WorldWideScience

Sample records for ceramics division annual

  1. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The major elements of the Materials Sciences Program can be grouped under the areas of (1) structural characterization, (2) high-temperature alloy studies, (3) structural ceramics, and (4) radiation effects

  2. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys

  3. Metals and Ceramics Division. Annual progress report, ending June 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research is reported concerning: (1) engineering materials, including materials compatibility, mechanical properties, nondestructive testing, pressure vessel technology, and welding and brazing; (2) fuels and processes consisting of ceramic technology, fuel cycle technology, fuels evaluation, fuel fabrication and metals processing; and (3) materials science which includes, ceramic studies, physical metallurgy properties, radiation effects and microstructural analysis, metastable and superconducting materials, structure and properties of surfaces, theroretical research and x-ray research and applications. Highlights of the work of the metallographic group and the current state of the High-Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) and the Materials and Structures Technology Management Center (MSTMC) are presented

  4. Metals and Ceramics Division annual progress report, October 1, 1978-June 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research is reported concerning: (1) engineering materials including materials compatibility, mechanical properties, nondestructive testing, pressure vessel technology, and welding and brazing; (2) fuels and processes consisting of ceramic technology, fuel cycle technology, fuels evaluation, fuels fabrication and metals processing; and (3) materials science which includes, ceramic studies, physical metallurgy and properties, radiation effects and microstructural analysis, metastable and superconducting materials, structure and properties of surfaces, theoretical research, and x-ray research and applications. Highlights of the work of the metallographic group and the current status of the High-Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) and the Materials and Structures Technology Management Center (MSTMC) are presented

  5. Metals and Ceramics Division annual progress report, October 1, 1978-June 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S. (ed.)

    1979-09-01

    Research is reported concerning: (1) engineering materials including materials compatibility, mechanical properties, nondestructive testing, pressure vessel technology, and welding and brazing; (2) fuels and processes consisting of ceramic technology, fuel cycle technology, fuels evaluation, fuels fabrication and metals processing; and (3) materials science which includes, ceramic studies, physical metallurgy and properties, radiation effects and microstructural analysis, metastable and superconducting materials, structure and properties of surfaces, theoretical research, and x-ray research and applications. Highlights of the work of the metallographic group and the current status of the High-Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) and the Materials and Structures Technology Management Center (MSTMC) are presented. (FS)

  6. Metals and Ceramics Division. Annual progress report, ending June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    Research is reported concerning: (1) engineering materials, including materials compatibility, mechanical properties, nondestructive testing, pressure vessel technology, and welding and brazing; (2) fuels and processes consisting of ceramic technology, fuel cycle technology, fuels evaluation, fuel fabrication and metals processing; and (3) materials science which includes, ceramic studies, physical metallurgy properties, radiation effects and microstructural analysis, metastable and superconducting materials, structure and properties of surfaces, theroretical research and x-ray research and applications. Highlights of the work of the metallographic group and the current state of the High-Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) and the Materials and Structures Technology Management Center (MSTMC) are presented. (FS)

  7. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning the theoretical studies of metals and alloys; x-ray diffraction research; structural ceramics; structure of coal; analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy; deformation and mechanical properties; mechanisms of surface and solid-state reactions; physical properties research; metastable materials; neutron radiation effects; charged particle radiation effects; theory and modeling of radiation effects; facility and advanced technique development; fundamentals of welding and joining; and studies in nondestructive evaluation

  8. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topics covered include: structure of materials, theoretical research; x-ray diffraction research; fundamental ceramics studies; preparation and synthesis of high-temperature and special service materials; physical metallurgy; grain boundary segregation and fracture; mechanisms of surface and solid-state reactions; physical properties research; superconducting materials; radiation effects; facility and technique development; nuclear microanalysis; cooperative studies with universities and other research organizations; and fundamentals of welding and joining

  9. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J.; Peterson, S. (comps.)

    1978-09-01

    Topics covered include: structure of materials, theoretical research; x-ray diffraction research; fundamental ceramics studies; preparation and synthesis of high-temperature and special service materials; physical metallurgy; grain boundary segregation and fracture; mechanisms of surface and solid-state reactions; physical properties research; superconducting materials; radiation effects; facility and technique development; nuclear microanalysis; cooperative studies with universities and other research organizations; and fundamentals of welding and joining. (GHT)

  10. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division`s annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  11. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  12. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals

  13. Chemical Technology Division Annual Report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Technology Division (CMT) is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base through developing industrial technology and transferring that technology to industry. The Chemical Technology Division is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by ANL's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which provides a broad range of analytical services to ANL and other organizations. The Division is multi-disciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia, urban planning, and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature superconductors. In this annual report we present an overview of the technical programs together with representative highlights. The report is not intended to be comprehensive or encyclopedic, but to serve as an indication of the condition

  14. The History of Metals and Ceramics Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    The division was formed in 1946 at the suggestion of Dr. Eugene P. Wigner to attack the problem of the distortion of graphite in the early reactors due to exposure to reactor neutrons, and the consequent radiation damage. It was called the Metallurgy Division and assembled the metallurgical and solid state physics activities of the time which were not directly related to nuclear weapons production. William A. Johnson, a Westinghouse employee, was named Division Director in 1946. In 1949 he was replaced by John H Frye Jr. when the Division consisted of 45 people. He was director during most of what is called the Reactor Project Years until 1973 and his retirement. During this period the Division evolved into three organizational areas: basic research, applied research in nuclear reactor materials, and reactor programs directly related to a specific reactor(s) being designed or built. The Division (Metals and Ceramics) consisted of 204 staff members in 1973 when James R. Weir, Jr., became Director. This was the period of the oil embargo, the formation of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) by combining the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) with the Office of Coal Research, and subsequent formation of the Department of Energy (DOE). The diversification process continued when James O. Stiegler became Director in 1984, partially as a result of the pressure of legislation encouraging the national laboratories to work with U.S. industries on their problems. During that time the Division staff grew from 265 to 330. Douglas F. Craig became Director in 1992.

  15. 2003 Chemical Engineering Division annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Engineering Division is one of six divisions within the Engineering Research Directorate at Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, to promote national security, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. The Division is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which provides a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training in chemistry; physics; materials science; and electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineering. They are specialists in electrochemistry, ceramics, metallurgy, catalysis, materials characterization, nuclear magnetic resonance, repository science, and the nuclear fuel cycle. Our staff have experience working in and collaborating with university, industry and government research and development laboratories throughout the world. Our wide-ranging expertise finds ready application in solving energy, national security, and environmental problems. Division personnel are frequently called on by governmental and industrial organizations for advice and contributions to problem solving in areas that intersect present and past Division programs and activities. Currently, we are engaged in the development of several technologies of

  16. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 59 papers of the 1981 annual report of the Earth Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The general topics covered included nuclear waste isolation, geophysics and reservoir engineering, and geosciences

  17. Physics division annual report 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2008-02-28

    This report highlights the activities of the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory in 2006. The Division's programs include the operation as a national user facility of ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System, research in nuclear structure and reactions, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear theory, investigations in medium-energy nuclear physics as well as research and development in accelerator technology. The mission of nuclear physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the core of matter, the fuel of stars, and the basic constituent of life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission.

  18. Physics division annual report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report highlights the activities of the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory in 2006. The Division's programs include the operation as a national user facility of ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System, research in nuclear structure and reactions, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear theory, investigations in medium-energy nuclear physics as well as research and development in accelerator technology. The mission of nuclear physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the core of matter, the fuel of stars, and the basic constituent of life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission

  19. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1981 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  20. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1977 are described. Works of the Division are development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, fusion reactor engineering, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor for Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology, and Committee on Reactor Physics. (Author)

  1. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities conducted in Reactor Engineering Division in fiscal 1975 are summarized in this report. Works in the division are closely related to the development of multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering research of thermonuclear fusion reactor. Many achievements are described concerning nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (auth.)

  2. Physics division annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research performed in 2000 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory and medium energy physics research, and accelerator research and development. As the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee and the nuclear science community create a new long range plan for the field in 2001, it is clear that the research of the Division is closely aligned with and continues to help define the national goals of our field. The NSAC 2001 Long Range Plan recommends as the highest priority for major new construction the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), a bold step forward for nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The accelerator R and D in the Physics Division has made major contributions to almost all aspects of the RIA design concept and the community was convinced that this project is ready to move forward. 2000 saw the end of the first Gammasphere epoch at ATLAS, One hundred Gammasphere experiments were completed between January 1998 and March 2000, 60% of which used the Fragment Mass Analyzer to provide mass identification in the reaction. The experimental program at ATLAS then shifted to other important research avenues including proton radioactivity, mass measurements with the Canadian Penning Trap and measurements of high energy gamma-rays in nuclear reactions with the MSU/ORNL/Texas A and M BaF2 array. ATLAS provided 5460 beam-research hours for user experiments and maintained an operational reliability of 95%. Radioactive beams accounted for 7% of the beam time. ATLAS also provided a crucial test of a key RIA concept, the ability to accelerate multiple charge states in a superconducting heavy-ion linac. This new capability was immediately used to increase the performance for a scheduled experiment. The medium energy program continued to make strides in examining how the quark-gluon structure of

  3. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. We are proud to be able to bring you this report, which we hope will convey not only a description of the Division's scientific activities but also a sense of the enthusiasm and excitement present today in the Earth Sciences.

  4. Physics division annual report - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R and D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part, defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design

  5. Physics division annual report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report highlights the research performed in 2005 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The mission of Nuclear Physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the matter that makes up stars, planets and human life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission and 2005 was a year of great progress. One of the most exciting developments is the initiation of the Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade, CARIBU. By combining a Cf-252 fission source, the gas catcher technology developed for rare isotope beams, a high-resolution isobar separator, and charge breeding ECR technology, CARIBU will make hundreds of new neutron-rich isotope beams available for research. The cover illustration shows the anticipated intensities of low-energy beams that become available for low-energy experiments and for injection into ATLAS for reacceleration. CARIBU will be completed in early 2009 and provide us with considerable experience in many of the technologies developed for a future high intensity exotic beam facility. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the isomeric states in 252No that helps pin down the single particle structure expected for superheavy elements, and a new low-background measurement of 16N beta-decay to determine the 12C(α, γ)16O reaction rate that is so important in astrophysical environments. Precise mass measurements shed new light on the unitarity of the quark weak-mixing matrix in the search for physics beyond the standard model. ATLAS operated for 4686 hours of research in FY2005 while achieving 95% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium-Energy Physics, radium isotopes were trapped in an atom trap for the

  6. Physics division annual report 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2007-03-12

    This report highlights the research performed in 2005 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The mission of Nuclear Physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the matter that makes up stars, planets and human life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission and 2005 was a year of great progress. One of the most exciting developments is the initiation of the Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade, CARIBU. By combining a Cf-252 fission source, the gas catcher technology developed for rare isotope beams, a high-resolution isobar separator, and charge breeding ECR technology, CARIBU will make hundreds of new neutron-rich isotope beams available for research. The cover illustration shows the anticipated intensities of low-energy beams that become available for low-energy experiments and for injection into ATLAS for reacceleration. CARIBU will be completed in early 2009 and provide us with considerable experience in many of the technologies developed for a future high intensity exotic beam facility. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the isomeric states in {sup 252}No that helps pin down the single particle structure expected for superheavy elements, and a new low-background measurement of {sup 16}N beta-decay to determine the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction rate that is so important in astrophysical environments. Precise mass measurements shed new light on the unitarity of the quark weak-mixing matrix in the search for physics beyond the standard model. ATLAS operated for 4686 hours of research in FY2005 while achieving 95% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium-Energy Physics, radium

  7. Physics Division annual report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report highlights the research performed in 2004 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The intellectual challenges of this research represent some of the most fundamental challenges in modern science, shaping our understanding of both tiny objects at the center of the atom and some of the largest structures in the universe. A great strength of these efforts is the critical interplay of theory and experiment. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the charge radius of He-6 in an atom trap and its explanation in ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure. Precise mass measurements on critical waiting point nuclei in the rapid-proton-capture process set the time scale for this important path in nucleosynthesis. An abrupt fall-off was identified in the subbarrier fusion of several heavy-ion systems. ATLAS operated for 5559 hours of research in FY2004 while achieving 96% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium Energy Physics, substantial progress was made on a long-term experiment to search for the violation of time-reversal invariance using trapped Ra atoms. New results from HERMES reveal the influence of quark angular momentum. Experiments at JLAB search for evidence of color transparency in rho-meson production and study the EMC effect in helium isotopes. New theoretical results include a Poincare covariant description of baryons as composites of confined quarks and non-point-like diquarks. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques give accurate descriptions of the excited states of light nuclei and these techniques been extended to scattering states for astrophysics studies. A theoretical description of the phenomena of proton radioactivity has been extended to triaxial nuclei. Argonne continues to

  8. Physics Division annual report 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.

    2006-04-06

    This report highlights the research performed in 2004 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The intellectual challenges of this research represent some of the most fundamental challenges in modern science, shaping our understanding of both tiny objects at the center of the atom and some of the largest structures in the universe. A great strength of these efforts is the critical interplay of theory and experiment. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the charge radius of He-6 in an atom trap and its explanation in ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure. Precise mass measurements on critical waiting point nuclei in the rapid-proton-capture process set the time scale for this important path in nucleosynthesis. An abrupt fall-off was identified in the subbarrier fusion of several heavy-ion systems. ATLAS operated for 5559 hours of research in FY2004 while achieving 96% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium Energy Physics, substantial progress was made on a long-term experiment to search for the violation of time-reversal invariance using trapped Ra atoms. New results from HERMES reveal the influence of quark angular momentum. Experiments at JLAB search for evidence of color transparency in rho-meson production and study the EMC effect in helium isotopes. New theoretical results include a Poincare covariant description of baryons as composites of confined quarks and non-point-like diquarks. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques give accurate descriptions of the excited states of light nuclei and these techniques been extended to scattering states for astrophysics studies. A theoretical description of the phenomena of proton radioactivity has been extended to triaxial nuclei. Argonne

  9. Physics division annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example

  10. Physics division annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example

  11. 2002 Chemical Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Engineering Division is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. The Division is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by Argonne's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory; Environment, Safety, and Health Analytical Chemistry services; and Dosimetry and Radioprotection services, which provide a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia; urban planning; and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature superconductors. Our wide-ranging expertise finds ready application in solving energy and environmental problems. Division personnel are frequently called on by

  12. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2).

  13. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2)

  14. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions

  15. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, N. (ed.)

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions.

  16. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Technology Division (CMT) is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. CMT is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by Argonne's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory and Environment, Safety, and Health Analytical Chemistry services, which provide a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia; urban planning; and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature superconductors

  17. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  18. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division`s research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth`s crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989 a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will in the coming years be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required.

  19. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Technology Division (CMT) is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. CMT is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by Argonne's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory and Environment, Safety, and Health Analytical Chemistry services, which provide a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia; urban planning; and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature super-conductors. The Division's wide-ranging expertise finds ready application in solving energy and environmental problems. Division personnel are frequently called on by governmental and industrial

  20. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing 99Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  1. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

    1994-04-01

    Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support.

  2. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing 99Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support

  3. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division's research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth's crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989 a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will in the coming years be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required

  4. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

    1993-06-01

    In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste, mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and municipal solid waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, treating water contaminated with volatile organics, and concentrating radioactive waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (EFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials (corium; Fe-U-Zr, tritium in LiAlO{sub 2} in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel` ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, and molecular sieve structures; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  5. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste, mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and municipal solid waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, treating water contaminated with volatile organics, and concentrating radioactive waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (EFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials (corium; Fe-U-Zr, tritium in LiAlO2 in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel' ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, and molecular sieve structures; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  6. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials and electrified interfaces. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1997 are presented.

  7. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1981. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 59 papers of the 1981 annual report of the Earth Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The general topics covered included nuclear waste isolation, geophysics and reservoir engineering, and geosciences. (KRM)

  8. Radiochemistry Division annual progress report : 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development activities of the Radiochemistry Division during 1992 are briefly described in the form of individual summaries grouped under the headings: 1) Nuclear Chemistry, 2) Actinide Chemistry, 3) Spectroscopy, and 4) Instrumentation. A list of publications numbering 95 by the scientific staff of the Division is also included in the report. (author). 35 figs., 56 tabs

  9. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials and electrified interfaces. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1997 are presented

  10. 1998 Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, J.P.; Einziger, R.E.; Gay, E.C.; Green, D.W.; Miller, J.F.

    1999-08-06

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1998 are presented.

  11. Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-04-01

    The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

  12. Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future

  13. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  14. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences)

  15. Theoretical Division annual report, FY 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an overview of the activities in the Theoretical Division and a summary of research highlights during FY 1975. It is intended to inform a wide audience about the theoretical work of the LASL and, therefore, contains introductory material which places recent advances in a broader context. The report is organized into two special interest reports: reactor safety research and the Advanced Research Committee, and 11 reports from the T-Division group leaders on the work of their respective groups. Main interests and responsibilities are outlined including the relationship of the group's work to the work of other T-Division groups and other divisions at the Laboratory. The description of research highlights for FY 1975 explains in a fairly simple, straightforward manner the major recent advances and their significance. Each group report is followed by a publication list for FY 1975 (330 references) and a list of talks given outside the Laboratory (140 references). 29 figures

  16. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences).

  17. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations

  18. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W.D. [ed.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  19. Nuclear Physics Division annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report covers the research and development activities of the Nuclear Physics Division for the period January to December 1992. These research and development activities are reported under the headings: 1) Experiments, 2) Theory, 3) Applications, 4) Instrumentation, and 5) The Pelletron Accelerator. At the end a list of publications by the staff scientists of the Division is given. Colloquia and seminars held during the year are also listed. (author). refs., tabs., figs

  20. Radiochemistry Division annual progress report : 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development activities of the Radiochemistry Division during 1991 are briefly described under the headings: (i) Nuclear chemistry, (ii) Actinide chemistry, and (iii) Spectroscopy. In the field of nuclear chemistry, the main emphasis has been on the studies of fission process induced by reactor neutrons and light and heavy ions on actinides and low Z (Zc superconductors. A list of publications by the scientific staff of the Division is given at the end. (author). 31 figs., 49 tabs

  1. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    CMT is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. It conducts R&D in 3 general areas: development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, materials chemistry of electrified interfaces and molecular sieves, and the theory of materials properties. It also operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at ANL and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1996 are presented.

  2. The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oegerle, William; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2009-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. This report includes the Division's activities during 2008.

  3. Analytical Chemistry Division : annual report (for) 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account of the various activities of the Analytical Chemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during 1985 is presented. The main function of the Division is to provide chemical analysis support to India's atomic energy programme. In addition, the Division also offers its analytical services, mostly for measurement of concentrations at trace levels to Indian industries and other research organization in the country. A list of these determinations is given. The report also describes the research and development (R and D) activities - both completed and in progress, in the form of individual summaries. During the year an ultra trace analytical laboratory for analysis of critical samples without contamination was set up using indigenous material and technology. Publications and training activities of the staff, training of the staff from other institution, guidance by the staff for post-graduate degree and invited talks by the staff are listed in the appendices at the end of the report. (M.G.B.)

  4. Radiochemistry Division annual progress report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development activities of the Division during 1989 are briefly described in the form of individual summaries arranged under the headings: (1)Nuclear chemistry, (2)Actinide chemistry, and (3)Spectroscopy. In the field of nuclear chemistry, main emphasis is on studies in fission chemistry. R and D work in actinide chemistry area is oriented towards study of solvent extraction behaviour of actinide ions from aqueous solutions. The spectroscpoic studies are mainly concerned with EPR investigations. A list of publications by the scientist of the division is given at the end. (author). 22 figs., 39 tabs

  5. Life Sciences Division annual report, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Life Sciences Division for the calendar year 1988. Technical reports related to the current status of projects are presented in sufficient detail to permit the informed reader to assess their scope and significance. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the Group Leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information

  6. Life Sciences Division annual report, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrone, B.L.; Cram, L.S. (comps.)

    1989-04-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Life Sciences Division for the calendar year 1988. Technical reports related to the current status of projects are presented in sufficient detail to permit the informed reader to assess their scope and significance. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the Group Leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  7. Nuclear Physics Division: annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief account of the research and development activities carried out by the Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during the period January 1991 to December 1991 is presented. These R and D activities are reported under the headings : 1) Accelerator Facilities, 2) Research Activities, and 3) Instrumentation. At the end, a list of publications by the staff scientists of the Division is given. The list includes papers published in journals, papers presented at conferences, symposia etc., and technical reports. (author). figs., tabs

  8. Ontario Hydro Research Division annual report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Research Division of Ontario Hydro conducts research in the fields of chemistry, civil engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, metallurgy, and operations. Much of the research has a bearing on the safe, environmentally benign operation of Ontario Hydro's nuclear power plants. Particular emphasis has been placed on nuclear plant component aging and plant life assurance

  9. Chemical Biodynamics Division. Annual report 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    The Chemical Biodynamics Division of LBL continues to conduct basic research on the dynamics of living cells and on the interaction of radiant energy with organic matter. Many aspects of this basic research are related to problems of environmental and health effects of fossil fuel combustion, solar energy conversion and chemical/ viral carcinogenesis.

  10. Theoretical Division annual report, FY 1975. [LASL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carruthers, P.A.

    1976-02-01

    This report presents an overview of the activities in the Theoretical Division and a summary of research highlights during FY 1975. It is intended to inform a wide audience about the theoretical work of the LASL and, therefore, contains introductory material which places recent advances in a broader context. The report is organized into two special interest reports: reactor safety research and the Advanced Research Committee, and 11 reports from the T-Division group leaders on the work of their respective groups. Main interests and responsibilities are outlined including the relationship of the group's work to the work of other T-Division groups and other divisions at the Laboratory. The description of research highlights for FY 1975 explains in a fairly simple, straightforward manner the major recent advances and their significance. Each group report is followed by a publication list for FY 1975 (330 references) and a list of talks given outside the Laboratory (140 references). 29 figures. (auth)

  11. Radiochemistry Division annual progress report for 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development work carried by the Radiochemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during the calendar year 1977 in the areas of reactor chemistry, actinide chemistry, process chemistry of neptunium and plutonium-239, radioanalytical chemistry and nuclear chemistry has been reported. (M.G.B.)

  12. Radiochemistry Division: annual progress report: 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress of Research and Development (R and D) activities during the year 1987 are reported in the form of summaries, which are presented under the headings (1) Actinide Chemistry, (2) Nuclear Chemistry, and (3) Spectroscopy. Microwave absorption studies of the high Tsub(c) oxide superconductor YBa2Cu3Osub(7-x) using electron paramagnetic resonance techniques are the new feature during the report year. Radioanalytical services and radiation sources in the form of electrodeposited sources or standard soluti ons were also given to the other Divisions, other units of the Department of Atomic Energy, and other organisations in the country. A list of papers by the members of the Division published in various journals and presented at various symposia, conferences etc. is given at the end of the report. (M.G.B.). refs., 51 tabs., 33 figs

  13. Chemical Technology Division. Annual technical report, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laidler, J.J.; Myles, K.M.; Green, D.W.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1996-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1995 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (3) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (4) processes for separating and recovering selected elements from waste streams, concentrating low-level radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; (5) electrometallurgical treatment of different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (6) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems.

  14. Radiochemistry Division annual progress report for 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress report of the Radiochemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, presents the research and development work carried out during 1982 in the form of individual summaries arranged under the headings: reactor fuel chemistry, heavy element chemistry, radioanalytical chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Some of the highlights of the R and D activities are: (1) optimisation of the chemical parameters for the preparation of UO2 microspheres by internal gelation method, (2) synergetic extraction studies of various actinides from aqueous solutions, (3) development of methods of determination of uranium, 241Am and 239Pu, (4) fission studies of 232Th, 236U, 252Cf and 229Th, (5) determination of half-life of 241Pu by various methods. A list of publications of the members of the Division published during 1982 is also given. (M.G.B.)

  15. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CMT is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. It conducts R ampersand D in 3 general areas: development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, materials chemistry of electrified interfaces and molecular sieves, and the theory of materials properties. It also operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at ANL and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1996 are presented

  16. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-01

    Summaries of the highlights of programs in the Earth Sciences Division are presented under four headings; Geosciences, Geothermal Energy Development, Nuclear Waste Isolation, and Marine Sciences. Utilizing both basic and applied research in a wide spectrum of topics, these programs are providing results that will be of value in helping to secure the nation's energy future. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each project for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  17. Energy and Environment Division annual report, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camp, J.A. (ed.)

    1978-01-01

    Research activities of this Division are reported under nine separate programs, namely: Energy Analysis; Solar Energy; Energy-Efficient Buildings; Chemical Process Research and Development; Environmental Research; Atmospheric Aerosol Research; Oil Shale Research; Instrumentation Development; and Combustion Research. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the nine programs, each of which contained several individual research summaries, with responsible researchers listed. All of the abstracts will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA), and five will appear in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA).

  18. Analytical Chemistry Division: annual report (for) 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Research and Development (R and D) activities of the Analytical Chemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during 1986 are reported in the form of individual summaries. Analytical consultancies to outside organisations are also described in brief. Information regarding number of samples analysed, publications, invited talks, award of research degrees, training imparted to scientists from R and D organisations in the country and abroad etc. is given in the appendices at the end of the report. (M.G.B.)

  19. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing 99Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  20. Chemical Engineering Division annual technical report, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Engineering (CEN) Division's activities during 1980 are presented. In this period, CEN conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) rechargeable lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide batteries for electric vehicles and other applications; (2) ambient-temperature batteries - improved lead-acid, nickel/zinc, and nickel/iron - for electric vehicles; (3) energy-efficient industrial electrochemical processes; (4) molten carbonate fuel cells for use by electric utilities; (5) coal technology, mainly fluidized-bed combustion of coal in the presence of SO2 sorbent of limestone; (6) heat- and seed-recovery technology for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic systems; (7) solar energy collectors and thermal energy storage; (8) fast breeder reactor chemistry research - chemical support of reactor safety studies, chemistry of irradiated fuels, and sodium technology; (9) fuel cycle technology - management of nuclear wastes, reprocessing of nuclear fuels, and proof-of-breeding studies for the Light Water Breeder Reactor; and (10) magnetic fusion research - systems analysis and engineering experimentation, materials research, and neutron dosimetry and damage analysis. The CEN Division also has a basic energy sciences program, which includes experimental and theoretical research on (1) the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide and methanol homologation, (2) the thermodynamic properties of a wide variety of inorganic and organic materials, (3) significant mechanisms for the formation of atmospheric sulfate and nitrogen-bearing aerosols, (4) processes occurring at electrodes and in electrolytes, and (5) the physical properties of salt vapors. In addition, the Division operated the Central Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

  1. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  2. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1985 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) advanced batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (3) corrosion-protective coatings for high-strength steel; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methodologies for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) nuclear technology related to waste management, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and proof of breeding in a light water breeder reactor; and (7) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL

  3. Bibliography of the technical literature of the Metals and Ceramics Division, 1970--1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bibliography of the scientific information originating in the Metals and Ceramics Division of ORNL during the period 1970 through 1974 is presented. The master listing contains 925 references, for which both subject and author indexes are provided

  4. Bibliography of the technical literature of the Metals and Ceramics Division, 1970--1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, M.R. (comp.)

    1977-07-01

    A bibliography of the scientific information originating in the Metals and Ceramics Division of ORNL during the period 1970 through 1974 is presented. The master listing contains 925 references, for which both subject and author indexes are provided.

  5. Earth Sciences Division. Annual report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report contains articles describing the research programs conducted during the year. Major areas of interest include geothermal exploration technology, geothermal energy conversion technology, reservoir engineering, geothermal environmental research, basic geosciences studies, applied geosciences studies, nuclear waste isolation, and marine sciences

  6. Earth Sciences Division. Annual report 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    This annual report contains articles describing the research programs conducted during the year. Major areas of interest include geothermal exploration technology, geothermal energy conversion technology, reservoir engineering, geothermal environmental research, basic geosciences studies, applied geosciences studies, nuclear waste isolation, and marine sciences. (ACR)

  7. Chemical technology division: Annual technical report 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1987 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries--mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet and for the purification of ferrous scrap; (6) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (7) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of various minerals; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 54 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Divisions's activities during 1988 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries (mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide, sodium/metal chloride, and sodium/sulfur); (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous chemical water; (6) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing /sup 99/Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (7) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 53 figs., 16 tabs

  9. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  10. Nuclear Science Division 1994 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W.D. [ed.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the period of January 1, 1994, to December 31, 1994. This was a time of significant accomplishment for all of the programs in the Division. Assembly of the solar neutrino detector at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is well under way. All of the components fabricated by LBL were shipped to Sudbury early in the year and our efforts are now divided between assisting the assembly of the detector and preparing software for data analysis once the detector is operational in 1996. Much of the activity at the 88-Inch Cyclotron centered on Gammasphere. The {open_quotes}early implementation{close_quotes} phase of the detector ended in September. This phase was extremely successful, involving over 60 experiments with nearly 200 users from 37 institutions worldwide. The mechanical structure was installed and the final electronic system is expected to operate in March 1995. The Division concurrently hosted a conference on physics for large {gamma}-ray detector arrays at the Clark Kerr Campus at UC Berkeley in August. This was a very successful meeting, reflecting the enthusiasm for this field worldwide. Also at the Cyclotron, the progress toward weak interaction experiments using ultra-thin sources passed a major milestone with the trapping of radioactive {sup 21}Na atoms. We are now engaged in a major upgrade of the experimental area and the outlook is very promising for these novel experiments. Another highlight of research at the Cyclotron was the confirmation of element 106. This development allowed the original LLNL/LBL discovery team to move forward with their proposal to name this element seaborgium.

  11. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO/sub 2/ recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Physics division annual report - October 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K. [ed.

    2000-10-16

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part, defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design.

  13. Chemical technology division: Annual technical report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1987 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries--mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet and for the purification of ferrous scrap; (6) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (7) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of various minerals; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 54 figs., 9 tabs

  14. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO2 recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs

  15. Nuclear Science Division 1994 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the period of January 1, 1994, to December 31, 1994. This was a time of significant accomplishment for all of the programs in the Division. Assembly of the solar neutrino detector at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is well under way. All of the components fabricated by LBL were shipped to Sudbury early in the year and our efforts are now divided between assisting the assembly of the detector and preparing software for data analysis once the detector is operational in 1996. Much of the activity at the 88-Inch Cyclotron centered on Gammasphere. The open-quotes early implementationclose quotes phase of the detector ended in September. This phase was extremely successful, involving over 60 experiments with nearly 200 users from 37 institutions worldwide. The mechanical structure was installed and the final electronic system is expected to operate in March 1995. The Division concurrently hosted a conference on physics for large γ-ray detector arrays at the Clark Kerr Campus at UC Berkeley in August. This was a very successful meeting, reflecting the enthusiasm for this field worldwide. Also at the Cyclotron, the progress toward weak interaction experiments using ultra-thin sources passed a major milestone with the trapping of radioactive 21Na atoms. We are now engaged in a major upgrade of the experimental area and the outlook is very promising for these novel experiments. Another highlight of research at the Cyclotron was the confirmation of element 106. This development allowed the original LLNL/LBL discovery team to move forward with their proposal to name this element seaborgium

  16. CSIR Division of Mining Technology annual review 1993/94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The Division of Mining Technology of the CSIR (Council for Scientific and Industrial Research) works in partnership with the mining industry to solve problems threatening the health, safety and well-being of the workforce, and the productivity of mining operations through the development and implementation of knowledge and technology. The annual review describes the Division's research projects in the following field: rock engineering (for gold, platinum and coal mining); mining environment; occupational hygiene; surface environment; and mining equipment and systems (systems and equipment, orebody information, coal mining and causes of accidents). Details are also given of the Division's publications, research and consultancy services and information centre.

  17. Environmental Chemistry Division annual report, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research activities making up the programs in the Environmental Chemistry Division of the Department of Applied Science are presented. Some of the more significant accomplishments during 1989 are described and plans for 1990 are discussed briefly. Publications for the period are listed and abstracts are provided. Research objectives and principal investigators are given for each of the active programs. A list of personnel and collaborators during the past year is presented. The support distribution of FY 1989 is approximately 85% from the Department of Energy (65% Office of Health and Environmental Research), and 15% other agencies (principally from the Electric Power Research Institute)

  18. Environmental Chemistry Division annual report, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, L.

    1990-01-01

    The research activities making up the programs in the Environmental Chemistry Division of the Department of Applied Science are presented. Some of the more significant accomplishments during 1989 are described and plans for 1990 are discussed briefly. Publications for the period are listed and abstracts are provided. Research objectives and principal investigators are given for each of the active programs. A list of personnel and collaborators during the past year is presented. The support distribution of FY 1989 is approximately 85% from the Department of Energy (65% Office of Health and Environmental Research), and 15% other agencies (principally from the Electric Power Research Institute).

  19. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  20. The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oegerle, William (Editor); Reddy, Francis (Editor); Tyler, Pat (Editor)

    2010-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum - from gamma rays to radio wavelengths - as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions - WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contrast imaging techniques to search for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and support the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new concepts and inventing new technologies.

  1. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2012-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division(ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center(GSFC)is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radiowavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contract imaging techniques to serch for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, and provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and suppport the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new conepts and inventing new technologies.

  2. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kimberly A. (Editor); Reddy, Francis J. (Editor); Tyler, Patricia A. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for two orbiting astrophysics missions Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and Swift as well as the Science Support Center for Fermi. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contrast imaging techniques to search for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and support the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new concepts and inventing new technologies.

  3. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  4. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-04-01

    This book briefly describes the activities of the Biology and Medicine Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. During the past year the Donner Pavilion program on the treatment of arteriovenous malformations in the brain has chalked up very significant successes. The disease control rate has been high and objective measures of success using cerebral angiography have been established. The new high resolution positron emitting tomographic imager has been demonstrated to operate successfully. In the Radiation Biophysics program, the availability of higher mass ions up to uranium has allowed us cell and tissue studies in a radiation domain that is entirely new. Using uranium beams, investigators have already made new and exciting findings that are described in the body of the report.

  5. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book briefly describes the activities of the Biology and Medicine Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. During the past year the Donner Pavilion program on the treatment of arteriovenous malformations in the brain has chalked up very significant successes. The disease control rate has been high and objective measures of success using cerebral angiography have been established. The new high resolution positron emitting tomographic imager has been demonstrated to operate successfully. In the Radiation Biophysics program, the availability of higher mass ions up to uranium has allowed us cell and tissue studies in a radiation domain that is entirely new. Using uranium beams, investigators have already made new and exciting findings that are described in the body of the report

  6. Chemical Technology Division. Annual technical report, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1995 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (3) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (4) processes for separating and recovering selected elements from waste streams, concentrating low-level radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing 99Mo from low-enriched uranium; (5) electrometallurgical treatment of different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (6) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems

  7. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1990 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for coal- fired magnetohydrodynamics and fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for a high-level waste repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, concentrating plutonium solids in pyrochemical residues by aqueous biphase extraction, and treating natural and process waters contaminated by volatile organic compounds; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 66 refs., 69 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1990 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for coal- fired magnetohydrodynamics and fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for a high-level waste repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, concentrating plutonium solids in pyrochemical residues by aqueous biphase extraction, and treating natural and process waters contaminated by volatile organic compounds; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 66 refs., 69 figs., 6 tabs

  9. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1981-1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 61 research reports in the 1981-1982 annual report for the Biology and Medicine Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Programs reviewed include research medicine, Donner Pavilion, environmental physiology, radiation biophysics and structural biophysics

  10. FY2015 ceramic fuels development annual highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-22

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2015 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY15 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  11. Radiochemistry Division: annual progress report for 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development (R and D) activities of the Radiochemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay, during 1980 are reported in the form of individual summaries under the headings: reactor chemistry, heavy element chemistry, process chemistry (of actinides), nuclear chemistry and instrumentation. Some of the highlights of the R and D activities are: (1) setting up of the facilities for the prepa.ration of (U,Pu)O2 microspheres by sot-gel process on laboratory scale, (2) studies on synergistic extraction of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Th(IV), Np(IV) and Pu(IV) with mixtures of TTA and oxodonor6s like TBP, (3) kinetics of radiation induced oxidation of Pu(IV) and that of reduction of Pu(VII), (4) determination of fission yields of 138Xe, 139Cs, 252Cf and 229Th, (5) measuring of gamma ray abundance of 229Th and isotopic ratios in thorium and plutonium and (6) design and fabrication of an osmistor for the determination of the molecular weight of actinide complexes. A list of papers published in journals and papers presented at conference/symposia during the year is also given. (M.G.B.)

  12. Radiochemistry Division annual progress report for 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development (R and D) activities of the Radiochemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during 1979 are reported in the form of individual summaries under the headings: reactor chemistry, heavy element chemistry, radioanalytical chemistry and services, nuclear chemistry, and instrumentation. Some of the highlights of the R and D activities are: (1) studies on the solvent extraction of actinides, (2) work on the preparation of UO2 microspheres of 600 μm and 100 μm size by sol-gel process, (3) studies on structural chemistry of uranium compounds and plutonium compounds, (4) development of alpha spectroscopic method of determination of plutonium and americium, (5) studies on charge distribution, mass distribution and mass yield in fission, (6) determination of half life of actinide isotopes, and (7) studies on solid state nuclear track detectors - threshold, etching, and applications. A list of publications i.e. papers published during 1979 in journals, papers presented at conferences, symposia, etc. and reports is also given. (M.G.B.)

  13. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) advanced batteries - mainly lithium alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur for electric vehicles; (2) aqueous batteries - mainly improved lead-acid and nickel/iron for electric vehicles; (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic plants and the technology for pressurized fluidized-bed combustors; (5) methodologies for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) solid and liquid desiccants that allow moisture to be removed with a minium of energy; (7) nuclear technology related to waste management, proof of breeding for a light water reactor, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission, fusion, and other energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting abundant raw materials to desired products; materials chemistry of liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; atmospheric chemistry, most notably SO2 oxidation mechanisms; and the thermochemistry of zeolites, related silicates, and inorganic compounds

  14. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern biology is characterized by rapid change. The development of new tools and the results derived from their application to various biological systems require significant shifts in our concepts and the strategies that are adopted to analyze and elucidate mechanisms. In parallel with exciting new scientific developments our organizational structure and programmatic emphases have altered. These changes and developments have enabled the life sciences at LBL to be better positioned to create and respond to new opportunities. The work summarized in this annual report reflects a vital multifaceted research program that is in the vanguard of the areas represented. We are committed to justifying the confidence expressed by LBL through the new mission statement and reorganizational changes designed to give greater prominence to the life sciences

  15. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-04-01

    Modern biology is characterized by rapid change. The development of new tools and the results derived from their application to various biological systems require significant shifts in our concepts and the strategies that are adopted to analyze and elucidate mechanisms. In parallel with exciting new scientific developments our organizational structure and programmatic emphases have altered. These changes and developments have enabled the life sciences at LBL to be better positioned to create and respond to new opportunities. The work summarized in this annual report reflects a vital multifaceted research program that is in the vanguard of the areas represented. We are committed to justifying the confidence expressed by LBL through the new mission statement and reorganizational changes designed to give greater prominence to the life sciences.

  16. Radiochemistry Division : annual progress report for 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development (R and D) activities of the Radiochemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay, during 1978 are reported in the form of individual summaries under the headings: reactor chemistry, heavy element chemistry, process chemistry, radioanalytical chemistry and services, nuclear chemistry, and instrumentation. Some of the highlights of the R and D activities are: (1) preparation of microspheres of uranium oxide and uranium-thorium oxides by sol-gel process, (2) study of vaporization thermodynamics of Th and U by transpiration and boiling techniques, (3) preparation and characterisation of uranium(III) sulphates and double sulphates by X-ray, thermal and infra-red analysis, (4) extraction of trivalent actinides and lanthanides by long chain amines from chloride solutions, (5) study of radiation chemical behaviour of U(VI) in hydrochloric acid and sulphuric acid media, (6) purification and concentration of neptunium by the primary and secondary amines, (7) development of gamma spectroscopic method for determination of isotopic composition of plutonium using low energy gamma rays of plutonium isotopes, (8) standardisation of method of determination of isotopic abundances of uranium at nanogram level by thermal ionisation mass spectroscopy, (9) extraction photometric determination of Pu(IV) and Np(IV) present in mixtures, (10) study of various aspects of nuclear fission such as charge distribution, mass distribution and fragment angular momentum in low energy fission of actinides, and (11) fabrication of: (a) spark counting unit for counting fission tracks in their plastic films, (b) autoranging alpha monitor to be used with fractionating column, (c) remote pipetter for use in hot cells and (d) a thermoluminescence unit for glovebox operation. (M.G.B.)

  17. Annual report of the Metallurgy Division - period ending December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The R and D activities of the Metallurgy Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India) during 1975 are described. Some of the R and D programmes of particular interest to nuclear technology are: (1) flowsheet development for the production of rare metals and alloys of nuclear use e.g. hafnium, beryllium, zirconium (2) metallurgical, irradiation hardening and corrosion studies on Zr and Zr-base alloys and (3) studies of nuclear ceramic materials such as UO2 and beryllia. (M.G.B.)

  18. Fuel Chemistry Division annual progress report for 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress report gives a brief description of the various activities of the Fuel Chemistry Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay for the year 1989. The descriptions of activities are arranged under the headings: Fuel Development Chemistry, Chemical Quality Control, Chemistry of Actinides, Sol-Gel process for the non Nuclear Ceramics and Studies related to Nuclear Material Accounting.At the end of the report, a list of papers published in journals and presented at various conferences/symposia is also given. (author). 69 tabs., 6 figs

  19. Physics Division annual report, April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.; Henning, W.F.

    1994-08-01

    This is the Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division Annual Report for the period April 1, 1993 to March 31, 1994. It summarizes work done in a number of different fields, both on site, and at other facilities. Chapters describe heavy ion nuclear physics research, operation and development of the ATLAS accelerator, medium-energy nuclear physics research, theoretical physics, and atomic and molecular physics research.

  20. Physics Division annual report, April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division Annual Report for the period April 1, 1993 to March 31, 1994. It summarizes work done in a number of different fields, both on site, and at other facilities. Chapters describe heavy ion nuclear physics research, operation and development of the ATLAS accelerator, medium-energy nuclear physics research, theoretical physics, and atomic and molecular physics research

  1. Geosciences program annual report 1978. [LBL Earth Sciences Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    This report is a reprint of the Geosciences section of the LBL Earth Sciences Division Annual Report 1978 (LBL-8648). It contains summary papers that describe fundamental studies addressing a variety of earth science problems of interest to the DOE. They have applications in such diverse areas as geothermal energy, oil recovery, in situ coal gasification, uranium resource evaluation and recovery, and earthquake prediction. Completed work has been reported or likely will be in the usual channels. (RWR)

  2. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, D.F.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the division, whose purpose is to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by US DOE. Activities range from basic research to industrial research and technology transfer. The division (and the report) is divided into the following: Engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials, program activities, collaborative research facilities and technology transfer, and educational programs.

  3. Physics Division annual review, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the annual review of the Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division for the period April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993. Work on the ATLAS device is covered, as well as work on a number of others in lab, as well as collaborative projects. Heavy ion nuclear physics research looked at quasi-elastic, and deep-inelastic reactions, cluster states, superdeformed nuclei, and nuclear shape effects. There were programs on accelerator mass spectroscopy, and accelerator and linac development. There were efforts in medium energy nuclear physics, weak interactions, theoretical nuclear and atomic physics, and experimental atomic and molecular physics based on accelerators and synchrotron radiation

  4. Physics Division annual review, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1993-08-01

    This document is the annual review of the Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division for the period April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993. Work on the ATLAS device is covered, as well as work on a number of others in lab, as well as collaborative projects. Heavy ion nuclear physics research looked at quasi-elastic, and deep-inelastic reactions, cluster states, superdeformed nuclei, and nuclear shape effects. There were programs on accelerator mass spectroscopy, and accelerator and linac development. There were efforts in medium energy nuclear physics, weak interactions, theoretical nuclear and atomic physics, and experimental atomic and molecular physics based on accelerators and synchrotron radiation.

  5. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, D.F.; Bradley, R.A.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides an overview of activities and accomplishsments of the division from October 1992 through December 1993; the division is organized to provide technical support, mainly in the area of high-temperature materials, for technologies being developed by DOE. Activities span the range from basic research to industrial interactions (cooperative research and technology transfer). Sections 1-5 describe the different functional groups (engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials). Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines. Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative R and D programs and technology transfer functions. Finally, Sect. 8 briefly describes the division`s involvement in educational activities. Several organizational changes were effected during this period.

  6. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brogden, I. (ed.)

    1984-09-01

    This progress report covers the research and development activities of the Metals and Ceramics Division from January 1, 1983, through June 30, 1984. The format of the report follows the organizational structure of the division. Short summaries of technical work in progress in the various experimental groups are presented in six parts. Chapter 1 deals with the research and development activities of the Engineering Materials Section, Chapter 2 with the Processing Science and Technology Section, Chapter 3 with the Materials Science Section, Chapter 4 with Project Activities, Chapter 5 with Specialized Research Facilities and Equipment, and Chapter 6 with Miscellaneous Activities.

  7. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report covers the research and development activities of the Metals and Ceramics Division from January 1, 1983, through June 30, 1984. The format of the report follows the organizational structure of the division. Short summaries of technical work in progress in the various experimental groups are presented in six parts. Chapter 1 deals with the research and development activities of the Engineering Materials Section, Chapter 2 with the Processing Science and Technology Section, Chapter 3 with the Materials Science Section, Chapter 4 with Project Activities, Chapter 5 with Specialized Research Facilities and Equipment, and Chapter 6 with Miscellaneous Activities

  8. Bibliography of the technical literature of the Materials Joining Group, Metals and Ceramics Division, 1951--June 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Gardner, K. (comps.)

    1989-10-01

    This document contains a listing of the written scientific information originating in the Materials Joining (formerly the Welding and Brazing Group), Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 1951 through June 1989. This registry of documents is as much as possible, in the order of issue date. A complete cross-referenced listing of the technical literature of the Metals and Ceramics Division is also available.

  9. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M ampersand C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings

  10. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

  11. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M&C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

  12. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology. (KRM)

  13. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology

  14. Environmental Sciences Division Groundwater Program Office. Annual report, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-30

    This first edition of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) Groundwater Program Annual Report summarizes the work carried out by the Energy Systems GWPO for fiscal year (FY) 1993. This introductory section describes the GWPO`s staffing, organization, and funding sources. The GWPO is responsible for coordination and oversight for all components of the groundwater program at the three Oak Ridge facilities [ORNL, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site], and the PGDP and PORTS, respectively. Several years ago, Energy systems senior management recognized that the manner in which groundwater activities were conducted at the five facilities could result in unnecessary duplication of effort, inadequate technical input to decisions related to groundwater issues, and could create a perception within the regulatory agencies of a confusing and inconsistent approach to groundwater issues at the different facilities. Extensive interactions among management from Environmental Compliance, Environmental Restoration (ER), Environmental Sciences Division, Environmental Safety and Health, and the five facilities ultimately led to development of a net technical umbrella organization for groundwater. On April 25, 1991, the GWPO was authorized to be set up within ORNL thereby establishing a central coordinating office that would develop a consistent technical and administrative direction for the groundwater programs of all facilities and result in compliance with all relevant U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations such as RCRA and Comprehensive Environmental Restoration, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) as well as U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulations and orders. For example, DOE Order 5400.1, issued on November 9, 1988, called for each DOE facility to develop an environmental monitoring program for all media (e.g., air, surface water, and groundwater).

  15. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    Research is presented concerning materials science including metallurgy and ceramics; solid state physics; and materials chemistry; chemical sciences covering radiation science, chemical physics, and chemical energy; nuclear science; coal research; solar energy; magnetic fusion, conservation; and environmental research. (FS)

  16. Nuclear Science Division, 1995--1996 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poskanzer, A.M. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) for the two-year period, January 1, 1995 to January 1, 1997. This was a time of major accomplishments for all research programs in the Division-many of which are highlighted in the reports of this document.

  17. Nuclear Science Division, 1995--1996 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) for the two-year period, January 1, 1995 to January 1, 1997. This was a time of major accomplishments for all research programs in the Division-many of which are highlighted in the reports of this document

  18. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes some of the major research and development programs of the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division during FY 1988. The report includes articles on weapons chemistry, biochemistry and nuclear medicine, nuclear structure and reactions, and the INC Division facilities and laboratories

  19. Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Annual Reports 1996 and 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the activity of the Laser and Plasma Technology Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre during the two year period 1996- 1997. This division is engaged in the research and development of high power beams mainly laser, plasma and electron beams. Laser and Plasma Technology Division has strived to establish indigenous capability to cater to the requirements of Department of Atomic Energy. This involves development and technology readiness study of laser, plasma and electron beam devices. In addition, studies are also carried out on related physical phenomenon with a view to gain better understanding of the devices. This report has been compiled from individual reports of various groups/sections working in the division. A list of publications by the several members of the division is also included. (author)

  20. Laser and Plasma Technology Division annual report 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the activity of the Laser and Plasma Technology Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai during the period 1995. This division is engaged in the research and development of high power beams namely lasers, plasma and electron beams which are characterized by high power density. This division has strived to establish indigenous capability to cater to the requirements of the Department of Atomic Energy. The broad program objectives of the division are (1) development and technology readiness studies of laser, plasma and electron beam devices; (2) studies on related physical phenomena with a view to gain better understanding of the devices and (3) improvements in technology and exploration of new areas. This report has been compiled from individual reports of various groups/sections with marginal editing. At the end of each section; a list of publications by the staff members in the field indicated by the title of the section is given. refs., figs., tabs

  1. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress made in the following research areas is reported: materials sciences (metallurgy and ceramics, solid state physics, materials chemistry); chemical sciences (fundamental interactions, processes and techniques); nuclear sciences; fossil energy; advanced isotope separation technology; energy storage; magnetic fusion energy; and nuclear waste management

  2. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-06-01

    Progress made in the following research areas is reported: materials sciences (metallurgy and ceramics, solid state physics, materials chemistry); chemical sciences (fundamental interactions, processes and techniques); nuclear sciences; fossil energy; advanced isotope separation technology; energy storage; magnetic fusion energy; and nuclear waste management.

  3. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Searcy, A.W.; Muller, R.H.; Peterson, C.V.

    1984-07-01

    Progress is reported in the following fields: materials sciences (metallurgy and ceramics, solid-state physics, materials chemistry), chemical sciences (fundamental interactions, processes and techniques), actinide chemistry, fossil energy, electrochemical energy storage systems, superconducting magnets, semiconductor materials and devices, and work for others. (DLC)

  4. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported in the following fields: materials sciences (metallurgy and ceramics, solid-state physics, materials chemistry), chemical sciences (fundamental interactions, processes and techniques), actinide chemistry, fossil energy, electrochemical energy storage systems, superconducting magnets, semiconductor materials and devices, and work for others

  5. Laser and Plasma Technology Division annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the activities of the Laser and Plasma Technology Division during the year 1993. This Division is engaged in the research and development of high power beams namely laser, plasma and electron beams, which are characterized by high power density, normally in excess of 1 kW/mm2. Laser and Plasma Technology Division has strived to establish indigenous capability to cater to the requirements of the Department of Atomic Energy. The broad programme objectives of the Division are : (1) Development and technology readiness studies of laser, plasma and electron beam devices, (2) Studies on related physical phenomena with a view to gain better understanding of the devices, and (3) Improvements in technology and exploration of new areas. This report covers the activities of the Division during 1993 and describes how successfully the objectives have been met. The activities described in the report are diverse in nature. The report has been compiled from individual reports of various groups/sections with marginal editing. (author). refs., tabs., figs

  6. Bibliography of the technical literature of the Materials Joining Group, Metals and Ceramics Division, 1951 through June 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains a listing of the written scientific information originating in the Materials Joining Group (formerly the Welding and Brazing Group), Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 1951 through June 1987. It is a registry of about 400 documents as nearly as possible in the order in which they were issued

  7. Bibliography of the technical literature of the Materials Joining Group, Metals and Ceramics Division, 1951 through June 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Gardner, K. (comps.)

    1987-08-01

    This document contains a listing of the written scientific information originating in the Materials Joining Group (formerly the Welding and Brazing Group), Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 1951 through June 1987. It is a registry of about 400 documents as nearly as possible in the order in which they were issued.

  8. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division: Annual report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the Chemical and Laser Sciences Division concludes its first year, the Division personnel can be proud of their many scientific and technical accomplishments. Among the important milestones which the Division achieved were significant demonstrations of the process performance in the Special Isotope Separation program, of beam sensing techniques for the NPB program, and of optical angular multiplexing and energy extraction from the ICF KrF laser. In addition, the Los Alamos FTS was brought to operational status and the Bright Source attained intensities on the order of 1017 W/cm2. A few highlights of these and other research and development activities are presented in the following sections of this report

  9. Annual report of the Division of High Temperature Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities conducted in the Division of High Temperature Engineering during fiscal 1981 are described. R and D works of our division are mainly related to a multi-purpose very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) and a fusion reactor. This report deals with the main results obtained on material test, development of computer codes, heat transfer, fluid-dynamics, structural mechanics and the construction of an M + A (Mother and Adapter) section of a HENDEL (Helium Engineering Demonstration Loop) as well. (author)

  10. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 14 of the 20 sections included in this progress report. The other 6 sections include: introductory statements by the division director; descriptions of the animal, computer, electron microscope, and radiation support facilities; a listing of the educational activities, divisional seminars, and oral presentations by staff members; and divisional staff publications. An author index to the report is included

  11. Annual progress report for 1983 of Theoretical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A resume of the work done in the Theoretical Physics Division of the Bhadha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during the calendar year 1983 is reported in the form of individual summaries. The main thrust of the work has been in the field of particle transport theory, reactor physics and reactor safety. (M.G.B)

  12. Analytical Chemistry Division : annual report for the year 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development activities of the Analytical Chemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, during 1980 are reported in the form of abstracts. Various methods nuclear, spectral, thermal, electrochemical ion exchange developed for chemical analysis are described. Solvent extraction studies are also reviewed. (M.G.B.)

  13. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report presents brief summaries of research activities during 1982 to 1983. Program activities have been individually entered into EDB. They include research medicine, radiosurgery, environmental physiology, radiation biophysics, and structural biophysics

  14. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1982-1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-04-01

    This annual report presents brief summaries of research activities during 1982 to 1983. Program activities have been individually entered into EDB. They include research medicine, radiosurgery, environmental physiology, radiation biophysics, and structural biophysics. (ACR)

  15. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January-31 December 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research performed in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar year 1983. The major activity of the Division is research in high-energy physics, both experimental and theoretical, and research and development in associated technologies. A smaller, but still significant, program is in computer science and applied mathematics. During 1983 there were approximately 160 people in the Division active in or supporting high-energy physics research, including about 40 graduate students. In computer science and mathematics, the total staff, including students and faculty, was roughly 50. Because of the creation in late 1983 of a Computing Division at LBL and the transfer of the Computer Science activities to the new Division, this annual report is the last from the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. In December 1983 the Division reverted to its historic name, the Physics Division. Its future annual reports will document high energy physics activities and also those of its Mathematics Department

  16. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January-31 December 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    This report summarizes the research performed in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar year 1983. The major activity of the Division is research in high-energy physics, both experimental and theoretical, and research and development in associated technologies. A smaller, but still significant, program is in computer science and applied mathematics. During 1983 there were approximately 160 people in the Division active in or supporting high-energy physics research, including about 40 graduate students. In computer science and mathematics, the total staff, including students and faculty, was roughly 50. Because of the creation in late 1983 of a Computing Division at LBL and the transfer of the Computer Science activities to the new Division, this annual report is the last from the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. In December 1983 the Division reverted to its historic name, the Physics Division. Its future annual reports will document high energy physics activities and also those of its Mathematics Department.

  17. Health, Safety, and Environment Division: Annual progress report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environment protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Many disciplines are required to meet the responsibilities, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health and safety problems arise occasionally from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory. Research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed to study specific problems for the Department of Energy and to help develop better occupational health and safety practices

  18. Annual report of the maintenance division for 1965

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The personnel of the Division is organized in groups, each responsible for a number of tasks related to maintenance of reactor mechanical structures, electric equipment, electronic equipment. According to the action plan for 1965 the division for RA reactor maintenance the main activities were: planned maintenance of the reactor components, planned repair of the main components, indispensable repairs during reactor operation, repair during planned shutdown periods and tasks related to improvement of operation components and systems. Quite a significant number of failures was related to electronic equipment resulting from failures of thermometers in the heavy water system due to vibrations of the pumps. A number of spare parts and tools were produced needed for maintenance of reactor components, as well as instruments for control and calibration of reactor measuring devices

  19. Health, Safety, and Environment Division: Annual progress report 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.A. (comp.)

    1988-04-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environment protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Many disciplines are required to meet the responsibilities, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health and safety problems arise occasionally from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory. Research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed to study specific problems for the Department of Energy and to help develop better occupational health and safety practices.

  20. Physics Division: Annual report, 1 January-31 December 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research programs of the Physics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar 1985. The Division's principal activities are research in theoretical and experimental high energy physics, and the development of tools such as sophisticated detectors to carry out that research. The physics activity also includes a program in astrophysics, and the efforts of the Particle Data Group whose compilations serve the worldwide high energy physics community. Finally, in addition to the physics program, there is a smaller but highly significant research effort in applied mathematics. Some specific topics included in this report are: Research on e+e- annihilation, superconducting super collider, double beta decay, high energy astrophysics and interdisciplinary experiments, detector research and development, electroweak interactions, strong interaction, quantum field theory, superstrings and quantum gravity, vortex methods and turbulence and computational mathematics

  1. Health, Safety, and Environment Division annual report, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Many disciplines are required to meet the responsibilities, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health and safety problems occasionally arise from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory. Research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed, to study specific problems for the Department of Energy and to help develop better occupational health and safety practices. 52 refs

  2. Physics Division: Annual report, 1 January-31 December 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-05-01

    This report summarizes the research programs of the Physics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar 1985. The Division's principal activities are research in theoretical and experimental high energy physics, and the development of tools such as sophisticated detectors to carry out that research. The physics activity also includes a program in astrophysics, and the efforts of the Particle Data Group whose compilations serve the worldwide high energy physics community. Finally, in addition to the physics program, there is a smaller but highly significant research effort in applied mathematics. Some specific topics included in this report are: Research on e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, superconducting super collider, double beta decay, high energy astrophysics and interdisciplinary experiments, detector research and development, electroweak interactions, strong interaction, quantum field theory, superstrings and quantum gravity, vortex methods and turbulence and computational mathematics.

  3. Physics Division Annual Report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research performed over the past year by the Argonne Physics Division in the areas of nuclear and atomic physics. The Division's programs in nuclear physics include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility and related accelerator development, nuclear structure research and reactions with beams of heavy ions, primarily at ATLAS but also using forefront instrumentation elsewhere, medium energy nuclear physics at SLAC, Fermilab, Novosibirsk, DESY and CEBAF, and nuclear theory. In atomic and molecular physics the research programs are directed towards studies of highly charged ions at ATLAS, and towards studies with synchrotron radiation, currently at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven but also in preparation for the future program at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne. Separate abstracts have been indexed for individual contributions to this report

  4. Annual report 1983/1984. Division of Solid State Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives a survey of the present research projects at the division of solid state physics, Inst. of Technology, Uppsala University. The projects fall within the fields of magnetism, i.e. spin glasses, ordered magnetic structures and itinerant electron magnetism, as well as optics, i.e. properties of crystalline and amorphous materials for selective transmission and absorption in connection with energy-related research. (author)

  5. Laser and Plasma Technology Division annual report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief account of the research and development (R and D) activities carried out by Laser and Plasma Technology Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during the period 1994 is presented. The activities are reported under the headings: 1) laser activities, 2) thermal plasma activities, 3) electron beam activity. At the end of each section, a list of publications by the staff members in the field indicated by the title of the section is given. (author). refs., tabs., figs

  6. Analytical Chemistry Division, annual report for the year 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities of the Analytical Chemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India), for the year 1973 are reported. From the point of view of nuclear science and technology, the following are worth mentioning: (1) radiochemical analysis of mercury in marine products (2) rapid anion exchange separation and spectrophotometric determination of gadolinium in uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide blend and (3) neutron activation analysis for forensic purpose. (M.G.B.)

  7. Laser and Plasma Technology Division : annual report (1990-91)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief account of the research and development (R and D) activities carried out by Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during the period 1990-91 is presented. The R and D activities are reported under the headings: 1) Laser Activities, 2) Thermal Plasma Activities, and 3) Electron Beam Activities. List of publications including journal articles, papers published in symposia, conferences etc. is given at the end. (original). figs

  8. Laser and Plasma Technology Division : annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief account of the research and development (R and D) activities carried out by Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during 1991 is presented. The R and D activities are reported under the headings (1) Laser Activities, (2) Thermal Plasma Activities, (3) Electron Beam Activities and (4) Divisional Workshop Activities. List of publications is given at the end of each activity heading

  9. Fuel Chemistry Division annual progress report for 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress report gives brief descriptions of the various activities of the Fuel Chemistry Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay for the year 1990. The descriptions of activities are arranged under the headings: Fuel Development Chemistry, Chemistry of Actinides, Quality Control of Nuclear Fuels, and studies related to Nuclear Materials Accounting. At the end of the report, a list of papers published in journals and presented at various conferences/symposia is also given. (author). 7 figs., 52 tabs

  10. Atmospheric sciences division. Annual report, fiscal year 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research activities of the Atmospheric Sciences Division of the Department of Energy and Environment for FY 1981 are presented. Facilities and major items of equipment are described. Research programs are summarized in three categories, modeling, field and laboratory experiments and data management and analysis. Each program is also described individually with title, principal investigator, sponsor and funding levels for FY 1981 and FY 1982. Future plans are summarized. Publications for FY 1981 are listed with abstracts. A list of personnel is included

  11. Fuel Chemistry Division: annual progress report for 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress report gives the brief descriptions of various activites of the Fuel Chemistry Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay for the year 1988. The descriptions of activities are arranged under the headings: Fuel Development Chemistry of Actinides, Quality Control of Fuel, and Studies related to Nuclear Material Accounting. At the end of report, a list of publications published in journals and papers presented at various conferences/symposia during 1988 is given. (author). 13 figs., 61 tabs

  12. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, 1 January-31 December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report describes the research work carried out by the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division during 1979. The major research effort of the Division remained High Energy Particle Physics with emphasis on preparing for experiments to be carried out at PEP. The largest effort in this field was for development and construction of the Time Projection Chamber, a powerful new particle detector. This work took a large fraction of the effort of the physics staff of the Division together with the equivalent of more than a hundred staff members in the Engineering Departments and shops. Research in the Computer Science and Mathematics Department of the Division (CSAM) has been rapidly expanding during the last few years. Cross fertilization of ideas and talents resulting from the diversity of effort in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division contributed to the software design for the Time Projection Chamber, made by the Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Department

  13. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, 1 January-31 December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.V. (ed.)

    1980-09-01

    This annual report describes the research work carried out by the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division during 1979. The major research effort of the Division remained High Energy Particle Physics with emphasis on preparing for experiments to be carried out at PEP. The largest effort in this field was for development and construction of the Time Projection Chamber, a powerful new particle detector. This work took a large fraction of the effort of the physics staff of the Division together with the equivalent of more than a hundred staff members in the Engineering Departments and shops. Research in the Computer Science and Mathematics Department of the Division (CSAM) has been rapidly expanding during the last few years. Cross fertilization of ideas and talents resulting from the diversity of effort in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division contributed to the software design for the Time Projection Chamber, made by the Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Department.

  14. Physics Division annual report, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    The past year has seen several major advances in the Division`s research programs. In heavy-ion physics these include experiments with radioactive beams of interest to nuclear astrophysics, a first exploration of the structure of nuclei situated beyond the proton drip line, the discovery of new proton emitters--the heaviest known, the first unambiguous detection of discrete linking transitions between superdeformed and normal deformed states, and the impact of the APEX results which were the first to report, conclusively, no sign of the previously reported sharp electron positron sum lines. The medium energy nuclear physics program of the Division has led the first round of experiments at the CEBAF accelerator at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and the study of color transparency in rho meson propagation at the HERMES experiment at DESY, and it has established nuclear polarization in a laser driven polarized hydrogen target. In atomic physics, the non-dipolar contribution to photoionization has been quantitatively established for the first time, the atomic physics beamline at the Argonne 7 GeV Advanced Photon Source was constructed and, by now, first experiments have been successfully performed. The theory program has pushed exact many-body calculations with fully realistic interactions (the Argonne v{sub 18} potential) to the seven-nucleon system, and interesting results have been obtained for the structure of deformed nuclei through meanfield calculations and for the structure of baryons with QCD calculations based on the Dyson-Schwinger approach. Brief summaries are given of the individual research programs.

  15. Basic research in crystalline and noncrystalline ceramic systems. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingery, W. D.; Coble, R. L.

    1968-04-01

    Various research subjects on ceramics have been investigated, including heat conduction, surface characteristics, diffusion in oxides, high-temperature kinetic processes, microstructure development, effects of microstructure on properties, structure and properties of noncrystalline ceramics, dissolution kinetics, and solid-vapor reactions. (DLC)

  16. C-Division annual review and operating plan, August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, N.R.

    1990-11-01

    The Computing and Communications Division is responsible for the Laboratory's Integrated Computing Network as well as Laboratory-wide communications. Our computing network, used by 8000 people distributed throughout the nation, constitutes one of the most powerful scientific computing facilities in the world. The purpose of this publication is to inform our clients of our strategic and operating plans. We review major accomplishments since early 1989 and describe our strategic planning goals and specific projects that will guide our operations over the next couple of years. Our mission statement, planning considerations, and management policies and practices are also included.

  17. Annual progress report for 1985 of Theoretical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a resume of the work done in the Theoretical Physics Division during the calender year, 1985. The topics covered are described by their brief summaries. The main fields of the work were : (a) physics design of the 500 MWe PHWR and related developmental studies, (b) reactor physics work related to Rajasthan, Narora and Tarapur stations, (c) laser fusion studies, (d) mathematical physics studies on Monte-Carlo method, transport equation and Fokker-Planck Equation and (e) theoretical physics studies related to Feynman path integrals and quantum optics. The lists of research publications and Trombay Colloquia organised are also appended. (author)

  18. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A. (eds.)

    1984-05-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes.

  19. Biomedical Research Group, Health Division annual report 1954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langham, W.H.; Storer, J.B.

    1955-12-31

    This report covers the activities of the Biomedical Research Group (H-4) of the Health Division during the period January 1 through December 31, 1954. Organizationally, Group H-4 is divided into five sections, namely, Biochemistry, Radiobiology, Radiopathology, Biophysics, and Organic Chemistry. The activities of the Group are summarized under the headings of the various sections. The general nature of each section`s program, publications, documents and reports originating from its members, and abstracts and summaries of the projects pursued during the year are presented.

  20. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1984 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques: development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes. 287 refs

  1. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes

  2. Laser and Plasma Technology Division annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the research and development (R and D) activities of Laser and Plasma technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during 1992. The broad programme objectives of the Division are: (1) development and technology readiness studies of laser, plasma and electron beam devices, (2) studies on related physical phenomena with a view to gain better understanding of the devices, and (3) improvements in technology and exploration of new areas. The R and D activities are reported under the sections entitled: (1) Laser Activities, (2) Thermal Plasma Activities, and (3) Electron Beam Activities. At the end of each section, a list of publications by the staff members in the field indicated by the title of the section is given. Some of the highlights of R and D work during 1992 are:(1) fabrication of an electron beam sustained CO2 laser, (2) commissioning of a 6.5 m high LMMHD (Liquid Metal Magneto-hydrodynamic) generator loaded with 1.5 tons of mercury, (3) fabrication of electron beam processing equipment, and (4) study of the magnetic properties of vanadium nitride films produced by reactive sputtering in an indigenously developed DC magnetron sputtering equipment. (author). 56 figs., 6 tabs

  3. GSFC Heliophysics Science Division FY2010 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Holly R.; Strong, Keith T.; Saba, Julia L. R.; Clark, Judith B.; Kilgore, Robert W.; Strong, Yvonne M.

    2010-01-01

    This report is intended to record and communicate to our colleagues, stakeholders, and the public at large about heliophysics scientific and flight program achievements and milestones for 2010, for which NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Heliophysics Science Division (HSD) made important contributions. HSD comprises approximately 323 scientists, technologists, and administrative personnel dedicated to the goal of advancing our knowledge and understanding of the Sun and the wide variety of domains that its variability influences. Our activities include: Leading science investigations involving flight hardware, theory, and data analysis and modeling that will answer the strategic questions posed in the Heliophysics Roadmap; Leading the development of new solar and space physics mission concepts and support their implementation as Project Scientists; Providing access to measurements from the Heliophysics Great Observatory through our Science Information Systems; and Communicating science results to the public and inspiring the next generation of scientists and explorers.

  4. Physics Division annual progress report, January 1-December 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Physics Division is organized into three major research areas: Weapons Physics, Inertial Fusion Physics, and Basic Research. In Weapons Physics, new strategic defensive research initiatives were developed in response to President Reagan's speech in May 1983. Significant advances have been made in high-speed diagnostics including electro-optic technique, fiber-optic systems, and imaging. In Inertial Fusion, the 40-kJ Antares CO2 laser facility was completed, and the 1- by 1- by 2-m-long large-aperture module amplifier (LAM) was constructed and operated. In Basic Research, our main emphasis was on development of the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility as a world-class pulsed neutron research facility

  5. Physics Division annual progress report, January 1-December 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trela, W.J. (comp.)

    1984-12-01

    The Physics Division is organized into three major research areas: Weapons Physics, Inertial Fusion Physics, and Basic Research. In Weapons Physics, new strategic defensive research initiatives were developed in response to President Reagan's speech in May 1983. Significant advances have been made in high-speed diagnostics including electro-optic technique, fiber-optic systems, and imaging. In Inertial Fusion, the 40-kJ Antares CO/sub 2/ laser facility was completed, and the 1- by 1- by 2-m-long large-aperture module amplifier (LAM) was constructed and operated. In Basic Research, our main emphasis was on development of the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility as a world-class pulsed neutron research facility

  6. H-Division annual report of research activities, December 1, 1947-- December 1, 1948

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1949-04-19

    This volume constitutes part 2 of the H-Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Annual Report of Research Activities for December 1, 1947 to December 1, 1948. Full reports of ten projects involving exposure of man or rodents to various forms of radiation are described. The individual reports are separately indexed and abstracted for the database.

  7. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, July 1979-June 1980. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowland, R.E.; Stehney, A.F.

    1981-05-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 19 of the 33 papers presented by the Center for Human Radiobiology for the Radiological and Environmental Research Division Annual Report. The 14 items not included are abstracts only and deal with the mechanisms and dosimetry for induction of malignancies by radium. (KRM)

  8. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1981-1982. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 61 research reports in the 1981-1982 annual report for the Biology and Medicine Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Programs reviewed include research medicine, Donner Pavilion, environmental physiology, radiation biophysics and structural biophysics. (KRM)

  9. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes research during 1981 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Low Level Radiation include comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, delineation of the responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, elucidation of mechanisms of radiation damage and repair in mammalian cells, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiations. Carcinogenesis research addresses mechanisms of tumor initiation and promotion in rat liver, chemical carcinogenesis in cultured mammalian cells, and molecular and genetic mechanisms of chemical and ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteria. Research in Toxicology uses a variety of cellular, whole animal, and chronobiological end points, chemical separations, and statistical models to evaluate the hazards and mechanisms of actions of metals, coal gasification by products, and other energy-related pollutants. Human Protein Index studies develop two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other disease. Biophysics research includes fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and key biological molecules using NMR, crystallographic, and x-ray and neutron small-angle scattering techniques. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies

  10. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes research during 1982 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Carcinogenesis address mechanisms of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis including the processes of tumor initiation and promotion. The studies employ rat liver and mouse skin models as well as human rodent cell culture systems. The use of liposomes for metal mobilization is also explored. Low Level Radiation studies include delineation of the hematopoietic and other responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiation. Molecular Biology research develops two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other diseases. Fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and other key proteins are included, as are studies of cell growth, and of molecular and cellular effects of solar uv light. Research in Toxicology uses cellular, physiological, whole animal, and chronobiological end points and chemical separations to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate hazards of coal conversion by-products, actinides, and toxic metals. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies

  11. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

    1982-06-01

    This report summarizes research during 1981 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Low Level Radiation include comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, delineation of the responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, elucidation of mechanisms of radiation damage and repair in mammalian cells, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiations. Carcinogenesis research addresses mechanisms of tumor initiation and promotion in rat liver, chemical carcinogenesis in cultured mammalian cells, and molecular and genetic mechanisms of chemical and ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteria. Research in Toxicology uses a variety of cellular, whole animal, and chronobiological end points, chemical separations, and statistical models to evaluate the hazards and mechanisms of actions of metals, coal gasification by products, and other energy-related pollutants. Human Protein Index studies develop two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other disease. Biophysics research includes fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and key biological molecules using NMR, crystallographic, and x-ray and neutron small-angle scattering techniques. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  12. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes research during 1982 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Carcinogenesis address mechanisms of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis including the processes of tumor initiation and promotion. The studies employ rat liver and mouse skin models as well as human rodent cell culture systems. The use of liposomes for metal mobilization is also explored. Low Level Radiation studies include delineation of the hematopoietic and other responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiation. Molecular Biology research develops two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other diseases. Fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and other key proteins are included, as are studies of cell growth, and of molecular and cellular effects of solar uv light. Research in Toxicology uses cellular, physiological, whole animal, and chronobiological end points and chemical separations to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate hazards of coal conversion by-products, actinides, and toxic metals. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  13. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual report 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

    1978-01-01

    The research during 1978 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory, is summarized. Studies related to nuclear energy include responses of beagles to continuous low-level /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, and development of leukemic indicators; comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low-level neutron and /sup 60/Co gamma radiation; genetic effects of high LET radiations; and metabolic and therapeutic studies of heavy metals. Studies of nonnuclear energy sources deal with characterization and toxicological evaluation of effluents of fluidized bed combustion and coal gasification; electrical storage systems; electric fields associated with energy transmission; and development of population projection models and assessment of human risk. Basic research studies include fundamental structural and biophysical investigations; circadian rhythms; mutagenesis in bacteria and mammalian cells; cell killing, damage, and repair in mammalian cells; carcinogenesis and cocarcinogenesis; the use of liposomes as biological carriers; and studies of environmental influences on life-span, physiological performance, and circadian cycles. In the area of medical development, proteins in urine and tissues of normal and diseased humans are analyzed, and advanced analytical procedures for use of stable isotopes in clinical research and diagnosis are developed and applied. The final sections of the report cover support facilities, educational activities, the seminar program, staff talks, and staff publications.

  14. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual report, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research during 1980 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory, is summarized. Research related to nuclear energy includes the delineation, in the beagle, of the responses to continuous low level 60Co gamma radiation and the development of cellular indicators of preclinical phases of leukemia; comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and 60Co gamma radiation; studies of the genetic effects of high LET radiations; and studies of the gastrointestinal absorption of the actinide elements. Research related to nonuclear energy sources deals with characterization and toxicological evaluation of process streams and effluents of coal gasification; with electrical storage systems; and electric fields associated with energy transmission. Proteins in human urine and selected tissues are examined by two-dimensional electrophoresis to detect disease and pollutant related changes. Assessment of human risk associated with nuclearing collective dose commitment will result in more attention being paid to potential releases of radionuclides at relatively short times after disposal

  15. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual report 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research during 1978 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory, is summarized. Studies related to nuclear energy include responses of beagles to continuous low-level 60Co gamma radiation, and development of leukemic indicators; comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low-level neutron and 60Co gamma radiation; genetic effects of high LET radiations; and metabolic and therapeutic studies of heavy metals. Studies of nonnuclear energy sources deal with characterization and toxicological evaluation of effluents of fluidized bed combustion and coal gasification; electrical storage systems; electric fields associated with energy transmission; and development of population projection models and assessment of human risk. Basic research studies include fundamental structural and biophysical investigations; circadian rhythms; mutagenesis in bacteria and mammalian cells; cell killing, damage, and repair in mammalian cells; carcinogenesis and cocarcinogenesis; the use of liposomes as biological carriers; and studies of environmental influences on life-span, physiological performance, and circadian cycles. In the area of medical development, proteins in urine and tissues of normal and diseased humans are analyzed, and advanced analytical procedures for use of stable isotopes in clinical research and diagnosis are developed and applied. The final sections of the report cover support facilities, educational activities, the seminar program, staff talks, and staff publications

  16. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This eighth annual report of the Division covers work done during FY 1981 (October 1, 1980, through September 30, 1981). As with these documents in the past, the format follows approximately the organizational structure of the Energy Division. Chapters 2 through 6 summarize the activities of the sections of the Division: Environmental Impact Section, headed by H.E. Zittel; Regional and Urban Studies Section, R.M. Davis; Economic Analysis Section, R.B. Shelton; Data and Analysis Section, A.S. Loebl; and Efficiency and Renewables Research Section, J.W. Michel. In addition, work on a variety of projects which cut across section lines is reported in Chapter 7, Integrated Programs. These activities are under the supervision of T.J. Wilbanks, Associate Director for the Division. Separate abstracts are included for individual projects

  17. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-01

    This eighth annual report of the Division covers work done during FY 1981 (October 1, 1980, through September 30, 1981). As with these documents in the past, the format follows approximately the organizational structure of the Energy Division. Chapters 2 through 6 summarize the activities of the sections of the Division: Environmental Impact Section, headed by H.E. Zittel; Regional and Urban Studies Section, R.M. Davis; Economic Analysis Section, R.B. Shelton; Data and Analysis Section, A.S. Loebl; and Efficiency and Renewables Research Section, J.W. Michel. In addition, work on a variety of projects which cut across section lines is reported in Chapter 7, Integrated Programs. These activities are under the supervision of T.J. Wilbanks, Associate Director for the Division. Separate abstracts are included for individual projects.

  18. Health physics division annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-01

    This annual progress report follows, as in the past, the organizational structure of the Health Physics Division. Each part is a report of work done by a section of the division: Assessment and Technology Section (Part I), headed by H.W. Dickson; Biological and Radiation Physics Section (Part II), H.A. Wright; Chemical Physics and Spectroscopy Section (Part III), W.R. Garrett; Emergency Technology Section (Part IV), C.V. Chester, Medical Physics and Internal Dosimetry Section (Part V), K.E. Cowser; and the Analytic Dosimetry and Education Group (Part VI), J.E. Turner.

  19. ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Authors, Various

    1979-12-01

    The research reported in this volume was undertaken during FY 1979 within the Energy & Environment Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. This volume will comprise a section of the Energy & Environment Division 1979 Annual Report, to be published in the summer of 1980. Work reported relate to: thermal performance of building envelopes; building ventilation and indoor air quality; a computer program for predicting energy use in buildings; study focused specifically on inherently energy intensive hospital buildings; energy efficient windows and lighting; potential for energy conservation and savings in the buildings sector; and evaluation of energy performance standards for residential buildings.

  20. Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge : Annada District : Clarence Cannon NWR, Delair Division, Gardner Division, Gregory Landing Division, Harlow Island Division : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the Annada District of Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 1996 calendar year. Clarence...

  1. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, J.N. [ed.

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division`s total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division`s programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  2. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Counce, D.M.; Wolff, P.P. [eds.

    1993-04-01

    Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related Issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1992. Energy Division`s total expenditures in FY 1992 were $42.8 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, the US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 116.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, technology transfer, analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries, and civilian transportation analysis. Energy conservation technologies focus on electric power systems, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems conduct research for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. Much of Energy Division`s research is valuable to other organizations as well as to sponsors. This information is disseminated by the staff`s involvement in professional and trade organizations and workshops; joint research with universities and private-sector firms; collaboration with state and local governments; presentation of work at conferences; and publication of research results in journals, reports, and conference proceedings.

  3. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, P.P. [ed.

    1994-07-01

    One of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY1993. Energy Division is committed to (1) understanding the mechanisms by which societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society`s understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy-efficient technologies; (4) improving transportation policy and planning; (5) enhancing basic knowledge in the social sciences as related to energy and associated issues. Energy Division`s expenditures in FY1993 totaled $42 million. The work was supported by the US DOE, DOD, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 126.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and computer sciences and data systems. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy use and delivery technologies, and (3) transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on emergency preparedness, transportation analysis, and analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries. Energy use and delivery technologies focus on electric power systems, building equipment, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Transportation systems research is conducted both to improve the quality of civilian transportation and for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  4. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, January 1--December 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.V. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    This annual report of the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division describes the scientific research and other work carried out within the Division during the calendar year 1976. The Division is concerned with work in experimental and theoretical physics, with computer science and applied mathematics, and with the operation of a computer center. The major physics research activity is in high-energy physics; a vigorous program is maintained in this pioneering field. The high-energy physics research program in the Division now focuses on experiments with e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams using advanced techniques and developments initiated and perfected at the Laboratory. The Division continues its work in medium energy physics, with experimental work carried out at the Bevatron and at the Los Alamos Pi-Meson Facility. Work in computer science and applied mathematics includes construction of data bases, computer graphics, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, and mathematical analysis of differential and integral equations resulting from physical problems. The computer center serves the Laboratory by constantly upgrading its facility and by providing day-to-day service. This report is descriptive in nature; references to detailed publications are given. (RWR)

  5. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, January 1--December 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report of the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division describes the scientific research and other work carried out within the Division during the calendar year 1976. The Division is concerned with work in experimental and theoretical physics, with computer science and applied mathematics, and with the operation of a computer center. The major physics research activity is in high-energy physics; a vigorous program is maintained in this pioneering field. The high-energy physics research program in the Division now focuses on experiments with e+e- colliding beams using advanced techniques and developments initiated and perfected at the Laboratory. The Division continues its work in medium energy physics, with experimental work carried out at the Bevatron and at the Los Alamos Pi-Meson Facility. Work in computer science and applied mathematics includes construction of data bases, computer graphics, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, and mathematical analysis of differential and integral equations resulting from physical problems. The computer center serves the Laboratory by constantly upgrading its facility and by providing day-to-day service. This report is descriptive in nature; references to detailed publications are given

  6. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selden, R.H. (ed.)

    1991-06-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division are described in this annual progress report for FY 1990. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of how societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy efficient technologies; and (4) developing improved transportation planning and policy. Disciplines of the 129 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, chemical heat pumps, refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building enveloped (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), retrofits for existing buildings, and electric power systems. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. 48 refs., 34 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1988: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-06-01

    The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described in this annual progress report for Fiscal Year (FY) 1988. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of the way society makes choices in energy use and energy-using technologies, (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental implications of changes in energy technology, and (3) improving and developing new energy-efficient technologies. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on four major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) transportation and decision systems research, (3) technology research and development for improving the efficiency of energy and end-use technologies, and (4) electric power systems. The Division's total expenditures in FY 1988 were $44.3 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 139 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics.

  8. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, J.N. (ed.)

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division's total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  9. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, 1 January--31 December 1977. [LBL, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.V. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    This annual report of the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division describes the scientific research and other work carried out within the Division during 1977. The Division is concerned with work in experimental and theoretical physics, with computer science and applied mathematics, and with the operation of a computer center. The major physics research activity is in high-energy physics, although there is a relatively small program of medium-energy research. The High Energy Physics research program in the Physics Division is concerned with fundamental research which will enable man to comprehend the nature of the physical world. The major effort is now directed toward experiments with positron-electron colliding beam at PEP. The Medium Energy Physics program is concerned with research using mesons and nucleons to probe the properties of matter. This research is concerned with the study of nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, and the interactions between nuclei and electromagnetic radiation and mesons. The Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Department engages in research in a variety of computer science and mathematics disciplines. Work in computer science and applied mathematics includes construction of data bases, computer graphics, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, and mathematical analysis of differential and integral equations resulting from physical problems. The Computer Center provides large-scale computational support to LBL's scientific programs. Descriptions of the various activities are quite short; references to published results are given. 24 figures. (RWR)

  10. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described in this annual progress report for Fiscal Year (FY) 1988. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of the way society makes choices in energy use and energy-using technologies, (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental implications of changes in energy technology, and (3) improving and developing new energy-efficient technologies. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on four major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) transportation and decision systems research, (3) technology research and development for improving the efficiency of energy and end-use technologies, and (4) electric power systems. The Division's total expenditures in FY 1988 were $44.3 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 139 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics

  11. Annual report of the Metallurgy Division [for the] period ending December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development work carried out and the various programmes underway in the Metallurgy Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during the calendar year 1977 have been reported. The R and D work and programmes cover extraction metallurgy, physical metallurgy, alloy development, corrosion metallurgy and ceramics. Some of the major studies and programmes are: (1) development of processes for extraction of niobium, vanadium, hafnium and nickel, (2) preparation of niobium alloys, ferro-zirconium, ceramic grade zirconia, (3) electro-refining of zircaloy scrap, (4) preparation of anhydrous beryllium fluoride from Indian beryl, (5) preparation of beryllium alloys, (6) studies on phase transformation and deformation behaviour of zirconium and zirconium-oxygen alloys, (7) self-diffusion studies in dilute Zr-Fe and Zr-Cr alloys, (8) studies on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of zirconium base alloys and (9) sintering studies on ZrO2-PuO2 and BeO. (M.G.B.)

  12. Nuclear Physics Division Institute of Experimental Physics Warsaw University annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osuch, S. [ed.

    1995-12-31

    In the presented Annual Report the activities of the Nuclear Physics Division of the Institute of Experimental Physics of the Warsaw University in 1994 are described. The report consist of three sections: (i) Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure (12 articles); (ii) Experimental Methods and Instrumentation (2 articles); (iii) Other Research (1 article). Additionally the list of seminars held at the NPD, personnel list and list of published papers is also given. In the first, leading article of the report written by head of NPD prof. Ch. Droste the general description of the Department activity is presented.

  13. Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osuch, S. [ed.

    1996-12-31

    In the presented Annual Report the activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of Warsaw University in 1995 are described. The report consists of three sections: (i) Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure (11 articles); (ii) Instrumentation and Experimental Methods (9 articles); (iii) Other Research (1 article). Additionally the list of seminars held at the NPD, personnel list and list of published papers are also given. The first, leading article in the report written by head of NPD prof. Ch. Droste the general description of the Department activity is presented.

  14. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Energy Division's mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY1993. Energy Division is committed to (1) understanding the mechanisms by which societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy-efficient technologies; (4) improving transportation policy and planning; (5) enhancing basic knowledge in the social sciences as related to energy and associated issues. Energy Division's expenditures in FY1993 totaled $42 million. The work was supported by the US DOE, DOD, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 126.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and computer sciences and data systems. The division's programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy use and delivery technologies, and (3) transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on emergency preparedness, transportation analysis, and analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries. Energy use and delivery technologies focus on electric power systems, building equipment, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Transportation systems research is conducted both to improve the quality of civilian transportation and for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination

  15. 15th annual conference on composites and advanced ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baaklini, G.Y.; Bhatt, R.T.

    1991-01-01

    The room-temperature tensile testing of silicon carbide fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SiC/RBSN) composite specimens was monitored by using in-situ x ray film radiography. Radiographic evaluation before, during, and after loading provided data on the effect of preexisting volume flaws (high density impurities, and local density variations) on the fracture behavior of composites. Results from (0)1, (0)3, (0)5, and (0)8 composite specimens, showed that x ray film radiography can monitor damage accumulations during tensile loading. Matrix cracking, fiber-matrix debonding, and fiber pullout were imaged throughout the tensile loading history of the specimens. Further, in-situ film radiography was found to be a helpful and practical technique for estimating interfacial shear strength between the SiC fiber and the RBSN matrix by the matrix crack spacing method. It is concluded that pretest, in-situ, and post-test radiography can provide for a greater understanding of ceramic matrix composite mechanical behavior, a verification of related experimental procedures, and a validation and development of related analytical models.

  16. AICD -- Advanced Industrial Concepts Division Biological and Chemical Technologies Research Program. 1993 Annual summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, G.; Bair, K.; Ross, J. [eds.

    1994-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1993 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1993 (ASR 93) contains the following: A program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives), program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1993, detailed descriptions of individual projects, a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  17. Physics Division annual review, 1 April 1984-31 March 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for individual sections in this annual report of the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Many diverse topics of research were discussed. Among these were topics of medium-energy research such as a study of non-nucleonic effects in nuclei, two-nucleon physics with pions and electrons, nuclear structure studies and weak interaction studies. Research efforts which were performed at the superconducting Linac accelerator were studies of fusion of heavy ions, investigation of quasielastic and strongly damped collisions, studies of high angular momentum states in nuclei, accelerator mass spectrometry, and nuclear spectrometry. Atomic and molecular research programs included photoionization-photoelectron studies, high-resolution laser spectroscopy with beams, beam foil studies, and studies of interactions of beams with solids and gases. Theoretical endeavors were carried out in both atomic physics and nuclear physics

  18. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1988-11-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

  19. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs

  20. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 1991 Annual Water Management Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Water Management Plan provides guidelines for water levels during rehabilitation of moist soil units after major dike renovation and continued warm...

  1. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 1973 Annual Narrative Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuge, West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuge, Navarre Unit,...

  2. Rocketdyne Division annual site environmental report Santa Susana Field Laboratory and Desoto sites 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation (Rocketdyne). These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and the DeSoto site. The sites have been used for manufacturing, R ampersand D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The DeSoto site essentially comprises office space and light industry with no remaining radiological operations, and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2,668 acres), warrants comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. SSFL consists of four administrative areas used for research, development, and test operations as well as a buffer zone. A portion of Area I and all of Area II are owned by the U.S. Government and assigned to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A portion of Area IV is under option for purchase by the Department of Energy (DOE)

  3. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

  4. Rocketdyne division annual site environmental report, Santa Susana Field Laboratory and De Soto Sites, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1993-12-14

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for manufacturing, R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site is essentially light industry with some laboratory-scale R&D and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2,668 acres), warranted comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. The purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring primarily for the regulatory agencies involved in controlling environmental remediation, i.e., the U.S. DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the California State Department of Health Services (DHS) Radiologic Health Branch (RHB). For that reason, information concentrates on Area IV at SSFL as this is the site of the former nuclear operations. While the major area of interest is radiological, this report also includes a discussion of nonradiological monitoring at SSFL.

  5. Rocketdyne division environmental monitoring annual report, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, De Soto, and Canoga Sites, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1991-06-20

    This annual report discuses environmental monitoring at three manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Southern California area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL.), the De Soto site, and the Canoga site. These sites have been used for manufacturing, R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto and Canoga sites are essentially light industry with some laboratory-scale R&D and have little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2,668 acres), warranted comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. The purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring primarily for the regulatory agencies involved in controlling operations with nuclear and radioactive materials, i.e., the U.S. DOE, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the California State Department of Health Services (DHS), Radiologic Health Branch (RHB). For that reason, information concentrates on Area IV at SSFL as this is the site of the former nuclear operations. While the major realm of interest is radiological, this report also includes some discussion of nonradiological monitoring at SSFL

  6. Rocketdyne division annual site environmental report, Santa Susana Field Laboratory and De Soto Sites, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1994-10-21

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for manufacturing, R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site is essentially light industry with some laboratory-scale R&D and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2,668 acres), warranted comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. The purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring primarily for the regulatory agencies involved in controlling environmental remediation, i.e., the U.S. DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the California State Department of Health Services (DHS) Radiologic Health Branch (RHB). For that reason, information concentrates on Area IV at SSFL as this is the site of the former nuclear operations. While the major area of interest is radiological, this report also includes a discussion of nonoradiological monitoring at SSFL.

  7. Rocketdyne division annual site environmental report, Santa Susana Field Laboratory and De Soto Site, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1992-12-03

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for manufacturing, R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site is essentially light industry with some laboratory-scale R&D and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2.668 acres), warranted comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. The purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring primarily for the regulatory agencies involved in controlling operations with nuclear fuel or nuclear reactors. i.e., the U.S. DOE and the California State Department of Health Services (DHS). Radiologic Health Branch (RHB). For that reason. information concentrates on Area IV at SSFL as this is the site of the former nuclear operations. While the major area of interest is radiological, this report also includes a discussion of nonradiological monitoring at SSFL.

  8. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report

  9. Radiological and Environmental Research Division: ecology. Annual report, January-December 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    This is the annual report of the Radiological and Environmental Division of the Argonne National Laboratory for 1982. Studies of the effects of ozone on crop growth and yield have been carried out by the Terrestrial Ecology Group for winter wheat and for sorghum. The Microcosms for Acid Rain Studies (MARS) facility was completed in the early summer. Controlled investigations of plant and soil responses in acid rain were initiated with crop plants grown in two different midwestern soil types. The Transuranics Group has found that the solubility and adsorptive behavior of plutonium previously observed at fallout concentrations in natural waters (approx. 10/sup -16/ to 10/sup -18/ M) is applicable at plutonium concentrations as high as 10/sup -8/ M. The Lake Michigan eutrophication model has been adapted to operation in a Monte Carlo mode. Simulations based on yearly phosphorus loadings and winter conditions were selected at random from prescribed probability distributions and used to estimate some of the uncertainties associated with model forecasts of Lake Michigan water quality.

  10. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  11. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  12. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations

  13. Annual report of the Nuclear Physics Division [for] period ending December 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development (R and D) activities of the Nuclear Physics Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during the calendar year 1976 are reported. The R and D activities of the Division cover the areas of nuclear physics, fission physics and solid state physics. Various experimental techniques and instruments developed are also briefly described. (M.G.B.)

  14. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1990, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes some of the major research and development programs of the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division during FY 1990. The report includes articles on weapons chemistry, environmental chemistry, actinide and transition metal chemistry, geochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, biochemistry and nuclear medicine, materials chemistry, and INC Division facilities and laboratories

  15. 1998 Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report. Applying chemical innovation to environmental problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1998 are presented

  16. Basic research in crystalline and noncrystalline ceramic systems. Annual report, August 1, 1980-October 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Basic Research Programs in Ceramics sponsored by the US Department of Energy supports a significant fraction of the research effort and graduate student training in ceramics at MIT. Various research activities involving ceramic materials include electrical properties; kinetic studies; defect structures, defect interactions, grain boundaries and surfaces; sintering studies; and mechanical properties

  17. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD`s accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  18. Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge : Cannon Division : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Mark Twain NWR (Cannon Division) outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1977 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to...

  19. Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge : Cannon Division : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Mark Twain NWR (Cannon Division) outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1979 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to...

  20. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1994, which extended from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to covey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who wee in ESD at the end of FY 1994 is located in the final section of the report.

  1. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report.

  2. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress for the period ending September 30, 1979 by the Environmental Sciences Division is reported. Sections reporting include terrestrial ecoloy; earth sciences; environmental resources; aquatic ecology; synthetic fuels; nuclear program; environmental impacts program; ecosystem studies; and burial ground technology

  3. Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeflinski, Z.; Kirejczyk, M.; Popkiewicz, M. [eds.

    1998-08-01

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Institute of Experimental Physics (Warsaw University) in year 1997 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure, Experimental Methods and Instrumentation and the third one contain the lists of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ``Preface`` written by NDP director prof. K. Siwek-Wilczynska

  4. Nuclear Physics Division - Inst. of Experimental Physics - Warsaw University - Annual Report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirejczyk, M.; Szeflinski, Z. [eds.

    1999-08-01

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Warsaw University Institute of Experimental Physics in year of 1998 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure, Experimental Methods and Instrumentation and the third one contains the lists of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and list of published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ``Preface`` written by NDP director prof. K. Siwek-Wilczynska

  5. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shultz, W.D.

    1986-05-01

    Progress reports are presented for the four major sections of the division: analytical spectroscopy, radioactive materials laboratories, inorganic chemistry, and organic chemistry. A brief discussion of the division's role in the Laboratory's Environmental Restoration and Facilities Upgrade is given. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited.

  6. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress reports are presented for the four major sections of the division: analytical spectroscopy, radioactive materials laboratories, inorganic chemistry, and organic chemistry. A brief discussion of the division's role in the Laboratory's Environmental Restoration and Facilities Upgrade is given. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited

  7. Nuclear Physics Division - Inst. of Experimental Physics - Warsaw University - Annual Report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Warsaw University Institute of Experimental Physics in year of 1999 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure, Experimental Methods and Instrumentation and the third one contain the lists of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and list of published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ''Preface'' written by NDP director prof. K. Siwek-Wilczynska

  8. Instrumentation and Controls Division annual progress report for period ending September 1, 1973

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, G.S. (comp.)

    1976-08-01

    Research progress is described under the following topics: (1) pulse counting and analysis; (2) support for the thermonuclear division ORMAK project; (3) miscellaneous electronics development; (4) detectors of ionizing particles and radiation; (5) radiation monitoring; (6) support for the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; (7) automatic control and data acquisition; (8) process instrumentation and control; (9) reactor instrumentation and controls; (10) instrumentation for reactor division experiments and test loops; (11) maintenance and service; and (12) ecological science studies. (WHK)

  9. Annual report of the Nuclear Physics Division [for] period ending December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development work of the Nuclear Physics Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay for the period ending on 31 December 1982 is reported in the form of individual summaries arranged under the headings: (1) nuclear physics, (2) solid state physics, and (3) instrumentation and techniques. A list of papers by the staff-members of the Division published in journals and presented at conferences during the report period is also given. (author)

  10. Instrumentation and Controls Division annual progress report for period ending September 1, 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research progress is described under the following topics: (1) pulse counting and analysis; (2) support for the thermonuclear division ORMAK project; (3) miscellaneous electronics development; (4) detectors of ionizing particles and radiation; (5) radiation monitoring; (6) support for the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; (7) automatic control and data acquisition; (8) process instrumentation and control; (9) reactor instrumentation and controls; (10) instrumentation for reactor division experiments and test loops; (11) maintenance and service; and (12) ecological science studies

  11. Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University Annual Report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeflinski, Z.; Popkiewicz, M. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Institute of Experimental Physics (Warsaw University) in year 1996 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction mechanisms and nuclear structure; Experimental methods and instrumentation and the third part contains the list of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ``Preface`` by NPD director prof. Ch. Droste.

  12. Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Institute of Experimental Physics (Warsaw University) in year 1997 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure, Experimental Methods and Instrumentation and the third one contain the lists of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ''Preface'' written by NDP director prof. K. Siwek-Wilczynska

  13. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD's accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  14. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) Analytical Research, Development, and Implementation. The division maintains a program to conceptualize, investigate, develop, assess, improve, and implement advanced technology for chemical and physicochemical measurements. Emphasis is on problems and needs identified with ORNL and Department of Energy (DOE) programs; however, attention is also given to advancing the analytical sciences themselves. (2) Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization. The division carries out a wide variety of chemical work that typically involves analytical research and/or development plus the utilization of analytical capabilities to expedite programmatic interests. (3) Technical Support. The division performs chemical and physicochemical analyses of virtually all types. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each of which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1988. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8

  15. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) Analytical Research, Development, and Implementation. The division maintains a program to conceptualize, investigate, develop, assess, improve, and implement advanced technology for chemical and physicochemical measurements. Emphasis is on problems and needs identified with ORNL and Department of Energy (DOE) programs; however, attention is also given to advancing the analytical sciences themselves. (2) Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization. The division carries out a wide variety of chemical work that typically involves analytical research and/or development plus the utilization of analytical capabilities to expedite programmatic interests. (3) Technical Support. The division performs chemical and physicochemical analyses of virtually all types. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each of which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1988. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8.

  16. Compilation of contract research for the Materials Engineering Branch, Division of Engineering Technology. Annual report for FY 1984. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation of annual reports by contractors to the Materials Engineering Branch of the NRC Office of Research, concentrates on achievments in safety research for the primary system of commercial light water power reactors, particularly with regard to reactor vessels, primary system piping, steam generators and for non-destructive examination of primary system components. This report, covering research conducted during Fiscal Year 1984, is the third volume of the series of NUREG-0975, compilation of Contractor Research for the Materials Engineering Branch, Division of Engineering Technology

  17. Compilation of contract research for the Materials Engineering Branch, Division of Engineering Technology. Annual report for FY 1985. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compilation of annual reports by contractors to the Materials Engineering Branch of the NRC Office of Research, concentrates on achievements in safety research for the primary system of commercial light water power reactors, particularly with regard to reactor vessels, primary system piping, steam generators and for non-destructive examination of primary system components. This report, covering research conducted during Fiscal Year 1985, is the fourth volume of the series of NUREG-0975, Compilation of Contractor Research for the Materials Engineering Branch, Division of Engineering Technology

  18. Compilation of contract research for the Materials Engineering Branch, Division of Engineering: Annual report for FY 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation of annual reports by contractors to the Materials Engineering Branch of the NRC Office of Research concentrates on achievements in safety research for the primary system of commercial light water power reactors, particularly with regard to reactor vessels, primary system piping, steam generators, nondestructive examination of primary components, and in safety research for decommissioning and decontamination, on-site storage, and engineered safety features. This report, covering research conducted during Fiscal Year 1987 is the sixth volume of the series of NUREG-0975, ''Compilation of Contractor Research for the Materials Engineering Branch, Division of Engineering.''

  19. Compilation of contract research for the Materials Engineering Branch, Division of Engineering: Annual report for FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation of annual reports by contractors to the Materials Engineering Branch of the NRC Office of Research concentrates on achievements in safety research for the primary system of commercial light water power reactors, particularly with regard to reactor vessels, primary system piping, steam generators, nondestructive examination of primary components, and in safety research for decommissioning and decontamination, on-site storage and engineered safety features. The Materials Engineering Branch assembles abbreviated reports from all the branch contractors and publishes them in a single annual report as soon after the end of the year as possible so that the information developed throughout the year can be promptly used in the safety-regulatory process. This report, covering research conducted during Fiscal Year 1988 is the seventh volume of the series of NUREG-0975, ''Compilation of Contractor Research for the Materials Engineering Branch, Division of Engineering.'' Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  20. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report

  1. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1994, which extended from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to covey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who wee in ESD at the end of FY 1994 is located in the final section of the report

  2. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    This report describes work done by staff of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during FY 1986. The work of the Division is quite diversified, but it can be divided into four research themes: (1) technology for improving the productivity of energy use; (2) technology for electric power systems; (3) analysis and assessment of energy and environmental issues, policies, and technologies; and (4) data systems research and development (R and D). The research is supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), numerous other federal agencies, and some private organizations. 190 refs., 60 figs., 23 tabs.

  3. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1980. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    Research conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division for the Fiscal Year 1980 included studies carried out in the following Division programs and sections: (1) Advanced Fossil Energy Program, (2) Nuclear Program, (3) Environmental Impact Program, (4) Ecosystem Studies Program, (5) Low-Level Waste Research and Development Program, (6) National Low-Level Waste Program, (7) Aquatic Ecology Section, (8) Environmental Resources Section, (9) Earth Sciences Section, and (10) Terrestrial Ecology Section. In addition, Educational Activities and the dedication of the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park are reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report.

  4. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes work done by staff of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during FY 1986. The work of the Division is quite diversified, but it can be divided into four research themes: (1) technology for improving the productivity of energy use; (2) technology for electric power systems; (3) analysis and assessment of energy and environmental issues, policies, and technologies; and (4) data systems research and development (R and D). The research is supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), numerous other federal agencies, and some private organizations. 190 refs., 60 figs., 23 tabs

  5. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division for the Fiscal Year 1980 included studies carried out in the following Division programs and sections: (1) Advanced Fossil Energy Program, (2) Nuclear Program, (3) Environmental Impact Program, (4) Ecosystem Studies Program, (5) Low-Level Waste Research and Development Program, (6) National Low-Level Waste Program, (7) Aquatic Ecology Section, (8) Environmental Resources Section, (9) Earth Sciences Section, and (10) Terrestrial Ecology Section. In addition, Educational Activities and the dedication of the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park are reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report

  6. Nuclear Technology Division annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of research projects are presented concerning nuclear properties, general reactor development and support, test reactor operations support, LOFT support, PBF support, FEFPL support, TRSP support, techniques and instrumentation, non-nuclear energy sources, and related activities of division personnel. (U.S.)

  7. Physics Division annual review, 1 April 1975--31 March 1976. [ANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvey, G. T.

    1976-01-01

    An overview is given of Physics Division activities in the following areas: the heavy-ion booster; medium-energy physics; heavy-ion physics; low-energy charged-particle physics; accelerator operations; neutron physics; theoretical nuclear physics, and atomic and molecular physics. A bibliography of publications amounts to 27 pages. (RWR)

  8. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between October 1, 1982 and September 30, 1983. Experimental and theoretical investigations of heavy ion reactions are reported. In addition, the development of instrumentation for charge measurements and an on-line mass analyzer are discussed. Individual reports are cataloged separately

  9. Physics Division annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977. [ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelson, P.H.

    1977-09-01

    The bulk of the Division's effort concerned nuclear physics and accelerator development, but work in the areas of nuclear data, research applicable to the magnetic fusion project, atomic and molecular physics, and high-energy physics is also recounted. Lists of publications, technical talks, personnel, etc., are included. Individual reports with sufficient data are abstracted separately. (RWR)

  10. Semi-annual report of Chemical Division of CDTN - July to December 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main activities developed by the Chemical Division of CDTN are described, including 1) the characterization of rare earths and yttrium; 2) the specification of Cu++ selective electrode; 3) chemical characterization of UO2 sintering pellets; 4) determination of graphitic carbon in cement; 5) determination of lead in blood and urine; and 6) analytical determinations. (C.G.C.)

  11. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual report, 1979. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

    1979-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 14 of the 20 sections included in this progress report. The other 6 sections include: introductory statements by the division director; descriptions of the animal, computer, electron microscope, and radiation support facilities; a listing of the educational activities, divisional seminars, and oral presentations by staff members; and divisional staff publications. An author index to the report is included. (ERB)

  12. Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, Southern Island Division, Wallops Island NWR: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2002 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  13. Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, Southern Island Division, Wallops Island NWR: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2003 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  14. Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge: Big Timber Division: Annual Narrative Report: Calendar Year 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge, Big Timber summarizes Refuge activities during the 1980 calendar year for the Complex...

  15. Basic research in crystalline and noncrystalline ceramic systems. Annual report, August 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Basic Research Programs in Ceramics supports a significant fraction of the research effort and graduate student training in ceramics at M.I.T. The importance of basic research programs in ceramics processing and properties is becoming widely recognized as the critical role of improved ceramic materials for energy systems is acknowledged. The needs identified in the 1977 series of workshops on DOE programs in energy-related materials research and by the ongoing efforts of the DOE Council on Materials Science are being translated into the basic and applied research necessary to fulfill the established objectives in the effort to solve the nation's energy problems. Present indications are that ceramics in numerous applications will be critical in meeting national energy requirements

  16. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research in the physics, computer science, and mathematics division is described for the year 1980. While the division's major effort remains in high energy particle physics, there is a continually growing program in computer science and applied mathematics. Experimental programs are reported in e+e- annihilation, muon and neutrino reactions at FNAL, search for effects of a right-handed gauge boson, limits on neutrino oscillations from muon-decay neutrinos, strong interaction experiments at FNAL, strong interaction experiments at BNL, particle data center, Barrelet moment analysis of πN scattering data, astrophysics and astronomy, earth sciences, and instrument development and engineering for high energy physics. In theoretical physics research, studies included particle physics and accelerator physics. Computer science and mathematics research included analytical and numerical methods, information analysis techniques, advanced computer concepts, and environmental and epidemiological studies

  17. Analytical Chemistry Division. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The functions of the Analytical Chemistry Division fall into three general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development and utilization; (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections each of which may carry out any type of work falling into the thre categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections which are: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectrometry; analytical technical support; bio/organic analysis section; and nuclear and radiochemical analysis. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Chapter 7 covers supplementary activities. Chapter 8 is on presentation of research results (publications, articles reviewed or referred for periodicals). Approximately 56 articles, 31 proceedings publications and 33 reports have been published, and 119 oral presentations given during this reporting period

  18. Analytical Chemistry Division. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, W. S. [ed.

    1982-04-01

    The functions of the Analytical Chemistry Division fall into three general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development and utilization; (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections each of which may carry out any type of work falling into the thre categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections which are: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectrometry; analytical technical support; bio/organic analysis section; and nuclear and radiochemical analysis. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Chapter 7 covers supplementary activities. Chapter 8 is on presentation of research results (publications, articles reviewed or referred for periodicals). Approximately 56 articles, 31 proceedings publications and 33 reports have been published, and 119 oral presentations given during this reporting period.

  19. Division of energy biosciences: Annual report and summaries of FY 1995 activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The mission of the Division of Energy Biosciences is to support research that advances the fundamental knowledge necessary for the future development of biotechnologies related to the Department of Energy`s mission. The departmental civilian objectives include effective and efficient energy production, energy conservation, environmental restoration, and waste management. The Energy Biosciences program emphasizes research in the microbiological and plant sciences, as these understudied areas offer numerous scientific opportunities to dramatically influence environmentally sensible energy production and conservation. The research supported is focused on the basic mechanisms affecting plant productivity, conversion of biomass and other organic materials into fuels and chemicals by microbial systems, and the ability of biological systems to replace energy-intensive or pollutant-producing processes. The Division also addresses the increasing number of new opportunities arising at the interface of biology with other basic energy-related sciences such as biosynthesis of novel materials and the influence of soil organisms on geological processes.

  20. Environmental Education and Development Division (EM-522). Annual report, Fiscal year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The Environmental Education and Development Division (EM-522) is one of three divisions within the Office of Technology Integration and Environmental Education and Development (EM-52) in Environmental Restoration and Waste Management`s (EM`s) Office of Technology Development (EM-50). The primary design criterion for EM-522 education activities is directly related to meeting EM`s goal of environmental compliance on an accelerated basis and cleanup of the 1989 inventory of inactive sites and facilities by the year 2019. Therefore, EM-522`s efforts are directed specifically toward stimulating knowledge and capabilities to achieve the goals of EM while contributing to DOE`s overall goal of increasing scientific, mathematical, and technical literacy and competency. This report discusses fiscal year 1993 activities.

  1. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birge, R.W.

    1981-12-01

    Research in the physics, computer science, and mathematics division is described for the year 1980. While the division's major effort remains in high energy particle physics, there is a continually growing program in computer science and applied mathematics. Experimental programs are reported in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, muon and neutrino reactions at FNAL, search for effects of a right-handed gauge boson, limits on neutrino oscillations from muon-decay neutrinos, strong interaction experiments at FNAL, strong interaction experiments at BNL, particle data center, Barrelet moment analysis of ..pi..N scattering data, astrophysics and astronomy, earth sciences, and instrument development and engineering for high energy physics. In theoretical physics research, studies included particle physics and accelerator physics. Computer science and mathematics research included analytical and numerical methods, information analysis techniques, advanced computer concepts, and environmental and epidemiological studies. (GHT)

  2. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1981-September 1982. Fiscal year 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.K.; Bouret, C. (eds.)

    1983-05-01

    This report covers the activities of LBL's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division (AFRD) during 1982. In nuclear physics, the Uranium Beams Improvement Project was concluded early in the year, and experimentation to exploit the new capabilities began in earnest. Technical improvement of the Bevalac during the year centered on a heavy-ion radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) as part of the local injector upgrade, and we collaborated in studies of high-energy heavy-ion collision facilities. The Division continued its collaboration with Fermilab to design a beam-cooling system for the Tevatron I proton-antiprotron collider and to engineer the needed cooling components for the antiproton. The high-field magnet program set yet another record for field strength in an accelerator-type dipole magnet (9.2 T at 1.8 K). The Division developed the design for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a 1.3-GeV electron storage ring designed explicitly (with low beam emittance and 12 long straight sections) to generate high-brilliance synchrotron light from insertion devices. The Division's Magnetic Fusion Energy group continued to support major experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and General Atomic Co. by developing positive-ion-based neutral-beam injectors. Progress was made toward converting our major source-test facility into a long-pulse national facility, the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility, which was completed on schedule and within budget in 1983. Heavy Ion Fusion research focused on planning, theoretical studies, and beam-transport experiments leading toward a High Temperature Experiment - a major test of this promising backup approach to fusion energy.

  3. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-01

    This report covers work done during FY 1983 by the staff of the Energy Division and its subcontractors and by colleagues in other Oak Ridge National Laboratory divisions working on Energy Division projects. The work can be divided into four areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) models and data systems, (3) research to improve the efficiency of energy use and to improve electric power transmission and distribution, and (4) research utilization. Support came principally from the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the US Department of Defense, but also from a number of other agencies and organizations. Analysis and assessment included work on (a) environmental issues, including those deriving from the preparation of environmental impact statements; (b) energy and resource analysis; and (c) emergency preparedness. The models and data systems area involved research on evaluating and developing energy, environment, and engineering simulation models and on devising large data management systems, evaluating user data requirements, and compiling data bases. Research on improving the efficiency of energy use was focused primarily on the buildings and electricity sectors. A major effort on heat pump technology, which includes both heat-activated and electrically driven systems, continues. An important aspect of all the work was research utilization. Since the Energy Division is doing applied research, results are, by definition, intended to solve problems or answer questions of DOE and other sponsors. However, there are other users, and research utilization activities include technology transfer, commercialization efforts, outreach to state and regional organizations, and, of course, information dissemination.

  4. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    The energy crisis and creation of ERDA were dominant factors affecting the activities of the Environmental Sciences Division during the past year. Efforts primarily centered on coal conversion effluents, aquatic effects from power plants, terrestrial modeling of both radioactive and nonradioactive waste transport, mineral cycling, forest management, and information handling codes and techniques. A bibliography of publications, presentation, these, and other professional activities is included. (PCS)

  5. Physics Division annual review, 1 April 1986-31 March 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review presents a broad view of the research activities within the Division for the year ending in March 1987. Major topic areas are: Medium Energy Physics Research; Theoretical Nuclear Physics; Superconducting Linac Development, and Accelerator Operations. Research at ATLAS is also included as a broad topic. Included in this research are studies in the areas of: Quasielastic Processes and Strongly Damped Collisions; Fusion and Fission of Heavy Ions; High Angular Momentum States in Nuclei; Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy; and Equipment Development

  6. Isotope and nuclear chemistry division. Annual report, FY 1987. Progress report, October 1986-September 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1987 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical weapons diagnostics and research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry

  7. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers work done during FY 1983 by the staff of the Energy Division and its subcontractors and by colleagues in other Oak Ridge National Laboratory divisions working on Energy Division projects. The work can be divided into four areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) models and data systems, (3) research to improve the efficiency of energy use and to improve electric power transmission and distribution, and (4) research utilization. Support came principally from the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the US Department of Defense, but also from a number of other agencies and organizations. Analysis and assessment included work on (a) environmental issues, including those deriving from the preparation of environmental impact statements; (b) energy and resource analysis; and (c) emergency preparedness. The models and data systems area involved research on evaluating and developing energy, environment, and engineering simulation models and on devising large data management systems, evaluating user data requirements, and compiling data bases. Research on improving the efficiency of energy use was focused primarily on the buildings and electricity sectors. A major effort on heat pump technology, which includes both heat-activated and electrically driven systems, continues. An important aspect of all the work was research utilization. Since the Energy Division is doing applied research, results are, by definition, intended to solve problems or answer questions of DOE and other sponsors. However, there are other users, and research utilization activities include technology transfer, commercialization efforts, outreach to state and regional organizations, and, of course, information dissemination

  8. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-04-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: Analytical Research, Development and Implementation; Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization; and Technical Support. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1989. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 69 articles, 41 proceedings, and 31 reports were published, and 151 oral presentations were given during this reporting period. Some 308,981 determinations were performed.

  9. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: Analytical Research, Development and Implementation; Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization; and Technical Support. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1989. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 69 articles, 41 proceedings, and 31 reports were published, and 151 oral presentations were given during this reporting period. Some 308,981 determinations were performed

  10. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport

  11. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1987-10-01

    This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

  12. Radiological and Environmental Research Division, Center for Human Radiobiology. Annual report, July 1980-June 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 22 papers of this annual report of the Center for Human Radiobiology. Abstracts were not written for 2 appendices which contain data on the exposure and radium-induced malignancies of 2259 persons whose radium content has been determined at least once

  13. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report summarizes activities in the Aquatic Ecology, Earth Sciences, Environmental Analyses, and Terrestrial Ecology sections, as well as in the Fossil Energy, Biomass, Low-Level Waste Research and Management, and Global Carbon Cycle Programs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each section

  14. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-04-01

    This annual report summarizes activities in the Aquatic Ecology, Earth Sciences, Environmental Analyses, and Terrestrial Ecology sections, as well as in the Fossil Energy, Biomass, Low-Level Waste Research and Management, and Global Carbon Cycle Programs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each section. (ACR)

  15. 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NIH Pain Consortium will convene the 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research, featuring keynote speakers and expert panel sessions on Innovative Models and Methods. The first keynote address will be delivered by David J. Clark, MD, PhD, Stanford University entitled “Challenges of Translational Pain Research: What Makes a Good Model?” |

  16. Physics Division annual review, 1 April 1985-31 March 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    The highlight of the Argonne Physics Division during the past year (1985/86) has been the completion and dedication of the final superconducting linac stages of the ATLAS system and the beginning of the research program that utilizes the full capabilities of that system. The transition to using the full ATLAS and the new experimental area has been a smooth one and the research program is beginning to bear fruit. The experimental facilities have also come into operation with three major components, consisting of the first stage of a gamma detection system incorporating an array of Compton-suppressed germanium detectors and BGO total energy detectors, a magnetic spectrograph of the Enge split-pole design, with a focal-plane detector system adapted to heavy ions, and a new scattering facility with a number of features. Interesting new data are emerging on quasi-elastic processes, on the transition between fission and quasi-fission and the study of nuclear structure at high spin. The past year has also seen the merging of the nuclear research in the Argonne Chemistry Division, mostly in heavy-ion and medium-energy nuclear physics, with the Physics Division. The merger is leading to full cooperation within the larger group and will help broaden and strengthen the total effort in nuclear physics. In medium-energy physics the year has seen the successful execution of an experiment at the SLAC NPAS station to study the delta resonance in nuclei. Progress is being made in the effort at Fermilab on deep inelastic muon scattering, on the development of a tensor polarized gas deuterium target for use with storage rings, and on the LAMPF neutrino oscillation experiment. In theoretical nuclear physics an effort is continuing on investigating the relevant degrees of freedom in the microscopic dynamics of nuclei and the importance of three-body forces. 51 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Physics Division annual review, 1 April 1985-31 March 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The highlight of the Argonne Physics Division during the past year (1985/86) has been the completion and dedication of the final superconducting linac stages of the ATLAS system and the beginning of the research program that utilizes the full capabilities of that system. The transition to using the full ATLAS and the new experimental area has been a smooth one and the research program is beginning to bear fruit. The experimental facilities have also come into operation with three major components, consisting of the first stage of a gamma detection system incorporating an array of Compton-suppressed germanium detectors and BGO total energy detectors, a magnetic spectrograph of the Enge split-pole design, with a focal-plane detector system adapted to heavy ions, and a new scattering facility with a number of features. Interesting new data are emerging on quasi-elastic processes, on the transition between fission and quasi-fission and the study of nuclear structure at high spin. The past year has also seen the merging of the nuclear research in the Argonne Chemistry Division, mostly in heavy-ion and medium-energy nuclear physics, with the Physics Division. The merger is leading to full cooperation within the larger group and will help broaden and strengthen the total effort in nuclear physics. In medium-energy physics the year has seen the successful execution of an experiment at the SLAC NPAS station to study the delta resonance in nuclei. Progress is being made in the effort at Fermilab on deep inelastic muon scattering, on the development of a tensor polarized gas deuterium target for use with storage rings, and on the LAMPF neutrino oscillation experiment. In theoretical nuclear physics an effort is continuing on investigating the relevant degrees of freedom in the microscopic dynamics of nuclei and the importance of three-body forces. 51 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poutsma, M.L.; Ferris, L.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    The Chemistry Division conducts basic and applied chemical research on projects important to DOE`s missions in sciences, energy technologies, advanced materials, and waste management/environmental restoration; it also conducts complementary research for other sponsors. The research are arranged according to: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, chemistry of advanced inorganic materials, structure and dynamics of advanced polymeric materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, chemical and structural principles in solvent extraction, surface science related to heterogeneous catalysis, photolytic transformations of hazardous organics, DNA sequencing and mapping, and special topics.

  19. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shults, W.D.

    1993-04-01

    This report is divided into: Analytical spectroscopy (optical spectroscopy, organic mass spectrometry, inorganic mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry), inorganic and radiochemistry (transuranium and activation analysis, low-level radiochemical analysis, inorganic analysis, radioactive materials analysis, special projects), organic chemistry (organic spectroscopy, separations and synthesis, special projects, organic analysis, ORNL/UT research program), operations (quality assurance/quality control, environmental protection, safety, analytical improvement, training, radiation control), education programs, supplementary activities, and presentation of research results. Tables are included for articles reviewed or refereed for periodicals, analytical service work, division manpower and financial summary, and organization chart; a glossary is also included.

  20. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1986, October 1985-September 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1986 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical diagnostics and weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry

  1. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1985, October 1984-September 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1985 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiations facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes

  2. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1986, October 1985-September 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, J.H. (ed.)

    1987-06-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1986 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical diagnostics and weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry.

  3. Basic research in crystalline and noncrystalline ceramic systems. Annual report, May 1, 1975--April 1, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities in research programs on ceramics are reported in sections on electric conductivity and dielectric properties, microstructure and properties, ion transport and diffusion, defect interactions and grain boundary phenomena, and future developments

  4. Ceramic technology report. Semi-annual progress report, April 1994--September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1995-06-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned. The work elements are as follows: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, low-expansion ceramics, and testing and data base development.

  5. FY 1998 annual report. Research and development on ceramic gas turbine (300kW class)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    Research and development have been made on a small ceramic gas turbine which is high in efficiency, low in pollutant emission, capable of corresponding to different fuels, and can be utilized in cogeneration and/or movable electric power generation systems. Fundamental researches in developing and researching heat resistant ceramic parts have been carried out on a method for fabricating turbine nozzles using heat resistant silicon nitride, improvement in accuracy in fabricating combustors using the heat resistant silicon nitride, and casting of turbine blades made from sialon. In developing the devices, researches were made on reliability of bond between a ceramic blade and a metallic disk, air-fuel ratio in a combustor, distribution of fuel concentrations, fuel injection methods, reduction of loss in a diffuser in a compressor, and matching of the diffuser with an impeller. In addition, research and development were performed on a single shaft ceramic gas turbine for cogeneration and a double shaft ceramic gas turbine. Researches were executed on reliability of ceramic materials. (NEDO)

  6. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program

  7. Division of Energy Biosciences annual report and summaries of FY 1996 activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The mission of the Division of Energy Biosciences is to support research that advances the fundamental knowledge necessary for the future development of biotechnologies related to the Department of Energy`s mission. The departmental civilian objectives include effective and efficient energy production, energy conservation, environmental restoration, and waste management. The Energy Biosciences program emphasizes research in the microbiological and plant sciences, as these understudied areas offer numerous scientific opportunities to dramatically influence environmentally sensible energy production and conservation. The research supported is focused on the basic mechanism affecting plant productivity, conversion of biomass and other organic materials into fuels and chemicals by microbial systems, and the ability of biological systems to replace energy-intensive or pollutant-producing processes. The Division also addresses the increasing number of new opportunities arising at the interface of biology with other basic energy-related sciences such as biosynthesis of novel materials and the influence of soil organisms on geological processes. This report gives summaries on 225 projects on photosynthesis, membrane or ion transport, plant metabolism and biosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism lipid metabolism, plant growth and development, plant genetic regulation and genetic mechanisms, plant cell wall development, lignin-polysaccharide breakdown, nitrogen fixation and plant-microbial symbiosis, mechanism for plant adaptation, fermentative microbial metabolism, one and two carbon microbial metabolism, extremophilic microbes, microbial respiration, nutrition and metal metabolism, and materials biosynthesis.

  8. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program.

  9. Physics Division annual review, 1 April 1983-31 March 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A broad but necessarily incomplete review of the research activities within the Division is presented. Activities in medium-energy physics research include studies of pion reaction mechanisms, nuclear structure studies, two-nucleon physics with pions and electrons, weak interactions and particle searches. Research at the Superconducting Linac Accelerator includes studies on quasi-elastic processes and reaction strengths, heavy-ion fusion reactions, high angular momentum states in nuclei, accelerator mass spectrometry and equipment development at the Tandem-Linac Facility. Theoretical nuclear physics studies reviewed are grouped in the areas: nuclear forces and subnucleon degrees of freedom, variational calculation of finite many-body systems, nuclear shell theory and nuclear structure, intermediate energy physics, heavy-ion reactions and other theoretical studies. The status of the superconducting linac program is detailed, and operation and development of the tandem-linac accelerator and the Dynamitron Facility are described. The atomic and molecular physics research is detailed in the five ongoing programs: photoionization-photoelectron research, high-resolution laser-rf spectroscopy with atomic and molecular beams, photon interactions involving fast ions, interactions of fast atomic and molecular ions with solid and gaseous targets, and theoretical atomic physics. A complete list of publications and the Division roster are included

  10. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. As in previous years, experimental research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, during this time, preparations began for a new generation of relativistic heavy-ion experiments at CERN. The Nuclear Science Division is involved in three major experiments at CERN and several smaller ones. The report is divided into 5 sections. Part I describes the research programs and operations, and Part II contains condensations of experimental papers arranged roughly according to program and in order of increasing energy, without any further subdivisions. Part III contains condensations of theoretical papers, again ordered according to program but in order of decreasing energy. Improvements and innovations in instrumentation and in experimental or analytical techniques are presented in Part IV. Part V consists of appendices, the first listing publications by author for this period, in which the LBL report number only is given for papers that have not yet appeared in journals; the second contains abstracts of PhD theses awarded during this period; and the third gives the titles and speakers of the NSD Monday seminars, the Bevatron Research Meetings and the theory seminars that were given during the report period. The last appendix is an author index for this report

  11. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1986-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. As in previous years, experimental research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, during this time, preparations began for a new generation of relativistic heavy-ion experiments at CERN. The Nuclear Science Division is involved in three major experiments at CERN and several smaller ones. The report is divided into 5 sections. Part I describes the research programs and operations, and Part II contains condensations of experimental papers arranged roughly according to program and in order of increasing energy, without any further subdivisions. Part III contains condensations of theoretical papers, again ordered according to program but in order of decreasing energy. Improvements and innovations in instrumentation and in experimental or analytical techniques are presented in Part IV. Part V consists of appendices, the first listing publications by author for this period, in which the LBL report number only is given for papers that have not yet appeared in journals; the second contains abstracts of PhD theses awarded during this period; and the third gives the titles and speakers of the NSD Monday seminars, the Bevatron Research Meetings and the theory seminars that were given during the report period. The last appendix is an author index for this report.

  12. Fusion energy division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-11-01

    The ORNL Program encompasses most aspects of magnetic fusion research including research on two magnetic confinement programs (tokamaks and ELMO bumpy tori); the development of the essential technologies for plasma heating, fueling, superconducting magnets, and materials; the development of diagnostics; the development of atomic physics and radiation effect data bases; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; the physics and engineering of present-generation devices; and the design of future devices. The integration of all of these activities into one program is a major factor in the success of each activity. An excellent example of this integration is the extremely successful application of neutral injection heating systems developed at ORNL to tokamaks both in the Fusion Energy Division and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The goal of the ORNL Fusion Program is to maintain this balance between plasma confinement, technology, and engineering activities.

  13. Annual progress report - Health Sciences Division - 1990 January 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for the Dosimetric Research Branch and the Radiation Biology Branch. The major topics discussed in this report include: neutron dosimetry, photon dosimetry, beta ray dosimetry, tritium measurement and dosimetry, internal dosimetry, biological dosimetry, instrumentation and measurement techniques, bioassay and in vivo counting development, dosimetry services, external activities, dose estimation by electron spin resonance, molecular and physical approaches to the structure and genetic function of DNA that determine cellular radioresponse, carcinogenic risks of radiation, stress induced changes in DNA structure and in cell biology, assessment of variation in the responses of individuals to ionizing radiation, cytotoxicity of beryllium, RBE of tritium beta rays for causes of death other than myeloid leukemia in male CBA/H mice, animal facility operations, and the Chalk River follow-up study

  14. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-04-01

    A summmary of the work in each section of the Energy Division at ORNL is given and can be characterized by two themes: (1) environmental assessment, including social and economic considerations, and (2) fuel conservation and energy conversion efficiency. The first theme encompasses the preparation of environmental statements and assessments for nuclear power plants and other energy facilities (Chap. 2) as well as regional analyses of social, economic, and environmental effects due to energy system development patterns (Chap. 3). The second theme characterizes a broad scope of conservation-related work, including efforts to understand energy demand patterns and to develop technologies and arrangements for reducing these demands (Chap. 4). This theme also encompasses research directed at improving both high- and low-temperature thermodynamic cycles driven by solar, geothermal, or fossil energy sources (Chaps. 5 and 6). A listing of publications and oral presentations complete the report. A separate abstract was prepared for each major section or program. (MCW)

  15. Fusion energy division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ORNL Program encompasses most aspects of magnetic fusion research including research on two magnetic confinement programs (tokamaks and ELMO bumpy tori); the development of the essential technologies for plasma heating, fueling, superconducting magnets, and materials; the development of diagnostics; the development of atomic physics and radiation effect data bases; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; the physics and engineering of present-generation devices; and the design of future devices. The integration of all of these activities into one program is a major factor in the success of each activity. An excellent example of this integration is the extremely successful application of neutral injection heating systems developed at ORNL to tokamaks both in the Fusion Energy Division and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The goal of the ORNL Fusion Program is to maintain this balance between plasma confinement, technology, and engineering activities

  16. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January-31 December 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birge, R.W.

    1982-12-01

    This report summarizes the research performed in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar year 1981. During the year under review the Division devoted roughly half its effort to the final construction stages of the Time Projection Chamber and other equipment for the PEP-4 facility at SLAC. The year was marked by the successful passage of milestone after milestone - the two-sector test of the TPC with cosmic rays in July 1981, the full TPC test in November 1981, and the roll-in onto the PEP beam line on 6 January 1982. In other e/sup +/e/sup -/ experiments, the Mark II detector continued its productive data-taking at PEP. In other areas, the final stages of data analysis, particularly for the structure functions, proceeded for the inelastic muon scattering experiment performed at Fermilab, a muon polarimeter experiment was developed and mounted at TRIUMF to probe for the presence of right-handed currents in muon decay, and the design and then construction began of fine-grained hadron calorimeters for the end caps of the Colliding Detector Facility at Fermilab. The Particle Data Group intensified its activities, despite financial constraints, as it proceeded toward production of a new edition of its authoritative Review of Particle Properties early in 1982. During 1981 the Theoretical Physics Group pursued a diverse spectrum of research in its own right and also interacted effectively with the experimental program. Research and development continued on the segmented mirror for the ten-meter telescope proposed by the University of California. Activities in the Computer Science and Mathematics Department encompassed networking, database management, software engineering, and computer graphics, as well as basic research in nonlinear phenomena in combustion and fluid flow.

  17. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January-31 December 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research performed in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar year 1981. During the year under review the Division devoted roughly half its effort to the final construction stages of the Time Projection Chamber and other equipment for the PEP-4 facility at SLAC. The year was marked by the successful passage of milestone after milestone - the two-sector test of the TPC with cosmic rays in July 1981, the full TPC test in November 1981, and the roll-in onto the PEP beam line on 6 January 1982. In other e+e- experiments, the Mark II detector continued its productive data-taking at PEP. In other areas, the final stages of data analysis, particularly for the structure functions, proceeded for the inelastic muon scattering experiment performed at Fermilab, a muon polarimeter experiment was developed and mounted at TRIUMF to probe for the presence of right-handed currents in muon decay, and the design and then construction began of fine-grained hadron calorimeters for the end caps of the Colliding Detector Facility at Fermilab. The Particle Data Group intensified its activities, despite financial constraints, as it proceeded toward production of a new edition of its authoritative Review of Particle Properties early in 1982. During 1981 the Theoretical Physics Group pursued a diverse spectrum of research in its own right and also interacted effectively with the experimental program. Research and development continued on the segmented mirror for the ten-meter telescope proposed by the University of California. Activities in the Computer Science and Mathematics Department encompassed networking, database management, software engineering, and computer graphics, as well as basic research in nonlinear phenomena in combustion and fluid flow

  18. Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division annual report, January--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1997-08-01

    The past year has seen several of the Physics Division`s new research projects reach major milestones with first successful experiments and results: the atomic physics station in the Basic Energy Sciences Research Center at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source was used in first high-energy, high-brilliance x-ray studies in atomic and molecular physics; the Short Orbit Spectrometer in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator (TJNAF) Facility that the Argonne medium energy nuclear physics group was responsible for, was used extensively in the first round of experiments at TJNAF; at ATLAS, several new beams of radioactive isotopes were developed and used in studies of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics; the new ECR ion source at ATLAS was completed and first commissioning tests indicate excellent performance characteristics; Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of mass-8 nuclei were performed for the first time with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions using state-of-the-art computers, including Argonne`s massively parallel IBM SP. At the same time other future projects are well under way: preparations for the move of Gammasphere to ATLAS in September 1997 have progressed as planned. These new efforts are imbedded in, or flowing from, the vibrant ongoing research program described in some detail in this report: nuclear structure and reactions with heavy ions; measurements of reactions of astrophysical interest; studies of nucleon and sub-nucleon structures using leptonic probes at intermediate and high energies; atomic and molecular structure with high-energy x-rays. The experimental efforts are being complemented with efforts in theory, from QCD to nucleon-meson systems to structure and reactions of nuclei. Finally, the operation of ATLAS as a national users facility has achieved a new milestone, with 5,800 hours beam on target for experiments during the past fiscal year.

  19. Environmental Research Division annual report: Center for Human Radiobiology, July 1982-June 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the fourteenth Annual Report of the Center for Human Radiobiology. New cases of bone cancer and carcinoma of head sinuses are occurring at a rate of about one per year in patients who acquired radium burdens 50 to 60 years ago. Several papers deal with dosimetry of alpha-emitting radionuclides in man, in animals, or in the environment. The report concludes with an appendix containing data on the exposure of 2312 persons whose radium content has been determined and an appendix listing the classical radium-related malignancies (osteosarcomas and carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses and mastoid)

  20. Environmental Protection Department Operations and Regulatory Affairs Division LLNL NESHAPs 2005 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, J; Peterson, S R; Wilson, K; Bowen, B; MacQueen, D; Wegrecki, A

    2006-06-19

    This annual report is prepared pursuant to the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs; Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61, Subpart H). Subpart H governs radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem (100 {micro}Sv) to any member of the public. The EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from operations in 2005 are summarized here. Livermore site: 0.0065 mrem (0.065 {micro}Sv) (41% from point source emissions, 59% from diffuse source emissions). The point source emissions include gaseous tritium modeled as tritiated water vapor as directed by EPA Region IX; the resulting dose is used for compliance purposes. Site 300: 0.018 mrem (0.18 {micro}Sv) (48% from point source emissions, 52% from diffuse source emissions). The EDEs were calculated using the EPA-approved CAP88-PC air dispersion/dose-assessment model, except for doses for two diffuse sources that were estimated using measured radionuclide concentrations and dose coefficients. Specific inputs to CAP88-PC for the modeled sources included site-specific meteorological data and source emissions data, the latter variously based on continuous stack effluent monitoring data, stack flow or other release-rate information, ambient air monitoring data, and facility knowledge.

  1. Nuclear Science Division annual report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarizes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1981, and September 30, 1982. Heavy-ion investigations continue to dominate the experimental and theoretical research efforts. Complementary programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluation, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out. Results from Bevalac experiments employing a wide variety of heavy ion beams, along with new or upgraded detector facilities (HISS, the Plastic Ball, and the streamer chamber) are contained in this report. These relativistic experiments have shed important light on the degree of equilibration for central collisions, the time evolution of a nuclear collision, the nuclear density and compressional energy of these collisions, and strange particle production. Reaction mechanism work dominates the heavy-ion research at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the SuperHILAC. Recent experiments have contributed to our understanding of the nature of light-particle emission in deep-inelastic collisions, of peripheral reactions, incomplete fusion, fission, and evaporation. Nuclear structure investigations at these accelerators continue to be directed toward the understanding of the behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum. Research in the area of exotic nuclei has led to the observation at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the ..beta..-delayed proton decay of odd-odd T/sub z/ = -2 nuclides; ..beta..-delayed proton emitters in the rare earth region are being investigated at the SuperHILAC.

  2. LASER SPECTROSCOPY AND TRACE ELEMENT ANALYSIS Chapter from the Energy and Environment Division Annual Report 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various, Authors

    1981-05-01

    In order to control pollutants resulting from energy production and utilization, adequate methods are required for monitoring the level of various substances often present at low concentrations. The Energy and Environment Division Applied Research in Laser Spectroscopy & Analytical Techniques Program is directed toward meeting these needs, Emphasis is on the development of physical methods, as opposed to conventional chemical analysis techniques. The advantages, now widely recognized, include ultra-high sensitivity coupled with minimal sample preparation. In some instances physical methods provide multi-parameter measurements which often provide the only means of achiev·ing the sensitivity necessary for the detection of trace contaminants. Work is reported in these areas: APPLIED PHYSICS AND LASER SPECTROSCOPY RESEARCH; MICROPROCESSOR CONTROLLER ANODIC STRIPPING VOLTAMETER FOR TRACE METALS ANALYSIS IN WATER; THE SURVEY OF INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING; THE POSSIBLE CHRONDRITIC NATURE OF THE DANISH CRETACEOUS~TERTIARY BOUNDARY; IMPROVEMENT OF THE SENSITIVITY AND PRECISION OF NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS OF SOME ELEMENTS IN PLANKTON AND PLANKTONIC FISH; and SOURCES OF SOME SECONDARILY WORKED OBSIDIAN ARTIFACTS FROM TIKAL, GUATEMALA.

  3. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1983-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Dvision of Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development, and utilization; and (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections, each of which may carry out any type of work falling in the three categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections (analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials, bio/organic analysis, and general and environmental analysis) during the period January 1, 1982 to December 31, 1982. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 61 articles, 32 proceedings publications and 37 reports have been published, and 107 oral presentations were given during this reporting period.

  4. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Analytical Chemistry Dvision of Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development, and utilization; and (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections, each of which may carry out any type of work falling in the three categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections (analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials, bio/organic analysis, and general and environmental analysis) during the period January 1, 1982 to December 31, 1982. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 61 articles, 32 proceedings publications and 37 reports have been published, and 107 oral presentations were given during this reporting period

  5. Nuclear Science Division annual report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1981, and September 30, 1982. Heavy-ion investigations continue to dominate the experimental and theoretical research efforts. Complementary programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluation, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out. Results from Bevalac experiments employing a wide variety of heavy ion beams, along with new or upgraded detector facilities (HISS, the Plastic Ball, and the streamer chamber) are contained in this report. These relativistic experiments have shed important light on the degree of equilibration for central collisions, the time evolution of a nuclear collision, the nuclear density and compressional energy of these collisions, and strange particle production. Reaction mechanism work dominates the heavy-ion research at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the SuperHILAC. Recent experiments have contributed to our understanding of the nature of light-particle emission in deep-inelastic collisions, of peripheral reactions, incomplete fusion, fission, and evaporation. Nuclear structure investigations at these accelerators continue to be directed toward the understanding of the behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum. Research in the area of exotic nuclei has led to the observation at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the β-delayed proton decay of odd-odd T/sub z/ = -2 nuclides; β-delayed proton emitters in the rare earth region are being investigated at the SuperHILAC

  6. Chemical and ceramic methods toward safe storage of actinides using monazite. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The use of ceramic monazite, (La,Ce)PO4, for sequestering actinides, especially plutonium, and some other radioactive waste elements (rare earths e.g.) and thus isolating them from the environment has been championed by Lynn Boatner of ORNL. It may be used alone or, as it is compatible with many other minerals in nature, can be used in composite combinations. Natural monazite, which almost invariably contains Th and U, is often formed in hydrothermal pegmatites and is extremely water resistant--examples are known where the mineral has been washed out of rocks (becoming a placer mineral as on the beach sands of India, Australia, Brazil etc.) then reincorporated into new rocks with new crystal overgrowths and then washed out again--being 2.5--3 billion years old. During this demanding water treatment it has retained Th and U. Where very low levels of water attack have been seen (in more siliceous waters), the Th is tied up as new ThSiO4 and remains immobile. Lest it be thought that rare-earths are rare or expensive, this is not so. In fact, the less common lanthanides such as gadolinium, samarium, europium, and terbium, are necessarily extracted and much used by, e.g., the electronics industry, leaving La and Ce as not-sufficiently-used by-products. The recent development of large scale use of Nd in Nd-B-Fe magnets has further exaggerated this. Large deposits of the parent mineral bastnaesite are present in the USA and in China. (Mineral monazite itself is not preferred due to its thorium content.) In the last 5 years it has become apparent show that monazite (more specifically La-monazite) is an unrecognized/becoming-interesting ceramic material. PuPO4 itself has the monazite structure; the PO4 3-unit strongly stabilizes actinides and rare earths in their trivalent state. Monazite melts without decomposition (in a closed system) at 2,074 C and, being compatible with common ceramic oxides such as alumina, mullite, zirconia and YAG, is useful in oxidatively stable

  7. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January--31 December 1975. [LBL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.L. (ed.)

    1975-01-01

    This annual report describes the scientific research and other work carried out during the calendar year 1975. The report is nontechnical in nature, with almost no data. A 17-page bibliography lists the technical papers which detail the work. The contents of the report include the following: experimental physics (high-energy physics--SPEAR, PEP, SLAC, FNAL, BNL, Bevatron; particle data group; medium-energy physics; astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmic rays; instrumentation development), theoretical physics (particle theory and accelerator theory and design), computer science and applied mathematics (data management systems, socio-economic environment demographic information system, computer graphics, computer networks, management information systems, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, programing languages, applied mathematics research), real-time systems (ModComp and PDP networks), and computer center activities (systems programing, user services, hardware development, computer operations). A glossary of computer science and mathematics terms is also included. 32 figures. (RWR)

  8. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January--31 December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report describes the scientific research and other work carried out during the calendar year 1975. The report is nontechnical in nature, with almost no data. A 17-page bibliography lists the technical papers which detail the work. The contents of the report include the following: experimental physics (high-energy physics--SPEAR, PEP, SLAC, FNAL, BNL, Bevatron; particle data group; medium-energy physics; astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmic rays; instrumentation development), theoretical physics (particle theory and accelerator theory and design), computer science and applied mathematics (data management systems, socio-economic environment demographic information system, computer graphics, computer networks, management information systems, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, programing languages, applied mathematics research), real-time systems (ModComp and PDP networks), and computer center activities (systems programing, user services, hardware development, computer operations). A glossary of computer science and mathematics terms is also included. 32 figures

  9. Ion Selective Ceramics for Waste Separations. Input for Annual Accomplishments Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoerke, Erik David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report discusses“Ion-Selective Ceramics for Waste Separations” which aims to develop an electrochemical approach to remove fission product waste (e.g., Cs+ ) from the LiCl-KCl molten salts used in the pyroprocessing of spent nuclear fuel.

  10. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1986 to September 30, 1987. A highlight of the experimental program during this time was the completion of the first round of heavy-ion running at CERN with ultrarelativistic oxygen and sulfur beams. Very rapid progress is being made in the analysis of these important experiments and preliminary results are presented in this report. During this period, the Bevalac also continued to produce significant new physics results, while demand for beam time remained high. An important new community of users has arrived on the scene, eager to exploit the unique low-energy heavy-beam capabilities of the Bevalac. Another major highlight of the program has been the performance of the Dilepton Spectrometer which has entered into production running. Dileptons have been observed in the p + Be and Ca + Ca reactions at several bombarding energies. New data on pion production with heavy beams measured in the streamer chamber to shed light on the question of nuclear compressibility, while posing some new questions concerning the role of Coulomb forces on the observed pion spectra. In another quite different area, the pioneering research with radioactive beams is continuing and is proving to be one of the fastest growing programs at the Bevalac. Exotic secondary beams (e.g., 8He, 11Li, and 14Be) have been produced for fundamental nuclear physics studies. In order to further enhance the scientific research program and ensure the continued vitality of the facility, the Laboratory has proposed an upgrade of the existing Bevalac. Specifically, the Upgrade would replace the Bevatron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams to continue the forefront research program. Other papers on nuclear physics research are included in this report

  11. Nuclear Science Division: Annual report for the period October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, at CERN, oxygen-16 beams were accelerated to 3.2 TeV using the LBL-GSI heavy ion injector into the CERN SPS. First results obtained during the beam test period are presented in this report. Bevalac research has probed new regions of the nuclear matter equation of state. Studies of collisions between the most massive nuclei have revealed rich new phenomena such as collective flow, where the pressures generated force the emerging particles away from the beam direction. Experiments on dileptons e+e- pairs) utilizing the newly completed Dilepton Spectrometer (DLS) are being carried out to glean new insights into the hot, high-density stage of the collision. Major new results on the nuclear structure of exotic, very neutron-rich light nuclei are being obtained by exploiting the projectile fragmentation process to produce secondary radioactive beams. The Laboratory has proposed the Bevalac Upgrade Project to replace the Bevalac's weak-focusing synchrotron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams. The significant enhancement of the heavy ion capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron as a result of the recent development of the ECR source has led to a renaissance of the cyclotron as indicated by the increased demand for beam time. A variety of other scientific activities were also carried out during this period. The Isotopes Project published the first edition of a new radioactivity reference book for applied users-The Table of Radioactive Isotopes and division members organized several major scientific meetings

  12. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1988-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1986 to September 30, 1987. A highlight of the experimental program during this time was the completion of the first round of heavy-ion running at CERN with ultrarelativistic oxygen and sulfur beams. Very rapid progress is being made in the analysis of these important experiments and preliminary results are presented in this report. During this period, the Bevalac also continued to produce significant new physics results, while demand for beam time remained high. An important new community of users has arrived on the scene, eager to exploit the unique low-energy heavy-beam capabilities of the Bevalac. Another major highlight of the program has been the performance of the Dilepton Spectrometer which has entered into production running. Dileptons have been observed in the p + Be and Ca + Ca reactions at several bombarding energies. New data on pion production with heavy beams measured in the streamer chamber to shed light on the question of nuclear compressibility, while posing some new questions concerning the role of Coulomb forces on the observed pion spectra. In another quite different area, the pioneering research with radioactive beams is continuing and is proving to be one of the fastest growing programs at the Bevalac. Exotic secondary beams (e.g., 8He, 11Li, and 14Be) have been produced for fundamental nuclear physics studies. In order to further enhance the scientific research program and ensure the continued vitality of the facility, the Laboratory has proposed an upgrade of the existing Bevalac. Specifically, the Upgrade would replace the Bevatron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams to continue the forefront research program. Other papers on nuclear physics research are included in this report.

  13. Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division annual report, January--December 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The past year has seen several of the Physics Division's new research projects reach major milestones with first successful experiments and results: the atomic physics station in the Basic Energy Sciences Research Center at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source was used in first high-energy, high-brilliance x-ray studies in atomic and molecular physics; the Short Orbit Spectrometer in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator (TJNAF) Facility that the Argonne medium energy nuclear physics group was responsible for, was used extensively in the first round of experiments at TJNAF; at ATLAS, several new beams of radioactive isotopes were developed and used in studies of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics; the new ECR ion source at ATLAS was completed and first commissioning tests indicate excellent performance characteristics; Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of mass-8 nuclei were performed for the first time with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions using state-of-the-art computers, including Argonne's massively parallel IBM SP. At the same time other future projects are well under way: preparations for the move of Gammasphere to ATLAS in September 1997 have progressed as planned. These new efforts are imbedded in, or flowing from, the vibrant ongoing research program described in some detail in this report: nuclear structure and reactions with heavy ions; measurements of reactions of astrophysical interest; studies of nucleon and sub-nucleon structures using leptonic probes at intermediate and high energies; atomic and molecular structure with high-energy x-rays. The experimental efforts are being complemented with efforts in theory, from QCD to nucleon-meson systems to structure and reactions of nuclei. Finally, the operation of ATLAS as a national users facility has achieved a new milestone, with 5,800 hours beam on target for experiments during the past fiscal year

  14. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1980-September 1981. Fiscal year, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.K.; Thomson, H.A. (eds.)

    1982-04-01

    Major accomplishments during fiscal year 1981 are presented. During the Laboratory's 50th anniversary celebrations, AFRD and the Nuclear Science Division formally dedicated the new (third) SuperHILAC injector that adds ions as heavy as uranium to the ion repertoire at LBL's national accelerator facilities. The Bevalac's new multiparticle detectors (the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System and the GSI-LBL Plastic Ball/Plastic Wall) were completed in time to take data before the mid-year shutdown to install the new vacuum liner, which passed a milestone in-place test with flying colors in September. The Bevalac biomedical program continued patient treatment with neon beams aimed at establishing a complete data base for a dedicated biomedical accelerator, the design of which NCI funded during the year. Our program to develop alternative Isabelle superconducting dipole magnets, which DOE initiated in FY80, proved the worth of a new magnet construction technique and set a world record - 7.6 Tesla at 1.8 K - with a model magnet in our upgraded test facility. Final test results at LBL were obtained by the Magnetic Fusion Energy Group on the powerful neutral beam injectors developed for Princeton's TFTR. The devices exceeded the original design requirements, thereby completing the six-year, multi-million-dollar NBSTF effort. The group also demonstrated the feasibility of efficient negative-ion-based neutral beam plasma heating for the future by generating 1 A of negative ions at 34 kV for 7 seconds using a newly developed source. Collaborations with other research centers continued, including: (1) the design of LBL/Exxon-dedicated beam lines for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory; (2) beam cooling tests at Fermilab and the design of a beam cooling system for a proton-antiproton facility there; and (3) the development of a high-current betatron for possible application to a free electron laser.

  15. Nuclear Science Division: Annual report for the period October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1987-07-01

    Research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, at CERN, oxygen-16 beams were accelerated to 3.2 TeV using the LBL-GSI heavy ion injector into the CERN SPS. First results obtained during the beam test period are presented in this report. Bevalac research has probed new regions of the nuclear matter equation of state. Studies of collisions between the most massive nuclei have revealed rich new phenomena such as collective flow, where the pressures generated force the emerging particles away from the beam direction. Experiments on dileptons e/sup +/e/sup -/ pairs) utilizing the newly completed Dilepton Spectrometer (DLS) are being carried out to glean new insights into the hot, high-density stage of the collision. Major new results on the nuclear structure of exotic, very neutron-rich light nuclei are being obtained by exploiting the projectile fragmentation process to produce secondary radioactive beams. The Laboratory has proposed the Bevalac Upgrade Project to replace the Bevalac's weak-focusing synchrotron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams. The significant enhancement of the heavy ion capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron as a result of the recent development of the ECR source has led to a renaissance of the cyclotron as indicated by the increased demand for beam time. A variety of other scientific activities were also carried out during this period. The Isotopes Project published the first edition of a new radioactivity reference book for applied users-The Table of Radioactive Isotopes and division members organized several major scientific meetings.

  16. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-01-01

    The following sentences highlight some of the technical activities carried out during 1991. They illustrate the diversity of programs and technical work performed within the Analytical Chemistry Division. Our neutron activation analysis laboratory at HFIR was placed into operation during 1991. We have combined inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) with a preparation procedure developed at the Argonne National Laboratory to measure ultra-trace levels of U, Pu, Np, and Am in body fluids, primarily urine. Much progress has been made over the last year in the interfacing of an rf-powered glow discharge source to a double-focusing mass spectrometer. Preliminary experiments using electrospray ionization combined with ion trap mass spectrometry show much promise for the analysis of metals in solution. A secondary ion microprobe has been constructed that permits determination of the distribution of organic compounds less than a monolayer thick on samples as large as 1 cm diameter. Fourier transform mass spectrometry has been demonstrated to be a highly effective tool for the detailed characterization of biopolymers, especially normal and modified oligonucleotides. Much has been accomplished in understanding the fundamentals of quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Work with ITMS instrumentation has led to the development of rapid methods for the detection of trace organics in environmental and physiological samples. A new type of time-of-flight mass spectrometer was designed for use with our positron ionization experiments. Fundamental research on chromatography at high concentrations and on gas-solid adsorption has continued. The preparation of a monograph on the chemistry of environmental tobacco smoke was completed this year.

  17. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1980-September 1981. Fiscal year, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major accomplishments during fiscal year 1981 are presented. During the Laboratory's 50th anniversary celebrations, AFRD and the Nuclear Science Division formally dedicated the new (third) SuperHILAC injector that adds ions as heavy as uranium to the ion repertoire at LBL's national accelerator facilities. The Bevalac's new multiparticle detectors (the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System and the GSI-LBL Plastic Ball/Plastic Wall) were completed in time to take data before the mid-year shutdown to install the new vacuum liner, which passed a milestone in-place test with flying colors in September. The Bevalac biomedical program continued patient treatment with neon beams aimed at establishing a complete data base for a dedicated biomedical accelerator, the design of which NCI funded during the year. Our program to develop alternative Isabelle superconducting dipole magnets, which DOE initiated in FY80, proved the worth of a new magnet construction technique and set a world record - 7.6 Tesla at 1.8 K - with a model magnet in our upgraded test facility. Final test results at LBL were obtained by the Magnetic Fusion Energy Group on the powerful neutral beam injectors developed for Princeton's TFTR. The devices exceeded the original design requirements, thereby completing the six-year, multi-million-dollar NBSTF effort. The group also demonstrated the feasibility of efficient negative-ion-based neutral beam plasma heating for the future by generating 1 A of negative ions at 34 kV for 7 seconds using a newly developed source. Collaborations with other research centers continued, including: (1) the design of LBL/Exxon-dedicated beam lines for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory; (2) beam cooling tests at Fermilab and the design of a beam cooling system for a proton-antiproton facility there; and (3) the development of a high-current betatron for possible application to a free electron laser

  18. Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovrak, Jon; Ward, Glen

    2004-01-01

    Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's production, together with the Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, will contribute to an annual goal of one million kokanee yearlings for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fingerlings and fry for Banks Lake. The purpose of this multi-agency program is to restore and enhance kokanee salmon and rainbow trout populations in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake due to Grand Coulee Dam impoundments. The Ford Hatchery will produce 9,533 lbs. (572,000) kokanee annually for release as fingerlings into Banks Lake in October. An additional 2,133 lbs. (128,000) kokanee will be transferred to net pens on Banks Lake at Electric City in October. The net pen raised kokanee will be reared through the fall, winter, and early spring to a total of 8,533 lbs and released in May. While the origin of kokanee comes from Lake Whatcom, current objectives will be to increase the use of native (or, indigenous) stocks for propagation in Banks Lake and the Upper Columbia River. Additional stocks planned for future use in Banks Lake include Lake Roosevelt kokanee and Meadow Creek kokanee. The Ford Hatchery continues to produce resident trout (80,584 lb. per year) to promote the sport fisheries in trout fishing lakes in eastern Washington (WDFW Management, Region 1). Operation and maintenance funding for the increased kokanee program was implemented in FY 2001 and scheduled to continue through FY 2010. Funds from BPA allow for an additional employee at the Ford Hatchery to assist in the operations and maintenance associated

  19. Environmental Protection Department, Operations and Regulatory Affairs Division, LLNL NESHAPs 2006 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, J; Peterson, S; Wilson, K R

    2007-06-20

    NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem (100 {micro}Sv) to any member of the public. The EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from operations in 2006 are summarized here. Livermore site: 0.0045 mrem (0.045 {micro}Sv) (36% from point source emissions, 64% from diffuse source emissions). The point source emissions include gaseous tritium modeled as tritiated water vapor as directed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IX; the resulting dose is used for compliance purposes. Site 300: 0.016 mrem (0.16 {micro}Sv) (87.5% from point source emissions, 12.5% from diffuse source emissions). The EDEs were calculated using the EPA-approved CAP88-PC air dispersion/dose-assessment model, except for doses for two diffuse sources that were estimated using measured radionuclide concentrations and dose coefficients. Specific inputs to CAP88-PC for the modeled sources included site-specific meteorological data and source emissions data, the latter variously based on continuous stack effluent monitoring data, stack flow or other release-rate information, ambient air monitoring data, and facility knowledge.

  20. Solar Energy Program: Chapter from the Energy and EnvironmentalDivision Annual Report 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Energy and Environment Division

    1981-03-01

    -cooled and suitable for use with flat plate or higher-temperature collectors. Operation of the controls test facility and computer modeling of collector loop and building load dynamics are yielding quantitative evaluations of the performance of different control strategies for active solar-heating systems. Research is continuing on ''passive'' approaches to solar heating and cooling, where careful considerations of architectural design, construction materials, and the environment are used to moderate a building's interior climate. Computer models of passive concepts are being developed and incorporated into building energy analysis computer programs which are in the public domain. The resulting passive analysis capabilities are used in systems studies leading to design tools and in the design of commercial buildings on a case study basis. The investigation of specific passive cooling methods is an ongoing project; for example, a process is being studied in which heat-storage material would be cooled by radiation to the night sky, and would then provide ''coolness'' to the building. Laboratory personnel involved in the solar cooling, controls, and passive projects are also providing technical support to the Active Heating and Cooling Division and the Passive and Hybrid Division of DOE in developing program plans, evaluating proposals, and making technical reviews of projects at other institutions and in industry. Low-grade heat is a widespread energy resource that could make a significant contribution to energy needs if economical methods can be developed for converting it to useful work. Investigations continued this year on the feasibility of using the ''shape-memory'' alloy, Nitinol, as a basis for constructing heat engines that could operate from energy sources, such as solar-heated water, industrial waste heat, geothermal brines, and ocean thermal gradients. Several projects are investigating longer

  1. High resolution energy loss research: Si compound ceramics and composites. [1990 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, R W; Lin, S H

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses proposed work on silicon compound ceramics and composites. High resolution composition and structure analysis of interfaces in ceramic and metal matrix composites and certain grain boundaries in silicon and its interfaces with oxides and nitrides is proposed. Composition and bonding analysis will be done with high spatial resolution (20 Angstroms or better) parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy using a field emission analytical electron microscope. Structural analysis will be done at the 1.8 Angstrom resolution level at 200kV by HREM. Theoretical electron energy loss cross section computations will be used to interpret electronic structure of these materials. Both self-consistent field MO and multiple scattering computational methods are being done and evaluated.

  2. Annual report of the Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research and the Division of Large Tokamak Development for the period of April 1, 1977 to March 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development works in fiscal year 1977 of the Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research and the Division of Large Tokamak Development are described. 1) Theoretical studies on tokamak confinement have continued with more emphasis on computations. A task was started of developing a computer code system for mhd behavior of tokamak plasmas. 2) Experimental studies of lower hybrid heating up to 140 kW were made in JFT-2. The ion temperature was increased by 50% -- 60% near the plasma center. Plasma-wall interactions (particle and thermal fluxes to the wall, and titanium gettering) were studied. In JFT-2a (DIVA) ion sputtering, arcing and evaporation were identified, and the impurity ion sputtering was found to be a dominant origin of metal impurities in the present tokamaks. High temperature and high-density plasma divertor actions were demonstrated; i.e. the divertor decreases the radiation power loss by a factor of 3 and increases the energy confinement time by a factor of 2.5. Various diagnostic instruments operated sufficiently to provide useful information for the research with JFT-2 and JFT-2a(DIVA). 3) JFT-2 and JFT-2a(DIVA) operated as scheduled. Technological improvements were made such as titanium coating of the chamber wall, discharge cleaning and pre-ionization. 4) Detailed design of the prototype JT-60 neutral beam injector was made. A 200 kW, 650 MHz radiofrequency heating system for JFT-2 was completed; a lower hybrid heating experiment in JFT-2 was successful 5) In particle-surface interactions, the sputtering and surface erosion were studied. 6) Improvement designs of a superconducting cluster test facility and a test module coil were made in the toroidal coil development. 7) Second preliminary design of the tokamak experimental fusion reactor JXFR started in April 1977. Safety analyses were made of the main components and system of JXFR on the basis of the first preliminary design. (J.P.N.)

  3. High temperature fracture and fatigue of ceramics. Annual technical progress report No. 6, August 15, 1994--August 14, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, B.

    1996-04-01

    This report covers work done in the first year of our new contract {open_quotes}High Temperature Fracture and Fatigue of Ceramics,{close_quotes} which commenced in August, 1995 as a follow-on from our prior contract {open_quotes}Mechanisms of Mechanical Fatigue in Ceramics.{close_quotes} Our activities have consisted mainly of studies of the failure of fibrous ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) at high temperature; with a little fundamental work on the role of stress redistribution in the statistics of fracture and cracking in the presence of viscous fluids.

  4. Instrumentation and Controls Division annual progress report for period ending September 1, 1974. Non-LMFBR program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, G.S. (comp.)

    1976-09-01

    Research projects are summarized under the following categories: (1) basic electronics development; (2) engineering support for research facilities; (3) pulse counting and analysis; (4) radiation detection and monitoring; (5) instrument development; (6) automatic control and data acquisition; (7) process systems and instrumentation development; (8) reactor instrumentation and controls; (9) fuel reprocessing and shipping; (10) standards laboratory; (11) instrumentation for reactor division experiments and test loops; (12) maintenance and service; (13) ecological science studies; and (14) administration and training. (WHK)

  5. Radiological and Environmental Research Division, Center for Human Radiobiology. Annual report, July 1980-June 1981. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 22 papers of this annual report of the Center for Human Radiobiology. Abstracts were not written for 2 appendices which contain data on the exposure and radium-induced malignancies of 2259 persons whose radium content has been determined at least once. (KRM)

  6. Compilation of contract research for the Materials Branch, Division of Engineering Safety: Annual report for FY 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents summaries of the research work performed during Fiscal Year 1986 by laboratories and organizations under contracts administered by the NRC's Materials Branch, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Each contractor has written a more complete and detailed annual report of their work which can be obtained by writing to NRC; however, we believe it is useful to have a summary of each contractor's efforts for the year combined into one volume

  7. Compilation of contract research for the Chemical Engineering Branch, Division of Engineering Technology. Annual report for FY 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation of annual research reports by the contractors to the Chemical Engineering Branch, DET, is published to disseminate information from ongoing programs and covers research conducted during fiscal year 1985. The programs covered in this document include research on: (1) engineered safety feature (ESF) system effectiveness in terms of fission product retention under severe accident conditions; (2) effectiveness and safety aspects of selected decontamination methods; (3) decontamination impacts on solidification and waste disposal; (4) evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects and concepts, and (5) operational schemes to prevent or mitigate the effects of hydrogen combustion during LWR accidents

  8. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). Annual report 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Garrett Auxiliary Power Division (GAPD), a unit of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company, during calendar year 1992, toward development and demonstration of structural ceramic technology for automotive gas turbine engines. This work was performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) under National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Contract DEN3-335, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). GAPD utilized the AGT101 regenerated gas turbine engine developed under the previous DOE/NASA Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) program as the ATTAP test bed for ceramic engine technology demonstration. ATTAP focussed on improving AGT101 test bed reliability, development of ceramic design methodologies, and improvement of fabrication and materials processing technology by domestic US ceramics fabricators. A series of durability tests was conducted to verify technology advancements. This is the fifth in a series of technical summary reports published annually over the course of the five-year contract.

  9. Rocketdyne division, environmental monitoring and facility effluent. Annual report, De Soto and Santa Susana Field Laboratories Sites, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J. D. [Rockwell International, Canoga Park, CA (United States)

    1990-05-01

    Work in nuclear energy research and development in what has become the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation began in 1946. During the evolution of these operations, small test and demonstration reactors and critical assemblies were operated, reactor fuel elements were fabricated and used reactor fuel elements were disassembled and declad. These projects have been completed and terminated over the past 30 years. Most of this work was performed at the Santa Susana Field Laboratories (SSFL) and is described in detail in Reference 18. No work with nuclear materials has been conducted since 1987, and the only ongoing work during 1989 was the cleanup of the Rockwell International Hot Laboratory (RIHL) and continuing decontamination of the remaining nuclear facilities. In October 1989, the NRC Special Nuclear Materials License was amended to permit only a minor amount of nuclear material for research purposes. Since then, the license has been further amended to permit only decommissioning operations. These operations have been conducted under State and Federal licenses and under contract to DOE and its predecessors at three main locations. identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratories (SSFL). De Soto (DS), and Canoga (CA).

  10. Compilation of contract research for the Materials Engineering Branch, Division of Engineering Technology. Annual report for FY 1983. Vol.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents summaries of the research work performed during Fiscal Year 1983 by laboratories and organizations under contracts administered by the NRC's Materials Engineering Branch, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Each contractor has written a more complete and detailed annual report of their work which can be obtained by writing to NRC. The contractor reports are organized into the major areas of concern to Primary System Integrity, which is the main focus for the branch's research. These areas are: Vessel and Piping Fracture Mechanics; Pressure Vesel Surveillance Dosimetry; Steam Generators, Aging, and Environmental Cracking; and Non-Destructive Examination. The research programs reported provide information on the overall program objectives, a more limited scope of work for FY 1983, a technical description of the year's work, and a brief forecast of the plans for continuing work

  11. Fundamental molecular physics and chemistry. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, October 1981-December 1982. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the twelfth Annual Report of our Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry Program. Scientifically, the work of the program deals with aspects of the physics and chemistry of molecules related to their interactions with photons, electrons, and other external agents. We chose these areas of study in view of our matic goals; that is to say, we chose them so that the eventual outcome of our work meets some of the needs of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and of other government agencies that support our research. First, we endeavor to determine theoretically and experimentally cross sections for electron and photon interactions with molecules, because those cross sections are indispensable for detailed microscopic analyses of the earliest processes of radiation action on any molecular substance, including biological materials. Those analyses in turn provide a sound basis for radiology and radiation dosimetry. Second, we study the spectroscopy of certain molecules and of small clusters of molecules because this topic is fundamental to the full understanding of atmospheric-pollutant chemistry

  12. Automotive gas turbine ceramic regenerator design and reliability program. Final annual report, July 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.A.; Fucinari, C.A.; Lingscheit, J.N.; Rahnke, C.J.

    1976-10-01

    The primary objective of the ERDA/Ford Ceramic Regenerator Design and Reliability Program is to develop ceramic regenerator cores that can be used in passenger car gas turbine engines, Stirling engines, and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. Specific durability objectives are defined as achieving a B/sub 10/ life of 10,000 hours on a truck/industrial gas turbine engine duty cycle. Previous reports, under this program, summarized operating experience on lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) ceramic regenerator cores obtained at Ford Motor Company. The primary cause of failure of these regenerators was determined to be chemical attack of the LAS material. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability test in Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engines late in 1974. A description is given of the results of 18,500 hours of turbine engine durability testing accumulated during the period from July 1, 1975 to Sept. 30, 1976. Two materials, aluminum silicate and magnesium aluminum silicate continue to show promise toward achieving the durability objectives of this program. Regenerator cores made from aluminum silicate show no evidence of chemical attack damage after 5600 hours of engine test.

  13. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  14. Physics Division annual report - 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summaries are given of progress accomplished for the year in the following areas: (1) Heavy-Ion Nuclear Physics Research; (2) Operation and Development of Atlas; (3) Medium-Energy Nuclear Physics Research; (4) Theoretical Physics Research; and (5) Atomic and Molecular Physics Research

  15. Physics Division annual report - 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-07

    Summaries are given of progress accomplished for the year in the following areas: (1) Heavy-Ion Nuclear Physics Research; (2) Operation and Development of Atlas; (3) Medium-Energy Nuclear Physics Research; (4) Theoretical Physics Research; and (5) Atomic and Molecular Physics Research.

  16. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (83rd, Phoenix, Arizona, August 9-12, 2000). Media Ethics Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Media Ethics Division section of the proceedings contains the following seven papers: "The Concept of Media Accountability Reconsidered" (Patrick Lee Plaisance); "Of Joint Ventures, Sock Puppets and New Media Synergy: Codes of Ethics and the Emergence of Institutional Conflicts of Interest" (Charles N. Davis and Stephanie Craft);…

  17. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (86th, Kansas City, Missouri, July 30-August 2, 2003). International Communication Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003

    The International Communication Division of the proceedings contains the following 18 papers: "Press Freedom in Asia: New Paradigm Needed in Building Theories" (Jiafei Yin); "Entertainment East and West: A Comparison of Prime-Time U.S. and Asian TV Content Using the Methodology of the National Television Violence Study" (Anne Cooper-Chen);…

  18. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (86th, Kansas City, Missouri, July 30-August 2, 2003). Magazine Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003

    The Magazine Division of the proceedings contains the following 6 papers: "Henry Luce's Anti-Communist Legacy: A Qualitative Content Analysis of U.S. News Magazines' Coverage of China's Cultural Revolution" (Daniel Marshall Haygood); "Gender Images in Global Versions of 'Gentlemen's Quarterly'" (Hong Ji); "Selling Silicon: The Framing of…

  19. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (85th, Miami, Florida, August 5-8, 2002). Magazine Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    The Magazine Division of the proceedings contains the following 8 papers: "The Coverage of Prostate Cancer and Impotence in Four Magazines: 1991-2000" (W. Buzz Hoon); "A Content Analysis of Advertising Visuals in the Magazine Advertisements: The Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression" (Daechun An); "Do They 'Play Like Girls'? A Look at…

  20. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (86th, Kansas City, Missouri, July 30-August 2, 2003). Advertising Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003

    The Advertising Division of the proceedings contains the following 20 papers: "Stereotyping the 'Model Minority': A Longitudinal Analysis of U.S. Primetime Network Commercials, Comparing Asian Female and Male Characters to Themselves and Others" (Dennis J. Ganahl, Liang Ge and Kwangok Kim); "Cultivation Effects of Television Viewing: A Study of…

  1. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (85th, Miami, Florida, August 5-8, 2002). Media Ethics Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    The Media Ethics division of the proceedings contains the following 6 papers: "A Masochist's Teapot: Where to Put the Handle in Media Ethics" (Thomas W. Hickey); "Stalker-razzi and Sump-pump Hoses: The Role of the Media in the Death of Princess Diana" (Elizabeth Blanks Hindman); "The Promise and Peril of Anecdotes in News Coverage: An Ethical…

  2. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (86th, Kansas City, Missouri, July 30-August 2, 2003). Miscellaneous Divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003

    The Miscellaneous Divisions of the proceedings contains the following 17 papers: "Analyzing Sequential Art: Visual Narrative Techniques in 'Calvin and Hobbes'" (Sharron M. Hope); "A Critical Vision of Gender in 2002 Campaign Ads" (Janis Teruggi Page); "Personal Impact Assessment of Advertising Culture of 'Whiteness': Facial Skin Color Preferences…

  3. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (86th, Kansas City, Missouri, July 30-August 2, 2003). Media Ethics Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003

    The Media Ethics Division of the proceedings contains the following 10 papers: "Punctuation and Epistemic Honesty: Do Photos Need What Words Have?" (Scott Fosdick and Shahira Fahmy); "A Bellwether in Media Accountability: The Work of the New York 'World's' Bureau of Accuracy and Fair Play" (Neil Nemeth); "Eight Arguments for the Importance of…

  4. On Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  5. NRCC annual report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report of the National Research for Computation in Chemistry (NRCC) Division describes the program of research workshops, software development, and scientific research of the Division in 1979. This year marked the first full calendar year of activity of the Division. Initial staffing in the core scientific areas was completed by the addition of a crystallographer

  6. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.)

  7. 2002 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delivering products and services to nuclear power plants operators, AREVA operates in every sector of the civilian nuclear power and fuel cycle industry. This annual report 2002 provides information on financial highlights, corporate governance, organization of the Group, share, sustainable development policy (integration into the management practices, financial and environmental responsibility, responsibility to the employees and to the society), nuclear power (front end division, reactors and services division, back end division), connectors division, equity interests and financial report. (A.L.B.)

  8. FY16 Annual Accomplishments - Waste Form Development and Performance: Evaluation Of Ceramic Waste Forms - Comparison Of Hot Isostatic Pressed And Melt Processed Fabrication Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dandeneau, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-10-13

    FY16 efforts were focused on direct comparison of multi-phase ceramic waste forms produced via melt processing and HIP methods. Based on promising waste form compositions previously devised at SRNL[13], simulant material was prepared at SRNL and a portion was sent to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) for HIP treatments, while the remainder of the material was melt processed at SRNL. The microstructure, phase formation, elemental speciation, and leach behavior, and radiation stability of the fabricated ceramics was performed. In addition, melt-processed ceramics designed with different fractions of hollandite, zirconolite, perovskite, and pyrochlore phases were investigated. for performance and properties. Table 1 lists the samples studied.

  9. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  10. Ceramic Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  11. Ceramic Bas-Reliefs of the Divine Comedy: A Gift from Italian Master Engo Babini

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu; Nianrui

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the China Jingdezhen International Ceramic Fair(CJICF),held annually since 2004,is to promote ceramic cultural exchanges and world ceramic development.Over a hundred foreign ceramists attended in 2009,when Engo Babini,a famous Italian carving master,introduced his elaborately created ceramic bas-reliefs of the Divine Comedy to enhance Sino-Italian friendship and

  12. FY 1998 annual report on the study on development of corrosion-resistant ceramic materials for garbage incinerators; 1998 nendo gomi shori shisetsuyo taishoku ceramics zairyo no kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Described herein are the FY 1988 results of development of corrosion-resistant ceramic materials for garbage incinerators. Residue released when porcelain stocks are collected is selected as the inexpensive stock for SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based refractory materials. It is incorporated with carbon black and reduced at 1,200 to 1,500 degrees C in a nitrogen atmosphere. Synthesis of the target Si-Al-C-N-O-based compound succeeds in the presence of a solid catalyst, but it is a fine powder, and hence that of the massive compound fails. The commercial ceramic materials and new refractory materials, made on a trial basis, are evaluated for their resistance to corrosion using fry ashes collected from a commercial incinerator. These ashes are higher in melting point, more viscous, holding a larger quantity of attached slag and more corrosive than synthetic ashes. These materials are corroded acceleratedly as temperature increases to 1,200 degrees C or higher, more noted with the ceramic materials than with the refractory materials. Oxidation and melting characteristics of the molten slag affect corrosion of some materials. Use of the graphite-based material shall be limited to a section below the slag surface, where graphite is oxidized to a smaller extent. The MgO-based material is promising. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based material is more promising than any other material developed in this study. Their bending strength before and after the corrosion test is measured at normal temperature to 1,700 degrees C, to investigate their deterioration by high temperature and corrosion. (NEDO)

  13. Engineering ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bengisu, Murat

    2001-01-01

    This is a comprehensive book applying especially to junior and senior engineering students pursuing Materials Science/ Engineering, Ceramic Engineering and Mechanical Engineering degrees. It is also a reference book for other disciplines such as Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Engineering. Important properties of most engineering ceramics are given in detailed tables. Many current and possible applications of engineering ceramics are described, which can be used as a guide for materials selection and for potential future research. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials, processing properties, characterization and applications of engineering ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  14. Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of liquid waste. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The project on ceramic-supported polymer membranes focuses on the development of a novel class of membranes for the separation of organics from both organic-aqueous and organic-organic mixtures, Theses membranes are fabricated by a graft polymerization process where polymer chains are grown onto the surface of a ceramic support membrane. The surface graft polymerization process, developed at UCLA, results in the formation of a thin polymer layer covalently bonded to the membrane pore surface as a layer of terminally anchored polymeric chains. Through the selection of the polymer most appropriate for the desired separation task, the graft polymerized surface layer can be synthesized to impart specific separation properties to the membrane. It is expected that this project will lead to the demonstration of a new technology for the tailor design of a new class of selective and robust ceramic-supported polymer membranes. This new approach will allow the rapid deployment of task-specific membranes for the separation of waste constituents for subsequent recovery, treatment or disposal. Progress to date includes the preparation of successful silica-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) membrane for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsions and a silica-polyvinylacetate (PVAc) pervaporation membrane for the separation of organics from water. Current work is ongoing to study the performance of the pervaporation membrane for the removal of chlorinated organics from water and to develop a pervaporation membrane for organic-organic separation. In another aspect of the study, the authors are studying the hydrophilic PVP CSP membrane for oil-in-water emulsion treatment with the goal of determining the optimal membrane polymer surface structure as a function of various operating conditions (e.g., tube-side Reynolds number and transmembrane pressure), Work is also in progress to characterize the polymer layer by AFM and internal reflection FTIR, and to model the conformation of the polymer

  15. Tailored ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In polyphase tailored ceramic forms two distinct modes of radionuclide immobilization occur. At high waste loadings the radionuclides are distributed through most of the ceramic phases in dilute solid solution, as indicated schematically in this paper. However, in the case of low waste loadings, or a high loading of a waste with low radionuclide content, the ceramic can be designed with only selected phases containing the radionuclides. The remaining material forms nonradioactive phases which provide a degree of physical microstructural isolation. The research and development work with polyphase ceramic nuclear waste forms over the past ten years is discussed. It has demonstrated the critical attributes which suggest them as a waste form for future HLW disposal. From a safety standpoint, the crystalline phases in the ceramic waste forms offer the potential for demonstrable chemical durability in immobilizing the long-lived radionuclides in a geologic environment. With continued experimental research on pure phases, analysis of mineral analogue behavior in geochemical environments, and the study of radiation effects, realistic predictive models for waste form behavior over geologic time scales are feasible. The ceramic forms extend the degree of freedom for the economic optimization of the waste disposal system

  16. Structural Ceramics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  17. PERSONNEL DIVISION BECOMES HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION

    CERN Multimedia

    Division des ressources humaines

    2000-01-01

    In the years to come, CERN faces big challenges in the planning and use of human resources. At this moment, Personnel (PE) Division is being reorganised to prepare for new tasks and priorities. In order to accentuate the purposes of the operation, the name of the division has been changed into Human Resources (HR) Division, with effect from 1st January 2000. Human Resources DivisionTel.73222

  18. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roode, M. van [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  19. Materials division facilities and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research activities of the Division at the Petten Establishment have the aims of characterising the properties of high temperature materials in industrial process environments and of understanding the structures involved in order to gain an insight into behavioural mechanisms. Metallic materials fall within the scope of the programme; the activities are, at present, almost entirely concerned with austenitic steels and nickel based alloys. Starting in 1984, advanced ceramic materials will be studied as well. The equipment available permits the study of mechanical properties in controlled gaseous environments, of the rates and mechanisms of corrosive reactions between materials and those environments, and of the surface and bulk structures by advanced physical techniques. Special preparation and treatment techniques are available. The Division has developed a Data Bank on high temperature alloys. It also operates an information Centre, the activities of which include the organisation of scientific meetings, the commissioning of ''state of the art'' studies on topics in the field of high temperature materials and their applications and the development of a inventory of current research activities in the field in Europe. This booklet is intended to present the facilities and services of the Division to the organizations which are interested in its programmes of work

  20. Nuclear Science Division annual report for 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses research being conducted under the following programs: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation program; and 88-inch cyclotron operations

  1. Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains sections on the following topics: photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at the high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H2, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO2, potentially catalytic and conducting polyorganometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures

  2. Accelerator Technology Division annual report, FY 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This paper discusses: accelerator physics and special projects; experiments and injectors; magnetic optics and beam diagnostics; accelerator design and engineering; radio-frequency technology; accelerator theory and simulation; free-electron laser technology; accelerator controls and automation; and high power microwave sources and effects.

  3. Nuclear Science Division 1992 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains short papers from research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in Nuclear Physics. The categories of these papers are: Low-Energy Research Program; Bevalac Research Program; Relativistic Nuclear Collisions Program; Nuclear Theory Program; Nuclear Data Evaluation Program; and 88-Inch Cyclotron Operations

  4. International Technology Exchange Division: 1993 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Technology Development (OTD) was established to ensure that reliable and acceptable technologies are available for implementation at DOE sites and that a technically trained work force is available to complete the EM mission by 2019. OTD established the International Technology Exchange Staff (ITES) to identify, evaluate, and acquire international technologies which can accelerate US DOE cleanup operations. ITES's goal is to pursue international collaboration among government organizations, educational institutions, and private industry to identify world-wide needs and available technologies that will meet US environmental needs in general, and EM cleanup needs in particular; and establish mechanisms by which US government ER/WM technologies will be transferred to the US private sector for commercialization and export to international markets. ITES has developed the following strategic objectives to implement its international goals: develop and implement EM's policy for international programs in accordance with DOE and US Government policies and regulations; establish efficient and predictable international technology transfer mechanisms; assist the US private sector in the commercialization and deployment of federally funded EM technologies and related knowledge in international markets; leverage US and non-US resources to accelerate international development and regulatory acceptance of EM technologies; contribute to the improvement of EM's training of US students, scientists, and managers on international environmental issues. A summary and descriptions of program activities and accomplishments are given for 17 programs which comprise the four main areas of the ITES program: Activities with the Former Soviet Union, International Technology Transfer, International Cooperation, and Information Systems and Publications. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  5. Nuclear Science Division annual report for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W.D. (ed.)

    1992-04-01

    This paper discusses research being conducted under the following programs: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation program; and 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  6. Radiological and Environmental Research Division. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventeen papers are presented with abstracts. In addition, five abstracts without papers are included for related topics, i.e., in-vitro inhibition of cell growth; suppression of B.P.-transformed foci in cells; plutonium in drinking water; radioactive properties and biological behavior of radon; and radioactivity and health status of former thorium workers. Two appendices dealing with exposure data for radium patients and radium-induced malignancies are included

  7. Accelerator Technology Division annual report, FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; Φ Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations

  8. Accelerator Technology Division annual report, FY 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses: accelerator physics and special projects; experiments and injectors; magnetic optics and beam diagnostics; accelerator design and engineering; radio-frequency technology; accelerator theory and simulation; free-electron laser technology; accelerator controls and automation; and high power microwave sources and effects

  9. Energy and Environmental Division annual report, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, C.W. (ed.)

    1976-01-01

    Separate entries were made for the nine main sections of the report. These sections deal with geosciences, controlled thermonuclear research, solar energy, chemical processes, engineering, energy use, instrumentation, environment, and energy analysis.

  10. Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-01

    This report contains sections on the following topics: photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at the high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting polyorganometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures.

  11. Energy Technology Division research summary -- 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Research funded primarily by the NRC is directed toward assessing the roles of cyclic fatigue, intergranular stress corrosion cracking, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking on failures in light water reactor (LWR) piping systems, pressure vessels, and various core components. In support of the fast reactor program, the Division has responsibility for fuel-performance modeling and irradiation testing. The Division has major responsibilities in several design areas of the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The Division supports the DOE in ensuring safe shipment of nuclear materials by providing extensive review of the Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARPs). Finally, in the nuclear area they are investigating the safe disposal of spent fuel and waste. In work funded by DOE`s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the high-temperature superconductivity program continues to be a major focal point for industrial interactions. Coatings and lubricants developed in the division`s Tribology Section are intended for use in transportation systems of the future. Continuous fiber ceramic composites are being developed for high-performance heat engines. Nondestructive testing techniques are being developed to evaluate fiber distribution and to detect flaws. A wide variety of coatings for corrosion protection of metal alloys are being studied. These can increase lifetimes significant in a wide variety of coal combustion and gasification environments.

  12. Dental ceramics: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Shenoy Arvind; Shenoy Nina

    2010-01-01

    In the last few decades, there have been tremendous advances in the mechanical properties and methods of fabrication of ceramic materials. While porcelain-based materials are still a major component of the market, there have been moves to replace metal ceramics systems with all ceramic systems. Advances in bonding techniques have increased the range and scope for use of ceramics in dentistry. In this brief review, we will discuss advances in ceramic materials and fabrication techniques. Examp...

  13. Natural gas annual 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1991 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition form 1987 to 1991 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level

  14. Natural gas annual 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  15. Natural gas annual 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1993 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1989 to 1993 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level

  16. Development of Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujari, V.K.

    2001-04-05

    Advanced structural ceramics are enabling materials for new transportation engine systems that have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption and pollution in automobiles and heavy vehicles. Ceramic component reliability and performance have been demonstrated in previous U.S. DOE initiatives, but high manufacturing cost was recognized as a major barrier to commercialization. Norton Advanced Ceramics (NAC), a division of Saint-Gobain Industrial Ceramics, Inc. (SGIC), was selected to perform a major Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Technology (ACMT) Program. The overall objectives of NAC's program were to design, develop, and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technology for the production of ceramic exhaust valves for diesel engines. The specific objectives were (1) to reduce the manufacturing cost by an order of magnitude, (2) to develop and demonstrate process capability and reproducibility, and (3) to validate ceramic valve performance, durability, and reliability. The program was divided into four major tasks: Component Design and Specification, Component Manufacturing Technology Development, Inspection and Testing, and Process Demonstration. A high-power diesel engine valve for the DDC Series 149 engine was chosen as the demonstration part for this program. This was determined to be an ideal component type to demonstrate cost-effective process enhancements, the beneficial impact of advanced ceramics on transportation systems, and near-term commercialization potential. The baseline valve material was NAC's NT451 SiAION. It was replaced, later in the program, by an alternate silicon nitride composition (NT551), which utilized a lower cost raw material and a simplified powder-processing approach. The material specifications were defined based on DDC's engine requirements, and the initial and final component design tasks were completed.

  17. Computational Fair Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branzei, Simina

    Fair division is a fundamental problem in economic theory and one of the oldest questions faced through the history of human society. The high level scenario is that of several participants having to divide a collection of resources such that everyone is satisfied with their allocation -- e.g. two...... heirs dividing a car, house, and piece of land inherited. The literature on fair division was developed in the 20th century in mathematics and economics, but computational work on fair division is still sparse. This thesis can be seen as an excursion in computational fair division divided in two parts...... study alternative and richer models, such as externalities in cake cutting, simultaneous cake cutting, and envy-free cake cutting. The second part of the thesis tackles the fair allocation of multiple goods, divisible and indivisible. In the realm of divisible goods, we investigate the well known...

  18. Annual Burn Plan FY 94 : Brussels District Mark Twain NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual burn plan for the Brussels District of Mark Twain NWR provides proposals for the Calhoun Division and the Gilbert Lake Division. Each proposal includes...

  19. Division of atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Atomic Physics, Lund Institute of Technology (LTH), is responsible for the basic physics teaching in all subjects at LTH and for specialized teaching in Optics, Atomic Physics, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy and Laser Physics. The Division has research activities in basic and applied optical spectroscopy, to a large extent based on lasers. It is also part of the Physics Department, Lund University, where it forms one of eight divisions. Since the beginning of 1980 the research activities of our division have been centred around the use of lasers. The activities during the period 1991-1992 is described in this progress reports

  20. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division. 1994 January 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report marks the change from biannual to annual reports recording technical developments in Physics Division. During this period, AECL has continued with its restructuring program, with Physics Division now included in an expanded Physical and Environmental Sciences Unit. The Division itself remains unchanged, with major activities on neutron scattering, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and developments and applications of accelerator technology. (author)

  1. Energy Technology Division research summary -- 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research funded primarily by the NRC is directed toward assessing the roles of cyclic fatigue, intergranular stress corrosion cracking, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking on failures in light water reactor (LWR) piping systems, pressure vessels, and various core components. In support of the fast reactor program, the Division has responsibility for fuel-performance modeling and irradiation testing. The Division has major responsibilities in several design areas of the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The Division supports the DOE in ensuring safe shipment of nuclear materials by providing extensive review of the Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARPs). Finally, in the nuclear area they are investigating the safe disposal of spent fuel and waste. In work funded by DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the high-temperature superconductivity program continues to be a major focal point for industrial interactions. Coatings and lubricants developed in the division's Tribology Section are intended for use in transportation systems of the future. Continuous fiber ceramic composites are being developed for high-performance heat engines. Nondestructive testing techniques are being developed to evaluate fiber distribution and to detect flaws. A wide variety of coatings for corrosion protection of metal alloys are being studied. These can increase lifetimes significant in a wide variety of coal combustion and gasification environments

  2. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (85th, Miami, Florida, August 5-8, 2002). Science Communication Interest Group Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    The Science Communication Interest Group Division of the proceedings contains the following 7 papers: "Forecasting the Future: How Television Weathercasters' Attitudes and Beliefs about Climate Change Affect Their Cognitive Knowledge on the Science" (Kris Wilson); "The Web and E-Mail in Science Communication: Results of In-Depth Interviews"…

  3. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (86th, Kansas City, Missouri, July 30-August 2, 2003). Minorities and Communication Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003

    The Minorities and Communication Division of the proceedings contains the following 6 papers: "Can We Talk? Racial Discourse as a Community-Building Paradigm for Journalists" (Meta G. Carstarphen); "Can Cross Burning Be Constitutionally Proscribed?: Sixty Years of Hate Speech Rulings Culminating in 'Black v. Virginia'" (Roxanne S. Watson and…

  4. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (85th, Miami, Florida, August 5-8, 2002). Commission on the Status of Women Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    The Commission on the Status of Women Division of the proceedings contains the following 6 papers: "Relationship Content in Four Men's and Women's Magazines" (Alexis Zachary and Bryan Denham); "Mind the Gender Gap: Gender Differences in Motivation to Contribute Online Content" (Cindy Royal); "Peering through the Glass Ceiling of the Boys' Club:…

  5. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (85th, Miami, Florida, August 5-8, 2002). Communication Theory and Methodology Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    The Theory and Methodology Division of the proceedings contains the following 16 papers: "The Deep Audit as an Epistemology for the Watchdog: Computer-assisted Reporting and Investigative Journalism" (John E. Newhagen); "Race and Class in 1980s Hollywood" (Chris Jordan); "The Impact of Website Campaigning on Traditional News Media and Public's…

  6. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (83rd, Phoenix, Arizona, August 9-12, 2000). Communication Theory and Method Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Communication Theory and Method Division section of the proceedings contains the following 16 papers: "Profiling TV Ratings Users: Content-Based Advisories and Their Adoption" (Robert Abelman and David Atkin); "It's All About the Information: Salience Effects on the Perceptions of News Exemplification" (Francesca R. Dillman Carpentier,…

  7. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (86th, Kansas City, Missouri, July 30-August 2, 2003). Communication Theory & Methodology Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003

    The Communication Theory & Methodology Division of the proceedings contains the following 14 papers: "Interaction As a Unit of Analysis for Interactive Media Research: A Conceptualization" (Joo-Hyun Lee and Hairong Li); "Towards a Network Approach of Human Action: Theoretical Concepts and Empirical Observations in Media Organizations" (Thorsten…

  8. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (85th, Miami, Florida, August 5-8, 2002). Media Management and Economics Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    The Media Management and Economics Division of the proceedings contains the following 8 papers: "Anatomy of a Death Spiral: Newspapers and Their Credibility" (Philip Meyer and Yuan Zhang); "A Case-Study Analysis of Divestiture Determinants & Strategies of Major Media Firms, 1996-2000" (Daphne Eilein Landers); "Managing Innovation: U.S. Newspapers…

  9. Power Dissipation in Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    A few classes of algorithms to implement division in hardware have been used over the years: division by digit-recurrence, by reciprocal approximation by iterative methods and by polynomial approximation. Due to the differences in the algorithms, a comparison among their implementation in terms...

  10. Division: The Sleeping Dragon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Of the four mathematical operators, division seems to not sit easily for many learners. Division is often described as "the odd one out". Pupils develop coping strategies that enable them to "get away with it". So, problems, misunderstandings, and misconceptions go unresolved perhaps for a lifetime. Why is this? Is it a case of "out of sight out…

  11. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  12. Fatigue of dental ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; lawn, brian

    2013-01-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics

  13. Ceramic art in sculpture

    OpenAIRE

    Rokavec, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Diploma seminar speaks of ceramics as a field of artistic expression and not just as pottery craft. I presented short overview of developing ceramic sculpture and its changing role. Clay inspires design and touch more than other sculpture media. It starts as early as in prehistory. Although it sometimes seems that was sculptural ceramics neglected in art history overview, it was not so in actual praxis. There is a rich tradition of ceramics in the East and also in Europe during the renaissanc...

  14. Ceramic Laser Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo Villalobos; Jasbinder Sanghera; Ishwar Aggarwal; Bryan Sadowski; Jesse Frantz; Colin Baker; Brandon Shaw; Woohong Kim

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers,...

  15. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  16. Areva 2005 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report contains information on AREVA's objectives, prospects and strategies, particularly in Chapters 4 and 7, as well as contains information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Content: 1 - Person responsible for the annual report and persons responsible for auditing the financial statements; 2 - Information pertaining to the transaction; 3 - General information on the company and share capital: Information on AREVA, Information on share capital and voting rights, Investment certificate trading, Dividends, Organizational chart of the AREVA group, Equity interests, Shareholders' agreements; 4 - Information on company operations, 5 - New developments and future prospects: Overview and strategy of the AREVA group, The Nuclear Power and Transmission and Distribution markets, AREVA group energy businesses, Front End Division, Reactors and Services Division, Back End Division, Transmission and Distribution Division, Major Contracts, The Group's principal sites, AREVA's customers and suppliers, Human resources, Sustainable Development and Continuous Improvement, Capital spending programs, Research and development, intellectual property and brand name programs, Risk and insurance; 6 - Assets - Financial position - financial performance: Analysis of and comments on the Group's financial position and performance, Human Resources report 2005, Environmental report, Consolidated financial statements, Notes to the consolidated financial statements, AREVA SA Financial statements 2005, Notes to the corporate financial statements; 7 - Corporate governance: Composition and functioning of administrative bodies, Executive compensation, Profit-sharing plans, AREVA Values Charter, Annual General Meeting of Shareholders of May 2, 2006; 8 - Recent developments and outlook: Events subsequent to year-end closing for 2005, Outlook

  17. Underwater Sound Reference Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Underwater Sound Reference Division (USRD) serves as the U.S. standardizing activity in the area of underwater acoustic measurements, as the National Institute...

  18. Theoretical physics division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities of the theoretical physics division for 1979 are described. Short summaries are given of specific research work in the following fields: nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, intermediate energy physics, elementary particles

  19. Nondestructive Evaluation of Ceramic Candle Filters Using Vibration Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Roger H. L.; Kiriakidis, Alejandro C.; Peng, Steve W.

    1997-07-01

    This study aims at the development of an effective nondestructive evaluation technique to predict the remaining useful life of a ceramic candle filter during a power plant's annual maintenance shutdown. The objective of the present on-going study is to establish the vibration signatures of ceramic candle filters at varying degradation levels due to different operating hours, and to study the various factors involving the establishment of the signatures.

  20. 78 FR 1833 - Annual Surveys in the Manufacturing Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ... Bureau of the Census Annual Surveys in the Manufacturing Area AGENCY: Bureau of the Census, Department of... the 2013 Annual Surveys in the Manufacturing Area. The 2013 Annual Surveys consist of the Annual..., Manufacturing and Construction Division at (301) 763-4587 or by email at...

  1. 78 FR 68023 - Annual Surveys in the Manufacturing Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... Bureau of the Census Annual Surveys in the Manufacturing Area AGENCY: Bureau of the Census, Department of... the 2014 Annual Surveys in the Manufacturing Area. The 2014 Annual Surveys consist of the Annual.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mendel D. Gayle, Chief, Manufacturing and Construction Division...

  2. Ceramic tamper-revealing seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupperman, David S.; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Sheen, Shuh-Haw

    1992-01-01

    A flexible metal or ceramic cable with composite ceramic ends, or a u-shaped ceramic connecting element attached to a binding element plate or block cast from alumina or zirconium, and connected to the connecting element by shrink fitting.

  3. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics

  4. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  5. Theoretical Division progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents highlights of activities in the Theoretical (T) Division from October 1976-January 1979. The report is divided into three parts. Part I presents an overview of the Division: its unique function at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) and within the scientific community as a whole; the organization of personnel; the main areas of research; and a survey of recent T-Division initiatives. This overview is followed by a survey of the 13 groups within the Division, their main responsibilities, interests, and expertise, consulting activities, and recent scientific accomplisments. The remainder of the report, Parts II and III, is devoted to articles on selected research activities. Recent efforts on topics of immediate interest to energy and weapons programs at LASL and elsewhere are described in Part II, Major National Programs. Separate articles present T-Divison contributions to weapons research, reactor safety and reactor physics research, fusion research, laser isotope separation, and other energy research. Each article is a compilation of independent projects within T Division, all related to but addressing different aspects of the major program. Part III is organized by subject discipline, and describes recent scientific advances of fundamental interest. An introduction, defining the scope and general nature of T-Division efforts within a given discipline, is followed by articles on the research topics selected. The reporting is done by the scientists involved in the research, and an attempt is made to communicate to a general audience. Some data are given incidentally; more technical presentations of the research accomplished may be found among the 47 pages of references. 110 figures, 5 tables

  6. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  7. 07261 Summary -- Fair Division

    OpenAIRE

    Brams, Steven J.; Pruhs, Kirk

    2007-01-01

    The problem of fair division—dividing goods or "bads" (e.g., costs) among entities in an impartial and equitable way—is one of the most important problems that society faces. A Google search on the phrase "fair allocation" returns over 100K links, referring to the division of sports tickets, health resources, computer networking resources, voting power, intellectual property licenses, costs of environmental improvements, etc.

  8. Measuring Fracture Times Of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Bister, Leo; Bickler, Donald G.

    1989-01-01

    Electrical measurements complement or replace fast cinematography. Electronic system measures microsecond time intervals between impacts of projectiles on ceramic tiles and fracture tiles. Used in research on ceramics and ceramic-based composite materials such as armor. Hardness and low density of ceramics enable them to disintegrate projectiles more efficiently than metals. Projectile approaches ceramic tile specimen. Penetrating foil squares of triggering device activate display and recording instruments. As ceramic and resistive film break oscilloscope plots increase in electrical resistance of film.

  9. Annual report 2001. A (AREVA) for.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report 2001, on the group Areva, provides data and information on the Areva emerges, overview of operations, sustainable development policy, research and development programs, nuclear power activities (front-end, reactors and services back-end divisions), components (connectors division and STMicroelectronics, human resources, share data and the financial report. (A.L.B.)

  10. Natural gas annual 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

  11. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  12. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Encrypted integer division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veugen, P.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    When processing signals in the encrypted domain, homomorphic encryption can be used to enable linear operations on encrypted data. Integer division of encrypted data however requires an additional protocol with the server and will be relatively expensive. We present new solutions for dividing encryp

  14. The Problem with Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Of the "big four", division is likely to regarded by many learners as "the odd one out", "the difficult one", "the one that is complicated", or "the scary one". It seems to have been that way "for ever", in the perception of many who have trodden the learning pathways through the world of number. But, does it have to be like this? Clearly the…

  15. Talking Division Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Lisa Storm

    introducing concerns of division that were at odds with daily life in the region. I argue that it was driven by motives that were somewhat extraneous to the cause of language priority, based as they were on concerns of expediency with regard to the most effective way to escape the power monopoly...

  16. Solid State Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces

  17. Solid State Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  18. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  19. Verification of ceramic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behar-Lafenetre, S.; Cornillon, L.; Rancurel, M.; Graaf, D. de; Hartmann, P.; Coe, G.; Laine, B.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the "Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures" contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instr

  20. Solid State Division: Progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1988-03-01

    This paper contains a collection of articles on research done at the Solid State Division of ORNL. General topics covered are: theoretical solid state physics; neutron scattering; physical properties of superconductors and ceramics; synthesis and characterization of solids; ion beam and laser processing; and surface and defect studies. (LSP)

  1. Solid State Division: Progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper contains a collection of articles on research done at the Solid State Division of ORNL. General topics covered are: theoretical solid state physics; neutron scattering; physical properties of superconductors and ceramics; synthesis and characterization of solids; ion beam and laser processing; and surface and defect studies

  2. 75 FR 16178 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Joint... Director of Operations, Antitrust Division. BILLING CODE 4410-11-M...

  3. 77 FR 38831 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993... Civil Enforcement, Antitrust Division. BILLING CODE P...

  4. Silicon on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth for Large-Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Annual report No. 4, September 29, 1978-September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, P W; Zook, J D; Heaps, J D; Koepke, B; Grung, B L; Schuldt, S B

    1979-10-31

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. The effort is divided into several areas of investigation in order to most efficiently meet the goals of the program. These areas include: (1) dip-coating; (2) continuous coating; (3) material characterization; (4) cell fabrication; and (5) theoretical analysis. Progress in all areas of the program is reported in detail. (WHK)

  5. Natural radioactivity in imported ceramic tiles used in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija M. Janković

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic tiles are one of the commonly used decorative building materials. Body of ceramic tiles is a mixture of different raw materials including clays, quartz materials and feldspat, and may be glazed or left unglazed. Due to the presence of zircon in the glaze, ceramic tiles can show natural radioactivity concentration significantly higher than the average values for building materials. This study presents a summary of results obtained by a survey which was consisted of measurements of activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in imported ceramic tile samples used in Serbia using a gamma spectrometer with HPGe detector. Based on the obtained concentrations, gamma index, radium equivalent activity, the indoor absorbed dose rate and the corresponding annual effective dose were evaluated to assess the potential radiological hazard associated with these building materials.

  6. Ceramics As Materials Of Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, A.; Eteiba, M. B.; Abdelmonem, N.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper attempts to review the limitations for using the important ceramics in contact with corrosive media. Different types of ceramics are included. Corrosion properties of ceramics and their electrical properties are mentioned. Recommendations are suggested for using ceramics in different media.

  7. The status of ceramic turbine component fabrication and quality assurance relevant to automotive turbine needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richerson, D.W.

    2000-02-01

    This report documents a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) with guidance from the Ceramics Division of the United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP). DOE and the automotive companies have funded extensive development of ceramic materials for automotive gas turbine components, the most recent effort being under the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program.

  8. Mechanical properties of dispersed ceramic nanoparticles in polymer composites for orthopedic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Huinan Liu, Thomas J WebsterDivision of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Ceramic/polymer composites have been considered as third-generation orthopedic biomaterials due to their ability to closely match properties (such as surface, chemistry, biological, and mechanical) of natural bone. It has already been shown that the addition of nanophase compared with conventional (or micron-scale) ceramics to polymers enhances bone cell functions. However, in order to fully ta...

  9. Divisibility of characteristic numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Borghesi, Simone

    2009-01-01

    We use homotopy theory to define certain rational coefficients characteristic numbers with integral values, depending on a given prime number q and positive integer t. We prove the first nontrivial degree formula and use it to show that existence of morphisms between algebraic varieties for which these numbers are not divisible by q give information on the degree of such morphisms or on zero cycles of the target variety.

  10. 3. Theoretical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the period September 1980 - Aug 1981, the studies in theoretical physics divisions have been compiled under the following headings: in nuclear physics, nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and intermediate energies; in particle physics, NN and NantiN interactions, dual topological unitarization, quark model and quantum chromodynamics, classical and quantum field theories, non linear integrable equations and topological preons and Grand unified theories. A list of publications, lectures and meetings is included

  11. Biorepositories- | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carefully collected and controlled high-quality human biospecimens, annotated with clinical data and properly consented for investigational use, are available through the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories listed in the charts below. Biorepositories Managed by the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories Supported by the Division of Cancer Prevention Related Biorepositories | Information about accessing biospecimens collected from DCP-supported clinical trials and projects.

  12. High pressure ceramic joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  13. The APS ceramic chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, S.; Warner, D.

    1994-07-01

    Ceramics chambers are used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) machines at the locations of the pulsed kicker and bumper magnets. The ceramic will be coated internally with a resistive paste. The resistance is chosen to allow the low frequency pulsed magnet field to penetrate but not the high frequency components of the circulating beam. Another design goal was to keep the power density experienced by the resistive coating to a minimum. These ceramics, their associated hardware, the coating process, and our recent experiences with them are described.

  14. CAS Academic Divisions in 2001

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ 1.Election of New Members In 2001, 56 scientists were elected new CAS members, including l0 in the Division of Mathematics & Physics, 10 in the Division of Chemistry, 12 in the Division of Biology, nine in the Division of Earth Sciences and 15 in the Division of Engineering Sciences.The average age of the new members is 60.4, and the youngest one is 38 years old. They are now working in nine provinces or municipalities, or governmental departments under the State Council, including 23 outstanding experts working for the CAS.

  15. THE SPRINGBOK SIXTH DIVISION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hertzog Biermann

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Springbok Sixth Division was a mighty armoured force Of men whose ancestors made war in ships, on foot and horse They wrote a stirring chapter in Springbok Martial lore When they went to sunny Italy in Nineteen-Forty-Four.   They were in the Springbok First Team and their modest claim to fame Was their response to the clarion call: "Pay up and play the game!" Their duty they did nobly as their fathers did of old They proudly wore the Sixth Div flash of Springbok green and gold.

  16. Ceramic Solar Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Solar receiver uses ceramic honeycomb matrix to absorb heat from Sun and transfer it to working fluid at temperatures of 1,095 degrees and 1,650 degrees C. Drives gas turbine engine or provides heat for industrial processes.

  17. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  18. Advanced Ceramics Property Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the "what, how, how not, and why" for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of standards in one volume.

  19. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  20. Selecting Ceramics - Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Cassidy, M.

    2002-01-01

    AIM OF PRESENTATION: To compare a number of materials for extracoronal restoration of teeth with particular reference to CAD-CAM ceramics. CASE DESCRIPTION AND TREATMENT CARRIED OUT: This paper will be illustrated using clinical examples of patients treated using different ceramic restorations to present the advantages and disadvantages and each technique. The different requirements of tooth preparation, impression taking and technical procedures of each system will be presented and compar...

  1. Silicon on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth development for the Large-Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Annual report No. 2, September 17, 1976--September 19, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Maciolek, R.B.; Koepke, B.; Butter, C.D.; Schuldt, S.B.

    1977-09-30

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. In the past year significant progress was made in all areas of the program. The physical and chemical properties of the standard mullite refractory used for the majority of the coating runs (McDanel MV20 and Coors S1SI) have been characterized. A number of experimental compositions have been identified and procured from Coors. Characterization of the standard compositions revealed that the thermal expansion of mullite depends on both relative amounts of glass phase and on the impurity level in the glass. Since the thermal expansion in mullite exceeds that of silicon, the silicon coating should be in a state of compression. This was confirmed by x-ray measurements. After modifying and cleaning the dip-coating facility, silicon on ceramic (SOC) solar cells were fabricated which demonstrate that the SOC process can produce silicon of solar cell quality. SOC cells having 1 cm/sup 2/ active areas demonstrated measured conversion efficiencies as high as 7.2 percent. Typical open-ciruit voltages (V/sub oc/) and short-circuit current densities (J/sub sc/) were 0.51 volt and 20 mA/cm/sup 2/, respectively. Since the active surface of these solar cells is a highly reflective ''as-grown'' surface, one can expect improvement in J/sub sc/ after an anti-reflection (AR) coating is applied. Results of an economic analysis of the SOC process are presented.

  2. Thermoluminescence dating of Brazilian indigenous ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two indigenous ceramics fragments, one from Lagoa Queimada (LQ) and another from Barra dos Negros (BN), both sites located on Bahia state (Brazil), were dated by thermoluminescence (TL) method. Each fragment was physically prepared and divided into two fractions, one was used for TL measurement and the other for annual dose determination. The TL fraction was chemically treated, divided in sub samples and irradiated with several doses. The plot extrapolation from TL intensities as function of radiation dose enabled the determination of the accumulated dose (Dac), 3.99 Gy and 1.88 Gy for LQ and BN, respectively. The annual dose was obtained through the uranium, thorium and potassium determination by ICP-MS. The annual doses (D an) obtained were 2.86 and 2.26 mGy/year. The estimated ages were ∼1375 and 709 y for BN and LQ ceramics, respectively. The ages agreed with the archaeologists' estimation for the Aratu and Tupi tradition periods, respectively. (authors)

  3. Deconstructing Calculation Methods, Part 4: Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    In the final article of a series of four, the author deconstructs the primary national strategy's approach to written division. The approach to division is divided into five stages: (1) mental division using partition; (2) short division of TU / U; (3) "expanded" method for HTU / U; (4) short division of HTU / U; and (5) long division. [For part…

  4. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  5. Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2007-08-28

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  6. Air quality comparison between two European ceramic tile clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguillón, M. C.; Monfort, E.; Escrig, A.; Celades, I.; Guerra, L.; Busani, G.; Sterni, A.; Querol, X.

    2013-08-01

    The European ceramic tile industry is mostly concentrated in two clusters, one in Castelló (Spain) and another one in Modena (Italy). Industrial clusters may have problems to accomplish the EU air quality regulations because of the concentration of some specific pollutants and, hence, the feasibility of the industrial clusters can be jeopardised. The present work assesses the air quality in these ceramic clusters in 2008, when the new EU emission regulations where put into force. PM10 samples were collected at two sampling sites in the Modena ceramic cluster and one sampling site in the Castelló ceramic cluster. PM10 annual average concentrations were 12-14 μg m-3 higher in Modena than in Castelló, and were close to or exceeded the European limit. Air quality in Modena was mainly influenced by road traffic and, in a lower degree, the metalmechanical industry, as evidenced by the high concentrations of Mn, Cu, Zn, Sn and Sb registered. The stagnant weather conditions from Modena hindering dispersion of pollutants also contributed to the relatively high pollution levels. In Castelló, the influence of the ceramic industry is evidenced by the high concentrations of Ti, Se, Tl and Pb, whereas this influence is not seen in Modena. The difference in the impact of the ceramic industry on the air quality in the two areas was attributed to: better abatement systems in the spray-drier facilities in Modena, higher coverage of the areas for storage and handling of dusty raw materials in Modena, presence of two open air quarries in the Castelló region, low degree of abatement systems in the ceramic tile kilns in Castelló, and abundance of ceramic frit, glaze and pigment manufacture in Castelló as opposed to scarce manufacture of these products in Modena. The necessity of additional measures to fulfil the EU air quality requirements in the Modena region is evidenced, despite the high degree of environmental measures implemented in the ceramic industry. The Principal

  7. Accelerator Technology Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  8. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project, ceramic component developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teneyck, M. O.; Macbeth, J. W.; Sweeting, T. B.

    1987-01-01

    The ceramic component technology development activity conducted by Standard Oil Engineered Materials Company while performing as a principal subcontractor to the Garrett Auxiliary Power Division for the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project (NASA Contract DEN3-167) is summarized. The report covers the period October 1979 through July 1987, and includes information concerning ceramic technology work categorized as common and unique. The former pertains to ceramic development applicable to two parallel AGT projects established by NASA contracts DEN3-168 (AGT100) and DEN3-167 (AGT101), whereas the unique work solely pertains to Garrett directed activity under the latter contract. The AGT101 Technology Development Project is sponsored by DOE and administered by NASA-Lewis. Standard Oil directed its efforts toward the development of ceramic materials in the silicon-carbide family. Various shape forming and fabrication methods, and nondestructive evaluation techniques were explored to produce the static structural components for the ceramic engine. This permitted engine testing to proceed without program slippage.

  9. Piezoelectric Ceramics and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, I.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the piezoelectric effect in ceramics and presents a quantitative representation of this effect. Explains the processes involved in the manufacture of piezoelectric ceramics, the materials used, and the situations in which they are applied. (GS)

  10. Cooled Ceramic Turbine Vane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — N&R Engineering will investigate the feasibility of cooled ceramics, such as ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine blade concepts that can decrease specific...

  11. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  12. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  13. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  14. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Annual technical report, fiscal year 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1989-06-30

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. Four topical subcommittees are established and are continuing their own programs: Structural Ceramics, Batteries and Fuel Cells, Radioactive Waste Containment, and Superconductivity (established in FY 1987). In addition, the EMaCC aids in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Membership in the EMaCC is open to any Department organizational unit; participants are appointed by Division or Office Directors. The current active membership is listed on the following four pages. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research in his capacity as overseer of the technical programs of the Department. This annual technical report is mandated by the EMaCC terms of reference. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1988 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department.

  15. Assessment of ceramic membrane filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.; Im, K.H. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this project include the development of analytical models for evaluating the fluid mechanics of membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters, and to determine the effects of thermal and thermo-chemical aging on the material properties of emerging ceramic hot gas filters. A honeycomb cordierite monolith with a thin ceramic coating and a rigid candle filter were evaluated.

  16. Ceramic vane drive joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Charles H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A variable geometry gas turbine has an array of ceramic composition vanes positioned by an actuating ring coupled through a plurality of circumferentially spaced turbine vane levers to the outer end of a metallic vane drive shaft at each of the ceramic vanes. Each of the ceramic vanes has an end slot of bow tie configuration including flared end segments and a center slot therebetween. Each of the vane drive shafts has a cross head with ends thereof spaced with respect to the sides of the end slot to define clearance for free expansion of the cross head with respect to the vane and the cross head being configured to uniformly distribute drive loads across bearing surfaces of the vane slot.

  17. Developmental control of cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxem, M. (Mike)

    2002-01-01

    During development of multicellular organisms, cell divisions need to be coordinated with the developmental program of the entire organism. Although the mechanisms that drive cells through the division cycle are well understood, very little is known about the pathways that link extracellular signals

  18. Lightning Talks 2015: Theoretical Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlachter, Jack S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    This document is a compilation of slides from a number of student presentations given to LANL Theoretical Division members. The subjects cover the range of activities of the Division, including plasma physics, environmental issues, materials research, bacterial resistance to antibiotics, and computational methods.

  19. 75 FR 70031 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Open.... Brink, Deputy Director of Operations, Antitrust Division. BILLING CODE 4410-11-M...

  20. 78 FR 17431 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... January 2, 2013 (78 FR 117). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement, Antitrust Division. BILLING...) of the Act on July 30, 2001 (66 FR 39336). The last notification was filed with the Department on... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of...

  1. 77 FR 54611 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... on June 8, 2012 (77 FR 34067). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement, Antitrust Division... Section 6(b) of the Act on June 30, 2000 (65 FR 40693). The last notification was filed with the... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of...

  2. Division of Analytical Chemistry, 1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    1999-01-01

    The article recounts the 1998 activities of the Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC- formerly the Working Party on Analytical Chemistry, WPAC), which body is a division of the Federation of European Chemical Societies (FECS). Elo Harald Hansen is the Danish delegate, representing The Danish...... Chemical Society/The Society for Analytical Chemistry....

  3. Important projects of the Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter important projects of the Division for Radiation Safety, NPP Decommissioning and Radwaste Management of the VUJE, a. s. are presented. Division for Radiation Safety, NPP Decommissioning and Radwaste Management has successfully carried out variety of significant projects. The most significant projects that were realised, are implemented and possible future projects are introduced in the following part of presentation.

  4. E-Division activities report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes some of the activities in E (Experimental Physics) Division during the past year. E-Division carries out research and development in areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Many of the activities are in pure and applied atomic and nuclear physics. In addition, this report describes work on accelerators, radiation damage, microwaves, and plasma diagnostics

  5. Inversive meadows and divisive meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bergstra; C.A. Middelburg

    2011-01-01

    Inversive meadows are commutative rings with a multiplicative identity element and a total multiplicative inverse operation satisfying 0−1=0. Divisive meadows are inversive meadows with the multiplicative inverse operation replaced by a division operation. We give finite equational specifications of

  6. Plutonium immobilization in glass and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, D.A. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls (United States); Murphy, W.M. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Materials Research Society Nineteenth Annual Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management was held in Boston on November 27 to December 1, 1995. Over 150 papers were presented at the Symposium dealing with all aspects of nuclear waste management and disposal. Fourteen oral sessions and on poster session included a Plenary session on surplus plutonium dispositioning and waste forms. The proceedings, to be published in April, 1996, will provide a highly respected, referred compilation of the state of scientific development in the field of nuclear waste management. This paper provides a brief overview of the selected Symposium papers that are applicable to plutonium immobilization and plutonium waste form performance. Waste forms that were described at the Symposium cover most of the candidate Pu immobilization options under consideration, including borosilicate glass with a melting temperature of 1150 {degrees}C, a higher temperature (1450 {degrees}C) lanthanide glass, single phase ceramics, multi-phase ceramics, and multi-phase crystal-glass composites (glass-ceramics or slags). These Symposium papers selected for this overview provide the current status of the technology in these areas and give references to the relevant literature.

  7. Petroleum marketing annual 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-24

    The Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysis, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the fob and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Annual. For this production, all estimates have been recalculated since their earlier publication in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM). These calculations made use of additional data and corrections that were received after the PMM publication date.

  8. Petroleum marketing annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysis, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the fob and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners' acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Annual. For this production, all estimates have been recalculated since their earlier publication in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM). These calculations made use of additional data and corrections that were received after the PMM publication date

  9. Mechanical properties of dispersed ceramic nanoparticles in polymer composites for orthopedic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huinan Liu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Huinan Liu, Thomas J WebsterDivision of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Ceramic/polymer composites have been considered as third-generation orthopedic biomaterials due to their ability to closely match properties (such as surface, chemistry, biological, and mechanical of natural bone. It has already been shown that the addition of nanophase compared with conventional (or micron-scale ceramics to polymers enhances bone cell functions. However, in order to fully take advantage of the promising nanometer size effects that nanoceramics can provide when added to polymers, it is critical to uniformly disperse them in a polymer matrix. This is critical since ceramic nanoparticles inherently have a strong tendency to form larger agglomerates in a polymer matrix which may compromise their properties. Therefore, in this study, model ceramic nanoparticles, specifically titania and hydroxyapatite (HA, were dispersed in a model polymer (PLGA, poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid using high-power ultrasonic energy. The mechanical properties of the resulting PLGA composites with well-dispersed ceramic (either titania or HA nanoparticles were investigated and compared with composites with agglomerated ceramic nanoparticles. Results demonstrated that well-dispersed ceramic nanoparticles (titania or HA in PLGA improved mechanical properties compared with agglomerated ceramic nanoparticles even though the weight percentage of the ceramics was the same. Specifically, well-dispersed nanoceramics in PLGA enhanced the tensile modulus, tensile strength at yield, ultimate tensile strength, and compressive modulus compared with the more agglomerated nanoceramics in PLGA. In summary, supplemented by previous studies that demonstrated greater osteoblast (bone-forming cell functions on well-dispersed nanophase ceramics in polymers, the present study demonstrated that the combination of PLGA with well-dispersed nanoceramics enhanced mechanical properties

  10. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, E.; Anderson, M.

    1993-12-14

    A method for the formation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms. 4 figures.

  11. Physics Division computer facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyborski, D.R.; Teh, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    The Physics Division maintains several computer systems for data analysis, general-purpose computing, and word processing. While the VMS VAX clusters are still used, this past year saw a greater shift to the Unix Cluster with the addition of more RISC-based Unix workstations. The main Divisional VAX cluster which consists of two VAX 3300s configured as a dual-host system serves as boot nodes and disk servers to seven other satellite nodes consisting of two VAXstation 3200s, three VAXstation 3100 machines, a VAX-11/750, and a MicroVAX II. There are three 6250/1600 bpi 9-track tape drives, six 8-mm tapes and about 9.1 GB of disk storage served to the cluster by the various satellites. Also, two of the satellites (the MicroVAX and VAX-11/750) have DAPHNE front-end interfaces for data acquisition. Since the tape drives are accessible cluster-wide via a software package, they are, in addition to replay, used for tape-to-tape copies. There is however, a satellite node outfitted with two 8 mm drives available for this purpose. Although not part of the main cluster, a DEC 3000 Alpha machine obtained for data acquisition is also available for data replay. In one case, users reported a performance increase by a factor of 10 when using this machine.

  12. Agro-climatic Division of Rana chensinensis in Fushun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Based on data collected by 3 basic weather stations in Fushun City and 47 automatic weather stations in the whole region,we selected indexes suitable for agro-climatic division of Rana chensinensis,and carried out a study on agro-climatic division of Rana chensinensis in this region.Annual active accumulated temperature ≥10 ℃ and precipitation during April and September are used as basic calculation factors,and we use climatic aridity to make climatic division of Rana chensinensis in Fushun City.According to relevant indexes,we divide Fushun City into 3 regions,namely most appropriate,appropriate and general regions.Finally,countermeasures and suggestions are put forward for providing reference for agricultural production.

  13. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1987-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1988 covers: Research Company; CANDU Operations; Radiochemical Company; Medical Products Division; The Future; Financial Sections; Board of Directors and Officers; and AECL locations

  14. USCIS FY 2009 Annual Report: H-1B Petitions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The American Competitiveness and Workforce Improvement Act (ACWIA), Public Law 105-277, Division C, imposes annual reporting requirements on U.S. Citizenship and...

  15. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    Research programs from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in materials science, chemical science, nuclear science, fossil energy, energy storage, health and environmental sciences, program development funds, and work for others is briefly described. (CBS)

  16. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual report, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M W [ed.

    1975-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 sections of the report. Educational activities, outside lectures by divisional staff, seminars, and publications are also listed. An organizational chart and author index are included. (HLW)

  17. Environmental and Occupational Safety Division annual progress report for 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 950 radiation workers were monitored at ORNL for both internal and external exposure to ionizing radiation and radioactive materials in 1984, and no employee exceeded 50% of the applicable DOE dose limit. No internal exposure exceeded 10% of the maximum permissible organ burden, as determined by in-vivo gamma spectrometry. Dose readings from 5000 TLDs and 136,000 pocket meters were determined, and more than 5800 calibrations were performed on these devices. Approximately 82,000 radioassays were performed; among these were 1500 urinalyses and 3000 radiochemical analyses. Over 3000 calibrations were performed for approximately 2000 portable and fixed survey instruments. Response teams were identified in support of the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP). Documentation, procedures, and equipment for the RAP vehicle were upgraded. A long-range environmental plan was issued early in the year and again in June 1984 to document the scope and justification for each project. The DEM is developing an environmental information system for managing DOE-ORO and ORNL environmental data. Five hundred eighty-four waste disposal requests containing 5769 items were handled by the Hazardous Materials Control Group during 1984. The Office of Operational Safety made significant progress in the completion of Safety Analysis Reports for existing facilities. The Radiation and Safety Surveys Department is becoming increasingly involved in work resulting in facility improvement, repair, or upgrade as well as decontamination and decommissioning of older facilities

  18. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, programs are discussed in the following topics: materials sciences; chemical sciences; fossil energy; energy storage systems; health and environmental sciences; exploratory research and development funds; and work for others. A total of fifty eight programs are briefly presented. References, figures, and tables are included where appropriate with each program

  19. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual research summary, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, S.H. (ed.)

    1984-08-01

    This research summary contains brief descriptions of research in the following areas: (1) mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis; (2) role of metals in cocarcinogenesis and the use of liposomes for metal mobilization; (3) control of mutagenesis and cell differentiation in cultured cells by tumor promoters; (4) radiation effects in mammalian cells; (5) radiation carcinogenesis and radioprotectors; (6) life shortening, tumor induction, and tissue dose for fission-neutron and gamma-ray irradiations; (7) mammalian genetics and biostatistics; (8) radiation toxicity studies; (9) hematopoiesis in chronic toxicity; (10) molecular biology studies; (11) chemical toxicology; (12) carcinogen identification and metabolism; (13) metal metabolism and toxicity; and (14) neurobehavioral chronobiology. (ACR)

  20. Applied Science Division annual report, Environmental Research Program FY 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary concern of the Environmental Research Program is the understanding of pollutant formation, transport, and transformation and the impacts of pollutants on the environment. These impacts include global, regional, and local effects on the atmosphere and hydrosphere, and on certain aspects of human health. This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. During FY 1983, research concentrated on atmospheric physics and chemistry, applied physics and laser spectroscopy, combustion theory and phenomena, environmental effects of oil shale processing, freshwater ecology and acid precipitation, trace element analysis for the investigation of present and historical environmental impacts, and a continuing survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring