based, structured approach to mapping the pathway from the nationally consistent training package of the Diploma of Nursing to the diversity of baccalaureate nursing programs across Australia. The findings of this study reflect the practical nature of the role of the enrolled nurse, particularly the greater emphasis placed on direct care activities as opposed to those related to professional development and the generation and use of evidence. These findings provide a valuable summative overview of the relationship between the Diploma of Nursing and the expectations of the registered nurse role.

  15. Polyurethane film dressings and ceramide 2-containing hydrocolloid dressing reduce the risk of pressure ulcer development in high-risk patients undergoing surgery: a matched case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohta M

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Masushi Kohta,1 Kazumi Sakamoto,2 Tsunao Oh-i31Medical Engineering Laboratory, ALCARE Co, Ltd, Sumida-ku, Tokyo, 2Department of Nursing, 3Department of Dermatology, Tokyo Medical University Ibaraki Medical Center, Ami, Ibaraki, JapanBackground: Numerous clinical challenges regarding adhesive dressings have shown that using an adhesive dressing could minimize or prevent superficial skin loss in patients at risk of developing pressure ulcers. However, evidence that polyurethane film dressings and ceramide 2-containing hydrocolloid dressing can reduce the risk of pressure ulcer development in high-risk patients undergoing surgery is limited. Therefore, we assessed the effects of application of these dressings for reducing the risk of pressure ulcer development in these patients and identified other risk factors.Methods: A matched case-control study was conducted involving 254 patients at high risk for pressure ulcer development at one acute care hospital in Japan. No patients in this study had a pressure ulcer at the start of the study. Thirty-one patients developed a pressure ulcer during surgery, and these patients were defined as cases. Controls were randomly matched for sex and age (±4 years, from which 62 patients were selected. Medical records were obtained for preoperative factors, including age, sex, body mass index, diabetes mellitus, albumin, total protein, C-reactive protein, white cell count, red cell count, and hemoglobin, and for intraoperative factors, including dressing application, operation time, body position, and surgery type. The odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI were determined to identify risk factors for pressure ulcer development in patients undergoing surgery.Results: By multiple logistic regression analysis, there was a significantly reduced risk of pressure ulcer development for patients who had dressing applications as compared with those without dressing applications (OR 0.063; 95% CI 0.012–0.343; P=0

  16. Pathways to Global Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David E.; Mitry, Darryl J.

    2011-01-01

    . An important case study is McDonald‘s corporation, the world‘s largest fast food restaurant chain. This company has employed divergent marketing and economic strategies in both domestic and the international markets to become a leader in the global marketplace. An overview of the company‘s background......, organizational structures, mission and vision illustrate McDonald‘s strategic focus on its proactive evolution from a small drive-through operation to a global fast-food giant. The strategy is based on its ability to adapt to the cultural differences of the markets that McDonald‘s serves while preserving its......For marketing and economic researchers, an important aspect of globalization is the degree to which various consumer behavior dimensions and consumption patterns in different parts of the world are becoming similar, and how multinational companies have identified pathways to global success...

  17. The Kallikrein-Kinin-System in Experimental Chagas Disease: A Paradigm to Investigate the Impact of Inflammatory Edema on GPCR-mediated pathways of Host Cell Invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio eScharfstein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic chagasic myocarditis (CCM depends on Trypanosoma cruzi persistence in the myocardium. Studies of the proteolytic mechanisms governing host/parasite balance in peripheral sites of T. cruzi infection revealed that tissue culture trypomastigotes (TCTs elicit inflammatory edema and stimulate protective type-1 effector T cells through the activation of the Kallikrein-Kinin System (KKS. Molecular studies linked the proinflammatory phenotype of Dm28c TCTs to the synergistic activities of tGPI, a lipid anchor that functions as a TLR2 ligand, and cruzipain, a kinin-releasing cysteine protease. Analysis of the dynamics of inflammation revealed that TCTs activate innate sentinel cells via TLR2, releasing CXC chemokines, which in turn evoke neutrophil/CXCR2-dependent extravasation of plasma proteins, including high molecular weight kininogen (HK, in parasite-laden tissues. Further downstream, TCTs process surface bound HK, liberating lysyl-BK (LBK, which then propagates inflammatory edema via signaling of endothelial G-protein-coupled bradykinin B2 receptors (BK2R. Dm28 TCTs take advantage of the transient availability of infection-promoting peptides (e.g., bradykinin and endothelins in inflamed tissues to invade cardiovascular cells via interdependent signaling of BKRs and endothelin receptors (ETRs. Herein we present a space-filling model whereby ceramide-enriched endocytic vesicles generated by the shingomyelinase pathway might incorporate BK2R and ETRs, which then trigger Ca2+-driven responses that optimize the housekeeping mechanism of plasma membrane repair from cell wounding. The hypothesis predicts that the NFB-inducible BKR (BK1R may integrate the multimolecular signaling platforms forged by ceramide rafts, as the chronic myocarditis progresses. Exploited as gateways for parasite invasion, BK2R, BK1R, ETAR, ETBR and other GPCR partners may enable persistent myocardial parasitism in the edematous tissues at expense of adverse cardiac

  18. Bioactive lipids sphingosine-1-phosphate and ceramide-1-phosphate are pro-metastatic factors in human rhabdomyosarcomas cell lines, and their tissue level increases in response to radio/chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Gabriela; Bryndza, Ewa; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Ratajczak, Janina; Maj, Magdalena; Tarnowski, Maciej; Klyachkin, Yurij; Houghton, Peter; Morris, Andrew J.; Vater, Axel; Klussmann, Sven; Kucia, Magdalena; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.

    2013-01-01

    We observed that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) strongly enhance in vitro motility and adhesion of human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cells. This effect was observed at physiological concentrations of both bioactive lipids, which are present in biological fluids, and is much stronger than the effects observed in response to known RMS pro-metastatic factors such as stromal derived factors-1 (SDF-1) or hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF). We also present novel evidence that the levels of S1P and C1P increase in several organs after γ-irradiation or chemotherapy, which indicates induction of an unwanted pro-metastatic environment related to treatment. Most importantly, we found that the metastasis of RMS cells in response to S1P can be effectively inhibited in vivo with the S1P-specific binder NOX-S93 that is based on a high affinity Spiegelmer. We propose that bioactive lipids play a previously underappreciated role in dissemination of RMS and the unwanted side effects of radio/chemotherapy by creating a pro-metastatic microenvironment. Therefore, an anti-metastatic treatment with specific S1P-binding scavenger such as NOX-S93 could become a part of standard radio/chemotherapy. PMID:23615526

  19. A pathway to spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jon A

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenology of mystical experiences has been described throughout all the ages and in all religions. All mystical traditions identify some sense of union with the absolute as the ultimate spiritual goal. I assume that the pathway to both theistic and secular spirituality and our readiness to seek a solution in a psychological merger with something beyond the self evolves out of our human experience. Spirituality is one of man's strategies for dealing with the limitations of the life cycle, separation and loss, biological fragility, transience, and non-existence. Spirituality may serve as the affective component to a belief system or myth that is not rooted in scientific evidence but is lived as if it is true. Spirituality may take many forms, but I will suggest that in some instances it may serve as a reparative process in which one creates in the external world, through symbolic form, a nuance or facet of an internalized mental representation which has become lost or is no longer available to the self; or it may represent the continuity of the self-representation after death through a self-object merger. Lastly I will illustrate from the writings of two of our greatest poets, Dante Alighieri and William Wordsworth, how their poetry became interwoven with a profound spirituality. In Dante we will see the elaboration of a religious spirituality, while in the writings of Wordsworth a secular spirituality emerges interwoven with nature and belatedly his identification with "tragic man" as his mythos.

  20. Evolution of the TOR Pathway.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, T.J.P. van; Zwartkruis, F.J.; Bos, J.L.; Snel, B.

    2011-01-01

    The TOR kinase is a major regulator of growth in eukaryotes. Many components of the TOR pathway are implicated in cancer and metabolic diseases in humans. Analysis of the evolution of TOR and its pathway may provide fundamental insight into the evolution of growth regulation in eukaryotes and provid

  1. Autism: Many Genes, Common Pathways?

    OpenAIRE

    Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    Autism is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental syndrome with a complex genetic etiology. It is still not clear whether autism comprises a vast collection of different disorders akin to intellectual disability or a few disorders sharing common aberrant pathways. Unifying principles among cases of autism are likely to be at the level of brain circuitry in addition to molecular pathways.

  2. Autism: many genes, common pathways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geschwind, Daniel H

    2008-10-31

    Autism is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental syndrome with a complex genetic etiology. It is still not clear whether autism comprises a vast collection of different disorders akin to intellectual disability or a few disorders sharing common aberrant pathways. Unifying principles among cases of autism are likely to be at the level of brain circuitry in addition to molecular pathways.

  3. Biogenetic Pathways for Marine Terpenoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑其煌; 苏镜娱; 黄起鹏; 王植材; 刘璇; 高碧; 曾陇梅; 郑德炫

    1994-01-01

    A reasonable theoretical elucidation of biogenetic pathways is given for marine ter-penoids——halogenated terpenoids,cernbranolides and tetracyclic tetraterpenoids in marine organisms ac-cording to biogenesis,and the possibility of studying biogenetic pathways by chemical synthesis and molecu-lar probe method is discussed.

  4. KeyPathwayMinerWeb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Alcaraz, Nicolas; Dissing-Hansen, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    We present KeyPathwayMinerWeb, the first online platform for de novo pathway enrichment analysis directly in the browser. Given a biological interaction network (e.g. protein-protein interactions) and a series of molecular profiles derived from one or multiple OMICS studies (gene expression...

  5. Novel protein regulates ERK pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway plays a critical role in the vital processes of living cells such as proliferation and differentiation.Recently, CAS scientists in Shanghai have discovered a novel mechanism of spatial regulation on ERK pathway. The result was published in the 4 September issue of the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences(PNAS).

  6. Refining the quantitative pathway of the Pathways to Mathematics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowinski, Carla; LeFevre, Jo-Anne; Skwarchuk, Sheri-Lynn; Kamawar, Deepthi; Bisanz, Jeffrey; Smith-Chant, Brenda

    2015-03-01

    In the current study, we adopted the Pathways to Mathematics model of LeFevre et al. (2010). In this model, there are three cognitive domains--labeled as the quantitative, linguistic, and working memory pathways--that make unique contributions to children's mathematical development. We attempted to refine the quantitative pathway by combining children's (N=141 in Grades 2 and 3) subitizing, counting, and symbolic magnitude comparison skills using principal components analysis. The quantitative pathway was examined in relation to dependent numerical measures (backward counting, arithmetic fluency, calculation, and number system knowledge) and a dependent reading measure, while simultaneously accounting for linguistic and working memory skills. Analyses controlled for processing speed, parental education, and gender. We hypothesized that the quantitative, linguistic, and working memory pathways would account for unique variance in the numerical outcomes; this was the case for backward counting and arithmetic fluency. However, only the quantitative and linguistic pathways (not working memory) accounted for unique variance in calculation and number system knowledge. Not surprisingly, only the linguistic pathway accounted for unique variance in the reading measure. These findings suggest that the relative contributions of quantitative, linguistic, and working memory skills vary depending on the specific cognitive task.

  7. Pathways Intern Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Evan A.

    2015-01-01

    During my time at NASA, I worked with the Granular Mechanics and Regolith Organization (GMRO), better known as Swamp Works. The goal of the lab is to find ways to utilize resources found after the astronaut or robot has landed on another planet or asteroid. This concept is known as in-situ resource utilization and it is critical to long term missions such as those to Mars. During my time here I worked on the Asteroid and Lava Tube Free Flyer project (ALTFF). A lava tube, such as the one shown in figure 1, is a long tear drop shaped cavern that is produced when molten lava tunnels through the surrounding rock creating large unground pathways. Before mining for resources on Mars or on asteroids, a sampling mission must be done to scout out useful resource deposits. ALTFF's goal is to provide a low cost, autonomous scout robot that can sample the surface and return to the mother ship or lander for further processing of the samples. The vehicle will be looking for water ice in the regolith that can be processed into either potable water, hydrogen and oxygen fuel, or a binder material for 3D printing. By using a low cost craft to sample, there is much less risk to the more expensive mother ship or lander. While my main task was the construction of a simulation environment to test control code in and the construction of the asteroid free flyer prototype, there were other tasks that I performed relating to the ALTFF project.

  8. Protein design for pathway engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Dawn T; Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-02-01

    Design and construction of biochemical pathways has increased the complexity of biosynthetically-produced compounds when compared to single enzyme biocatalysis. However, the coordination of multiple enzymes can introduce a complicated set of obstacles to overcome in order to achieve a high titer and yield of the desired compound. Metabolic engineering has made great strides in developing tools to optimize the flux through a target pathway, but the inherent characteristics of a particular enzyme within the pathway can still limit the productivity. Thus, judicious protein design is critical for metabolic and pathway engineering. This review will describe various strategies and examples of applying protein design to pathway engineering to optimize the flux through the pathway. The proteins can be engineered for altered substrate specificity/selectivity, increased catalytic activity, reduced mass transfer limitations through specific protein localization, and reduced substrate/product inhibition. Protein engineering can also be expanded to design biosensors to enable high through-put screening and to customize cell signaling networks. These strategies have successfully engineered pathways for significantly increased productivity of the desired product or in the production of novel compounds.

  9. Jasmonate Signal Pathway in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yi Shan; Zhi-Long Wang; Daoxin Xie

    2007-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs), which include jasmonic acid and its cyclopentane derivatives are synthesized from the octadecanoid pathway and widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. JAs modulate the expression of numerous genes and mediate responses to stress, wounding, insect attack, pathogen infection, and UV damage. They also affect a variety of processes in many plant developmental processes. The JA signal pathway involves two important events: the biosynthesis of JA and the transduction of JA signal. Several important Arabidopsis mutants in jasmonate signal pathway were described in this review.

  10. Multiple pathways regulate shoot branching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eRameau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoot branching patterns result from the spatio-temporal regulation of axillary bud outgrowth. Numerous endogenous, developmental and environmental factors are integrated at the bud and plant levels to determine numbers of growing shoots. Multiple pathways that converge to common integrators are most probably involved. We propose several pathways involving not only the classical hormones auxin, cytokinins and strigolactones, but also other signals with a strong influence on shoot branching such as gibberellins, sugars or molecular actors of plant phase transition. We also deal with recent findings about the molecular mechanisms and the pathway involved in the response to shade as an example of an environmental signal controlling branching. We propose the TCP transcription factor TB1/BRC1 and the polar auxin transport stream in the stem as possible integrators of these pathways. We finally discuss how modeling can help to represent this highly dynamic system by articulating knowledges and hypothesis and calculating the phenotype properties they imply.

  11. The Oxylipin Pathway in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Creelman, Robert A.; Mulpuri, Rao

    2002-01-01

    Oxylipins are acyclic or cyclic oxidation products derived from the catabolism of fatty acids which regulate many defense and developmental pathways in plants. The dramatic increase in the volume of publications and reviews on these compounds since 1997 documents the increasing interest in this compound and its role in plants. Research on this topic has solidified our understanding of the chemistry and biosynthetic pathways for oxylipin production. However, more information is still needed on...

  12. Session on computation in biological pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karp, P.D. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Riley, M. [Marine Biological Lab., Woods Hole, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The papers in this session focus on the development of pathway databases and computational tools for pathway analysis. The discussion involves existing databases of sequenced genomes, as well as techniques for studying regulatory pathways.

  13. ASM-3 acid sphingomyelinase functions as a positive regulator of the DAF-2/AGE-1 signaling pathway and serves as a novel anti-aging target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongsoon; Sun, Hong

    2012-01-01

    In C. elegans, the highly conserved DAF-2/insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor signaling (IIS) pathway regulates longevity, metabolism, reproduction and development. In mammals, acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to produce ceramide. ASM has been implicated in CD95 death receptor signaling under certain stress conditions. However, the involvement of ASM in growth factor receptor signaling under physiological conditions is not known. Here, we report that in vivo ASM functions as a positive regulator of the DAF-2/IIS pathway in C. elegans. We have shown that inactivation of asm-3 extends animal lifespan and promotes dauer arrest, an alternative developmental process. A significant cooperative effect on lifespan is observed between asm-3 deficiency and loss-of-function alleles of the age-1/PI 3-kinase, with the asm-3; age-1 double mutant animals having a mean lifespan 259% greater than that of the wild-type animals. The lifespan extension phenotypes caused by the loss of asm-3 are dependent on the functions of daf-16/FOXO and daf-18/PTEN. We have demonstrated that inactivation of asm-3 causes nuclear translocation of DAF-16::GFP protein, up-regulates endogenous DAF-16 protein levels and activates the downstream targeting genes of DAF-16. Together, our findings reveal a novel role of asm-3 in regulation of lifespan and diapause by modulating IIS pathway. Importantly, we have found that two drugs known to inhibit mammalian ASM activities, desipramine and clomipramine, markedly extend the lifespan of wild-type animals, in a manner similar to that achieved by genetic inactivation of the asm genes. Our studies illustrate a novel strategy of anti-aging by targeting ASM, which may potentially be extended to mammals.

  14. Rac-1 superactivation triggers insulin-independent glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation that bypasses signaling defects exerted by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)- and ceramide-induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Tim Ting; Sun, Yi; Koshkina, Alexandra; Klip, Amira

    2013-06-14

    Insulin activates a cascade of signaling molecules, including Rac-1, Akt, and AS160, to promote the net gain of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) at the plasma membrane of muscle cells. Interestingly, constitutively active Rac-1 expression results in a hormone-independent increase in surface GLUT4; however, the molecular mechanism and significance behind this effect remain unresolved. Using L6 myoblasts stably expressing myc-tagged GLUT4, we found that overexpression of constitutively active but not wild-type Rac-1 sufficed to drive GLUT4 translocation to the membrane of comparable magnitude with that elicited by insulin. Stimulation of endogenous Rac-1 by Tiam1 overexpression elicited a similar hormone-independent gain in surface GLUT4. This effect on GLUT4 traffic could also be reproduced by acutely activating a Rac-1 construct via rapamycin-mediated heterodimerization. Strategies triggering Rac-1 "superactivation" (i.e. to levels above those attained by insulin alone) produced a modest gain in plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, moderate Akt activation, and substantial AS160 phosphorylation, which translated into GLUT4 translocation and negated the requirement for IRS-1. This unique signaling capacity exerted by Rac-1 superactivation bypassed the defects imposed by JNK- and ceramide-induced insulin resistance and allowed full and partial restoration of the GLUT4 translocation response, respectively. We propose that potent elevation of Rac-1 activation alone suffices to drive insulin-independent GLUT4 translocation in muscle cells, and such a strategy might be exploited to bypass signaling defects during insulin resistance.

  15. Changes in winter depression phenotype correlate with white blood cell gene expression profiles : A combined metagene and gene ontology approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, Fokko J.; Terpstra, Peter; Gladkevich, Anatoliy V.; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. Janneke; te Meerman, Gerard; Nolen, Willem A.; Schoevers, Robert A.; Meesters, Ybe

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we evaluate the feasibility of gene expression in white blood cells as a peripheral marker for winter depression. Sixteen patients with winter type seasonal affective disorder were included in the study. Blood was taken by venous puncture at three time points; in winter prior an

  16. Evaluation of Acid Ceramidase Overexpression-Induced Activation of the Oncogenic Akt Pathway in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    understudied . AC deacylates ceramide to form sphingosine, which can be phosphorylated by sphingosine kinase (SphK)1 or SphK2 to form sphingosine 1...PPC-1 [15] (a kind gift of Dr. Yi Lu, University of Tennessee), 22rv1, and DU145 (ATCC, Manassas, VA) were maintained in RPMI 1640 media supplemented

  17. 青刺果油对神经酰胺合成及神经酰胺酶表达的影响%Effects of Prinsepia utilis Royle oil on the synthesis of ceramide and expression of ceramidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂颖; 顾华; 李娜; 庞勤; 何黎

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of Prinsepia utilis Royle oil (PURO) on the synthesis of ceramide and expression of acid ceramidase N-acylsphingosine amidohydrolase 1 (ASH1),and to explore the mechanisms underlying its moisturizing and skin barrier-repairing effects.Methods Keratinocytes from human foreskin tissue were classified into 2 groups to be cultured in keratinocyte-serum free medium (K-SFM) with or without the presence of PURO.Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to measure the level of ceramide in the culture supernatant of keratinocytes at 0,3,8,24 and 48 hours.The back of nude mice was divided into 4 areas,i.e.,test area,matrix area,blank control area and negative control area.Acetone and ether were used to destroy the epidermal barrier in the test,matrix,and blank control areas,then,the former 2 areas were topically treated with emulsions containing 1% PURO and matrix,respectively,and the blank control area remained untreated.The epidermal barrier remained intact and untreated in the negative control area.Noninvasive methods were used to determine transepidermal water loss (TEWL),epidermal moisture content and skin lipid content in these areas on day 0,1,3,and 7.Skin tissue was obtained from these areas on day 0 and 7 followed by an immunohistochemical study for the quantification of ASH1 expression.Results The level of supernatant ceramide increased with time in the PURO-treated keratinocytes,which was significantly higher at 24 hours and 48 hours than at 0 hour (1.3817 ± 0.100 and 1.3737 ± 0.047 vs.0.7630 ± 0.143,both P < 0.05).The supernatant ceramide was also elevated in the PURO-treated keratinocytes compared with untreated keratinocytes at 24 and 48 hours (both P < 0.05).Noninvasive skin tests showed a gradual decrease in the TEWL,but an increase in the epidermal moisture content and skin lipid content with time in the 3 epidermal barrier-destroyed areas.As far as the test area was concerned,TEWL value was

  18. LXR signaling pathways and atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkin, Anna; Tontonoz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    First discovered as orphan receptors, liver X receptors (LXRs) were subsequently identified as the nuclear receptor target of the cholesterol metabolites, oxysterols.1 There are 2 LXR receptors encoded by distinct genes: LXRα is most highly expressed in the liver, adipose, kidney, adrenal tissues and macrophages, and LXRβ is ubiquitously expressed. Despite differential tissue distribution, these isoforms have 78% homology in their ligand-binding domain and appear to respond to the same endogenous ligands. Work over the past 10 years has shown that the LXR pathway regulates lipid metabolism and inflammation via both the induction and repression of target genes. Given the importance of cholesterol regulation and inflammation in the development of cardiovascular disease, it is not surprising that activation of the LXR pathway attenuates various mechanisms underlying atherosclerotic plaque development.2 In this minireview we will discuss the impact of the LXR pathway on both cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis. PMID:20631351

  19. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, A L; Broze, G J

    1997-10-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), a 42 kD protein, provides the physiological inhibition of tissue factor initiated coagulation by inhibition of both factor Xa and factor VIIa/tissue factor. In plasma, most TFPI is lipoprotein bound with an additional "releasable" pool bound to the endothelial cell surface. TFPI clearance is via receptor mediated endocytosis into liver. Heparin sulfate proteoglycans and LRP (low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein), an extremely large (∼600 kD) cell surface protein, primarily mediate this clearance, although additional TFPI binding sites and endocytosis pathways exist. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997; 7:234-239). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  20. [Pathways of flowering regulation in plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongping; Yang, Jing; Yang, Mingfeng

    2015-11-01

    Flowering, the floral transition from vegetative growth to reproductive growth, is induced by diverse endogenous and exogenous cues, such as photoperiod, temperature, hormones and age. Precise flowering time is critical to plant growth and evolution of species. The numerous renewal molecular and genetic results have revealed five flowering time pathways, including classical photoperiod pathway, vernalization pathway, autonomous pathway, gibberellins (GA) pathway and newly identified age pathway. These pathways take on relatively independent role, and involve extensive crosstalks and feedback loops. This review describes the complicated regulatory network of this floral transition to understand the molecular mechanism of flowering and provide references for further research in more plants.

  1. Loco signaling pathway in longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuh-Ru; Parikh, Hardik; Park, Yongkyu

    2011-05-01

    Despite the various roles of regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) protein in the G protein signaling pathway that have been defined, the function of RGS has not been characterized in longevity signaling pathways. We found that reduced expression of Loco, a Drosophila RGS protein, resulted in a longer lifespan of flies with stronger resistance to stress, higher MnSOD activity and increased fat content. In contrast, overexpression of the loco gene shortened the fly lifespan significantly, lowered stress resistance and reduced fat content, also indicating that the RGS domain containing GTPase-activating protein (GAP) activity is related to the regulation of longevity. Interestingly, expressional changes of yeast RGS2 and rat RGS14, homologs to the fly Loco, also affected oxidative stress resistance and longevity in the respective species. It is known that Loco inactivates inhibitory Gαi•GTP protein to reduce activity of adenylate cyclase (AC) and RGS14 interacts with activated H-Ras and Raf-1 kinases, which subsequently inhibits ERK phosphorylation. We propose that Loco/RGS14 protein may regulate stress resistance and longevity as an activator in AC-cAMP-PKA pathway and/or as a molecular scaffold that sequesters active Ras and Raf from Ras•GTP-Raf-MEK-ERK signaling pathway. Consistently, our data showed that downregulation of Loco significantly diminishes cAMP amounts and increases p-ERK levels with higher resistance to the oxidative stress.

  2. The lectin pathway of complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Vibe Cecilie Diederich; Haugaard, Anna Karen; Garred, P;

    2014-01-01

    The pattern recognition molecules of the lectin complement pathway are important components of the innate immune system with known functions in host-virus interactions. This paper summarizes current knowledge of how these intriguing molecules, including mannose-binding lectin (MBL), Ficolin-1, -2...

  3. Solvents and vapor intrusion pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Scott D; Krieger, Gary R; Palmer, Robert B; Waksman, Javier C

    2004-08-01

    Vapor intrusion must be recognized appropriately as a separate pathway of contamination. Although many issues resemble those of other forms of contamination (particularly its entryway, which is similar to that of radon seepage), vapor intrusion stands apart as a unique risk requiring case-specific action. This article addresses these issues and the current understanding of the most appropriate and successful remedial actions.

  4. Critical nodes in signalling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taniguchi, Cullen M; Emanuelli, Brice; Kahn, C Ronald

    2006-01-01

    Physiologically important cell-signalling networks are complex, and contain several points of regulation, signal divergence and crosstalk with other signalling cascades. Here, we use the concept of 'critical nodes' to define the important junctions in these pathways and illustrate their unique role...

  5. Auditory pathways: anatomy and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, James O

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines the anatomy and physiology of the auditory pathways. After a brief analysis of the external, middle ears, and cochlea, the responses of auditory nerve fibers are described. The central nervous system is analyzed in more detail. A scheme is provided to help understand the complex and multiple auditory pathways running through the brainstem. The multiple pathways are based on the need to preserve accurate timing while extracting complex spectral patterns in the auditory input. The auditory nerve fibers branch to give two pathways, a ventral sound-localizing stream, and a dorsal mainly pattern recognition stream, which innervate the different divisions of the cochlear nucleus. The outputs of the two streams, with their two types of analysis, are progressively combined in the inferior colliculus and onwards, to produce the representation of what can be called the "auditory objects" in the external world. The progressive extraction of critical features in the auditory stimulus in the different levels of the central auditory system, from cochlear nucleus to auditory cortex, is described. In addition, the auditory centrifugal system, running from cortex in multiple stages to the organ of Corti of the cochlea, is described.

  6. The oxylipin pathway in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creelman, Robert A; Mulpuri, Rao

    2002-01-01

    Oxylipins are acyclic or cyclic oxidation products derived from the catabolism of fatty acids which regulate many defense and developmental pathways in plants. The dramatic increase in the volume of publications and reviews on these compounds since 1997 documents the increasing interest in this compound and its role in plants. Research on this topic has solidified our understanding of the chemistry and biosynthetic pathways for oxylipin production. However, more information is still needed on how free fatty acids are produced and the role of beta-oxidation in the biosynthetic pathway for oxylipins. It is also becoming apparent that oxylipin content and composition changes during growth and development and during pathogen or insect attack. Oxylipins such as jasmonic acid (JA) or 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid modulate the expression of numerous genes and influence specific aspects of plant growth, development and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Although oxylipins are believed to act alone, several examples were presented to illustrate that JA-induced responses are modulated by the type and the nature of crosstalk with other signaling molecules such as ethylene and salicylic acid. How oxylipins cause changes in gene expression and instigate a physiological response is becoming understood with the isolation of mutations in both positive and negative regulators in the jasmonate signaling pathway and the use of cDNA microarrays.

  7. Fumonisin B1, a mycotoxin contaminant of cereal grains, and inducer of apoptosis via the tumour necrosis factor pathway and caspase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciacci-Zanella, J R; Jones, C

    1999-07-01

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium moniliforme, a prevalent fungus which infects corn or other cereal grains. Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is the most common mycotoxin produced by F. moniliforme, suggesting that it has toxicological significance. The structure of FB1 resembles sphingoid bases and it inhibits ceramide synthase. As sphingoid bases regulate cell growth, differentiation, transformation and apoptosis, it is reasonable to hypothesize that FB1 can also regulate these activities. Previous studies concluded that FB1 induced apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest in CV-1 cells (African green monkey kidney fibroblasts). In this study, we have identified genes that inhibit FB1-induced apoptosis in CV-1 cells and in two primary human cell types (lung fibroblasts and neonatal kidney cells). A baculovirus gene. inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP), protected CV-1 and the human cells from apoptosis. IAP blocks apoptosis which is induced by the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) pathway. Inhibition of interleukin converting enzymes (ICE proteases or caspases) by the baculovirus gene p35 also inhibited FB1-induced apoptosis. FB1 treatment led to cleavage of Rb (retinoblastoma protein) at its C-terminus in CV-1 or human lung cells. As the C-terminus of Rb is cleaved by ICE proteases during apoptosis, this supports an active role for ICE proteases in FB1-induced apoptosis. The tumour suppressor gene p53 was not required for FB1-induced apoptosis because p53-/- primary mouse embryo fibroblasts underwent apoptosis following FB1 treatment. Furthermore, Bcl-2 was not an effective inhibitor of FB1-induced apoptosis in CV-1 or IMR-90 cells. In summary, these results demonstrate that the TNF pathway and caspases plays an important role in FB1-induced apoptosis.

  8. DMPD: Signalling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17904888 Signalling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. Edwards M...csml) Show Signalling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. PubmedID 17904888 Title Signalling pathways media

  9. Plasma Metabolic Profile Determination in Young ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients with Ischemia and Reperfusion: Ultra-performance Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry for Pathway Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Huang; Tong Li; Ying-Wu Liu; Lei Zhang; Zhi-Huan Dong; Shu-Ye Liu; Ying-Tang Gao

    2016-01-01

    Background:This study was to establish a disease differentiation model for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) youth patients experiencing ischemia and reperfusion via ultra-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) platform,which searches for closely related characteristic metabolites and metabolic pathways to evaluate their predictive value in the prognosis after discharge.Methods:Forty-seven consecutive STEMI patients (23 patients under 45 years of age,referred to here as "youth," and 24 "elderly" patients) and 48 healthy control group members (24 youth,24 elderly) were registered prospectively.The youth patients were required to provide a second blood draw during a follow-up visit one year after morbidity (n =22,one lost).Characteristic metabolites and relative metabolic pathways were screened via UPLC/MS platform base on the Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) and Human Metabolome Database.Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were drawn to evaluate the predictive value of characteristic metabolites in the prognosis after discharge.Results:We successfully established an orthogonal partial least squares discriminated analysis model (R2X =71.2%,R2Y =79.6%,and Q2 =55.9%) and screened out 24 ions; the sphingolipid metabolism pathway showed the most drastic change.The ROC curve analysis showed that ceramide [Cer(d18:0/16:0),Cer(t18:0/12:0)] and sphinganine in the sphingolipid pathway have high sensitivity and specificity on the prognosis related to major adverse cardiovascular events after youth patients were discharged.The area under curve (AUC) was 0.671,0.750,and 0.711,respectively.A follow-up validation one year after morbidity showed corresponding AUC of 0.778,0.833,and 0.806.Conclusions:By analyzing the plasma metabolism of myocardial infarction patients,we successfully established a model that can distinguish two different factors simultaneously:pathological conditions and age

  10. Hydrogen sulfide in signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata

    2015-01-15

    For a long time hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) was considered a toxic compound, but recently H₂S (at low concentrations) has been found to play an important function in physiological processes. Hydrogen sulfide, like other well-known compounds - nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) is a gaseous intracellular signal transducer. It regulates the cell cycle, apoptosis and the oxidative stress. Moreover, its functions include neuromodulation, regulation of cardiovascular system and inflammation. In this review, I focus on the metabolism of hydrogen sulfide (including enzymatic pathways of H₂S synthesis from l- and d-cysteine) and its signaling pathways in the cardiovascular system and the nervous system. I also describe how hydrogen sulfide may be used as therapeutic agent, i.e. in the cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Dual pathways to prospective remembering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Mark A.; Umanath, Sharda; Einstein, Gilles O.; Waldum, Emily R.

    2015-01-01

    According to the multiprocess framework (McDaniel and Einstein, 2000), the cognitive system can support prospective memory (PM) retrieval through two general pathways. One pathway depends on top–down attentional control processes that maintain activation of the intention and/or monitor the environment for the triggering or target cues that indicate that the intention should be executed. A second pathway depends on (bottom–up) spontaneous retrieval processes, processes that are often triggered by a PM target cue; critically, spontaneous retrieval is assumed not to require monitoring or active maintenance of the intention. Given demand characteristics associated with experimental settings, however, participants are often inclined to monitor, thereby potentially masking discovery of bottom–up spontaneous retrieval processes. In this article, we discuss parameters of laboratory PM paradigms to discourage monitoring and review recent behavioral evidence from such paradigms that implicate spontaneous retrieval in PM. We then re-examine the neuro-imaging evidence from the lens of the multiprocess framework and suggest some critical modifications to existing neuro-cognitive interpretations of the neuro-imaging results. These modifications illuminate possible directions and refinements for further neuro-imaging investigations of PM. PMID:26236213

  12. Dual Pathways to Prospective Remembering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Mcdaniel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available According to the multiprocess framework (McDaniel & Einstein, 2000, the cognitive system can support prospective memory (PM retrieval through two general pathways. One pathway depends on top-down attentional control processes that maintain activation of the intention and/or monitor the environment for the triggering or target cues that indicate that the intention should be executed. A second pathway depends on (bottom-up spontaneous retrieval processes, processes that are often triggered by a PM target cue; critically spontaneous retrieval is assumed to not require monitoring or active maintenance of the intention. Given demand characteristics associated with experimental settings, however, participants are often inclined to monitor, thereby potentially masking discovery of bottom-up spontaneous retrieval processes. In this article, we discuss parameters of laboratory PM paradigms to discourage monitoring and review recent behavioral evidence from such paradigms that implicate spontaneous retrieval in PM. We then re-examine the neuro-imaging evidence from the lens of the multiprocess framework and suggest some critical modifications to existing neuro-cognitive interpretations of the neuro-imaging results. These modifications illuminate possible directions and refinements for further neuro-imaging investigations of PM.

  13. Identification of Metabolic Pathway Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh eDolatshahi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of parameters in even moderately large biological systems is a significant challenge. This challenge is greatly exacerbated if the mathematical formats of appropriate process descriptions are unknown. To address this challenge, the method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE was proposed for the analysis of metabolic time series data. Under ideal conditions, the first phase of DFE yields numerical representations of all fluxes within a metabolic pathway system, either as values at each time point or as plots against their substrates and modulators. However, this numerical result does not reveal the mathematical format of each flux. Thus, the second phase of DFE selects functional formats that are consistent with the numerical trends obtained from the first phase. While greatly facilitating metabolic data analysis, DFE is only directly applicable if the pathway system contains as many dependent variables as fluxes. Because most actual systems contain more fluxes than metabolite pools, this requirement is seldom satisfied. Auxiliary methods have been proposed to alleviate this issue, but they are not general. Here we propose strategies that extend DFE toward general, slightly underdetermined pathway systems.

  14. Imbalanced kynurenine pathway in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Magdalena E; Bhat, Maria; Skogh, Elisabeth; Samuelsson, Martin; Lundberg, Kristina; Dahl, Marja-Liisa; Sellgren, Carl; Schwieler, Lilly; Engberg, Göran; Schuppe-Koistinen, Ina; Erhardt, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Several studies suggest a role for kynurenic acid (KYNA) in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. It has been proposed that increased brain KYNA levels in schizophrenia result from a pathological shift in the kynurenine pathway toward enhanced KYNA formation, away from the other branch of the pathway leading to quinolinic acid (QUIN). Here we investigate the levels of QUIN in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls, and relate those to CSF levels of KYNA and other kynurenine metabolites from the same individuals. CSF QUIN levels from stable outpatients treated with olanzapine (n = 22) and those of controls (n = 26) were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. No difference in CSF QUIN levels between patients and controls was observed (20.6 ± 1.5 nM vs. 18.2 ± 1.1 nM, P = 0.36). CSF QUIN was positively correlated to CSF kynurenine and CSF KYNA in patients but not in controls. The CSF QUIN/KYNA ratio was lower in patients than in controls (P = 0.027). In summary, the present study offers support for an over-activated and imbalanced kynurenine pathway, favoring the production of KYNA over QUIN in patients with schizophrenia.

  15. Pathways to Shape the Bioeconomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Priefer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In view of the increasing depletion of fossil fuel resources, the concept “bioeconomy” aims at the gradual replacement of fossil fuels by renewable feedstock. Seen as a comprehensive societal transition, the bioeconomy is a complex field that includes a variety of sectors, actors, and interests and is related to far-reaching changes in today’s production systems. While the objectives pursued—such as reducing dependence on fossil fuels, mitigating climate change, ensuring global food security, and increasing the industrial use of biogenic resources—are not generally contentious, there is fierce controversy over the possible pathways for achieving these objectives. Based on a thorough literature review, the article identifies major lines of conflict in the current discourse. Criticism of the prevalent concept refers mainly to the strong focus on technology, the lack of consideration given to alternative implementation pathways, the insufficient differentiation of underlying sustainability requirements, and the inadequate participation of societal stakeholders. Since today it cannot be predicted which pathway will be the most expedient—the one already being taken or one of the others proposed—this paper suggests pursuing a strategy of diversity concerning the approaches to shape the bioeconomy, the funding of research topics, and the involvement of stakeholders.

  16. Identification of Metabolic Pathway Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatshahi, Sepideh; Voit, Eberhard O

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of parameters in even moderately large biological systems is a significant challenge. This challenge is greatly exacerbated if the mathematical formats of appropriate process descriptions are unknown. To address this challenge, the method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE) was proposed for the analysis of metabolic time series data. Under ideal conditions, the first phase of DFE yields numerical representations of all fluxes within a metabolic pathway system, either as values at each time point or as plots against their substrates and modulators. However, this numerical result does not reveal the mathematical format of each flux. Thus, the second phase of DFE selects functional formats that are consistent with the numerical trends obtained from the first phase. While greatly facilitating metabolic data analysis, DFE is only directly applicable if the pathway system contains as many dependent variables as fluxes. Because most actual systems contain more fluxes than metabolite pools, this requirement is seldom satisfied. Auxiliary methods have been proposed to alleviate this issue, but they are not general. Here we propose strategies that extend DFE toward general, slightly underdetermined pathway systems.

  17. The updated RGD Pathway Portal utilizes increased curation efficiency and provides expanded pathway information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, G Thomas; Jayaraman, Pushkala; Petri, Victoria; Tutaj, Marek; Liu, Weisong; De Pons, Jeff; Dwinell, Melinda R; Shimoyama, Mary

    2013-02-05

    The RGD Pathway Portal provides pathway annotations for rat, human and mouse genes and pathway diagrams and suites, all interconnected via the pathway ontology. Diagram pages present the diagram and description, with diagram objects linked to additional resources. A newly-developed dual-functionality web application composes the diagram page. Curators input the description, diagram, references and additional pathway objects. The application combines these with tables of rat, human and mouse pathway genes, including genetic information, analysis tool and reference links, and disease, phenotype and other pathway annotations to pathway genes. The application increases the information content of diagram pages while expediting publication.

  18. Primary Metabolic Pathways and Metabolic Flux Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    his chapter introduces the metabolic flux analysis (MFA) or stoichiometry-based MFA, and describes the quantitative basis for MFA. It discusses the catabolic pathways in which free energy is produced to drive the cell-building anabolic pathways. An overview of these primary pathways provides...

  19. A brain cancer pathway in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Emilie Lund; Rasmussen, Birthe Krogh

    2012-01-01

    Danish healthcare seeks to improve cancer survival through improved diagnostics, rapid treatment and increased focus on cancer prevention and early help-seeking. In neuro-oncology, this has resulted in the Integrated Brain Cancer Pathway (IBCP). The paper explores how the pathway works...... in the initial phase in a clinical setting with emphasis on pathway criteria....

  20. KEGG PATHWAY / Acute myeloid leukemia [KEGG

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PATHWAY: map05221 Entry map05221Pathway Name Acute myeloid leukemia Description Acute...Class Human Diseases; Cancers Pathwaymap map05221Acute myeloid leukemia Disease H00003Acute myeloid leukemia...inkDB DBGET integrated database retrieval system KEGG PATHWAY / Acute myeloid leukemia ...

  1. Apoptotic engulfment pathway and schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangning Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apoptosis has been speculated to be involved in schizophrenia. In a previously study, we reported the association of the MEGF10 gene with the disease. In this study, we followed the apoptotic engulfment pathway involving the MEGF10, GULP1, ABCA1 and ABCA7 genes and tested their association with the disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ten, eleven and five SNPs were genotyped in the GULP1, ABCA1 and ABCA7 genes respectively for the ISHDSF and ICCSS samples. In all 3 genes, we observed nominally significant associations. Rs2004888 at GULP1 was significant in both ISHDSF and ICCSS samples (p = 0.0083 and 0.0437 respectively. We sought replication in independent samples for this marker and found highly significant association (p = 0.0003 in 3 Caucasian replication samples. But it was not significant in the 2 Chinese replication samples. In addition, we found a significant 2-marker (rs2242436 * rs3858075 interaction between the ABCA1 and ABCA7 genes in the ISHDSF sample (p = 0.0022 and a 3-marker interaction (rs246896 * rs4522565 * rs3858075 amongst the MEGF10, GULP1 and ABCA1 genes in the ICCSS sample (p = 0.0120. Rs3858075 in the ABCA1 gene was involved in both 2- and 3-marker interactions in the two samples. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: From these data, we concluded that the GULP1 gene and the apoptotic engulfment pathway are involved in schizophrenia in subjects of European ancestry and multiple genes in the pathway may interactively increase the risks to the disease.

  2. Apoptotic engulfment pathway and schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chen, Xiangning

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Apoptosis has been speculated to be involved in schizophrenia. In a previously study, we reported the association of the MEGF10 gene with the disease. In this study, we followed the apoptotic engulfment pathway involving the MEGF10, GULP1, ABCA1 and ABCA7 genes and tested their association with the disease. METHODOLOGY\\/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ten, eleven and five SNPs were genotyped in the GULP1, ABCA1 and ABCA7 genes respectively for the ISHDSF and ICCSS samples. In all 3 genes, we observed nominally significant associations. Rs2004888 at GULP1 was significant in both ISHDSF and ICCSS samples (p = 0.0083 and 0.0437 respectively). We sought replication in independent samples for this marker and found highly significant association (p = 0.0003) in 3 Caucasian replication samples. But it was not significant in the 2 Chinese replication samples. In addition, we found a significant 2-marker (rs2242436 * rs3858075) interaction between the ABCA1 and ABCA7 genes in the ISHDSF sample (p = 0.0022) and a 3-marker interaction (rs246896 * rs4522565 * rs3858075) amongst the MEGF10, GULP1 and ABCA1 genes in the ICCSS sample (p = 0.0120). Rs3858075 in the ABCA1 gene was involved in both 2- and 3-marker interactions in the two samples. CONCLUSIONS\\/SIGNIFICANCE: From these data, we concluded that the GULP1 gene and the apoptotic engulfment pathway are involved in schizophrenia in subjects of European ancestry and multiple genes in the pathway may interactively increase the risks to the disease.

  3. Fibromyalgia and the serotonin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhl, J H

    1998-10-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a musculoskeletal pain and fatigue disorder manifested by diffuse myalgia, localized areas of tenderness, fatigue, lowered pain thresholds, and nonrestorative sleep. Evidence from multiple sources support the concept of decreased flux through the serotonin pathway in fibromyalgia patients. Serotonin substrate supplementation, via L-tryptophan or 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), has been shown to improve symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia and somatic pains in a variety of patient cohorts. Identification of low serum tryptophan and serotonin levels may be a simple way to identify persons who will respond well to this approach.

  4. Oxylipin Pathway in Rice and Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E. Wassim Chehab; John V. Perea; Banu Gopalan; Steve Theg; Katayoon Dehesh

    2007-01-01

    Plants have evolved complex signaling pathways to coordinate responses to developmental and environmental information. The oxylipin pathway is one pivotal lipid-based signaling network, composed of several competing branch pathways, that determines the plant's ability to adapt to various stimuli. Activation of the oxylipin pathway induces the de novo synthesis of biologically active metabolltes called "oxylipins". The relative levels of these metabolltes are a distinct indicator of each plant species and determine the ability of plants to adapt to different stimuli. The two major branches of the oxylipln pathway, allene oxide synthase (AOS) and hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) are responsible for production of the signaling compounds,jasmonates and aldehydes respectively. Here, we compare and contrast the regulation of AOS and HPL branch pathways in rice and Arabidopsis as model monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous systems. These analyses provide new Insights into the evolution of JAs and aldehydes signaling pathways, and the complex network of processes responsible for stress adaptations in monocots and dicots.

  5. System-based proteomic and metabonomic analysis of the Df(16)A+/− mouse identifies potential miR-185 targets and molecular pathway alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesseling, H; Xu, B; Want, E J; Holmes, E; Guest, P C; Karayiorgou, M; Gogos, J A; Bahn, S

    2017-01-01

    Deletions on chromosome 22q11.2 are a strong genetic risk factor for development of schizophrenia and cognitive dysfunction. We employed shotgun liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) proteomic and metabonomic profiling approaches on prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampal (HPC) tissue from Df(16)A+/− mice, a model of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Proteomic results were compared with previous transcriptomic profiling studies of the same brain regions. The aim was to investigate how the combined effect of the 22q11.2 deletion and the corresponding miRNA dysregulation affects the cell biology at the systems level. The proteomic brain profiling analysis revealed PFC and HPC changes in various molecular pathways associated with chromatin remodelling and RNA transcription, indicative of an epigenetic component of the 22q11.2DS. Further, alterations in glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, mitochondrial function and lipid biosynthesis were identified. Metabonomic profiling substantiated the proteomic findings by identifying changes in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS)-related pathways, such as changes in ceramide phosphoethanolamines, sphingomyelin, carnitines, tyrosine derivates and panthothenic acid. The proteomic findings were confirmed using selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, validating decreased levels of several proteins encoded on 22q11.2, increased levels of the computationally predicted putative miR-185 targets UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-peptide N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 110 kDa subunit (OGT1) and kinesin heavy chain isoform 5A and alterations in the non-miR-185 targets serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 2B catalytic subunit gamma isoform, neurofilament light chain and vesicular glutamate transporter 1. Furthermore, alterations in the proteins associated with mammalian target of rapamycin signalling were detected in the PFC and with glutamatergic signalling in the hippocampus. Based on the proteomic and metabonomic findings, we were

  6. 线纹香茶菜地下部分甾体与神经酰胺类成分%Steroidal and Ceramide Constituents from Underground Part of Isodon lophanthoides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐伟; 孙俊哲; 赵明早; 王靖雯; 董相; 姜北

    2016-01-01

    目的:对线纹香茶菜(Isodon lophanthoides)地下部分化学成分进行研究。方法:采用硅胶、Sephadex LH-20等多种柱层析方法对线纹香茶菜地下部分进行分离纯化,并运用现代波谱学技术与理化性质等手段对分离的化合物进行结构鉴定。结果:从线纹香茶菜地下部分70%丙酮-水提取物的乙酸乙酯部位分离得到5个甾体类化合物和2个神经酰胺类化合物,分别鉴定为:豆甾-4-烯-3-酮(1)、豆甾醇(2)、7α-羟基谷甾醇(3)、胡萝卜苷(4)、5α,6β-二羟基胡萝卜苷(5)、(2S,3S,4R,8E)-2-[(2′R)-2′-羟基-二十四酰氨基]-8-十八烯-1,3,4-三醇(6)、(2S,3R,4E,8Z)-1-O-β-D-葡萄糖-2-[(2′R)-2′-羟基-二十四酰氨基]-4,8-十八二烯-1,3-二醇(7)。结论:化合物1、3、5~7为首次从该植物中分离得到,其中化合物5~7为首次从该属植物地下部分分离得到。%Objective: To explore the chemical constituents from the underground part of Isodon lophanthoides. Methods: The compounds were isolated and purified by silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. Their structures were identified by various spectral analysis and physicochemical properties. Results: Five steroidal compounds and two ceramide compounds were obtained from ethyl acetate fraction of 70% acetone-water extract of the Isodon lophanthoides underground part and identified as stigmast-4-ene-3-one(1), stigmasterol(2), 7α-hydroxysitosterol(3), daucosterol(4), 5α, 6β-dihydroxy-daucosterol(5),(2S, 3S, 4R, 8E)-2-[(2′R)-2-hydroxytetracosanoylamino]-1, 3, 4-octadecanetriol-8-ene(6), and 1-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(2S, 3R, 4E, 8Z)-2-[(2′R)-2-hydroxytetracosanoylamino]-1,3-octadecanediol-4, 8-diene(7). Conclusion:All of these compounds except for 2 and 4 were isolated from this plant for the first time, while the compounds 5-7 were firstly obtained from the underground part of Isodon

  7. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  8. DMPD: Pathways connecting inflammation and cancer. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18325755 Pathways connecting inflammation and cancer. Allavena P, Garlanda C, Borre...llo MG, Sica A, Mantovani A. Curr Opin Genet Dev. 2008 Feb;18(1):3-10. Epub 2008 Mar 5. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Pathway...s connecting inflammation and cancer. PubmedID 18325755 Title Pathways connecting infl...ni A. Publication Curr Opin Genet Dev. 2008 Feb;18(1):3-10. Epub 2008 Mar 5. Pathway - PNG File (.png) SVG F

  9. Ceramide-induced TCR up-regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menné, C; Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst; Dietrich, J

    2000-01-01

    The TCR is a constitutively recycling receptor meaning that a constant fraction of TCR from the plasma membrane is transported inside the cell at the same time as a constant fraction of TCR from the intracellular pool is transported to the plasma membrane. TCR recycling is affected by protein kin...

  10. Enzymatic Production of Ceramide from Sphingomyelin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Long; Hellgren, Lars; Xu, Xuebing

    activity. After seven recycles, immobilized enzyme retains around 70% of its initial activity. Through kinetic study, it has been found that the hydrolysis reactions catalyzed by both soluble and immobilized enzyme follow the Michaelis-Menten equation. The presentation will describe the research background......, introduce the basic reaction system with its optimisation as well as the immobilization study, and release the recent results from the kinetic study....

  11. Mechanisms and impact of ceramide phosphoethanolamine biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hentes Vacaru, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Sphingolipids represent an essential class of membrane molecules in eukaryotic cells. They are primarily found in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane where they help create a rigid and impermeable barrier to the extracellular environment. While sphingomyelin (SM) is the most abundant sphingolip

  12. Hand eczema and stratum corneum ceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J. M.; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2015-01-01

    hyperkeratotic HE. Differences in the skin barrier properties of these two conditions could theoretically be expected. Aim:To examine whether differences exist in the lipid profile and the susceptibility of the stratum corneum (SC) in patients with allergic/irritant HE and those with hyperkeratotic HE. Methods......: Using cyanoacrylate, SC samples were taken from 23 patients with allergic/irritant HE and 15 with hyperkeratotic HE for lipid analysis by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC). Samples were also taken from adjacent, unaffected skin. Severity of HE was assessed by the Hand Eczema Severity...... Index (HECSI), and skin barrier susceptibility was assessed by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL) after a 24-hour patch test with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS). Results: No statistically significant difference was found between groups for the lipid analysis or for skin susceptibility to SLS. We...

  13. Longevity pathways and memory ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias eGkikas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The ageing process has been associated with numerous pathologies at the cellular, tissue, and organ level. Decline or loss of brain functions, including learning and memory, is one of the most devastating and feared aspects of ageing. Learning and memory are fundamental processes by which animals adjust to environmental changes, evaluate various sensory signals based on context and experience, and make decisions to generate adaptive behaviours. Age-related memory impairment is an important phenotype of brain ageing. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related memory impairment is crucial for the development of therapeutic strategies that may eventually lead to the development of drugs to combat memory loss. Studies in invertebrate animal models have taught us much about the physiology of ageing and its effects on learning and memory. In this review we survey recent progress relevant to conserved molecular pathways implicated in both ageing and memory formation and consolidation.

  14. Pathways towards ferroelectricity in hafnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Tran Doan; Sharma, Vinit; Rossetti, George A.; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2014-08-01

    The question of whether one can systematically identify (previously unknown) ferroelectric phases of a given material is addressed, taking hafnia (HfO2) as an example. Low free energy phases at various pressures and temperatures are identified using a first-principles based structure search algorithm. Ferroelectric phases are then recognized by exploiting group theoretical principles for the symmetry-allowed displacive transitions between nonpolar and polar phases. Two orthorhombic polar phases occurring in space groups Pca21 and Pmn21 are singled out as the most viable ferroelectric phases of hafnia, as they display low free energies (relative to known nonpolar phases), and substantial switchable spontaneous electric polarization. These results provide an explanation for the recently observed surprising ferroelectric behavior of hafnia, and reveal pathways for stabilizing ferroelectric phases of hafnia as well as other compounds.

  15. Signalling pathways in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoguang; Ishii, Norito; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    Acantholysis in pemphigus vulgaris is induced by binding of autoantibodies to desmoglein 3 (Dsg3). The roles of signalling pathways on development of acantholysis have recently been extensively studied. In the study by Sayar et al., recently published in Exp Dermatol, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling was activated in both in vivo and in vitro pemphigus vulgaris experimental models. However, while EGFR inhibitors suppressed activity of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) linearly, they suppressed activity of c-Myc and acantholysis in a non-linear, V-shaped relationship. These findings indicated complicated interactions among EGFR, p38MAPK and c-Myc in pemphigus vulgaris pathology.

  16. Fuel Dependence of Benzene Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H; Eddings, E; Sarofim, A; Westbrook, C

    2008-07-14

    The relative importance of formation pathways for benzene, an important precursor to soot formation, was determined from the simulation of 22 premixed flames for a wide range of equivalence ratios (1.0 to 3.06), fuels (C{sub 1}-C{sub 12}), and pressures (20 to 760 torr). The maximum benzene concentrations in 15 out of these flames were well reproduced within 30% of the experimental data. Fuel structural properties were found to be critical for benzene production. Cyclohexanes and C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} fuels were found to be among the most productive in benzene formation; and long-chain normal paraffins produce the least amount of benzene. Other properties, such as equivalence ratio and combustion temperatures, were also found to be important in determining the amount of benzene produced in flames. Reaction pathways for benzene formation were examined critically in four premixed flames of structurally different fuels of acetylene, n-decane, butadiene, and cyclohexane. Reactions involving precursors, such as C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} species, were examined. Combination reactions of C{sub 3} species were identified to be the major benzene formation routes with the exception of the cyclohexane flame, in which benzene is formed exclusively from cascading fuel dehydrogenation via cyclohexene and cyclohexadiene intermediates. Acetylene addition makes a minor contribution to benzene formation, except in the butadiene flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced directly from the fuel, and in the n-decane flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced from large alkyl radical decomposition and H atom abstraction from the resulting large olefins.

  17. Changing Arctic Ocean freshwater pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, James; Kwok, Ron; Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Alkire, Matt; Rigor, Ignatius; Andersen, Roger; Steele, Mike

    2012-01-04

    Freshening in the Canada basin of the Arctic Ocean began in the 1990s and continued to at least the end of 2008. By then, the Arctic Ocean might have gained four times as much fresh water as comprised the Great Salinity Anomaly of the 1970s, raising the spectre of slowing global ocean circulation. Freshening has been attributed to increased sea ice melting and contributions from runoff, but a leading explanation has been a strengthening of the Beaufort High--a characteristic peak in sea level atmospheric pressure--which tends to accelerate an anticyclonic (clockwise) wind pattern causing convergence of fresh surface water. Limited observations have made this explanation difficult to verify, and observations of increasing freshwater content under a weakened Beaufort High suggest that other factors must be affecting freshwater content. Here we use observations to show that during a time of record reductions in ice extent from 2005 to 2008, the dominant freshwater content changes were an increase in the Canada basin balanced by a decrease in the Eurasian basin. Observations are drawn from satellite data (sea surface height and ocean-bottom pressure) and in situ data. The freshwater changes were due to a cyclonic (anticlockwise) shift in the ocean pathway of Eurasian runoff forced by strengthening of the west-to-east Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation characterized by an increased Arctic Oscillation index. Our results confirm that runoff is an important influence on the Arctic Ocean and establish that the spatial and temporal manifestations of the runoff pathways are modulated by the Arctic Oscillation, rather than the strength of the wind-driven Beaufort Gyre circulation.

  18. Pathway-Based Functional Analysis of Metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, Sivan; Sharon, Itai; Pinter, Ron Y.; Shlomi, Tomer

    Metagenomic data enables the study of microbes and viruses through their DNA as retrieved directly from the environment in which they live. Functional analysis of metagenomes explores the abundance of gene families, pathways, and systems, rather than their taxonomy. Through such analysis researchers are able to identify those functional capabilities most important to organisms in the examined environment. Recently, a statistical framework for the functional analysis of metagenomes was described that focuses on gene families. Here we describe two pathway level computational models for functional analysis that take into account important, yet unaddressed issues such as pathway size, gene length and overlap in gene content among pathways. We test our models over carefully designed simulated data and propose novel approaches for performance evaluation. Our models significantly improve over current approach with respect to pathway ranking and the computations of relative abundance of pathways in environments.

  19. Reconstructing fungal natural product biosynthetic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, C M; Williams, K; Bailey, A M

    2014-10-01

    Large scale fungal genome sequencing has revealed a multitude of potential natural product biosynthetic pathways that remain uncharted. Here we describe some of the methods that have been used to explore them via heterologous gene expression. We focus on filamentous fungal hosts and discuss the technological challenges and successes behind the reconstruction of fungal natural product pathways. Optimised, efficient heterologous expression of reconstructed biosynthetic pathways promises progress in the discovery of novel compounds that could be utilised by the pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries.

  20. Coherent band pathways between knots and links

    CERN Document Server

    Buck, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    We categorise coherent band (aka nullification) pathways between knots and 2-component links. Additionally, we characterise the minimal coherent band pathways (with intermediates) between any two knots or 2-component links with small crossing number. We demonstrate these band surgeries for knots and links with small crossing number. We apply these results to place lower bounds on the minimum number of recombinant events separating DNA configurations, restrict the recombination pathways and determine chirality and/or orientation of the resulting recombinant DNA molecules.

  1. Effects of PDT on the endocytic pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, David

    2010-02-01

    Two lines of evidence point to an early effect of photodamage on membrane trafficking. [1] Internalization of a fluorescent probe for hydrophobic membrane loci was impaired by prior photodamage. [2] Interference with the endocytic pathway by the PI-3 kinase antagonist wortmannin led to accumulation of cytoplasmic vacuoles suggesting a block in the recycling of plasma membrane components. Prior photodamage blocked this pathway so that no vacuoles were formed upon exposure of cells to wortmannin. In a murine hepatoma line, the endocytic pathway was preferentially sensitive to lysosomal photodamage. The role of photodamage to the endocytic pathway as a factor in PDT efficacy remains to be assessed.

  2. Female offenders’ pathways to prison in Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuytiens An

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines some results of a research on female offenders’ life histories and pathways to prison in Belgium. Women’s pathways into crime will be presented and the connection of these pathways to their life histories will be explored. The study reveals that the greater part of the research population are adult-onset offenders. The authors argue that the importance of adult-onset pathways for female offenders might be explained by the emergence of (gendered vulnerabilities within the women’s lives, often accumulated not before adulthood.

  3. Correcting ligands, metabolites, and pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vriend Gert

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide range of research areas in bioinformatics, molecular biology and medicinal chemistry require precise chemical structure information about molecules and reactions, e.g. drug design, ligand docking, metabolic network reconstruction, and systems biology. Most available databases, however, treat chemical structures more as illustrations than as a datafield in its own right. Lack of chemical accuracy impedes progress in the areas mentioned above. We present a database of metabolites called BioMeta that augments the existing pathway databases by explicitly assessing the validity, correctness, and completeness of chemical structure and reaction information. Description The main bulk of the data in BioMeta were obtained from the KEGG Ligand database. We developed a tool for chemical structure validation which assesses the chemical validity and stereochemical completeness of a molecule description. The validation tool was used to examine the compounds in BioMeta, showing that a relatively small number of compounds had an incorrect constitution (connectivity only, not considering stereochemistry and that a considerable number (about one third had incomplete or even incorrect stereochemistry. We made a large effort to correct the errors and to complete the structural descriptions. A total of 1468 structures were corrected and/or completed. We also established the reaction balance of the reactions in BioMeta and corrected 55% of the unbalanced (stoichiometrically incorrect reactions in an automatic procedure. The BioMeta database was implemented in PostgreSQL and provided with a web-based interface. Conclusion We demonstrate that the validation of metabolite structures and reactions is a feasible and worthwhile undertaking, and that the validation results can be used to trigger corrections and improvements to BioMeta, our metabolite database. BioMeta provides some tools for rational drug design, reaction searches, and

  4. Machine learning methods for metabolic pathway prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karp Peter D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A key challenge in systems biology is the reconstruction of an organism's metabolic network from its genome sequence. One strategy for addressing this problem is to predict which metabolic pathways, from a reference database of known pathways, are present in the organism, based on the annotated genome of the organism. Results To quantitatively validate methods for pathway prediction, we developed a large "gold standard" dataset of 5,610 pathway instances known to be present or absent in curated metabolic pathway databases for six organisms. We defined a collection of 123 pathway features, whose information content we evaluated with respect to the gold standard. Feature data were used as input to an extensive collection of machine learning (ML methods, including naïve Bayes, decision trees, and logistic regression, together with feature selection and ensemble methods. We compared the ML methods to the previous PathoLogic algorithm for pathway prediction using the gold standard dataset. We found that ML-based prediction methods can match the performance of the PathoLogic algorithm. PathoLogic achieved an accuracy of 91% and an F-measure of 0.786. The ML-based prediction methods achieved accuracy as high as 91.2% and F-measure as high as 0.787. The ML-based methods output a probability for each predicted pathway, whereas PathoLogic does not, which provides more information to the user and facilitates filtering of predicted pathways. Conclusions ML methods for pathway prediction perform as well as existing methods, and have qualitative advantages in terms of extensibility, tunability, and explainability. More advanced prediction methods and/or more sophisticated input features may improve the performance of ML methods. However, pathway prediction performance appears to be limited largely by the ability to correctly match enzymes to the reactions they catalyze based on genome annotations.

  5. Robust de novo pathway enrichment with KeyPathwayMiner 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcaraz, Nicolas; List, Markus; Dissing-Hansen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Identifying functional modules or novel active pathways, recently termed de novo pathway enrichment, is a computational systems biology challenge that has gained much attention during the last decade. Given a large biological interaction network, KeyPathwayMiner extracts connected subnetworks...... several network perturbation techniques and over a range of perturbation degrees. In addition, users may now provide a gold-standard set to determine how enriched extracted pathways are with relevant genes compared to randomized versions of the original network....

  6. Optic pathway degeneration in Japanese black cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Shiori; Funato, Shingo; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Inokuma, Hisashi; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2015-02-01

    Degeneration of the optic pathway has been reported in various animal species including cattle. We experienced a case of bilateral optic tract degeneration characterized by severe gliosis in a Japanese black cattle without any obvious visual defects. To evaluate the significance, pathological nature and pathogenesis of the lesions, we examined the optic pathway in 60 cattle (41 Japanese black, 13 Holstein and 6 crossbreed) with or without ocular abnormalities. None of these animals had optic canal stenosis. Degenerative changes with severe gliosis in the optic pathway, which includes the optic nerve, optic chiasm and optic tract, were only observed in 8 Japanese black cattle with or without ocular abnormalities. Furthermore, strong immunoreactivity of glial fibrillary acidic protein was observed in the retinal stratum opticum and ganglion cell layer in all 5 cattle in which the optic pathway lesions could be examined. As etiological research, we also examined whether the concentrations of vitamin A and vitamin B12 or bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection was associated with optic pathway degeneration. However, our results suggested that the observed optic pathway degeneration was probably not caused by these factors. These facts indicate the presence of optic pathway degeneration characterized by severe gliosis that has never been reported in cattle without bilateral compressive lesions in the optic pathway or bilateral severe retinal atrophy.

  7. Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team (FPITT) supports the U.S. DRIVE Partnership (the Partnership) in the identification and evaluation of implementation scenarios for fuel cell technology pathways, including hydrogen and fuel cell electric vehicles in the transportation sector, both during a transition period and in the long term.

  8. Opportunities for pharmaceutical care with critical pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, K E

    1995-01-01

    Critical pathways are multidisciplinary tools designed to improve patient care and efficiency. Almost every path requires some type of pharmacotherapeutic intervention, from selection of surgical prophylaxis to management of anticoagulation. Pharmacists should become involved with the critical pathway process because it offers an excellent opportunity to incorporate pharmaceutical care and to meet Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization compliance criteria.

  9. Modeling cancer progression via pathway dependencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena J Edelman

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a heterogeneous disease often requiring a complexity of alterations to drive a normal cell to a malignancy and ultimately to a metastatic state. Certain genetic perturbations have been implicated for initiation and progression. However, to a great extent, underlying mechanisms often remain elusive. These genetic perturbations are most likely reflected by the altered expression of sets of genes or pathways, rather than individual genes, thus creating a need for models of deregulation of pathways to help provide an understanding of the mechanisms of tumorigenesis. We introduce an integrative hierarchical analysis of tumor progression that discovers which a priori defined pathways are relevant either throughout or in particular steps of progression. Pathway interaction networks are inferred for these relevant pathways over the steps in progression. This is followed by the refinement of the relevant pathways to those genes most differentially expressed in particular disease stages. The final analysis infers a gene interaction network for these refined pathways. We apply this approach to model progression in prostate cancer and melanoma, resulting in a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Our analysis supports previous findings for the deregulation of several pathways involved in cell cycle control and proliferation in both cancer types. A novel finding of our analysis is a connection between ErbB4 and primary prostate cancer.

  10. Mining the Wnt pathway for cancer therapeutics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; Clevers, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Wnt pathway is implicated in driving the formation of various human cancers, particularly those of the digestive tract. Inhibition of aberrant Wnt pathway activity in cancer cell lines efficiently blocks their growth, highlighting the great potential of therapeutics design

  11. DMPD: Parallel pathways of virus recognition. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16713969 Parallel pathways of virus recognition. Tenoever BR, Maniatis T. Immunity.... 2006 May;24(5):510-2. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Parallel pathways of virus recognition. PubmedID 1...6713969 Title Parallel pathways of virus recognition. Authors Tenoever BR, Maniatis T. Publication Immunity.

  12. DMPD: Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18549796 Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways. Moore CB, Ting J...P. Immunity. 2008 Jun;28(6):735-9. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral ...signaling pathways. PubmedID 18549796 Title Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways. Author

  13. A thermosensory pathway that controls body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Morrison, Shaun F

    2008-01-01

    Defending body temperature against environmental thermal challenges is one of the most fundamental homeostatic functions that are governed by the nervous system. Here we describe a somatosensory pathway that essentially constitutes the afferent arm of the thermoregulatory reflex that is triggered by cutaneous sensation of environmental temperature changes. Using in vivo electrophysiological and anatomical approaches in the rat, we found that lateral parabrachial neurons are pivotal in this pathway by glutamatergically transmitting cutaneous thermosensory signals received from spinal somatosensory neurons directly to the thermoregulatory command center, the preoptic area. This feedforward pathway mediates not only sympathetic and shivering thermogenic responses but also metabolic and cardiac responses to skin cooling challenges. Notably, this 'thermoregulatory afferent' pathway exists in parallel with the spinothalamocortical somatosensory pathway that mediates temperature perception. These findings make an important contribution to our understanding of both the somatosensory system and thermal homeostasis -- two mechanisms that are fundamental to the nervous system and to our survival.

  14. Ordering the multiple pathways of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, D S; Stefanis, L; Greene, L A

    1997-11-01

    Apoptosis plays an important role in development, homeostasis, and disease. Current work has suggested that apoptosis can be evoked by multiple stimuli that, in turn, initiate distinct death pathways. Recently, exciting advances have been made in the understanding of biochemical pathways that regulate apoptotic processes. These pathways contain both evolutionarily conserved elements and components that are dependent on the death stimulus and cell context. Accordingly, this review focuses on the compositions and relative ordering of the apoptotic pathways in four different death paradigms: activation of receptors of the Fas ligand, destruction by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, exposure to DNA damaging agents, and loss of support by neurotrophic factors. These examples illustrate the conservation and divergence in the ways that death pathways are composed and ordered. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:294-301). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  15. Engineering the spatial organization of metabolic pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Line; Maury, Jerome; Bach, Lars Stougaard;

    does however often depend on both heterologous and host enzymes. In this case, no spatial coordination of the biosynthetic enzymes can be expected to be in place. Presumably this contributes to the low productivity regularly observed for heterologous pathways. In one test case, we investigated whether...... of the spatial organization of biosynthetic pathways. Several natural systems for ensuring optimal spatial arrangement of biosynthetic enzymes exist. Sequentially acting enzymes can for example be positioned in close proximity by attachment to cellular structures, up-concentration in membrane enclosed organelles......, as enzyme fusion combined with down-regulation of a competing pathway and up-regulation of a selected pathway enzyme resulted in a five-fold higher sesquiterpene production. This simple test case demonstrates that engineering of the spatial organization of pathways has great potential for diverting flux...

  16. Pathway projector: web-based zoomable pathway browser using KEGG atlas and Google Maps API.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuaki Kono

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biochemical pathways provide an essential context for understanding comprehensive experimental data and the systematic workings of a cell. Therefore, the availability of online pathway browsers will facilitate post-genomic research, just as genome browsers have contributed to genomics. Many pathway maps have been provided online as part of public pathway databases. Most of these maps, however, function as the gateway interface to a specific database, and the comprehensiveness of their represented entities, data mapping capabilities, and user interfaces are not always sufficient for generic usage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified five central requirements for a pathway browser: (1 availability of large integrated maps showing genes, enzymes, and metabolites; (2 comprehensive search features and data access; (3 data mapping for transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic experiments, as well as the ability to edit and annotate pathway maps; (4 easy exchange of pathway data; and (5 intuitive user experience without the requirement for installation and regular maintenance. According to these requirements, we have evaluated existing pathway databases and tools and implemented a web-based pathway browser named Pathway Projector as a solution. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Pathway Projector provides integrated pathway maps that are based upon the KEGG Atlas, with the addition of nodes for genes and enzymes, and is implemented as a scalable, zoomable map utilizing the Google Maps API. Users can search pathway-related data using keywords, molecular weights, nucleotide sequences, and amino acid sequences, or as possible routes between compounds. In addition, experimental data from transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic analyses can be readily mapped. Pathway Projector is freely available for academic users at (http://www.g-language.org/PathwayProjector/.

  17. Novel personalized pathway-based metabolomics models reveal key metabolic pathways for breast cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Sijia; Chong, Nicole; Lewis, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    . Methods: We propose that higher-order functional representation of metabolomics data, such as pathway-based metabolomic features, can be used as robust biomarkers for breast cancer. Towards this, we have developed a new computational method that uses personalized pathway dysregulation scores for disease...... the Curve, a receiver operating characteristic curve) of 0.968 and 0.934, sensitivities of 0.946 and 0.954, and specificities of 0.934 and 0.918. These two metabolomics-based pathway models are further validated by RNA-Seq-based TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) breast cancer data, with AUCs of 0.995 and 0.......993. Moreover, important metabolic pathways, such as taurine and hypotaurine metabolism and the alanine, aspartate, and glutamate pathway, are revealed as critical biological pathways for early diagnosis of breast cancer. Conclusions: We have successfully developed a new type of pathway-based model to study...

  18. Remodeling the isoprenoid pathway in tobacco by expressing the cytoplasmic mevalonate pathway in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shashi; Hahn, Frederick M; Baidoo, Edward; Kahlon, Talwinder S; Wood, Delilah F; McMahan, Colleen M; Cornish, Katrina; Keasling, Jay D; Daniell, Henry; Whalen, Maureen C

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic engineering to enhance production of isoprenoid metabolites for industrial and medical purposes is an important goal. The substrate for isoprenoid synthesis in plants is produced by the mevalonate pathway (MEV) in the cytosol and by the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway in plastids. A multi-gene approach was employed to insert the entire cytosolic MEV pathway into the tobacco chloroplast genome. Molecular analysis confirmed the site-specific insertion of seven transgenes and homoplasmy. Functionality was demonstrated by unimpeded growth on fosmidomycin, which specifically inhibits the MEP pathway. Transplastomic plants containing the MEV pathway genes accumulated higher levels of mevalonate, carotenoids, squalene, sterols, and triacyglycerols than control plants. This is the first time an entire eukaryotic pathway with six enzymes has been transplastomically expressed in plants. Thus, we have developed an important tool to redirect metabolic fluxes in the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway and a viable multigene strategy for engineering metabolism in plants.

  19. Logical modelling of Drosophila signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbodj, Abibatou; Junion, Guillaume; Brun, Christine; Furlong, Eileen E M; Thieffry, Denis

    2013-09-01

    A limited number of signalling pathways are involved in the specification of cell fate during the development of all animals. Several of these pathways were originally identified in Drosophila. To clarify their roles, and possible cross-talk, we have built a logical model for the nine key signalling pathways recurrently used in metazoan development. In each case, we considered the associated ligands, receptors, signal transducers, modulators, and transcription factors reported in the literature. Implemented using the logical modelling software GINsim, the resulting models qualitatively recapitulate the main characteristics of each pathway, in wild type as well as in various mutant situations (e.g. loss-of-function or gain-of-function). These models constitute pluggable modules that can be used to assemble comprehensive models of complex developmental processes. Moreover, these models of Drosophila pathways could serve as scaffolds for more complicated models of orthologous mammalian pathways. Comprehensive model annotations and GINsim files are provided for each of the nine considered pathways.

  20. Driving and dementia: a clinical decision pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kirsty; Monaghan, Sophie; O'Brien, John; Teodorczuk, Andrew; Mosimann, Urs; Taylor, John-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to develop a pathway to bring together current UK legislation, good clinical practice and appropriate management strategies that could be applied across a range of healthcare settings. Methods The pathway was constructed by a multidisciplinary clinical team based in a busy Memory Assessment Service. A process of successive iteration was used to develop the pathway, with input and refinement provided via survey and small group meetings with individuals from a wide range of regional clinical networks and diverse clinical backgrounds as well as discussion with mobility centres and Forum of Mobility Centres, UK. Results We present a succinct clinical pathway for patients with dementia, which provides a decision-making framework for how health professionals across a range of disciplines deal with patients with dementia who drive. Conclusions By integrating the latest guidance from diverse roles within older people's health services and key experts in the field, the resulting pathway reflects up-to-date policy and encompasses differing perspectives and good practice. It is potentially a generalisable pathway that can be easily adaptable for use internationally, by replacing UK legislation for local regulations. A limitation of this pathway is that it does not address the concern of mild cognitive impairment and how this condition relates to driving safety. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24865643

  1. Targeting the TGFβ pathway for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzillet, Cindy; Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï; Cohen, Romain; Cros, Jérôme; Faivre, Sandrine; Raymond, Eric; de Gramont, Armand

    2015-03-01

    The TGFβ signaling pathway has pleiotropic functions regulating cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, motility and invasion, extracellular matrix production, angiogenesis, and immune response. TGFβ signaling deregulation is frequent in tumors and has crucial roles in tumor initiation, development and metastasis. TGFβ signaling inhibition is an emerging strategy for cancer therapy. The role of the TGFβ pathway as a tumor-promoter or suppressor at the cancer cell level is still a matter of debate, due to its differential effects at the early and late stages of carcinogenesis. In contrast, at the microenvironment level, the TGFβ pathway contributes to generate a favorable microenvironment for tumor growth and metastasis throughout all the steps of carcinogenesis. Then, targeting the TGFβ pathway in cancer may be considered primarily as a microenvironment-targeted strategy. In this review, we focus on the TGFβ pathway as a target for cancer therapy. In the first part, we provide a comprehensive overview of the roles played by this pathway and its deregulation in cancer, at the cancer cell and microenvironment levels. We go on to describe the preclinical and clinical results of pharmacological strategies to target the TGFβ pathway, with a highlight on the effects on tumor microenvironment. We then explore the perspectives to optimize TGFβ inhibition therapy in different tumor settings.

  2. A markov classification model for metabolic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamitsuka Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper considers the problem of identifying pathways through metabolic networks that relate to a specific biological response. Our proposed model, HME3M, first identifies frequently traversed network paths using a Markov mixture model. Then by employing a hierarchical mixture of experts, separate classifiers are built using information specific to each path and combined into an ensemble prediction for the response. Results We compared the performance of HME3M with logistic regression and support vector machines (SVM for both simulated pathways and on two metabolic networks, glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway for Arabidopsis thaliana. We use AltGenExpress microarray data and focus on the pathway differences in the developmental stages and stress responses of Arabidopsis. The results clearly show that HME3M outperformed the comparison methods in the presence of increasing network complexity and pathway noise. Furthermore an analysis of the paths identified by HME3M for each metabolic network confirmed known biological responses of Arabidopsis. Conclusions This paper clearly shows HME3M to be an accurate and robust method for classifying metabolic pathways. HME3M is shown to outperform all comparison methods and further is capable of identifying known biologically active pathways within microarray data.

  3. Dissecting the PCP pathway: one or more pathways?: Does a separate Wnt-Fz-Rho pathway drive morphogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapébie, Pascal; Borchiellini, Carole; Houliston, Evelyn

    2011-10-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP), the alignment of cells within 2D tissue planes, involves a set of core molecular regulators highly conserved between animals and cell types. These include the transmembrane proteins Frizzled (Fz) and VanGogh and the cytoplasmic regulators Dishevelled (Dsh) and Prickle. It is widely accepted that this core forms part of a 'PCP pathway' for signal transduction, which can affect cell morphology through activation of an evolutionary ancient regulatory module involving Rho family GTPases and Myosin II, and/or the JNK kinase cascade. We have re-examined the evidence for interactions between the proposed PCP pathway components, and question the placing of the cell morphology regulators in the same pathway as the PCP core. While Fz and Dsh are clearly involved in both PCP and Rho-based cell morphology regulation, available evidence cannot currently discriminate whether these processes are linked mechanistically by a shared Fz/Dsh population, or pass by two distinct pathways.

  4. Role of care pathways in interprofessional teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaria, Minimol Kulakkottu

    2016-08-24

    Cohesive interprofessional teamwork is essential to successful healthcare services. Interprofessional teamwork is the means by which different healthcare professionals - with diverse knowledge, skills and talents - collaborate to achieve a common goal. Several interventions are available to improve teamwork in the healthcare setting. This article explores the role of care pathways in improving interprofessional teamwork. Care pathways enhance teamwork by promoting coordination, collaboration, communication and decision making to achieve optimal healthcare outcomes. They result in improved staff knowledge, communication, documentation and interprofessional relations. Care pathways also contribute to patient-centred care and increase patient satisfaction.

  5. Cancer and deregulation of stem cells pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Correia Martins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells may have an important etiological role in cancer. Their classic regulatory pathways are deregulated in tumors, strengthening the stem cell theory of cancer. In this manuscript, we review Wnt, Notch and Hedhehog pathways, describing which of their factors may be responsible for the neoplastic development. Furthermore, we classify these elements as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, demonstrating their mutation implications in cancer. The activation of these pathways is associated with the expression of certain genes which maintain proliferation and apoptosis inhibition. Further work should be carried out in the future in order to control tumor development by controlling these signaling cascades.

  6. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  7. Imaging the Visual Pathway in Neuromyelitis Optica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caspar F. Pfueller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this paper is to summarize the current knowledge on visual pathway damage in neuromyelitis optica (NMO assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and optical coherence tomography (OCT.

  8. The Wnt signaling pathway in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchartre, Yann; Kim, Yong-Mi; Kahn, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is critically involved in both the development and homeostasis of tissues via regulation of their endogenous stem cells. Aberrant Wnt signaling has been described as a key player in the initiation of and/or maintenance and development of many cancers, via affecting the behavior of Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs). CSCs are considered by most to be responsible for establishment of the tumor and also for disease relapse, as they possess inherent drug-resistance properties. The development of new therapeutic compounds targeting the Wnt signaling pathway promises new hope to eliminate CSCs and achieve cancer eradication. However, a major challenge resides in developing a strategy efficient enough to target the dysregulated Wnt pathway in CSCs, while being safe enough to not damage the normal somatic stem cell population required for tissue homeostasis and repair. Here we review recent therapeutic approaches to target the Wnt pathway and their clinical applications.

  9. Clinical implications of hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hailan Liu; Dongsheng Gu; Jingwu Xie

    2011-01-01

    Hedgehog was first described in Drosophila melanogaster by the Nobel laureates Eric Wieschaus and Christiane Nusslein-Volhard. The hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a major regulator of cell differentiation,proliferation, tissue polarity, stem cell maintenance, and carcinogenesis. The first link of Hh signaling to cancer was established through studies of a rare familial disease, Gorlin syndrome, in 1996. Follow-up studies revealed activation of this pathway in basal cell carcinoma, medulloblastoma and, leukemia as well as in gastrointestinal, lung, ovarian, breast, and prostate cancer. Targeted inhibition of Hh signaling is now believed to be effective in the treatment and prevention of human cancer. The discovery and synthesis of specific inhibitors for this pathway are even more exciting. In this review, we summarize major advances in the understanding of Hh signaling pathway activation in human cancer, mouse models for studying Hhmediated carcinogenesis, the roles of Hh signaling in tumor development and metastasis, antagonists for Hh signaling and their clinical implications.

  10. Imaging the visual pathway in neuromyelitis optica

    OpenAIRE

    Pfueller, Caspar F.; Friedemann Paul

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to summarize the current knowledge on visual pathway damage in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT).

  11. The Pentose Phosphate Pathway in Parasitic Trypanosomatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovářová, Julie; Barrett, Michael P

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic trypanosomatids cause important diseases. Dissecting the biochemistry of these organisms offers a means of discovering targets against which inhibitors may be designed and developed as drugs. The pentose phosphate pathway is a key route of glucose metabolism in most organisms, providing NADPH for use as a cellular reductant and various carbohydrate intermediates used in cellular metabolism. The pathway and its enzymes have been studied in Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and various Leishmania species. Its functions in these parasites are becoming clear. Some enzymes of the pathway are essential to the parasites and have structural features distinguishing them from their mammalian counterparts, and this has stimulated several programs of inhibitor discovery with a view to targeting the pathway with new drugs.

  12. Amygdalar vocalization pathways in the squirrel monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, U

    1982-06-10

    In 22 squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) vocalization-eliciting electrodes were implanted into the amygdala and along the trajectory of the stria terminalis. Then, lesions were placed in the stria terminalis, its bed nucleus, the ventral amygdalofugal pathway and several di- and mesencephalic structures in order to find out the pathways along which the amygdala exerts its vocalization-controlling influence. It was found that different call types are controlled by different pathways. Purring and chattering calls, which express a self-confident, challenging attitude and an attempt to recruit fellow-combatants in intra-specific mobbing, respectively, are controlled via the stria terminalis; alarm peep and groaning calls, in contrast, which indicate flight motivation and resentment, respectively, are triggered via the ventral amygdalofugal fibre bundle. Both pathways traverse the dorsolateral and dorsomedial hypothalamus, respectively, and unite in the periaqueductal grey of the midbrain.

  13. The Notch pathway in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, Kaitlyn E; George, Dennis C; Fender, Alexander W; Bertrand, Fred E; Sigounas, George

    2016-04-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. It is also the third most common cancer diagnosis among men, and the second most common cancer diagnosis among women. Globally, CRC can account for nearly 694,000 annual deaths. It is widely appreciated that CRC is the result of dysregulated cellular pathways that promote an inappropriate stem-cell-like phenotype, apoptotic resistance, unchecked proliferation and metastatic spread. While no single pathway is responsible for all of these attributes, an array of recent studies suggests a pivotal role for abnormal Notch-1 signaling in CRC, in part due to interconnectivity of Notch with other pathways. This review will summarize recent evidence for a role of Notch signaling in CRC, will consider interconnectivity between Notch and other pathways involved in CRC and will discuss the possible utility of targeting Notch as a CRC therapeutic.

  14. Pathway Model and Nonextensive Statistical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, A. M.; Haubold, H. J.; Tsallis, C.

    2015-12-01

    The established technique of eliminating upper or lower parameters in a general hypergeometric series is profitably exploited to create pathways among confluent hypergeometric functions, binomial functions, Bessel functions, and exponential series. One such pathway, from the mathematical statistics point of view, results in distributions which naturally emerge within nonextensive statistical mechanics and Beck-Cohen superstatistics, as pursued in generalizations of Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics.

  15. The mevalonate pathway in C. Elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauthan Manish

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mevalonate pathway in human is responsible for the synthesis of cholesterol and other important biomolecules such as coenzyme Q, dolichols and isoprenoids. These molecules are required in the cell for functions ranging from signaling to membrane integrity, protein prenylation and glycosylation, and energy homeostasis. The pathway consists of a main trunk followed by sub-branches that synthesize the different biomolecules. The majority of our knowledge about the mevalonate pathway is currently focused on the cholesterol synthesis branch, which is the target of the cholesterol-lowering statins; less is known about the function and regulation of the non-cholesterol-related branches. To study them, we need a biological system where it is possible to specifically modulate these metabolic branches individually or in groups. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans is a promising model to study these non-cholesterol branches since its mevalonate pathway seems very well conserved with that in human except that it has no cholesterol synthesis branch. The simple genetic makeup and tractability of C. elegans makes it relatively easy to identify and manipulate key genetic components of the mevalonate pathway, and to evaluate the consequences of tampering with their activity. This general experimental approach should lead to new insights into the physiological roles of the non-cholesterol part of the mevalonate pathway. This review will focus on the current knowledge related to the mevalonate pathway in C. elegans and its possible applications as a model organism to study the non-cholesterol functions of this pathway.

  16. Salicylic acid-independent plant defence pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L. C. Van

    1999-01-01

    Salicylic acid is an important signalling molecule involved in both locally and systemically induced disease resistance responses. Recent advances in our understanding of plant defence signalling have revealed that plants employ a network of signal transduction pathways, some of which are independent of salicylic acid. Evidence is emerging that jasmonic acid and ethylene play key roles in these salicylic acid-independent pathways. Cross-talk between the salicylic acid-dependent and the salicy...

  17. Pathway and Enzyme Redundancy in Putrescine Catabolism in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Barbara L.; Reitzer, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Putrescine as the sole carbon source requires a novel catabolic pathway with glutamylated intermediates. Nitrogen limitation does not induce genes of this glutamylated putrescine (GP) pathway but instead induces genes for a putrescine catabolic pathway that starts with a transaminase-dependent deamination. We determined pathway utilization with putrescine as the sole nitrogen source by examining mutants with defects in both pathways. Blocks in both the GP and transaminase pathways were requir...

  18. Subpathway Analysis based on Signaling-Pathway Impact Analysis of Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianbin Li

    Full Text Available Pathway analysis is a common approach to gain insight from biological experiments. Signaling-pathway impact analysis (SPIA is one such method and combines both the classical enrichment analysis and the actual perturbation on a given pathway. Because this method focuses on a single pathway, its resolution generally is not very high because the differentially expressed genes may be enriched in a local region of the pathway. In the present work, to identify cancer-related pathways, we incorporated a recent subpathway analysis method into the SPIA method to form the "sub-SPIA method." The original subpathway analysis uses the k-clique structure to define a subpathway. However, it is not sufficiently flexible to capture subpathways with complex structure and usually results in many overlapping subpathways. We therefore propose using the minimal-spanning-tree structure to find a subpathway. We apply this approach to colorectal cancer and lung cancer datasets, and our results show that sub-SPIA can identify many significant pathways associated with each specific cancer that other methods miss. Based on the entire pathway network in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, we find that the pathways identified by sub-SPIA not only have the largest average degree, but also are more closely connected than those identified by other methods. This result suggests that the abnormality signal propagating through them might be responsible for the specific cancer or disease.

  19. Neural pathways for visual speech perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne E Bernstein

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the questions, what levels of speech can be perceived visually, and how is visual speech represented by the brain? Review of the literature leads to the conclusions that every level of psycholinguistic speech structure (i.e., phonetic features, phonemes, syllables, words, and prosody can be perceived visually, although individuals differ in their abilities to do so; and that there are visual modality-specific representations of speech qua speech in higher-level vision brain areas. That is, the visual system represents the modal patterns of visual speech. The suggestion that the auditory speech pathway receives and represents visual speech is examined in light of neuroimaging evidence on the auditory speech pathways. We outline the generally agreed-upon organization of the visual ventral and dorsal pathways and examine several types of visual processing that might be related to speech through those pathways, specifically, face and body, orthography, and sign language processing. In this context, we examine the visual speech processing literature, which reveals widespread diverse patterns activity in posterior temporal cortices in response to visual speech stimuli. We outline a model of the visual and auditory speech pathways and make several suggestions: (1 The visual perception of speech relies on visual pathway representations of speech qua speech. (2 A proposed site of these representations, the temporal visual speech area (TVSA has been demonstrated in posterior temporal cortex, ventral and posterior to multisensory posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS. (3 Given that visual speech has dynamic and configural features, its representations in feedforward visual pathways are expected to integrate these features, possibly in TVSA.

  20. Bacterial variations on the methionine salvage pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haas Dieter

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thiomethyl group of S-adenosylmethionine is often recycled as methionine from methylthioadenosine. The corresponding pathway has been unravelled in Bacillus subtilis. However methylthioadenosine is subjected to alternative degradative pathways depending on the organism. Results This work uses genome in silico analysis to propose methionine salvage pathways for Klebsiella pneumoniae, Leptospira interrogans, Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis and Xylella fastidiosa. Experiments performed with mutants of B. subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa substantiate the hypotheses proposed. The enzymes that catalyze the reactions are recruited from a variety of origins. The first, ubiquitous, enzyme of the pathway, MtnA (methylthioribose-1-phosphate isomerase, belongs to a family of proteins related to eukaryotic intiation factor 2B alpha. mtnB codes for a methylthioribulose-1-phosphate dehydratase. Two reactions follow, that of an enolase and that of a phosphatase. While in B. subtilis this is performed by two distinct polypeptides, in the other organisms analyzed here an enolase-phosphatase yields 1,2-dihydroxy-3-keto-5-methylthiopentene. In the presence of dioxygen an aci-reductone dioxygenase yields the immediate precursor of methionine, ketomethylthiobutyrate. Under some conditions this enzyme produces carbon monoxide in B. subtilis, suggesting a route for a new gaseous mediator in bacteria. Ketomethylthiobutyrate is finally transaminated by an aminotransferase that exists usually as a broad specificity enzyme (often able to transaminate aromatic aminoacid keto-acid precursors or histidinol-phosphate. Conclusion A functional methionine salvage pathway was experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, in P. aeruginosa. Apparently, methionine salvage pathways are frequent in Bacteria (and in Eukarya, with recruitment of different polypeptides to perform the needed reactions (an ancestor of a translation initiation factor and Ru

  1. Leptin signalling pathways in hypothalamic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Obin; Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is the most critical hormone in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance among those so far discovered. Leptin primarily acts on the neurons of the mediobasal part of hypothalamus to regulate food intake, thermogenesis, and the blood glucose level. In the hypothalamic neurons, leptin binding to the long form leptin receptors on the plasma membrane initiates multiple signaling cascades. The signaling pathways known to mediate the actions of leptin include JAK-STAT signaling, PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling, SHP2-ERK signaling, AMPK signaling, and mTOR-S6K signaling. Recent evidence suggests that leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons is also linked to primary cilia function. On the other hand, signaling molecules/pathways mitigating leptin actions in hypothalamic neurons have been extensively investigated in an effort to treat leptin resistance observed in obesity. These include SOCS3, tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, and inflammatory signaling pathways such as IKK-NFκB and JNK signaling, and ER stress-mitochondrial signaling. In this review, we discuss leptin signaling pathways in the hypothalamus, with a particular focus on the most recently discovered pathways.

  2. Persisting eicosanoid pathways in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkova, Marina; Jakobsson, Per-Johan

    2014-04-01

    An unmet clinical need exists for early treatment of rheumatic diseases and improved treatment strategies that can better maintain remission with reduced ongoing subclinical inflammation and bone destruction. Eicosanoids form one of the most complex networks in the body controlling many physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. Persisting eicosanoid pathways are thought to be involved in the development of rheumatic diseases, and targeting this pathway might enable improved treatment strategies. Several enzymes of the arachidonic acid cascade as well as eicosanoid receptors (all part of the eicosanoid pathway) are today well-recognized targets for anti-inflammatory drugs that can reduce symptoms of inflammation in rheumatic diseases. In this Review, we outline the evidence supporting pivotal roles of eicosanoid signalling in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases and discuss findings from studies in animals and humans. We focus first on rheumatoid arthritis and discuss the upregulation of the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways as most data are available in this condition. Research into the roles of eicosanoids in other rheumatic diseases (osteoarthritis, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, systemic lupus erythematosus and gout) is also progressing rapidly and is discussed. Finally, we summarize the prospects of targeting eicosanoid pathways as anti-inflammatory treatment strategies for patients with rheumatic diseases.

  3. Molecular pathways: translational and therapeutic implications of the Notch signaling pathway in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previs, Rebecca A; Coleman, Robert L; Harris, Adrian L; Sood, Anil K

    2015-03-01

    Over 100 years have passed since the first observation of the notched wing phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster, and significant progress has been made to characterize the role of the Notch receptor, its ligands, downstream targets, and cross-talk with other signaling pathways. The canonical Notch pathway with four Notch receptors (Notch1-4) and five ligands (DLL1, 3-4, Jagged 1-2) is an evolutionarily conserved cell signaling pathway that plays critical roles in cell-fate determination, differentiation, development, tissue patterning, cell proliferation, and death. In cancer, these roles have a critical impact on tumor behavior and response to therapy. Because the role of Notch remains tissue and context dependent, alterations within this pathway may lead to tumor suppressive or oncogenic phenotypes. Although no FDA-approved therapies currently exist for the Notch pathway, multiple therapeutics (e.g., demcizumab, tarextumab, GSI MK-0752, R04929097, and PF63084014) have been developed to target different aspects of this pathway for both hematologic and solid malignancies. Understanding the context-specific effects of the Notch pathway will be important for individualized therapies targeting this pathway.

  4. Genome-Wide Pathway Analysis Identifies Genetic Pathways Associated with Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aterido, Adrià; Julià, Antonio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Fonseca, Eduardo; Fernández-López, Emilia; Dauden, Esteban; Sánchez-Carazo, José Luís; López-Estebaranz, José Luís; Moreno-Ramírez, David; Vanaclocha, Francisco; Herrera, Enrique; de la Cueva, Pablo; Dand, Nick; Palau, Núria; Alonso, Arnald; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; García-Montero, Andrés; Codó, Laia; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Absher, Devin; Capon, Francesca; Myers, Richard M; Barker, Jonathan N; Marsal, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a complex genetic architecture. To date, the psoriasis heritability is only partially explained. However, there is increasing evidence that the missing heritability in psoriasis could be explained by multiple genetic variants of low effect size from common genetic pathways. The objective of this study was to identify new genetic variation associated with psoriasis risk at the pathway level. We genotyped 598,258 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a discovery cohort of 2,281 case-control individuals from Spain. We performed a genome-wide pathway analysis using 1,053 reference biological pathways. A total of 14 genetic pathways (PFDR ≤ 2.55 × 10(-2)) were found to be significantly associated with psoriasis risk. Using an independent validation cohort of 7,353 individuals from the UK, a total of 6 genetic pathways were significantly replicated (PFDR ≤ 3.46 × 10(-2)). We found genetic pathways that had not been previously associated with psoriasis risk such as retinol metabolism (Pcombined = 1.84 × 10(-4)), the transport of inorganic ions and amino acids (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)), and post-translational protein modification (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)). In the latter pathway, MGAT5 showed a strong network centrality, and its association with psoriasis risk was further validated in an additional case-control cohort of 3,429 individuals (P psoriasis susceptibility.

  5. Policy Pathways: Energy Management Programmes for Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-06

    The IEA Policy Pathway publications provide details on how to implement specific recommendations drawn from the IEA 25 Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations. This Policy Pathway, jointly produced by the International Energy Agency and the Institute for Industrial Productivity, develops the critical steps for policy makers implementing energy management programmes for industry. Optimising energy use in industry is essential to improve industrial competitiveness and achieve wider societal goals such as energy security, economic recovery and development, climate change mitigation and environmental protection.While there is significant potential to decrease energy consumption in this sector, opportunities to improve energy efficiency are still under-exploited. Energy management programmes have shown to be instrumental in addressing many of the barriers that inhibit wide-scale uptake of energy management in industry. The Policy Pathway builds on lessons learned from country experiences and provides actionable guidance on how to plan and design, implement, evaluate and monitor energy management programmes for industry.

  6. JNK pathway:diseases and therapeutic potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie CUI; Ming ZHANG; Yong-qing ZHANG; Zhi-heng XU

    2007-01-01

    c-Jun N-terminal protein kinases (JNK), also known as stress-activated protein kinases, were originally identified by their ability to phosphorylate the N-terminal of the transcription factor c-Jun and by their activation in response to a variety of stresses. JNK are multifunctional kinases involved in many physiological processes. The JNK pathway has been shown to play a major role in apoptosis in many cell death paradigms and its association with a variety of pathological pro-cesses is gradually been recognized. This review will concentrate on describing the involvement of the JNK pathway in the context of different diseases and the potential to adopt the JNK pathway components as therapeutic targets.

  7. NOTCH pathway inactivation promotes bladder cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraver, Antonio; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J; Cash, Timothy P; Mendez-Pertuz, Marinela; Dueñas, Marta; Maietta, Paolo; Martinelli, Paola; Muñoz-Martin, Maribel; Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Cañamero, Marta; Roncador, Giovanna; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L; Grivas, Dimitrios; de la Pompa, Jose Luis; Valencia, Alfonso; Paramio, Jesús M; Real, Francisco X; Serrano, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    NOTCH signaling suppresses tumor growth and proliferation in several types of stratified epithelia. Here, we show that missense mutations in NOTCH1 and NOTCH2 found in human bladder cancers result in loss of function. In murine models, genetic ablation of the NOTCH pathway accelerated bladder tumorigenesis and promoted the formation of squamous cell carcinomas, with areas of mesenchymal features. Using bladder cancer cells, we determined that the NOTCH pathway stabilizes the epithelial phenotype through its effector HES1 and, consequently, loss of NOTCH activity favors the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Evaluation of human bladder cancer samples revealed that tumors with low levels of HES1 present mesenchymal features and are more aggressive. Together, our results indicate that NOTCH serves as a tumor suppressor in the bladder and that loss of this pathway promotes mesenchymal and invasive features.

  8. Lectin Complement Pathway Proteins in Healthy Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Anne; Hansen, Annette; Hansen, Søren W K

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the lectin pathway of complement activation, numerous clinical cohorts have been examined for one or more of the proteins, with the intention of uncovering the functions of the proteins or with the aim of discovering new biomarkers or diagnostic tools. To unveil the abnormal......, it is pivotal to know the normal. Our aim was to describe the concentrations of the eleven known proteins of the lectin pathway in serum and plasma and to uncover possible gender differences, age and diurnal variations, which must be taken into account for investigations in different cohorts. We examined...... the concentrations of all lectin pathway proteins (mannan-binding lectin (MBL), H-ficolin, L-ficolin, M-ficolin, collectin-K1, collectin-L1, MBL-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2), MASP-3, MBL associated protein of 44 kDa (MAp44) and MAp19 in 300 Danish blood donors in serum and EDTA plasma in established assays...

  9. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Biocompatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Estrid; Garred, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In modern health technologies the use of biomaterials in the form of stents, haemodialysis tubes, artificial implants, bypass circuits etc. is rapidly expanding. The exposure of synthetic, foreign surfaces to the blood and tissue of the host, calls for strict biocompatibility in respect to contac...... been broadly documented. However, the specific role of lectin pathway and the pattern recognition molecules initiating the pathway has only been transiently investigated. Here we review the current data on the field....... and the alternative pathway, all converging in an amplification loop of the cascade system and downstream reactions. Thus, when exposed to foreign substances complement components will be activated and lead to a powerful inflammatory response. Biosurface induced complement activation is a recognised issue that has...

  10. Exergetical Evaluation of Biobased Synthesis Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Frenzel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of today’s chemical products are based on crude oil. An attractive and sustainable alternative feedstock is biomass. Since crude oil and biomass differ in various properties, new synthesis pathways and processes have to be developed. In order to prioritize limited resources for research and development (R & D, their economic potential must be estimated in the early stages of development. A suitable measure for an estimation of the economic potential is based on exergy balances. Different structures of synthesis pathways characterised by the chemical exergy of the main components are evaluated. Based on a detailed evaluation of the underlying processes, general recommendations for future bio-based synthesis pathways are derived.

  11. Understanding trade pathways to target biosecurity surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Colunga-Garcia

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing trends in global trade make it extremely difficult to prevent the entry of all potential invasive species (IS. Establishing early detection strategies thus becomes an important part of the continuum used to reduce the introduction of invasive species. One part necessary to ensure the success of these strategies is the determination of priority survey areas based on invasion pressure. We used a pathway-centred conceptual model of pest invasion to address these questions: what role does global trade play in invasion pressure of plant ecosystems and how could an understanding of this role be used to enhance early detection strategies? We concluded that the relative level of invasion pressure for destination ecosystems can be influenced by the intensity of pathway usage (import volume and frequency, the number and type of pathways with a similar destination, and the number of different ecological regions that serve as the source for imports to the same destination. As these factors increase, pressure typically intensifies because of increasing a propagule pressure, b likelihood of transporting pests with higher intrinsic invasion potential, and c likelihood of transporting pests into ecosystems with higher invasibility. We used maritime containerized imports of live plants into the contiguous U.S. as a case study to illustrate the practical implications of the model to determine hotspot areas of relative invasion pressure for agricultural and forest ecosystems (two ecosystems with high potential invasibility. Our results illustrated the importance of how a pathway-centred model could be used to highlight potential target areas for early detection strategies for IS. Many of the hotspots in agricultural and forest ecosystems were within major U.S. metropolitan areas. Invasion ecologists can utilize pathway-centred conceptual models to a better understand the role of human-mediated pathways in pest establishment, b enhance current

  12. Discovery of Host Factors and Pathways Utilized in Hantaviral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    cellular pathways, and broadly effective inhibitors targeting these pathways, that impact numerous hantaviruses. In the longer run , we hypothesize...common cellular pathways, and broadly effective inhibitors targeting these pathways, that impact numerous hantaviruses. In the longer run , we...the Venus fluorescent protein via an internal ribosome entry site. The sequence and orientation of the insert was verified by complete sequencing

  13. Developmental pathways to antisocial behavior: the delayed-onset pathway in girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverthorn, P; Frick, P J

    1999-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that there are two distinct trajectories for the development of antisocial behavior in boys: a childhood-onset pathway and an adolescent-onset pathway. After reviewing the limited available research on antisocial girls, we propose that this influential method of conceptualizing the development of severe antisocial behavior may not apply to girls without some important modifications. Antisocial girls appear to show many of the correlates that have been associated with the childhood-onset pathway in boys, and they tend to show impaired adult adjustment, which is also similar to boys in the childhood-onset pathway. However, antisocial girls typically show an adolescent-onset to their antisocial behavior. We have proposed that these girls show a third developmental pathway which we have labeled the "delayed-onset" pathway. This model rests on the assumption that many of the putative pathogenic mechanisms that contribute to the development of antisocial behavior in girls, such as cognitive and neuropsychological deficits, a dysfunctional family environment, and/or the presence of a callous and unemotional interpersonal style, may be present in childhood, but they do not lead to severe and overt antisocial behavior until adolescence. Therefore, we propose that the delayed-onset pathway for girls is analogous to the childhood-onset pathway in boys and that there is no analogous pathway in girls to the adolescent-onset pathway in boys. Although this model clearly needs to be tested in future research, it highlights the need to test the applicability of current theoretical models for explaining the development of antisocial behavior in girls.

  14. Supporting liver transplantation by clinical pathway intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, K; Malessa, Ch; Herzberg, N; Krumnow, S; Habrecht, O; Scheuerlein, H; Bauschke, A; Settmacher, U

    2013-06-01

    A reproducible and transparent quality of clinical treatments plays an important role in the performance of a hospital. In liver transplantation (LT), this is particularly important for patient safety, resource planning, documentation, and quality management. Thus, the clinical pathway for LT was documented in an electronic format within our research project PIGE. Data from clinical information systems were linked to this pathway, which allows for process monitoring (the assessment of the current state for every patient in the LT process) and a retrospective analysis of all treatments in addition to all data pertaining to the treatment, for example, cost, time, number of personnel, etc.

  15. PI3K pathway in NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex eMartínez Martí

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks are members of a family of intracellular lipid kinases that phosphorylate the 3’-hydroxyl group of phosphatidylinositol and phosphoinositides. PI3K regulate signaling pathways for neoplasia, including cell proliferation, adhesion, survival and motility. Different classes of PI3K have distinct roles in cellular signal transduction. PI3K pathway is activated by several different mechanisms in cancers, including, somatic mutation and gene amplification. In this review, we examine the literature addressing PI3K mutation status and gene amplification, with an emphasis on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC.

  16. Teaching Biochemical Pathways Using Concept Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Brown

    2013-01-01

    The interesting paper by Dinarvand and Vaisi-Raygan (1) makes valuable points about a particularly challenging aspect of biochemistry learning and teaching. Their work prompts me to ask two questions and make a comment. First, what do the authors mean by a concept map (CM)? A pathway map could be considered a CM, but a CM could cover modes of regulation and kinetics in relation to particular reactions or pathways and there are many other possibilities. Irrespective of this, a CM can get extre...

  17. Hippo pathway in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peiguo; Feng, Jing; Chen, Ceshi

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that the Hippo signaling pathway plays crucial roles in mammary gland development and breast cancer. Key components of the Hippo pathway regulate breast epithelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and stemness. Additionally, the Hippo pathway regulates breast tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. It is expected that the Hippo pathway will provide novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer. This review will discuss and summarize the roles of several core components of the Hippo pathway in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

  18. Robust de novo pathway enrichment with KeyPathwayMiner 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcaraz, Nicolas; List, Markus; Dissing-Hansen, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    Identifying functional modules or novel active pathways, recently termed de novo pathway enrichment, is a computational systems biology challenge that has gained much attention during the last decade. Given a large biological interaction network, KeyPathwayMiner extracts connected subnetworks tha...... several network perturbation techniques and over a range of perturbation degrees. In addition, users may now provide a gold-standard set to determine how enriched extracted pathways are with relevant genes compared to randomized versions of the original network.......Identifying functional modules or novel active pathways, recently termed de novo pathway enrichment, is a computational systems biology challenge that has gained much attention during the last decade. Given a large biological interaction network, KeyPathwayMiner extracts connected subnetworks...... that are enriched for differentially active entities from a series of molecular profiles encoded as binary indicator matrices. Since interaction networks constantly evolve, an important question is how robust the extracted results are when the network is modified. We enable users to study this effect through...

  19. Pathway Tools version 19.0 update: software for pathway/genome informatics and systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Peter D; Latendresse, Mario; Paley, Suzanne M; Krummenacker, Markus; Ong, Quang D; Billington, Richard; Kothari, Anamika; Weaver, Daniel; Lee, Thomas; Subhraveti, Pallavi; Spaulding, Aaron; Fulcher, Carol; Keseler, Ingrid M; Caspi, Ron

    2016-09-01

    Pathway Tools is a bioinformatics software environment with a broad set of capabilities. The software provides genome-informatics tools such as a genome browser, sequence alignments, a genome-variant analyzer and comparative-genomics operations. It offers metabolic-informatics tools, such as metabolic reconstruction, quantitative metabolic modeling, prediction of reaction atom mappings and metabolic route search. Pathway Tools also provides regulatory-informatics tools, such as the ability to represent and visualize a wide range of regulatory interactions. This article outlines the advances in Pathway Tools in the past 5 years. Major additions include components for metabolic modeling, metabolic route search, computation of atom mappings and estimation of compound Gibbs free energies of formation; addition of editors for signaling pathways, for genome sequences and for cellular architecture; storage of gene essentiality data and phenotype data; display of multiple alignments, and of signaling and electron-transport pathways; and development of Python and web-services application programming interfaces. Scientists around the world have created more than 9800 Pathway/Genome Databases by using Pathway Tools, many of which are curated databases for important model organisms.

  20. Targeting stem cell signaling pathways for drug discovery: advances in the Notch and Wnt pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Songzhu Michael; Ding, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Xie, JingYi; Li, LingSong

    2014-06-01

    Signaling pathways transduce extracellular stimuli into cells through molecular cascades to regulate cellular functions. In stem cells, a small number of pathways, notably those of TGF-β/BMP, Hedgehog, Notch, and Wnt, are responsible for the regulation of pluripotency and differentiation. During embryonic development, these pathways govern cell fate specifications as well as the formation of tissues and organs. In adulthood, their normal functions are important for tissue homeostasis and regeneration, whereas aberrations result in diseases, such as cancer and degenerative disorders. In complex biological systems, stem cell signaling pathways work in concert as a network and exhibit crosstalk, such as the negative crosstalk between Wnt and Notch. Over the past decade, genetic and genomic studies have identified a number of potential drug targets that are involved in stem cell signaling pathways. Indeed, discovery of new targets and drugs for these pathways has become one of the most active areas in both the research community and pharmaceutical industry. Remarkable progress has been made and several promising drug candidates have entered into clinical trials. This review focuses on recent advances in the discovery of novel drugs which target the Notch and Wnt pathways.

  1. PathwayExplorer: web service for visualizing high-throughput expression data on biological pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlecnik, Bernhard; Scheideler, Marcel; Hackl, Hubert; Hartler, Jürgen; Sanchez-Cabo, Fatima; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2005-07-01

    While generation of high-throughput expression data is becoming routine, the fast, easy, and systematic presentation and analysis of these data in a biological context is still an obstacle. To address this need, we have developed PathwayExplorer, which maps expression profiles of genes or proteins simultaneously onto major, currently available regulatory, metabolic and cellular pathways from KEGG, BioCarta and GenMAPP. PathwayExplorer is a platform-independent web server application with an optional standalone Java application using a SOAP (simple object access protocol) interface. Mapped pathways are ranked for the easy selection of the pathway of interest, displaying all available genes of this pathway with their expression profiles in a selectable and intuitive color code. Pathway maps produced can be downloaded as PNG, JPG or as high-resolution vector graphics SVG. The web service is freely available at https://pathwayexplorer.genome.tugraz.at; the standalone client can be downloaded at http://genome.tugraz.at.

  2. Wnt/Ca2+ signaling pathway: a brief overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antara De

    2011-01-01

    The non-canonical Wnt/Ca2+ signaling cascade is less characterized than their canonical counterpart,the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.The non-canonical Wnt signaling pathways are diverse,defined as planer cell polarity pathway,Wnt-RAP1 signaling pathway,Wnt-Ror2 signaling pathway,Wnt-PKA pathway,Wnt-GSK3MT pathway,Wnt-aPKC pathway,Wnt-RYK pathway,Wnt-mTOR pathway,and Wnt/calcium signaling pathway.All these pathways exhibit a considerable degree of overlap between them.The Wnt/Ca2+ signaling pathway was deciphered as a crucial mediator in development.However,now there is substantial evidence that the signaling cascade is involved in many other molecular phenomena.Many aspects of Wnt/Ca2+ pathway are yet enigmatic.This review will give a brief overview of the fundamental and evolving concepts of the Wnt/Ca2+ signaling pathway.

  3. Alternative Certification Pathways: Filling a Gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Carlyn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the proliferation of alternative certification pathways through an analysis of the role and history of teacher certification and supply followed by a synthesis of national, regional, and state research studies on alternative routes to certification programs and a review of studies conducted on well-known…

  4. Oxidative stress: Biomarkers and novel therapeutic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Hou, Jinling; Shang, Yan Chen

    2010-03-01

    Oxidative stress significantly impacts multiple cellular pathways that can lead to the initiation and progression of varied disorders throughout the body. It therefore becomes imperative to elucidate the components and function of novel therapeutic strategies against oxidative stress to further clinical diagnosis and care. In particular, both the growth factor and cytokine erythropoietin (EPO) and members of the mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FoxOs) may offer the greatest promise for new treatment regimens since these agents and the cellular pathways they oversee cover a range of critical functions that directly influence progenitor cell development, cell survival and degeneration, metabolism, immune function, and cancer cell invasion. Furthermore, both EPO and FoxOs function not only as therapeutic targets, but also as biomarkers of disease onset and progression, since their cellular pathways are closely linked and overlap with several unique signal transduction pathways. However, biological outcome with EPO and FoxOs may sometimes be both unexpected and undesirable that can raise caution for these agents and warrant further investigations. Here we present the exciting as well as complicated role EPO and FoxOs possess to uncover the benefits as well as the risks of these agents for cell biology and clinical care in processes that range from stem cell development to uncontrolled cellular proliferation.

  5. Crowding in the S-cone pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Daniel R; Chung, Susana T L

    2016-05-01

    The spatial extent of interference from nearby object or contours (the critical spacing of "crowding") has been thoroughly characterized across the visual field, typically using high contrast achromatic stimuli. However, attempts to link this measure with known properties of physiological pathways have been inconclusive. The S-cone pathway, with its ease of psychophysical isolation and known anatomical characteristics, offers a unique tool to gain additional insights into crowding. In this study, we measured the spatial extent of crowding in the S-cone pathway at several retinal locations using a chromatic adaptation paradigm. S-cone crowding was evident and extensive, but its spatial extent changed less markedly as a function of retinal eccentricity than the extent found using traditional achromatic stimuli. However, the spatial extent agreed with that of low contrast achromatic stimuli matched for isolated resolvability. This suggests that common cortical mechanisms mediate the crowding effect in the S-cone and achromatic pathway, but contrast is an important factor. The low contrast of S-cone stimuli makes S-cone vision more acuity-limited than crowding-limited.

  6. Using biological pathway data with paxtools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emek Demir

    Full Text Available A rapidly growing corpus of formal, computable pathway information can be used to answer important biological questions including finding non-trivial connections between cellular processes, identifying significantly altered portions of the cellular network in a disease state and building predictive models that can be used for precision medicine. Due to its complexity and fragmented nature, however, working with pathway data is still difficult. We present Paxtools, a Java library that contains algorithms, software components and converters for biological pathways represented in the standard BioPAX language. Paxtools allows scientists to focus on their scientific problem by removing technical barriers to access and analyse pathway information. Paxtools can run on any platform that has a Java Runtime Environment and was tested on most modern operating systems. Paxtools is open source and is available under the Lesser GNU public license (LGPL, which allows users to freely use the code in their software systems with a requirement for attribution. Source code for the current release (4.2.0 can be found in Software S1. A detailed manual for obtaining and using Paxtools can be found in Protocol S1. The latest sources and release bundles can be obtained from biopax.org/paxtools.

  7. Macropinocytosis: a pathway to protozoan infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tecia Maria Ulisses Carvalho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the various endocytic mechanisms in mammalian cells, macropinocytosis involves internalization of large amounts of plasma membrane together with extracellular medium, leading to macropinosome formation. These structures are formed when plasma membrane ruffles are assembled after actin filament rearrangement. In dendritic cells, macropinocytosis has been reported to play a role in antigen presentation. Several intracellular pathogens are internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways and macropinocytosis has been described as an important entry site for various organisms. Some bacteria, such as Legionella pneumophila, as well as various viruses, use this pathway to penetrate and subvert host cells. Some protozoa, which are larger than bacteria and virus, can also use this pathway to invade host cells. As macropinocytosis is characterized by the formation of large uncoated vacuoles and is triggered by various signaling pathways, which is similar to what occurs during the formation of the majority of parasitophorous vacuoles, it is believed that this phenomenon may be more widely used by parasites than is currently appreciated. Here we review protozoa host cell invasion via macropinocytosis.

  8. Notch pathway is dispensable for adipocyte specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Amy M; Pan, Yonghua; Herreman, An; Hadland, Brandon K; De Strooper, Bart; Kopan, Raphael; Huppert, Stacey S

    2004-09-01

    In the past decade we have witnessed an epidemic of obesity in developed countries. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms involved in regulation of body weight is becoming an increasingly important goal shared by the public and the scientific community. The key to fat deposition is the adipocyte, a specialized cell that plays a critical role in energy balance and appetite regulation. Much of our knowledge of adipogenesis comes from studies using preadipocytic cell lines that have provided important information regarding molecular control of adipocyte differentiation. However, they fall short of revealing how naive cells acquire competence for adipogenesis. Studies in preadipocytes indicate that the Notch pathway plays a role in regulating adipogenesis (Garces et al.: J Biol Chem 272:29729-29734, 1997). Given the known biological functions of Notch in mediating cell fate decisions (Artavanis-Tsakonas et al.: Science 284:770-776, 1999), we wished to test the hypothesis that the Notch pathway is required for this cellular program by examining adipogenesis in several genetic loss-of-function models that encompass the entire pathway. We conclude that the "canonical" Notch signaling pathway is dispensable for adipocyte specification and differentiation from either mesenchymal or epithelial progenitors.

  9. Final report on the Pathway Analysis Task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, F.W.; Kirchner, T.B. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1993-04-01

    The Pathway Analysis Task constituted one of several multi-laboratory efforts to estimate radiation doses to people, considering all important pathways of exposure, from the testing of nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The primary goal of the Pathway Analysis Task was to predict radionuclide ingestion by residents of Utah, Nevada, and portions of seven other adjoining western states following radioactive fallout deposition from individual events at the NTS. This report provides comprehensive documentation of the activities and accomplishments of Colorado State University`s Pathway Analysis Task during the entire period of support (1979--91). The history of the project will be summarized, indicating the principal dates and milestones, personnel involved, subcontractors, and budget information. Accomplishments, both primary and auxiliary, will be summarized with general results rather than technical details being emphasized. This will also serve as a guide to the reports and open literature publications produced, where the methodological details and specific results are documented. Selected examples of results on internal dose estimates are provided in this report because the data have not been published elsewhere.

  10. Students' Perspectives of an EAP Pathway Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooey, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Increasing numbers of overseas students are applying to study at universities in Australia. Many students who meet all of the university's academic entry requirements except English language proficiency are offered pathway programs which prepare them for their tertiary studies. To date, much of the research relating to international students…

  11. TGF-β signaling pathways in cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Talar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available TGF-β is a multifunctional cytokine involved in growth, cell differentiation and maintenanceof tissue homeostasis. In addition, TGF-β plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including cancer. TGF-β-induced signaling pathways have either tumor-suppression or tumor-promoting effects in a cancer-type-specific and stage-dependent manner. TGF-β at an early stage of cancer development induces signaling pathways involved in inhibitionof cell proliferation, induction of differentiation, apoptosis or autophagy, suppression of angiogenesis and inflammation. At a later stage of disease, TGF-β exerts metastasis-promoting activity associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, modulation of cancer microenvironment and extracellular matrix components, inflammation and immune suppression. Furthermore, the TGF-β pathways play a pivotal role in the maintenance of stem cell-like properties of tumor cells. The pleiotropic action of TGF-β during tumorigenesis depends on interactions with different signaling pathways, including Hedgehog, WNT, PI3K--AKT, NOTCH, INF-γ, TNF-α, and RAS-ERK.

  12. Pathway Analysis: State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Campos, Miguel A.; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Pathway analysis is a set of widely used tools for research in life sciences intended to give meaning to high-throughput biological data. The methodology of these tools settles in the gathering and usage of knowledge that comprise biomolecular functioning, coupled with statistical testing and other algorithms. Despite their wide employment, pathway analysis foundations and overall background may not be fully understood, leading to misinterpretation of analysis results. This review attempts to comprise the fundamental knowledge to take into consideration when using pathway analysis as a hypothesis generation tool. We discuss the key elements that are part of these methodologies, their capabilities and current deficiencies. We also present an overview of current and all-time popular methods, highlighting different classes across them. In doing so, we show the exploding diversity of methods that pathway analysis encompasses, point out commonly overlooked caveats, and direct attention to a potential new class of methods that attempt to zoom the analysis scope to the sample scale. PMID:26733877

  13. The Competitiveness of Alternative Hydrogen Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Chr.

    The paper surveys the literature on the competitiveness of alternative hydrogen pathways in the transport sector. The competitiveness of the alternative systems can be differentiated in the “well-to-tank (WtT)” and “tank-to-wheel (TtW)” sections of the pathway transforming primary energy to trans......The paper surveys the literature on the competitiveness of alternative hydrogen pathways in the transport sector. The competitiveness of the alternative systems can be differentiated in the “well-to-tank (WtT)” and “tank-to-wheel (TtW)” sections of the pathway transforming primary energy...... to transport services and in market competitiveness and societal competitiveness. The major societal competitive advantage of hydrogen is its convertibility to electricity and from any other source of energy. This enables a flexible use of natural gas and primary electricity as transport fuels. The major...... advantage in market competitiveness is the energy efficiency of the fuel cell. This advantage is, however, to some extent balanced by the costs associated with conversion, transport, and storage. The balance between these factors required for market competitiveness is identified....

  14. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (‘syngas’) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  15. Novel inositol catabolic pathway in Thermotoga maritima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, Irina A; Leyn, Semen A; Burkart, Michael D; Boucher, Nathalie; Noll, Kenneth M; Osterman, Andrei L; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2013-08-01

    myo-inositol (MI) is a key sugar alcohol component of various metabolites, e.g. phosphatidylinositol-based phospholipids that are abundant in animal and plant cells. The seven-step pathway of MI degradation was previously characterized in various soil bacteria including Bacillus subtilis. Through a combination of bioinformatics and experimental techniques we identified a novel variant of the MI catabolic pathway in the marine hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. By using in vitro biochemical assays with purified recombinant proteins we characterized four inositol catabolic enzymes encoded in the TM0412-TM0416 chromosomal gene cluster. The novel catabolic pathway in T. maritima starts as the conventional route using the myo-inositol dehydrogenase IolG followed by three novel reactions. The first 2-keto-myo-inositol intermediate is oxidized by another, previously unknown NAD-dependent dehydrogenase TM0412 (named IolM), and a yet unidentified product of this reaction is further hydrolysed by TM0413 (IolN) to form 5-keto-l-gluconate. The fourth step involves epimerization of 5-keto-l-gluconate to d-tagaturonate by TM0416 (IolO). T. maritima is unable to grow on myo-inositol as a single carbon source. The determined in vitro specificity of the InoEFGK (TM0418-TM0421) transporter to myo-inositol-phosphate suggests that the novel pathway in Thermotoga utilizes a phosphorylated derivative of inositol.

  16. Pathways to Postsecondary: Indiana Career Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Terri

    2007-01-01

    Education today for the work of tomorrow must take on an entirely new look if the United States is to remain competitive in the global economy. Today, students need to be critical thinkers and problem solvers, have excellent communication and digital literacy skills and master challenging core content. This paper presents "Pathways to…

  17. Pathways to deep decarbonization in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P.; Dhar, Subash; Pathak, Minal

    This report is a part of the global Deep Decarbonisation Pathways (DDP) Project. The analysis consider two development scenarios for India and assess alternate roadmaps for transiting to a low carbon economy consistent with the globally agreed 2°C stabilization target. The report does not consider...

  18. Fetal and neonatal pathways to obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluckman, Peter D; Hanson, Mark A; Beedle, Alan S; Raubenheimer, David

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary and developmental perspectives add considerably to our understanding of the aetiology of obesity and its related disorders. One pathway to obesity represents the maladaptive consequences of an evolutionarily preserved mechanism by which the developing mammal monitors nutritional cues from its mother and adjusts its developmental trajectory accordingly. Prediction of a nutritionally sparse environment leads to a phenotype that promotes metabolic parsimony by favouring fat deposition, insulin resistance, sarcopenia and low energy expenditure. But this adaptive mechanism evolved to accommodate gradual changes in nutritional environment; rapid transition to a situation of high energy density results in a mismatch between predicted and actual environments and increased susceptibility to metabolic disease. This pathway may also explain why breast and bottle feeding confer different risks of obesity. We discuss how early environmental signals act through epigenetic mechanisms to alter metabolic partitioning, glucocorticoid action and neuroendocrine control of appetite. A second pathway involves alterations in fetal insulin levels, as seen in gestational diabetes, leading to increased prenatal fat mass which is subsequently amplified by postnatal factors. Both classes of pathway may coexist in an individual. This developmental approach to obesity suggests that potential interventions will vary according to the target population.

  19. Signaling pathways regulating murine pancreatic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Palle

    2012-01-01

    The recent decades have seen a huge expansion in our knowledge about pancreatic development. Numerous lineage-restricted transcription factor genes have been identified and much has been learned about their function. Similarly, numerous signaling pathways important for pancreas development have...

  20. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, M.; Davis, R.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  1. Macropinocytosis: a pathway to protozoan infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Tecia M. U.; Barrias, Emile S.; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-01-01

    Among the various endocytic mechanisms in mammalian cells, macropinocytosis involves internalization of large amounts of plasma membrane together with extracellular medium, leading to macropinosome formation. These structures are formed when plasma membrane ruffles are assembled after actin filament rearrangement. In dendritic cells, macropinocytosis has been reported to play a role in antigen presentation. Several intracellular pathogens are internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways and macropinocytosis has been described as an important entry site for various organisms. Some bacteria, such as Legionella pneumophila, as well as various viruses, use this pathway to penetrate and subvert host cells. Some protozoa, which are larger than bacteria and virus, can also use this pathway to invade host cells. As macropinocytosis is characterized by the formation of large uncoated vacuoles and is triggered by various signaling pathways, which is similar to what occurs during the formation of the majority of parasitophorous vacuoles, it is believed that this phenomenon may be more widely used by parasites than is currently appreciated. Here we review protozoa host cell invasion via macropinocytosis. PMID:25914647

  2. Learning figurative idioms via cognitive semantic pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In FTL contexts, traditional view treats idiomatic language as essentially arbitrary, which has typically led to the belief that they can only be learned through blind memoriztion. However, the cognitive semantic idea considers that idioms are typically motivated, which can help learners to identify their senses. This paper demonstrates how to learn figurative idioms through cognitive semantic pathway by taking anger as one example.

  3. Vitamins and aging: pathways to NAD+ synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denu, John M

    2007-05-04

    Recent genetic evidence reveals additional salvage pathways for NAD(+) synthesis. In this issue, Belenky et al. (2007) report that nicotinamide riboside, a new NAD(+) precursor, regulates Sir2 deacetylase activity and life span in yeast. The ability of nicotinamide riboside to enhance life span does not depend on calorie restriction.

  4. Exergetical evaluation of biobased synthesis pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenzel, P.; Hillerbrand, R.; Pfennig, A.

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of today’s chemical products are based on crude oil. An attractive and sustainable alternative feedstock is biomass. Since crude oil and biomass differ in various properties, new synthesis pathways and processes have to be developed. In order to prioritize limited resources for res

  5. Pathways to Relationship Aggression between Adult Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Dean M.; Holman, Thomas B.; Walker, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the pathways to adult aggression beginning in the family of origin (FOO) and continuing through adult relationships were investigated. With a sample of 30,600 individuals, a comprehensive model was evaluated that included the unique influences of violent victimization in the family, witnessing parental violence, perpetrating…

  6. Salicylic acid-independent plant defence pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L.C. van

    1999-01-01

    Salicylic acid is an important signalling molecule involved in both locally and systemically induced disease resistance responses. Recent advances in our understanding of plant defence signalling have revealed that plants employ a network of signal transduction pathways, some of which are independen

  7. Regulatory pathways in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    In principle, there are three defined procedures to obtain approval for a medicinal product in the European Union. As discussed in this overview of the procedures, the decision on which regulatory pathway to use will depend on the nature of the active substance, the target indication(s), the history of product and/or the marketing strategy.

  8. Policy Pathways: Energy Performance Certification of Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Improving energy efficiency is one of the most effective measures to address energy security, climate change and economic objectives. The Policy Pathways series can help countries capture this potential by assisting with the implementation of the 25 energy efficiency policy recommendations that were published by the International Energy Agency (IEA) in 2008. This policy pathway on energy performance certification of buildings is the second in the series. It aims to provide a 'how-to' guide to policy makers and relevant stakeholders on the essential elements in implementing energy performance certification of buildings programmes. Energy performance certification of buildings is a way to rate the energy efficiency of individual buildings -- whether they be residential, commercial or public. It is a key policy instrument that can assist governments in reducing energy consumption in buildings. This policy pathway showcases experiences from countries around the world to show examples of good practice and delivers a pathway of ten critical steps to implement energy performance certification of buildings programmes.

  9. The Ran pathway in Drosophila melanogaster mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G Wakefield

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the small GTPase Ran has emerged as a central regulator of both mitosis and meiosis, particularly in the generation, maintenance and regulation of the microtubule (MT-based bipolar spindle. Ran-regulated pathways in mitosis bear many similarities to the well-characterized functions of Ran in nuclear transport and, as with transport, the majority of these mitotic effects are mediated through affecting the physical interaction between karyopherins and Spindle Assembly Factors (SAFs - a loose term describing proteins or protein complexes involved in spindle assembly through promoting nucleation, stabilization, and/or depolymerization of MTs, through anchoring MTs to specific structures such as centrosomes, chromatin or kinetochores, or through sliding MTs along each other to generate the force required to achieve bipolarity. As such, the Ran-mediated pathway represents a crucial functional module within the wider spindle assembly landscape. Research into mitosis using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster has contributed substantially to our understanding of centrosome and spindle function. However, in comparison to mammalian systems, very little is known about the contribution of Ran-mediated pathways in Drosophila mitosis. This article sets out to summarize our understanding of the roles of the Ran pathway components in Drosophila mitosis, focusing on the syncytial blastoderm embryo, arguing that, far from being superfluous, it can provide important insights into the conserved functions on Ran during spindle formation.

  10. Pathway analyses implicate glial cells in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laramie E Duncan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The quest to understand the neurobiology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is ongoing with multiple lines of evidence indicating abnormalities of glia, mitochondria, and glutamate in both disorders. Despite high heritability estimates of 81% for schizophrenia and 75% for bipolar disorder, compelling links between findings from neurobiological studies, and findings from large-scale genetic analyses, are only beginning to emerge. METHOD: Ten publically available gene sets (pathways related to glia, mitochondria, and glutamate were tested for association to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using MAGENTA as the primary analysis method. To determine the robustness of associations, secondary analyses were performed with: ALIGATOR, INRICH, and Set Screen. Data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC were used for all analyses. There were 1,068,286 SNP-level p-values for schizophrenia (9,394 cases/12,462 controls, and 2,088,878 SNP-level p-values for bipolar disorder (7,481 cases/9,250 controls. RESULTS: The Glia-Oligodendrocyte pathway was associated with schizophrenia, after correction for multiple tests, according to primary analysis (MAGENTA p = 0.0005, 75% requirement for individual gene significance and also achieved nominal levels of significance with INRICH (p = 0.0057 and ALIGATOR (p = 0.022. For bipolar disorder, Set Screen yielded nominally and method-wide significant associations to all three glial pathways, with strongest association to the Glia-Astrocyte pathway (p = 0.002. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with findings of white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia by other methods of study, the Glia-Oligodendrocyte pathway was associated with schizophrenia in our genomic study. These findings suggest that the abnormalities of myelination observed in schizophrenia are at least in part due to inherited factors, contrasted with the alternative of purely environmental causes (e.g. medication effects or

  11. Los avances de la Metagenómica aplicados a la Microbiología del aire (Programa AIRBIOTA-CM)

    OpenAIRE

    Nuñez Hernández, Andrés; Rastrojo, Alberto; Garcia Ruiz, Ana Maria; Alcamí, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Bustillo, A. Montserrat; Campoy Cervera, Pascual; Guantes, Raúl; Moreno Gómez, Diego Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    El proyecto AIRBIOTA-CM nace del interés por conocer y modelizar en profundidad la biodiversidad del aire urbano. Los escasos estudios hasta el momento, a menudo parciales, centrados en un solo grupo taxonómico y abordado mediante técnicas tradicionales, sugieren que la diversidad de este ambiente es mayor de lo pensado, considerándolo como un ecosistema propio y con capacidad de interaccionar e influir sobre los demás presentes en la biosfera.

  12. Análisis taxonómico y funcional del microbioma humano mediante aproximaciones clásicas, moleculares y metagenómicas

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrera Rubio, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    La presente tesis muestra distintas aproximaciones para el estudio del microbioma humano. Éstas han ido desde la secuenciación masiva de productos de PCR, la pirosecuenciación directa del ADN ambiental, la elaboración de librerías de fósmidos y por último el aislamiento de especies presentes en el microbioma mediante sembrado de la muestra. Todas estas técnicas tienen sus ventajas y desventajas, pero todas ellas son complementarias para el estudio de un determinado microbioma. Además la elabo...

  13. Targeting the Fanconi Anemia Pathway to Identify Tailored Anticancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Jenkins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fanconi Anemia (FA pathway consists of proteins involved in repairing DNA damage, including interstrand cross-links (ICLs. The pathway contains an upstream multiprotein core complex that mediates the monoubiquitylation of the FANCD2 and FANCI heterodimer, and a downstream pathway that converges with a larger network of proteins with roles in homologous recombination and other DNA repair pathways. Selective killing of cancer cells with an intact FA pathway but deficient in certain other DNA repair pathways is an emerging approach to tailored cancer therapy. Inhibiting the FA pathway becomes selectively lethal when certain repair genes are defective, such as the checkpoint kinase ATM. Inhibiting the FA pathway in ATM deficient cells can be achieved with small molecule inhibitors, suggesting that new cancer therapeutics could be developed by identifying FA pathway inhibitors to treat cancers that contain defects that are synthetic lethal with FA.

  14. Discovery of Unclustered Fungal Indole Diterpene Biosynthetic Pathways through Combinatorial Pathway Reassembly in Engineered Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Man-Cheng; Lin, Hsiao-Ching; Li, Dehai; Zou, Yi; Li, Jian; Xu, Wei; Cacho, Ralph A; Hillenmeyer, Maureen E; Garg, Neil K; Tang, Yi

    2015-11-01

    The structural diversity and biological activities of fungal indole diterpenes (IDTs) are generated in large part by the IDT cyclases (IDTCs). Identifying different IDTCs from IDT biosynthetic pathways is therefore important toward understanding how these enzymes introduce chemical diversity from a common linear precursor. However, IDTCs involved in the cyclization of the well-known aflavinine subgroup of IDTs have not been discovered. Here, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a heterologous host and a phylogenetically guided enzyme mining approach, we combinatorially assembled IDT biosynthetic pathways using IDTCs homologues identified from different fungal hosts. We identified the genetically standalone IDTCs involved in the cyclization of aflavinine and anominine and produced new IDTs not previously isolated. The cyclization mechanisms of the new IDTCs were proposed based on the yeast reconstitution results. Our studies demonstrate heterologous pathway assembly is a useful tool in the reconstitution of unclustered biosynthetic pathways.

  15. The cardiopulmonary effects of ambient air pollution and mechanistic pathways: a comparative hierarchical pathway analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Roy

    Full Text Available Previous studies have investigated the associations between exposure to ambient air pollution and biomarkers of physiological pathways, yet little has been done on the comparison across biomarkers of different pathways to establish the temporal pattern of biological response. In the current study, we aim to compare the relative temporal patterns in responses of candidate pathways to different pollutants. Four biomarkers of pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, five biomarkers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, ten parameters of autonomic function, and three biomarkers of hemostasis were repeatedly measured in 125 young adults, along with daily concentrations of ambient CO, PM2.5, NO2, SO2, EC, OC, and sulfate, before, during, and after the Beijing Olympics. We used a two-stage modeling approach, including Stage I models to estimate the association between each biomarker and pollutant over each of 7 lags, and Stage II mixed-effect models to describe temporal patterns in the associations when grouping the biomarkers into the four physiological pathways. Our results show that candidate pathway groupings of biomarkers explained a significant amount of variation in the associations for each pollutant, and the temporal patterns of the biomarker-pollutant-lag associations varied across candidate pathways (p<0.0001 and were not linear (from lag 0 to lag 3: p = 0.0629, from lag 3 to lag 6: p = 0.0005. These findings suggest that, among this healthy young adult population, the pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress pathway is the first to respond to ambient air pollution exposure (within 24 hours and the hemostasis pathway responds gradually over a 2-3 day period. The initial pulmonary response may contribute to the more gradual systemic changes that likely ultimately involve the cardiovascular system.

  16. Molecular neurodegeneration: basic biology and disease pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassar, Robert; Zheng, Hui

    2014-09-23

    The field of neurodegeneration research has been advancing rapidly over the past few years, and has provided intriguing new insights into the normal physiological functions and pathogenic roles of a wide range of molecules associated with several devastating neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia, Huntington's disease, and Down syndrome. Recent developments have also facilitated initial efforts to translate preclinical discoveries toward novel therapeutic approaches and clinical trials in humans. These recent developments are reviewed in the current Review Series on "Molecular Neurodegeneration: Basic Biology and Disease Pathways" in a number of state-of-the-art manuscripts that cover themes presented at the Third International Conference on Molecular Neurodegeneration: "Basic biology and disease pathways" held in Cannes, France, September, 2013.

  17. Pathways: Strategies for Susceptibility Genes in SLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, James M.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kimberly, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disorder marked by an inappropriate immune response to nuclear antigens. Recent whole genome association and more focused studies have revealed numerous genes implicated in this disease process, including ITGAM, Fc gamma receptors, complement components, C-reactive protein, and others. One common feature of these molecules is their involvement in the immune opsonins pathway and phagocytic clearing of nuclear antigens and apoptotic debris which provide excessive exposure of lupus-related antigens to immune cells. Analysis of gene-gene interactions in the opsonin pathway and its relationship to SLE may provide a systems-based approach to identify additional candidate genes associated with disease able to account for a larger part of lupus susceptibility. PMID:20144911

  18. When RNA and protein degradation pathways meet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal eGENSCHIK

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available RNA silencing has become a major focus of molecular and biomedical research in the last decade. This mechanism, which is conserved in most eukaryotes, has been extensively studied and is associated to various pathways implicated in the regulation of development, in the control of transposition events, heterochromatin maintenance and also playing a role in defense against viruses. Despite of its importance, the regulation of the RNA silencing machinery itself remains still poorly explored. Recently several reports in both plants and metazoans revealed that key components of RNA silencing, such as RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC component ARGONAUTE proteins, but also the endonuclease Dicer are subjected to proteasomal and autophagic pathways. Here we will review these post-translational proteolytic regulations with a special emphasis on plant research and also discuss their functional relevance.

  19. Lung carcinoma signaling pathways activated by smoking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wen; Jian-Hua Fu; Wei Zhang; Ming Guo

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and women worldwide, with over a million deaths annually. Tobacco smoke is the major etiologic risk factor for lung cancer in current or previous smokers and has been strongly related to certain types of lung cancer, such as small cell lung carcinoma and squamous cell lung carcinoma. In recent years, there has been an increased incidence of lung adenocarcinoma. This change is strongly associated with changes in smoking behavior and cigarette design. Carcinogens present in tobacco products and their intermediate metabolites can activate multiple signaling pathways that contribute to lung cancer carcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize the smoking-activated signaling pathways involved in lung cancer.

  20. Targeting the EGFR pathway for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnston, JB; Navaratnam, S; Pitz, MW

    2006-01-01

    provided the rationale for the targeting of the components of the EGFR signaling pathways for cancer therapy. Below we discuss various aspects of EGFR-targeted therapies mainly in hematologic malignancies, lung cancer and breast cancer. Beside novel therapeutic approaches, we also discuss specific side......Clinical studies have shown that HER-2/Neu is over-expressed in up to one-third of patients with a variety of cancers, including B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), breast cancer and lung cancer, and that these patients are frequently resistant to conventional chemo-therapies. Additionally...... effects associated with the therapeutic inhibition of components of the EGFR-pathways. Alongside small inhibitors, such as Lapatinib (Tykerb, GW572016), Gefitinib (Iressa, ZD1839), and Erlotinib (Tarceva, OSI-774), a significant part of the review is also dedicated to therapeutic antibodies (e...